WorldWideScience

Sample records for diabetes complications

  1. Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  2. Long term complications of diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long-term complications of diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, ... other tests. All these may help you keep complications of diabetes away. You will need to check your blood ...

  3. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Radiotherapy of complicated diabetic osteoarthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlyashchuk, E.L.; Ustinova, V.F.; Machkovskaya, G.K.; Moskvicheva, G.P.; Shekhtman, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    The method of antiinflammatory X-ray therapy as a complex treatment of 50 patients with complicated diabetic osteoarthropathy is presented. High efficacy of antiinflammatory X-ray therapy was noted; it broadened the possibilities of treatment of the given pathology. There was no patient in whom a negative effect of irradiation on the course of diabetes mellitus had been observed

  5. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nihat Sayin; Necip Kara; Gokhan Pekel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problemthat induces ernestful complications and it causessignificant morbidity owing to specific microvascularcomplications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy andneuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as,ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy.It can affect children, young people and adults and isbecoming more common. Ocular complications associatedwith DM are progressive and rapidly becoming theworld's most significant cause of morbidity and arepreventable with early detection and timely treatment.This review provides an overview of five main ocularcomplications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathyand papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surfacediseases.

  6. Diabetes Care: 10 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes care: 10 ways to avoid complications Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes is a serious disease. Following ...

  7. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient's history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients' data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan.

  8. Diabetic Foot Complications Despite Successful Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyo; Lee, Ho Seong; Park, Jungu; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Han, Duck Jong; Seo, Sang Gyo

    2017-06-01

    It is known that successful pancreas transplantation enables patients with diabetes to maintain a normal glucose level without insulin and reduces diabetes-related complications. However, we have little information about the foot-specific morbidity in patients who have undergone successful pancreas transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and predisposing factors for foot complications after successful pancreas transplantation. This retrospective study included 218 patients (91 males, 127 females) who had undergone pancreas transplantation for diabetes. The mean age was 40.7 (range, 15-76) years. Diabetes type, transplantation type, body mass index, and diabetes duration before transplantation were confirmed. After pancreas transplantation, the occurrence and duration of foot and ankle complications were assessed. Twenty-two patients (10.1%) had diabetic foot complications. Fifteen patients (6.9%) had diabetic foot ulcer and 7 patients (3.2%) had Charcot arthropathy. Three patients had both diabetic foot ulcer and Charcot arthropathy. Three insufficiency fractures (1.4%) were included. Mean time of complications after transplantation was 18.5 (range, 2-77) months. Creatinine level 1 year after surgery was higher in the complication group rather than the noncomplication group ( P = .02). Complications of the foot and ankle still occurred following pancreas transplantation in patients with diabetes. Level III, comparative study.

  9. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    such as endothelin Table 1. Long-Term Complications of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)  Retinopathy Results in retinal edema, hemorrhage and loss of...fact, people with type 1 diabetes who retain a low but detectable level of C-peptide are less prone to develop microvascular complications of the eyes...induced apoptosis of pericytes in early diabetic retinopathy . J Ophthalmol 2010:746978 33. Zhao X, Carnevale KA, Cathcart MK (2003) Human monocytes use

  10. Early detection of diabetes after pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jane Hyldgård; Overgaard, Charlotte; Olesen, Christinna Rebecca

    Title: Early detection of diabetes after pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes Background: Women whose pregnancy was complicated by gestational diabetes have a 7-fold higher risk of developing diabetes, primarily type 2. 40% of women with a history gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM...... of health consequences for women. Aims: Examine the extent of participation in follow-up screening in the Danish Region of North Jutland, and the possible consequences of nonattendance. Methods: A register based study. In Danish national registers 2171 birthing women whose pregnancy was complicated by GDM...

  11. Candidate Genes for Late Diabetic Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Lindholm, Eero

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The new WHO criteria for classification of diabetes takes into account also clinical stages dividing the diabetic patients into noninsulin requiring (NIR), insulin requiring for control (IRC) and insulin requiring for survival (IRS) subgroups. Diabetic complications are the result of chronically elevated blood glucose. Genetic factors are beli...

  12. Puberty as an accelerator for diabetes complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Hi; Craig, Maria E; Donaghue, Kim C

    2014-02-01

    Much is written about how difficult it is to deal with diabetes during adolescence, and rightly so. Less is understood as to how puberty may be an accelerator of vascular complications. With the increase in childhood diabetes, complication risks need to be revisited in relation to puberty and the secular increase in adiposity. Recent data suggest greater risk for severe vascular complications in those with diabetes during puberty, compared with young people who develop diabetes after puberty. It is also widely recognized that higher hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) results are often seen during the pubertal period. This article will review complication outcomes in relation to puberty and examine mechanisms by which puberty may modify risk above glycemic exposure, and possible gender disparities in the risk of complications in the adolescent period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Race/Ethnic Difference in Diabetes and Diabetic Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Spanakis, Elias K.; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities in diabetes and its complications and co-morbidities exist globally. A recent Endocrine Society Scientific Statement described the Health Disparities in several endocrine disorders, including type 2 diabetes. In this review we summarize that statement and provide novel updates on race/ethnic differences in children and adults with type 1 diabetes, children with type 2 diabetes and in Latino subpopulations. We also review race/ethnic differences in the epidemiology of diabet...

  14. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  15. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the ..... cohort with nominal significance, and a recent meta-analysis ..... Whereas it is generally thought that lysine acetylation is.

  16. Knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, F.; Afridi, A.K.; Rahim, F.; Ashfaq, M.; Khan, S.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Results: Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 ± 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 ± 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Conclusions: Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus. (author)

  17. KNOWLEDGE OF DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Fahim; Afridi, Ayesha Khan; Rahim, Fawad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Khan, Sheema; Shabbier, Ghulam; Rahman, Sadiq Ur

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 +/- 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 +/- 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus.

  18. Natural history of diabetic complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert, T; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Borch-Johnsen, K

    1991-01-01

    Until recently Type 1 diabetes has been characterized by a considerable degree of mortality, mainly associated with the development of diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by persistent proteinuria, decreasing glomerular filtration rate (GFR), increasing blood pressure......, and morphological changes. Proteinuria represents a late stage in a prolonged process, which begins at the onset of Type 1 diabetes, when urinary albumin excretion is at the lower end of its normal range (less than 10 mg 24-h-1). However, in those patients who will later develop persistent proteinuria, urinary...... albumin excretion increases exponentially at about 20% per year. These patients also tend to have rising blood pressure and falling GFR, higher rates of proliferative retinopathy and coronary heart disease, and elevated levels of cardiovascular risk factors. As intervention is possible in all these areas...

  19. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetesmellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin M Nentwich; Michael W Ulbig

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the mostfrequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitusand the most common cause of blindness in the workingagepopulation. In the next 15 years, the number ofpatients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected toincrease significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 millionpeople in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to besuffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people withdiabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts foran increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e. , exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema.

  20. The urinary proteome in diabetes and diabetes-associated complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Kasper; Mischak, Harald; Rossing, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes represents one of the main chronic diseases worldwide. Diabetes and its associated complications may be detectable even at early stages in the urinary proteome. In this article we review the current literature on urinary proteomics applied to the study of diabetes and diabetic...... complications. Further, we present recent data that strongly indicate urinary proteome analysis may be a valuable tool in detecting diabetes-associated pathophysiological changes at an early stage, and also may enable assessment of disease progression and efficacy of therapy. Current data indicate that collagen......-derived peptides represent one of the main peptidic components in urine, which are consistently found at reduced levels in diabetes. It is tempting to speculate that this decrease in urinary collagen-derived peptides is related to an increase in extracellular matrix deposition which is a major complication...

  1. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the cardiovascular system constitute a major public health problem. There is evidence demonstrating that genetic factors contribute to the risk of DVC genetic variants, structural variants, and epigenetic changes play ...

  2. Association between diabetic nephrology and other diabetic microvascularand macrovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, A.; John, M.; Pawar, B.; Isaac, R.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is found to be significantly associated withdiabetic retinopathy and coronary artery disease. Few studies have also shownan association between diabetic nephropathy and neuropathy and peripheralvascular disease. A cross sectional study was done among consecutive type 2diabetics presenting to Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana fromJune 2004 to may 2005. Patients were subjected to the clinical and laboratoryinvestigations 174 patients were studied over a period of one year. Diabeticnephropathy was found to be associated with proliferative diabeticretinopathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease by univariate analysis. Inmultivariate analysis, diabetic nephropathy was again sufficiently associatedwith proliferative diabetic retinopathy and coronary artery disease. Weconclude that close association between diabetic nephropathy and other microand macrovascular complications exists in our Indian patients also. (author)

  3. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-1055 TITLE: Towards A Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT : Approved for public release...official Department of the Army position , policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved

  4. Protein O-GlcNAcylation in diabetes and diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junfeng; Hart, Gerald W

    2013-08-01

    The post-translational modification of serine and threonine residues of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is highly ubiquitous, dynamic and inducible. Protein O-GlcNAcylation serves as a key regulator of critical biological processes including transcription, translation, proteasomal degradation, signal transduction and apoptosis. Increased O-GlcNAcylation is directly linked to insulin resistance and to hyperglycemia-induced glucose toxicity, two hallmarks of diabetes and diabetic complications. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about protein O-GlcNAcylation and nutrient metabolism, as well as discuss the commonly used tools to probe changes of O-GlcNAcylation in cultured cells and in animal models. We then focus on some key proteins modified by O-GlcNAc, which play crucial roles in the etiology and progression of diabetes and diabetic complications. Proteomic approaches are also highlighted to provide a system view of protein O-GlcNAcylation. Finally, we discuss how aberrant O-GlcNAcylation on certain proteins may be exploited to develop methods for the early diagnosis of pre-diabetes and/or diabetes.

  5. Machine Learning Methods to Predict Diabetes Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagliati, Arianna; Marini, Simone; Sacchi, Lucia; Cogni, Giulia; Teliti, Marsida; Tibollo, Valentina; De Cata, Pasquale; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2018-03-01

    One of the areas where Artificial Intelligence is having more impact is machine learning, which develops algorithms able to learn patterns and decision rules from data. Machine learning algorithms have been embedded into data mining pipelines, which can combine them with classical statistical strategies, to extract knowledge from data. Within the EU-funded MOSAIC project, a data mining pipeline has been used to derive a set of predictive models of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) complications based on electronic health record data of nearly one thousand patients. Such pipeline comprises clinical center profiling, predictive model targeting, predictive model construction and model validation. After having dealt with missing data by means of random forest (RF) and having applied suitable strategies to handle class imbalance, we have used Logistic Regression with stepwise feature selection to predict the onset of retinopathy, neuropathy, or nephropathy, at different time scenarios, at 3, 5, and 7 years from the first visit at the Hospital Center for Diabetes (not from the diagnosis). Considered variables are gender, age, time from diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hypertension, and smoking habit. Final models, tailored in accordance with the complications, provided an accuracy up to 0.838. Different variables were selected for each complication and time scenario, leading to specialized models easy to translate to the clinical practice.

  6. Recurrent Admissions for Diabetic Foot Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang CL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot complications are a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Patients who undergo recurrent admissions for the same diabetic foot problems represent a difficult subgroup to treat. From July 2007 to June 2008, there were 38 such patients who were admitted recurrently. Eighteen patients (47% were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgical treatment. Eighteen patients (47% received treatment as necessary but were still readmitted for recurrent infection at the same wound site. Assessment of patients’ compliance to outpatient treatment was found to be generally lacking. As a significant proportion were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgery, a trained counselor may be suitable in counselling patients for debridement or amputation surgery.

  7. Patterns of diabetic complications at Jimma University Specialized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Larger proportion, 189 (62.0%), of patients had type II diabetes and 163 ... of the patient but age had statistically significant association with hypertension, ... were significantly associated with the development of diabetic complications.

  8. Management of diabetic complications: a chemical constituents based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Kaur, Navpreet; Kishore, Lalit; Gupta, Girish Kumar

    2013-10-28

    Long term hyperglycemia leads to development of complications associated with diabetes. Diabetic complications are now a global health problem without effective therapeutic approach. Hyperglycemia and oxidative stress are important components for the development of diabetic complications. Over the past few decades, herbal medicines have attracted much attention as potential therapeutic agents in the prevention and treatment of diabetic complications due to their multiple targets and less toxic side effects. This review aims to assess the current available knowledge of medicinal herbs for attenuation and management of diabetic complications and their underlying mechanisms. Bibliographic investigation was carried out by scrutinizing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases (SCOPUS, PUBMED, SCIELO, NISCAIR, Google Scholar) to retrieve available published literature. The inclusion criteria for the selection of plants were based upon all medicinal herbs and their active compounds with attributed potentials in relieving diabetic complications. Moreover, plants which have potential effect in ameliorating oxidative stress in diabetic animals have been included. Overall, 238 articles were reviewed for plant literature and out of the reviewed literature, 127 articles were selected for the study. Various medicinal plants/plant extracts containing flavonoids, alkaloids, phenolic compounds, terpenoids, saponins and phytosterol type chemical constituents were found to be effective in the management of diabetic complications. This effect might be attributed to amelioration of persistent hyperglycemia, oxidative stress and modulation of various metabolic pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Screening chemical candidate from herbal medicine might be a promising approach for new drug discovery to treat the diabetic complications. There is still a dire need to explore the mechanism of action of

  9. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progressi...

  10. Prevalence of diabetic complications in rural Goa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisa C Vaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and its associated diabetic complications in rural Goa, India. Materials and Methods: A community-based study was carried out in a rural setting in Goa, India. About 1,266 participants were selected by systematic random sampling. The participants were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire and were subjected to anthropometric, clinical evaluation and biochemical investigations. American Diabetes Association criteria were used to determine the prevalence of diabetes and standard operational definitions were used to define the diabetic complications. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 14.0 while chi-square and chi-square for trend were the tests used. Results: Among the total 1,266 study participants about 130 (10.3% were diabetics. The prevalence of the associated diabetic complications were as follows viz. neuropathy (60%, CHD (32.3% and cataract (20%, retinopathy (15.4%, peripheral vascular disease (11.5% and cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs (6.9%. A significant rising trend in the prevalence of all diabetic complications was observed with advancing duration of diabetes. Conclusion: The prevalence of DM and its associated complications was higher among the diabetic individuals in the rural setting of Goa, India. All the associated diabetic complications observed need to be addressed with appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  11. Diabetes mellitus complicating β-thalassemia: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of beta-thalassemia major complicated by diabetes mellitus in a Fiji national is presented. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this complication are highlighted. Keywords: β-thalassemia, diabetes mellitus, iron overload. Annals of African Medicine Vol.2(1) 2003: 36-38 ...

  12. Micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of vascular complications among diabetes patients (DP), to find out the relationship with risk factors and to assess the effect of diabetic check-up (DC) in the onset of these complications. Methods: Clinical and laboratory data of DP followed between ...

  13. Complications of Diabetes and Their Implications for Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchillia, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents information on the complications of both Type I and Type II diabetes and the implications for the rehabilitation of persons with diabetes and visual impairment. Topics covered include retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic hand syndrome, neuropathy of the autonomic nervous…

  14. Brief communication : Patterns of chronic complications of diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 283 diabetic patients (112 type -1 and the rest Type -2) were followed between September 1996 and July 1997 at the diabetic follow-up clinic of Menelik II Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The subjects were studied for evidence of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. One hundred and six patients (37.45%) ...

  15. Diabetic patients treated with dialysis: complications and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Watt, T

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of complications, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the influence of beliefs about control over health in diabetic dialysis patients. METHODS: Of 53 eligible diabetic patients on chronic dialysis during January 2004...... in our clinic, 38 (76%) completed a kidney-specific (Kidney Disease Quality of Life) and a generic (SF-36) questionnaire and were characterised in terms of cardiovascular diseases and diabetic complications. Matched groups of non-diabetic dialysis patients (n = 40) and diabetic patients with a long...... population (47 +/- 19). The diabetic dialysis patients had similar levels of kidney-specific quality of life and mental health compared with the control groups. Reduced physical health was predicted by the presence of end-stage renal disease, diabetes and short time spent in education. Among the diabetic...

  16. Profile and analysis of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri J.E. Tarigan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus have a significant role in increasing morbidity, mortality, disability, and health cost. In the outpatient setting, the availability of data regarding to the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes is useful for evaluation of prevention, education, and patient’s treatment. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of type 2 diabetes chronic complications in outpatient diabetes clinic.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using 155 patients in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM, Jakarta in 2010. Secondary data were used from medical record based on history taking, physical examination, diabetic foot assessment, laboratory, neurologic, cardiology, opthalmology, ankle brachial index, and electrography of the patients. Characteristic profiles of the subjects, prevalence of the chronic complications, and its association with diabetes risk factors, such as glycemic control using HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes, and LDL cholesterol were analyzed using chi square test.Results: Among 155 subjects participated in the study, most of them were women (59% and elderly (46%. The prevalence of diabetes chronic complications was 69% from all subjects. These chronic complications included microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and mixed complications, with prevalence of 56%, 7% and 27% respectively. Microangiopathy included nephropathy (2%, retinopathy (7%, neuropathy (38% and mixed complications (53%. Macroangiopathy included coronary heart disease (46%, peripheral arterial disease (19%, stroke (18%, and mixed complication (17%. From the analysis, we found significant association between duration of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy (p = 0.003.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, mainly dominated by microvascular-related complications including nephropathy, retinopathy

  17. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progression starts at glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level of 7%. As per the American Diabetes Association, a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c 20 years as compared to patients <10 years of age. Screening of these complications should be done regularly, and appropriate preventive strategies should be followed. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blocker reduce progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria and increase the regression rate to normoalbuminuria. Diabetic microvascular complications can be controlled with tight glycemic therapy, dyslipidemia management and blood pressure control along with renal function monitoring, lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation and low-protein diet. An integrated and personalized care would reduce the risk of development of microvascular complications in T1DM patients. The child with diabetes who receives limited care is more likely to develop long-term complications at an earlier age. Screening for subclinical complications and early interventions with intensive therapy is the need of the hour.

  18. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progression starts at glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 7%. As per the American Diabetes Association, a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c 20 years as compared to patients <10 years of age. Screening of these complications should be done regularly, and appropriate preventive strategies should be followed. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blocker reduce progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria and increase the regression rate to normoalbuminuria. Diabetic microvascular complications can be controlled with tight glycemic therapy, dyslipidemia management and blood pressure control along with renal function monitoring, lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation and low-protein diet. An integrated and personalized care would reduce the risk of development of microvascular complications in T1DM patients. The child with diabetes who receives limited care is more likely to develop long-term complications at an earlier age. Screening for subclinical complications and early interventions with intensive therapy is the need of the hour. PMID:25941647

  19. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included. All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand group proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR. The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy(DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN, peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus(PVD, diabetic foot(DF, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA, was analyzed.RESULTS: The development of DR was related to hypertension, hyperlipemia, carotid atherosclerosis and plaque, lower extremity arteriosclerosis and plaque, DN, DPN, DF and PVD. PDR was closely associated with hypertension and DPN. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR increased in the diabetic patients with systemic complications, especially, the increase of prevalence of PDR in the patients with hypertension and DPN. Vascular endothelial injury and microcirculatory disturbance are the common pathologic base for DR and other complications. Therefore, it is important to carry out the regular fundus examination in the diabetic patients, especially in those with systemic complication, in order to decrease the rate of blindness.

  20. Antioxidant status in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients, with cataract or cardiovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, A.; Rahman, Muhammad A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess the total antioxidant status in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients, with cataract or cardiovascular complications, and without complications. A comparative study on 186 senile patients and control subjects was carried from March 2004 to November 2006 on patients from Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Among them 33 were diabetic patients without any clinical evidence of chronic diabetic complications, 32 with cardiovascular complications, 30 non-diabetic patients with cardiovascular complications, 30 diabetic patients with cataract and 31 apparently normal, age, gender and weight matched control subjects were investigated. All patients were selected on clinical grounds. Total antioxidant status was significantly decreased (p<0.001) in all diabetic patients with and without complications and non-diabetic patients with same complications (155 patients) as compared with control subjects (31 subjects). Fasting plasma glucose was increased (p<0.001) in all diabetic patients with and without complications (95 patients), and correlated significantly with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and serum fructosamine concentrations. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and serum fructosamine were not different in diabetic patients with and without complications. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, serum fructosamine and total serum protein were not different in non-diabetic patients with the same complications as compared with control subjects. Total antioxidant status is decreased in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients with the same complication as compared with same complication as compared with control subjects. Some other factors may be responsible for decease antioxidant status. (author)

  1. Clustering of microvascular complications in Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Lasse; Hulman, Adam; Charles, Morten

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To describe to what extent microvascular complications exhibit clustering in persons with Type 1 diabetes, and to assess whether the presence of one complication modified the strength of the association between the other two. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the electronic...... medical records of 2276 persons with Type 1 diabetes treated in a specialized care hospital in Denmark in 2013. We used log-linear analysis to describe associations between diabetic kidney disease, neuropathy and retinopathy and logistic regression models to quantify the magnitude of associations...... adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: The median duration of diabetes was 24 years and median HbA1c was 63 mmol/mol (7.9%). We found strong indication of clustering and found no evidence that presence of one complication modified the association between the other two. In models adjusted for diabetes...

  2. Preventing Diabetic Foot Complications : Strategic Recommendations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diabetic foot is the commonest cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation in the developed and developing nations. Several risk factors predispose the diabetic patient to foot ulceration and peripheral neuropathy, with peripheral vascular disease are the commonest risk factors. Clinical examination for these risk ...

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus : prevention of macrovascular complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwisse-Pasterkamp, Susanne H; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease that affects a rapidly increasing number of patients. Most patients with Type 2 diabetes will develop vascular complications. This may be microvascular disease, such as nephropathy, retinopathy or polyneuropathy, and also macrovascular disease, such as coronary

  4. Correlates of time to microvascular complications among diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-demographic and clinical factors have been known to affect the time to microvascular complications and survival probabilities of diabetes mellitus patients. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors and estimate average survival times for the time to the development of microvascular complications of ...

  5. Impact of postprandial glucose control on diabetes-related complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting findings in the literature and lack of long-term definitive outcome studies have led to difficulty in drawing conclusions about the role of postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetes and its complications. Recent scientific publications support the role of postprandial glucose (PPG......) as a key contributor to overall glucose control and a predictor of microvascular and macrovascular events. However, the need remains for definitive evidence to support the precise relationship between PPG excursions and the development and progression of cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Drawing...... complications is unclarified and is one of the remaining unanswered questions in diabetes. Nevertheless, current evidence supports PPG control as an important strategy to consider in the comprehensive management plan of individuals with diabetes....

  6. Microvasular and macrovascular complications in diabetes mellitus: Distinct or continuum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aastha Chawla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and related complications are associated with long-term damage and failure of various organ systems. The line of demarcation between the pathogenic mechanisms of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes and differing responses to therapeutic interventions is blurred. Diabetes induces changes in the microvasculature, causing extracellular matrix protein synthesis, and capillary basement membrane thickening which are the pathognomic features of diabetic microangiopathy. These changes in conjunction with advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, low grade inflammation, and neovascularization of vasa vasorum can lead to macrovascular complications. Hyperglycemia is the principal cause of microvasculopathy but also appears to play an important role in causation of macrovasculopathy. There is thought to be an intersection between micro and macro vascular complications, but the two disorders seem to be strongly interconnected, with micro vascular diseases promoting atherosclerosis through processes such as hypoxia and changes in vasa vasorum. It is thus imperative to understand whether microvascular complications distinctly precede macrovascular complications or do both of them progress simultaneously as a continuum. This will allow re-focusing on the clinical issues with a unifying perspective which can improve type 2 diabetes mellitus outcomes.

  7. Awareness of diabetes complications in an Irish population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients\\' awareness of the increased cardiovascular risk associated with their diabetes is poorly documented. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the awareness of diabetes complications among patients with diabetes in Ireland. METHODS: Patients attending diabetes outpatient clinics in two teaching hospitals in different regions of the country were invited to complete a questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 258 (59.3% male) patients completed the questionnaire; mean age 57.8 years. On questioning, 53.5% reported cardiovascular disease as a potential complication of diabetes, with awareness rates of 61.2, 17.1, 16.3 and 12% for retinopathy, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and amputation, respectively. Disappointingly, less than half of respondents felt that improvements in diet and exercise could potentially reduce their cardiovascular risk. CONCLUSIONS: Awareness of cardiovascular risk and knowledge of effective measures to reduce this were low in our study and an alternative means of education may need to be considered.

  8. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Jaap J; van Baal, Jeff G; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A

    2013-09-01

    Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability of high-resolution infrared thermal imaging for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease. The plantar foot surfaces of 15 diabetes patients were imaged with an infrared camera (resolution, 1.2 mm/pixel): 5 patients had no visible signs of foot complications, 5 patients had local complications (e.g., abundant callus or neuropathic ulcer), and 5 patients had diffuse complications (e.g., Charcot foot, infected ulcer, or critical ischemia). Foot temperature was calculated as mean temperature across pixels for the whole foot and for specified regions of interest (ROIs). No differences in mean temperature >1.5 °C between the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were found in patients without complications. In patients with local complications, mean temperatures of the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were similar, but temperature at the ROI was >2 °C higher compared with the corresponding region in the contralateral foot and to the mean of the whole ipsilateral foot. In patients with diffuse complications, mean temperature differences of >3 °C between ipsilateral and contralateral foot were found. With an algorithm based on parameters that can be captured and analyzed with a high-resolution infrared camera and a computer, it is possible to detect signs of diabetic foot disease and to discriminate between no, local, or diffuse diabetic foot complications. As such, an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease is one step closer. Future studies are essential to confirm and extend these promising early findings. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  9. Genes associated with Type 2 Diabetes and vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesanto, Alberto; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Crocco, Paolina; Garagnani, Paolo; De Luca, Maria; Boemi, Massimo; Marasco, Elena; Pirazzini, Chiara; Giuliani, Cristina; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe; Testa, Roberto; Olivieri, Fabiola; Rose, Giuseppina

    2018-02-04

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disease associated with a number of micro- and macrovascular complications that increase the morbidity and mortality of patients. The risk of diabetic complications has a strong genetic component. To this end, we sought to evaluate the association of 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 21 candidate genes with T2D and its vascular complications in 503 T2D patients and 580 healthy controls. The genes were chosen because previously reported to be associated with T2D complications and/or with the aging process. We replicated the association of T2D risk with I GF2BP rs4402960 and detected novel associations with TERT rs2735940 and rs2736098. The addition of these SNPs to a model including traditional risk factors slightly improved risk prediction. After stratification of patients according to the presence/absence of vascular complications, we found significant associations of variants in the CAT , FTO , and UCP1 genes with diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Additionally, a variant in the ADIPOQ gene was found associated with macrovascular complications. Notably, these genes are involved in some way in mitochondrial biology and reactive oxygen species regulation. Hence, our findings strongly suggest a potential link between mitochondrial oxidative homeostasis and individual predisposition to diabetic vascular complications.

  10. Meat consumption, diabetes and its complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feskens, E.J.M.; Sluik, D.; Woudenbergh, van G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Several prospective studies have reported that risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is elevated in meat consumers, especially when processed meats are consumed. Elevated risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in meat consumers have also been reported. In this overview, the evidence regarding

  11. An investigation into diabetic patients knowledge of diabetes and its ocular complications in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Clarke-Farr

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a study which evaluated the knowledge of a sample of diabetic patients about their disease and its ocular complications. A comprehensive questionnaire was provided to diabetic patients in the Cape Town metropolitan district and its surrounds. Specifically, the questionnaire aimed to determine the patient’s knowledge of diabetes, their knowledge of the ocular complications of diabetes, the options for its management and treatment as well as a section considering other general information relating to diabetes and its ocular complications. Their subject knowledge about diabetes and its ocular complications was relatively limited as only 42% of respondents knew about the existence of two types of diabetes. Twenty nine percent of respondents believed that diabetes would not affect their eyes. Although 76% of the patients felt it very important to measure their blood sugar and 80% rated blood sugar control as very important, only 37% of the respondents measured their blood sugar on a daily basis. A particular concern was that although 96% of the respondents felt that it was important to have their eyes checked regularly, only 30% of the respondents stated that they had actually had their eyes checked every year. The results of this investigation support the need for diabetic patients to receive better patient education about diabetes and its ocular complications. Furthermore, attention needs to be paid to expanding patient access to diabetic screenings and ocular examinations in order to manage this condition effectively.

  12. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    pancreatic beta cells. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients are, instead, afflicted by an heterogeneous set of sub- syndromes characterized by peripheral...military, their families , and retired military personnel. Finding a cure to T1D will provide significant healthcare savings and improved patients’ well...Circulation 2000: 101: 235–238. 60. Lehrke M, Lazar MA. The many faces of PPARgamma. Cell 2005: 123: 993–999. 61. Duan SZ, Usher MG, Mortensen RM. Peroxi- some

  13. 5'-Monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) improves autophagic activity in diabetes and diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fan; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), an endocrine disorder, will be one of the leading causes of death world-wide in about two decades. Cellular injuries and disorders of energy metabolism are two key factors in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which also become the important causes for the process of diabetic complications. AMPK is a key enzyme in maintaining metabolic homeostasis and has been implicated in the activation of autophagy in distinct tissues. An increasing number of researchers have confirmed that autophagy is a potential factor to affect or induce diabetes and its complications nowadays, which could remove cytotoxic proteins and dysfunctional organelles. This review will summarize the regulation of autophagy and AMPK in diabetes and its complications, and explore how AMPK stimulates autophagy in different diabetic syndromes. A deeper understanding of the regulation and activity of AMPK in autophagy would enhance its development as a promising therapeutic target for diabetes treatment.

  14. PARP-1 inhibition alleviates diabetic cardiac complications in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Esraa M; El-Bassossy, Hany M; El-Maraghy, Nabila N; Ahmed, Ahmed F; Ali, Abdelmoneim A

    2016-11-15

    Cardiovascular complications are the major causes of mortality among diabetic population. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 enzyme (PARP-1) is activated by oxidative stress leading to cellular damage. We investigated the implication of PARP-1 in diabetic cardiac complications. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats by high fructose-high fat diet and low streptozotocin dose. PARP inhibitor 4-aminobenzamide (4-AB) was administered daily for ten weeks after diabetes induction. At the end of study, surface ECG, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were studied. PARP-1 activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitrite contents were assessed in heart muscle. Fasting glucose, fructosamine, insulin, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were measured in serum. Finally, histological examination and collagen deposition detection in rat ventricular and aortic sections were carried out. Hearts isolated from diabetic animals showed increased PARP-1 enzyme activity compared to control animals while significantly reduced by 4-AB administration. PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AB alleviated cardiac ischemia in diabetic animals as indicated by ECG changes. PARP-1 inhibition also reduced cardiac inflammation in diabetic animals as evidenced by histopathological changes. In addition, 4-AB administration improved the elevated blood pressure and the associated exaggerated vascular contractility, endothelial destruction and vascular inflammation seen in diabetic animals. Moreover, PARP-1 inhibition decreased serum levels of TNF-α and cardiac nitrite but increased cardiac GSH contents in diabetic animals. However, PARP-1 inhibition did not significantly affect the developed hyperglycemia. Our findings prove that PARP-1 enzyme plays an important role in diabetic cardiac complications through combining inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Design of Knowledge Management System for Diabetic Complication Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiarni, Cut

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how to develop a Model for Knowledge Management System (KMS) for diabetes complication diseases. People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing a series of serious health problems. Each patient has different condition that could lead to different disease and health problem. But, with the right information, patient could have early detection so the health risk could be minimized and avoided. Hence, the objective of this research is to propose a conceptual framework that integrates social network model, Knowledge Management activities, and content based reasoning (CBR) for designing such a diabetes health and complication disease KMS. The framework indicates that the critical knowledge management activities are in the process to find similar case and the index table for algorithm to fit the framework for the social media. With this framework, KMS developers can work with healthcare provider to easily identify the suitable IT associated with the CBR process when developing a diabetes KMS.

  16. Assessment of the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic complications of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Brock, Birgitte; Pedersen, Anne Grave

    2016-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing; arguably as a consequence of changes in diet, lifestyle and the trend towards urbanization. Unsurprisingly, the incidence of both micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mirrors this increasing prevalence. Amongst the complications...... with the highest symptom burden, yet frequently under-diagnosed and sub-optimally treated, is diabetic autonomic neuropathy, itself potentially resulting in cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and gastrointestinal (GI) tract dysmotility. The aims of this review are fourfold. Firstly to provide an overview...... of the pathophysiological processes that cause diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Secondly, to discuss both the established and emerging cardiometric methods for evaluating autonomic nervous system function in vivo. Thirdly, to examine the tools for assessing pan-GI and segmental motility and finally, we will provide...

  17. Concomitant macro and microvascular complications in diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alwakeel Jamal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of concomitant microvascular and macrovascular complica-tions of diabetic nephropathy we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all 1,952 type 2 dia-betic patients followed-up at Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 1989 to December 2004. There were 626 (32.1% patients (294 (47% were males who developed diabetic nephropathy. Their mean age was 66.9 ± 11.4 years, mean duration of diabetes was 15.4 ± 7.5 years, mean age at the onset of nephropathy was 61.5 ± 12.4 years, and mean duration of nephropathy was 3.9 ± 3.8 years. Concomitant diabetic complications included cataract (38.2%, acute coronary syndrome (36.1%, peripheral neuropathy (24.9%, myocardial infarction (24.1%, background retinopathy (22.4%, stroke (17.6%, proliferative retinopathy (11.7%, foot infection (7.3%, limb amputation (3.7% and blindness (3%. Hypertension was documented in 577 (92.2% patients, dyslipidemia in 266 (42.5% and mortality from all causes in 86 (13.7%. There were 148 (23.6% patients with one complication, 81 (12.9% with two, 83 (13.3% with three, and 61 (9.7% with four or more. Dete-rioration of glomerular filtration rate was observed in 464 (74% patients and doubling of serum creatinine in 250 (39.9%, while 95 (15.2% developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD at the end of study and 79 (12.6% required dialysis. Complications were significantly more prevalent among males with greater number reaching ESRD level than females (P< 0.05. Relative risks of developing com-plications were significant after the onset of nephropathy; ACS (1.41, MI (1.49, stroke (1.48, diabetic foot (1.6, amputation (1.58 and death (1.93. We conclude that complications of diabetes are aggre-ssive and progressive including high prevalence of diabetic nephropathy. Careful monitoring and proper institution of management protocols should be implemented to identify diabetic patients at high risk for complications and mitigate progression

  18. Concomitant macro and microvascular complications in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwakeel, Jamal S; AlSuwaida, Abdulkareem; Isnani, Arthur C; AlHarbi, Ali; Alam Awatif

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of concomitant microvascular and macro vascular complications of diabetic nephropathy we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all 1,952 type 2 dia-betic patients followed-up at Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 1989 to December 2004. There were 626 (32.1%) patients (294 (47%) were males) who developed diabetic nephropathy. Their mean age was 66.9 + -11.4 years, mean duration of diabetes was 15.4 + -7.5 years, mean age at the onset of nephropathy was 61.5 + - 12.4 years, and mean duration of nephropathy was 3.9 + - 3.8 years. Concomitant diabetic complications included cataract (38.2%), acute coronary syndrome (36.1%), peripheral neuropathy (24.9%), myocardial infarction (24.1%), background retinopathy (22.4%), stroke (17.6%), proliferative retinopathy (11.7%), foot infection (7.3%), limb amputation (3.7%) and blindness (3%). Hypertension was documented in 577 (92.2%) patients, dyslipidemia in 266 (42.5%) and mortality from all causes in 86 (13.7%). There were 148 (23.6%) patients with one complication, 81 (12.9%) with two, 83 (13.3%) with three, and 61 (9.7%) with four or more. Deterioration of glomerular filtration rate was observed in 464 (74%) patients and doubling of serum creatinine in 250 (39.9%), while 95 (15.2%) developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at the end of study and 79 (12.6%) required dialysis. Complications were significantly more prevalent among males with greater number reaching ESRD level than females (P< 0.05). Relative risks of developing complications were significant after the onset of nephropathy; ACS (1.41), MI (1.49), stroke (1.48), diabetic foot (1.6), amputation (1.58) and death (1.93). We conclude that complications of diabetes are aggressive and progressive including high prevalence of diabetic nephropathy. Careful monitoring and proper institution of management protocols should be implemented to identify diabetic patients at high risk for complications and mitigate

  19. Concomitant macro and microvascular complications in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwakeel, Jamal S; AlSuwaida, Abdulkareem [Div. of Nephrology, Dept. of Medicine, King Khalid Univ., Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Isnani, Arthur C [Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); AlHarbi, Ali [Coll. of Medicine and Research Center, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Awatif, Alam [Div. of Nephrology, Dept. of Medicine, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of concomitant microvascular and macro vascular complications of diabetic nephropathy we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all 1,952 type 2 dia-betic patients followed-up at Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 1989 to December 2004. There were 626 (32.1%) patients (294 (47%) were males) who developed diabetic nephropathy. Their mean age was 66.9 + -11.4 years, mean duration of diabetes was 15.4 + -7.5 years, mean age at the onset of nephropathy was 61.5 + - 12.4 years, and mean duration of nephropathy was 3.9 + - 3.8 years. Concomitant diabetic complications included cataract (38.2%), acute coronary syndrome (36.1%), peripheral neuropathy (24.9%), myocardial infarction (24.1%), background retinopathy (22.4%), stroke (17.6%), proliferative retinopathy (11.7%), foot infection (7.3%), limb amputation (3.7%) and blindness (3%). Hypertension was documented in 577 (92.2%) patients, dyslipidemia in 266 (42.5%) and mortality from all causes in 86 (13.7%). There were 148 (23.6%) patients with one complication, 81 (12.9%) with two, 83 (13.3%) with three, and 61 (9.7%) with four or more. Deterioration of glomerular filtration rate was observed in 464 (74%) patients and doubling of serum creatinine in 250 (39.9%), while 95 (15.2%) developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at the end of study and 79 (12.6%) required dialysis. Complications were significantly more prevalent among males with greater number reaching ESRD level than females (P< 0.05). Relative risks of developing complications were significant after the onset of nephropathy; ACS (1.41), MI (1.49), stroke (1.48), diabetic foot (1.6), amputation (1.58) and death (1.93). We conclude that complications of diabetes are aggressive and progressive including high prevalence of diabetic nephropathy. Careful monitoring and proper institution of management protocols should be implemented to identify diabetic patients at high risk for complications and mitigate

  20. Associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mehravar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Diabetes self-management can reduce complications and mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 562 Iranian patients older than 30 years of age with type 2 diabetes who received treatment at the Diabetes Research Center of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences were identified. The participants were enrolled and completed questionnaires between January and April 2014. Patients’ diabetes self-management was assessed as an independent variable by using the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire translated into Persian. The outcomes were the microvascular complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, identified from the clinical records of each patient. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs between diabetes self-management and the microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounders, a significant association was found between the diabetes self-management sum scale and neuropathy (adjusted OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.92, p=0.01. Additionally, weak evidence was found of an association between the sum scale score of diabetes self-management and nephropathy (adjusted OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.05, p=0.09. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes, a lower diabetes self-management score was associated with higher rates of nephropathy and neuropathy.

  1. Reducing the risks of diabetes complications through diabetes self-management education and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Dan; D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Stuart, Patricia Mickey W; McKoy, June M; Urbanski, Patti; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Coke, Lola; Winters, Janis E; Horsley, Neil L; Sherr, Dawn; Lipman, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    People with diabetes are at risk of developing complications that contribute to substantial morbidity and mortality. In 2011, the American Association of Diabetes Educators convened an invitational Reducing Risks Symposium, during which an interdisciplinary panel of 11 thought leaders examined current knowledge about the reduction and prevention of diabetes-related risks and translated evidence into diabetes care and self-management education. Symposium participants reviewed findings from the literature and engaged in a moderated roundtable discussion. This report summarizes the discussion and presents recommendations to incorporate into practice to improve outcomes. The objective of the symposium was to develop practical advice for diabetes educators and other members of the diabetes care team regarding the reduction of diabetes-related risks. Optimal diabetes management requires patients to actively participate in their care, which occurs most effectively with a multidisciplinary team. Diabetes education is an integral part of this team approach because it not only helps the patient understand diabetes, its progression, and possible complications, but also provides guidance and encouragement to the patient to engage in proactive risk-reduction decisions for optimal health. A variety of tools are available to help the diabetes educator develop an individualized, patient-centered plan for risk reduction. More research is needed regarding intervention efficacy, best practices to improve adherence, and quantification of benefits from ongoing diabetes support in risk reduction. Diabetes educators are urged to stay abreast of evolving models of care and to build relationships with health care providers both within and beyond the diabetes care team.

  2. EQUILIBRE GLYCEMIQUE ET COMPLICATIONS MACROANGIOPATHIQUES DU DIABETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyse BORDIER

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available La question de l’efficacité d’un équilibre glycémique optimal dans la prévention des complications macroangiopathiques du diabète a fait l’objet d’une récente polémique. Si les faits sont clairs pour la microangiopathie notamment au cours du diabète de type 1, ils paraissent moins certains pour les complications cardiovasculaires du diabète de type 2. Cette constatation vient de l’intrication des autres facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires qui sont très fréquents chez ces patients. Cependant, les études de suivi sur une longue durée s’inscrivent en faveur de l’intérêt d’un bon équilibre glycémique sur les complications macroangiopathiques. Les résultats négatifs sur la mortalité de l’étude ACCORD et les inquiétudes concernant la rosiglitazone ont conduit à la mise en place d’études sur la sécurité d’utilisation des nouvelles molécules. Tous ces travaux ont abouti à la démonstration de l’absence de risque des iDPP-4 et de l’effet très positif de certaines molécules de la classe des analogues du GLP-1 et des iSGLT2.Il reste à espérer que la récente mise au point de l’Académie de Médecine soulignant que les complications du diabète de type 2 exigent une prévention multifactorielle qui passe obligatoirement par un contrôle optimisé de l'équilibre glycémique mette fin à une polémique inutile et dangereuse pour nos malades.

  3. Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Herbert D; Abbott, J Dawn; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2018-03-27

    Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction, which can result in cardiogenic shock. Data on the relation of diabetes and the occurrence and prognosis of cardiogenic shock postacute myocardial infarction are scant. Among the National Inpatient Sample patients aged ≥18 years and hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction during the 2012-2014 period, we examined the association between diabetes and the incidence and outcomes of cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction, using multivariable logistic and linear regression models. Of 1,332,530 hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction, 72,765 (5.5%) were complicated by cardiogenic shock. In acute myocardial infarction patients, cardiogenic shock incidence was higher among those with vs without diabetes (5.8% vs 5.2%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.19; P diabetes. Diabetic patients were less likely to undergo revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting) (67.1% vs 68.7%; aOR 0.88; 95% CI, 0.80-0.96; P = .003). Diabetes was associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock (37.9% vs 36.8%; aOR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09-1.28; P diabetes had a longer hospital stay (mean ± SEM: 11.6 ± 0.16 vs 10.9 ± 0.16 days; adjusted estimate 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.18; P diabetes was associated with an increased risk of cardiogenic shock and worse outcomes in those with cardiogenic shock. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Skewed Epigenetics: An Alternative Therapeutic Option for Diabetes Complications

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    Gabriele Togliatto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes patients. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and a lack of efficient antioxidant machinery, a result of hyperglycaemia, mainly contribute to this problem. Although advances in therapy have significantly reduced both morbidity and mortality in diabetic individuals, diabetes-associated vascular complications are still one of the most challenging health problems worldwide. New healing options are urgently needed as current therapeutics are failing to improve long-term outcomes. Particular effort has recently been devoted to understanding the functional relationship between chromatin structure regulation and the persistent change in gene expression which is driven by hyperglycaemia and which accounts for long-lasting diabetic complications. A detailed investigation into epigenetic chromatin modifications in type 2 diabetes is underway. This will be particularly useful in the design of mechanism-based therapeutics which interfere with long-lasting activating epigenetics and improve patient outcomes. We herein provide an overview of the most relevant mechanisms that account for hyperglycaemia-induced changes in chromatin structure; the most relevant mechanism is called “metabolic memory.”

  5. Complications of ankle fracture in patients with diabetes.

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    Chaudhary, Saad B; Liporace, Frank A; Gandhi, Ankur; Donley, Brian G; Pinzur, Michael S; Lin, Sheldon S

    2008-03-01

    Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus have long been recognized as a challenge to practicing clinicians. Complications of impaired wound healing, infection, malunion, delayed union, nonunion, and Charcot arthropathy are prevalent in this patient population. Controversy exists as to whether diabetic ankle fractures are best treated noninvasively or by open reduction and internal fixation. Patients with diabetes are at significant risk for soft-tissue complications. In addition, diabetic ankle fractures heal, but significant delays in bone healing exist. Also, Charcot ankle arthropathy occurs more commonly in patients who were initially undiagnosed and had a delay in immobilization and in patients treated nonsurgically for displaced ankle fractures. Several techniques have been described to minimize complications associated with diabetic ankle fractures (eg, rigid external fixation, use of Kirschner wires or Steinmann pins to increase rigidity). Regardless of the specifics of treatment, adherence to the basic principles of preoperative planning, meticulous soft-tissue management, and attention to stable, rigid fixation with prolonged, protected immobilization are paramount in minimizing problems and yielding good functional outcomes.

  6. RAGE receptor and its soluble isoforms in diabetes mellitus complications

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    Mauren Isfer Anghebem Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycemia, which is present in all types of diabetes, increases the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. The interaction of AGEs with receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE initiates a cascade of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant processes that result in oxidative stress, stimulating the formation and accumulation of more AGE molecules. This cyclic process, denominated metabolic memory, may explain the persistency of diabetic vascular complications in patients with satisfactory glycemic control. The RAGE found in several cell membranes is also present in soluble isoforms (esRAGE and cRAGE, which are generated by alternative deoxyribonucleic acid splicing or by proteolytic cleavage. This review focuses on new research into these mediators as potential biomarkers for vascular complications in diabetes.

  7. Associations between barriers to self-care and diabetes complications among patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    Sina, Maryam; Graffy, Jonathan; Simmons, David

    2018-07-01

    To determine which barriers to care are associated with type 2 diabetes complications in an area in rural East England. 3649 individuals with type 2 diabetes from 62 general practices were contacted via postal invitation which included a 33 item Barriers-to-Diabetes-Care Survey. Barriers were grouped into five priori major categories: educational, physical, psychological, psychosocial, and systems. The associations of reported barriers, both individually and as a group, with self-reported complications were assessed using logistic regression. 39.5% of participants had self-reported diabetes complications. Physical health barriers (OR = 3.3; 95%CI: 2.7, 4.0), systems barriers (OR = 1.6; 95%CI: 1.3, 2.0) and psychological barriers (OR = 1.3 (95%CI: 1.1, 1.5) were associated with diabetes complications. In subcategories, presence of comorbidities (OR = 4.8; 95%CI: 3.9, 5.9), financial difficulties (OR = 1.7; 95%CI: 1.3, 2.1), absence of services (OR = 2.0; 95%CI: 1.4, 3.0), feeling others should bear more financial responsibility for their care (OR = 1.6 (95%CI: 1.1, 2.1), no access to diabetes service (OR = 1.3; 95%CI: 1.1, 1.5), feeling worried about their diabetes (OR = 1.5; 95%CI: 1.2, 2.0) and lack of readiness to exercise (OR = 1.4; 95%CI: 1.2, 1.7) were associated with diabetes complications. Barriers to self-care are significantly more common among those with, than those without, diabetes complications. Systematic identification and management of different barriers to self-care could help personalise care for those with diabetes related complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk factors and complications in type 2 diabetes outpatients

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    Ellen Fernandes Flávio Silva

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: Our study investigated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM outpatients attending a university hospital in Montes Claros, MG, to estimate the prevalence of risk factors and their association with diabetes complications. Method: This was a quantitative, documental, retrospective and analytical study. Medical records of 95 outpatients with T2DM treated in this hospital from 2011 to 2015 were analyzed. Data were collected according to a structured questionnaire surveying sociodemographic, anthropometric and biochemical data and clinical and lifestyle aspects. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between risk factor variables and complications. Results: With a mean age of 54 years, the study population showed irregular blood glucose control, despite the use of hypoglycemic medication, and did not have a healthy lifestyle. The main complication reported was high blood pressure (HBP, occurring in 70.9% of patients. The prevalence of complications was positively associated with patients receiving insulin treatment (p=0.042 and multidisciplinary monitoring (p=0.050. Conclusion: The associations identified reflect the condition of patients that were already treating diabetes and its complications, especially HBP. The characteristics of the study population indicate the need to improve clinical follow-up and increase motivation for healthy behaviors.

  9. Diabetes complications in 1952 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients managed in a single institution

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    Alwakeel, Jamal S.; Suliman, R.; Tarif, N.; Al-Suwaida, A.; Hammad, D.; Al-Asaad, H.; Al-Harbi, A.; Al-Mohaya, S.; Alam, A.

    2008-01-01

    Because there is no recent update on the state of diabetes and its concomitant applications in Saudi Arabia, we undertook a study of the prevalence of health complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted to our institution. We conducted a retrospective review of medical results of adult Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes who were seen in clinics or admitted to the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 1989 and January 2004. Of 1952, 943 (48.3%) were males. For the whole study population the mean age at enrollment was 58.4+-14.2 years, the mean age at the onset of diabetes was 48.1+-12.8 years, the mean duration of diabetes was 10.4+-7.5 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 7.9+-4.6 years. Nephropathy was the most prevalent complication, occurring in 626 patients (32.1%). Acute coronary syndrome occurred in 451 (23.1%), cataracts in 447 (22.9$), retinopathy in 326 (16.7%), and myocardial infarction in 279 (14.3%), Doubling of serum ceartinine was seen in 250 (12.8%) and 79 (4.0%) went into dialysis. Hypertension was present in 1524 (78.1%) dyslipidemia in 764 (39.1%). Overall mortality was 8.2%. Multiple complications were frequent. Males had higher prevalence of complications than females (P<.05). Mortality was significantly higher in males 92 (9.8%) than females 69 (6.8%) (P=.024). The prevalence of complications significantly increased with duration of diabetes and age (P<.05). Among Saudis, the prevalence of concomitant diabetic complications is high, with cardiovascular and renal complications the most frequent. Many patients had multiple complications. Early and frequent screening in patients with type 2 diabetes is desirable to identify patients at high risk for concomitant complications and to prevent disabilities. (author)

  10. Diabetes complications in 1952 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients managed in a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwakeel, Jamal S; Suliman, R; Tarif, N; Al-Suwaida, A; Hammad, D [Dept. of Medicine, Security Forces, Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Asaad, H; Al-Harbi, A; Al-Mohaya, S [Coll. of Medicine and Research Center, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Alam, A [Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-07-01

    Because there is no recent update on the state of diabetes and its concomitant applications in Saudi Arabia, we undertook a study of the prevalence of health complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted to our institution. We conducted a retrospective review of medical results of adult Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes who were seen in clinics or admitted to the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 1989 and January 2004. Of 1952, 943 (48.3%) were males. For the whole study population the mean age at enrollment was 58.4+-14.2 years, the mean age at the onset of diabetes was 48.1+-12.8 years, the mean duration of diabetes was 10.4+-7.5 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 7.9+-4.6 years. Nephropathy was the most prevalent complication, occurring in 626 patients (32.1%). Acute coronary syndrome occurred in 451 (23.1%), cataracts in 447 (22.9$), retinopathy in 326 (16.7%), and myocardial infarction in 279 (14.3%), Doubling of serum ceartinine was seen in 250 (12.8%) and 79 (4.0%) went into dialysis. Hypertension was present in 1524 (78.1%) dyslipidemia in 764 (39.1%). Overall mortality was 8.2%. Multiple complications were frequent. Males had higher prevalence of complications than females (P<.05). Mortality was significantly higher in males 92 (9.8%) than females 69 (6.8%) (P=.024). The prevalence of complications significantly increased with duration of diabetes and age (P<.05). Among Saudis, the prevalence of concomitant diabetic complications is high, with cardiovascular and renal complications the most frequent. Many patients had multiple complications. Early and frequent screening in patients with type 2 diabetes is desirable to identify patients at high risk for concomitant complications and to prevent disabilities. (author)

  11. Clinical Implications of Glucose Variability: Chronic Complications of Diabetes

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    Hye Seung Jung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glucose variability has been identified as a potential risk factor for diabetic complications; oxidative stress is widely regarded as the mechanism by which glycemic variability induces diabetic complications. However, there remains no generally accepted gold standard for assessing glucose variability. Representative indices for measuring intraday variability include calculation of the standard deviation along with the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE. MAGE is used to measure major intraday excursions and is easily measured using continuous glucose monitoring systems. Despite a lack of randomized controlled trials, recent clinical data suggest that long-term glycemic variability, as determined by variability in hemoglobin A1c, may contribute to the development of microvascular complications. Intraday glycemic variability is also suggested to accelerate coronary artery disease in high-risk patients.

  12. Alcohol consumption and risk of microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes patients; the EURODIAB Prospective Complications study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Kruidhof, J.S.; Grobbee, D.E.; Chaturvedi, N.; Fuller, J.H.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between alcohol consumption and risk of microvascular complications (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy) in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study. METHODS: The EURODIAB Prospective

  13. Novel biomarkers for prediabetes, diabetes, and associated complications

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    Dorcely B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brenda Dorcely,1 Karin Katz,1 Ram Jagannathan,2 Stephanie S Chiang,1 Babajide Oluwadare,1 Ira J Goldberg,1 Michael Bergman1 1New York University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, 2Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: The number of individuals with prediabetes is expected to grow substantially and estimated to globally affect 482 million people by 2040. Therefore, effective methods for diagnosing prediabetes will be required to reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes and its complications. The current biomarkers, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, fructosamine, and glycated albumin have limitations including moderate sensitivity and specificity and are inaccurate in certain clinical conditions. Therefore, identification of additional biomarkers is being explored recogni­zing that any single biomarker will also likely have inherent limitations. Therefore, combining several biomarkers may more precisely identify those at high risk for developing prediabetes and subsequent progression to diabetes. This review describes recently identified biomarkers and their potential utility for addressing the burgeoning epidemic of dysglycemic disorders. Keywords: prediabetes, biomarkers, inflammatory markers, diabetes, diabetes complications

  14. Presentations and complications of diabetes patients presenting to diabetic clinic of Eastern Nepal

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    Nabin Kumar Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Diabetes mellitus leads to damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs especially eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. The latency of occurence of hyperglycemia and diagnosis may be of long duration. This study was aimed to find out the mode of presetation of diabetes mellitus in diabetic patients attending out patients clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences. Associated complications and comorbid condition present at the time of presenation were also studied. Methods The diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Out Patient Clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences during June 2006 to June 2007 were included in this study.The patients details were collected from the predefined Proforma for diabetes patient from the database. This included demographic data, biochemical parameters and diabetic complications. For the purpose of study a total of 775 patients were randomly selected.The Data collected were entered and analysed using excel and SPSS(version 11.5 Results Out of 775 cases 436 (56.3% were male and 339(43.7% were female. Majority of patients 81.55% (n=632 had osmotic sympmtoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes at the time of presentation to the clinic. Asymptomatic patient constituted 18.45% (n=143. The most common presenting complaints were polyuria (44.58%, followed by polydypsia (39.62% and polyphagia (24.88%. About 54.97% (n=426 had symptoms of complications related to diabetes. Among them most common complication was neurological (39.67%, followed by renal (10.8% metabolic (4.93%, cardiac(4.46%, autonomic neuropathy (4.93% and peripheral vascular disease (3.99%. Conclusion Majority of the patients presenting in our OPD had osmotic symptoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes. Access to diabetes care and lack of awareness of the disease and its complication might had contributed to this. Community awareness, program for early detection and managemnet may help proper diabetes care

  15. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cai-Guo; Zhang, Ning; Yuan, Sha-Sha; Ma, Yan; Yang, Long-Yan; Feng, Ying-Mei; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Despite being featured as metabolic disorder, diabetic patients are largely affected by hyperglycemia-induced vascular abnormality. Accumulated evidence has confirmed the beneficial effect of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in coronary heart disease. However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment is the main therapy for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, indicating the uncertain role of EPCs in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. In this review, we first illustrate how hyperglycemia induces metabolic and epigenetic changes in EPCs, which exerts deleterious impact on their number and function. We then discuss how abnormal angiogenesis develops in eyes and kidneys under diabetes condition, focusing on "VEGF uncoupling with nitric oxide" and "competitive angiopoietin 1/angiopoietin 2" mechanisms that are shared in both organs. Next, we dissect the nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular complications. After we overview the current EPCs-related strategies, we point out new EPCs-associated options for future exploration. Ultimately, we hope that this review would uncover the mysterious nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular disease for therapeutics.

  16. Characteristics of diabetic foot lesions and its complications

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    Carla Luiza da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases, and the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality, involving some complications, leaving the patient vulnerable. The aim of this work was to determine the prevalence of lower limb amputations due to diabetic ulcers of patients with infection at a Family Health Unit and analyze the physiological changes detected during the assessment of the patients. This is a retrospective approach to quantitative research, conducted from May to October 2010 with a sample of 40 people involved in the activities. As a result it was found out that the patients have some deformity or bony prominence (30.8% and relative insensitivity and the dryness of the feet, 46.2% had such complications. It is concluded that health professionals, especially nurses should perform care for these patients, thus delivering knowledge-focused in the care and prevention, through educational activities aimed at the social well-being.

  17. Diabetic foot complications among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica: prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, T S; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Younger, N O M; Wright-Pascoe, R A; Boyne, M S; McFarlane, S R; Francis, D K; Wilks, R J

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diabetic foot complications among patients at a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica and identify factors associated with foot complications. A stratified random sample of 188 patients were interviewed and examined between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses obtained demographic and clinical data, measured anthropometrics and performedfoot examinations including inspection for amputations, ulcers or infection and assessment of pain, vibration and pressure perception. Participants included 143 women and 45 men (mean age 56years; mean diabetes duration 16 years). The prevalence of amputations was 8.5% (95% CI 4.5, 12.5%) and was higher among men (22.2%) compared to women (4.2%, p foot infections was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. Overall, 12% ofpatients had at least one of these foot complications. Foot complications were more prevalent among men, patients with high blood pressure (BP > or = 130/80 mmHg) or peripheral neuropathy In multivariable logistic regression models, factors associated with foot complications were: neuropathy (OR 9.3 [95% CI 2.8, 30.3]), high BP (OR 7.9 [1.3, 49.7]) and diabetes duration (OR 1.32 [1.02, 1.72]). Approximately one of every eight patients in this specialist clinic had a major foot complication. Associated factors were neuropathy, high blood pressure and longer duration of diabetes.

  18. Vitamin D levels and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes

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    Sarita Bajaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D has important actions on glucose metabolism. These include improved insulin exocytosis, direct stimulation of insulin receptor, improved uptake of glucose by peripheral tissues, improving insulin resistance. It has got various pleiotropic effects like suppression of cell mediated immunity, regulation of cell proliferation, stimulation of neurotropic factors such as nerve growth factor, Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotropin, suppression of RAAS, reduction of albuminuria, immunomodulatory effects, and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, vitamin D is implicated in many ways in the pathogenesis of retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy. Objectives: To study the correlation of vitamin D levels with microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional case-control study of 18 patients (18-70 years, who met the American Diabetes Association 2011 criteria for type 2 diabetes, was conducted. Age and sex matched healthy controls were taken. Subjects were evaluated for the presence of microvascular complications by clinical evaluation, urine examination, fundus examination, nerve conduction studies, and various biochemical tests. 25-OH cholecalciferol levels were done for each. Cut off level for vitamin D deficiency was 20 ng/ml. Results: Mean vitamin D was lower in type 2 diabetics than healthy subjects (19.046 vs. 27.186 ng/ml. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was found to significantly higher in diabetics when compared to healthy subjects (P = 0.0001. Vitamin D deficiency was found to be significantly associated with neuropathy (χ2 = 5.39, df = 1, P = 0.020, retinopathy, (χ2 = 6.6, df = 1, P = 0.010 and nephropathy (χ2 = 10. 52, df = 1, P = 0.001. Lower levels of vitamin D were found to be associated with increasing prevalence of combinations of microvascular complications namely neuropathy with retinopathy (P = 0.036, neuropathy with nephropathy (P = 0

  19. Diabetes control and complications in public hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafauzy, M

    2006-10-01

    The Diabcare-Asia project was initiated to study the status of diabetes care and prevalence of diabetic complications in Asia and this study was done to evaluate the above in public hospitals in Malaysia and compare to a similar study done in 1998. A total of 19 public hospitals participated in this study from which a total of 1099 patients were included and analysed. The majority of patients (94.8%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus and 66.5% were overweight or obese. As for glycaemic control only 41.0% of the patients had HbA1c 1.1 mmol/L and 51.1% had triglycerides diet regularly and 38.9% exercised regularly. As for glucose monitoring, only 26.8% of the patients did home blood glucose monitoring and 1.8% did home urine glucose testing. There was also a high complication rate with the commonest being neuropathy (19.0%) followed by albuminuria (15.7%), background retinopathy (11.1%) and microalbuminuria (6.6%). Compared to the 1998 study, there was some improvement in the percentage of patients achieving target levels and a reduction in the prevalence of complications. In conclusion, the majority of diabetic patients treated at the public hospitals were still not satisfactorily controlled and this was still associated with a high prevalence of complications. There is still an urgent need to educate both patients and health care personnel on the importance of achieving the clinical targets and greater effort must be made to achieve these targets.

  20. Combined diabetic foot infections treatment, complicated by foot phlegmon

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    Yavruyan O.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the article shows the analysis of treatment results of 163 patients with diabetic foot infections, complicated by foot phlegmon. Patients were divided into 2 groups. The control group received traditional treatment and had an autopsy deep plantar space done and then, during the second phase, cytokine-rich autoplatelet concentrate had been applied. The research results confirmed a significant decrease in the duration of treatment and hospitalization of patients in the hospital.

  1. A Unified Pathophysiological Construct of Diabetes and its Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Epstein, Solomon; Corkey, Barbara E; Grant, Struan F A; Gavin Iii, James R; Aguilar, Richard B; Herman, Mary E

    2017-09-01

    Advances in understanding diabetes mellitus (DM) through basic and clinical research have helped clarify and reunify a disease state fragmented into numerous etiologies and subtypes. It is now understood that a common pathophysiology drives the diabetic state throughout its natural history and across its varied clinical presentations, a pathophysiology involving metabolic insults, oxidative damage, and vicious cycles that aggravate and intensify organ dysfunction and damage. This new understanding of the disease requires that we revisit existing diagnostics and treatment approaches, which were built upon outmoded assumptions. 'The Common Pathophysiologic Origins of Diabetes Mellitus and its Complications Construct' is presented as a more accurate, foundational, and translatable construct of DM that helps make sense of the hitherto ambiguous findings of long-term outcome studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Significance of determination of bone mineral density and osteocalcin in diabetic patients with diabetic microvascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xianghui; Mu Junqing; Lu Kuan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of diabetic microvascular complications on bone mineral density (BMI) and osteocalcin (BGP). Methods: 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were studied, including 33 with microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy) (group 1) and 27 without complications (group 2). Fasting blood glucose, serum fructosamine (GSP), total alkaline phosphatase (TALP), calcium (Ca 2+ ) levels were measured by biochemical method; osteocalcin (BGP) level was detected by RIA. BMD of the lumbar spine and femur was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in all patients. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from the height and body weight. Results: The BMI, GSP, FBG, TALP and Ca 2+ values in the two groups were not much different, but BGP and BMD in group 1 were significantly lower than those in group 2. Conclusion: Bone mineral density (BMD) and BGP values were closely related to the microvascular complications in diabetes, which could decrease bone formation and increase the frequency of osteoporosis

  3. Neglected-Noncompliant Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Complications

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    Afdal .

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakDiabetes mellitus (DM tipe 1 merupakan kelainan sistemik akibat terjadinya gangguan metabolisme glukosayang ditandai oleh hiperglikemia kronis. Keadaan ini disebabkan oleh proses autoimun yang merusak sel βpankreas sehingga produksi insulin berkurang bahkan terhenti, penderitanya akan memerlukan asupan insulineksogen. Penyakit ini menimbulkan komplikasi kronik sehingga memerlukan manajemen pengobatan yangberkelanjutan dan edukasi pada pasien serta keluarganya. Penyakit yang tidak terkontrol akan menimbulkanberbagai komplikasi metabolisme, gangguan makrovaskular dan mikrovaskular yang menyebabkan penurunankualitas dan harapan hidup penderita.Kata Kunci : Diabetes melitus tipe 1, makrovaskular, mikrovaskularAbstractDiabetes mellitus (DM type 1 is a result of the systemic disorder of glucose metabolism disorder characterized bychronic hyperglycemia. This situation is caused by the autoimmune processes that destroy pancreatic β cellsresulting in the production of insulin is reduced even halted, the sufferer will require exogenous insulin intake. Thisraises the complications of chronic disease that requires ongoing medication management and education forpatients and their families. Uncontrolled disease will cause various metabolic complications, macrovascular andmicrovascular disorders that cause loss of quality and life expectancy of the patient.Keywords: Type 1 diabetes mellitus, macrovascular, microvascular

  4. Vascular Complications and Diabetes: Current Therapies and Future Challenges

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    Abbott L. Willard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinal complications, including macular edema (DME and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, are the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74. Chronic hyperglycemia, considered the underlying cause of diabetic retinopathy, is thought to act first through violation of the pericyte-endothelial coupling. Disruption of microvascular integrity leads to pathologic consequences including hypoxia-induced imbalance in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling. Several anti-VEGF medications are in clinical trials for use in arresting retinal angiogenesis arising from DME and PDR. Although a review of current clinical trials shows promising results, the lack of large prospective studies, head-to-head therapeutic comparisons, and potential long-term and systemic adverse events give cause for optimistic caution. Alternative therapies including targeting pathogenic specific angiogenesis and mural-cell-based therapeutics may offer innovative solutions for currently intractable clinical problems. This paper describes the mechanisms behind diabetic retinal complications, current research supporting anti-VEGF medications, and future therapeutic directions.

  5. Protective effects of dietary chamomile tea on diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Atsushi; Minoshima, Yuka; Yamamoto, Jo; Adachi, Isao; Watson, Alison A; Nash, Robert J

    2008-09-10

    Matricaria chamomilla L., known as "chamomile", has been used as an herbal tea or supplementary food all over the world. We investigated the effects of chamomile hot water extract and its major components on the prevention of hyperglycemia and the protection or improvement of diabetic complications in diabetes mellitus. Hot water extract, esculetin (3) and quercetin (7) have been found to show moderate inhibition of sucrase with IC50 values of 0.9 mg/mL and 72 and 71 microM, respectively. In a sucrose-loading test, the administration of esculetin (50 mg/kg body weight) fully suppressed hyperglycemia after 15 and 30 min, but the extract (500 mg/kg body weight) and quercetin (50 mg/kg body weight) were less effective. On the other hand, a long-term feed test (21 days) using a streptozotocin-induced rat diabetes model revealed that the same doses of extract and quercetin showed significant suppression of blood glucose levels. It was also found that these samples increased the liver glycogen levels. Moreover, chamomile extract showed potent inhibition against aldose reductase (ALR2), with an IC50 value of 16.9 microg/mL, and its components, umbelliferone (1), esculetin (3), luteolin (6), and quercetin (7), could significantly inhibit the accumulation of sorbitol in human erythrocytes. These results clearly suggested that daily consumption of chamomile tea with meals could contribute to the prevention of the progress of hyperglycemia and diabetic complications.

  6. Cognition in type 2 diabetes: Association with vascular risk factors, complications of diabetes and depression

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    Iype Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The role of variables like duration of diabetes, diabetic control and microvascular complications in the causation of cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes is not well studied. The contribution of hypertension to the cognitive decline in nondemented diabetic patients is unclear. Aims: We wanted to see if cognition in patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with the duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, complications of diabetes, vascular risk factors, or depression. We also looked at association of noncompliance with cognition, and depression. Settings and Design: We recruited ambulant patients with type 2 diabetes who are 55 years or more in age from the weekly diabetic clinic. We excluded patients with past history of stroke. Methods and Material: We selected the time taken for the Trial A test, delayed recall on ten-word list from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer′s Disease (CERAD, Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS and Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D screening instrument to assess these patients. Statistical Analysis Used: We utilized mean, standard deviation, Chi-square test and Pearson′s correlation for statistical analysis. We considered P < 0.05 to be significant. Results: RUDAS scores inversely correlated ( r = -0.360 with CES-D scores ( P = 0.002. Scores of the screening instrument for depression, the CES-D was associated with the duration of diabetes mellitus ( P = 0.018, fasting blood glucose ( P = 0.029 as well as with 2-hour post prandial blood glucose ( P = 0.017. Conclusions: There is correlation between depression and global cognitive score. Depression seems to be associated with duration of diabetes and control of diabetes.

  7. [Macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosolová, H; Petrlová, B; Simon, J; Sifalda, P; Sípová, I; Sefrna, F

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic vascular complications is higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the incidence and types of macrovascular (MVC) and microvascular (mvc) complications and to analyse their relation to the different risk factors and biomarkers in order to improve their prevention. 415 patients (219 men and 196 women) with an average age of 66 +/- 9 years enrolled in the study. A total of 95% of patients with DM2 had a history of hypertension, 27% had MVC (of which 55% had ischaemic heart disease), and 54% had mvc (ofwhich 95% had diabetic nephropathy). The patients with vascular complications were significantly older and had a longer history of DM2; they did not differ for their systolic blood pressure, but had a higher pulse pressure and took more antihypertensives. They did not differ for their lipid levels or the respective therapy. Diabetic patients with MVC and mvc had higher insulin resistance, higher plasmatic levels of total homocysteine and a higher incidence ofalbuminuria or proteinuria. The factors which significantly and independently associated with MVC were male gender, age over 60 years, higher hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) exceeding 1 mg/l, glycaemia over 5.6 mmol/l, lower diastolic blood pressure and lower HDL-cholesterol; mvc associated with higher age over 60 years, a history of DM2 exceeding 8 years, and hs-CRP above 1 mg/l. Our results show that patients with DM2 have a high incidence ofvascular complications significantly associated with age, DM2 history and higher hs-CRP, irrespective of the other monitored parametres.

  8. Frequency of chronic complications of type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, A.; Hydrie, M.Z.I.; Ahmedani, M.Y.; Masood, Q.; Hakeem, R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the frequency of chronic complications of type II diabetes in subjects attending a tertiary care Unit in Karachi, Pakistan. Subjects and Methods: Computerized clinical records of 2199 type II diabetic subjects were analyzed for this study. The clinical and laboratory variables were statistically evaluated with significance at p. Results: Means of glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c, fasting and random plasma glucose levels, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were higher than the risk indicator value for both genders (p<0.005). Mean body mass index and total blood cholesterol was higher for females only. Hyperglycemia was present in 88%, high HbA1c in 81%, low HDL in 81%, obesity in 66% and hypertriglyceridemia in 54%, neuropathy in 36% proteinuria in 28% and hypertension in 50% of the subjects. Frequency of obesity, low HDL and hypertension was higher among females (p<0.001 in each case). Retinopathy (p<0.05), nephropathy (p<0.005), neuropathy (p<0.005) and foot ulcers (p<0.001) were higher among males. Frequency of obesity was significantly higher among those with shorter duration and in younger group while frequency of other complications was higher among those with longer duration and in the older groups. Conclusion: Higher rates of complications were observed compared to previous studies. Certain variables showed significant association with gender and age as described above. (author)

  9. Aspects of thyroid hormone regulation of mitochondrial function in diabetes and diabetic complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthonsen, Stine

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been related to lifestyle, obesity and age; however, T2DM has also been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria produce ATP and during this synthesis, reactive oxygen species are generated. Increased levels of reactive oxygen species are associated...... with development of diabetic complications. ATP-synthesis and ROS-generation are dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which indicate the activity of the mitochondria....

  10. Diabetes insipidus as a complication after pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Jennifer A; Verbalis, Joseph G

    2007-06-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with new-onset vertigo and diplopia that had started 2 weeks previously. An MRI scan of the brain revealed an 11 x 9 x 9 mm sellar mass that extended into the suprasellar region. Evaluation of pituitary function showed mild central hypothyroidism and secondary adrenal insufficiency. The patient underwent trans-sphenoidal resection of the mass without any significant intraoperative complications. On postoperative day 1 she abruptly developed polyuria, hypernatremia and urine hypo-osmolality. Measurements of plasma and urine osmolality, urine specific gravity, and serum sodium levels. Postoperative diabetes insipidus with a triphasic pattern. The patient's diabetes insipidus was initially treated with intravenous desmopressin, and her fluid status, serum sodium levels, and serum and urine osmolality were carefully monitored. During the second, antidiuretic phase, desmopressin was discontinued and the patient's fluid intake was restricted. After recurrence of diabetes insipidus during the third phase, the patient was treated with intranasal desmopressin and was discharged. She remains on desmopressin therapy for chronic diabetes insipidus.

  11. Lithium-associated primary hyperparathyroidism complicated by nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakal, Nihat; Erçetin, Candaş; Özçınar, Beyza; Aral, Ferihan; Erbil, Yeşim

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-associated hyperparathyroidism is the leading cause of hypercalcemia in lithium-treated patients. Lithium may lead to exacerbation of pre-existing primary hyperparathyroidism or cause an increased set-point of calcium for parathyroid hormone suppression, leading to parathyroid hyperplasia. Lithium may cause renal tubular concentration defects directly by the development of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus or indirectly by the effects of hypercalcemia. In this study, we present a female patient on long-term lithium treatment who was evaluated for hypercalcemia. Preoperative imaging studies indicated parathyroid adenoma and multinodular goiter. Parathyroidectomy and thyroidectomy were planned. During the postoperative course, prolonged intubation was necessary because of agitation and delirium. During this period, polyuria, severe dehydration, and hypernatremia developed, which responded to controlled hypotonic fluid infusions and was unresponsive to parenteral desmopressin. A diagnosis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was apparent. A parathyroid adenoma and multifocal papillary thyroid cancer were detected on histopathological examination. It was thought that nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was masked by hypercalcemia preoperatively. A patient on lithium treatment should be carefully followed up during or after surgery to prevent life-threatening complications of previously unrecognized nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and the possibility of renal concentrating defects on long-term lithium use should be sought, particularly in patients with impaired consciousness.

  12. AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY ON COMPLICATIONS OF CHRONIC DIABETES ENCOUNTERED IN A PULMONOLOGIST CLINIC

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    V. Vinod Kumar Viswanathan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND With the ever increasing prevalence of diabetes, complications of diabetes are encountered across all specialities. Hence, it is imperative that all specialists should have a working knowledge of diabetes mellitus. This study was done to understand the prevalence and complications of diabetes among patients attending a pulmonologist OPD. Knowledge of diabetes and its complications will help pulmonary medicine specialists to identify and manage the complications of diabetes better. MATERIALS AND METHODS All patients attending a pulmonologist’s clinic for a period of one month were enquired regarding their diabetes status and patients with known history of diabetes were questioned using a standard questionnaire and their available records examined regarding their complications pertaining to diabetes and the results analysed. RESULTS In this study, 18.7% of patients attending pulmonologist clinic had diabetes mellitus and 13.5% of patients had diabetes of more than 10 years duration. Most of the patients were in the age group of 40 to 60 years and were predominantly male. Among the diabetic patients, 71.9% had complications due to diabetes. Infections were the most commonly associated complication followed by pulmonary and cardiovascular complications. Many cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were observed among these patients. Other respiratory infections observed included pneumonias and flu. Cardiovascular complications like systemic hypertension, coronary artery disease and dyslipidaemia were observed. CONCLUSION With the rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus, such cases are frequently observed across all medical specialities. Hence, it is vital that all specialists should be trained in a management of diabetes, which is a frequent comorbidity observed by all specialists. Knowledge of diabetes, identifying diabetes early and management of complications will go a long way in reducing the morbidity and mortality due to diabetes and also

  13. Novel biomarkers for prediabetes, diabetes, and associated complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorcely, Brenda; Katz, Karin; Jagannathan, Ram; Chiang, Stephanie S; Oluwadare, Babajide; Goldberg, Ira J; Bergman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The number of individuals with prediabetes is expected to grow substantially and estimated to globally affect 482 million people by 2040. Therefore, effective methods for diagnosing prediabetes will be required to reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes and its complications. The current biomarkers, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fructosamine, and glycated albumin have limitations including moderate sensitivity and specificity and are inaccurate in certain clinical conditions. Therefore, identification of additional biomarkers is being explored recognizing that any single biomarker will also likely have inherent limitations. Therefore, combining several biomarkers may more precisely identify those at high risk for developing prediabetes and subsequent progression to diabetes. This review describes recently identified biomarkers and their potential utility for addressing the burgeoning epidemic of dysglycemic disorders. PMID:28860833

  14. Knowledge level and incidence of complications in diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Krzyżanowska, Ewa; Indycka, Ewelina; Łuczyk, Robert Jan; Łuczyk, Marta; Sawicka, Katarzyna; Wawryniuk, Agnieszka; Daniluk, Jadwiga

    2017-01-01

    Krzyżanowska Ewa, Indycka Ewelina, Łuczyk Robert Jan, Łuczyk Marta, Sawicka Katarzyna, Wawryniuk Agnieszka, Daniluk Jadwiga. Knowledge level and incidence of complications in diabetic patients. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(8):446-472. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.883767 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4758 https://pbn.nauka.gov.pl/sedno-webapp/works/830341 The journal has had 7 points in Min...

  15. Association between Diabetic Polyneuropathy and Cardiovascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ook Chung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetes mellitus is a major independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, but high cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus patients is not completely explained by clustering traditional risk factors. Recently, associations between diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN and macrovasculopathy have been suggested. We aimed to assess associations between DPN and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients.MethodsMicrovascular and cardiovascular complications were evaluated in 1,041 type 2 diabetic patients.ResultsIn patients with DPN, the age, prevalence of hypertension, diabetes duration, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and hemoglobin glycation (HbA1c levels were significantly higher, while the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were lower than in those without DPN. The prevalence of CVD was higher in patients with DPN. In multivariate analysis, DPN was independently associated with CVD (odds ratio, 1.801; 95% confidence interval, 1.009 to 3.214.ConclusionOur results showed that DPN was associated with a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetic patients, but further studies are needed to investigate the causative nature of associations between DPN and CVD.

  16. Comparing metabolic control and complications in type 2 diabetes in two Pacific Islands at baseline and following diabetes care intervention

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    Si Thu Win Tin

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study indicates improved metabolic control but little change in diabetes complications 15 months after intervention. Efforts to improve and evaluate the ongoing quality and accessibility of diabetes care in Pacific Island settings need to be further strengthened.

  17. Ketosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus: complication or compensatory mechanism?

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    Ivan Kruljac

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The exact clinical role of diabetic ketosis in patients presenting to emergency departments with hyperglycemic crises is largely unknown. The aim of this brief review is to provide insights into possible mechanisms and clinical impact of diabetic ketosis in patients with hyperglycemic crises and clinical features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Patients with T2DM have impaired ketogenesis and lower blood ketone levels. High insulin, low glucagon, IGF-I, ghrelin and adiponectin levels are associated with suppressed ketogenesis. Adenosine 5’-monophosphate-activated protein kinase is an enzyme expressed in skeletal muscle and seems to have pivotal role in impaired ketogenesis. An increase in ketogenesis is associated with weight loss, increase in insulin sensitivity and serum IGF-I levels, which have beneficial effects on glycemia but also on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Ketone bodies are far more efficient fuel sources than glucose, especially in diabetics with heart failure and kidney disease. In theory, ketogenesis in patients with T2DM can be improved by low- carbohydrate and low-calorie diet, physical activity, moderate alcohol use, metformin, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2 inhibitors. SGLT-2 inhibitors are the most potent inducers of ketogenesis. They induce profound glycosuria with a consequent shift to fatty acid metabolism and increased ketogenesis. This could potentially explain how SGLT-2 inhibitor empagliflozin lowers cardiovascular mortality and slowers progression of kidney disease. Therefore, we believe that diabetic ketosis in patients with hyperglycemic crisis may be a compensatory mechanism, rather than a complication itself. Further prospective studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  18. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Microvascular Complications of Diabetes

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    Saeed Yadranji Aghdam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is the mainstay of protein quality control which regulates cell cycle, differentiation and various signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic cells. The timely and selective degradation of surplus and/or aberrant proteins by the UPS is essential for normal cellular physiology. Any disturbance, delay or exaggeration in the process of selection, sequestration, labeling for degradation and degradation of target proteins by the UPS will compromise cellular and tissue homeostasis. High blood glucose or hyperglycemia caused by diabetes disrupts normal vascular function in several target organs including the retina and kidney resulting in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR and diabetic nephropathy (DN. We and others have shown that hyperglycemia and oxidative stress modulate UPS activity in the retina and kidney. The majority of studies have focused on the kidney and provided insights into the contribution of dysregulated UPS to microvascular damage in DN. The eye is a unique organ in which a semi-fluid medium, the vitreous humor, separates the neural retina and its anastomosed blood vessels from the semi-solid lens tissue. The complexity of the cellular and molecular components of the eye may require a normal functioning and well tuned UPS for healthy vision. Altered UPS activity may contribute to the development of retinal microvascular complications of diabetes. A better understanding of the molecular nature of the ocular UPS function under normal and diabetic conditions is essential for development of novel strategies targeting its activity. This review will discuss the association of retinal vascular cell UPS activity with microvascular damage in DR with emphasis on alterations of the PA28 subunits of the UPS.

  19. Investigation of role of plasma endothelin in diabetes mellitus patients complicated with angiocardiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Jingbo; Wang Zhihua; Niu Aijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of plasma endothelin in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients complicated with angiocardiopathy. Methods: Plasma endothelin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in 34 diabetics, 27 diabetics complicated with angiocardiopathy and in 30 controls. Results: Plasma endothelin levels in both diabetic groups were significantly higher than those in normal subjects (p < 0.01); plasma endothelin levels in DM patients complicated with angiocardiopathy were significantly higher than those in patients with diabetes only (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Plasma endothelin was of important role in the pathogenesis of DM complicated with angiocardiopathy and could be used as an early and sensitive marker

  20. Diabetes in Mexico: cost and management of diabetes and its complications and challenges for health policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mexico has been experiencing some of the most rapid shifts ever recorded in dietary and physical activity patterns leading to obesity. Diabetes mellitus has played a crucial role causing nearly 14% of all deaths. We wanted to make a comprehensive study of the role of diabetes in terms of burden of disease, prevalence, cost of diabetes, cost of complications and health policy. Method We review the quantitative data that provides evidence of the extent to which the Mexican health economy is affected by the disease and its complications. We then discuss the current situation of diabetes in Mexico with experts in the field. Results There was a significant increase in the prevalence of diabetes from 1994 to 2006 with rising direct costs (2006: outpatient USD$ 717,764,787, inpatient USD$ 223,581,099) and indirect costs (2005: USD$ 177,220,390), and rising costs of complications (2010: Retinopathy USD$ 10,323,421; Cardiovascular disease USD$ 12,843,134; Nephropathy USD$ 81,814,501; Neuropathy USD$ 2,760,271; Peripheral vascular disease USD$ 2,042,601). The health policy focused on screening and the creation of self-support groups across the country. Conclusions The increasing diabetes mortality and lack of control among diagnosed patients make quality of treatment a major concern in Mexico. The growing prevalence of childhood and adult obesity and the metabolic syndrome suggest that the situation could be even worse in the coming years. The government has reacted strongly with national actions to address the growing burden posed by diabetes. However our research suggests that the prevalence and mortality of diabetes will continue to rise in the future. PMID:23374611

  1. Diabetes in Mexico: cost and management of diabetes and its complications and challenges for health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquera, Simon; Campos-Nonato, Ismael; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Lopez-Ridaura, Ruy; Arredondo, Armando; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan

    2013-02-02

    Mexico has been experiencing some of the most rapid shifts ever recorded in dietary and physical activity patterns leading to obesity. Diabetes mellitus has played a crucial role causing nearly 14% of all deaths. We wanted to make a comprehensive study of the role of diabetes in terms of burden of disease, prevalence, cost of diabetes, cost of complications and health policy. We review the quantitative data that provides evidence of the extent to which the Mexican health economy is affected by the disease and its complications. We then discuss the current situation of diabetes in Mexico with experts in the field. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of diabetes from 1994 to 2006 with rising direct costs (2006: outpatient USD$ 717,764,787, inpatient USD$ 223,581,099) and indirect costs (2005: USD$ 177,220,390), and rising costs of complications (2010: Retinopathy USD$ 10,323,421; Cardiovascular disease USD$ 12,843,134; Nephropathy USD$ 81,814,501; Neuropathy USD$ 2,760,271; Peripheral vascular disease USD$ 2,042,601). The health policy focused on screening and the creation of self-support groups across the country. The increasing diabetes mortality and lack of control among diagnosed patients make quality of treatment a major concern in Mexico. The growing prevalence of childhood and adult obesity and the metabolic syndrome suggest that the situation could be even worse in the coming years. The government has reacted strongly with national actions to address the growing burden posed by diabetes. However our research suggests that the prevalence and mortality of diabetes will continue to rise in the future.

  2. Skin Autofluorescence and Complications of Diabetes : Does Ethnic Background or Skin Color Matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, Mohamed; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Graaff, Reindert; Kuipers, Saskia; Smit, Andries J.; Meesters, Eelco W.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Skin autofluorescence (AF) has been associated with complications of diabetes. We evaluated the influence of skin color and ethnicity on the association between skin AF and the presence of diabetes-related complications. Materials and Methods: In a multiethnic type 2 diabetes cohort we

  3. Role of AMPK in Diabetic Cardiovascular Complications: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Nellaiappan, Karthika; Yerra, Veera Ganesh

    2018-05-07

    Macrovascular complications of diabetes like cardiovascular diseases appear to be one of the leading causes of mortality. Current therapies aimed at counteracting the adverse effects of diabetes on cardiovascular system are found to be inadequate. Hence, there is growing need in search of novel targets. Adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is one such promising target, as a plethora of evidences point to its cardioprotective role in pathological milieu like cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis and heart failure. AMPK is a serine-threonine kinase, which gets activated in response to a cellular depriving energy status. It orchestrates cellular metabolic response to energy demand and is, therefore, often referred to as "metabolic master switch" of the cell. In this review, we provide an overview of patho-mechanisms of diabetic cardiovascular disease; highlighting the role of AMPK in the regulation of this condition, followed by a description of extrinsic modulators of AMPK as potential therapeutic tools. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Recurrent diabetic muscle infarction, a rare complication of diabetes: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Bhat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus that presents as a localized, exquisitely painful swelling and limited range of motion of the involved extremity. The onset is usually acute, persists for several weeks and resolves spontaneously over several weeks to months without the need for intervention. However, as diabetes mellitus is an immunocompromised state and any painful swelling in the limbs is often taken as infectious in aetiology, the patient is inadvertently investigated with invasive procedures and is started on unnecessary antibiotics, adding to the burden of management. Keeping in view the low threshold for starting antibiotics in painful limb swelling in diabetes mellitus in our setting, we hereby describe a case of recurrent painful diabetic muscle infarction, first involving the right upper and later the right lower limb, managed with physical rest and analgesics. This case emphasizes that the treating physician keep this rare complication of diabetes mellitus in consideration in the respective clinical scenario and adopt a less aggressive (a noninvasive method like ultrasound rather than a more aggressive (an invasive method like muscle biopsy approach in diagnosis and take a similar approach towards management.

  5. [Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Recommendations from the American Diabetes Association 2011. Prevention and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla Pera, Pilar

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the diseases with greater impact public health, not only because of its high prevalence, but, above all, by the consequences of the chronic complications arising from this disease. Hyperglycemia generates damage both in the field of microcirculation and the great vessels causing injury, macroangiopathies and microangiopathies. Macroangiopathies complications are generated from alterations or injury in the great vessels of the arterial to the most important, being from the clinical point of view, ischemic heart disease, disease stroke and peripheral arterial disease. Microangiopathies complications are due to alterations or injury of small vessels being the most important, from a clinical point of view, nephropathy, retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy. Macroangiopathies complications are generated from alterations or injury in the great vessels of the arterial to the most important, being from the clinical point of view, ischemic heart disease, disease stroke and peripheral arterial disease. Microangiopathies complications are due to alterations or injury of small vessels being the most important, from a clinical point of view, nephropathy, retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Apolipoprotein B level and diabetic microvascular complications ( is there a correlation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N. Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Apo B levels are strongly correlated to diabetic microvascular complications. The higher the degree of nephropathy, the higher the Apo B level. The presence of more than one microvascular complication correlates positively with high levels of Apo B. This suggests the possible use of Apo B as a sensitive biomarker of the presence of early diabetic microvascular complications.

  7. Effects of fenofibrate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic neuropathy

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    Olga Nikolaevna Tkacheva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus (DM that considerably worsens the patients quality of life and reduces life expectancy.The FIELD study for the first time demonstrated the ability of fenofibrate to prevent macro- and microvacular complications in patientswith DM2 regardless of glycated hemoglobin level and dyslipidemia at the early stage of the disease. Neuropathy being a manifestation of microangiopathy,it suggests the possibility to treat this disorder with fenofibrate.Aim. To study effects of fenofibrate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic neuropathy. Materials and methods. The present study included 73 patients with DM2 randomized into 2 groups to receive standard therapy (antihypertensiveand glucose control, statins or fenofibrate (Tricor 145 mg, Solvay Pharma in addition to the standard treatment. Results. Positive effect of fenofibrate on autonomous and peripheral neuropathy was apparent within 6 months after the onset of therapy when thesought parameters of AP, glycemia, and lipid spectrum were achieved. Fenofibrate improved cardiovascular function, reduced cardiac rhythm variability;QT length and dispersion, pain and paresthesia thereby enhancing quality of life and preventing cardiovascular catastrophes including death. Conclusion. It is concluded that supplementation of standard therapy of DM with fenofibrate is both safe and pathogenetically sound.

  8. Microvascular diabetes complications in Wolfram syndrome (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness [DIDMOAD]): an age- and duration-matched comparison with common type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Aline; Molines, Laurent; Valéro, René; Simonin, Gilbert; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique; Vialettes, Bernard

    2007-09-01

    Some previous studies suggested that patients suffering from Wolfram syndrome or DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness) might be relatively preserved from diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. However, these data were not conclusive because either observations were only anecdotic or did not match with control type 1 diabetic populations. A group of 26 French diabetic patients with DIDMOAD was compared with a population of 52 patients with common type 1 diabetes matched for age at diabetes diagnosis (8.62 +/- 1.84 vs. 8.27 +/- 1.30 years; P = NS) and diabetes duration (12.88 +/- 1.58 vs. 12.87 +/- 1.13 years; P = NS) to study the quality of glycemic control and the incidence of microvascular complications. Glycemic control was significantly better in the DIDMOAD group than in the type 1 diabetic group (A1C: 7.72 +/- 0.21 vs. 8.99 +/- 0.25%, respectively; P = 0.002), with significant lower daily insulin requirements (0.71 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.88 +/- 0.04 UI x kg(-1) x day(-1), respectively; P = 0.0325). The prevalence of microvascular complications in the DIDMOAD group was half that observed in the type 1 diabetic group, but the difference was not significant. Diabetes in DIDMOAD patients is more easily controlled despite the presence of other handicaps. This better glycemic control could explain the trend to decreased microvascular diabetes complications observed in previous studies.

  9. Uric acid is not associated with diabetic nephropathy and other complications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilemann-Lyberg, Sascha; Hansen, Tine Willum; Persson, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    pressure (BP) in unadjusted analyses (P lost after adjustment (P ≥ 0.17). UA was higher across...... duration, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, haemoglobin A1c, 24-h pulse pressure, urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and treatment with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers. Results: Of the 676 patients, 372 (55%) were...... decliners (lost after adjustment (P = 0.10). Conclusions: In type 1 diabetes patients, higher UA was associated with lower kidney function and other diabetic complications. The association between higher UA and lower eGFR and lower diastolic BP was independent...

  10. Sarcopenia: a chronic complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trierweiler, Heloísa; Kisielewicz, Gabrielle; Hoffmann Jonasson, Thaísa; Rasmussen Petterle, Ricardo; Aguiar Moreira, Carolina; Zeghbi Cochenski Borba, Victória

    2018-01-01

    Diabetics are at increased risk for impaired mobility and strength, frequently related to the disease control. Sarcopenia is the reduction of muscle mass associated with the decrease in muscle strength and/or performance, resulting in worse morbidity in chronic diseases. The objectives of this paper was to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and determine its association with diabetes characteristics, progression, and complications, as well as changes in bone mineral density. The sample consisted of patients with T2DM followed at the outpatient clinics of the Serviço de Endocrinologia e Metabologia do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná, from March to August 2016. Participants were men and women above 18 years with T2DM diagnosed at least 1 year earlier. Individuals with chronic diseases, users of any drug that modifies body composition, patients with body mass index (BMI) > 35 or < 18 kg/m 2 , and users of illicit drugs or hormonal or nutritional supplementation were excluded. The selected patients answered questionnaires about demographics, eating habits, and disease characteristics, and performed a bone densitometry exam in a dual energy absorptiometry (total body; spine and femur (total and neck)), a handgrip test by manual dynamometer, and an evaluation of the abdominal circumference (AC). The medical records were reviewed seeking diabetes data and laboratory test results. Patients were matched for sex, age, and race with healthy controls [Control Group (CG)]. The diagnosis of sarcopenia was conducted according to the criteria of the Foundation for National Institute of Health. The final sample consisted of 83 patients in the DG and 83 in the CG. The DG had higher BMI, WC, past history of fractures and lower calcium and healthy diet intake (p < 0.005), compared to the CG. The DG presented a higher frequency of abnormal BMD (osteopenia in 45 (53%), and osteoporosis in 14 (19

  11. Dietary sodium intake and incidence of diabetes complications in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: analysis of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study (JDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Chika; Yoshimura, Yukio; Kamada, Chiemi; Tanaka, Shiro; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hanyu, Osamu; Araki, Atsushi; Ito, Hideki; Tanaka, Akira; Ohashi, Yasuo; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Sone, Hirohito

    2014-10-01

    Many guidelines recommend that patients with type 2 diabetes should reduce their dietary sodium intake. However, the relationship between dietary sodium intake and incidence of diabetic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been explored. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between dietary sodium intake and incidence of diabetes complications. The study was of a nationwide cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes aged 40 to 70 years with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥6.5%. After excluding nonresponders to a dietary survey, 1588 patients were analyzed. Baseline dietary intake was assessed by the Food Frequency Questionnaire based on food groups. Primary outcomes were times to cardiovascular disease (CVD), overt nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and all-cause mortality. Mean daily dietary sodium intake in quartiles ranged from 2.8 to 5.9 g. After adjustment for confounders, hazard ratios for CVD in patients in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of sodium intake compared with the first quartile were 1.70 (95% confidence interval, 0.98-2.94), 1.47 (0.82-2.62), and 2.07 (1.21-3.90), respectively (trend P sodium intake was dramatically elevated compared with patients with HbA1c sodium intake. Findings suggested that high dietary sodium intake is associated with elevated incidence of CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes and that there is a synergistic effect between HbA1c values and dietary sodium intake for the development of CVD.

  12. Eye Complications and Markers of Morbidity and Mortality in Long-term Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is rising all over the world. Furthermore, the increased life-expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients is likely to cause a higher number of diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications in the years to come. In order to examine the level of long......-term complications in type 1 diabetes as well as potential markers of micro- and macroangiopathy, a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients was examined in order to achieve the following aims: 1  To evaluate diabetic retinopathy as a long-term marker of all-cause mortality in type 1 diabetes...... (Paper I). 2  To estimate the long-term incidence and associated risk factors of blindness (Paper II) and cataract surgery (Paper III) in type 1 diabetes. 3  To use retinal vascular analyses in order to investigate the associations of long-term micro- and macrovascular complications and retinal vascular...

  13. Metabolic Disorders and Diabetic Complications in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Leprfa Rat: A New Obese Type 2 Diabetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kemmochi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Leprfa (SDT fatty rat, established by introducing the fa allele of the Zucker fatty rat into SDT rat genome, is a new model of obese type 2 diabetes. Both male and female SDT fatty rats show overt obesity, and hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia are observed at a young age as compared with SDT rats. With early incidence of diabetes mellitus, diabetic complications, such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy, in SDT fatty rats were seen at younger ages compared to those in the SDT rats. In this paper, we overview pathophysiological features in SDT fatty rats and also describe new insights regarding the hematology, blood pressure, renal complications, and sexual dysfunction. The SDT fatty rats showed an increase of leukocytes, especially the monocyte count, prominent hypertension associated with salt drinking, end-stage renal disease with aging, and hypogonadism. Unlike other diabetic models, the characteristic of SDT fatty rat is to present an incidence of diabetes in females, hypertension, and retinopathy. SDT fatty rat is a useful model for analysis of various metabolic disorders and the evaluation of drugs related to metabolic disease.

  14. d-limonene ameliorates diabetes and its complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacanlı, Merve; Anlar, Hatice Gül; Aydın, Sevtap; Çal, Tuğbagül; Arı, Nuray; Ündeğer Bucurgat, Ülkü; Başaran, A Ahmet; Başaran, Nurşen

    2017-12-01

    It is known that diabetes causes some complications including alterations in lipid profile, hepatic enzyme levels but also it causes oxidative stress. Limonene, a major component of Citrus oils, has important health beneficial effects in lowering the level of oxidative stress due to its antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of D-limonene on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in Wistar albino rats. For this purpose, DNA damage was evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Changes in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and the levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), total glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), insulin, total bilirubin and BCA protein, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol and triglyceride were also evaluated. D-limonene treatment was found to significantly decrease DNA damage, GR enzyme activities and MDA levels and significantly increase GSH levels and CAT, SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activities and altered lipid and liver enzyme parameters in diabetic rats. According to our results, it seems that D-limonene might have a role in the prevention of the complication of diabetes in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and disability: What is the contribution of diabetes risk factors and diabetes complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, Maryam; Shaw, Jonathan E; Zimmet, Paul Z; Söderberg, Stefan; Koye, Digsu N; Kowlessur, Sudhir; Timol, Maryam; Joonas, Noorjehan; Sorefan, Ameena; Gayan, Praneel; Alberti, K George M M; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Magliano, Dianna J

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between type 2 diabetes and disability in Mauritius and to assess the extent to which the effect of diabetes is explained by diabetes risk factors and concomitant complications. Data from a national survey in the multiethnic nation of Mauritius, which comprises South Asians and African Creoles, were analyzed. Disability was measured using the Katz activities of daily living questionnaire in participants aged >50 years. Among 3692 participants, 487 (13.2%) had some level of disability. Diabetes was associated with significantly higher risk of disability (odds ratio [OR] 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34-2.08). After adjusting for demographic, behavioral, and metabolic factors, as well as comorbidities, disability was significantly associated with diabetes among African Creoles (OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.16-3.56), but not South Asians (OR 1.27; 95% CI 0.98-1.66). Obesity explained much of the association between diabetes and disability (excess percentage of risk: 26.3% in South Asians and 12.1% in African Creoles). Obesity, history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), asthma-like symptoms, and depression together explained 46.5% and 29.0% of the excess risk in South Asians and African Creoles, respectively. Diabetes is associated with a 67% increased risk of disability. Diabetes risk factors and comorbidities explain more of the association between diabetes and disability among South Asians than Africans. Obesity and history of CVD explained the largest percentage of the relationship between diabetes and disability, indicating that weight and CVD management may be helpful in controlling disability related to diabetes. © 2018 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Ethnic differences in glycaemic control and complications: the adult diabetes control and management (ADCM), Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, B H; Mastura, I; Lee, P Y; Wahyu, T Sri; Cheong, A T; Zaiton, A

    2011-08-01

    Ethnicity is an important factor in diabetes care. The understanding of its effect in this country may help to improve diabetes care, glycaemic control and diabetic complication rates. This study was to determine the diabetes control profile in relation to complication rates between the three main ethnics group in Malaysia. This nested cross-sectional study was part of the Audit of Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM), an ongoing cohort patient registry focused on diabetes control and management in the primary care setting in Malaysia. This registry registers all diabetes patients aged 18 years old and above. Demographic data, diabetes duration, treatment modalities, as well as various risk factors and diabetes complications are reported. Data was handled by statisticians using STATA version 9. A total of 20330 patients from 54 health centers were registered at the time of this report. The majority were type 2 diabetics (99.1%) of whom 56.6% were female. The mean age was 57.9 years (SD 11.58). Malay accounted for 56.3%, Chinese 19.5% and Indian 22.5%. There were 30.3% who attained HbA1c profiles. The Chinese diabetics suffer as many diabetes-related complications despite better glycaemic control. Further studies will need to look into other socio-genetic factors in order to provide a more personalized effective diabetes care.

  17. Diabetes technology: improving care, improving patient-reported outcomes and preventing complications in young people with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, P; Tanenbaum, M; Hood, K; Maahs, D M

    2018-04-01

    With the evolution of diabetes technology, those living with Type 1 diabetes are given a wider arsenal of tools with which to achieve glycaemic control and improve patient-reported outcomes. Furthermore, the use of these technologies may help reduce the risk of acute complications, such as severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, as well as long-term macro- and microvascular complications. In addition, diabetes technology can have a beneficial impact on psychosocial health by reducing the burden of diabetes. Unfortunately, diabetes goals are often unmet and people with Type 1 diabetes too frequently experience acute and long-term complications of this condition, in addition to often having less than ideal psychosocial outcomes. Increasing realization of the importance of patient-reported outcomes is leading to diabetes care delivery becoming more patient-centred. Diabetes technology in the form of medical devices, digital health and big data analytics have the potential to improve clinical care and psychosocial support, resulting in lower rates of acute and chronic complications, decreased burden of diabetes care, and improved quality of life. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  18. A 4-year prospective study on long-term complications of type 2 diabetic patients: the Thai DMS diabetes complications (DD.Comp.) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potisat, Somkiat; Krairittichai, Udom; Jongsareejit, Amporn; Sattaputh, Charnvate; Arunratanachote, Woranut

    2013-06-01

    To assess the clinical course of long-term diabetic complications; diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and foot problems in Thai patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes were followed for four years between March 2006 and September 2010. Seven hospitals in all levels of care under the Ministry of Public Health Thailand were included in the present study. A physical examination and a diabetic complications assessment were performed each year during the study period, by physician specialists in the related areas. Among 1,120 patients who participated in the present study, 705 (62.95%) patients completed the 4-year follow-up time. There were 88 (7.86%) patients reported deaths during the present study period. The mean age was 59.14 +/- 10.12 years. The average duration of diabetes was 7.30 +/- 6.14 years. Approximately 57.32% of patients had a family history of diabetes. The average plasma glucose level and HbA1C were 153 to 160 mg/dl and 8.25 to 8.75%. Moreover less than one-fourth of patients had HbA1C below 7%. The prevalence for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy were approximately 23.7% and 38.3%. In addition, more than 15% of patients had diabetic foot problems, loss of protective sensation and pedal pulse deficit. Finally, the incidence rates were 80.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI 69.7, 91.8) for diabetic retinopathy, and 91.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI 78.8, 105.1) for diabetic nephropathy Problems regarding poor diabetes control exist in Thai diabetes patients. It results in high prevalence and incidence of diabetic complications. As such, it is crucial to establish the country's diabetes management plan as well as evaluate the long-term complications in diabetic patients annually, in order for patients to receive the benefits of early treatment and prevent further complications.

  19. Extracts of Magnolia Species-Induced Prevention of Diabetic Complications: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic complications are the major cause of mortality for the patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been recognized as important contributors for the development of many diabetic complications, such as diabetic nephropathy, hepatopathy, cardiomyopathy, and other cardiovascular diseases. Several studies have established the anti-inflammatory and oxidative roles of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark, which has been widely used in the traditional herbal medicines in Chinese society. These findings have attracted various scientists to investigate the effect of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark on diabetic complications. The aim of this review is to present a systematic overview of bioactive constituents in Magnolia bark that induce the prevention of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and diabetic complications, including cardiovascular, liver, and kidney.

  20. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus complications among palestinians with T2DM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Al-Halaweh, Ahmad; Davidovitch, Nadav; Almdal, Thomas Peter

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of microvascular and macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) among Palestinians. METHODS: 1308 diagnosed T2DM attending four main Primary Health Care Clinics on the Southern West Bank of Palestine examined by a Mobile Diabetes Clinic team. All diabetes...

  1. Hepatitis B and C seroprevalence in patients with diabetes mellitus and its relationship with microvascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Gisi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic patients are susceptible to bacterial, viral and fungal infections because of various deficiencies in the immune system. Aim: To investigate a possible link between hepatitis B/C prevalence and microvascular complications as well as duration of diabetes. Material and methods: In total 1263 diabetic patients (1149 type 2, 114 type 1 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 1482 healthy blood donors who were over 40 years old. All diabetic patients were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HCV beside routine laboratory tests. Diabetic patients were divided into three groups according to their diabetes duration, and all of the patients were scanned for microvascular complications. Demographic data of all patients were recorded. Results : HBsAg seropositivity was 3.7% in diabetic patients and 1.08% in the control group; this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001. HBsAg positivity rates in type 1 and type 2 diabetics were 0.8% and 4%, respectively (p = 0.09. HCV seropositivity was 2.2% for diabetics and 0.5% for the control group; this difference was statistically significant (p 0.05. Also, no relationship was found between microvascular complications of diabetes and hepatitis B/C seropositivity. Conclusions : Hepatitis B and C seroprevalence was found to be increased in diabetes mellitus; however, there was no relationship between hepatitis seroprevalence and the duration or microvascular complications of diabetes.

  2. Impact of Diabetic Complications on Balance and Falls: Contribution of the Vestibular System

    OpenAIRE

    D'Silva, Linda J.; Lin, James; Staecker, Hinrich; Whitney, Susan L.; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes causes many complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy, which are well understood as contributing to gait instability and falls. A less understood complication of diabetes is the effect on the vestibular system. The vestibular system contributes significantly to balance in static and dynamic conditions by providing spatially orienting information. It is noteworthy that diabetes has been reported to affect vestibular function in both animal and clinical studies. Pa...

  3. Knowledge of complications of diabetes mellitus among patients visiting the diabetes clinic at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaa Obirikorang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM appears to be a global epidemic and an increasingly major non-communicable disease threatening both affluent and non-affluent society. The study aimed to determine the knowledge of diabetic complications among diabetes mellitus clients visiting the Diabetic Clinical at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana. Method This questionnaire-based descriptive study recruited a total 630 patients visiting the Diabetes Clinic at the Sampa Government Hospital. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information such as socio-demographic and knowledge on complications of diabetes. Results Out of a total of 630 participants, 325 (51.5 % knew diabetic foot as the most common complication followed by hypertension 223(35.4 %, neuropathy 184 (29.2 %, hypoactive sexual arousal 160(25.4 %, arousal disorder 135(21.5 %, eye diseases 112(17.7 %, heart disease 58(9.2 %, and renal disease 34(5.4 %. Comprehensive assessment of level of knowledge on the complications showed that majority 378(60.0 % of T2D patients did not have knowledge on diabetes complications, 169(26.9 % had inadequate knowledge on diabetics complication while 82(13.1 % had adequate knowledge. The risk factors associated with the level of knowledge of diabetic complications were female gender adjusted odd ratio (AOR =2.31 (1.56–3.41 married participants AOR = 3.37 (1.44–7.93, widowed AOR = 2.98 (1.10–8.08, basic level of education AOR =0.18 (0.082–0.50, Junior High School (JHS and above of education level AOR = 0.035(0.017–0.75, 5–9 years of T2D duration AOR = 0.31(0.018–0.57, ≥10 years T2D duration AOR = 0.042 (0.02–0.10 and urban dwellers AOR = 0.36 (0.22–0.68 respectively. Conclusion Participants knew the individual complication of diabetic mellitus but lack an in-depth knowledge on the complications. Further expansion of diabetic educative programs like using mass media and involving national curriculum

  4. Knowledge of complications of diabetes mellitus among patients visiting the diabetes clinic at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Anto, Enoch Odame; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Batu, Emmanuella Nsenbah; Stella, Agyemang Duah; Constance, Omerige; Brenya, Peter Kojo

    2016-07-26

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to be a global epidemic and an increasingly major non-communicable disease threatening both affluent and non-affluent society. The study aimed to determine the knowledge of diabetic complications among diabetes mellitus clients visiting the Diabetic Clinical at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana. This questionnaire-based descriptive study recruited a total 630 patients visiting the Diabetes Clinic at the Sampa Government Hospital. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information such as socio-demographic and knowledge on complications of diabetes. Out of a total of 630 participants, 325 (51.5 %) knew diabetic foot as the most common complication followed by hypertension 223(35.4 %), neuropathy 184 (29.2 %), hypoactive sexual arousal 160(25.4 %), arousal disorder 135(21.5 %), eye diseases 112(17.7 %), heart disease 58(9.2 %), and renal disease 34(5.4 %). Comprehensive assessment of level of knowledge on the complications showed that majority 378(60.0 %) of T2D patients did not have knowledge on diabetes complications, 169(26.9 %) had inadequate knowledge on diabetics complication while 82(13.1 %) had adequate knowledge. The risk factors associated with the level of knowledge of diabetic complications were female gender adjusted odd ratio (AOR) =2.31 (1.56-3.41) married participants AOR = 3.37 (1.44-7.93), widowed AOR = 2.98 (1.10-8.08), basic level of education AOR =0.18 (0.082-0.50), Junior High School (JHS) and above of education level AOR = 0.035(0.017-0.75), 5-9 years of T2D duration AOR = 0.31(0.018-0.57), ≥10 years T2D duration AOR = 0.042 (0.02-0.10) and urban dwellers AOR = 0.36 (0.22-0.68) respectively. Participants knew the individual complication of diabetic mellitus but lack an in-depth knowledge on the complications. Further expansion of diabetic educative programs like using mass media and involving national curriculum of education can improve self-regulatory awareness of

  5. The influence of the telomere-telomerase system on diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi Nan, Wu; Ling, Zhang; Bing, Chen

    2015-06-01

    The telomere-telomerase system plays an important role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of diabetes mellitus as well as in its vascular complications. Recent studies suggest that telomere shortening and abnormal telomerase activity occur in patients with diabetes mellitus, and targeting the telomere-telomerase system has become a prospective treatment for diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. This review highlights the significance of the telomere-telomerase system and supports its role as a possible therapeutic target for patients with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications Areas covered: This review covers the advances in understanding the telomere-telomerase system over the last 30 years and its significance in diabetes mellitus. In addition, it provides knowledge regarding the significance of the telomere-telomerase system in diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications as well as its role and mechanisms in oxidative stress, cell therapy and antioxidant activity Expert opinion: The telomere-telomerase system may be a potential therapeutic target that can protect against DNA damage and apoptosis in patients with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. DNA damage and apoptosis are associated with oxidative stress and are involved in the dysfunction of pancreatic β cells, insulin resistance, and its vascular complications. Abnormalities in the telomere-telomerase system may be associated with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. Therapies targeting telomere-telomerase system, telomerase reverse transcriptase transfection and alterative telomere lengthening must be identified before gene therapy can commence.

  6. Prevalence of micro- and macrovascular diabetes complications at time of type 2 diabetes diagnosis and associated clinical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gedebjerg, Anne; Almdal, Thomas Peter; Berencsi, Klara

    2018-01-01

    enrolled in the prospective Danish Center for Strategic Research in T2D cohort during 2010-2016. We calculated age- and gender-adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) of complications using log-binomial and Poisson regression. RESULTS: In total, 35% (n=2456) T2D patients had diabetic complications around...... diagnosis; 12% (n=828) had microvascular complications, 17% (n=1186) macrovascular complications, and 6% (n=442) had both. HbA1c levels of ≥7% were associated with microvascular complications [HbA1c 7%-8%; aPR: 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.62] but not macrovascular complications [aPR: 0.91, 95......, smoking, elevated CRP levels, and anti-hypertensive therapy. Microvascular complications were associated with high blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, and absence of lipid-lowering therapy. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of patients with T2D had diabetes complications around time of diagnosis. Our findings...

  7. Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications

    OpenAIRE

    Apovian, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Caroline M ApovianMedicine and Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine; Nutrition and Weight Management Center; and Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in...

  8. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child keeps all appointments with them. Having a child with diabetes may seem overwhelming at times, but you're ... It's Important Monitoring Blood Sugar Talking to Your Child About Diabetes When Blood Sugar Is Too High Keeping Track ...

  9. Characterization and comparison of SGLT2 inhibitors: Part 3. Effects on diabetic complications in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Atsuo; Takasu, Toshiyuki; Yokono, Masanori; Imamura, Masakazu; Kurosaki, Eiji

    2017-08-15

    In this study, we investigated and compared the effects of all six sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitors commercially available in Japan on diabetes-related diseases and complications in type 2 diabetic mice. Following 4-week repeated administration to diabetic mice, all SGLT2 inhibitors showed significant improvement in diabetes-related diseases and complications, including obesity; abnormal lipid metabolism; steatohepatitis; inflammation; endothelial dysfunction; and nephropathy. While all SGLT2 inhibitors exerted comparable effects in reducing hyperglycemia, improvement of these diabetes-related diseases and complications was more potent with the two long-acting drugs (ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin) than with the four intermediate-acting four drugs (tofogliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin, and luseogliflozin), albeit without statistical significance. These findings demonstrate that SGLT2 inhibitors alleviate various diabetic pathological conditions in type 2 diabetic mice, and suggest that SGLT2 inhibitors, particularly long-acting drugs, might be useful not only for hyperglycemia but also in diabetes-related diseases and complications, including nephropathy in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute Abdomen in Diabetic Patients – Analysis of Complications and Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejeu Dănuț

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. We aimed to analyze the complications and mortality of acute abdomen cases in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Materials and Method. This observational, retrospective, cohort study was conducted between 2008 - 2011, on a total of 4021 cases with acute abdomen admitted to the Surgical Ward I of the Clinical County Emergency Hospital Oradea. Of these, 488 were diabetic patients and 3533 non-diabetics. Results. Women represented the majority in both groups (62.24% respectively 58.40%. Entero-mesenteric infarction and acute pancreatitis were more common in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetics. Peritonitis was more frequent in non-diabetics, with statistically significant difference (p = 0.0003. In diabetic patients the postoperative morbidity was 36.27%, significantly higher than in non-diabetic patients (14.43%. The mortality was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in nondiabetics (9.84% vs. 5.38%. Average length of stay in Surgical Ward I is 3.8 days. For non-diabetic patients, mean hospitalization for acute abdomen was 5.1 days, and for diabetics 7.8 days. Conclusions. This study showed important differences between diabetics and non-diabetic patients in the clinical evolution, complications, mortality and length of hospitalization.

  11. Potential benefit of (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate for macrovascular complications in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Vascular problems are the most common complications in diabetes. Substantial evidence from epidemiological and pathophysiological studies show that hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for macrovascular complications in patients with diabetes. (--Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the major catechin derived from green tea, is known to exert a variety of cardiovascular beneficial effects. The protective effects of EGCG in diabetes are also evident. However, whether EGCG is beneficial against macrovascular complications that occur in diabetes remains unknown. Our previous studies demonstrated that treatment of EGCG inhibits high glucose-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suppresses high glucose-mediated vascular inflammation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that EGCG might be an effective potential candidate to reduce the macrovascular complications in diabetes.

  12. The Role of High-Density Lipoproteins in Diabetes and Its Vascular Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan K. P. Wong

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Almost 600 million people are predicted to have diabetes mellitus (DM by 2035. Diabetic patients suffer from increased rates of microvascular and macrovascular complications, associated with dyslipidaemia, impaired angiogenic responses to ischaemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, and inflammation. Despite recent treatment advances, many diabetic patients remain refractory to current approaches, highlighting the need for alternative agents. There is emerging evidence that high-density lipoproteins (HDL are able to rescue diabetes-related vascular complications through diverse mechanisms. Such protective functions of HDL, however, can be rendered dysfunctional within the pathological milieu of DM, triggering the development of vascular complications. HDL-modifying therapies remain controversial as many have had limited benefits on cardiovascular risk, although more recent trials are showing promise. This review will discuss the latest data from epidemiological, clinical, and pre-clinical studies demonstrating various roles for HDL in diabetes and its vascular complications that have the potential to facilitate its successful translation.

  13. Prevalence of chronic complications, metabolic control and nutritional intake in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toeller, M; Buyken, A E; Heitkamp, G

    1999-01-01

    and proliferative retinopathy were more common. Persons from the eastern European and the German centres consumed undesirably high amounts of cholesterol, total and saturated fat. Overall, improvements in the prevention, detection and management of diabetes complications in persons with type 1 diabetes......) and chronic diabetes complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiovascular disease) were all considerably more frequent in the eastern European centres. HbA1c was lower in the German centres than in the total EURODIAB cohort or in the north-western European centres, but severe hypoglycaemia......This study compares the prevalence of chronic complications, the quality of metabolic control and the nutritional intake in people with type 1 diabetes in different European regions. The EURODIAB Complications Study included a sample of 3250 European patients with type 1 diabetes stratified...

  14. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Microvascular Complications of Diabetes and Their Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Heckler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a crucial metabolic disease that leads to severe disorders. These include macrovascular complications such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease and microvascular complications including diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Diabetes mellitus, along with its associated organ pathologies, is one of the key problems in today’s medicine. Zebrafish is an upcoming disease model organism in diabetes research. Its glucose metabolism and the pathways of reactive metabolite formation are very similar to those of humans. Moreover, several physiological and pathophysiological pathways that also exist in humans and other mammals have been identified in this species or are currently under intense investigation. Zebrafish offer sophisticated imaging techniques and allow simple and fast genetic and pharmacological approaches with a high throughput. In this review, we highlight achievements and mechanisms concerning microvascular complications discovered in zebrafish, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of zebrafish as a model for studying diabetic complications.

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targher, Giovanni; Lonardo, Amedeo; Byrne, Christopher D

    2018-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and diabetes mellitus are common diseases that often coexist and might act synergistically to increase the risk of hepatic and extra-hepatic clinical outcomes. NAFLD affects up to 70-80% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and up to 30-40% of adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The coexistence of NAFLD and diabetes mellitus increases the risk of developing not only the more severe forms of NAFLD but also chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. Indeed, substantial evidence links NAFLD with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD is also associated with an increased risk of developing microvascular diabetic complications, especially chronic kidney disease. This Review focuses on the strong association between NAFLD and the risk of chronic vascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus, thereby promoting an increased awareness of the extra-hepatic implications of this increasingly prevalent and burdensome liver disease. We also discuss the putative underlying mechanisms by which NAFLD contributes to vascular diseases, as well as the emerging role of changes in the gut microbiota (dysbiosis) in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and associated vascular diseases.

  16. Mitigating micro- and macro-vascular complications of diabetes beginning in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Moore

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Moore1, Justin M Gregory2, Yaa A Kumah-Crystal1, Jill H Simmons11Department of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN, USAAbstract: Diabetes is a chronic disorder, which manifests when insulin levels or resistance to insulin action becomes insufficient to control systemic glucose levels. Although the number of available agents to manage diabetes continues to expand rapidly, the maintenance of euglycemia by individuals with diabetes remains a substantial challenge. Unfortunately, many patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes will ultimately experience diabetes complications. These complications result from the toxic effects of chronic hyperglycemia combined with other metabolic derangements that afflict persons with diabetes. This review will present a comprehensive look at the complications of diabetes, the risk factors for their progression, the mechanistic basis for their development, and the clinical approach to screening for, preventing, and treating these sequelae. In addition, since diabetes is commonly diagnosed in childhood, we will provide a special focus on the care of the adolescent patient.Keywords: diabetes, microvascular, macrovascular, complications, glycemia, pediatric, retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy

  17. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  18. Ethnic differences in mortality, end-stage complications, and quality of care among diabetic patients: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Lanting (Loes); I.M.A. Joung (Inez); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); A.H. Bootsma (Aart)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of ethnic differences in diabetes care on inequalities in mortality and prevalence of end-stage complications among diabetic patients. The following questions were examined: 1) Are there ethnic differences among diabetic patients

  19. Statins and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Complications: A Retrospective Cohort Study of US Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansi, Ishak; Frei, Christopher R; Wang, Chen-Pin; Mortensen, Eric M

    2015-11-01

    Statin use is associated with increased incidence of diabetes and possibly with increased body weight and reduced exercise capacity. Data on the long-term effects of these associations in healthy adults, however, are very limited. In addition, the relationship between these effects and diabetic complications has not been adequately studied. To examine the association between statin use and new-onset diabetes, diabetic complications, and overweight/obesity in a cohort of healthy adults. This was a retrospective cohort study. Subjects were Tricare beneficiaries who were evaluated between October 1, 2003 and March 1, 2012. Patients were divided into statin users and nonusers. We excluded patients who, at baseline, had a preexisting disease indicative of cardiovascular diseases, any positive element of the Charlson comorbidity index (including diabetes mellitus), or life-limiting chronic diseases. Using 42 baseline characteristics, we generated a propensity score to match statin users and nonusers. Outcomes assessed included new-onset diabetes, diabetic complications, and overweight/obesity. A total of 25,970 patients (3982 statin users and 21,988 nonusers) were identified as healthy adults at baseline. Of these, 3351 statins users and 3351 nonusers were propensity score-matched. Statin users had higher odds of new-onset diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.87; 95 % confidence interval [95 % CI] 1.67-2.01), diabetes with complications (OR 2.50; 95 % CI 1.88-3.32), and overweight/obesity (OR 1.14; 95 % CI 1.04-1.25). Secondary and sensitivity analyses demonstrated similar findings. Diabetes, diabetic complications, and overweight/obesity were more commonly diagnosed among statin-users than similar nonusers in a healthy cohort of adults. This study demonstrates that short-term clinical trials might not fully describe the risk/benefit of long-term statin use for primary prevention.

  20. STUDY ON KAP OF OCULAR COMPLICATIONS DUE TO DIABETES AMONG TYPE II DIABETICS VISITING A TERTIARY TEACHING HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Koshy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem worldwide. Diabetic patients are at risk of developing blindness from diabetic retinopathy. While occurrence of diabetic retinopathy cannot be prevented, its complications can be minimized. This requires awareness of the sight-threatening potential of diabetes and the need for regular eye examinations. Aim: To study the knowledge of ocular complications of diabetes, among type II diabetics visiting a tertiary level hospital. Settings and Design: This was a prospective study in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods and Material: This was a questionnaire based study on 350 type II diabetics. All patients were interviewed by the same investigator. Statistical analysis used: The data was analysed using chi square test. Results: With increase in the duration of illness, the awareness about diabetic retinopathy is more. Even though the awareness of the disease increased with increasing duration of the disease, 51.4% of the diabetics did not know how diabetes can affect the eye, 49.7% of diabetics did not know if diabetic retinopathy can be treated and 67.4% had not heard of any treatment modality for diabetic retinopathy. This shows that lack of knowledge about the disease was significant. Conclusions: Prevention of non-communicable disease through increased awareness needs to be the thrust of the effort in resource poor contexts, where the treatment can be prohibitively costly. These measures would help to bring about more awareness and understanding about the disease among the patients and therefore prevent sight-threatening complications by timely intervention and management.

  1. Performance of people with diabetes in the labor market: An empirical approach controlling for complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Beatriz; Cantarero-Prieto, David

    2017-11-01

    This paper introduces a framework for modelling the impact that diabetes has on employment status and wages, improving the existing literature by controlling for diabetes-related complications. Using the last wave of the Spanish National Health Survey, we find that 1710 adults out of the original sample of 36,087 have diabetes, reporting higher rates of unemployment. Our empirical results suggest that persons with diabetes, compared with non-diabetic persons, have poorer labor outcomes in terms of length of unemployment and lower income. However, diabetes is not significantly associated with unemployment probabilities, suggesting that the burden of diabetes on employment is mediated by lifestyle factors and clinical and functional complications. In addition, there are mixed outcomes to this econometric approach, depending on age and gender, among other factors. This interesting finding has several implications for research and policy on strategies to get lower health inequalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of serum lipids in nigerians with type-2 diabetes mellitus complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idogun, E.S.; Unuigbe, E.I.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the serum lipids and lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with complicated type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM): Hypertensive diabetics and diabetic nephropathy. This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 52 type 2 DM patients and 20 healthy controls were studied. The patients' population consisted of 23 normotensive diabetics, 16 hypertensive diabetics and 13 patients with diabetic nephropathy. The serum total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were assayed in patients and controls, using standardized assay methods. The mean serum total cholesterol was higher in patients than controls. The normotensive diabetic patients had the lowest total cholesterol among the patients groups 4.01+-0.82 mmol/L compared to the hypertensive diabetics 6.01+-0.93 mmol/L and the diabetic nephropathy patients 6.90+-1.20 mmol/L, (P <0.0001). The prevalence of dyslipidaemia in the patients was between 25% - 69%, lowest in the normotensive diabetics and highest in the diabetic nephropathy patients. We hope that these findings will draw specific attention to the management of dyslipidaemia in patients with complicated type 2 DM especially diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive diabetics. (author)

  3. Translation, Revision, and Validation of the Diabetes Distress Scale for Indonesian Type 2 Diabetic Outpatients with Various Types of Complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arifin, Bustanul; Perwitasari, Dyah Aryani; Thobari, Jarir At; Cao, Qi; Krabbe, Paul F M; Postma, Maarten J

    OBJECTIVES: To translate, revise, and validate the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS) instrument for Indonesian type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) outpatients with various complications. METHODS: Participants were recruited from four hospitals and two primary health care centers. The study was performed

  4. Translation, adaptation and validation of the diabetes distress scale for Indonesian diabetic outpatients with various types of complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arifin, B.; Perwitasari, D.; Atthobari, J.; Cao, Q.; Krabbe, P.F.; Postma, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To translate, adapt and validate the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS) instrument for Indonesian type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) outpatients with various types of complications. Methods: Participants were recruited from four hospitals and two primary healthcare facilities. The procedure of

  5. Impact of Diabetic Complications on Balance and Falls: Contribution of the Vestibular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J; Lin, James; Staecker, Hinrich; Whitney, Susan L; Kluding, Patricia M

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes causes many complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy, which are well understood as contributing to gait instability and falls. A less understood complication of diabetes is the effect on the vestibular system. The vestibular system contributes significantly to balance in static and dynamic conditions by providing spatially orienting information. It is noteworthy that diabetes has been reported to affect vestibular function in both animal and clinical studies. Pathophysiological changes in peripheral and central vestibular structures due to diabetes have been noted. Vestibular dysfunction is associated with impaired balance and a higher risk of falls. As the prevalence of diabetes increases, so does the potential for falls due to diabetic complications. The purpose of this perspective article is to present evidence on the pathophysiology of diabetes-related complications and their influence on balance and falls, with specific attention to emerging evidence of vestibular dysfunction due to diabetes. Understanding this relationship may be useful for screening (by physical therapists) for possible vestibular dysfunction in people with diabetes and for further developing and testing the efficacy of interventions to reduce falls in this population. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  6. Protein Modifications as Manifestations of Hyperglycemic Glucotoxicity in Diabetes and Its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and its complications are hyperglycemic toxicity diseases. Many metabolic pathways in this array of diseases become aberrant, which is accompanied with a variety of posttranslational protein modifications that in turn reflect diabetic glucotoxicity. In this review, we summarize some of the most widely studied protein modifications in diabetes and its complications. These modifications include glycation, carbonylation, nitration, cysteine S-nitrosylation, acetylation, sumoylation, ADP-ribosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, and succination. All these posttranslational modifications can be significantly attributed to oxidative stress and/or carbon stress induced by diabetic redox imbalance that is driven by activation of pathways, such as the polyol pathway and the ADP-ribosylation pathway. Exploring the nature of these modifications should facilitate our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of diabetes and its associated complications.

  7. The Genetic Landscape of Renal Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholm, Niina; Van Zuydam, Natalie; Ahlqvist, Emma

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of ESRD. Despite evidence for a substantial heritability of diabetic kidney disease, efforts to identify genetic susceptibility variants have had limited success. We extended previous efforts in three dimensions, examining a more comprehensive set of genetic variants...

  8. Correlation of serum angiogenin level with various vascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa F. Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    As angiogenin is one of most powerful angiogenic factors, we recommend further studies to evaluate the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic value of angiogenin in various microangiopathic and cardiovascular complications of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Skin autofluorescence : A tool to identify type 2 diabetic patients at risk for developing microvascular complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, E.sther G.; Lutgers, Helen L.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Graaff, R.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Smit, Andries J.; Gans, Reinold; Bilo, Henk J.

    OBJECTIVE - Skin auto fluorescence is a noninvasive measure of the level of tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products, representing cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress. Recent studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as

  10. Prophylactic role of taurine and its derivatives against diabetes mellitus and its related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Poulami; Basak, Priyanka; Ghosh, Sumit; Kundu, Mousumi; Sil, Parames C

    2017-12-01

    Taurine is a conditionally essential amino acid present in the body in free form. Mammalian taurine is synthesized in the pancreas via the cysteine sulfinic acid pathway. Anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation are two main properties through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Many studies have shown its excellent therapeutic potential against diabetes mellitus and related complications like diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, hematological dysfunctions, reproductive dysfunctions, liver and pancreas related complications etc. Not only taurine, a number of its derivatives have also been reported to be important in ameliorating diabetic complications. The present review has been aimed to describe the importance of taurine and its derivatives against diabetic metabolic syndrome and related complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Subhuman Primate Pregnancy Complicated by Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Daniel H.; Chez, Ronald A.; Hutchinson, Donald L.

    1972-01-01

    streptozotocin-treated pregnancies. These data provide evidence that maternal glucose intolerance during pregnancy is associated with enhanced fetal and neonatal pancreatic islet cell responsiveness to glucose and mixed amino acids. Although the specific mechanism(s) that alters both the sensitivity and responsiveness of the normal pancreatic fetal islet to insulinogenic stimuli remains unclear, the data do indicate that insulin-dependent maternal hyperglycemia and hyperaminoacidemia, separately or in combination could contribute to the fetal hyperinsulinemia of pregnancies complicated by diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the overall experiences with these streptozotocin-treated animals suggest that a subhuman primate model may be available to examine directly the antenatal pathophysiology of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:4259254

  12. Is the Proportion of Carbohydrate Intake Associated with the Incidence of Diabetes Complications?—An Analysis of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Horikawa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate proportions of macronutritional intake have been controversial in medical nutritional therapy for diabetes, and evidence of the effects of carbohydrate consumption on diabetes complications in prospective settings is sparse. We investigated the relationships between proportions of carbohydrate intake as the % of total energy and diabetes complications in a nationwide cohort of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes aged 40–70 years with hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%. The analysis was of 1516 responders to a baseline dietary survey assessed by the Food Frequency Questionnaire based on food groups. Primary outcomes were times to overt nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and cardiovascular disease (CVD after 8 years. Hazard ratios (HRs for proportions of carbohydrate intake were estimated by Cox regression adjusted for confounders. High carbohydrate intake was significantly related to higher intakes of grain, fruits, and sweets/snacks and lower intakes of soybean and soy products, vegetables, seaweed, meat and processed meat, fish and processed fish, eggs, milk and dairy products, oil, and alcoholic beverages. During the eight-year follow-up, there were 81, 275, and 129 events of overt nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and CVD, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, HRs for complications in patients with carbohydrate intake in the second or third tertiles (51.0%–56.4% and ≥56.5%, respectively compared with carbohydrate intake in the first tertile (<50.9%, referent were analyzed. No significant associations were shown in the second and third tertiles relative to first tertile (overt nephropathy: 1.05 (95% Confidence Interval, 0.54–2.06 and 0.98 (0.40–2.44; diabetic retinopathy: 1.30 (0.90–1.88 and 1.30 (0.78–2.15; and CVD: 0.95 (0.55–1.63 and 1.37 (0.69–2.72. By exploring potentially nonlinear relationships, trends for the incidence of diabetes complications according to proportions of carbohydrate intake were not

  13. Cardiovascular disease risk profile and microvascular complications of diabetes: comparison of Indigenous cohorts with diabetes in Australia and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maple-Brown Louise J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous populations of Australia and Canada experience disproportionately high rates of chronic disease. Our goal was to compare cardiovascular (CVD risk profile and diabetes complications from three recent comprehensive studies of diabetes complications in different Indigenous populations in Australia and Canada. Methods We compared participants from three recent studies: remote Indigenous Australians (2002-2003, n = 37 known diabetes, urban Indigenous Australians (2003-2005, n = 99 known diabetes, and remote Aboriginal Canadians (2001-2002, n = 188 known diabetes. Results The three groups were similar for HbA1c, systolic BP, diabetes duration. Although leaner by body-mass-index criteria, remote Indigenous Australians displayed a more adverse CVD risk profile with respect to: waist-hip-ratio (1.03, 0.99, 0.94, remote Indigenous Australians, urban Indigenous Australians, remote Canadians, p Conclusions Although there are many similarities in diabetes phenotype in Indigenous populations, this comparison demonstrates that CVD risk profiles and diabetes complications may differ among groups. Irrespective, management and intervention strategies are required from a young age in Indigenous populations and need to be designed in consultation with communities and tailored to community and individual needs.

  14. DiabCare survey of diabetes management and complications in the Gulf countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamed Shahed Omar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the status of diabetes control and complications, and the quality of diabetes management in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates, and to obtain an insight into the relationship between these factors.Methods: Patients with diabetes for>12 months were enrolled from specialist clinics and general hospitals. All available data from the patients' medical files including patient demographics; glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure status; diabetes-related complications; and diabetes management were recorded in data collection forms and analyzed.Results: Overall, 1290 patients with diabetes were enrolled with a mean (±standard deviation age of 49.4 ± 12.3 years and duration of diabetes of 8.7 ± 5.9 years. Glycemic control was poor: Mean glycated hemoglobin A1cof 8.3 ± 2.0%, fasting and postprandial plasma glucose levels of 155.9 ± 57.1 mg/dL (8.7 ± 3.2 mmol/L, and 218.2 ± 87.4 mg/dL (12.1 ± 4.9 mmol/L, respectively. Diabetes-related complications such as neuropathy (34.9% of patients, background retinopathy (29.9%, and cataract (14.1% were common. Cardiovascular complications were reported in <10% of patients, and microalbuminuria was detected in 34.4% of patients. Oral antidiabetic drug (OAD monotherapy (43.3% was the most common treatment, followed by insulin + OADs (39.3% and insulin monotherapy (17.6%. Conclusion: The status of diabetes care was found to be suboptimal. Further improvements in diabetes management are necessary to prevent or delay the development of diabetes-related complications.

  15. Does osteoprotegerin relate to micro- and macrovascular complications in long-term type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Jakob; Rasmussen, Lars M; Green, Anders

    2010-01-01

    was 1257 pg/ml (range 379-5706 pg/ml). In univariate analyses, OPG was related to age, duration of diabetes, female gender, nephropathy and inversely to diastolic blood pressure. In an age- and sex-adjusted model, higher levels of OPG were associated with a higher risk of nephropathy (OR 2.54, 95......Abstract Purpose. Markers of micro- and macrovascular disease are needed in type 1 diabetes in order to identify patients at risk of severe complications. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is expressed in vascular myocytes, and increasing levels have been reported in type 1 diabetes. Consequently, we...... investigated OPG as a non-invasive marker of micro- and macrovascular complications in long-term type 1 diabetic patients. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study of 200 type 1 diabetic patients with long diabetes duration from a population-based cohort from Fyn County, Denmark. Patients were examined...

  16. Predictions of type 2 diabetes and complications in Greenland in 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Nina; Jørgensen, Marit E; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    population in 2014. RESULTS: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was not predicted to increase by 2014 under the 1st assumption. It was predicted to increase from 11% to 23% for women, but not for men under the 2nd assumption. Approximately half of the cases of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk......OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to predict the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the associated burden to the health care system in Greenland posed by diabetic complications by 2014. The predictions were based on changes in demographic variables and obesity. STUDY DESIGN: Projection...... 2 diabetes was predicted under these assumptions and based on the observed association between BMI and type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of complications was estimated using the 2nd assumption, as was the prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and stroke in the non-diabetic...

  17. Presence of diabetic microvascular complications does not incrementally increase risk of ischemic stroke in diabetic patients with atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Annie Y.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chao, Tze-Fan; Wang, Kang-Ling; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conventional stroke risk prediction tools used in atrial fibrillation (AF) incorporate the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor. However, it is unknown whether this risk is homogenous or dependent on the presence of diabetic microvascular complications, such as diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The present study examined the risk of ischemic stroke in diabetic patients with and without microvascular complications. The present study used the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan with detailed healthcare data on all-comers to the Taiwanese medical system from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2011. AF and DM were identified when listed as discharge diagnoses or confirmed more than twice in the outpatient department. Patients on antithrombotic agents were excluded. The clinical endpoint was ischemic stroke. Among the 50,180 AF patients with DM, the majority had no microvascular complications (72.7%), while 2.6% had diabetic retinopathy, 8.4% had diabetic nephropathy, and 16.1% had diabetic neuropathy. Ischemic stroke occurred in 6003 patients, with a 4.74% annual risk of ischemic stroke. When compared with DM patients without microvascular complications, those with diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy had higher incidences of ischemic stroke (4.65 vs 5.07, 4.77, or 5.20 per 100 person-years, respectively). However, after adjusting for confounding factors, the differences were no longer significant. In a large nationwide AF cohort with DM, risk of ischemic stroke was similar between patients with and without microvascular complications, suggesting that risk stratification of these patients does not require inclusion of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. PMID:27399075

  18. Homeostatic effect of laughter on diabetic cardiovascular complications: The myth turned to fact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldein, Mohamed H; Eid, Assaad A

    2018-01-01

    Laughter has been used for centuries to alleviate pain in morbid conditions. It was not until 1976 that scientists thought about laughter as a form of therapy that can modulate hormonal and immunological parameters that affect the outcome of many serious diseases. Moreover, laughter therapy was shown to be beneficial in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by delaying the onset of many diabetic complications. Laughter is also described to influence the cardiovascular and endothelial functions and thus may protect against diabetic cardiovascular complications. In this review, we outline the different biochemical, physiological and immunological mechanisms by which laughter may influence the overall state of wellbeing and enhance disease prognosis. We also focus on the biological link between laughter therapy and diabetic cardiovascular complications as well as the underlying mechanisms involved in T2DM. Reviewing all the essential databases for "laughter" and "type 2 diabetes mellitus". Although laughter therapy is still poorly investigated, recent studies show that laughter may retard the onset of diabetic complications, enhance cardiovascular functions and rectify homeostatic abnormalities associated with T2DM. Laughter therapy is effective in delaying diabetic complications and should be used as an adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Emerging Trends On Drug Delivery Strategy of Momordica charantia against Diabetes and its Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thent, Zar Chi; Das, Srijit; Zaidun, Nurul Hannim

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus has increased drastically over the past few decades. This oxidant-antioxidant imbalance resulting in complication of diabetes mellitus includes macro- and microvascular complications. Resistance to conventional treatment and patient compliance has paved the way to the usage of effective natural products and supplements. Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) is widely consumed in many parts of Malaysia as a vegetable. Momordica charantia (MC) is mainly used in the management of diabetes mellitus. The present review discusses the literature concerning the antidiabetic and antioxidant properties of MC focusing on the complication of diabetes mellitus along with its mode of delivery. We found that among the whole part of MC, its fruit extract has been widely studied, therapeutically. The evidence based analysis of the beneficiary effects of MC on the different organs involved in diabetes complication is also highlighted. This review elucidated an essential understanding of MC based drug delivery system in both clinical and experimental studies and appraised the great potential of the protein based MC extract against diabetes mellitus. The review paper is believed to assist the researchers and medical personnel in treating diabetic associated complications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Relation between BMI and diabetes mellitus and its complications among US older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Natallia; Picone, Gabriel; Sloan, Frank; Yashkin, Arseniy

    2015-01-01

    This study examined relations between elevated body mass index (BMI) and time to diagnosis with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications among older adults in the United States. Data came from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, 1991-2010. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess relations between excess BMI at the first Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey interview and time to diabetes mellitus diagnosis, complications, and insulin dependence among Medicare beneficiaries, older than 65 years of age with no prior diabetes mellitus diagnosis, and who were not enrolled in Medicare Advantage (N = 14,657). Among individuals diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus, elevated BMIs were associated with a progressively higher risk of complications from diabetes mellitus. For women with a BMI ≥40, the risk of insulin dependence (hazard ratio [HR] 3.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.36-5.39) was twice that for women with 25 ≤ BMI diabetes mellitus. For men, the increased risk of these complications occurred at higher BMI levels than in women. Ocular complications occurred at higher BMI levels than other complication types in both men and women.

  1. Performance of people with diabetes in the labor market : An empirical approach controlling for complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Beatriz; Cantarero-Prieto, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for modelling the impact that diabetes has on employment status and wages, improving the existing literature by controlling for diabetes-related complications. Using the last wave of the Spanish National Health Survey, we find that 1710 adults out of the original

  2. Diagnostic values for skin temperature assessment to detect diabetes-related foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Prijs, Miranda; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, C.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Skin temperature assessment is a promising modality for early detection of diabetic foot problems, but its diagnostic value has not been studied. Our aims were to investigate the diagnostic value of different cutoff skin temperature values for detecting diabetes-related foot complications such as

  3. Blood and plasma viscosity in diabetes: possible contribution to late organ complications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, N. H.; van Arkel, E. C.; Hardeman, M. R.; Bilo, H. J.; Michels, R. P.; Vreeken, J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been postulated that an increased whole blood and plasma viscosity contribute to diabetic organ complications. Blood viscosity was measured in 30 controls and four groups of insulin-dependent diabetic patients at three shear rates: 70 sec-1, 0.5 sec-1 and 0.05 sec-1. Results were compared

  4. Preventive effects of benfotiamine in chronic diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Rana; Chen, Megan; Liu, Weihua; Chen, Shali

    2011-04-07

    Aims/Introduction:  In diabetes, increased oxidative stress as a result of damage to the electron transport chain can lead to tissue injury through upregulation of multiple vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix proteins. Benfotiamine, a lipid soluble thiamine derivative, through reducing mitochondrial superoxide production, blocks multiple pathways leading to tissue damage in hyperglycemia. We investigated if treatment with benfotiamine can prevent diabetes-induced production of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix proteins, and whether such effects are tissue-specific. We also examined whether effects of benfotiamine are mediated through a nuclear mechanism.   Retinal, renal and cardiac tissues from the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were examined after 4 months of follow up. mRNA levels were quantified using real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels were quantified using western blot and ELISA. Cellular expressions of 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of nuclear DNA damage and Phospho-H2AX were also examined.   Diabetic animals showed hyperglycemia, glucosuria, increased urinary albumin/creatine ratio and loss of bodyweight. In the kidneys, heart and retina, diabetes caused increased production of endothelin-1, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor and augmented extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin [FN] and its splice variant extradomain B containing FN), along with evidence of structural alterations, characteristic of diabetes-induced tissue damage. Such changes were prevented by benfotiamine. Furthermore, benfotiamine prevented diabetes-induced oxidative DNA damage and upregulation of p300, a histone acetylator and a transcription coactivator.   Data from the present study suggest that benfotiamine is effective in preventing tissue damage in diabetes and at the transcriptional level such effects are mediated through prevention of p300 upregulation. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040

  5. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2012-02-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  6. Charcot-marie-tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2011-07-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  7. The Protective Effect of Antioxidants Consumption on Diabetes and Vascular Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes is generally accompanied by a chronic state of oxidative stress, disequilibrium in the redox balance, implicated in the development and progression of complications such as micro- and macro-angiopathies. Disorders in the inner layer of blood vessels, the endothelium, play an early and critical role in the development of these complications. Blunted endothelium-dependent relaxation and/or contractions are quietly associated to oxidative stress. Thus, preserving endothelial function and oxidative stress seems to be an optimization strategy in the prevention of vascular complications associated with diabetes. Diet is a major lifestyle factor that can greatly influence the incidence and the progression of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications. The notion that foods not only provide basic nutrition but can also prevent diseases and ensure good health and longevity is now attained greater prominence. Some dietary and lifestyle modifications associated to antioxidative supply could be an effective prophylactic means to fight against oxidative stress in diabesity and complications. A significant benefit of phytochemicals (polyphenols in wine, grape, teas, vitamins (ascorbate, tocopherol, minerals (selenium, magnesium, and fruits and vegetables in foods is thought to be capable of scavenging free radicals, lowering the incidence of chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in diabetes and complications, highlight the endothelial dysfunction, and examine the impact of antioxidant foods, plants, fruits, and vegetables, currently used medication with antioxidant properties, in relation to the development and progression of diabetes and cardiovascular complications.

  8. Cardiac, renal and vascular complications in the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zanchetti

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes has long been known to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes have also been shown to benefit more from antihypertensive therapy than do non-diabetics with hypertension. The benefits of aggressive antihypertensive therapy are reflected in the recent reduction of blood pressure (BP targets in international guidelines. Drugs acting on the reninangiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS have well-documented efficacy, and results from large-scale trials with highly selective angiotensin II (Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs, such as valsartan, are awaited. The VALUE trial will provide the largest body of information yet on the comparative benefits of using an ARB or calcium channel blocker in hypertensive patients with diabetes.

  9. [The changes of serum angiotensin converting enzyme activity in Type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Qu, S; Zhang, Y; Deng, J; Li, J; Zhou, J

    2000-09-01

    This investigation was made with reference to the changes of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) activity in type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications. SACE activity was studied in 127 type 2 diabetic patients and 90 healthy persons by using a spectrophotometric assay. The results showed SACE activity was obviously higher in diabetic patients (459.51 +/- 175.85 U) than in healthy persons (321.14 +/- 121.27 U); SACE activity was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy (548.27 +/- 166.60 U) than in patients without diabetic nephropathy (383.2 +/- 139.00 U), but there was no difference between patients with microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria; no statistical difference was detected in SACE activity between diabetic patients with diabetic retinopathy (465.64 +/- 178.93 U) and without retinopathy (449.07 +/- 170.04 U); SACE activity was not associated with the course of diabetes, blood pressure, blood lipid and blood glucose. These data suggest that raised SACE activity might only play a role in the initiation of type 2 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy, but not relate to the progress of diabetic nephropathy, the onset of diabetic retinopathy and hypertension.

  10. Genetic Determinants of Macrovascular Complications and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Yazdanpanah (Mojgan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEvidence is accumulating that there is a genetic predisposition for the development of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes. There is a large variation in the risk and onset of complication in patients, which may partly be explained by genetic susceptibility. Most likely

  11. The Possible Role of Flavonoids in the Prevention of Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Testa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease that affects many metabolic pathways. It is associated with insulin resistance, impaired insulin signaling, β-cell dysfunction, abnormal glucose levels, altered lipid metabolism, sub-clinical inflammation and increased oxidative stress. These and other unknown mechanisms lead to micro- and macro-complications, such as neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Based on several in vitro animal models and some human studies, flavonoids appear to play a role in many of the metabolic processes involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review, we seek to highlight the most recent papers focusing on the relationship between flavonoids and main diabetic complications.

  12. How to reduce avoidable admissions due to acute diabetes complications?: interrelation between primary and specialized attention in a diabetes unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Talavera Espín, N V; López-Ruiz, A; Nuñez Sánchez, Ma Á; Meoro Avilés, A; Sánchez Cañizares, C; Romero López-Reinoso, H; López Olivar, Ma D; Lapaz Jorge, Ma Á; Guirao Sastre, J Ma; San Eustaquio Tudanca, F; Soriano Palao, J

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a serious health problem. In the year 2030 it will affect 366 million people around the world. Evaluate the effectiveness of a mixed intervention and reducing the amount and seriousness of acute complications in diabetics from our Health Area. Protocols of action as well as information documents were produced. Diabetes Unit coordinated educational activities in the different support levels of the Area VII of Murcia. Information talks were provided for the people in charge of the Diabetes Unit in every Care Center and Service of the Health Area. Personalized training was provided for patients treated in the different Care levels. The study comprised three stages. Information leaflets were spread and talks offered to the patient regarding in house handling of hypo and hyper glycemia. A reduction of 39% of the emergencies due to acute non complicated diabetes was achieved, as well as a reduction of 47.6% of hospital admissions. There was a reduction of 67.8% of the amount of total hospital stays for the group of patients under 35 years who were admitted into the hospital due to type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus that didn't show any complications (GRD295). There was a reduction of more than thirty percent in the emergencies due to acute decompensations in the disease and a significant reduction in the avoidable hospital stays in the young adult, thus improving the patients' life quality and reducing the social cost of the diabetic patient.

  13. Functional food supplements to ameliorate the secondary complications in high fructose fed diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gite, S S; Yadav, S A; Nilegaonkar, S S; Agte, V V

    2017-05-24

    Functional foods are the most natural and safest source of health ingredients, providing health benefits beyond basic nutrition, and hence can be used as supplements for the prevention of secondary complications in diabetes. Persistent diabetes may cause glycation of various tissue proteins such as of those in lens, kidney, blood, and brain, which may further lead to the development of pathological conditions such as cataract and cardiovascular diseases. This study on adult rats was designed to assess if the functional food supplements A and B (proprietary blends of antioxidant rich plant materials) can reduce secondary complications such as cataract, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress under severe diabetic conditions. After nine weeks of intervention of the supplements, it was found that the % HbA1c levels in the formulation group B significantly (p functional foods in the effective management of secondary complications associated with severe diabetic conditions.

  14. Retinal vessel calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Hodgson, L; Kawasaki, R

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between retinal vascular calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications in a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 208 long-surviving type 1 diabetic...... and a standardised protocol. Associations between retinal vascular calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications were examined after adjusting for confounding clinical characteristics. RESULTS: Retinal photographs were gradable for 188 of 208 patients (90.3%). The median age and duration of diabetes...... in CRAE), but not neuropathy (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.70-1.71, per SD decrease in CRAE). Retinal venular calibre was not associated with any micro- or macrovascular complications. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In type 1 diabetic patients, retinal arteriolar narrowing is associated with nephropathy...

  15. Heat Shock Proteins in Vascular Diabetic Complications: Review and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bellini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a large family of proteins highly conserved throughout evolution because of their unique cytoprotective properties. Besides assisting protein refolding and regulating proteostasis under stressful conditions, HSPs also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Therefore, HSPs are crucial in counteracting the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in target organs of diabetes vascular complications. Changes in HSP expression have been demonstrated in diabetic complications and functionally related to hyperglycemia-induced cell injury. Moreover, associations between diabetic complications and altered circulating levels of both HSPs and anti-HSPs have been shown in clinical studies. HSPs thus represent an exciting therapeutic opportunity and might also be valuable as clinical biomarkers. However, this field of research is still in its infancy and further studies in both experimental diabetes and humans are required to gain a full understanding of HSP relevance. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and discuss future perspective.

  16. Late Diabetic Complications in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes who Received Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Mikhaylovna Glazunova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate late diabetic complications in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM who received simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK.Materials and Methods. The study included 16 patients with T1DM who received SPK. All patients underwent clinical examination and diagnostic investigation.Results. After SPK, 93.75% of the patients had a functioning pancreas transplant, and 100% had a functioning kidney transplant within 4–48 months [mean 21 months (10 is revealed; 36. All patients had euglycaemia according to daily monitoring. The mean level of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c before surgery was 9.1% (range 8.7%–11% and was 5.7% after surgery (5.55%–5.9%; p < 0.0001. The baseline level of insulin was 12.5 μIU/ml (11.4–15.3 μIU/ml and the baseline level of C-peptide was 2.02 ng/ml (1.07–2.77 ng/ml. Normal renal function was observed (glomerular filtration rate 76 ml/min/1.73 m2 (68–90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Other laboratory findings included haemoglobin 127 g/l (120–130 g/l, serum parathyroid hormone 77.5 pg/ml (61–85 pg/ml, serum phosphate 1.2 mmol/l (1.07–1.3 mmol/l and blood pressure 110(100–120/70(64–80 mmHg. In 37.5% of the patients, vitrectomy and additional laser panretinal photocoagulation were performed for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Other ophthalmological disorders included newly diagnosed cataract (81.25%, secondary cataract (25% that required YAG discission in three patients, glaucoma (25% and macular oedema (12.5%. Ulcers of the lower extremities were observed in 31.25% of the patients, and chronic osteoarthropathy was observed in four. One patient underwent amputation of index and ring fingers and resection of the first and third metatarsal heads to treat osteomyelitis. One patient underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting for advanced atherosclerotic stenosis of blood vessels of the lower extremities.Conclusions. Euglycaemia and recovery of renal function

  17. Periodontal disease and type I diabetes mellitus: Associations with glycemic control and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajita Meenawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate periodontal health status in patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and to establish a correlation between metabolic control and periodontal health status. Materials and Methods: Periodontal health parameters namely plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were recorded in 28 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and 20 healthy controls. Diabetes history was recorded based on the information provided by the physician and it included date of diagnosis, duration, age of diagnosis, latest values of glycosylated haemoglobin and existing diabetic complications. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between periodontal parameters and degree of metabolic control, the duration of the disease and the appearance of complications. Results: The periodontal health in the diabetic group was compromised and they had greater bleeding index (P < 0.001, probing pocket depth (P < 0.001 and clinical attachment level (P = 0.001. Patients diagnosed for diabetes for shorter duration of time (4-7 years showed bleeding index-disease severity correlation to be 1.760 ΁ 0.434. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and periodontal inflammation is greatly increased in subjects with longer disease course, poor metabolic control and diabetic complications.

  18. The Catalase –262C/T Promoter Polymorphism and Diabetic Complications in Caucasians with Type 2 Diabetes

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    Kátia Gonçalves dos Santos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalase is a central antioxidant enzyme constituting the primary defense against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether the functional –262C/T polymorphism in the promoter of catalase gene is associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR, diabetic nephropathy (DN and ischemic heart disease (IHD in 520 Caucasian-Brazilians with type 2 diabetes. The –262C/T polymorphism was also examined in 100 Caucasian blood donors. Patients underwent a clinical and laboratory evaluation consisting of a questionnaire, physical examination, assessment of diabetic complications and laboratory tests. Genotype analysis was performed using the polymerase chain reaction followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. The genotype and allele frequencies of the –262C/T polymorphism in patients with type 2 diabetes were very similar to those of blood donors (T allele frequency = 0.20 and 0.18, respectively. Likewise, there were no differences in either genotype or allele frequencies between type 2 diabetic patients with or without DR, DN or IHD. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis that the –262C/T polymorphism is related to the development of DR, DN or IHD in patients with type 2 diabetes. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the role of catalase gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications.

  19. Male Reproductive Complications of Diabetes Mellitus and Possible

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Objective: Male reproductive dysfunction and subsequent infertility are major complications that are becoming .... pancreatic â-islet cells, while NIDDM is usually as a result of a ... the endocrine control of spermatogenesis, it was concluded that ...

  20. Analysis of serum from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication using surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H. W.; Yan, X. L.; Dong, R. X.; Ban, G.; Li, K.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we show surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of serums from type II diabetes mellitus and diabetic complication (coronary disease, glaucoma and cerebral infarction), and analyze the SERS through the multivariate statistical methods of principal component analysis (PCA). In particular, we find that there exist many adenines in these serums, which maybe come from DNA (RNA) damage. The relative intensity of the band at 725±2 cm-1 assigned to adenine is higher for patients than for the healthy volunteers; therefore, it can be used as an important ‘fingerprint’ in order to diagnose these diseases. It is also shown that serums from type II diabetes mellitus group, diabetic complication group and healthy volunteers group can be discriminated by PCA.

  1. Diabetic complications do not hamper improvement of health-related quality of life over the course of treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, Volkert; Thorsen, Hanne; Holstein, Per E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic complications, and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), are associated with low health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated whether the presence of diabetic complications also influenced the improvement of HRQoL during DFU treatment. Methods: 1088 patients presenting...

  2. Ovarian markers and irregular menses among women with type 1 diabetes in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C; Miller, R S; Braffett, B H; Pan, Y; Arends, V L; Saenger, A K; Barnie, A; Sarma, A V

    2018-03-01

    Women with type 1 diabetes have increased risk of infertility compared to women without diabetes even after adjustment for irregular menses, but aetiologies are incompletely understood. Our aim was to examine the prevalence of abnormalities in ovarian markers consistent with polycystic ovary syndrome in women with type 1 diabetes and associations with irregular menses and diabetes-specific variables. We conducted a secondary analysis of women in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (DCCT/EDIC), a randomized trial and observational follow-up of intensive insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes. We included women with anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) measurements among women not using oral contraceptives (n = 187). Initial AMH and testosterone measures were performed between EDIC years 1 and 4. History of irregular menses was assessed annually. The median age of women was 35 (interquartile ratio 29, 40) years; 133 (35%) had elevated AMH and 62 (17%) reported irregular menses. Twelve per cent of women had relative elevations in total testosterone. In multivariable models, lower insulin dosages were associated with higher AMH concentrations (P = .0027), but not diabetes duration, glycemic control, body mass index or irregular menses. Neither irregular menses nor diabetes-specific variables were associated with testosterone concentrations. Among women with type 1 diabetes in their thirties, abnormalities in ovarian markers are common and not associated with irregular menses and thus may partially account for decreased fecundity in women with type 1 diabetes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Diabetes insipidus - a rare complication of major flame burn: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes insipidus is a syndrome characterised by polyuria which is associated with urinary frequency, enuresis, nocturia and polydipsia. We present this case to highlight the significant role of high degree of clinical suspicion and interdisciplinary management resulting in a rewarding outcome in a limited ...

  4. A Descriptive Study Of Foot Complications In Diabetic Patients With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most frequent symptoms of peripheral neuropathy were numbness or tingling sensation in (65.6%), cramps, aches and fatigue (14.1%) respectively, and burning sensation (10.9%). Dry skin, hyperpigmentation, corns and callosities, cracked skin and fungal infections were the most frequent lesions seen in diabetic ...

  5. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, C.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Bus, Sicco A.

    Background: Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the

  6. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability

  7. Bilirubin levels determine vascular complications in diabetes mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu V Pankratova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по материалам статьи Katsiki N, Karagiannis A, Mikhailidis DP. Diabetes, bilirubin and amputations: is there a link? Diabetologia. DOI 10.1007/s00125-013-2840-1

  8. An investigation into diabetic patients’ knowl-edge of diabetes and its ocular complications in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Clarke-Farr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a study which  evaluated  the  knowledge  of  a  sample of diabetic patients about their disease and its ocular complications. A comprehensive ques-tionnaire  was  provided  to  diabetic  patients in  the  Cape  Town  metropolitan  district  and its  surrounds.  Specifically,  the  questionnaire aimed  to  determine  the  patient’s  knowledge of  diabetes,  their  knowledge  of  the  ocular complications of diabetes, the options for its management and treatment as well as a section considering  other  general  information  relat-ing  to  diabetes  and  its  ocular  complications. Their subject knowledge about diabetes and its ocular complications was relatively limited as only 42% of respondents knew about the exis-tence  of  two  types  of  diabetes. Twenty  nine percent of respondents believed that diabetes would not affect their eyes. Although 76% of the patients felt it very important to measure their blood sugar and 80% rated blood sugar control  as  very  important,  only  37%  of  the respondents  measured  their  blood  sugar  on a  daily  basis. A  particular  concern  was  that although  96%  of  the  respondents  felt  that  it was important to have their eyes checked regu-larly, only 30% of the respondents stated that they had actually had their eyes checked every year. The results of this investigation support the need for diabetic patients to receive better patient education about diabetes and its ocular complications. Furthermore, attention needs to be paid to expanding patient access to diabetic screenings and ocular examinations in order to manage this condition effectively.

  9. Influencing factors for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by hypertriglyceridemia

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    BAI Yunlei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the association between hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes, in order to guide the prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis in patients with diabetes. MethodsA total of 46 patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by acute pancreatitis who were admitted to The First Hospital of Yulin from January 2013 to December 2016 were enrolled as study group, and 52 patients with type 2 diabetes alone who were admitted to our hospital within the same period of time were enrolled as control group. Related data were recorded, including age, sex, course of diabetes, body height and weight, abdominal circumference, smoking, drinking, gallstones, hypertension, blood glucose, and blood lipids [total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C]. The incidence rates of complications associated with diabetes were analyzed. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data (general status, blood lipids, and diabetic complications between two groups; and the t-test was used for comparison of such data between two groups. A logistic regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis. ResultsThere were no significant differences between the two groups in age, sex composition, body height and weight, abdominal circumference, smoking and drinking habits, hypertension, gallstones, and course of diabetes (all P>005. The study group had significantly higher levels of TC, TG, and LDL-C than the control group (t=5.122, 4.127, and 3.524, P<0.01, <0.01, and =0.012, while the control group had a significantly higher level of HDL-C than the study group (t=2.231, P=0.037. The study group had a significantly higher incidence rate of diabetic microangiopathy (diabetic retinopathy and chronic diabetic nephropathy than the control group (χ2=92.126, P<0.01. The multivariate analysis showed that

  10. Genetic examination of SETD7 and SUV39H1/H2 methyltransferases and the risk of diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syreeni, Anna; El-Osta, Assam; Forsblom, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Hyperglycemia plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of vascular complications, which are the major sources of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Furthermore, these vascular complications often persist and progress despite improved glucose control, possibly as a result of prior......, and SUV39H2 methyltransferases as predictors of risk for micro- and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes....

  11. Fisetin lowers methylglyoxal dependent protein glycation and limits the complications of diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Maher

    Full Text Available The elevated glycation of macromolecules by the reactive dicarbonyl and α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal (MG has been associated with diabetes and its complications. We have identified a rare flavone, fisetin, which increases the level and activity of glyoxalase 1, the enzyme required for the removal of MG, as well as the synthesis of its essential co-factor, glutathione. It is shown that fisetin reduces two major complications of diabetes in Akita mice, a model of type 1 diabetes. Although fisetin had no effect on the elevation of blood sugar, it reduced kidney hypertrophy and albuminuria and maintained normal levels of locomotion in the open field test. This correlated with a reduction in proteins glycated by MG in the blood, kidney and brain of fisetin-treated animals along with an increase in glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity and an elevation in the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of glutathione, a co-factor for glyoxalase 1. The expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, serum amyloid A and serum C-reactive protein, markers of protein oxidation, glycation and inflammation, were also increased in diabetic Akita mice and reduced by fisetin. It is concluded that fisetin lowers the elevation of MG-protein glycation that is associated with diabetes and ameliorates multiple complications of the disease. Therefore, fisetin or a synthetic derivative may have potential therapeutic use for the treatment of diabetic complications.

  12. Fisetin Lowers Methylglyoxal Dependent Protein Glycation and Limits the Complications of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pamela; Dargusch, Richard; Ehren, Jennifer L.; Okada, Shinichi; Sharma, Kumar; Schubert, David

    2011-01-01

    The elevated glycation of macromolecules by the reactive dicarbonyl and α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) has been associated with diabetes and its complications. We have identified a rare flavone, fisetin, which increases the level and activity of glyoxalase 1, the enzyme required for the removal of MG, as well as the synthesis of its essential co-factor, glutathione. It is shown that fisetin reduces two major complications of diabetes in Akita mice, a model of type 1 diabetes. Although fisetin had no effect on the elevation of blood sugar, it reduced kidney hypertrophy and albuminuria and maintained normal levels of locomotion in the open field test. This correlated with a reduction in proteins glycated by MG in the blood, kidney and brain of fisetin-treated animals along with an increase in glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity and an elevation in the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of glutathione, a co-factor for glyoxalase 1. The expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), serum amyloid A and serum C-reactive protein, markers of protein oxidation, glycation and inflammation, were also increased in diabetic Akita mice and reduced by fisetin. It is concluded that fisetin lowers the elevation of MG-protein glycation that is associated with diabetes and ameliorates multiple complications of the disease. Therefore, fisetin or a synthetic derivative may have potential therapeutic use for the treatment of diabetic complications. PMID:21738623

  13. Diabetes mellitus: The linkage between oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability and vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingueti, Caroline Pereira; Dusse, Luci Maria Sant'Ana; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; de Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Gomes, Karina Braga; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Vascular complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These vascular abnormalities result of a chronic hyperglycemic state, which leads to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. This review addresses the relationships among endothelial dysfunction, hypercoagulability and inflammation and their biomarkers in the development of vascular complications in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and hypercoagulability are correlated to each other, playing an important role in the development of vascular complications in diabetic patients. Moreover, it has been observed that several endothelial, inflammatory and pro-coagulant biomarkers, such as VWF, IL-6, TNF-α, D-dimer and PAI-1, are increased in diabetic patients who have microvascular and macrovascular complications, including nephropathy or cardiovascular disease. It is promising the clinical and laboratory use of endothelial, inflammatory and pro-coagulant biomarkers for predicting the risk of cardiovascular and renal complications in diabetic patients and for monitoring these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Placental Expression of Glucose Transporter Proteins in Pregnancies Complicated by Gestational and Pregestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanirowski, Paweł Jan; Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Pazura-Turowska, Monika; Sawicki, Włodzimierz; Cendrowski, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus and pregestational diabetes mellitus constitute carbohydrate metabolism disorders, which, if not diagnosed and adequately treated, lead to serious and often life-threatening pregnancy complications. According to a recently formulated hypothesis, some diabetes-related complications, such as fetal macrosomia, may be the result of disturbances in the transplacental transport of nutrients-in particular, excessive maternal-fetal glucose transfer. Throughout pregnancy, glucose flux across the placenta is mediated by the group of facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT), the expression of which in different placental compartments is the precondition for effective glucose uptake from maternal blood and its subsequent transfer to the fetal circulation. In diabetes-complicated pregnancies, the location, expression and activity of glucose transporters are modified to an extent that results in alterations in the maternal-fetal glucose exchange, potentially leading to an excessive supply of energy substrates to the fetus. This paper reviews the literature on the expression and activity of glucose transporter proteins-GLUT-1, GLUT-3, GLUT-4, GLUT-8, GLUT-9 and GLUT-12-in the human placenta, with a special focus on diabetes-complicated pregnancy. The characteristics of transporters in conditions of maternal normoglycemia and modifications occurring in the diabetic placenta are summarized, and the factors responsible for the regulation of the expression of selected isoforms are described. Finally, the impact of alterations in the placental expression of the aforementioned members of the GLUT family on intrauterine fetal development in pregnancies complicated by diabetes mellitus is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular complications in diabetes: Microparticles and microparticle associated microRNAs as active players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Nicoleta; Badila, Elisabeta; Weiss, Emma; Cochior, Daniel; Stępień, Ewa; Georgescu, Adriana

    2016-03-25

    The recognition of the importance of diabetes in vascular disease has greatly increased lately. Common risk factors for diabetes-related vascular disease include hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, inflammation, hypercoagulability, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. All of these factors contribute to the endothelial dysfunction which generates the diabetic complications, both macro and microvascular. Knowledge of diabetes-related vascular complications and of associated mechanisms it is becoming increasingly important for therapists. The discovery of microparticles (MPs) and their associated microRNAs (miRNAs) have opened new perspectives capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers. MPs known as submicron vesicles generated from membranes of apoptotic or activated cells into circulation have the ability to act as autocrine and paracrine effectors in cell-to-cell communication. They operate as biological vectors modulating the endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, coagulation, angiogenesis, thrombosis, subsequently contributing to the progression of macro and microvascular complications in diabetes. More recently, miRNAs have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which suggest their significant role in vascular physiology and disease. The contribution of MPs and also of their associated miRNAs to the development of vascular complications in diabetes was largely unexplored and undiscussed. In essence, with this review we bring light upon the understanding of impact diabetes has on vascular biology, and the significant role of MPs and MPs associated miRNAs as novel mediators, potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in vascular complications in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endothelial dysfunction in normoglycaemic first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with hyperuricaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junxia; Xiang, Lin; Zhang, Bilin; Cheng, Yangyang

    2017-03-01

    To reveal the effect of hyperuricaemia on endothelial function in normoglycaemic first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In all, 40 first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetes mellitus with hyperuricaemia, 40 first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetes mellitus with normouricaemia and 35 healthy subjects without diabetic family history were recruited in this study. Anthropometric parameters as well as blood pressure, blood lipids, fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 were measured. Insulin resistance was assessed with homoeostasis model assessment index-insulin resistance index. To assess endothelial function, high-resolution ultrasonography was used for measuring flow- and nitroglycerine-mediated brachial artery vasodilation. When compared with control, flow-mediated dilation was lower in first-degree relatives with or without hyperuricaemia (both p type 2 diabetes mellitus (β = -0.677, p type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with hyperuricaemia.

  17. A case of hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis following 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Funauchi, Masanori; Fukuma, Naobumi; Abe, Yohsuke; Hirooka, Yoshibumi; Nihei, Noriyuki

    1982-01-01

    The coexistence of diabetes mellitus and hyperthyroidism has long been known and, in a few cases, diabetic acidosis complicated with thyroid storm has been reported. We describe a case who developed thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis following 131 I therapy for severe hyperthyroidism. A 50-yr-old man was diagnosed as having hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetes mellitus at the age of 47. After he had been unsuccessfully treated with methimazole and oral hypoglycemic agents, radioactive iodine was administered twice. However, no remarkable effect was observed. After a third treatment with 131 I, the patient showed symptoms like thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was hospitalized on October 3, 1980. Administration of insulin and supportive therapy including correction of dehydration alleviated his symptoms after admission. Administration inistration of methimazole normalized his thyroid function. A 75 g GTT and tolbutamide i.v. test revealed impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient had a high level of serum T 3 and T 4 following 131 I therapy, indicating that the released hormone caused a transient condition like thyroid storm, which led to deterioration of glucose metabolism as indicated in high levels of hemoglobin A1c. Diabetic acidosis is the precipitating factor for thyroid storm. Prompt treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis, therefore, might prevent the complications of life-threatening thyroid storm. (author)

  18. Case of hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis following /sup 131/I therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Funauchi, Masanori; Fukuma, Naobumi; Abe, Yohsuke; Hirooka, Yoshibumi; Nihei, Noriyuki (Hamamatsu Univ. Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    The coexistence of diabetes mellitus and hyperthyroidism has long been known and, in a few cases, diabetic acidosis complicated with thyroid storm has been reported. We describe a case who developed thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis following /sup 131/I therapy for severe hyperthyroidism. A 50-yr-old man was diagnosed as having hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetes mellitus at the age of 47. After he had been unsuccessfully treated with methimazole and oral hypoglycemic agents, radioactive iodine was administered twice. However, no remarkable effect was observed. After a third treatment with /sup 131/I, the patient showed symptoms like thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was hospitalized on October 3, 1980. Adm of insulin and supportive therapy including correction of dehydration alleviated his symptoms after admission. Administration of methimazole normalized his thyroid function. A 75 g GTT and tolbutamide i.v. test revealed impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient had a high level of serum T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ following /sup 131/I therapy, indicating that the released hormone caused a transient condition like thyroid storm, which led to deterioration of glucose metabolism as indicated in high levels of hemoglobin A1c. Diabetic acidosis is the precipitating factor for thyroid storm. Prompt treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis, therefore, might prevent the complications of life-threatening thyroid storm.

  19. Long term complications of diabetes and co-morbidities contributing to atherosclerosis in diabetic population of Mirpur, Azad Kashmir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, C.; Afzal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and its chronic complications along with co-morbidities contributing to atherosclerosis in the diabetic population of Mirpur, Azad Kashmir. Methods: The cross-sectional study and was carried out at the Divisional Headquarter Hospital, Mirpur, Azad Kashmir, between January and August 2012. The patients selected were established diabetics. Data was collected through special questionnaire. SPSS version 14 was used to analyse the data. Results: A total 3602 patients were interviewed initially. Of them 318 were diabetics; the prevalence rate being 8.83%. Of the 318 study subjects, 24 (7.3%) had a history of stroke; 4 (1.3%) had history of transient ischaemic attack; 17 (5.3%) had history of myocardial infarction; 27 (8.5%) and had a history of angina. Foot ulcers were present in 22 (6.9%) and 3 (0.9%) had an amputation. Diabetic retinopathy was found in 95 (29.9%), diabetic nephropathy in 25 (7.9%) and diabetic neuropathy in 126 (39.6%). Co-morbid hypertension was found in 153 (48.1%) of cases whereas co-morbid hypercholesterolaemia was found in 66 (20.8%) and 56.9% had family history of diabetes mellitus. Overall, 34 (10.7%) were smokers. Conclusion: Diabetes is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Co-morbidities like hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia must be aggressively treated to prevent coronary heart disease. (author)

  20. Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroiditis Complicating Treatment with Nivolumab

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    Li Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 ligand inhibitors have gained popularity in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. The immune system is regulated by stimulatory and inhibitory signaling and aims to achieve the balance between activation and inhibition. Treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors enhances immune response, but is also known to diminish immune tolerance and increase autoimmune toxicity. Here we present a case of a patient with advanced squamous cell lung cancer who developed type I diabetes and thyroiditis after treatment with PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab. The presence of autoimmune diabetes mellitus and thyroiditis were confirmed by markedly elevated titers of the glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and thyroid peroxidase antibody, respectively. This report serves to heighten awareness of potential autoimmune toxicities related to anti-PD-1 therapy, especially as these toxicities are manageable if identified in a timely manner.

  1. Transsphenoidal surgery and diabetes mellitus: An analysis of inpatient data and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Morgan J; Raikundalia, Milap D; Svider, Peter F; Baredes, Soly; Liu, James K; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-10-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) has emerged as the standard approach for pituitary resection due to its minimally invasive nature. There has been little analysis examining the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on patients undergoing TSS. In this study, we characterize DM's association with postoperative TSS complications. In addition to analysis of associated charges and patient demographics, we performed comparison of complication rates between DM and non-DM patients who have undergone TSS in recent years. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a database encompassing nearly 8 million inpatient hospitalizations, was evaluated for patients undergoing TSS from 2002 to 2010. Of 12,938 TSS patients, 2,173 (16.8%) had a DM diagnosis. The non-DM cohort was younger (50.1 y ± 16.6SD vs. 56.8 y ± 14.1; P complications, and had a lesser incidence of diabetes insipidus (P complications was present only among patients diabetics when compared to non-DM blacks. DM is associated with greater length of stay and hospital charges among TSS patients. DM patients undergoing TSS have a significantly greater incidence of pulmonary and fluid/electrolyte complications among patients under the age of 60, and greater risk for urinary/renal complications across all ages. Despite a theoretical concern due to an impaired wound-healing in DM patients, association with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea was only noted among black diabetics. 2C. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Diabetic foot complications and their risk factors from a large retrospective cohort study.

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    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    Full Text Available Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR, being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem.This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥ 25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors.The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI of (3.16%-3.44%, whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%-2.16%, 0.19% (0.16%-0.22%, and 1.06% (0.98%-1.14%, respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD, neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥ 10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥ 45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD, poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD, male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16-99.62, 14.47 (8.99-23.31, 12.06 (10.54-13.80, 7.22 (6.10-8.55, 4.69 (4.28-5.14, 4.45 (4.05-4.89, 2.88 (2.43-3.40, 2.81 (2.31-3.43, 2.24 (1.98-2.45, 2.02 (1.84-2.22, 1.54 (1.29-1.83, and 1.51 (1.38-1.65, respectively.Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact of the complications. Other measurements, such as decompression of lower

  3. Diabetic Foot Complications and Their Risk Factors from a Large Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al Derwish, Mohammad; Ouizi, Samir; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ibrahim, Heba M.; Alamri, Bader N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR), being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of (3.16%–3.44%), whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%–2.16%), 0.19% (0.16%–0.22%), and 1.06% (0.98%–1.14%), respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD), poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD), male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16–99.62), 14.47 (8.99–23.31), 12.06 (10.54–13.80), 7.22 (6.10–8.55), 4.69 (4.28–5.14), 4.45 (4.05–4.89), 2.88 (2.43–3.40), 2.81 (2.31–3.43), 2.24 (1.98–2.45), 2.02 (1.84–2.22), 1.54 (1.29–1.83), and 1.51 (1.38–1.65), respectively. Conclusions Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact

  4. COAGULATION PROFILE IN DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH MICROVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS

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    Uma Shankar Mishra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study intends to assess the changes in the simple routine coagulation parameters in diabetes mellitus and to investigate whether any relationship exists among changes in these coagulation parameters and development of microvascular complication in diabetes mellitus. MATERIALS AND METHODS Period of study was from 2010-2012. It was done in M.K.C.G. Medical College with the approval from Berhampur University. It is a case control study. 50 diabetic patients and 50 age and sex matched non-diabetic patients were randomly selected. Simple coagulation parameters like Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT, Prothrombin Time (PT, serum fibrinogen, platelet count and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 were measured. Statistical study was done using unpaired t-test and analysis and calculations were done using GraphPad software. RESULTS Serum fibrinogen was found to be increased in diabetic patients when compared to non-diabetic patients (mean 278 ± 26.9 v/s 232.52 ± 16.5, P value - 0.009, significant. PAI-1 levels was found to be higher among the diabetics when compared to nondiabetics (47.64 ± 8.82 v/s 31.06 ± 7.12, the two-tailed P value is <0.0001, considered extremely significant. Platelet count through within normal limits. It was found to be decreased in diabetic patient when compared to non-diabetic (2.25 ± 0.18 v/s 2.33 ± 0.03, P value - 0.022. Prothrombin Time (PT (13.15 ± 0.52 v/s 13.04 ± 0.49, P value - 0.28 and PTT (33.04 ± 1.31 v/s 32.99 ± 1.29, P value 0.85, found to be statistically insignificant. Among 50 diabetic patients, 24 had neuropathy, 20 had nephropathy, 10 had retinopathy and 21 had none of these complications. On comparing diabetic patients with microvascular complications and without microvascular complications, significant age difference was observed (59.55 ± 5.06 v/s 51.00 ± 3.31, P=0.003. This probably was a reflection of increase in microvascular complications with increasing duration

  5. Do insulin cartridges really provide a lower risk of potential diabetes complications than traditional vials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharayri, Mohammad G; Aljbori, Tariq M; Migdadi, Qusai M; Al-Omoush, Marwa B; Jaarah, Ayman R

    2014-09-01

    Recently, many publicly funded healthcare organizations suffered from an economical crisis. This forced some organizations to utilize less costly alternatives where possible. Insulin cartridges and vials are examples. Many patients are questioning the difference between the two alternatives as they contain the same active ingredient. To find out if insulin cartridges really provide a lower risk of potential diabetes complications than traditional vials. A questionnaire was used to ask two random samples of diabetic patients about the development of some diabetes complications. The first sample (n = 41) consisted of patients using cartridges; the second sample (n = 40) consisted of patients using vials. Patients were randomly selected from the endocrine clinic and the out-patient pharmacy in Al-Hussein Hospital in King Hussein Medical Center in Amman- Jordan. 44% of respondents in the first sample did not suffer from any complication; on the other hand, the percentage was only 15% of respondents in the second sample. All respondents (100%) in the first sample suffered from only 2 complications or less; however, 25% of the respondents in the second sample suffered from 3 or more complications. Nephropathy complications, were slightly higher in the first sample; 22% compared to 15% in the second sample. On the other hand, all complications reported in the second sample were higher; 30% for neuropathy, 65% for retinopathy complications and 42.5% for extremities damage compared to only 9.7%, 7.3% and 26.8% respectively in the first sample. In general, respondents who were using cartridges reported a lesser incidence of diabetes complications. Although many organizations suffered from an economical crisis, the cost-effectiveness aspect should be taken into consideration when purchasing medical alternatives. This will provide higher quality of life for patients and eventually lower hidden and future costs for the organizations.

  6. NLRP3 Inflammasome Polymorphism and Macrovascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

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    Jasna Klen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is generally accepted that poor glycemic control, arterial hypertension and/or hyperlipidemia, and the associated oxidative stress may contribute to the development of macro- and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Such metabolic damage signals may activate inflammasome and trigger chronic inflammation. We investigated common polymorphisms in inflammasome coding genes and the risk for macro- and microvascular complications in T2D. Methods. In total 181 clinically well-characterised T2D patients were genotyped for NLRP3 rs35829419 and CARD8 rs2043211. Risk for diabetic complications was assessed using logistic regression. Results. Patients with median duration of T2D 11 (6–17 years had relatively well controlled blood glucose and lipid levels and blood pressure on the prescribed treatment regimen. Duration of T2D and plasma cholesterol levels were the most important clinical risk factors for macrovascular complications (P=0.007 and P=0.031. NLRP3 rs35829419 was associated with increased risk for macrovascular complications (P=0.004, with myocardial infarction in particular (P=0.052. No association was observed between CARD8 polymorphism and any of T2D complications. Conclusions. Our preliminary data suggest the role of NLRP3 polymorphism in diabetic macrovascular complications, especially in myocardial infarction.

  7. "COMPARISON OF MATERNAL AND FETAL/NEONATAL COMPLICATIONS IN GESTATIONAL AND PRE-GESTATIONAL DIABETES MELLITUS "

    OpenAIRE

    F. Akhlaghi A. B. Hamedi

    2005-01-01

    Presence of maternal diabetes mellitus (DM) during pregnancy has important consequences for both mother and child. To determine maternal and fetal/neonatal complications of gestational DM and compare them with pre-gestational DM, a prospective study was performed in 100 diabetic women delivered in our hospital from January 2001 to April 2002. Pregnancy outcome in 27 women with gestational DM and 73 women with pre-gestational DM and their offspring were studied and analyzed. The mean age of wo...

  8. Effect of Livingstone Potato ( N.E.Br on Diabetes and Its Complications in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetes in Rats

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    Chinedum Ogbonnaya Eleazu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe effect of livingstone potato (Plectranthus esculenthus N.E.Br on diabetes and its complications in Streptozotocin induced diabetic rats was investigated. The duration of the experiment was 4 weeks.MethodsThe blood glucose level of the rats was measured with a glucometer, the protein and glucose and specific gravity in the urine samples of the rats were measured using urine assay strips and urinometer respectively. The liver and kidney function parameters in the serum of the rats were determined using Biosystem Kits.ResultsThe diabetic rats given livingstonepotato incorporated feeds, had 129.7% decrease in their hyperglycemia with corresponding amelioration of their elevated urinary protein, sugars, specific gravity, renal growth, liver growth as well as 15.64% decrease in body weights compared with the nondiabetic rats that had 5.54% decrease in blood glucose and 20.39% increase in body weight unlike the diabetic control rats that had 18.34% decrease in blood glucose and 52.68% decrease in body weight. There were significant differences (P0.05 in the relative heart weights of all the rats in the three different groups. In terms of liver and kidney function parameters, values obtained for the diabetic rats given livingstone potato incorporated feeds were not significantly different from that of the nondiabetic rats except for total bilurubin, aspartate transaminase, and creatinine (P>0.05 while they were significantly different from the values obtained for the diabetic control rats (P<0.05. In addition, the serum amylase of the diabetic control rats were significantly higher (P<0.05 than that of the nondiabetic and diabetic rats treated with livingstone potato incorporated feeds.ConclusionResults show the antidiabetic actions of livingstone potato and its ability to ameliorate glomerular complication and liver hypertrophy in diabetics.

  9. Association between insulin resistance and risk of complications in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krochik, Andrea G; Botto, Marianela; Bravo, Mónica; Hepner, Mirta; Frontroth, Juan P; Miranda, Miguel; Mazza, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that insulin resistance may be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes complications and early diagnosis would be important for their prevention. Our aim was to study insulin resistance in our population of children with type 1 diabetes and to identify associated early risk factors for micro- and macrovascular complications. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted including 150 children with type 1 diabetes. Anthropometric, bioelectric impedance, carotid Doppler ultrasonography, electromyography, and conduction velocity studies were performed. Baseline plasma glucose, lipid profile, uric acid, plasma thyrotropin, glycosylated hemoglobin A1C, and microalbuminuria were assessed. More insulin-resistant patients were defined as those having an estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR) value below the first quartile. Clinically manifest microvascular complications were not found in any of the patients. More insulin-resistant patients had a greater sub scapular fold thickness, a higher incidence of obesity (12% vs. 1.7% p 0.007), higher fructosamine levels (496 vs. 403 p19, and a higher incidence of altered lipid metabolism (70% vs. 39% p 0.0007). In the subgroup of patients with lower eGDR there were more children with lipid disorders, obesity, and worse diabetic control, which, if not corrected, may lead to development of micro- and macrovascular complications. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Red cell 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate levels among diabetic patents with and without vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Y; Bessman, S P; Bessman, A

    1975-08-01

    There have been differences of opinion among authors concening in the levels of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and nucleotides in nonacidotic diabetic patients. Our data suggest that abnormal levels of 2, 3-DPG in diabetic patients are related to the presence of vascular complications and not to the duration of the disease per sec. 2,3-DPG levels are normal in diabetic patients with no evidence of vascular complications (group A). In ambulatory patients with vascular complications (group B), significantly higher levels of 2,3-DPG are found than in normal subjects and patients in group A. In hospitalized diabetic patients with active peripheral vascular complications (group C), levels of 2,3-DPG are likewise significantly increased over those of normal subjects and patients of group A. 2,3-DPG was found to be significantly elevated in patients of group C as compared with group B. 2,3-DPG levels in venous blood from infected legs as compared with those of the peripheral venous blood were not significantly different, thereby ruling out local factors. There were no differences in the blood lactate levels in any of the group studied. The elevation of the 2,3-DPG levels may be a reflection of attempted red blood cell compensation for tissue hypoxia in the diabetic with vascular disease.

  11. Animal Models of Diabetic Macrovascular Complications: Key Players in the Development of New Therapeutic Approaches

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    Suvi E. Heinonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong, incapacitating metabolic disease associated with chronic macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease and microvascular disorders leading to damage of the kidneys (nephropathy and eyes (retinopathy. Based on the current trends, the rising prevalence of diabetes worldwide will lead to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, novel means to prevent and treat these complications are needed. Under the auspices of the IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative, the SUMMIT (SUrrogate markers for Micro- and Macrovascular hard end points for Innovative diabetes Tools consortium is working on the development of novel animal models that better replicate vascular complications of diabetes and on the characterization of the available models. In the past years, with the high level of genomic information available and more advanced molecular tools, a very large number of models has been created. Selecting the right model for a specific study is not a trivial task and will have an impact on the study results and their interpretation. This review gathers information on the available experimental animal models of diabetic macrovascular complications and evaluates their pros and cons for research purposes as well as for drug development.

  12. [Prevention of cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus: hospital emergency department involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo Villa, Teresa; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esther; Caurel Sastre, Zaida; Martín Martínez, Alfonso; Merinero Palomares, Raúl; Alvarez Rodríguez, Virginia; Portero Sánchez, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the risk profile of patients with diabetes who seek care from hospital emergency departments and emergency department involvement in preventing cardiovascular complications in these patients. Cross-sectional analysis of case series from 2 Spanish hospital emergency departments. We included all patients with a history or final diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who were treated in the emergency department between November 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011. Each patient's cardiovascular risk profile was analyzed. The main outcome was the appropriate of prescribed treatment to prevent cardiovascular complications according to the 2012 guidelines of the American Diabetes Association on the patient's discharge from emergency care. A total of 298 patients were included; 275 (92%) had type II diabetes. Ninety percent of the series (269 patients) had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor and 147 (49%) had prior target organ damage; target organ damage was newly diagnosed in 41 (14%). Fifty-eight percent (172 patients) were discharged home from the emergency department. Although 215 patients (72%) were not adhering to at least 1 previously prescribed preventive treatment and 30 (10%) were not adhering to any prescribed treatment, drug prescriptions were modified only in 1.1% to 3.3% of patients and no follow-up was recommended in 42 cases (24%). Although diabetic patients treated in emergency departments are at high risk for cardiovascular complications, their visit is not used to optimize preventive treatment for these complications or ensure appropriate follow-up.

  13. The Role of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets in Treating Diabetic Complications

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    Yue Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To observe the clinical prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets for type 2 diabetic vascular complications. Methods. It was a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial. 140 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly divided into the treatment group and control group. The two groups were given basic therapy (management of blood sugar, blood pressure, etc.. Additionally, the treatment group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets, while the control group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets placebos. All subjects were followed up for consecutive 36 months and observed monthly. The clinical data as urinary microalbumin to urinary creatinine ratio (Umalb/cr, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT, diabetic nephropathy (DN and diabetic retinopathy (DR prevalence, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, blood glucose, and blood pressure were collected and analyzed statistically. Results. After 36-month treatment, the Umalb/cr level and DN and DR prevalence in treatment group were all significantly lower than control group (P0.05. Conclusions. Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets are beneficial to diabetic microvascular complications, while the efficacy to diabetic macrovascular complications needs more observations.

  14. The Role of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets in Treating Diabetic Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Yu, Jiangyi; Liu, Jingshun; An, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To observe the clinical prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets for type 2 diabetic vascular complications. Methods. It was a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial. 140 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly divided into the treatment group and control group. The two groups were given basic therapy (management of blood sugar, blood pressure, etc.). Additionally, the treatment group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets, while the control group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets placebos. All subjects were followed up for consecutive 36 months and observed monthly. The clinical data as urinary microalbumin to urinary creatinine ratio (Umalb/cr), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), diabetic nephropathy (DN) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) prevalence, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, blood glucose, and blood pressure were collected and analyzed statistically. Results. After 36-month treatment, the Umalb/cr level and DN and DR prevalence in treatment group were all significantly lower than control group ( P 0.05). Conclusions. Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets are beneficial to diabetic microvascular complications, while the efficacy to diabetic macrovascular complications needs more observations.

  15. Association of inflammatory markers with physical activity, family history and other diabetic complications in patients of diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, A.; Rashif, A.; Waheed, P.; Ishaq, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the association of inflammatory markers with physical activity, family history and other complications among patients of diabetic retinopathy. Study Design: Cross sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO) and Military Hospital Laboratories, Rawalpindi from Jan 2016 to Jun 2016. Material and Methods: A total of 90 diagnosed patients of diabetic retinopathy of ages 40-70 years were enrolled from Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi. Their inflammatory markers (ESR and CRP) were assessed and their levels were compared with their physical activity, family history and other complications of diabetes already developed in them. These were then compared with those of 90 normal healthy controls enrolled from general population using independent student's t test and one way Anova test for scale variables and Chi square test for nominal variables. Results: Both patients and controls were age and gender matched with mean age of 60 +- 8.9 years in patients and 59 +- 13.02 years in controls. Among 90 patients enrolled 51(56.7 percent) were males and 39 (43.3) were females. And among 90 controls 49 (54.4 percent) were males and 41(45.6 percent) were females. An inverse association was observed between inflammatory markers and physical activity with ap-value of 0.001. On the contrary a strong positive association was observed between inflammatory markers and family history and complications of diabetes with a p-value 0.001. Conclusion: There is an inverse association of inflammatory markers with physical activity and a direct association of these with family history and complications of diabetes among patients of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  16. Impaired Biomechanical Properties of Diabetic Skin Implications in Pathogenesis of Diabetic Wound Complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bermudez, Dustin M.; Herdrich, Benjamin J.; Xu, Junwang; Lind, Robert; Beason, David P.; Mitchell, Marc E.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Liechty, Kenneth W.

    Diabetic skin is known to have deficient wound healing properties, but little is known of its intrinsic biomeclhanical properties. We hypothesize that diabetic skin possesses inferior biomechanical properties at baseline, rendering it more prone to injury. Skin from diabetic and nondiabetic mice and

  17. Maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Per Glud; Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    and delivery and fetal complications were classified according to the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision. RESULTS: The final study population consisted of 398 623 women. Of these, 9014 (2.3%) had GDM. Data were adjusted for maternal age, parity, smoking, gestational age, birth weight, BMI......, gender of the fetus and calendar year. The risk of preeclampsia, caesarean section (both planned and emergency) and shoulder dystocia was increased in women with GDM. In the unadjusted analysis, the risk of thrombosis was increased by a factor 2 in the GDM patients, but in the adjusted analysis...

  18. Diabetic ketoacidosis in acromegaly; a rare complication precipitated by corticosteroid use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeremy; Wood, Anna J; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Grossmann, Mathis; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Ekinci, Elif I

    2017-12-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis has been described in the literature as a rare possible initial presentation of acromegaly before a diagnosis of acromegaly is eventually made. Indeed, diabetic ketoacidosis is a recognised complication of acromegaly. There are a number of factors that can predispose patients with acromegaly to diabetes as well as to diabetic ketoacidosis. These include high levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 in acromegaly and the effect on glycaemia by medications used in the management of acromegaly. Ketoacidosis has been described in patients with acromegaly even without the presence of an underlying autoimmune diabetes. Patients with acromegaly and ketoacidosis often respond to treatment and may not require long-term insulin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Epidemiology, Clinical and complications profile of diabetes in Saudi Arabia: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhadd, Tarik A.; Al-Amoudi, Abdallah; Alzahrani, Ali S.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is emerging as a public health problem in Saudi Arabia in parallel with the world wide diabetes pandemic, which is having a particular impact on upon the Middle East and the third world. This pandemic has accompanied the adoption of a modern life style and the abandonment of a traditional lifestyle, with a resultant increase in rates of obesity and other chronic non-communicable diseases. The indigenous Saudi population seems to have a special genetic predisposition to develop type 2 diabetes, which is further amplified by a rise in obesity rates, a high rate of consanguinity and the presence of other variables of the insulin resistance syndrome. We highlight the epidemiology, clinical and complication profile of diabetes in Saudi people. Diabetes is well studied in Saudi Arabia: however, there seems to be little research in the area of education and health acre delivery. This is of paramount importance to offset the perceived impact on health care delivery services, to lessen chronic diabetes complications and to reduce the expected morbidity and mortality from diabetes. (author)

  20. Serum Levels of Progranulin Are Closely Associated with Microvascular Complication in Type 2 Diabetes

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    Lin Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Progranulin (PGRN was recently introduced as a novel marker of chronic inflammatory response in obesity and type 2 diabetes capable of directly affecting the insulin signaling pathway. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between PGRN and type 2 diabetics with microvascular complications. Methods. PGRN serum levels and glucose metabolism related substance were measured in 84 type 2 diabetic patients with or without microangiopathies and 12 health persons. Further analyses of serum PGRN in different stages of diabetic microangiopathies were conducted. Results. Serum levels of PGRN were markedly higher in type 2 diabetic patients with microangiopathies. PGRN serum levels increased with the progress of diabetic microangiopathies with significantly highest values detectable in clinical diabetic nephropathy (CDN and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR groups. Serum PGRN concentrations in all individuals positively and markedly correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, body mass index (BMI, triglyceride (TG, urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine (CRE, white blood cell (WBC, disease duration, IL-6, and TNF-α, while correlating negatively and significantly with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only UAER and CRE were independently associated with serum PGRN. Conclusion. PGRN might be considered as a marker for diabetic microangiopathy and its severity.

  1. Bone regeneration in cranioplasty and clinical complications in rabbits with alloxan-induced diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanice Menezes Marçal Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the bone repair process in surgical defects created on the parietal bones of diabetic rabbits using the guided bone regeneration technique to observe the effects of alloxan in the induction of diabetes mellitus. Twenty-four adult rabbits were divided into three study groups: control (C, diabetic (D and diabetic associated to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membrane (D-PTFE. For diabetes induction the animals received one dose of monohydrated alloxan (90 mg/kg by intravenous administration in the auricular or femoral vein. In group D-PTFE the membrane covered both the floor and the surface of the bone defect. In groups D and C, the bone defect was filled up with blood clot. The specimens were fixed in 10% formol and prepared for histomorphometric analysis. The results showed that the 90 mg/kg dose of monohydrate alloxan was sufficient to promote diabetes mellitus when administered in the auricular vein. Bone regeneration was slower in the diabetic group when compared with the control and diabetic-PTFE groups, but there was no significant statistical difference between the two experimental groups (D and D-PTFE. The oral and general clinical complications among the diabetics were weight loss, polyuria, polyphagia and severe chronic gingivitis.

  2. Deregulation of arginase induces bone complications in high-fat/high-sucrose diet diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Anil; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Toque, Haroldo A; Cain, Michael; Wong, Abby; Howie, Nicole; Shinde, Rahul; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Yao, Lin; Chutkan, Norman; Hunter, Monty; Caldwell, Ruth B; Isales, Carlos; Caldwell, R William; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-02-15

    A balanced diet is crucial for healthy development and prevention of musculoskeletal related diseases. Diets high in fat content are known to cause obesity, diabetes and a number of other disease states. Our group and others have previously reported that activity of the urea cycle enzyme arginase is involved in diabetes-induced dysregulation of vascular function due to decreases in nitric oxide formation. We hypothesized that diabetes may also elevate arginase activity in bone and bone marrow, which could lead to bone-related complications. To test this we determined the effects of diabetes on expression and activity of arginase, in bone and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). We demonstrated that arginase 1 is abundantly present in the bone and BMSCs. We also demonstrated that arginase activity and expression in bone and bone marrow is up-regulated in models of diabetes induced by HFHS diet and streptozotocin (STZ). HFHS diet down-regulated expression of healthy bone metabolism markers (BMP2, COL-1, ALP, and RUNX2) and reduced bone mineral density, bone volume and trabecular thickness. However, treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH) prevented these bone-related complications of diabetes. In-vitro study of BMSCs showed that high glucose treatment increased arginase activity and decreased nitric oxide production. These effects were reversed by treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH). Our study provides evidence that deregulation of l-arginine metabolism plays a vital role in HFHS diet-induced diabetic complications and that these complications can be prevented by treatment with arginase inhibitors. The modulation of l-arginine metabolism in disease could offer a novel therapeutic approach for osteoporosis and other musculoskeletal related diseases. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Natural history of diabetes mellitus with special reference to age of onset and vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Y; Toyota, T; Masuda, M; Komatsu, K; Kuriki, A

    1976-06-01

    Age and sex distribution of diabetics, seasonal incidence of diabetes, grade of hyperglycemia, frequency of vascular complications and daily living conditions were studied of 2771 diabetic patients experienced at five clinics. The cases consisted of 1587 male and 1184 female diabetics. The distribution of age of diabetes onset revealed that males predominate among diabetics but females predominate among child diabetics, and that the precentage of child was extremely low. This pattern was emphasized as characteristic of Japanese diabetic population. Distribution of fasting blood sugar at the diagnosis of diabetes was compared among the age groups of diabetes-onset and the results showed that percentage of the value exceeding 300 mg/100 ml was highest in the under 10 year-onset cases and decreased with age. The frequency of diabetic retinopathy and of ischemic ECG changes was analysed from the view point of age of diabetes onset and also the duration of the disease. The frequency of the retinopathy at the diabetes-onset was zero in the under 10 year-onset cases, 4.2% in the 10s-onset cases and increased with age. The longer the duration of the disease the higher the frequency of the retinopathy was. This increase along with the duration was most remarkable in the 10s- and 20s-onset cases and less remarkable in the 30s-onset cases. The retinopathy was significantly more frequent in female diabetics. Daily of the patients were studied by a questionnaire and the analysis of 1022 cases with diabetes of more than three years revealed that cases of patients working uneventfully and/or feeling fit were most frequent among the 30s- or 40s-onset cases and that cases of bed-disability were frequent among the cases whose diabetes was found in their twenties or younger. This study showed that the prognosis of the patients is quite different according to whether their diabetes occurred before of after 30 years of age.

  4. [Costs of temporary disability in Spain related to diabetes mellitus and its complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, M Teófila; Terradillos García, M Jesús; Capdevila García, Luisa M; Ramírez Iñiguez de la Torre, M Victoria; López-González, Angel Arturo

    2013-10-01

    To ascertain the socioeconomic impact of diabetes, it is essential to estimate overall costs, including both direct and indirect costs (premature retirements, working hours lost, or sick leaves). This study analyzed indirect costs for temporary disability (TD) due to diabetes and its complications in Spain in 2011 by assessing the related ICD-9 MC codes. For this purpose, the number of TD processes and their mean duration were recorded. The indirect costs associated to loss of working days were also estimated. In 2011, diabetes and its complications were related to 2.567 TD processes, which resulted in the loss of 154.214 days. In terms of costs, this disease represented for Spanish public health administrations an expense of 3,297.095.3 €, with an estimated cost per patient and year of 141 €. These data suggest an urgent need to devise plans for prevention and early diagnosis of diabetes and its complications, as well as programs to optimize the available health care resources by creating multidisciplinary teams where occupational medical services assume an important role. A decrease in absenteeism would result in benefits for diabetic patients, society overall, and companies or public institutions. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Carotenoids in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications: A mechanistic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohbakhsh, Ali; Karimi, Gholamreza; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2017-07-01

    Carotenoids are a large class of natural antioxidants that occur in many vegetables, foods and other natural sources. To date, a large number of biological properties have been reported from carotenoids, particularly protective effects against diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer, and neurodegenerative, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, recent studies including clinical evidences, have shown that carotenoids play a role in the treatment of diabetes via enhancing insulin sensitivity. They are also able to protect the body from long-term consequences of diabetes including infectious diseases, nephropathy, neuronal and eye abnormalities. In this review, we try to discuss the mechanisms behind the biological effects of carotenoids for the prevention and treatment of DM and its complications. The authors believe that carotenoids will have a prominent place in the treatment of DM and its complications in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between Fluorescent Advanced Glycation End-Products and Vascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    Alexis Guerin-Dubourg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Diabetes is a major health problem associated with hyperglycemia and chronically increased oxidative stress and enhanced formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative plasma biomarkers in diabetic patients could be evidenced and associated with vascular complications. Methods. Oxidative stress biomarkers such as thiols, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA, glycated albumin (GA, fructosamine, and AGEs were measured in 75 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c > 7.5% with (44 or without (31 vascular disease and in 31 nondiabetic controls. Results. Most biomarkers of oxidation and glycation were significantly increased in diabetic patients in comparison with nondiabetics. Fructosamines, GA, IMA, and AGEs were positively correlated and levels of fluorescent AGEs were significantly increased in the plasma from patients presenting vascular complication. Conclusions. These results bring new evidence for the potential interest of glycated albumin, oxidative stress, and glycoxidation parameters in the monitoring of type 2 diabetic patients. Furthermore, it emphasizes fluorescent AGEs as a putative indicator for vascular event prediction in diabetic patients.

  7. Socioeconomic status and type 2 diabetes complications among young adult patients in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiko Funakoshi

    Full Text Available To assess the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES and complications of type 2 diabetes among young adults in Japan.A cross-sectional study.Outpatient wards of 96 member hospitals and clinics of the Japan Federation of Democratic Medical Institutions.A total of 782 outpatients with type 2 diabetes (525 males, 257 females, aged 20-40 years as of March 31, 2012. After excluding 110 participants whose retinopathy diagnosis was in question, 672 participants were analyzed.We examined the relations between SES (educational level, income, type of public healthcare insurance, and employment status and diabetes complications (retinopathy and nephropathy using a multivariate logistic regression analysis.The prevalence of type 2 diabetic retinopathy was 23.2%, while that of nephropathy was 8.9%. The odds of having retinopathy were higher among junior high school graduates (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.09-3.34, patients receiving public assistance (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.20-3.95, and patients with irregular (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.03-2.86 or no employment (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.36-3.68, compared to those with a higher SES, even after covariate adjustment (e.g., age, gender, body mass index. Similarly, the odds of having nephropathy were higher among patients with middle (OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.69-8.27 or low income levels (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.11-6.07, even after covariate adjustment.Low SES was associated with a greater likelihood of type 2 diabetes complications in young adults. These findings suggest the necessity of health policies that mitigate socioeconomic disparity and thereby reduce the prevalence of diabetic complications.

  8. Introduction of the DiaGene study: Clinical characteristics, pathophysiology and determinants of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.W. van Herpt (Thijs); Lemmers, R.F.H. (Roosmarijn F. H.); M. van Hoek (Mandy); J.G. Langendonk (Janneke); R.J. Erdtsieck (Ronald); B. Bravenboer (Bert); Lucas, A. (Annelies); M.T. Mulder (Monique); H.R. Haak (Harm); A. Lieverse (Aloysius); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Type 2 diabetes is a major healthcare problem. Glucose-, lipid-, and blood pressure-lowering strategies decrease the risk of micro- and macrovascular complications. However, a substantial residual risk remains. To unravel the etiology of type 2 diabetes and its complications,

  9. Teenage girls with type 1 diabetes have poorer metabolic control than boys and face more complications in early adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsson, Ulf; Anderzén, Johan; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To compare metabolic control between males and females with type 1 diabetes during adolescence and as young adults, and relate it to microvascular complications. METHODS: Data concerning 4000 adolescents with type 1 diabetes registered in the Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry, an...

  10. Global complication rates of type 2 diabetes in Indigenous peoples: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqshbandi, Mariam; Harris, Stewart B; Esler, James G; Antwi-Nsiah, Fred

    2008-10-01

    The world's Indigenous peoples are experiencing an unprecedented epidemic of type 2 diabetes [T2DM] but little has been published describing the complications burden. The objective of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of T2DM complications in Indigenous populations worldwide. A literature review was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE to examine available complications data. Country, Indigenous population, authors, publication year, total sample size, Indigenous sample size, age, methodology, and prevalence of nephropathy, end-stage renal disease, retinopathy, neuropathy, lower extremity amputations, cardiovascular disease, hospitalizations and mortality due to diabetes were recorded. One-hundred and eleven studies were selected. Results revealed a disproportionate burden of disease complications among all Indigenous peoples regardless of their geographic location. Complication rates were seen to vary widely across Indigenous groups. Gaps were found in the published literature on complications among Indigenous populations, especially those living in underdeveloped countries. These gaps may be in part due to the challenges caused by varying operational practices, research methodologies, and definitions of the term Indigenous, making documentation of rates among these peoples problematic. Comprehensive surveillance applying standardized definitions and methodologies is needed to design targeted prevention and disease management strategies for Indigenous peoples with T2DM.

  11. Epidemiology, management, complications and costs associated with type 2 diabetes in Brazil: a comprehensive literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background With an estimated 74% of all deaths attributable to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in 2010, NCDs have become a major health priority in Brazil. The objective of the study was to conduct a comprehensive literature review on diabetes in Brazil; specifically: the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes, the availability of national and regional sources of data (particularly in terms of direct and indirect costs) and health policies for the management of diabetes and its complications. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government and the World Health Organization, as well as other grey literature and official government websites were also reviewed. Results From 2006 to 2010, an approximate 20% increase in the prevalence of self-reported diabetes was observed. In 2010, it was estimated that 6.3% of Brazilians aged 18 years or over had diabetes. Diabetes was estimated to be responsible for 278,778 years of potential life lost for every 100,000 people. In 2013, it is estimated that about 7% of patients with diabetes has had one or more of the following complications: diabetic foot ulcers, amputation, kidney disease, and fundus changes. The estimated annual direct cost of diabetes was USD $3.952 billion in 2000; the estimated annual indirect cost was USD $18.6 billion. The two main sources of data on diabetes are the information systems of the Ministry of Health and surveys. In the last few years, the Brazilian Ministry of Health has invested considerably in improving surveillance systems for NCDs as well as implementing specific programmes to improve diagnosis and access to treatment. Conclusions Brazil has the capacity to address and respond to NCDs due to the leadership of the Ministry of Health in NCD prevention activities, including an integrated programme currently in place for diabetes. Strengthening the surveillance of NCDs is a

  12. The impact of chromatin modification on the development of chronic complications in patients with diabetes

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    Małgorzata Wegner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease. Over 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. Chronic complications (retinopathy, nephropathy or neuropathy are the major dangerous outcome of this disease. Recent studies indicate a significant role of epigenetic regulation in the development of chronic complications in patients with diabetes. Hyperglycemia could cause abnormal regulation of the activity of enzymes participating in the post-translational histone modifications (PTHMs and initiation of changes in patterns of DNA methylation. It leads to modification of chromatin structure. These epigenetic abnormalities result in changes in the expression of genes involved in development of chronic inflammation, such as NF-KAPPAB (nuclear factor kappaB gene, TNFα (tumor necrosis factor a gene, IL6 (interleukin 6 gene or MCP1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 gene. It enhances endothelial cell dysfunction, which plays an important role in development of chronic, diabetic complications. In addition, caused by hyperglycemia epigenetic modifications changes in structure of chromatin explains “metabolic memory”, a phenomenon of presence of pathological pathways related to the prolonged hyperglycemia in the past, despite maintaining good metabolic control later on.

  13. Oral benfotiamine plus alpha-lipoic acid normalises complication-causing pathways in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Edelstein, D; Brownlee, M

    2008-10-01

    We determined whether fixed doses of benfotiamine in combination with slow-release alpha-lipoic acid normalise markers of reactive oxygen species-induced pathways of complications in humans. Male participants with and without type 1 diabetes were studied in the General Clinical Research Centre of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Glycaemic status was assessed by measuring baseline values of three different indicators of hyperglycaemia. Intracellular AGE formation, hexosamine pathway activity and prostacyclin synthase activity were measured initially, and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. In the nine participants with type 1 diabetes, treatment had no effect on any of the three indicators used to assess hyperglycaemia. However, treatment with benfotiamine plus alpha-lipoic acid completely normalised increased AGE formation, reduced increased monocyte hexosamine-modified proteins by 40% and normalised the 70% decrease in prostacyclin synthase activity from 1,709 +/- 586 pg/ml 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha) to 4,696 +/- 533 pg/ml. These results show that the previously demonstrated beneficial effects of these agents on complication-causing pathways in rodent models of diabetic complications also occur in humans with type 1 diabetes.

  14. Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Mellitus: interference of vascular and neurological complications in occupational performance

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    Pâmela Bertazo Viêro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia and associated with complications. It is considered a chronic degenerative disease. Objective: This study aimed to identify which areas of human occupation suffered performance changes as a result of vascular and neurological complications of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Method: This is a quantitative study with exploratory approach. The data collection occurred in a University Hospital located in a city in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul, and used a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM. Data were analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient using the software Statistical Package for Social Science 15.0 (SPSS. Results: The sample consisted of 10 people with vascular and neurological complications resulting of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, with 80% men and 20% women. The most frequently cited occupational performance problems were in self-care activities (feeding, bathing and mobility, while the most affected productivity tasks were cooking and leisure activities such as walking and socializing. Conclusion: The data alert us to the work of occupational therapists caring for people with diabetes in all health care levels.

  15. Peripheral neuropathy as a complication of diabetic ketoacidosis in a child with newly diagnosed diabetes type 1 - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszyńska-Wilk, Marta; Wysocka-Mincewicz, Marta; Świercz, Anna; Świderska, Jolanta; Marszał, Magdalena; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2017-12-08

    Neurological complications of diabetic ketoacidosis are considered to be very serious clinical problem. The most common complication is cerebral edema. However this group includes also less common syndromes such as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis or very rare peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of 9-year old girl with new onset type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, cerebral edema, multifocal vasogenic brain lesions and lower limbs peripheral paresis. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria one week before admission to the hospital. In laboratory tests initial blood glucose level 1136 mg/dl and acidosis (pH 7.1; BE-25.9) were noted. She was admitted to the hospital in a critical condition and required treatment in intensive care unit. Computed tomography scan showed brain edema and hipodense lesion in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed more advanced multifocal brain lesions Nerve conduction studies demonstrated damage of the motor neuron in both lower extremities with dysfunction in both peroneal nerves and the right tibial nerve. As a result of diabetological, neurological treatment and physiotherapy patient's health state gradually improved. Acute neuropathy after ketoacidosis is rare complication and its pathomechanism is not clear. Patients with DKA require careful monitoring of neurological functions even after normalization of glycemic parameters.

  16. Role of aldose reductase C-106T polymorphism among diabetic Egyptian patients with different microvascular complications

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    Nermine Hossam Zakaria

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aldose reductase pathway proves that elevated blood glucose promotes cellular dysfunction. The polyol pathway converts excess intracellular glucose into alcohols via activity of the aldose reductase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of glucose to sorbitol which triggers variety of intracellular changes in the tissues. Among diabetes, activity is drastically increased in association with three main consequences inside the cells. The aim of this study was to detect the association of the C-106 T polymorphism of the aldose reductase gene and its frequency among a sample of 150 Egyptian adults with type 2 diabetic patients having diabetic microvascular. The detection of the aldose reductase C-106 T polymorphism gene was done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The genotype distribution of the C-106 T polymorphism showed that CC genotype was statistically significantly higher among patients with retinopathy compared to nephropathy. Patients with nephropathy had significant association with the TT genotype when compared with diabetic retinopathy patients. Follow up study after the genotype detection among recently diagnosed diabetic patients in order to give a prophylactic aldose reductase inhibitors; studying the microvascular complications and its relation to the genotype polymorphisms. The study may include multiple gene polymorphisms to make the relation between the gene and the occurrence of these complications more evident.

  17. Saving the limb in diabetic patients with ischemic foot lesions complicated by acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Giacomo; Faglia, Ezio

    2014-12-01

    Ischemia and infection are the most important factors affecting the prognosis of foot ulcerations in diabetic patients. To improve the outcome of these patients, it is necessary to aggressively treat 2 important pathologies--namely, occlusive arterial disease affecting the tibial and femoral arteries and infection of the ischemic diabetic foot. Each of these 2 conditions may lead to major limb amputation, and the presence of both critical limb ischemia (CLI) and acute deep infection is a major risk factor for lower-extremity amputation. Thus, the management of diabetic foot ulcers requires specific therapeutic approaches that vary significantly depending on whether foot lesions are complicated by infection and/or ischemia. A multidisciplinary team approach is the key to successful treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer: ischemic diabetic foot ulcers complicated by acute deep infection pose serious treatment challenges because high levels of skill, organization, accuracy, and timing of intervention are required to maximize the chances of limb salvage: these complex issues are better managed by a multidisciplinary clinical group. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. The Hospitalization Costs of Diabetes and Hypertension Complications in Zimbabwe: Estimations and Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsa P. Mutowo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Treating complications associated with diabetes and hypertension imposes significant costs on health care systems. This study estimated the hospitalization costs for inpatients in a public hospital in Zimbabwe. Methods. The study was retrospective and utilized secondary data from medical records. Total hospitalization costs were estimated using generalized linear models. Results. The median cost and interquartile range (IQR for patients with diabetes, $994 (385–1553 mean $1319 (95% CI: 981–1657, was higher than patients with hypertension, $759 (494–1147 mean $914 (95% CI: 825–1003. Female patients aged below 65 years with diabetes had the highest estimated mean costs ($1467 (95% CI: 1177–1828. Wound care had the highest estimated mean cost of all procedures, $2884 (95% CI: 2004–4149 for patients with diabetes and $2239 (95% CI: 1589–3156 for patients with hypertension. Age below 65 years, medical procedures (amputation, wound care, dialysis, and physiotherapy, the presence of two or more comorbidities, and being prescribed two or more drugs were associated with significantly higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion. Our estimated costs could be used to evaluate and improve current inpatient treatment and management of patients with diabetes and hypertension and determine the most cost-effective interventions to prevent complications and comorbidities.

  19. The prevalence of macrovascular complications among diabetic patients in the United Arab Emirates

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    Norman John N

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a major public health problem in the UAE with a prevalence rate reaching 24% in national citizens and 17.4% in expatriates. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of macrovascular complications among diabetic patients in the Al-Ain district of the United Arab Emirates (UAE. Methods The study was part of a general cross-sectional survey carried out to assess the prevalence of diabetes (DM complications among known diabetic patients in Al-Ain District, UAE. Patients were randomly selected during 2003/2004. Patients completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire carried out by treating doctors and underwent a complete medical assessment including measurement of height, weight, blood pressure and examination for evidence of macrovascular complications. A standard ECG was recorded and blood samples were taken to document fasting blood sugar, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C and lipid profile. Results A sample of 513 diabetic patients was selected with a mean age of 53 years (SD ± 13.01. Overall, 29.5% of DM patients had evidence of macrovascular complications: 11.6% (95% CI: 8.8–14.4 of patients had peripheral vascular disease (PVD, 14.4% (95% CI: 11.3–17.5 had a history of coronary artery disease (CAD and 3.5% (95% CI: 1.9–5.1% had cerebrovascular disease (CVD. Of the total population surveyed 35% (95%CI: 30.8–39 had hypertension. The analysis showed that macrovascular complications in diabetic patients were more common among males, increased with age, were more common among hypertensive patients and its prevalence increased steadily with duration of DM. Conclusion Our data revealed a significant association between hypertension and presence of macrovascular disease among diabetic patients. However, the risk of CAD in the UAE was relatively low compared to that seen in patients in other geographical settings. In addition, a lack of correlation between

  20. Conflicting interactions of apolipoprotein A and high density lipoprotein cholesterol with microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Zahra; Afarideh, Mohsen; Ghajar, Alireza; Esteghamati, Sadaf; Esteghamati, Alireza; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2017-11-01

    This study is amid at investigating the associations, and interactions of serum lipid biomarkers with microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes (T2D). A nested case-control study was conducted within an ongoing prospective study on patients with T2D. Microvascular complications of T2D including diabetic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy were investigated. A total of 444 cases with at least one of the microvascular complications of T2D and 439 age- and gender-matched controls free of any of the chronic microvascular complications of T2D were included. The associations and interactions of a panel of serum lipid biomarkers with the microvascular complications of T2D were investigated. Serum triglyceride had the strongest association with microvascular complications of T2D (crude model: β=0.632, P value=0.045). Each standard deviation increment in serum TG was associated with 3.7 times increased frequency of microvascular complications. Despite high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), serum apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) was positively associated with the presence of diabetic neuropathy. Each standard deviation increment in serum ApoA1 was associated with increased frequency of diabetic neuropathy (OR, 1.2, 95% CI, (1.1-1.3), P value=0.006). The frequency of diabetic neuropathy was higher in 2nd and 3rd quartiles of serum Lp(a) compared to diabetic patients in the first quartile (OR, 5.52, 95% (1.17-25.8), P value=0.047). ApoA1 but not HDL-C is straightly associated with diabetic neuropathy. Even Slight rise in serum Lp(a) is associated with increased frequency of diabetic retinopathLipid variables could serve as specific predictors of vascular complications in diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Retinal Vessel Calibers Predict Long-term Microvascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin L; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy cause significant morbidity in patients with type 1 diabetes, even though improvements in treatment modalities delay the appearance and reduce the severity of these complications. To prevent or further delay the onset, it is necessary to better.......5-1 disc diameter from the disc margin were measured and summarized as the central artery and vein equivalents. In multiple regression analyses, we found wider venular diameters and smaller arteriolar diameters were both predictive of the 16-year development of nephropathy, neuropathy, and proliferative...

  2. Association of the severity of diabetes-related complications with stage of breast cancer at diagnosis among elderly women with pre-existing diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenzi, Ebtihag O; Madhavan, S Suresh; Tan, Xi

    2018-01-01

    This study assessed the association between the severity of diabetes complications using diabetes complications severity index (DCSI) and stage of breast cancer (BC) at diagnosis among elderly women with pre-existing diabetes and incident BC. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data, we identified women with incident BC during 2004-2011 and pre-existing diabetes (N = 7729). Chi-square tests were used to test for group differences in stage of BC at diagnosis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the associations between the severity of diabetes complications and stage of BC at diagnosis. Overall, women with a DCSI = 2 and a DCSI ≥ 3 were more likely to be diagnosed at advanced stages as compared to those with no diabetes complications. In full adjusted association (after adding BC screening to the analysis model), the severity of diabetes complications was no longer an independent predictor of advanced stages at diagnosis. However, women with a DCSI = 2 were 26% more likely to be diagnosed at stage I (versus stage 0) of BC at diagnosis as compared to those without diabetes complications (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.53). The increased likelihood of having advanced-stage BC at diagnosis associated with severity of diabetes-related complications appears to be mediated by lower rates of breast cancer screening among elderly women with pre-existing diabetes complications. Therefore, reducing disparity in receiving breast cancer screening among elderly women with diabetes may reduce the risk of advanced-stage breast cancer diagnosis.

  3. A Survey on Prevalence of Ocular Complications and It’s Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients of Diabetic Center of Nader Kazemi Clinic Shiraz- Iran 1998-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Kashfi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: With respect to an increase in diabetes prevalence, and the likelihood of ocular complications among them, this study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and risk factors and incidence of the ocular complications in patients of Nader Kazemi, Shiraz Diabetic center from 1998 to 2010.Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional study , subjects were selected based on a systematic random sampling to investigate the incidence of the ocular complications and the influence of factors such as age, sex, types of diabetes, job, education, blood triglyceride (TG and cholesterol level, Family history of diabetes, history of hypertension, history of participation in educational classes, methods of treatment, duration of diabetes and fasting blood sugar were considered on them.Results: Ocular complications were found among 229 diabetic patients (32.6%. patients having type II diabetic have more ocular complications comparing with patients with type I diabetes (P<0. 005. Factors such as job (P=0. 022, history of participation in educational classes (P<0. 001, education (P<0. 001, family history of diabetes (P<0. 001, blood triglyceride (TG (P=0. 021, duration of diabetes(P<0. 001,age (P<0. 001, method of treatment(P<0. 001and fasting blood sugar (P<0. 001 had a significant relationship with the occurrence of ocular complication. However, other risk factors such as hypertension,gender and cholesterol levels were not statistically significant relationship with the occurrence of ocular complication.Conclusion: Given the prevalence of ocular complications, educating diabetics’ patients can have a significant influence in reducing the occurrence of ocular complications.

  4. The Degree of Autonomic Modulation Is Associated With the Severity of Microvascular Complications in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Jakobsen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to elucidate whether the degree of autonomic modulation is associated with the degree of microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 290 type 1 individuals with diabetes were randomly recruited during normal visits t......, nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy in individuals with type 1 diabetes patients. CONCLUSIONS: Autonomic dysfunction is present in early stages of retinopathy, nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes....

  5. Diabetes insipidus-like state complicating percutaneous transluminal renal stenting for transplant renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lu; He, Yangyan; Zhang, Hongkun; Wu, Ziheng; Li, Donglin; Chen, Shanwen

    2014-07-01

    To report the incidence, etiology, and treatments of diabetes insipidus-like state that complicate percutaneous transluminal renal stenting (PTRS) for transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS). Data from 7 patients on whom PTRS for TRAS was performed between October 2008 and March 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The parameters investigated included blood flow velocity, blood pressure, and creatinine levels before and after the intervention. The procedural success rate was 100%. Three cases developed a diabetes insipidus-like state in the immediate postprocedural period. Urine output returned to normal within 2 weeks after treatment. The median blood flow velocity was significantly reduced from 4.51 m/sec (4.31-4.61 m/sec) at the time of TRAS diagnosis to 1.33 m/sec (1.31-1.51 m/sec) at the most recent follow-up of the group with a diabetes insipidus-like state. The ratio of median blood flow velocity before and after stenting in the group with a diabetes insipidus-like state was significantly higher than that in the group without a diabetes insipidus-like state (3.39 vs. 1.93). Diabetes insipidus-like state that complicates PTRS for TRAS is not an uncommon event, but appears to be underreported in the medical literature. A high ratio of pre- and poststenting median blood flow velocity may be a predictor for a postprocedural diabetes insipidus-like state. The most probable cause may be the marked increase in renal arterial flow. Early recognition of the condition is essential to avoid dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mathematical model of diabetic encephalopathy in diagnosis of complicated forms of diabetes mellitus

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    A.O. Popruga

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this research is to optimize the methods for diagnosis of diabetic encephalopathy based on the study of indicators of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, functional state of the brain, metabolic disorders and morphological characteristics of the brain tissue. Materials and methods. A comprehensive survey was carried out in 537 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM, including 342 (63.7 % persons with type 1 DM, and 195 (36.3 % — with type 2 DM. Results. The article presents data on the integrated study of clinical, metabolic and functional indicators as risk factors for diabetic encephalopathy. Their diagnostic significance is argued. On the basis of a comprehensive assessment of the obtained data, which expanded the view on the pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy, the priority of metabolic disorders was confirmed. Diagnostic criteria of diabetic encephalopathy were established and its mathematical model was developed. Conclusions. The availa­bility of informative indicators identified will allow the doctor to diagnose diabetic encephalopathy at the early stages or to predict its development and to detect at the preclinical stage.

  7. Delayed recognition of Wolfram syndrome frequently misdiagnosed as type 1 diabetes with early chronic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmyslowska, A; Borowiec, M; Fichna, P; Iwaniszewska, B; Majkowska, L; Pietrzak, I; Szalecki, M; Szypowska, A; Mlynarski, W

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in diagnostic methods and greater genetic awareness have brought remarkable progress in the recognition of monogenic forms of diabetes, including Wolfram syndrome (WFS). WFS is diagnosed based on clinical criteria of coexistence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, and confirmed by molecular analysis; however, the condition is still sometimes misdiagnosed. To begin to understand the reasons for misdiagnosis, we conducted a retrospective analysis of WFS patients who were originally misdiagnosed. The medical histories of 13 pediatric patients with clinical misdiagnosis of type 1 diabetes and early chronic complications made in the years 1995-2010 and who were subsequently correctly diagnosed with WFS based on genetic testing in 2008-2011 were analyzed. The average age of the patients at diabetes onset was 5 (4.4-6.3) years, and the mean HbA1c level at diagnosis was 9.1±2.3%. Initially, all of these patients were treated as having type 1 diabetes with progressive visual impairment despite good metabolic control (mean HbA1c 7.5±1.3%). Diagnosis of optic atrophy was made at an average age of 9 (5.9-11.5) years, which corresponds to 4 years after diabetes recognition (p=0.002). At the time of genetic analysis, the average age of the patients was 16 (12-18.7) years, which corresponds to 7 years after recognition of coexistence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy (p=0.007). Delays of at least 7 years occurred before recognition of WFS among a cohort of pediatric patients with diabetes. All patients with WFS were primarily misdiagnosed as having type 1 diabetes. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Chrysin treatment improves diabetes and its complications in liver, brain, and pancreas in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Samini, Fariborz; Farkhondeh, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    Chrysin (CH) is a natural flavonoid with pharmacological influences. The purpose of the current study was the assessment of possible protective effects of CH against oxidative damage in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas of streptozotocin (STZ)- induced diabetic rats. In the present study, the rats were divided into the following groups of 8 animals each: control, untreated diabetic, 3 CH (20, 40, 80 mg/kg/day)-treated diabetic groups. To find out the modulations of cellular antioxidant defense systems, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and antioxidant enzymes including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were determined in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas. STZ caused an elevation of glucose, MDA, TG, TC, LDL-C and with reduction of HDL-C, total protein, SOD, CAT, and GST in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas (p < 0.01). The findings showed that the significant elevation in the glucose, MDA, TG, TC, LDL-C and reduction of HDL-C, total protein, SOD, CAT, and GST were ameliorated in the CH-treated diabetic groups versus to the untreated groups, in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). The current study offers that CH may be recovered diabetes and its complications by modification of oxidative stress.

  9. Complications and nursing care in interventional treatment of diabetic foot via radial artery access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lingyun; Zhou Xiaoxiang; Zeng Yongmei; Chen Junfei; Lai Lisha; Pang Pengfei; Zhu Kangshun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of interventional treatment via radial artery access for diabetic foot and to summarize its complications and nursing care. Methods: The interventional treatment via radial artery access was performed in twenty patients with diabetic foot. The preoperative psychological nursing care, the nursing of the punctured site of radial artery and the indwelling catheter, the complications of the puncture site and thrombolytic therapy were reviewed and retrospectively analyzed. Results: Some complications occurred in eight cases, including hematoma at puncture site (n= 1), oozing of blood (n=3), gingival bleeding (n=1) and pain (n=3). No retention of urine or infection occurred. Conclusion: It is very important to pay enough attention to the nursing care of puncture site and indwelling catheter sheath and to make a close observation of patient's condition in order to reduce the occurrence of complications. Rich clinical experience and careful observation after the operation can definitely reduce the occurrence of thrombolytic complications and improve the patient's living quality. (authors)

  10. Central diabetes insipidus: an unusual complication in a child with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and monosomy 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapolchai, Pacharapan; Ha, Shau-Yin; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung; Lukito, Johannes B; Wan, Thomas S K; So, Chi-Chiu; Chiang, Alan Kwok-Shing

    2013-03-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) is well-documented as a presenting feature of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in adults. However, DI is unusual in pediatric patients with myeloid malignancies. We report here this rare complication in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and monosomy 7. Our case and previously reported cases of DI arising as a complication in myeloid malignancies demonstrate a close association with deletion of chromosome 7. The clinical characteristics and outcomes of these uncommon cases in children are reviewed and discussed.

  11. Determinants of developing diabetes mellitus and vascular complications in patients with impaired fasting glucose

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    Faranak Sharifi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To detect the risk factors of diabetes mellitus (DM and cardiovascular complications in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty three subjects with proved IFG in Zanjan Healthy Heart Study (2002-2003 were recalled and participated in this study (2009-2010. Demographic and laboratoryinformation of the participants were collected.Ischemic heart disease (IHD was assessed by the exercise tolerance test (ETT. All the subjects with abnormal ETT or documented past history of IHD confirmed by angiographic evaluation. Ophthalmic complications including cataract, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy were estimated by an ophthalmologist. Results: Incidence of DM was 19.5%. All the diabetic and pre-diabetic patients had at least one of the other components of metabolic syndrome. Obesity (P: 0.04, OR: 1.8, 95%CI: 1.2-9 and low physical activity (P < 0.001, OR: 9.6, 95%CI: 3.4-32 were the only independent prognostic risk factors for progression to DM in patients with IFG. Total incidence of IHD was 14.6% and had a strong correlation with sex (P: 0.01, OR: 1.8, 95%CI: 1.2-1.5, age (P < 0.001, OR: 23, 95%CI: 2.1-67 and cigarette smoking (P < 0.001, OR: 36.5, 95%CI: 3.9-337. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy was shown in 2 (1.6% subjects who were all women. Conclusion: Obesity and low physical activity are the main factors of developing DM and its macrovascular complications in subjects with IFG.

  12. Biocompatible zinc oxide nanocrystals stabilized via hydroxyethyl cellulose for mitigation of diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Jihan; El-Banna, Mona; Razik, Tay Abdel; El-Naggar, Mehrez E

    2018-02-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes are the most serious manifestations of the disease. The hyperglycemia can directly promote an inflammatory state where the increase C-reactive (CRP) and cytokines, such as interleukins (IL-1 and IL-6), which contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The current study was aimed to evaluate the role of environmentally-synthesized zinc oxide nanocrystals (ZnO-NPs) in augmentation of hyperglycemia and its complications, as well as the preservation of asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) level as a specific marker for endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. ZnO-NPs was chemically-synthesized using environmental benign biodegradable hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HES) as both a stabilizing and directing agent in the presence of potassium hydroxide. HES is a biomaterial compound used in many biomedical applications due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility in nature. Particle size, morphological structure, purity, and crystallinity of the as-prepared ZnO-NPs were evaluated through different techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy connected to energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (SEM-EDS). Sixty male albino rats were used in this study and divided into four groups: control, ZnO-NPs, diabetic and treated groups; after the experimental period, CRP and interleukin-1 (IL-1α) were determined by ELISA. ADMA was estimated by RP-HPLC using a fluorescence detector. The results obtained indicate that CRP, IL-1α, and ADMA levels increased significantly concomitant with a reduction in NO level in the diabetic group, whereas ZnO-NPs supplementation significantly attenuated these parameters. Based on these encouraging results, the reported approach of environmental synthesis and application has the potential of leading to a new generation of nanometerials for treatment of diabetic complications with considerably enhanced

  13. Newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes complicated by ketoacidosis and peripheral thrombosis leading to transfemoral amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard Jørgensen, Line; Skov, Ole; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral vascular thromboembolism is a rarely described complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. We report a 41-year-old otherwise healthy man admitted with ketoacidosis and ischaemia of the left foot. The patient was unsuccessfully treated with thromboendarterectomy, and the extremity was ultima...... was ultimately amputated. The patient had no family history of cardiovascular disease, and all blood sample analyses for hypercoagulability were negative. We recommend an increased focus on peripheral thromboembolism, when treating patients with severe ketoacidosis....

  14. Type 2 diabetes in young adults in Central Auckland: demography and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, Junaid; Khanolkar, Manish; Cundy, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in young adults is associated with a high risk of diabetes complications. To investigated the demography and the emergence of complications of young adults with T2D in the central Auckland region where there has been substantial immigration. In total, 310 young adults with T2D (Auckland Diabetes Centre in 2015. We documented demographic, anthropometric and metabolic variables and prevalence and the emergence of complications. Three demographic groups accounted for 243 participants (78%): 135 (44%) were migrants of Asian or Pacific Island origin, diagnosed a median 9 years after migration at a mean age of 28 ± 6 years; 88 (29%) were New Zealand-born Pāsifika descent, with a high prevalence of morbid obesity and 37 (12%) had major mental illness or intellectual disability. At diagnosis, the median HbA1c was 80 mmol/mol, and in 28%, it was ≥100 mmol/mol. A median 6 years after diagnosis, 56% had some degree of retinopathy, with the prevalence related both to the duration of diabetes and glycaemic control (P = 0.001). Forty-four percent of subjects had abnormal albuminuria at diagnosis (12% with macroalbuminuria). Increased albuminuria was strongly associated with obesity (P = 0.002). The development of CKD stages 4-5 was related both to the severity of retinopathy and degree of albuminuria at diagnosis (P = 0.0001). Major cardiovascular events were related to the severity of retinopathy at diagnosis (P = 0.0001). New migrants, New Zealand-born Pāsifika and patients with mental illness or an intellectual disability comprise the bulk of young onset T2D. The disease is aggressive, and by the age of 40, patients are already developing advanced complications. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  15. Permanent Central Diabetes Insipidus as a Complication of S. pneumoniae Meningitis in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statz, Hannah; Hsu, Benson S

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare but recognized complication of meningitis. The occurrence of diabetes insidipus has been previously attributed to Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) in a handful of patients and only once within the pediatric subpopulation. We present the clinical course of a previously healthy 2-year, 8-month-old male child ultimately diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) secondary to S. pneumoniae meningitis. Permanent CDI following S. pneumoniae meningitis is unique to our case and has not been previously described. Following the case presentation, we describe the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CDI. The mechanism proposed for this clinical outcome is cerebral herniation for a sufficient duration and subsequent ischemia leading to the development of permanent CDI. Providers should be aware of CDI resulting from S. pneumoniae meningitis as prompt diagnosis and management may decrease the risk of permanent hypothalamo-pituitary axis damage. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  16. Retinal Vascular Fractals and Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Jakob; Green, Anders; Kawasaki, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    diabetes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: This was a cross-sectional study of 208 long-term surviving type 1 diabetes patients from a population-based Danish cohort identified in 1973. METHODS: Retinal photographs were obtained at a clinical examination in 2007 or 2008. D(f) was measured......, respectively. Median D(f) was 1.4610 (range, 1.3774-1.5188). After adjustments for age, gender, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, and smoking, persons with lower D(f) were more likely to have proliferative retinopathy (odds ratio [OR], 1.45 per standard deviation [SD] decrease in D(f); 95......PURPOSE: Fractal analysis is a method to quantify the geometric pattern and complexity of the retinal vessels. This study examined the association of retinal fractal dimension (D(f)) and microvascular and macrovascular complications in a population-based cohort of Danish patients with type 1...

  17. Epidemiological characteristics of diabetes mellitus and its complications in the Omsk region

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    Marina Lukmanovna Sayfullina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate epidemiological situation with respect to diabetes morbidity in the Omsk region during 2002-2008. Materials and methods. This prospective cohort study used official statistical reporting forms № 12. A total of 1398 Acts of medical and social assessment,Statistical cards (form № 25, Minute books of medico-social examination commissions, and Collected information-statistical materials ondisability situation in the Omsk region were available for analysis. Results. A stable trend toward reduction of unfavourable outcomes of diabetes mellitus (DM (complications, physical disability and mortality hasbeen documented despite overall enhancement of DM morbidity in the region. Conclusion. The study revealed improved rehabilitation records among disabled diabetics.

  18. HbA1c in relation to incident diabetes and diabetes-related complications in non-diabetic adults at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Patricia Anne; Kyle, Cam; Kenealy, Tim; Jackson, Rod T

    2017-05-01

    We compared the utility of glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) and oral glucose tolerance (oGTT) in non-diabetic patients for identifying incident diabetes; all-cause mortality; cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality; CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD), and ischemic stroke events; and diabetes microvascular complications. Data from a New Zealand community setting were prospectively linked to hospitalization, mortality, pharmaceutical and laboratory test results data. After applying exclusion criteria (prior laboratory diagnosis or history of drug treatment for diabetes or hospitalization for diabetes or CVD event), there were 31,148 adults who had an HbA 1c and 2-h 75g oGTT. HbA 1c was measured by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and glucose using a commercial enzymatic method. We compared glycemic measures and outcomes using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. The median follow-up time was 4years (range 0 to 13). The mean age was 57·6years and 53·0% were male. After adjusting for other glycemic measures (fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and/or HbA 1c where relevant) in addition to age, sex, ethnicity and smoking habit, the hazard ratios for incident diabetes and diabetes complications of retinopathy and nephropathy were highest for 2-h glucose levels, followed by HbA 1c and lastly by fasting glucose. However, all-cause mortality and CHD were significantly associated with HbA 1c concentrations only, and ischemic stroke and CVD events with 2-h glucose only. Circulatory complications showed a stronger association with HbA 1c . Apart from neuropathy, HbA 1c showed stronger associations with outcomes compared to fasting glucose and provides a convenient alternative to an oGTT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of diabetic retinopathy and other microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg

    fotografering af nethinden i forhold til guldstandarden med syv sammensatte felter defineret i studiet: Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) (Artikel II). Derudover har vi brugt en nyere metode til at undersøge kargeometrien i nethinden for at se om en suboptimal konfiguration i nethindens kar er......Forekomsten af type 1 diabetes er stigende og diabetisk retinopati er fortsat en af de primære årsager til nedsat syn blandt personer i den arbejdsdygtige alder. Derudover er andre mikrovaskulære komplikationer som diabetisk nefropati og neuropati blandt de primære årsager til nedsat nyrefunktion......, dialysebehandling, fodsår og amputationer. Optimal kontrol af blodsukker og blodtryk kan nedsætte risikoen for eller forsinke udviklingen af sene mikrovaskulære komplikationer. Derudover har sen debut alder og kortere varighed af diabetes vist sig at være beskyttende for udviklingen af mikrovaskulære komplikationer...

  20. Light Modulates Ocular Complications in an Albino Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawus, Elias; Veildbaum, Gizi; Zemel, Esther; Leibu, Rina; Perlman, Ido; Shehadeh, Naim

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess potential interactions of light exposure and hyperglycemia upon ocular complications in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced) diabetic rats ( N = 39) and non-diabetic rats ( N = 9) were distributed into eight groups according to the irradiance and color of the light phase during the 12/12-hour light/dark regime. Follow-up lasted 90 days and included assessment of cataract development and electroretinogram (ERG) recordings. Stress to the retina was also assessed by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunocytochemistry. Cataract development was fast in diabetic rats that were exposed to unattenuated white light or to bright colored lights during the light phase. Diabetic rats that were kept under attenuated brown or yellow light during the light phase exhibited slower rate of cataract development. Electroretinogram responses indicated very severe retinal damage in diabetic rats kept under bright colored lights in the blue-yellow range or bright white light during the light phase. Electroretinogram damage was milder in rats kept under bright red light or attenuated yellow or brown light during the light phase. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Müller cells was consistent with ERG assessment of retinal damage. Attenuating white light and filtering out short wavelengths have a protective effect on the eyes of diabetic rats as evident by slower rate of cataract formation and a smaller degree of retinal damage. Our findings suggest that special glasses attenuating light exposure and filtering out short wavelengths (400-530 nm) may be beneficial for diabetic patients.

  1. Toward Big Data Analytics: Review of Predictive Models in Management of Diabetes and Its Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Johansen, Mette Dencker; Hejlesen, Ole

    2015-10-14

    Diabetes is one of the top priorities in medical science and health care management, and an abundance of data and information is available on these patients. Whether data stem from statistical models or complex pattern recognition models, they may be fused into predictive models that combine patient information and prognostic outcome results. Such knowledge could be used in clinical decision support, disease surveillance, and public health management to improve patient care. Our aim was to review the literature and give an introduction to predictive models in screening for and the management of prevalent short- and long-term complications in diabetes. Predictive models have been developed for management of diabetes and its complications, and the number of publications on such models has been growing over the past decade. Often multiple logistic or a similar linear regression is used for prediction model development, possibly owing to its transparent functionality. Ultimately, for prediction models to prove useful, they must demonstrate impact, namely, their use must generate better patient outcomes. Although extensive effort has been put in to building these predictive models, there is a remarkable scarcity of impact studies. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  2. Glycated albumin as a marker of glycemia in diabetes and its vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Warwas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective glycemic control is very important to prevent the onset and the progression of chronic complications in diabetic patients. It is known that glycation of various proteins is increased in diabetic patients compared with non-diabetics. Among these glycated proteins, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is commonly used as a gold standard index of glycemic control in the clinical setting. However, it can be unreliable in conditions affecting the lifespan of erythrocytes (120 days as well as in the clinical state in which glycemic control alleviates or deteriorates in a short period. By overcoming the shortcomings of HbA1c, glycated albumin (GA has gained interest as a useful index for an intermediate glycation period (2 weeks and pathogenic protein.After giving a brief overview of the key role of HbA1c as a long-term glycemic marker, this review focuses on (a glycation of human albumin and its main properties, (b methods of GA determination, (c the recent clinical status of GA as a glycemic index in diabetic patients and its association with vascular complications. Finally, conditions with a possible inaccurate GA level are also mentioned.

  3. The role of diabetes and aging in the determinism of hypertension and the related cerebrovascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguarnera, Michele; Vacante, Marco; Frazzetto, Paola Mariangela; Motta, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies carried out on a large sample (3191 elderly and 640 centenarians) with identical criteria and applying the actual diagnostic standards, have evidenced a high, statistically significant prevalence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) (18.84%) in the elderly, as compared to the centenarians (7.50%). This aspect is correlated with the major frequency of maturity onset diabetes in elderly (MODE), compared to the centenarians, correlated also to the mortality of diabetes mellitus (DM) of long duration. The DMT2 and the aging interact in the determinism of vascular alterations, i.e., of the hypertension, and related cardio-cerebrovascular complications. The most frequently occurring hypertension in both the elderly and centenarians was always the systolic-isolated one. The prevalence of hypertension and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was statistically significantly higher in diabetics, compared to the normoglycemic patients, in both the elderly and the centenarians. In addition, in a group of 914 elderly patients, being diabetics or normoglycemic at the start of the studies, but having neither AMI nor stroke at the baseline studies, after 5 years, these complications were more prevalent, significantly in statistical terms, in the diabetic subjects, compared to the normoglycemic ones. The increase of life-span causes an increase of the age when the aging phenomena appear, resulting in that the equal-age elderly people today are of better clinical conditions, compared to the previous periods. The increased life span with a consequent progressive aging of the population causes a worse general clinical state of the elderly population, characterized by polypathologies, frailty, and appearance of cognitive deficits or incapabilities for performing manual or instrumental activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cognitive Disorders, Depressive Status and Chronic Complications of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tache Mirela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Depression and cognitive disorders were reported more frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. Our aim was to analyze the association of cognitive disorders and depression association with chronic complications of DM in a group of Romanian patients. Materials and methods: The data was analyzed from 181 patients, with a mean age of 58,3 years to whom we applied the MMSE (Mini- Mental State Examination and MADRS (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale questionnaires. We also analyzed the presence of chronic DM complications, HbA1c and lipid profile. Results: Most patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM had mild cognitive impairment (92%, more common in the age group 50-59 years. Chronic macrovascular complications were present in 74.58%, while chronic microvascular complications were present in 61.87% of patients with T2DM who associated mild and moderate cognitive impairment (p = 0.013. The most common form of depression was mild depression (90.2%, present in most patients with DM, regardless of progression and type of treatment. MADRS depression test scores were statistically significant correlated with the presence of peripheral artery disease - PAD (p <0.001, ischemic heart disease - IHD (p <0.001 and chronic kidney disease - CKD (p =0.05. We did not find a statistically significant correlation with HbA1c and serum lipid values (p˃0,05. Conclusion: Chronic diabetes macrovascular complications (PAD, IHD and CKD were more frequently associated with cognitive disorders and depression in patients with T2DM independent of the degree of metabolic control.

  5. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus: a complication of diabetic neuropathy or a different type of diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis). Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  6. Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Diabetes Mellitus: A Complication of Diabetic Neuropathy or a Different Type of Diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Hardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis. Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  7. Potential of Dietary Non-Provitamin A Carotenoids in the Prevention and Treatment of Diabetic Microvascular Complications12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Ana Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that affects a substantial part of the population around the world. Whether type I or type II, this disease has serious macro- and microvascular complications that constitute the primary cause of death in diabetic patients. Microvascular complications include diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Although these complications are clinically and etiologically diverse, they share a common factor: glucose-induced damage. In the progression of diabetic complications, oxidative stress, inflammation, and the formation of glycation end products play an important role. Previous studies have shown that a healthy diet is vital in preventing these complications; in particular, the intake of antioxidants has been studied for their potential effect in ameliorating hyperglycemic injuries. Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments synthesized by plants, bacteria, and some kinds of algae that are responsible for the yellow, red, and orange colors in food. These compounds are part of the antioxidant machinery in plants and have also shown their efficacy in quenching free radicals, scavenging reactive oxygen species, modulating gene expression, and reducing inflammation in vitro and in vivo, showing that they can potentially be used as part of a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders, including diabetes and its related complications. This review highlights the potential protective effects of 4 non-provitamin A carotenoids—lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene, and astaxanthin—in the development and progression of diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:26773012

  8. Establishing Differences in Thermographic Patterns between the Various Complications in Diabetic Foot Disease

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    Alfred Gatt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the potential of thermography as an assessment tool for the detection of foot complications by understanding the variations in temperature that occur in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods. Participants were categorized according to a medical examination, ankle brachial index, doppler waveform analysis, and 10-gram monofilament testing into five groups: healthy adult, DM with no complications, DM with peripheral neuropathy, DM with neuroischaemia, and DM with peripheral arterial disease (PAD groups. Thermographic imaging of the toes and forefeet was performed. Results. 43 neuroischaemic feet, 41 neuropathic feet, 58 PAD feet, 21 DM feet without complications, and 126 healthy feet were analyzed. The temperatures of the feet and toes were significantly higher in the complications group when compared to the healthy adult and DM healthy groups. The higher the temperatures of the foot in DM, the higher the probability that it is affected by neuropathy, neuroischaemia, or PAD. Conclusions. Significant differences in mean temperatures exist between participants who were healthy and those with DM with no known complications when compared to participants with neuroischaemia, neuropathy, or PAD. As foot temperature rises, so does the probability of the presence of complications of neuropathy, neuroischaemia, or peripheral arterial disease.

  9. RISK FACTORS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE AND DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

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    Mataradžija, Amra; Resić, Halima; Rašić, Senija; Kukavica, Nihad; Masnić, Fahrudin

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic renal disease. The aim of our paper is to evaluate the risk factors of cardiovascular complications in patients with various stages of chronic renal disease (CRD), with or without diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients and methods: The study included 98 patients with different stages of the CRD, with creatinine clearance homocysteine, BNP, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, HbA1c, Body Mass Index (BMI). First group comprised 49 patients with DM, age 50-82 years, M 28/F 21. Second group comprised 49 patients without DM, age 35-80 years, M 18/F 31. The IMT (intima media thickness) was measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and all patients had echocardiography examination done by 2D Doppler ultrasonography. Results: The IMT values in diabetic patients had statistically significant positive correlation with homocysteine values of r=0,9393, p0,05). 47,4% of diabetics had arteriosclerotic changes on carotid arteries, 8,5% had stenosis of ACC, and 22,0% had rhythm abnormalities on ECG. A positive correlation between IMT and BMI was found in diabetics, but was not statistically significant r=0,111, p>0,05. In the diabetics group a significantly higher (phomocystein, BNP and cholesterol. PMID:20433431

  10. New onset diabetes complicated by haemolysis and rhabdomyolysis: a case report and review of the literature

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    Galtrey Clare M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Previously undiagnosed glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency can be unmasked by a diabetic crisis and both can be associated with rhabdomyolysis. The relationship between diabetes and G6PD deficiency is discussed and the possible triggers for haemolysis as outlined in this case report. The incidence of G6PD deficiency is 10% in African-American males and up to 35% in parts of Africa so an increased awareness of G6PD deficiency is important when treating diabetes in these populations. Case presentation A 54-year-old Kenyan man presented with a 3-day history of reduced appetite, weakness and reduced level of consciousness as a result of a hyperglycaemic diabetic crisis with both hyperosmolarity and ketoacidosis. The patient then developed haemolysis and a raised creatine kinase level. A diagnosis of G6PD deficiency and rhabdomyolysis was made. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of simple laboratory investigations in the early identification of the rarer complications of diabetic crisis such as haemolysis secondary to G6PD deficiency and rhabdomyolysis.

  11. Sex and Gender Differences in Risk, Pathophysiology and Complications of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreiter, Jürgen; Pacini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The steep rise of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and associated complications go along with mounting evidence of clinically important sex and gender differences. T2DM is more frequently diagnosed at lower age and body mass index in men; however, the most prominent risk factor, which is obesity, is more common in women. Generally, large sex-ratio differences across countries are observed. Diversities in biology, culture, lifestyle, environment, and socioeconomic status impact differences between males and females in predisposition, development, and clinical presentation. Genetic effects and epigenetic mechanisms, nutritional factors and sedentary lifestyle affect risk and complications differently in both sexes. Furthermore, sex hormones have a great impact on energy metabolism, body composition, vascular function, and inflammatory responses. Thus, endocrine imbalances relate to unfavorable cardiometabolic traits, observable in women with androgen excess or men with hypogonadism. Both biological and psychosocial factors are responsible for sex and gender differences in diabetes risk and outcome. Overall, psychosocial stress appears to have greater impact on women rather than on men. In addition, women have greater increases of cardiovascular risk, myocardial infarction, and stroke mortality than men, compared with nondiabetic subjects. However, when dialysis therapy is initiated, mortality is comparable in both males and females. Diabetes appears to attenuate the protective effect of the female sex in the development of cardiac diseases and nephropathy. Endocrine and behavioral factors are involved in gender inequalities and affect the outcome. More research regarding sex-dimorphic pathophysiological mechanisms of T2DM and its complications could contribute to more personalized diabetes care in the future and would thus promote more awareness in terms of sex- and gender-specific risk factors. PMID:27159875

  12. SGLT2 inhibitors provide an effective therapeutic option for diabetes complicated with insulin antibodies.

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    Hayashi, Akinori; Takano, Koji; Kawai, Sayuki; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus complicated with insulin antibodies is rare in clinical practice but usually difficult to control. A high amount of insulin antibodies, especially with low affinity and high binding capacity, leads to unstable glycemic control characterized by hyperglycemia unresponsive to large volume of insulin and unanticipated hypoglycemia. There are several treatment options, such as changing insulin preparation, immunosupression with glucocorticoids, and plasmapheresis, most of which are of limited efficacy. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a novel class of drug which decrease renal glucose reabsorption and lowers plasma glucose level independent of insulin action. We report here a case with diabetes complicated with insulin antibodies who was effectively controlled by an SGLT2 inhibitor. A 47-year-old man with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin had very poor glycemic control characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia unresponsive to insulin therapy and repetitive hypoglycemia due to insulin antibodies. Treatment with ipragliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, improved HbA1c from 8.4% to 6.0% and glycated albumin from 29.4% to 17.9%. Continuous glucose monitoring revealed improvement of glycemic profile (average glucose level from 212 mg/dL to 99 mg/dL and glycemic standard deviation from 92 mg/dL to 14 mg/dL) with disappearance of hypoglycemic events. This treatment further ameliorated the characteristics of insulin antibodies and resulted in reduced insulin requirement. SGLT2 inhibitors may offer an effective treatment option for managing the poor glycemic control in diabetes complicated with insulin antibodies.

  13. Relationship between vitamin D status and vascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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    Jung, Chan-Hee; Kim, Kyu-Jin; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Chul-Hee; Kang, Sung Koo; Mok, Ji-Oh

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. It was hypothesized that lower 25(OH)D would be associated with increased microvascular complications in T2DM. A total of 257 T2DM patients (111 men, 146 women) who underwent diabetic microvascular complication (peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy) studies were recruited. Patients were categorized into 3 groups according to vitamin D status: vitamin D sufficient (n = 41, 25[OH]D ≥ 20 ng/mL), vitamin D insufficient (n = 132, 10 ≤ 25[OH]D 10 ng/mL). In men, the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in those with insufficiency or sufficiency (38%, 11.7%, and 10%, respectively; P = .005). In addition, the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) was significantly higher in women with vitamin D deficiency than in the other 2 groups (40%, 20.6%, and 0%; P = .007). Compared with men in the vitamin D-sufficient group (reference), men in the vitamin D-deficient group had an increased risk of DPN after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio, 7.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-40.05). For women, when the vitamin D-sufficient group was used as a reference, those in the vitamin D-deficient group had an increased risk of DN after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio, 4.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.58-11.56). This present study found that a serum 25(OH)D level less than 10 ng/mL is independently associated with increased DPN in male patients and increased DN in female patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sex and Gender Differences in Risk, Pathophysiology and Complications of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Harreiter, Jürgen; Pacini, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    The steep rise of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and associated complications go along with mounting evidence of clinically important sex and gender differences. T2DM is more frequently diagnosed at lower age and body mass index in men; however, the most prominent risk factor, which is obesity, is more common in women. Generally, large sex-ratio differences across countries are observed. Diversities in biology, culture, lifestyle, environment, and socioeconomic status impact differences between males and females in predisposition, development, and clinical presentation. Genetic effects and epigenetic mechanisms, nutritional factors and sedentary lifestyle affect risk and complications differently in both sexes. Furthermore, sex hormones have a great impact on energy metabolism, body composition, vascular function, and inflammatory responses. Thus, endocrine imbalances relate to unfavorable cardiometabolic traits, observable in women with androgen excess or men with hypogonadism. Both biological and psychosocial factors are responsible for sex and gender differences in diabetes risk and outcome. Overall, psychosocial stress appears to have greater impact on women rather than on men. In addition, women have greater increases of cardiovascular risk, myocardial infarction, and stroke mortality than men, compared with nondiabetic subjects. However, when dialysis therapy is initiated, mortality is comparable in both males and females. Diabetes appears to attenuate the protective effect of the female sex in the development of cardiac diseases and nephropathy. Endocrine and behavioral factors are involved in gender inequalities and affect the outcome. More research regarding sex-dimorphic pathophysiological mechanisms of T2DM and its complications could contribute to more personalized diabetes care in the future and would thus promote more awareness in terms of sex- and gender-specific risk factors.

  15. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF POLYMYXINE B AND NIFEDIPINE ON DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS IN RAT: ROLE OF PROTEIN KINASE C

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    H. Mehrani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM, experience significant morbidity and mortality from microvascular retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Hyperglycemia can induce diabetic complications through multiple pathways. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC by hyperglycemia is one of the pathways which causes diabetic complications. Effect of nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker, and polymyxine B sulphate (a Protein kinase C inhibitor was studied in adult male Sprague- dawley rats, who was made diabetic with streptozotocin. PKC activity was determined in tissues and serum enzymes and metabolite level was measured in all controls, diabetic and drug treated animals. The results showed that, levels of the, urea (two –fold, creatinine (60%, triglyceride (two-fold and liver alanine transaminase (ALT activity (two-fold, were significantly increased in diabetic group. In nifedipine, treated diabetic group, although urea and creatinine level was increased, but liver enzymes were not significantly different from those of control group. In diabetic group which was treated with polymyxine, all the measured metabolites and enzyme levels were the same as the control group, except glucose level which was increased and liver glycogen was decreased significantly. Protein kinase C activity in the cytoplasm of diabetic liver was increased comparing to its control group (5.73 ± 0.56 Vs, 4.00 ± 0.62. The enzyme activity in the plasma membranes of untreated and nifedipine treated diabetic groups was significantly increased (6.2 ± 0.42 and 3.66 ± 0.31 Vs 2.38 ± 0.36. These results show that polymyxine is more effective than nifedipine against protein kinase C activity in diabetic complications. In conclusion our results show that, liver and kidney damage in DM are related to PKC activation. The fact that polymyxine prevents diabetic related increase in PKC activity more than nifedipine, support the hypothesis that different PKC isozymes may play different roles

  16. Risk Factors for Development of Cardiovascular Complications in Patients with Chronic Renal Disease and Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Amra Mataradžija

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic renal disease. The aim of our paper is to evaluate the risk factors of cardiovascular complications in patients with various stages of chronic renal disease (CRD, with or without diabetes mellitus (DM.Patients and methods:The study included 98 patients with different stages of the CRD, with creatinine clearance <60 ml/min/1,73m2, and laboratory parameters monitored: homocysteine, BNP, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, HbA1c, Body Mass Index (BMI. First group comprised 49 patients with DM, age 50-82 years, M 28/F 21. Second group comprised 49 patients without DM, age 35-80 years, M 18/F 31. The IMT (intima media thickness was measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and all patients had echocardiography examination done by 2D Doppler ultrasonography.Results:The IMT values in diabetic patients had statistically significant positive correlation with homocysteine values of r=0,9393, p<0,034, and cholesterol r=0,289, p<0,05, compared to non-diabetics. A significant negative correlation was found between the ejection fraction (EF and BMI in both groups, more prominent in non-diabetics r=0,289, p<0,044 (diabetics r=0,162, p>0,05. 47,4% of diabetics had arteriosclerotic changes on carotid arteries, 8,5% had stenosis of ACC, and 22,0% had rhythm abnormalities on ECG. A positive correlation between IMT and BMI was found in diabetics, but was not statistically significant r=0,111, p>0,05. In the diabetics group a significantly higher (p<0,05 values of BNP, HbA1c, proteinuria, BMI, and cholesterol were found, and significantly lowered EF (p<0,0001.Conclusion:Risk factors for cardiovascular complications in patients with DM are various, and the most pronounced significance was found in the values of homocystein, BNP and cholesterol.

  17. Late administration of Mn porphyrin-based SOD mimic enhances diabetic complications

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    Dana K. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mn(III N-alkylpyridylporphyrins (MnPs have demonstrated protection in various conditions where increased production of reactive oxygen/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS, is a key pathological factors. MnPs can produce both pro-oxidative and antioxidative effects depending upon the cellular redox environment that they encounter. Previously we reported (Free Radic. Res. 39: 81–8, 2005 that when the treatment started at the onset of diabetes, Mn(III meso-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-2-ylporphyrin, MnTM-2-PyP5+ suppressed diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Diabetes, however, is rarely diagnosed at its onset. The aim of this study was to investigate if MnTM-2-PyP5+ can suppress oxidative damage and prevent diabetic complications when administered more than a week after the onset of diabetes. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin. The MnP-based treatment started 8 days after the onset of diabetes and continued for 2 months. The effect of the treatment on activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glyoxalases I and II as well as malondialdehyde and GSH/GSSG ratio were determined in kidneys. Kidney function was assessed by measuring lysozyme and total protein in urine and blood urea nitrogen. Vascular damage was evaluated by assessing vascular reactivity. Our data showed that delayed administration of MnTM-2-PyP5+ did not protect against oxidative damage and did not prevent diabetic complications. Moreover, MnTM-2-PyP5+ contributed to the kidney damage, which seems to be a consequence of its pro-oxidative action. Such outcome can be explained by advanced oxidative damage which already existed at the moment the therapy with MnP started. The data support the concept that the overall biological effect of a redox-active MnP is determined by (i the relative concentrations of oxidants and reductants, i.e. the cellular redox

  18. Data on carotid intima-media thickness and lipoprotein subclasses in type 1 diabetes from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC

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    Arpita Basu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1DM is associated with increased risk of macrovascular complications. We examined longitudinal associations of serum conventional lipids and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-determined lipoprotein subclasses with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT in adults with T1DM (n=455 enrolled in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT. Data on serum lipids and lipoproteins were collected at DCCT baseline (1983–89 and were correlated with common and internal carotid IMT determined by ultrasonography during the observational follow-up of the DCCT, the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC study, at EDIC ‘Year 1’ (199–1996 and EDIC ‘Year 6’ (1998–2000. This article contains data on the associations of DCCT baseline lipoprotein profiles (NMR-based VLDL & chylomicrons, IDL/LDL and HDL subclasses and ‘conventional’ total, LDL-, HDL-, non-HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides with carotid IMT at EDIC Years 1 and 6, stratified by gender. The data are supplemental to our original research article describing detailed associations of DCCT baseline lipids and lipoprotein profiles with EDIC Year 12 carotid IMT (Basu et al. in press [1]. Keywords: Lipids and lipoproteins, Carotid intima-media thickness, Type 1 diabetes

  19. [Case of distal renal tubular acidosis complicated with renal diabetes insipidus, showing aggravation of symptoms with occurrence of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hexing; Tomoda, Fumihiro; Koike, Tsutomu; Ohara, Maiko; Nakagawa, Taizo; Kagitani, Satoshi; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We report herein a 27-year-old male case of inherited distal renal tubular acidosis complicated with renal diabetes insipidus, the symptoms of which were aggravated by the occurrence of diabetes mellitus. At 2 months after birth, he was diagnosed as having inherited distal renal tubular acidosis and thereafter supplementation of both potassium and alkali was started to treat his hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. At the age of 4 years, calcification of the bilateral renal medulla was detected by computed tomography. Subsequently his urinary volume gradually increased and polyuria of approximately 4 L/day persisted. At the age of 27 years, he became fond of sugar-sweetened drinks and also often forgot to take the medicine. He was admitted to our hospital due to polyuria of more than 10 L day, muscle weakness and gait disturbance. Laboratory tests disclosed worsening of both hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis in addition to severe hyperglycemia. It seemed likely that occurrence of diabetes mellitus and cessation of medications can induce osmotic diuresis and aggravate hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. Consequently, severe dehydration, hypokalemia-induced damage of his urinary concentration ability and enhancement of the renin angiotensin system occurred and thereby possibly worsened his hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. As normalization of hyperglycemia and metabolic acidosis might have exacerbated hypokalemia further, dehydration and hypokalemia were treated first. Following intensive treatment, these abnormalities were improved, but polyuria persisted. Elevated plasma antidiuretic hormone (12.0 pg/mL) and deficit of renal responses to antidiuretic hormone suggested that the polyuria was attributable to the preexisting renal diabetes insipidus possibly caused by bilateral renal medulla calcification. Thiazide diuretic or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were not effective for the treatment of diabetes insipidus in the present case.

  20. Event rates, hospital utilization, and costs associated with major complications of diabetes: a multicountry comparative analysis.

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    Philip M Clarke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes imposes a substantial burden globally in terms of premature mortality, morbidity, and health care costs. Estimates of economic outcomes associated with diabetes are essential inputs to policy analyses aimed at prevention and treatment of diabetes. Our objective was to estimate and compare event rates, hospital utilization, and costs associated with major diabetes-related complications in high-, middle-, and low-income countries.Incidence and history of diabetes-related complications, hospital admissions, and length of stay were recorded in 11,140 patients with type 2 diabetes participating in the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE study (mean age at entry 66 y. The probability of hospital utilization and number of days in hospital for major events associated with coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, and nephropathy were estimated for three regions (Asia, Eastern Europe, and Established Market Economies using multiple regression analysis. The resulting estimates of days spent in hospital were multiplied by regional estimates of the costs per hospital bed-day from the World Health Organization to compute annual acute and long-term costs associated with the different types of complications. To assist, comparability, costs are reported in international dollars (Int$, which represent a hypothetical currency that allows for the same quantities of goods or services to be purchased regardless of country, standardized on purchasing power in the United States. A cost calculator accompanying this paper enables the estimation of costs for individual countries and translation of these costs into local currency units. The probability of attending a hospital following an event was highest for heart failure (93%-96% across regions and lowest for nephropathy (15%-26%. The average numbers of days in hospital given at least one admission were greatest for stroke (17-32 d across

  1. Hyperketonemia and ketosis increase the risk of complications in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanikarla-Marie, Preeti; Jain, Sushil K

    2016-06-01

    Diets that boost ketone production are increasingly used for treating several neurological disorders. Elevation in ketones in most cases is considered favorable, as they provide energy and are efficient in fueling the body's energy needs. Despite all the benefits from ketones, the above normal elevation in the concentration of ketones in the circulation tend to illicit various pathological complications by activating injurious pathways leading to cellular damage. Recent literature demonstrates a plausible link between elevated levels of circulating ketones and oxidative stress, linking hyperketonemia to innumerable morbid conditions. Ketone bodies are produced by the oxidation of fatty acids in the liver as a source of alternative energy that generally occurs in glucose limiting conditions. Regulation of ketogenesis and ketolysis plays an important role in dictating ketone concentrations in the blood. Hyperketonemia is a condition with elevated blood levels of acetoacetate, 3-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone. Several physiological and pathological triggers, such as fasting, ketogenic diet, and diabetes cause an accumulation and elevation of circulating ketones. Complications of the brain, kidney, liver, and microvasculature were found to be elevated in diabetic patients who had elevated ketones compared to those diabetics with normal ketone levels. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which hyperketonemia and ketoacidosis cause an increase in redox imbalance and thereby increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cross-sectional analysis of adult diabetes type 1 and type 2 patients with diabetic microvascular complications from a German retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happich, M; Breitscheidel, L; Meisinger, C; Ulbig, M; Falkenstein, P; Benter, U; Watkins, J

    2007-06-01

    To obtain epidemiological data on the prevalence of predefined stages of diabetic microvascular complications from a representative cross-section of patients with existing microvascular complications of type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Germany. A cross-sectional, retrospective study of medical records of 705 type 1 and 1910 type 2 adult diabetic patients with a diagnosis of retinopathy and/or peripheral neuropathy and/or nephropathy before 2002 and treated in 2002 in Germany. Of 376 patients with type 1 diabetes having retinopathy, 59.3% had mild or moderate non-proliferative retinopathy without macular oedema, 27.1% had macular oedema, and 13.6% had severe retinopathy without macular oedema. In 862 patients with type 2 diabetes, the distribution of retinopathy/maculopathy classes was 56.8%, 35.5%, and 7.7%, respectively. Of 381 type 1 diabetes patients with observed peripheral neuropathy, 81.4% had sensorimotor neuropathy, 8.9% had diabetic foot conditions, and 9.7% had lower extremity amputations because of diabetes. In 1005 patients with type 2 diabetes, the distribution of neuropathy classes was 78.2%, 12.1%, and 9.7%, respectively. The proportions of patients with renal insufficiency in type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups were 15.3% versus 13.5%, respectively. The study suggests that there are considerable proportions of patients with progressive stages of microvascular complications related to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Germany. This underlines the importance of improvement of optimal quality of care and frequent screening for preventing late diabetic microvascular complications and the necessity of effective intervention strategies to tackle this major public health problem.

  3. Treatment of early complications on eye fundus in patients with diabetes mellitus

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    Iva Akmadža

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Early ocular complications in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM mostly refer to non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR. Generally speaking, diabetic retinopathy (DR is one of the most common causes of blindness and the most common cause of blindness between the age of 20 and 65. DM is a disease characterized by metabolic disorders of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. The main characteristic is hyperglycemia, which affects all organs by different pathogenetic pathways. The presence of DR is associated with the duration of DM, glycemic control and blood pressure. DR is a microangiopathy and is diagnosed by simple indirect ophthalmoscopy. It is very important to perform regular eye examinations in patients with DM, whereas DR is usually asymptomatic in the early stage of the disease. Optical coherence tomography (OCT has the great importance in diagnostics of DR. Besides indirect ophthalmoscopy and OCT, fluorescein angiography and ultrasound are also widely used to diagnose DR. The prevention of the disease is most important, which is in domain of internal medicine specialist, diabetologist and general practitioner. Intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy is the gold standard in treatment of NPDR associated with diabetic macular edema (DME and impaired vision. Intravitreal injections of corticosteroids and laser photocoagulation are also used. The current and future treatment modalities are presented in the text that follows.

  4. Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects

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    Thiago Melo Costa Pereira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Because diabetes mellitus (DM is a multifactorial metabolic disease, its prevention and treatment has been a constant challenge for basic and clinical investigators focused on translating their discoveries into clinical treatment of this complex disorder. In this review, we highlight recent experimental and clinical evidences of potential coadjuvants in the management of DM, such as polyphenols (quercetin, resveratrol and silymarin, cultured probiotic microorganisms and drugs acting through direct/indirect or pleiotropic effects on glycemic control in DM. Among several options, we highlight new promising therapeutic coadjuvants, including chemical scavengers, the probiotic kefir and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, which besides the reduction of hyperglycemia and ameliorate insulin resistance, they reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vascular circulation. In the near future, experimental studies are expected to clear the intracellular pathways involving coadjuvants. The design of clinical trials may also contribute to new strategies with coadjuvants against the harmful effects of diabetic complications.

  5. Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Thiago Melo Costa; Pimenta, Fabio Silva; Porto, Marcella Lima; Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Campagnaro, Bianca Prandi; Gava, Agata Lages; Meyrelles, Silvana Santos; Vasquez, Elisardo Corral

    2016-01-01

    Because diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial metabolic disease, its prevention and treatment has been a constant challenge for basic and clinical investigators focused on translating their discoveries into clinical treatment of this complex disorder. In this review, we highlight recent experimental and clinical evidences of potential coadjuvants in the management of DM, such as polyphenols (quercetin, resveratrol and silymarin), cultured probiotic microorganisms and drugs acting through direct/indirect or pleiotropic effects on glycemic control in DM. Among several options, we highlight new promising therapeutic coadjuvants, including chemical scavengers, the probiotic kefir and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, which besides the reduction of hyperglycemia and ameliorate insulin resistance, they reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vascular circulation. In the near future, experimental studies are expected to clear the intracellular pathways involving coadjuvants. The design of clinical trials may also contribute to new strategies with coadjuvants against the harmful effects of diabetic complications. PMID:27527163

  6. Relationship between patients' perception of the importance of diabetes and metabolic control and pursuing chronic complications of disease

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    Mohammad Ebrahim Khamseh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type II diabetes is a metabolic disorder. Environmental factors and patient awareness have major roles on chronic complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of patients' perception of t the importance of diabetes and metabolic- control and pursuing of chronic complications. Material and Methods: 194 patients with diabetes enrolled from diabetes clinic of Institute Endocrinology & Metabolism in a cross-sectional study, from February to March 2010. Data were collected using a questionnaire to assess the personal demographics, individual approach in pursuit of complications, and glycemic control, as well as patient perception and attitude toward the importance of disease process and follow-up. Level of perceptions was determined as well, moderate and weak. Results: Out of 194 patients, 77(39.7% were male and 117(60.3% female. Mean age was 52.18±10.17years. 69.2% did not know what the glycosylated hemoglobin was. In 71.4%, willing to participate in decisions making on medical treatment was good and they knew that with initiation of insulin therapy, they would have better metabolic control. 68.9% of patients had regular follow-up for eye complications, and 51% for cardiac complications. Follow-up for diabetic foot complication was poor. Patients with good perception had regular follow-up regarding cardiac, eye and renal complications. Conclusion: These results indicate that better perception of diabetic patients might improve their compliance for regular follow- up regarding the pursuit of chronic complications, especially cardiac, eye and renal problems. Although, the metabolic- control of patients had not the association with patient perception about the importance of diabetes

  7. Association among individual deprivation, glycemic control, and diabetes complications: the EPICES score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihan, Hélène; Laurent, Silvana; Sass, Catherine; Nguyen, Gérard; Huot, Caroline; Moulin, Jean Jacques; Guegen, René; Le Toumelin, Philippe; Le Clésiau, Hervé; La Rosa, Emilio; Reach, Gérard; Cohen, Régis

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have related poor glycemic control and/or some diabetes complications to low socioeconomic status. Some aspects of socioeconomic status have not been assessed in these studies. In the present study, we used an individual index of deprivation, the Evaluation de la Précarité et des Inégalités de santé dans les Centres d'Examens de Santé (Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers [EPICES]) score, to determine the relationship among glycemic control, diabetes complications, and individual conditions of deprivation. We conducted a cross-sectional prevalence study in 135 consecutive diabetic patients (age 59.41 +/- 13.2 years [mean +/- SD]) admitted in the hospitalization unit of a French endocrine department. Individual deprivation was assessed by the EPICES score, calculated from 11 socioeconomic questions. Glycemic control, lipid levels, blood pressure, retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy were assessed. HbA(1c) level was significantly correlated with the EPICES score (r = 0.366, P < 0.001). The more deprived patients were more likely than the less deprived patients to have poor glycemic control (beta = 1.984 [SE 0.477], P < 0.001), neuropathy (odds ratio 2.39 [95% CI 1.05-5.43], P = 0.037), retinopathy (3.66 [1.39-9.64], P = 0.009), and being less often admitted for 1-day hospitalization (0.32 [0.14-0.74], P = 0.008). No significant relationship was observed with either nephropathy or cardiovascular risk factors. Deprivation status is associated with poor metabolic control and more frequent microvascular complications, i.e., retinopathy and neuropathy. The medical and economic burden of deprived patients is high.

  8. [Clinical observation of 5 cases of diabetes insipidus complicated with skeletal fluorosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuan-Chi; Tao, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Nan

    2017-07-25

    To investigate the mechanism of diabetes insipidus complicated with skeletal fluorosis and the surgical treatment of spinal canal stenosis caused by skeletal fluorosis. From January 2000 to November 2011, 5 patients with diabetes insipidus complicated with skeletal fluorosis were treated with drug and cervical or thoracic posterior decompression including 2 males and 3 females with age of 35, 45, 47, 49, 55 years old respectively. The symptoms was mainly limb motor sensory disturbance accompanied by polyuria and polyuria. Imaging showed that cervical and thoracic multi-segmental continuous spinal stenosis. It was diagnosed with diabetes insipidus according to the symptoms and laboratory tests. According to the symptoms, the vertebral with problems were located and treated by posterior laminectomy decompression or the expansive open-door laminectomy. The recovery of neurological symptoms were recorded and the operation result were evaluate by JOA score improvement rate. The wound healed well in 5 cases, and 1 case of cervical axial pain was improved after symptomatic treatment. Five patients were followed up for 2 to 6 years with an average of 4 years. Numbness of limb and weakness symptoms of follow-up patients were significantly improved, muscle strength and acupuncture hypothyroidism were significantly improved compared with preoperative, the JOA score was significantly improved. At the final follow-up, the improvement rate got excellent results in 2 cases, good in 2 and fair in 1. Long-term high intake of fluoride can cause skeletal fluorosis in patients with diabetes insipidus. The posterior decompression is effective for the majority of spinal canal stenosis caused by skeletal fluorosis.

  9. Pregnancy complications, mental health-related problems and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Malaysian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Thiruchelvam, Kaeshaelya; Ahmed, Syed Imran; Clavarino, Alexandra M; Mamun, Abdullah A; Kairuz, Therese

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between pregnancy complications, mental health-related problems, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Malaysian women. A case-control study of women with T2DM (n=160) matched by age range to controls without T2DM (n=160). Data were collected in the Negeri Sembilan and PutraJaya regions in Malaysia, from two hospital outpatient clinics, PutraJaya Hospital and Tuanku Jaa'far Hospital Seremban, and one health clinic at Seremban. Validated, interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to obtain the data. The unadjusted and adjusted estimates were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel method. Neither depression (RR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.39-1.41) nor anxiety (RR 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53-1.88) symptoms increased the risk of T2DM significantly. However, gestational diabetes (RR 1.35, 95% CI: 1.02-1.79), and ≥3 pregnancies (RR 1.39, 95% CI: 1.08-1.79) were significant risk factors for the development of T2DM. T2DM was not a significant risk factor for either depression (RR 1.26, 95% CI: 0.91-1.74) or anxiety symptoms (RR 1.13, 95% CI: 0.59-2.19). In this study, T2DM is not a significant risk factor for depression and anxiety; similarly, neither are depression and anxiety significant risk factors for T2DM. Although prevalence of depression and anxiety is not alarming, the findings reported here should alert clinicians to screen and treat anxiety and depression in people with diabetes and also note the importance of monitoring women with complications in pregnancy for risk of later T2DM. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Controlling diabetes mellitus and its complications in Medellín, Colombia, 2001-2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas Perrasse, Alberto; Abad, Sol Beatriz; Faciolince, Santiago; Hernández, Nayeli; Maya, Camilo; Parra, Lucrecia; Rivas, Edison; Vallejo, Pilar

    2006-12-01

    To identify the principal sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of patients participating in diabetic care programs in the city of Medellín, Colombia, and to evaluate progress toward the goal of metabolic control and diabetic care standards. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was done, analyzing the clinical records of patients who had been participating for at least 6 months in the diabetic care programs of nine health care centers in Medellín. The study period ran from January 2001 to December 2003. The following data were collected: sociodemographic (age and sex), clinical (time since disease onset, diabetes type and treatment, and concurrent illnesses and their treatment), lifestyle habits (exercise routine, smoking, and sugar and fat consumption), chronic complications, and laboratory test results from the prior year. Questionable or missing data were categorized as unavailable. Of the 3 583 clinical histories evaluated, we were able to confirm the form of diabetes for 3 554 patients. Of those 3 554, 95.1% had type 2 diabetes. Overall, 56.9% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 55.2% to 58.6%) of the patients exercised regularly, 15.1% (95% CI: 13.9% to 16.3%) were current smokers, 17.7% (95% CI: 16.4% to 19.0%) were former smokers, and 67.2% (95% CI: 65.6% to 68.8%) had never smoked. In all, 21.0% (95% CI: 19.6% to 22.5%) of the patients consumed sugar regularly, while 24.8% (95% CI: 23.3% to 26.3%) consumed fats and only 19.5% (95% CI: 17.8% to 21.3%) were self-monitoring their glucose levels at least weekly. Among the type 2 diabetics, 68.8% had high blood pressure, and 98.2% had dyslipidemia. The average body mass index was 28.0 kg/m(2) (95% CI: 27.8 to 28.2). The average number of medications that the patients were taking to treat type 2 diabetes was 1.3; to treat high blood pressure, 1.9; and to treat dyslipidemia, 0.6. There were no data on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in 44.8% of the clinical records, and no data on

  11. The relationship between hypomagnesemia, metformin therapy and cardiovascular disease complicating type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Peters

    Full Text Available Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community.We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean ± SD age 63.4 ± 11.6 years, 49.0% males from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1 who were followed for 12.3 ± 5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD and cerebrovascular disease (CVD as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L. Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05. There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI 0.28 (0.11-0.74; P=0.010, but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models.Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk.

  12. Diabetic microvascular complications are not associated with two polymorphisms in the GLUT-1 and PC-1 genes regulating glucose metabolism in Caucasian type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Grarup, N; Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An XbaI polymorphism in the gene encoding the glucose transporter, GLUT-1, is associated with development of diabetic nephropathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. In addition, an amino acid variant (K121Q) in the gene encoding the glycoprotein plasma cell differentiating antigen (PC...... men/77 women, age 40.9+/-9.6 years, diabetes duration 27+/-8 years) and type 1 diabetic patients with persistent normoalbuminuria (118 men/74 women, age 42.7+/-10.2 years, diabetes duration 26+/-9 years). Proliferative retinopathy was present in 156 patients (40%), while 67 patients (17%) had....... CONCLUSIONS: Neither the PC-1 K121Q nor the GLUT-1 XbaI polymorphism contribute to the genetic susceptibility of diabetic microvascular complications in Danish type 1 diabetic patients....

  13. Myostatin in the placentae of pregnancies complicated with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, H N; Lappas, M; Georgiou, H M; Vaswani, K; Salomon, C; Rice, G E; Mitchell, M D

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is characterised by maternal glucose intolerance and insulin resistance during pregnancy. Myostatin, initially identified as a negative regulator of muscle development may also function in the regulation of placental development and glucose uptake. Myostatin expression in placentae of GDM complicated pregnancies is unknown. However, higher myostatin levels occur in placentae of pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia. We hypothesise that myostatin will be differentially expressed in GDM complicated pregnancies. Myostatin concentrations (ELISA) were evaluated in plasma of presymptomatic women who later developed GDM and compared to plasma of normal glucose tolerant (NGT) women. Furthermore, myostatin protein expression (Western blot) was studied in placentae of pregnant women with GDM (treated with diet or insulin) compared to placentae of NGT women. No significant difference in myostatin concentration was seen in plasma of pre-symptomatic GDM women compared to NGT women. In placenta significant differences in myostatin protein expressions (higher precursor; p myostatin dimer expression (p Myostatin expression in placental tissue is altered under stress conditions (e.g. obesity and abnormal glucose metabolism) found in pregnancies complicated with GDM. We hypothesise that myostatin is active in these placentae and could affect glucose homoeostasis and/or cytokine production thereby altering the function of the placenta. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apovian CM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Caroline M ApovianMedicine and Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine; Nutrition and Weight Management Center; and Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in diet and lifestyle have repeatedly been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM and even to reverse early disease. Weight gain, a potential side effect of treatment for patients with T2DM, is also an important concern, and it has been noted that weight increases associated with antidiabetes therapy may blunt cardiovascular risk reductions achieved by decreasing blood glucose. Among older agents, metformin and acarbose have the lowest risk for weight gain, while sulfonylureas, meglitinides, and thiazolidinediones are all associated with weight increases. Clinical trial results have also consistently demonstrated that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylin lowers weight, and that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral in patients with T2DM. Conventional human insulin formulations are known to increase weight in patients with T2DM. However, some insulin analogs, particularly insulin detemir, have lower liability for this adverse event. The use of both pharmacologic and surgical therapies aimed at treating obesity rather than lowering blood glucose have the potential to improve glycemic control and even resolve T2DM in some patients.Keywords: bariatric, diabetes, incretin, insulin, obesity, oral antidiabetes agents

  15. Role of the Na+/H+ exchanger on the development of diabetes mellitus and its chronic complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yan-Ming; Su, Ying; Li, Jia; Tian, Ye; Wang, Lan-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NHE protect against intracellular hydrogen overload. ► NHE protect β-cells against strong acidification. ► NHE inhibitors improve myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. -- Abstract: Micro- and macrovascular complications are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes mellitus. The Na + /H + exchanger (NHE) is a family of proteins which exchange Na + for H + according to their concentration gradients in an electroneutral manner. The exchanger also plays a key role in several other cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and cytoskeletal organization. Since not much is known on the relationship between NHE and diabetes mellitus, this review outlines the contribution of NHE to chronic complications of diabetes mellitus, such as diabetic nephropathy; diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  16. Role of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger on the development of diabetes mellitus and its chronic complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yan-Ming [Department of Cardiac Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Su, Ying [Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Jia; Tian, Ye [Department of Cardiac Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Lan-Feng, E-mail: wlfccu@126.com [Department of Cardiac Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NHE protect against intracellular hydrogen overload. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NHE protect {beta}-cells against strong acidification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NHE inhibitors improve myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. -- Abstract: Micro- and macrovascular complications are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes mellitus. The Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger (NHE) is a family of proteins which exchange Na{sup +} for H{sup +} according to their concentration gradients in an electroneutral manner. The exchanger also plays a key role in several other cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and cytoskeletal organization. Since not much is known on the relationship between NHE and diabetes mellitus, this review outlines the contribution of NHE to chronic complications of diabetes mellitus, such as diabetic nephropathy; diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  17. 24-hour central aortic systolic pressure and 24-hour central pulse pressure are related to diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Simone; Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive measurements of 24 hour ambulatory central aortic systolic pressure (24 h-CASP) and central pulse pressure (24 h-CPP) are now feasible. We evaluate the relationship between 24 h central blood pressure and diabetes-related complications in patients with type 1 diabetes.......68) and 3.72 (1.85-7.47) and autonomic dysfunction: 3.25 (1.65-6.41), 1.64 (1.12-2.39) and 2.89 (1.54-5.42). CONCLUSIONS: 24 h-CASP and 24 h-CPP was higher in patients vs. controls and increased with diabetic complications independently of covariates. Furthermore, 24 h-CASP was stronger associated....... METHODS: The study was cross-sectional, including 715 subjects: 86 controls (C), 69 patients with short diabetes duration (diabetes (≥ 10 years) and normoalbuminuria (LN), 163...

  18. Effectiveness of Green Tea in a Randomized Human Cohort: Relevance to Diabetes and Its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naushad Ali Toolsee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have argued that green tea could mitigate diabetes and its complications. This study investigated the phytophenolic profile of Mauritian green tea and its antioxidant propensity. The effect of green tea on the risk factors: waist-hip ratio, glucose level, arterial pressure, antioxidant status, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT in prediabetics was assessed. The experimental group consumed 3 cups of green tea daily for 14 weeks followed by a 2-week washout period. The control group followed a water regimen. Green tea contained high level of phenolics related to its antioxidant power. Green tea suppressed waist-hip ratio of women from a significant increase and suppressed mean arterial pressure of men and women from a significant decrease after week 14. It reduced ALT level in women by 13.0% (P<0.1 while increasing the antioxidant potential of men and women sera by 2.7% (P<0.1 and 5.1% (P<0.1. The study timescale may have been too short to enable demonstration of effects on fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c outcomes. Green tea regimen could form part of a healthy lifestyle that might ameliorate features of metabolic syndrome and subsequent risks for diabetes and its complications. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01248143.

  19. Antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities of curcumin on diabetes mellitus and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Li, Jun; Cao, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has reached pandemic status and shows no signs of abatement. It can severely impair people's quality of life and affects patients all over the world. Since it is a serious, chronic metabolic disease, it can bring about many kinds of complications, which can in turn increase mortality. In recent decades, more and more studies have shown that oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions play critical roles in the pathogenesis of DM. There is an increasing demand for natural antidiabetic medicines that do not have the same side effects as modern drugs. Curcumin, a phytochemical found in the spice turmeric, has been used in India for centuries, and it has no known side effects. It has been shown to have some beneficial effects against various chronic illnesses. Many of these therapeutic actions can be attributed to its potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In view of the oxidative stress and inflammatory mechanisms of DM, curcumin can be considered suitable for the prevention and amelioration of diabetes. In this review, we summarize the nosogenesis of DM, giving primary focus to oxidative stress and inflammation. We discuss the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin in DM and its ability to mitigate the effects on DM and its associated complications in detail.

  20. The Ins2Akita mouse as a model of early retinal complications in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Alistair J; Antonetti, David A; Kern, Timothy S; Reiter, Chad E N; Soans, Rohit S; Krady, J Kyle; Levison, Steven W; Gardner, Thomas W; Bronson, Sarah K

    2005-06-01

    This study tested the Ins2(Akita) mouse as an animal model of retinal complications in diabetes. The Ins2(Akita) mutation results in a single amino acid substitution in the insulin 2 gene that causes misfolding of the insulin protein. The mutation arose and is maintained on the C57BL/6J background. Male mice heterozygous for this mutation have progressive loss of beta-cell function, decreased pancreatic beta-cell density, and significant hyperglycemia, as early as 4 weeks of age. Heterozygous Ins2(Akita) mice were bred to C57BL/6J mice, and male offspring were monitored for hyperglycemia, beginning at 4.5 weeks of age. After 4 to 36 weeks of hyperglycemia, the retinas were analyzed for vascular permeability, vascular lesions, leukostasis, morphologic changes of micro- and macroglia, apoptosis, retinal degeneration, and insulin receptor kinase activity. The mean blood glucose of Ins2(Akita) mice was significantly elevated, whereas the body weight at death was reduced compared with that of control animals. Compared with sibling control mice, the Ins2(Akita) mice had increased retinal vascular permeability after 12 weeks of hyperglycemia (P microglia, but no changes in expression of Muller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein. Increased apoptosis was identified by immunoreactivity for active caspase-3 after 4 weeks of hyperglycemia (P cell bodies in the retinal ganglion cell layer (P retinal complications of diabetes.

  1. Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

    Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

  2. Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apovian, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in diet and lifestyle have repeatedly been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM and even to reverse early disease. Weight gain, a potential side effect of treatment for patients with T2DM, is also an important concern, and it has been noted that weight increases associated with antidiabetes therapy may blunt cardiovascular risk reductions achieved by decreasing blood glucose. Among older agents, metformin and acarbose have the lowest risk for weight gain, while sulfonylureas, meglitinides, and thiazolidinediones are all associated with weight increases. Clinical trial results have also consistently demonstrated that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylin lowers weight, and that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral in patients with T2DM. Conventional human insulin formulations are known to increase weight in patients with T2DM. However, some insulin analogs, particularly insulin detemir, have lower liability for this adverse event. The use of both pharmacologic and surgical therapies aimed at treating obesity rather than lowering blood glucose have the potential to improve glycemic control and even resolve T2DM in some patients.

  3. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huri HZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,2 Lay Peng Lim,1 Soo Kun Lim3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 2Clinical Investigation Centre, University Malaya Medical Centre, 3Renal Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established.Purpose: This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD.Patients and methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7% or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7% based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association.Results: Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%. Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9% was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%. Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001, insulin therapy (P=0.005, and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038 were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004, comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024 and retinopathy (P=0.033, concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047, a-blockers (P=0.033, and antigouts (P=0.003 were also correlated with A1C.Conclusion: Identification of

  4. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Idewaki

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671 was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2. The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2. Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2. In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  5. Risk prediction of major complications in individuals with diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, C M; Matsushita, K; Woodward, M; Wagenknecht, L E; Coresh, J; Selvin, E

    2016-09-01

    To develop a prediction equation for 10-year risk of a combined endpoint (incident coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, lower extremity hospitalizations) in people with diabetes, using demographic and clinical information, and a panel of traditional and non-traditional biomarkers. We included in the study 654 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a prospective cohort study, with diagnosed diabetes (visit 2; 1990-1992). Models included self-reported variables (Model 1), clinical measurements (Model 2), and glycated haemoglobin (Model 3). Model 4 tested the addition of 12 blood-based biomarkers. We compared models using prediction and discrimination statistics. Successive stages of model development improved risk prediction. The C-statistics (95% confidence intervals) of models 1, 2, and 3 were 0.667 (0.64, 0.70), 0.683 (0.65, 0.71), and 0.694 (0.66, 0.72), respectively (p < 0.05 for differences). The addition of three traditional and non-traditional biomarkers [β-2 microglobulin, creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and cystatin C-based eGFR] to Model 3 significantly improved discrimination (C-statistic = 0.716; p = 0.003) and accuracy of 10-year risk prediction for major complications in people with diabetes (midpoint percentiles of lowest and highest deciles of predicted risk changed from 18-68% to 12-87%). These biomarkers, particularly those of kidney filtration, may help distinguish between people at low versus high risk of long-term major complications. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Correlation of global risk assessment with cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes mellitus living in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vigil, Efraín; Rodríguez-Chacón, Migdalia; Ruiz Valcarcel, José J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the current relationship between certain demographics and chemical factors, and the risk of cardiovascular complications, within a Puerto Rican population with diabetes mellitus. A total of 2075 patients with diabetes mellitus were retrospectively evaluated to determine the influence of certain demographics and chemical variables on the appearance of cardiovascular complications. A group of demographic and laboratory variables were analyzed. Our sample was obtained, based on convenience, from an endocrinologist's office in an area of about 250 000 people. All the patients met the American Diabetes Association (ADA) definitions for diabetes mellitus. The study covered a time period of 8 years. The patients signed an informed consent document at their first office visit. Data were obtained by the endocrinologist in charge. We considered the demographic variables of sex, age, time with diabetes, lipid profile, metabolic control (measured with glycated hemoglobin levels), and microalbumin renal excretion. Cardiovascular complications were more prevalent in patients with poor metabolic control, those with prolonged disease duration, men, and patients who were more than 50 years of age. We found no relationship between cardiovascular disease, systolic blood pressure over 130 mm Hg, body mass index and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels over 100 mg/dL. In Puerto Rican patients with diabetes mellitus, there is a statistically significant relationship between patient's gender, age, disease duration, glycemic control and increased kidney microalbumin excretion with cardiovascular complications.

  7. Glycaemic control and risk of incident urinary incontinence in women with Type 1 diabetes: results from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenherr, S M; Clemens, J Q; Braffett, B H; Dunn, R L; Cleary, P A; Kim, C; Herman, W H; Hotaling, J M; Jacobson, A M; Brown, J S; Wessells, H; Sarma, A V

    2016-11-01

    To study the impact of glycaemic control on urinary incontinence in women who participated in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT; 1983-1993) and its observational follow-up study, the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC; 1994-present). Study participants were women who completed, at both years 10 (2003) and 17 (2010) of the EDIC follow-up, the urological assessment questionnaire (UroEDIC). Urinary incontinence was defined as self-reported involuntary leakage of urine that occurred at least weekly. Incident urinary incontinence was defined as weekly urinary incontinence present at EDIC year 17 but not at EDIC year 10. Multivariable regression models were used to examine the association of incident urinary incontinence with comorbid prevalent conditions and glycaemic control (mean HbA 1c over the first 10 years of EDIC). A total of 64 (15.3%) women with Type 1 diabetes (mean age 43.6 ± 6.3 years at EDIC year 10) reported incident urinary incontinence at EDIC year 17. When adjusted for clinical covariates (including age, DCCT cohort assignment, DCCT treatment arm, BMI, insulin dosage, parity, hysterectomy, autonomic neuropathy and urinary tract infection in the last year), the mean EDIC HbA 1c was associated with increased odds of incident urinary incontinence (odds ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.06 per mmol/mol increase; odds ratio 1.41, 95% CI 1.07-1.89 per % HbA 1c increase). Incident urinary incontinence was associated with higher HbA 1c levels in women with Type 1 diabetes, independent of other recognized risk factors. These results suggest the potential for women to modify their risk of urinary incontinence with improved glycaemic control. (Clinical Trials Registry no: NCT00360815 and NCT00360893). © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  8. VISUALIZATION FROM INTRAOPERATIVE SWEPT-SOURCE MICROSCOPE-INTEGRATED OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN VITRECTOMY FOR COMPLICATIONS OF PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Hesham; Chen, Xi; Zevallos-Carrasco, Oscar M; Viehland, Christian; Dandrige, Alexandria; Sarin, Neeru; Mahmoud, Tamer H; Vajzovic, Lejla; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the use of live volumetric (4D) intraoperative swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography in vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy complications. In this prospective study, we analyzed a subgroup of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy complications who required vitrectomy and who were imaged by the research swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography system. In near real time, images were displayed in stereo heads-up display facilitating intraoperative surgeon feedback. Postoperative review included scoring image quality, identifying different diabetic retinopathy-associated pathologies and reviewing the intraoperatively documented surgeon feedback. Twenty eyes were included. Indications for vitrectomy were tractional retinal detachment (16 eyes), combined tractional-rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (2 eyes), and vitreous hemorrhage (2 eyes). Useful, good-quality 2D (B-scans) and 4D images were obtained in 16/20 eyes (80%). In these eyes, multiple diabetic retinopathy complications could be imaged. Swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography provided surgical guidance, e.g., in identifying dissection planes under fibrovascular membranes, and in determining residual membranes and traction that would benefit from additional peeling. In 4/20 eyes (20%), acceptable images were captured, but they were not useful due to high tractional retinal detachment elevation which was challenging for imaging. Swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography can provide important guidance during surgery for proliferative diabetic retinopathy complications through intraoperative identification of different complications and facilitation of intraoperative decision making.

  9. Perfluorocarbon-perfused 23 gauge three-dimensional vitrectomy for complicated diabetic tractional retinal detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Montoya, Raul; Guerrero-Naranjo, Jose Luis; Garcia-Aguirre, Gerardo; Morales-Cantón, Virgilio; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Background Perfluorocarbon liquid (PCL)-perfused vitrectomy has been shown in previous studies to be feasible, safe, and to have advantages in managing complicated cases of tractional retinal detachment. The present study had the objectives of describing the anatomical results and measuring surgical time and PCL consumption when combining PCL-perfused techniques with modern vitrectomy equipment. Methods A prospective, interventional consecutive case series was investigated. We enrolled patients with diabetic tractional retinal detachment, complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy and poor vision. A 23 gauge PCL-perfused vitrectomy was done with three-dimensional settings. During the procedure, we assessed the degree of surgical bleeding, visualization quality, and difficulty of membrane dissections. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and anatomical success were assessed at one and 3 months of follow-up. Results Twelve patients were enrolled in this study. There were no statistical significant changes in intraocular pressure and visual acuity throughout the follow-up period. Surgery was performed in a hemorrhage-free environment in almost all cases, with good visualization and low technical difficulty. The mean complete surgical time was 94.92 ± 25.03 minutes. The mean effective vitrectomy time was 22.50 ± 19.04 minutes and the mean PCL consumption was 25.08 ± 9.76 mL, with a speed of 1.11 mL/minute. Anatomical success was 67% at 3 months. Conclusion Although the technique proved to have some advantages in managing complicated cases of diabetic tractional retinal detachment, there was a high consumption of PCL. A redesign of the entire system is needed in order to decrease the amount of PCL needed for the technique. PMID:22267907

  10. Retinal vascular imaging technology to monitor disease severity and complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Ae Ra; Wong, Tien Yin; Li, Ling-Jun

    2017-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a major disease affecting a large number of young patients. In the recent years, retinal vascular imaging has provided an objective assessment of vascular health in patients with T1DM. Our study aimed to review the current literature on retinal vascular parameters in young patients with T1DM in order to understand the following: (i) How retinal vessels are affected in T1DM (ii) How such vascular changes can be predictive of future diabetic microvascular complications METHODS: We performed a systematic review and extracted relevant data from 17 articles. We found significant correlations between retinal vessel changes and diabetes-related risk factors (eg, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity), diabetes-related features (eg, diabetes duration and glycemic control), and diabetes-related microvascular complications (eg, diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy). Our findings suggest that retinal microvasculature is associated with both disease severity and complications in young patients with T1DM. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Acciones educativas de prevención del pie diabético Educational actions to prevent diabetic foot complications

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    Pedro Vejerano García

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available La Diabetes Mellitus y sus complicaciones son causas de hospitalización, invalidez y afectación económica. Este trabajo hace referencia a la experiencia camagüeyana en prevención, seguimiento y control del pie diabético. Dicha experiencia demostró que la pobre educación para prevenir las complicaciones del pie diabético, se convierte en un factor de riesgo sociocultural modificable. Una consulta de mayor alcance como la Clínica del Pie Diabético, pone al territorio en condiciones ventajosas para atender la transición epidemiológica de la diabetes y sus complicaciones.Diabetes Mellitus and its complications are causes of hospitalization, disability, and financial problems. This paper deals with the experience in prevention, monitoring, and control of diabetic foot in the province of Camagüey. This experience proved that a poor education in the prevention of diabetic foot complications is a modifiable sociocultural risk factor. As an example of more comprehensive consultation, the Diabetic Foot Clinic has benefitted the territory in the assistance of Diabetes Mellitus and its complications.

  12. The Intron 4 Polymorphism in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene in Diabetes Mellitus and its Chronic Complications, Diabetic Nephropathy and Non-Diabetic Renal Disease

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    Viera Železníková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR significantly affects calcium-phosphate metabolism in kidneys, and it is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM due to its expression in pancreatic F-cells. The role of CaSR as one of the players in pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD has been speculated. Methods: 158 Type 2 diabetic patients divided into three groups according to occurrence and type of kidney complications, 66 nondiabetic patients CKD, and 93 healthy subjects were enrolled into the study to analyze the role of two CaSR polymorphisms (in the codon 990 and in the intron 4 in ethiopathogenesis of DM and CKD. The Type 2 diabetic groups consisted of 48 patients without any kidney abnormalities, 58 patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN, and 52 patients with nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD. The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies was studied using PCR with the TaqMan Discrimination Assay or followed by the Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism method, respectively. Results: We have found that the intron 4 polymorphism is a risk factor for the development of DM and CKD, except DN, while the codon 990 does not show any disease association. Conclusion: We conclude that CaSR is a general factor in pancreas and kidney pathologies. i 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Relation of serum magnesium level to microvascular complications and the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Heba M Yossef

    2017-01-01

    Hypomagnesemia is prevalent in diabetic patients. It is associated with diabetic complications and poor glycemic control. High plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol, creatinine level, albuminuria, HbA1c, FBS, and 2-h PPBS are independent correlates of hypomagnesemia.

  14. Skin Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  15. [Low-dose aspirin in patients with diabete melitus: risks and benefits regarding macro and microvascular complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Eduardo G; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Weinert, Letícia S; Lavinsky, Joel; Silveiro, Sandra P

    2007-04-01

    Aspirin is recommended as cardiovascular disease prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus. Due to the increased risk of bleeding and because of the hypothesis that there could be a worsening of microvascular complications related to aspirin, there has been observed an important underutilization of the drug. However, it is now known that aspirin is not associated with a deleterious effect on diabetic retinopathy and there is evidence indicating that it also does not affect renal function with usual doses (150 mg/d). On the other hand, higher doses may prove necessary, since recent data suggest that diabetic patients present the so called "aspirin resistance". The mechanisms of this resistance are not yet fully understood, being probably related to an abnormal intrinsic platelet activity. The employment of alternative antiplatelet strategies or the administration of higher aspirin doses (150-300 mg/d) should be better evaluated regarding effective cardiovascular disease prevention in diabetes as well as the possible effects on microvascular complications.

  16. To determine the patterns of dyslipidaemia amongst the macrovascular complications of type - II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.A.; Fayyaz, M.; Jamil, A.; Sharif, N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the characteristics of dyslipidaemia amongst the type 2 diabetic patient with macrovascular complications like ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease and to compare the variables of dyslipidemia in male and female subjects under study. Design: A prospective observational analytic study. Setting and place of Study: Study was conducted in medical unit-III of Bahawal Victoria Hospital Bahawalpur, over a period of 6 months from July, 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008. Procedure: A total of hundred patients of type 2 diabetes were randomly selected for study. Those who had hyperlipidaemia due to secondary causes e.x. nephrotic syndrome, drugs, hypothyroidism etc. were excluded. Blood samples were taken for serum sugar fasting and random and fasting lipid profile. For statistical analysis student t.test at 5% level of significance was used. All mean values were presented as mean +- SD (Standard Deviation). Majority of patients presented in middle and old age category, and they had poor glycemic control. The female patients had uncontrolled hyper glycemic and hypertensive (BP = 145 +- 25.72 / 85.6 +- 76 mm/Hg) than males and their mean random serum sugar was 246.64 +- 105 mg% High percentage of complications were observed in patients of middle age group with great frequency of cardiovascular complications like coronary heart diseases and hypertension (52%) followed by cerebrovascular complications (30%) and peripheral vascular disease (18%). The lipid profile was in high risk range in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. In patients with CHD, the mean +SD concentration of cholesterol was 207.08 +- 27.94 mg/dl, HDL - C was 34.8 +- 6.27 mg/dl and TC : HDLC ratio > 6, (normally TC:HDLC ratio should be 40 mg/dl). In patients with CVA, HDL - C was 35.09 +- 6 mg/dl and triglycerides was 146.9 +- 50.70 mg/dl and these variables meet the definition of isolated low HDL - C (defined as TG < 150 mg% and HDL

  17. To determine the patterns of dyslipidaemia amongst the macrovascular complications of type - II diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamgir, M A; Fayyaz, M; Jamil, A; Sharif, N [Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur (Pakistan)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To assess the characteristics of dyslipidaemia amongst the type 2 diabetic patient with macrovascular complications like ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease and to compare the variables of dyslipidemia in male and female subjects under study. Design: A prospective observational analytic study. Setting and place of Study: Study was conducted in medical unit-III of Bahawal Victoria Hospital Bahawalpur, over a period of 6 months from July, 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008. Procedure: A total of hundred patients of type 2 diabetes were randomly selected for study. Those who had hyperlipidaemia due to secondary causes e.x. nephrotic syndrome, drugs, hypothyroidism etc. were excluded. Blood samples were taken for serum sugar fasting and random and fasting lipid profile. For statistical analysis student t.test at 5% level of significance was used. All mean values were presented as mean +- SD (Standard Deviation). Majority of patients presented in middle and old age category, and they had poor glycemic control. The female patients had uncontrolled hyper glycemic and hypertensive (BP = 145 +- 25.72 / 85.6 +- 76 mm/Hg) than males and their mean random serum sugar was 246.64 +- 105 mg% High percentage of complications were observed in patients of middle age group with great frequency of cardiovascular complications like coronary heart diseases and hypertension (52%) followed by cerebrovascular complications (30%) and peripheral vascular disease (18%). The lipid profile was in high risk range in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. In patients with CHD, the mean +SD concentration of cholesterol was 207.08 +- 27.94 mg/dl, HDL - C was 34.8 +- 6.27 mg/dl and TC : HDLC ratio > 6, (normally TC:HDLC ratio should be < 5 and HDL - C > 40 mg/dl). In patients with CVA, HDL - C was 35.09 +- 6 mg/dl and triglycerides was 146.9 +- 50.70 mg/dl and these variables meet the definition of isolated low HDL - C (defined as TG

  18. Disease and Economic Burden of Hospitalizations Attributable to Diabetes Mellitus and Its Complications: A Nationwide Study in Brazil

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    Michelle Quarti Machado Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with a significant burden globally. The costs of diabetes-related hospitalizations are unknown in most developing countries. The aim of this study was to estimate the total number and economic burden of hospitalizations attributable to diabetes mellitus (DM and its complications in adults from the perspective of the Brazilian Public Health System in 2014. Data sources included the National Health Survey (NHS and National database of Hospitalizations (SIH. We considered diabetes, its microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy and macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease, respiratory and urinary tract infections, as well as selected cancers. Assuming that DM patients are hospitalized for these conditions more frequently that non-DM individuals, we estimated the etiological fraction of each condition related to DM, using the attributable risk methodology. We present number, average cost per case, and overall costs of hospitalizations attributable to DM in Brazil in 2014, stratified by condition, state of the country, gender and age group. In 2014, a total of 313,273 hospitalizations due to diabetes in adults were reported in Brazil (4.6% of total adult hospitalization, totaling (international dollar Int$264.9 million. The average cost of an adult hospitalization due to diabetes was Int$845, 19% higher than hospitalization without DM. Hospitalizations due to cardiovascular diseases related to diabetes accounted for the higher proportion of costs (47.9%, followed by microvascular complications (25.4% and DM per se (18.1%. Understanding the costs of diabetes and its major complications is crucial to raise awareness and to support the decision-making process on policy implementation, also allowing the assessment of prevention and control strategies.

  19. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum Sepsis Complicated with Retroperitoneal Hematoma and Pleural Effusion in a Diabetic Patient

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    Shou-Wu Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Intra-abdominal infection due to Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is rare, and bacteremia complicated with pleural effusion and retroperitoneal hematoma caused by C. meningosepticum has not been reported previously. A 57-year-old diabetic man presented with bacteremia with retroperitoneal abscess and pleural effusion caused by C. meningosepticum on the 12th day of hospitalization. His clinical condition improved after antimicrobial therapy with levofloxacin and rifampin, debridement of the retroperitoneal hematoma and left-side chest tube insertion. Antibiotics were administered for 1 month, and he was later transferred to a local respiratory care ward under afebrile condition. C. meningosepticum should be included in the list of suspected nosocomial infections, especially in patients with immunocompromised status. Administration of appropriate antibiotics, such as quinolone, minocycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or rifampin, and treatment of local infection improve the clinical outcome of patients with C. meningosepticum infection.

  20. Type 2 diabetes and in-hospital complications after revision of total hip and knee arthroplasty.

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    Ana López-de-Andrés

    Full Text Available To assess the effect of type 2 diabetes (T2DM on hospital outcomes such as in hospital postoperative complications (IHPC, length of hospital stay (LOHS and in-hospital mortality (IHM after the revision of total hip arthroplasty (RHA and total knee arthroplasty (RKA and to identify factors associated with IHPC among T2DM patients undergoing these procedures.We performed a retrospective study using the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database, 2005-2014. We included patients who were ≥40 years old that had undergone RHA and RKA. For each T2DM patient, we selected a year-, gender-, age- and Charlson Comorbidity Index-matched non-diabetic patient.We identified 44,055 and 39,938 patients who underwent RHA (12.72% with T2DM and RKA (15.01% with T2DM. We matched 4,700 and 5,394 couples with RHA and RKA, respectively. Any IHPC was more frequent among patients with T2DM than among non-T2DM patients (19% vs. 15.64% in the RHA cohort and 12.94% vs. 11.09% in the RKA cohort, respectively. For patients who underwent RHA, postoperative infection (4.51% vs. 2.94%, p<0.001, acute post-hemorrhagic anemia (9.53% vs. 7.70%, p<0.001, mean LOHS and IHM were significantly higher in patients with T2DM. Among RKA patients, the incidence of acute posthemorrhagic anemia (7.21% vs. 5.62%; p = 0.001 and urinary tract infection (1.13% vs. 0.72%; p = 0.029 was significantly higher in patients with diabetes. Older age, obesity, infection due to internal joint prosthesis, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, mild liver disease and renal disease and emergency room admission were significantly associated with a higher risk of IHPC in T2DM patients. IHPC decreased over time only in T2DM patients who underwent RHA (OR 0.94, 95%CI 0.89-0.98.Patients with T2DM who underwent RHA and RKA procedures had more IHPC after controlling for the effects of possible confounders. LOHS and IHM were also higher among RHA patients with diabetes. Older age, comorbidity, obesity

  1. Prevalence of Chronic Diabetic Complications in Newly Diagnosed versus Known Type 2 Diabetic Subjects in a Sample of Alexandria Population, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Samir Assaad; Megallaa, Magdy Helmy; Rohoma, Kamel Hemida; Guindy, Myriam AbouSeif; Zaki, Adel; Hassanein, Mohamed; Malaty, Amin Helmy; Ismael, Hanaa Mohamed; Kharboush, Ibrahim Fahmy; El Kafash, Dalal Nasr-Eldein; Sallam, Hassan Nooman; Desouky, Iman Abdelkareem

    2018-01-24

    In Egypt, data on the prevalence of chronic diabetic complications, which are essential for the adjustment of policies and practices related to diabetes care, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency of chronic complications of diabetes; namely neuropathy, diabetic kidney disease (DKD), retinopathy and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in newly-diagnosed versus known type 2 diabetic patients. This is a cross-sectional study that is based on a previous household survey conducted on a representative sample of the population of Alexandria, Egypt. This study included 506 consecutive subjects with type 2 diabetes; 323 patients with previously known T2DM and 183 patients with newly diagnosed T2DM (discovered during the survey). For each participant, a focused history was taken. Comprehensive clinical examination was done including fundus examination, foot examination and assessment of ankle brachial index. Laboratory tests included HbAlc, lipids profile, serum creatinine and urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR). Peripheral neuropathy was detected in 20% of the studied patients; 29.4% of known patients and 3.3% of newly diagnosed patients (pDiabetic kidney disease was detected in 33.2% of the studied patients; 46.1% of known patients and 10.4% of newly diagnosed patients (pDiabetic retinopathy was detected in 34.6% of the studied patients; 48.3% of known patients and 10.4% of newly diagnosed patients (pdiabetes, the presence of any of the studied complications (neuropathy, diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy or PAD) was significantly associated with the presence of all other complications (pdiabetes, the presence of diabetic kidney disease was significantly associated with the presence of retinopathy (pdiabetes at the time of diagnosis. Finally, these results should be considered as a call for action for the health care planners and providers in our region to plan for early screening for diabetes and its complications to reduce the

  2. Dietary sources of aldose reductase inhibitors: prospects for alleviating diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Megha; Muthenna, P; Suryanarayana, P; Petrash, J Mark; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2008-01-01

    Activation of polyol pathway due to increased aldose reductase activity is one of the several mechanisms that have been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Though numerous synthetic aldose reductase inhibitors have been tested, these have not been very successful clinically. Therefore, a number of common plant/ natural products used in Indian culinary have been evaluated for their aldose reductase inhibitory potential in the present study. The aqueous extracts of 22 plant-derived materials were prepared and evaluated for the inhibitory property against rat lens and human recombinant aldose reductase. Specificity of these extracts towards aldose reductase was established by testing their ability to inhibit a closely related enzyme viz, aldehyde reductase. The ex vivo incubation of erythrocytes in high glucose containing medium was used to underscore the significance in terms of prevention of intracellular sorbitol accumulation. Among the 22 dietary sources tested, 10 showed considerable inhibitory potential against both rat lens and human recombinant aldose reductase. Prominent inhibitory property was found in spinach, cumin, fennel, lemon, basil and black pepper with an approximate IC50 of 0.2 mg/mL with an excellent selectivity towards aldose reductase. As against this, 10 to 20 times higher concentrations were required for 50% inhibition of aldehyde reductase. Reduction in the accumulation of intracellular sorbitol by the dietary extracts further substantiated their in vivo efficacy. The findings reported here indicate the scope of adapting life-style modifications in the form of inclusion of certain common sources in the diet for the management of diabetic complications.

  3. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications

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    Wu J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinzi Wu,1Zhen Jin,1Hong Zheng,1,2Liang-Jun Yan1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UNT System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA; 2Department of Basic Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Basic Medicine, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: NAD+ is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD+ can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD+ can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD+ as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD+ as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD+. Impairment of NAD+ regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD+ deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD+ redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. Keywords: mitochondria, complex I, reactive oxygen species, polyol pathway, poly ADP ribosylation, sirtuins, oxidative stress, oxidative damage

  4. Automatic detection of diabetic foot complications with infrared thermography by asymmetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van der Heijden, Ferdi

    2015-02-01

    Early identification of diabetic foot complications and their precursors is essential in preventing their devastating consequences, such as foot infection and amputation. Frequent, automatic risk assessment by an intelligent telemedicine system might be feasible and cost effective. Infrared thermography is a promising modality for such a system. The temperature differences between corresponding areas on contralateral feet are the clinically significant parameters. This asymmetric analysis is hindered by (1) foot segmentation errors, especially when the foot temperature and the ambient temperature are comparable, and by (2) different shapes and sizes between contralateral feet due to deformities or minor amputations. To circumvent the first problem, we used a color image and a thermal image acquired synchronously. Foot regions, detected in the color image, were rigidly registered to the thermal image. This resulted in 97.8%±1.1% sensitivity and 98.4%±0.5% specificity over 76 high-risk diabetic patients with manual annotation as a reference. Nonrigid landmark-based registration with B-splines solved the second problem. Corresponding points in the two feet could be found regardless of the shapes and sizes of the feet. With that, the temperature difference of the left and right feet could be obtained.

  5. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kallio, Peter J.; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C.; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients and Methods: Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncon...

  6. Enteroviral Meningoencephalitis Complicated by Central Diabetes Insipidus in a Neonate: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Garrett; Muriello, Michael; Patel, Aloka; Logan, Latania

    2015-06-01

    Enterovirus is a known cause of central nervous system infection in the neonatal population and typically has a benign course; however, neurologic complications have been reported. We describe what we believe to be the first documented case of enteroviral meningoencephalitis complicated by central diabetes insipidus in a neonate. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Placental three-dimensional power Doppler indices in mid-pregnancy and late pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surányi, A; Kozinszky, Z; Molnár, A; Nyári, T; Bitó, T; Pál, A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate placental three-dimensional power Doppler indices in diabetic pregnancies in the second and third trimesters and to compare them with those of the normal controls. Placental vascularization of pregnant women was determined by three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound technique. The calculated indices included vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), and vascularization flow index (VFI). Uncomplicated pregnancies (n = 113) were compared with pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 56) and diabetes mellitus (n = 43). The three-dimensional power Doppler indices were not significantly different between the two diabetic subgroups. All the indices in diabetic patients were significantly reduced compared with those in non-diabetic individuals (p power Doppler indices are slightly diminished throughout diabetic pregnancy [regression coefficients: -0.23 (FI), -0.06 (VI), and -0.04 (VFI)] and normal pregnancy [regression coefficients: -0.13 (FI), -0.20 (VI), and -0.11 (VFI)]. The uteroplacental circulation (umbilical and uterine artery) was not correlated significantly to the three-dimensional power Doppler indices. If all placental indices are low during late pregnancy, then the odds of the diabetes are significantly high (adjusted odds ratio: 1.10). A decreased placental vascularization could be an adjunct sonographic marker in the diagnosis of diabetic pregnancy in mid-gestation and late gestation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. [An analysis of the diabetic population in a Spanish rural are: morbidity profile, use of resources, complications and metabolic control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoriza, José M; Pérez, Marc; Cols, Montse; Sánchez, Inma; Carreras, Marc; Coderch, Jordi

    2013-11-01

    To describe the characteristics of a diabetic population, morbidity profile, resource consumption, complications and degree of metabolic control. Cross-sectional study during 2010. Four Health Areas (91.301 people) where the integrated management organization Serveis de Salut integrated Baix Empordà completely provide healthcare assistance. 4.985 diabetic individuals, identified through clinical codes using the ICD-9-MC classification and the 3M? Clinical Risk Groups software. Morbidity profile, related complications and degree of metabolic control were obtained for the target diabetic population. We analyzed the consumption of healthcare resources, pharmaceutical and blood glucose reagent strips. All measurements obtained at individual level. 99.3% of the diabetic population were attended at least once at a primary care center (14.9% of visits). 39.5% of primary care visits and less than 10% of the other scanned resources were related to the management of diabetes. The pharmaceutical expenditure was 25.4% of the population consumption (average cost ?1.014,57). 36.5% of diabetics consumed reagents strips (average cost ?120,65). The more frequent CRG are 5424-Diabetes (27%); 6144-Diabetes and Hypertension (25,5%) and 6143-Diabetes and Other Moderate Chronic Disease (17,2%). The degree of disease control is better in patients not consumers of antidiabetic drugs or treated with oral antidiabetic agents not secretagogues. Comorbidity is decisive in the consumption of resources. Just a few part of this consumption is specifically related to the management of diabetes. Results obtained provide a whole population approach to the main existing studies in our national and regional context. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Real Life Cancer Comorbidity in Greek Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Followed Up at a Single Diabetes Center: An Unappreciated New Diabetes Complication

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    Anastasia Thanopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined cancer comorbidity in patients with diabetes followed up at a single Greek academic clinic and investigated the potential related factors. Cancer comorbidity was prospectively recorded for all patients with type 2 (T2DM, n=759 or type 1 (T1DM, n=134 diabetes of at least 10-year duration examined during one year. Patient characteristics, diabetes age of onset, duration, treatment, control, and complication rates were compared between subjects with and without cancer. Moreover, a retrospective collection of data from similar patients examined for the first time during the last 25 years, but lost to follow-up, after at least one-year’s regular visits, was performed. In regularly followed-up T2DM patients cancer comorbidity was 12.6%. Patients with cancer were older and more frequently smokers. Prostate cancer was the most frequent (24.0% type. In T1DM cancer comorbidity was 3.0%. Similar rates of comorbidity and types of cancer were observed in lost to follow-up patients. In conclusion, our patients with T2DM of at least 10-year’ duration show high cancer comorbidity. No specific characteristics discriminate patients with cancer. Therefore presymptomatic cancer detection and prevention strategies may have to be incorporated into the annual systematic evaluation of our patients.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin -6 as diagnostic markers of diabetic complications in children with type I diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nashar, N.A.; Moawad, A.T.; Nassar, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of cellular auto immunity and its humoral mediators in pathogenesis and following up of type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM). Therefore, serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), glycemic control, body mass index, duration of the disease and microalbuminuria in children with TIDM were evaluated. This study was conducted on 30 patients suffered from type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM), 14 males and 16 females with mean age of 11.40 ±3.67 years and 20 apparently healthy children served as control (10 male and 10 female). Children with TIDM were classified according to duration: diabetic children for 5 years or less duration (n= 15, duration means: 2.74 ± 1.34 years) and diabetic children > 5 years (n=15, duration means: 7.35 ± 1.49 years); according to glycemic control: children with good glycemic control (n=16, HbAIc: 7.82 ± 2.70) and diabetic children with poor glycemic control (n=14, HbAIc: 10.49 ± 2.72) and according to complication: diabetic children without complications (n= 20) and diabetic children with microvascular or neurological complications (n= 10, nephritic, retinal or neurological complications). Patients and controls were subjected to careful history, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. The following investigations were done for all children; random blood glucose, Glycated hemoglobin (HbAIc %), microalbuminuria and kidney function tests. Serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured using immuno-enzymometric assay (ELISA). Patients with TIDM with duration more than 5 years, with poor glycemic control and with complications had higher serum glucose levels, higher HbAIc%, higher level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, microalbuminuria and elevated serum TNF-alpha (p<0.0001) and IL-6 (p<0.0001) in comparison to the same diabetic patients with 5 years duration or less, with good glycemic control

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) (C677T and A1298C) Polymorphisms and Vascular Complications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba; Mrad, Meriem; Ibrahim, Hazard; Akremi, Imen; Sayeh, Aicha; Jaidane, Amel; Ouertani, Haroun; Zidi, Borni; Gritli, Nasreddine

    2017-08-01

    To assess whether 2 polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, C677T and A1298C, are risk factors for vascular complications in Tunisian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The MTHFR polymorphisms were genotyped, and plasma homocysteine levels were evaluated in 160 Tunisian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prevalence of the 2 heterozygous polymorphisms of the thermolabile MTHFR gene (CT and AC) was encountered more commonly in patients with diabetes mellitus than in the healthy controls (phomocysteine (Hcy) levels than the control subjects; however, there was no statistical difference in plasma Hcy values between carriers of mutant genotypes (CT/TT for C677T and AC/CC for A1298C) and wild types (CC and AA) in patients with diabetes. Retinopathy was found to be a vascular complication in patients with either the 677CT or the 1298(AC+CC) genotype more commonly than in those with the wild-type genotypes (p=0.003; OR=3.2, 95% CI, 1.4 to 7.4; p<10 -3 ; OR=5.9, 95% CI, 2.7 to 13). Only patients who carry the A1298C mutation (AC+CC) are at risk for at least 1 complication (p=0.002). Double heterozygous mutants were at the greatest risk for retinopathy and for suffering at least 1 complication (p<10 -3 ). Studies involving a larger study population and various ethnic groups are required before ruling out the role of MTHFR gene in type 2 diabetes mellitus and in vascular complications. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The cross-sectional associations between sense of coherence and diabetic microvascular complications, glycaemic control, and patients' conceptions of type 1 diabetes

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    Saraheimo Markku

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sense of coherence (SOC has been associated with various self-care behaviours in the general population. As the management of type 1 diabetes heavily relies on self-management, the SOC concept could also prove important in this population. This paper is a report of a study conducted among patients with type 1 diabetes to assess the associations between SOC and glycaemic control, microvascular complications, and patients' conceptions of their disease. Methods Altogether 1,264 adult patients (45% men, age range 18-82 years with type 1 diabetes participated in this cross-sectional study. SOC was evaluated using a 13-item SOC questionnaire. Standardized assays were used to determine HbA1c. Nephropathy status was based on albumin excretion rate and retinal laser-treatment was used as an indication of severe retinopathy. Patients' subjective conceptions of diabetes were studied using a questionnaire. Results Higher SOC scores, reflecting stronger SOC, were associated with lower HbA1c values. Strong SOC was independently associated with reaching the HbA1c level 1c, weak SOC was associated with the presence of nephropathy among men, but not women. No associations were observed between SOC and severe retinopathy. Four dimensions describing patients' conceptions of HbA1c, complications, diabetes control and hypoglycaemia were formed from the diabetes questionnaire. Weak SOC was independently associated with worse subjective conceptions in the dimensions of HbA1c and hypoglycaemia. Furthermore among men, an association between weak SOC and the complications factor was observed. Conclusion Interventions to improve patients' SOC, if available, could improve patients' metabolic control and therefore also reduce the incidence of diabetic complications.

  13. Variability of Basal Rate Profiles in Insulin Pump Therapy and Association with Complications in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laimer, Markus; Melmer, Andreas; Mader, Julia K; Schütz-Fuhrmann, Ingrid; Engels, Heide-Rose; Götz, Gabriele; Pfeifer, Martin; Hermann, Julia M; Stettler, Christoph; Holl, Reinhard W

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, basal rate profiles in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy are individually adapted to cover expected insulin requirements. However, whether this approach is indeed superior to a more constant BR profile has not been assessed so far. This study analysed the associations between variability of BR profiles and acute and chronic complications in adult type 1 diabetes mellitus. BR profiles of 3118 female and 2427 male patients from the "Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation" registry from Germany and Austria were analysed. Acute and chronic complications were recorded 6 months prior and after the most recently documented basal rate. The "variability index" was calculated as variation of basal rate intervals in percent and describes the excursions of the basal rate intervals from the median basal rate. The variability Index correlated positively with severe hypoglycemia (r = .06; p1), hypoglycemic coma (r = .05; p = 0.002), and microalbuminuria (r = 0.05; p = 0.006). In addition, a higher variability index was associated with higher frequency of diabetic ketoacidosis (r = .04; p = 0.029) in male adult patients. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, duration of disease and total basal insulin confirmed significant correlations of the variability index with severe hypoglycemia (β = 0.013; p1) and diabetic ketoacidosis (β = 0.012; p = 0.017). Basal rate profiles with higher variability are associated with an increased frequency of acute complications in adults with type 1 diabetes.

  14. Race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and pregnancy complications in New York City women with pre-existing diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Todd, Tamarra; Janevic, Teresa; Brown, Florence M; Savitz, David A

    2014-03-01

    More women are entering pregnancy with pre-existing diabetes. Disease severity, glycaemic control, and predictors of pregnancy complications may differ by race/ethnicity or educational attainment, leading to differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes. We used linked New York City hospital record and birth certificate data for 6291 singleton births among women with pre-existing diabetes between 1995 and 2003. We defined maternal race/ethnicity as non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, South Asian, and East Asian, and education level as 12 years. Our outcomes were pre-eclampsia, preterm birth (PTB) (pregnancy complications. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and South Asian women with pre-existing diabetes may benefit from targeted interventions to improve pregnancy outcomes. © 2013 The Authors. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Central nervous system changes complicating the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of a nasopharyngeal neoplasm in a diabetic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.M.; McGinnis, W.; Cook, J.; Latourette, H.

    1979-01-01

    A case is reported of a diabetic patient with a nasopharyngeal neoplasm who developed radiation induced brainstem damage even though irradiated at a conventional time-dose-volume relationship. The clinical course was correlated with autopsy findings which revealed radiation changes in the brainstem consisting primarily of vascular hyalinization with foci of infarction, edema, and demyelination. Atherosclerotic changes were conspicuously absent and therefore not the cause of the alterations. The changes occurred three months after completion of therapy, which was more rapid than expected for radiation injury. It is hypothesized that diabetes may have predisposed the patient to this severe complication of standard therapy. More needs to be learned concerning the relationship between diabetes mellitus and radiation complications. Perhaps a modified time-dose relationship should be considered

  16. What is the contribution of two genetic variants regulating VEGF levels to type 2 diabetes risk and to microvascular complications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefond, Amélie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Stathopoulou, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key chemokine involved in tissue growth and organ repair processes, particularly angiogenesis. Elevated circulating VEGF levels are believed to play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D) microvascular complications, especially diabetic retinopathy. Recently...... for diabetic nephropathy (N(cases)¿=¿1,242-N(controls)¿=¿860) and the other for diabetic retinopathy (N(cases)¿=¿1,336-N(controls)¿=¿1,231). The effects of each SNP on quantitative traits were analyzed in a French general population-based cohort (N¿=¿4,760) and two French T2D studies (N¿=¿3,480). SNP...... on diabetic microvascular complications or the variation in related traits in T2D patients.In spite of their impact on the variance in circulating VEGF, we did not find any association between SNPs rs6921438 and rs10738760, and the risk of T2D, diabetic nephropathy or retinopathy. The link between VEGF and T2...

  17. Gait alterations in the UAE population with and without diabetic complications using both traditional and entropy measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Kinda; Al-Angari, Haitham M; Khandoker, Ahsan H; Lee, Sungmun; Almahmeed, Wael; Al Safar, Habiba S; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2017-10-01

    Diabetic foot, one of the most common and debilitating manifestations of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is the leading cause of worldwide non-traumatic lower extremity amputations. Diabetics who are at risk of ulceration are currently mainly identified by a thorough clinical examination of the feet, which typically does not show clear symptoms during the early stages of disease progression. In this study, we used a non-linear dynamics tool, gait entropy (GaitEN), in addition to traditional linear gait analysis methods, to investigate gait alterations amongst diabetic patients with combinations of three types of T2DM related complications: retinopathy, diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and nephropathy. Peak plantar pressure (PPP) was not significantly different in the group with DPN as compared to the control group (diabetics with no complications, CONT) in the forefoot region (DPN: mean±SD: 396±69.4kPa, CONT: 409±68.9kPa), although it was significantly lower in the heel region (DPN: mean±SD: 285±43.1.4kPa, CONT: 295±61.8kPa). On the other hand, gait entropy was significantly lower for the DPN compared to CONT group (DPN: 0.95±0.34, CONT: 1.03±0.28, pentropy was maintained when neuropathy was combined with either retinopathy or nephropathy. For the group with all three complications (ALL-C), the entropy was higher than CONT (ALL-C: 1.07±0.26). This may indicate an intrinsic sensorimotor feedback mechanism for the DPN patients to regulate their gait. However, this feedback gets weaker as patients develop multiple complications. Further analysis with longer walking time and different speeds is needed to verify the entropy results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DETECTION OF MICROVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS OF TYPE 2 DIABETES BY EZSCAN AND ITS COMPARISON WITH STANDARD SCREENING METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Bajaj

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND EZSCAN is a new, noninvasive technique to detect sudomotor dysfunction and thus neuropathy in diabetes patients at an early stage. It further predicts chances of development of other microvascular complications. In this study, we evaluated EZSCAN for detection of microvascular complications in Type 2 diabetes patients and compared accuracy of EZSCAN with standard screening methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS 104 known diabetes patients, 56 males and 48 females, were studied. All cases underwent the EZSCAN test, Nerve Conduction Study (NCS test, Vibration perception threshold test (VPT, Monofilament test, Fundus examination and Urine micral test. The results of EZSCAN were compared with standard screening methods. The data has been analysed and assessed by applying appropriate statistical tests within different groups. RESULTS Mean age of the subjects was 53.5 ± 11.4 years. For detection of diabetic neuropathy, sensitivity and specificity of EZSCAN was found to be 77.0 % and 95.3%, respectively. Odd’s ratio (OR was 68.82 with p < 0.0001. AUC in ROC curve was 0.930. Sensitivity and specificity of EZSCAN for detection of nephropathy were 67.1% and 94.1%, respectively. OR = 32.69 with p < 0.0001. AUC was 0.926. Sensitivity of EZSCAN for detection of retinopathy was 90% while specificity is 70.3%. OR = 21.27; p< 0.0001. AUC came out to be 0.920. CONCLUSION Results of EZSCAN test compared significantly to the standard screening methods for the detection of microvascular complications of diabetes and can be used as a simple, noninvasive and quick method to detect microvascular complications of diabetes.

  19. [Analysis of disability due to ocular complications of diabetes in Tashkent over a ten-year period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhamalova, Sh A; Iskandarova, Sh T; Nabiev, A M

    2016-01-01

    to study peculiarities of primary and recurrent disability due to ocular complications of diabetes in Tashkent over the years 2003-2012 and to assess the impact of risk factors on the effectiveness of laser photocoagulation of the retina. A total of 347 disability examination reports of diabetic patients with ocular complications were copied and 48 case histories of patients with type II diabetes who underwent laser photocoagulation of the retina - retrospectively analyzed. Stabilization of visual function was used as the effectiveness criterion. The rate of new cases of disability over the studied decade averaged 0.55 per 100,000 population per year, while that of recurrent disability was 1.8 times higher - 0.97. The overall rate of disability was not high - 1.53; at that, severe disability (i.e. grade I and II) prevailed. Both recurrent and primary disability groups were made up by middle-aged patients and those in their retirement age; however, in the recurrent disability group the number of young disabled people was 4.5 times higher than in the primary disability group. Studies of the effectiveness of laser photocoagulation of the retina in relation to the compensation of diabetes and blood pressure level showed that unstable general condition was associated with not only significant deterioration of visual function, but also complications, including severe. The rate of disability due to ocular complications of diabetes is generally not high, however, grades I and II disabilities that require greater social support has been found to prevail in both groups. Most of disabled people are middle-aged (working-age population), which also causes economic damage. In cases of decompensated diabetes and unstable blood pressure, the effectiveness of laser photocoagulation of the retina is reduced.

  20. More co-morbid depression in patients with Type 2 diabetes with multiple complications. An observational study at a specialized outpatient clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenbergen-Weijenburg, K.M.; van Puffelen, A.L.; Horn, E.K.; v.d. Nuyen, J.; van Dam, P.S.; van Benthem, T.B.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Rutten, F.F.H.; Hakkaart-van Roijen, L.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The impact of depression on patients with chronic medical illnesses such as diabetes is well documented. Depression is relatively common in diabetes patients with diabetes-related complications and they are more likely to be referred to specialized outpatient facilities. Only a few studies

  1. Serum ADEPONECTIN Level In Children And Adolescents With Type I Diabetes Mellitus And Its Association With Microvascular Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOAWAD, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipo cytokine, is secreted from the adipose tissue and plays an important role in obesity, type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to determine the concentration of serum adiponectin in type I diabetic children and to establish its association with microvascular complications. For this reason, weight (kg), height (m), body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2), random blood sugar, HbAIc, kidney functions, urinary microalbuminuria, lipid profiles and serum adiponectin were assessed in 25 children (11 males, 14 females) with type I diabetes and twenty healthy control children. Careful history, clinical examination, acetomorphine and pirbuterol assessment were done for all patients and controls. The diabetic patients were stratified depending on the pubertal stage into pre-pubertal group and pubertal group, and according to gender into male group and female group. The results obtained displayed significant elevated values for random blood glucose (P<0.001), HbAIc (P<0.001), total cholesterol (P<0.05), low density lipoprotein (LDL) (P<0.05), BUN (P<0.001), creatinine (P<0.05), urinary microalbuminuria (P<0.001) and serum adiponectin (P<0.001) in diabetic children and control. In patients suffering from microvascular diabetic complications as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, serum adiponectin level showed high significant increase in patients with diabetic nephropathy and neuropathy than without. On the other hand, patients with retinopathy had no significant increase in serum adiponectin as compared with patients without retinopathy but this result may be due to small sample size. Positive significant correlation was detected between serum adiponectin and HbAIc, total cholesterol and urinary microalbuminuria in the same patients. Negative significant correlation was observed between serum adiponectin level and body mass index (BMI). It could be concluded that serum adiponectin which increased in diabetic children than healthy control

  2. A Survey on Prevalence of Ocular Complications and It’s Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients Referred to Diabetic Center of Nader Kazemi Clinic Shiraz- Iran 1998-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali khani jeihooni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: With respect to increasing prevalence of diabetes, the chance for incidence of ocular complications among diabetics, this study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for the incidence of the ocular complications in the patients referred to the Nader Kazemi Shiraz Diabetic center from 1998 to 2010.Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional study , subjects were selected based on a systematic random sampling to investigate the incidence of the ocular complications and factors influencing like wise age, sex, type of diabet, job, education, blood triglyceride (TG and cholesterol level, Family history of diabetes, history of hypertension, history of participation in educational classes, method of treatment, duration of diabetes and fasting blood sugar were considered.Results: Ocular complications were found among 229 diabetic patients (32.6%. Ocular complications of type II diabetic patients than in patients with type I diabetes (P<0. 005. Factors such as job(P=0. 022, history of participation in educational classes(P<0. 001, education(P<0. 001, Family history of diabetes(P<0. 001, blood triglyceride (TG (P=0. 021, duration of diabetes(P<0. 001,age (P<0. 001, method of treatment(P<0. 001and fasting blood sugar (P<0. 001 had a significant relationship with the occurrence of ocular complication. But other risk factors such as hypertension, gender and cholesterol levels were not statistically significant relationship with the occurrence of ocular complication.Conclusion: Given the prevalence of ocular complications, continuing education on the disease of diabetes complications, it can have a role in reducing the occurrence of ocular complications.

  3. The Relationship Between Osteomyelitis Complication and Drug-Resistant Infection Risk in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Ding, Hui; Wu, Hua; Chen, Hong-Lin

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between osteomyelitis complications and drug-resistant infection risk in diabetic foot ulcer. Searches of MEDLINE and ISI databases were performed for the studies. Odds ratios (ORs) for drug-resistant infection incidence were calculated for diabetic foot ulcer patients with or without osteomyelitis complications. Eleven studies (12 cohorts) with 1526 patients were included in this study. Meta-analysis showed that the summary OR was 3.343 (95% CI = 2.355-4.745; Z = 6.75, P analysis by only pooled the adjusted ORs showed that the result was robust (the summary OR = 4.081, 95% CI = 2.471-6.739). Subgroup analysis by drug-resistant type showed that the summary OR was 4.391 (95% CI = 2.287-8.394) for methicillin-resistant infection subgroup, and 2.693 (95% CI = 1.882-3.851) for multidrug-resistant infection subgroup. The meta-regression showed that drug-resistant incidence ( t = -0.90, P = .389) and published year ( t = -0.11, P = .913) were not related with the OR changes. In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicates that osteomyelitis complications are related with drug-resistant infection risk in diabetic foot ulcer. We suggest bone culture-based narrow-spectrum antibiotic therapy for osteomyelitis for prevention drug-resistant infection in diabetic foot ulcer.

  4. Effects of thiamine and benfotiamine on intracellular glucose metabolism and relevance in the prevention of diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Elena; Berrone, Elena; Tarallo, Sonia; Porta, Massimo

    2008-09-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential cofactor in most organisms and is required at several stages of anabolic and catabolic intermediary metabolism, such as intracellular glucose metabolism, and is also a modulator of neuronal and neuro-muscular transmission. Lack of thiamine or defects in its intracellular transport can cause a number of severe disorders. Thiamine acts as a coenzyme for transketolase (TK) and for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, enzymes which play a fundamental role for intracellular glucose metabolism. In particular, TK is able to shift excess fructose-6-phosphate and glycerhaldeyde-3-phosphate from glycolysis into the pentose-phosphate shunt, thus eliminating these potentially damaging metabolites from the cytosol. Diabetes might be considered a thiamine-deficient state, if not in absolute terms at least relative to the increased requirements deriving from accelerated and amplified glucose metabolism in non-insulin dependent tissues that, like the vessel wall, are prone to complications. A thiamine/TK activity deficiency has been described in diabetic patients, the correction of which by thiamine and/or its lipophilic derivative, benfotiamine, has been demonstrated in vitro to counteract the damaging effects of hyperglycaemia on vascular cells. Little is known, however, on the positive effects of thiamine/benfotiamine administration in diabetic patients, apart from the possible amelioration of neuropathic symptoms. Clinical trials on diabetic patients would be necessary to test this vitamin as a potential and inexpensive approach to the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic vascular complications.

  5. Preventive and Protective Properties of Zingiber officinale (Ginger in Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Complications, and Associated Lipid and Other Metabolic Disorders: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zingiber officinale (ginger has been used as herbal medicine to treat various ailments worldwide since antiquity. Recent evidence revealed the potential of ginger for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Data from in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials has demonstrated the antihyperglycaemic effect of ginger. The mechanisms underlying these actions are associated with insulin release and action, and improved carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The most active ingredients in ginger are the pungent principles, gingerols, and shogaol. Ginger has shown prominent protective effects on diabetic liver, kidney, eye, and neural system complications. The pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, and the safety issues of ginger are also discussed in this update.

  6. Preventive and Protective Properties of Zingiber officinale (Ginger) in Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Complications, and Associated Lipid and Other Metabolic Disorders: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiming; Tran, Van H.; Duke, Colin C.; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2012-01-01

    Zingiber officinale (ginger) has been used as herbal medicine to treat various ailments worldwide since antiquity. Recent evidence revealed the potential of ginger for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Data from in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials has demonstrated the antihyperglycaemic effect of ginger. The mechanisms underlying these actions are associated with insulin release and action, and improved carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The most active ingredients in ginger are the pungent principles, gingerols, and shogaol. Ginger has shown prominent protective effects on diabetic liver, kidney, eye, and neural system complications. The pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, and the safety issues of ginger are also discussed in this update. PMID:23243452

  7. Event Rates, Hospital Utilization, and Costs Associated with Major Complications of Diabetes: A Multicountry Comparative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Philip M.; Glasziou, Paul; Patel, Anushka; Chalmers, John; Harrap, Stephen B.; Woodward, Mark Phillip; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2010-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Worldwide, nearly 250 million people have diabetes, and this number is increasing rapidly. Diabetes is characterized by dangerous amounts of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Blood sugar levels are normally controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Blood sugar control fails in people with diabetes because they make no insulin (type 1 diabetes) or, more commonly, because the fat and muscle cells that usually respond to insulin by removing excess sugar f...

  8. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ-dependent activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPARγ agonist. → The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NFκB activation and TNF α. → PPARγ activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPARγ downregulation in diabetic mice. → We provided the first evidence indicating that PPARγ activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPARγ agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPARγ activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPARγ antagonist), and losartan with no PPARγ activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) activation and tumor necrosis factor α. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPARγ activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of vascular PPARγ in db/db mice and this effect of telmisartan was cancelled by the coadministration

  9. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma}-dependent activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Yasuda, Osamu [Department of Cardiovascular Clinical and Translational Research, Kumamoto University Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan); Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Ogawa, Hisao [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei, E-mail: kimmitsu@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. {yields} The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NF{kappa}B activation and TNF {alpha}. {yields} PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPAR{gamma} downregulation in diabetic mice. {yields} We provided the first evidence indicating that PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPAR{gamma} activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPAR{gamma} antagonist), and losartan with no PPAR{gamma} activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPAR{gamma} activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of

  10. Clinical and scientific results in perinatal care of pregnancy complicated by insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelmis, J

    1998-01-01

    At the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Perinatal Unit for Diabetes and Fetal Growth, School of Medicine, Zagreb, perinatal care of pregnancies complicated with insulin dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM), has been performed for more than 36 years. The intention of this review is to show our own results in the management of IDDM pregnancies and the latest clinical advances in perinatal care of such pregnancies. Pregnancy complicated with IDDM is at risk because of numerous maternal, fetal and neonatal complications. Recent advances in medicine, especially in diabetology and perinatology, helps clinician avoid or lessen antenatal or perinatal complications in IDDM pregnancies. The main result of improved perinatal care is that today fetal and neonatal mortality in IDDM pregnancy is almost equal to that of healthy pregnant population. Intensive preconceptual care and optimal regulation of IDDM have resulted not only in decreased perinatal mortality but also in a decreased rate of congenital malformation. Tight glycemia control during pregnancy has a beneficial effect on fetal growth. Intensive control of fetal growth, verification of lung maturation at term by amniocenthesis, and control of fetal oxygenation will result in delivery of a mature eutrophic newborn with the lowest rate of neonatal complications possible. Perinatal mortality of less than 2% in IDDM pregnancy can be obtained by planned delivery between 38 and 39 weeks of gestation by either vaginal route or cesarean section, depending on indications. After delivery, intensive care of the newborn is necessary.

  11. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor levels are elevated and associated with complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Lyngbaek, S; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. We investigated the associations between suPAR and diabetes, including diabetes duration and complications, in patients with type 1 diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS......: From 2009 to 2011, 667 patients with type 1 diabetes and 51 nondiabetic control subjects were included in a cross-sectional study at Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark. suPAR levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The investigated diabetic......% confidence interval) values per 1 ln unit increase in suPAR were as follows: 2.5 (1.1-5.7) for CVD: 2.7 (1.2-6.2) for autonomic dysfunction; 3.8 (1.3-10.9) for albuminuria and 2.5 (1.1-6.1) for a high degree of arterial stiffness (P ≤ 0.039). CONCLUSION: The suPAR level is higher in patients with type 1...

  12. Garlic and Resveratrol attenuate diabetic complications, loss of β-cells, pancreatic and hepatic oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Kaur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The study was aimed at finding the effect of garlic and resveratrol on loss of β-cells and diabetic complication in streptozotocin (STZ-induced Type-I diabetic rats. Rats were injected with single dose STZ (50mg/kg, i.p. for induction of type 1 diabetes (Dia and compared with control group. Rats from third (Dia+Gar, fourth (Dia+Resv and fifth (Dia+Met groups were fed raw garlic homogenate (250 mg/kg/day, resveratrol (25 mg/kg/day and metformin (500 mg/kg/day orally, respectively for a period of 4 weeks. Diabetic group had decreased serum insulin and hydrogen sulfide levels along with increased blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin, triglyceride, uric acid and nitric oxide levels. Significant (p<0.05 increase in pancreatic and hepatic TBARS, conjugated dienes, nitric oxide, and AGE level and significant (p<0.05 decrease in SOD, catalase, H2S, GSH level were observed in diabetic group. Administration of garlic, resveratrol and metformin significantly (p<0.05 normalized most of the altered metabolic and oxidative stress parameters as well as histopathological changes. Administration of garlic, resveratrol and 9metformin in diabetic rat decreases pancreatic β-cell damage and hepatic injury. Our data concluded that administration of garlic showed more promising effect in terms of reducing oxidative stress and pathological changes when compared to resveratrol and metformin groups.

  13. Diabetes-induced microvascular complications at the level of the spinal cord; a contributing factor in diabetic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ved, N; Da Vitoria Lobo, M E; Bestall, S M; L Vidueira, C; Beazley-Long, N; Ballmer-Hofer, K; Hirashima, M; Bates, D O; Donaldson, L F; Hulse, R P

    2018-05-17

    Abnormalities of neurovascular interactions within the central nervous system of diabetic patients is associated with the onset of many neurological disease states. However, to date, the link between the neurovascular network within the spinal cord and regulation of nociception has not been investigated despite neuropathic pain being common in diabetes. We hypothesised that hyperglycaemia-induced endothelial degeneration in the spinal cord, due to suppression of VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signalling, induces diabetic neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain behaviour was investigated in a chemically induced model of type 1 diabetes (streptozotocin induced, insulin supplemented; either vehicle or VEGF-A 165 b treated) and an inducible endothelial knockdown of VEGFR2 (tamoxifen induced). Diabetic animals developed mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. This was associated with a reduction in the number of blood vessels and reduction in Evans blue extravasation in the lumbar spinal cord of diabetic animals versus age-matched controls. Endothelial markers occludin, CD31 and VE-cadherin were downregulated in the spinal cord of the diabetic group versus controls, as well as a concurrent reduction of VEGF-A 165 b expression. In diabetic animals, VEGF-A 165 b treatment (biweekly intraperitoneal, 20 ng g -1 ) restored normal Evans blue extravasation and prevented vascular degeneration, diabetes-induced central neuron activation and neuropathic pain. Inducible knockdown of VEGFR2 (tamoxifen treated Tie2CreER T2 -vegfr2 flfl mice) led to a reduction in blood vessel network volume in the lumbar spinal cord and development of heat hyperalgesia. These findings indicate that hyperglycaemia leads to a reduction in the VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signalling cascade resulting in endothelial dysfunction in the spinal cord, which could be an undiscovered contributing factor to diabetic neuropathic pain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All

  14. Long-term effects of lifestyle intervention or metformin on diabetes development and microvascular complications over 15-year follow-up: the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Effective prevention is needed to combat the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. We investigated the long-term extent of beneficial effects of lifestyle intervention and metformin on diabetes prevention, originally shown during the 3-year Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), and assessed whether these interventions reduced diabetes-associated microvascular complications. The DPP (1996-2001) was a randomised trial comparing an intensive lifestyle intervention or masked metformin with placebo in a cohort selected to be at very high risk of developing diabetes. All participants were offered lifestyle training at the end of the DPP. 2776 (88%) of the surviving DPP cohort were followed up in the DPP Outcomes Study (DPPOS, Sept 1, 2002, to Jan 2, 2014) and analysed by intention to treat on the basis of their original DPP assignment. During DPPOS, the original lifestyle intervention group was offered lifestyle reinforcement semi-annually and the metformin group received unmasked metformin. The primary outcomes were the development of diabetes and the prevalence of microvascular disease. For the assessment of microvascular disease, we used an aggregate microvascular outcome, composed of nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. During a mean follow-up of 15 years, diabetes incidence was reduced by 27% in the lifestyle intervention group (hazard ratio 0·73, 95% CI 0·65-0·83; pdiabetes were 55% in the lifestyle group, 56% in the metformin group, and 62% in the placebo group. The prevalences at the end of the study of the aggregate microvascular outcome were not significantly different between the treatment groups in the total cohort (placebo 12·4%, 95% CI 11·1-13·8; metformin 13·0%, 11·7-14·5; lifestyle intervention 11·3%, 10·1-12·7). However, in women (n=1887) the lifestyle intervention was associated with a lower prevalence (8·7%, 95% CI 7·4-10·2) than in the placebo (11·0%, 9·6-12·6) and metformin (11·2%, 9·7-12·9) groups, with reductions in the

  15. Novel strategies for preventing diabetes and obesity complications with natural polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpene, C; Gomez-Zorita, S; Deleruyelle, S; Carpene, M A

    2015-01-01

    During the last years, the list of resveratrol effects has grown in parallel with the number of other members of the polyphenol family described to modulate glucose or lipid handling. In the same time, more than ten human studies on the influence of resveratrol supplementation on two related metabolic diseases, obesity and diabetes, have indicated that impressive beneficial effects co-exist with lack of demonstration of clinical relevance, irrespective of the daily dose ingested (0.075 to 1.5 g per capita) or the number of studied patients. Such contrasting observations have been proposed to depend on the degree of insulin resistance of the patients incorporated in the study. To date, no definitive conclusion can be drawn on the antidiabetic or antiobesity benefits of resveratrol. On the opposite, studies on animal models of diabesity consistently indicated that resveratrol impairs diverse insulin actions in adipocytes, blunting glucose transport, lipogenesis and adipogenesis. Since resveratrol also favours lipolysis and limits the production of proinflammatory adipokines, its administration in rodents results in limitation of fat deposition, activation of hexose uptake into muscle, improvement of insulin sensitivity, and facilitation of glucose disposal. Facing to a somewhat disappointing extrapolation to man of these promising antidiabetic and antiobesity properties, attention must be paid to re-examine resveratrol targets, especially those attainable after polyphenol ingestion and to re-define the responses to low doses. In this context, human adipocytes are proposed as a convenient model for the screening of "novel" polyphenols that can reproduce, out class, or reinforce resveratrol metabolic actions, Moreover, the use of combination of polyphenols is proposed to treat diabesity complications in view of recently reported synergisms. Lastly, multidisciplinar approaches are recommended for future investigations, considering the wide range of polyphenol actions

  16. Changes of plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) and urinary albumin contents in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated with nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Lili

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) and urinary albumin contents in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated with nephropathy. Methods: Plasma Hcy (with fluorescence immunoassay) fasting glucose, BUN, Cr (with biochemistry) levels and urinary albumin contents (with RIA) were determined in 36 DM2 patients without nephropathy, 30 DM2 patients with nephropathy and 30 controls. Results: The fasting blood glucose levels in the 2 groups of diabetic patients were not much different. Again, the BUN and Cr levels in the 3 groups of patients were about the same. The plasma Hcy levels in the group of patients with diabetic nephropathy were significantly higher than those in both controls and DM2 patients without nephropathy (all P<0.01). Conclusion: Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for nephropathy in DM2 patients. (authors)

  17. Urinary creatinine concentration is inversely related to glycaemic control and the presence of some diabetic complications in patients with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Andreasen, Anne H; Vestbo, Else

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ratio between urinary albumin concentration (UAC) and urinary creatinine concentration (UCC) is widely used to estimate renal involvement. We examined how UAC and UCC associate with each other, with other risk factors, and with diabetic complications in a population-based sample...... of Type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: A freshly voided morning urine specimen was provided by 1,284 consecutive, newly diagnosed diabetic patients aged 40 years or over in general practice. Albumin was measured by a polyethyleneglycol radioimmunoassay and creatinine by a modified Jaffe method. RESULTS......: In a multivariate model including UAC, UCC, age, sex, HbA1c, and urinary glucose concentration, UAC increased with both age (P=.042) and HbA1c (P=.014), while UCC decreased (Phigh resting heart...

  18. Actinic keratosis and diabetes complications: A nationwide population-based study in South Korea (2009-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, YoungBok; Lee, JiHyun; Choi, JinYoung; Yu, DongSoo; Han, KyungDo; Park, Yong-Gyu

    2017-11-29

    As the associations between actinic keratosis (AK) and diabetes complications in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have never been investigated, this study aimed to evaluate any such associations in patients with DM. This retrospective cohort study analyzed clinical data for DM patients aged>40 years who had undergone the health examination recommended by the South Korea National Health Insurance Program between 2009 and 2012 (n=2,056,580). All of these patients were classified according to the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and history of DVD; myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischaemic attacks. Newly diagnosed AK was identified using claims data from baseline to the date of diagnosis or 31 December 2015, whichever came first. Of the 2,056,580 patients with DM, 6404 (0.31%) developed AK. Those patients in the DR, ESRD and CVD groups were more likely to be diagnosed with AK (PAK were significantly higher in the DR, ESRD and CVD groups: HR (95% CI): 1.29 (1.21-1.39), HR: 4.24 (3.28-5.47) and HR: 1.22 (1.13-1.31), respectively. This study has revealed that the incidence of AK is higher in diabetes patients with ocular, renal and cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. May the force be with you: why resistance training is essential for subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus without complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codella, Roberto; Ialacqua, Marta; Terruzzi, Ileana; Luzi, Livio

    2018-05-05

    Physical activity, together with diet and pharmacological therapy, represents one of the three cornerstones in type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment and care. The therapeutic appeal of regular physical activity stems from: (i) its non-pharmacological nature; (ii) its beneficial effects on the metabolic risk factors associated with diabetes complications; (iii) its low costs. Evidence accumulated in the last years suggests that aerobic training-endurance training-constitutes a safe modality of intervention, achievable, and effective in diabetes treatment, whenever it is not limited by comorbidities. Aerobic training exerts insulin-mimetic effects and has been shown to lower mortality risk too. Anaerobic, intense physical activity, such as that of strength or power sports disciplines, is not univocally recognized as safe and simple to realize, however, it is important in stimulating energy and glucose metabolism. According to recent evidence, high-intensity training may be prescribed even in the face of cardiovascular diseases, peripheral vascular disease, or osteoarthritis. Some studies have shown resistance training to be more efficient than aerobic exercise in improving glycemic control. This review explores the most up-to-date indications emerging from literature in support of the beneficial effects of strength stimulation and resistance training in patients with type 2 diabetes without complications.

  20. Diabetic complications do not hamper improvement of health-related quality of life over the course of treatment of diabetic foot ulcers - the Eurodiale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siersma, Volkert; Thorsen, Hanne; Holstein, Per E; Kars, Marleen; Apelqvist, Jan; Jude, Edward B; Piaggesi, Alberto; Bakker, Karel; Edmonds, Michael; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Mauricio, Didac; Reike, Heinrich; Spraul, Maximilian; Uccioli, Luigi; Urbancic, Vilma; van Acker, Kristien; van Baal, Jeff; Schaper, Nicolaas C

    2017-07-01

    Diabetic complications, and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), are associated with low health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated whether the presence of diabetic complications also influenced the improvement of HRQoL during DFU treatment. 1088 patients presenting for DFU treatment at the centers participating in the Eurodiale study were followed prospectively up to one year. HRQoL was measured both at presentation and after healing or at end of follow up, using EQ-5D: a standardized instrument consisting of five domains and a summary index. The influence of diabetic comorbidity on the course of HRQoL was evaluated for each of the EQ-5D outcomes in multi-level linear regression analyses, adjusting for baseline characteristics. HRQoL improved in all EQ-5D outcomes over the course of treatment for those DFUs that healed. The few significant differences in the development of HRQoL between patients with and without comorbidity showed a more beneficial development for patients with comorbidity in DFUs that did not heal or healed slowly. Comorbidity does not hamper improvement of HRQoL in DFU treatment. On the contrary, HRQoL improved sometimes more in patients with certain comorbidity with hard-to-heal ulcers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hordenine protects against hyperglycemia-associated renal complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shuhao; Cao, Meng; Wu, Guangyuan; Long, Zi; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fan, Junshu; Xu, Zhongrui; Su, Hongfei; Hao, Yiming; Li, Ge; Peng, Jie; Li, Shuang; Wang, Xin

    2018-05-15

    The worldwide prevalence of diabetes and associated metabolic diseases has dramatically increased. Pharmacological treatment of diabetes is still limited. Hordenine (HOR), a phenethylamine alkaloid, is a natural constituent in many plants. The present study was designed to explore the possible anti-diabetic effect of HOR in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Combined treatment of HOR and insulin significantly reduced fasting and postprandial blood glucose level in diabetic mice. HOR and insulin did not show evident protective effect against structural and functional injuries of pancreas. Renal histological and functional injuries were significantly improved by HOR or insulin treatment. Moreover, combined treatment of HOR and insulin resulted in a more significant amelioration of renal histological and functional injuries in diabetic mice. HOR induced a decrease of renal IL-1α/β and IL-6 expression, and a reduction of Col1α1 and MMP9 expression and PAS-stained mesangial expansion in glomeruli of diabetic mice. In diabetic mice, HOR significantly decreased Nrf2 expression and increased hnRNPF and hnRNPK expression in kidney. Moreover, HOR showed a synergistic effect with insulin on the expression of these regulators. Renal ROS level and TBARS content in diabetic mice were decreased by HOR. The reduction of renal expression of antioxidant enzymes in diabetic mice was inhibited by HOR and insulin. Furthermore, HOR and insulin function synergistically to play an antioxidant role against oxidative injury in diabetic nephropathy. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, we, for the first time, found the anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrotic role of HOR in combination with insulin. HOR functions synergistically with insulin and prevents diabetic nephropathy. However, the molecular mechanism of the synergistic effect of HOR and insulin needs to be elucidated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Peter J; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncontrolled). Those evaluated between in subsequent two-year intervals were referred to primary care for HbA1c ≥ 10% and ≥ 8%, respectively, to improve DM control before surgery. Complications and mortality were quantified postoperatively and at three, six, and twelve months. Length of stay (LOS) and patients requiring a prolonged LOS (> 5 days) were recorded. Patients (197 men, 6 women) underwent 71, 131, and 1 total hip, knee, and shoulder replacements, respectively. Patients undergoing TJA with uncontrolled HbA1c and those with HbA1c patients without DM. An increase in complication rate was observed in DM patients with uncontrolled HbA1c versus patients without DM (P patients with preoperative HbA1c that was uncontrolled or ≥ 10% required prolonged LOS versus those without DM (P diabetics undergoing TJA.

  3. Lost opportunities to prevent early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Judith A; McCloskey, Lois; Gebel, Christina M; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes in the decade after delivery, but few women receive appropriately timed postpartum glucose testing (PPGT) or a referral to primary care (PC) for continued monitoring. This qualitative study was designed to identify barriers and facilitators to testing and referral from patient and providers' perspectives. Methods We interviewed patients and clinicians in depth about knowledge, values, priorities, ...

  4. Successful maintenance on sulphonylurea therapy and low diabetes complication rates in a HNF1A-MODY cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, S; Kyithar, M P; Rizvi, S R; Donnelly, E; McCarthy, A; Burke, M; Colclough, K; Ellard, S; Byrne, M M

    2016-07-01

    HNF1A gene mutations are the most common cause of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) in the UK. Persons with HNF1A-MODY display sensitivity to sulphonylurea therapy; however, the long-term efficacy is not established. There is limited literature as to the prevalence of micro- and macrovascular complications in this unique cohort. The aim of this study was to determine the natural progression and clinical management of HNF1A-MODY diabetes in a dedicated MODY clinic. Sixty patients with HNF1A-MODY and a cohort of 60 BMI-, age-, ethnicity- and diabetes duration-matched patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus participated in the study. All patients were phenotyped in detail. Clinical follow-up of the HNF1A-MODY cohort occurred on a bi-annual basis. Following a genetic diagnosis of MODY, the majority of the cohort treated with sulphonylurea therapy remained insulin independent at 84-month follow-up (80%). The HbA1c in the HNF1A-MODY group treated with sulphonylurea therapy alone improved significantly over the study period [from 49 (44-63) mmol/mol, 6.6 (6.2-7.9)% to 41 (31-50) mmol/mol, 5.9 (5-6.7)%; P = 0.003]. The rate of retinopathy was significantly lower than that noted in the Type 1 diabetes mellitus group (13.6 vs. 50%; P = 0.0001).There was also a lower rate of microalbuminuria and cardiovascular disease in the HNF1A-MODY group compared with the Type 1 diabetes mellitus group. This study demonstrates that the majority of patients with HNF1A-MODY can be maintained successfully on sulphonylurea therapy with good glycaemic control. We note a significantly lower rate of micro- and macrovascular complications than reported previously. The use of appropriate therapy at early stages of the disorder may decrease the incidence of complications. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  5. Multiple diabetic complications, as well as impaired physical and mental function, are associated with declining balance function in older persons with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong XF

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiufang Hong,1,2 Xujiao Chen,2 Jiaojiao Chu,2 Shanshan Shen,2 Qichen Chai,2 Gaobo Lou,2 Lingyan Chen2 1Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, 2Department of Geriatrics, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate whether there is a difference in balance function between older persons with and without diabetes mellitus (DM, and to identify whether mediating factors, such as diabetic complications, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL score, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score, as well as hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, are associated with balance function in older persons with DM.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 208 older persons were divided into a DM group (n=80 and a control group who did not have DM (n=128. Balance function was evaluated with the Tinetti performance-oriented mobility assessment (POMA, which includes balance and gait subscales. Activities of daily living (ADL, IADL, and the MMSE were also measured. Fall incidents in last 12 months, the use of walking aids, fear of falling, comorbidities, and polypharmacy were recorded. Diabetic complications were recorded, and HbA1c, FPG, TC, TG, and LDL were measured in the patients of the DM group.Results: Fall incidents in last 12 months were higher in the DM group than in the control group (P<0.01. POMA score as well as ADL and IADL scores were lower in the diabetic group than the control group (P<0.05. Within the diabetic group, the POMA score was positively related to the ADL score (odds ratio [OR], 11.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.076–44.497; P<0.01, IADL score (OR, 16.286; 95% CI, 4.793–55.333; P<0.01, and MMSE score (OR, 10.524; 95% CI, 2.764–40.074; P<0.01, but was negatively related to age (OR, 7.707; 95% CI, 2.035–29.185; P<0.01 and diabetic complication (OR, 6.667; 95% CI, 2.279–19

  6. Diagnostic values for skin temperature assessment to detect diabetes-related foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Prijs, Miranda; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Skin temperature assessment is a promising modality for early detection of diabetic foot problems, but its diagnostic value has not been studied. Our aims were to investigate the diagnostic value of different cutoff skin temperature values for detecting diabetes-related foot

  7. Diabetes : Brain changes in T1DM—a microvascular complication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    A recent study indicates that type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with vascular brain lesions that affect cognition and might represent a target for preventive measures. This commentary discusses methods to ascertain vascular contributions to cerebral dysfunction in diabetes mellitus and

  8. Protection from retinopathy and other complications in patients with type 1 diabetes of extreme duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    We performed a cross-sectional, observational study of 351 U.S. residents with at least 50 years of insulin-dependent diabetes. Longitudinal data on retinopathy progression was obtained via chart review in patients followed at the Joslin Diabetes Center eye clinic (Boston, MA). HbA1c was determined ...

  9. Prevalence and complications of diabetes mellitus in Northern Africa, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Manouk; Agyemang, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is increasingly becoming a major chronic disease burden all over the world. This requires a shift in healthcare priorities and up-to-date data on the epidemiology and impact of diabetes in all regions of the world to help plan and prioritize health programs. We systematically reviewed the

  10. The global burden of diabetes and its complications: an emerging pandemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dieren, Susan; Beulens, Joline W. J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Neal, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients with type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in both developed and developing countries around the world. The emerging pandemic is driven by the combined effects of population ageing, rising levels of obesity and inactivity, and greater longevity among patients with diabetes

  11. Complications and characteristics of patients referred to a joint diabetes renal clinic in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thabit, H

    2012-12-01

    Joint diabetes renal (JDR) clinics are recommended as the appropriate model of care to manage advanced diabetic-associated renal failure. We performed a retrospective review of clinical data and records of the first 60 patients who attended our service and their follow-up at 12 months.

  12. Relation Between Different Measures of Glycemic Exposure and Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Observational Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijngaarden, R.P.T. (Rients P. T.); J.A. Overbeek (Jetty); E.M. Heintjes (Edith); Schubert, A. (Agata); Diels, J. (Joris); Straatman, H. (Huub); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R.M.C. Herings (Ron)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: This retrospective cohort study investigated the relation between different measures of glycemic exposure and micro- and macrovascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The analysis included patients receiving oral antihyperglycemic agents between

  13. European rational approach for the genetics of diabetic complications--EURAGEDIC: patient populations and strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L.; Groop, P.H.; Hadjadj, S.

    2008-01-01

    in 541 independent parent-offspring trios with or without diabetic nephropathy was applied for validation of consistency. Candidate genes were selected based on previous linkage studies, knowledge of metabolic pathways, and animal models. A comprehensive SNP discovery in more than 100 candidate genes......BACKGROUND: Diabetic nephropathy is likely to be a complex genetic trait. To date, most diabetic nephropathy candidate gene studies have tested a limited number of genes and variants in small sized populations, or in populations that were poorly matched or phenotyped. The main objective...... of the EURAGEDIC study was to address these problems. METHODS: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes were tested for association with overt diabetic nephropathy (persistent albuminuria >300 mg/24 h) in a large (n=2499) Type 1 diabetes case/control study. Testing for transmission disequilibrium...

  14. Association between microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and micro- and macrovascular complications in long-term type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, S L; Schlosser, A; Green, A

    2017-01-01

    in the former Funen County, Denmark. Detection of plasma-MFAP4 (pMFAP4) was performed by the AlphaLISA Technique. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was graded in accordance with the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study adaptation of the modified Airlie House classification. A monofilament test was used to test...... diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy or macrovascular disease. CONCLUSIONS: No association between pMFAP4 and macrovascular vascular complications was found. However, high levels of pMFAP4 correlated independently with diabetic neuropathy. Further studies on the predictive value of increased circulating MFAP4......AIMS: To evaluate microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) as a marker of micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 203 persons with a long duration of type 1 diabetes from a population-based cohort ascertained...

  15. A fiber-optic sorbitol biosensor based on NADH fluorescence detection toward rapid diagnosis of diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessei, Tomoko; Arakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-09-21

    Accumulation of sorbitol in the tissue is known to cause microvascular diabetic complications. In this paper, a fiber-optic biosensor for sorbitol which is used as a biomarker of diabetic complications was developed and tested. The biosensor used a sorbitol dehydrogenase from microorganisms of the genus Flavimonas with high substrate specificity and detected the fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by the enzymatic reaction. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED) was used as the excitation light source of NADH. The fluorescence of NADH was detected using a spectrometer or a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The UV-LED and the photodetector were coupled using a Y-shaped optical fiber. In the experiment, an optical fiber probe with a sorbitol dehydrogenase immobilized membrane was placed in a cuvette filled with a phosphate buffer containing the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). The changes in NADH fluorescence intensity were measured after adding a standard sorbitol solution. According to the experimental assessment, the calibration range of the sorbitol biosensor systems using a spectrometer and a PMT was 5.0-1000 μmol L(-1) and 1.0-1000 μmol L(-1), respectively. The sorbitol biosensor system using the sorbitol dehydrogenase from microorganisms of the genus Flavimonas has high selectivity and sensitivity compared with that from sheep liver. The sorbitol biosensor allows for point-of-care testing applications or daily health care tests for diabetes patients.

  16. [Acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7 and inv(3)(q21q26.2) complicated with central diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanno, Satoru; Hagihara, Kiyoyuki; Sakabe, Manami; Okamura, Hiroshi; Inaba, Akiko; Nagata, Yuki; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    A 20-year-old female presented with thirst, polyposia, and polyuria and was referred to our hospital because of leukocytosis and anemia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed 66.8% myeloperoxidase-positive blasts and trilineage myelodysplasia. The karyotype was 45, XX, inv(3)(q21q26.2), -7[19]. Therefore, a diagnosis of AML with inv(3)(q21q26.2) complicated by -7 was made. Moreover, hyposthenuria and a low anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) level were observed. Although cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the absence of hyperintensity in the neurohypophysis in T1-weighted images. Therefore, she was also diagnosed with diabetes insipidus. After she was administered a desmopressin nasal spray, the volume of urine produced decreased. Following treatment with second induction therapy containing high-dose cytarabine for AML, she achieved complete remission in the bone marrow. Moreover, when the abnormality on MRI and the volume of urine were normalized, she discontinued desmopressin. Although diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of AML, the majority of AML patients who have diabetes insipidus have the abnormal karyotypes with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) and monosomy 7. Further study is required to clarify the pathogenesis and develop a strategy for the treatment of this category of AML.

  17. Camel milk as a potential therapy for controlling diabetes and its complications: A review of in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Bakr Shori

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a condition in which there is an elevation of blood glucose. Insulin, which is produced by the pancreas, is an important hormone needed by the body because it enables glucose to be transported into cells. Under the diabetic condition, the cells may not respond properly to insulin or the body does not produce a sufficient amount of insulin, or both. This situation will cause glucose accumulation in the blood that leads to major complications. Oral insulin therapy has been used for many years; however, coagulation in an acidic environment decreases the efficacy of insulin by neutralizing its actions. Several researchers have found that camel milk can be an adjunct to insulin therapy. It appears to be safe and effective in improving long-term glycemic control. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review in vivo studies on the effect of camel milk as a potential therapy for controlling diabetes and its complications such as high cholesterol levels, liver and kidney disease, decreased oxidative stress, and delayed wound healing.

  18. Fetal pancreatic beta-cell function in pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus: relationship to fetal acidemia and macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, D R; Brudenell, J M; Proudler, A J; Crook, D; Nicolaides, K H

    1993-05-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between fetal pancreatic beta-cell function and fetal acidemia and macrosomia in pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study at the Harris Birthright Research Centre for Fetal Medicine, London, was performed. In 32 pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus cordocentesis was performed at 36 to 39 weeks' gestation for the measurement of umbilical venous blood pH, PO2, PCO2, lactate, and glucose concentration; plasma insulin immunoreactivity; and insulin/glucose ratio. A reference range for plasma insulin and insulin/glucose ratio was constructed by studying fetal blood samples from 80 women who did not have diabetes mellitus. Mean umbilical venous blood pH was significantly lower and plasma insulin immunoreactivity and insulin/glucose ratio were significantly higher than the appropriate normal mean for gestation. There were significant associations between (1) maternal and fetal blood glucose concentrations (r = 0.95, p < 0.0001), (2) fetal blood glucose and plasma insulin immunoreactivity (r = 0.57, p < 0.01), (3) fetal plasma insulin immunoreactivity and blood pH (r = -0.39, p < 0.05), and (4) fetal insulin/glucose ratio and degree of macrosomia (r = 0.76, p < 0.0001). Fetal pancreatic beta-cell hyperplasia is implicated in the pathogenesis of both fetal acidemia and macrosomia.

  19. Management of diabetic complications through fruit flavonoids as a natural remedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, Amna; Akram, Kashif; Farooq, Umar; Hayat, Zafar; Shafi, Afshan

    2017-05-03

    Diabetes mellitus is a global disorder, and a major issue for health care systems. The current review outlooks the use of fruit flavonoids as natural remedy in the prevention of diabetes mellitus. The onset of diabetes mainly depends upon genetics and lifestyle issues. Currently used therapeutic options for the control of diabetes, like dietary amendments, oral hypoglycemic drugs, and insulin, have their own limitations. Fruit flavonoids possess various antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant potentials and act on various cellular signaling pathways in pancreas, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver function, which in result induces antidiabetic effects. Recently, antidiabetic effect of fruit flavonoids has been studied using various animal models and clinical trials. Research studies revealed a statistically significant potential of fruit flavonoids in managing the altered glucose and oxidative metabolisms in diabetes. Unlike synthetic antidiabetic agents, fruit flavonoids manage diabetes without compromising cellular homeostasis thereby posing no side effects. Further studies are required in purification and characterization of different fruit flavonoids with respect to their beneficial effect for diabetic patients.

  20. Illness perceptions and self-care behaviours in the first years of living with type 2 diabetes; does the presence of complications matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puffelen, Anne L; Heijmans, Monique J W M; Rijken, Mieke; Rutten, Guy E H M; Nijpels, Giel; Schellevis, François G

    2015-01-01

    To assess illness perceptions, self-care behaviours and their relationship in recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with and without diabetes-related complications. Cross-sectional survey among 192 recently diagnosed T2DM patients of whom 23% reported the presence of diabetes-related complications. Illness perceptions and self-care were assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) and the revised Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) measure. Generally, participating patients perceived T2DM as a chronic, but relatively controllable condition with minor consequences. In the presence of complications, however, T2DM was perceived as more unpredictable with more (serious) consequences and less controllable by self-care or medical treatment. Furthermore, engagement in exercise and foot care was reported more often by patients with complications. Self-care was related to certain illness perception dimensions, and interactions between perceptions and complications were found. T2DM patients in the first years of their illness are often recommended to make lifestyle changes in the absence of noticeable diabetes-related symptoms or complaints. As many T2DM patients do not seem to perceive their condition to be serious and postpone lifestyle changes until diabetes-related complications appear, a major challenge for professionals is to convince asymptomatic patients of the importance of self-care.

  1. Laser therapy for onychomycosis in patients with diabetes at risk for foot complications : study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial (LASER-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis-Rosien, Leonie; Kleefstra, Nanne; Wolfhagen, Maurice J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Landman, Gijs W. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In a sham-controlled double-blind trial, we aim to establish the efficacy and safety of the local application of laser therapy in patients with diabetes, onychomycosis and risk factors for diabetes-related foot complications. Onychomycosis leads to thickened and distorted nails, which in

  2. Estimated incidence of cardiovascular complications related to type 2 diabetes in Mexico using the UKPDS outcome model and a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy; Mehta, Roopa; Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Villalpando, Salvador; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2011-01-07

    To estimate the incidence of complications, life expectancy and diabetes related mortality in the Mexican diabetic population over the next two decades using data from a nation-wide, population based survey and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) outcome model. The cohort included all patients with type 2 diabetes evaluated during the National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANut) 2006. ENSANut is a probabilistic multistage stratified survey whose aim was to measure the prevalence of chronic diseases. A total of 47,152 households were visited. Results are shown stratified by gender, time since diagnosis (> or ≤ to 10 years) and age at the time of diagnosis (> or ≤ 40 years). The prevalence of diabetes in our cohort was 14.4%. The predicted 20 year-incidence for chronic complications per 1000 individuals are: ischemic heart disease 112, myocardial infarction 260, heart failure 113, stroke 101, and amputation 62. Furthermore, 539 per 1000 patients will have a diabetes-related premature death. The average life expectancy for the diabetic population is 10.9 years (95%CI 10.7-11.2); this decreases to 8.3 years after adjusting for quality of life (CI95% 8.1-8.5). Male sex and cases diagnosed after age 40 have the highest risk for developing at least one major complication during the next 20 years. Based on the current clinical profile of Mexican patients with diabetes, the burden of disease related complications will be tremendous over the next two decades.

  3. Illness perceptions and self-care behaviours in the first years of living with type 2 diabetes; does the presence of complications matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puffelen, Anne L.; Heijmans, Monique J W M; Rijken, Mieke; Rutten, Guy E H M; Nijpels, Giel; Schellevis, François G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess illness perceptions, self-care behaviours and their relationship in recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with and without diabetes-related complications. Design: Cross-sectional survey among 192 recently diagnosed T2DM patients of whom 23% reported the

  4. Illness perceptions and self-care behaviours in the first years of living with type 2 diabetes: does the presence of complications matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puffelen, A.L. van; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Rijken, M.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Nijpels, G.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess illness perceptions, self-care behaviours and their relationship in recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with and without diabetes-related complications. Design: Cross-sectional survey among 192 recently diagnosed T2DM patients of whom 23% reported the

  5. Retinal vascular fractals predict long-term microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin L; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    : We included 180 patients with type 1 diabetes in a 16 year follow-up study. In baseline retinal photographs (from 1995), all vessels in a zone 0.5-2.0 disc diameters from the disc margin were traced using Singapore Institute Vessel Assessment-Fractal image analysis software. Artefacts were removed......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Fractal analysis of the retinal vasculature provides a global measure of the complexity and density of retinal vessels summarised as a single variable: the fractal dimension. We investigated fractal dimensions as long-term predictors of microvasculopathy in type 1 diabetes. METHODS....... Retinal fractal analysis therefore is a potential tool for risk stratification in type 1 diabetes....

  6. Incidence of retinal complications in a cohort of newly diagnosed diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Martín-Merino

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We aimed at estimating the incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR and maculopathy (DMP among newly diagnosed type 1 (t1DM and type 2 diabetic patients (t2DM in the United Kingdom primary care system. The incidence of DMP among patients with DR was also estimated. METHOD: We conducted a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network database. The cohort included 64,983 incident diabetic patients (97.3% were t2DM aged 1-84 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2007. This cohort was followed from the date of diabetes diagnosis until recording of DR or DMP in two separate follow-ups. Follow-up was censored at 85 years of age, death, or end of 2008. An additional follow-up was conducted from DR to DMP diagnosis using similar censoring reasons. DR and DMP cumulative incidences were calculated as well as incidence rates (IR; cases per 1,000 person-years per calendar period (2000-2001 and 2006-2007. RESULTS: Follow-up for DR: 9 years after diabetes diagnosis, 28% of t2DM and 24% of t1DM patients had developed DR (7,899 incident DR cases. During the first 2 years with diabetes, the IR was almost 2 times higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2006-2007 (47.7 than among those diagnosed in 2000-2001 (24.5. Follow-up for DMP: 9 years after diabetes diagnosis, 3.6% of t2DM and 4.4% of t2DM patients had developed DMP (912 incident DMP cases. During the first 2 years with diabetes, the IR was three times higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2006-2007 (5.8 than among those diagnosed in 2000-2001 (1.8. Macular oedema occurred in 0.8% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: In a cohort of incident diabetes, 28% of patients developed retinopathy and 4% maculopathy within the first 9 years. The 2-year IRs of DR and DMP were higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes during the period 2006-2007 than in those diagnosed during the 2000-2001 period.

  7. Effect of Rebound Exercises and Circuit Training on Complications Associated with Type 2 Diabetes: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaka, Bashir; Maharaj, Sonill Sooknunan

    2018-05-07

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, a chronic lifestyle disease, and its complications are on the rise. Exercise has been documented as being effective in the management of musculoskeletal pain, depression, and reduction of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. However, there is no consensus regarding the types of exercise that reduce musculoskeletal pain and depression and improve quality of life as well as respiratory function among individuals with type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of rebound and circuit training on musculoskeletal pain, blood glucose level, cholesterol level, quality of life, depression, and respiratory parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 70 participants are expected to be recruited in this single blind randomized controlled trial. Computer-generated random numbers will be used to randomize the participants into 3 groups, namely, the rebound exercise group, the circuit exercise group, and the control group. Measurements will be taken at baseline and at the end of the 8 weeks of the study. Participants' musculoskeletal pain will be assessed using the visual analog scale, quality of life will be assessed using the SF 12 Health Survey Questionnaire, depression using the Beck Depression Inventory, respiratory parameters using the spirometer, and biochemical parameters such as glucose level and cholesterol level using the glucometer. Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics and inferential statistics of multivariate analysis of variance between the groups and paired t test within the group. Alpha will be set at .05. The results of this study will identify the effectiveness of rebound exercise and circuit training, compared with the control, in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and on quality of life, musculoskeletal pain, depression, glycemic control, cholesterol level, as well as improvement in respiratory function. Though different additional strategies

  8. Allelic variations in the CYBA gene of NADPH oxidase and risk of kidney complications in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patente, Thiago A; Mohammedi, Kamel; Bellili-Muñoz, Naïma; Driss, Fathi; Sanchez, Manuel; Fumeron, Frédéric; Roussel, Ronan; Hadjadj, Samy; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Marre, Michel; Velho, Gilberto

    2015-09-01

    a role for NADPH oxidase in the pathophysiology of kidney complications of diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of lectin pathway activity and mannan-binding lectin levels in the course of pregnancy complicated by diabetes type 1, based on the genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertyńska Marczewska, Magdalena; Cedzyński, Maciej; Swierzko, Anna; Szala, Agnieszka; Sobczak, Małgorzata; Cypryk, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Jan

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous indications that either mannan-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency or its excessive activity are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. High MBL concentrations and corresponding MBL2 genotypes were shown to be associated with microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate levels of MBL and MBL-dependent activity of the lectin pathway (LP) of complement in the course of pregnancy in diabetic mothers, based on genetic background. These parameters were determined in samples from healthy non-pregnant (control), diabetic non-pregnant, healthy pregnant, and pregnant diabetic women. No significant differences in median MBL levels or LP activities were found in any study group compared to the control. However, statistically significant differences in MBL levels were noted during pregnancy between the 1st and 3rd trimesters in both healthy controls and pregnant diabetics. With regard to LP values, similar trends were evident, but statistically significant results were obtained only in the healthy pregnant group. When data analysis was confined to patients carrying the A/A (wild-type) MBL2 genotype, an increase in MBL level during pregnancy (in both healthy and diabetic pregnant women) was still observed. Similarly, LP activity increased during both healthy and diabetic pregnancies, significantly so for the former. Diabetes, an autoimmune disease, is a serious complication of pregnancy. Therefore, determination of MBL status might be beneficial in identifying type 1 diabetic patients who are at increased risk of developing both vascular complications and poor pregnancy outcomes.

  10. The assessment of clinical distal symmetric polyneuropathy in type 1 diabetes: a comparison of methodologies from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambianco, G; Costacou, T; Strotmeyer, Elsa; Orchard, T J

    2011-05-01

    Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, but often difficult to diagnose reliably. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between three point-of-care devices, Vibratron II, NC-stat(®), and Neurometer(®), and two clinical protocols, MNSI and monofilament, in identifying those with DSP, and/or amputation/ulcer/neuropathic pain (AUP), the two outcomes of major concern. This report presents data from 195 type 1 diabetic participants of the Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) Study attending the 18-year examination (2004-2006). Participants with physician-diagnosed DSP, AUP or who were abnormal on the NC-stat, and the Vibratron II, MNSI, and monofilament were older (pAUP, or any testing modality, with the exception of NCstat (motor). The Vibratron II and MNSI showed the highest sensitivity for DSP (>87%) and AUP (>80%), whereas the monofilament had the highest specificity (98% DSP, 94% AUP) and positive predictive value (89% DSP, 47% AUP), but lowest sensitivity (20% DSP, 30% AUP). The MNSI also had the highest negative predictive value (83%) and Youden's Index (37%) and currently presents the single best combination of sensitivity and specificity of DSP in type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Antioxidant, antiglycation and insulinotrophic properties of Coccinia grandis (L. in vitro: Possible role in prevention of diabetic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Packirisamy Meenatchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to develop Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM for the treatment of diabetes and related complications, the antidiabetic potential of the mature unripe fruits of Coccinia grandis (CGF was evaluated. Oxidative stress and glycation plays an important role in manifesting of diabetes and vascular complications. Agents with antioxidant and antiglycation properties may retard these pathological alterations. In this study, the edible plant Coccinia grandis was assessed for in vitro estimation of antioxidant and antiglycation potential and its insulinotrophic properties in RINm5F cells. Antioxidant activity was evaluated as DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion scavenging activities, whereas the protein glycation inhibitory potential was evaluated using in vitro albumin-fructose glycation model. Glycation inhibition was estimated by different biochemical parameters viz. fructosamine, protein carbonyl group and protein aggregation using thioflavin T fluorescence. C. grandis extract exerted a dose dependent radical scavenging activity and exhibited a significant antiglycation potential. The extract also showed a significant insulinotrophic property with 1.28 and 1.71-fold increase in insulin release when compared to control at 0.25 and 0.50 mg/mL, respectively. These data suggest the possible antidiabetic role of CGF extract, presumably by its antioxidant, antiglycation and insulin secretory effects. Present findings provide experimental evidence that the fruits of C. grandis have potential antidiabetic activity which might be used as a functional food and safe remedy for the treatment of diabetes and associated complications. This study also revealed that the plant can be a promising source for development of natural antiglycating agents and novel insulin secretagogues.

  12. Skin fluorescence as a clinical tool for non-invasive assessment of advanced glycation and long-term complications of diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, Bernardina T.; Smit, Andries J.

    Glycation is important in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus and may have a central role in the well-described glycaemic memory effect in developing these complications. Skin fluorescence has emerged over the last decade as a non-invasive method for assessing accumulation of

  13. Glutathione peroxidase-1 gene (GPX1) variants, oxidative stress and risk of kidney complications in people with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammedi, Kamel; Patente, Thiago A; Bellili-Muñoz, Naima; Driss, Fathi; Le Nagard, Hervé; Fumeron, Frédéric; Roussel, Ronan; Hadjadj, Samy; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Marre, Michel; Velho, Gilberto

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPX) is a class of antioxidant enzymes that catalyze the reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. GPX1 is the most abundant isoform and is expressed in all kidney cells. Isoprostane and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) were identified as markers of oxidative stress in patients with kidney disease. We investigated associations of GPX1 genotypes with kidney complications, and with plasma concentrations of isoprostane and AOPP in type 1 diabetic patients. Four SNPs in the GPX1 gene region were genotyped in SURGENE (n=340; 10-year follow-up); GENEDIAB (n=461) and GENESIS (n=584) cohorts of type 1 diabetic patients. Subsets of GENEDIAB (n=237) and GENESIS (n=466) participants were followed up for 9 and 5years, respectively. Plasma concentrations of isoprostane and AOPP were measured at baseline in GENEDIAB. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for incidence of kidney complications. In SURGENE, 98 renal events (new cases of microalbuminuria or progression to more severe stage of diabetic nephropathy) occurred during follow-up. The minor T-allele of rs3448 was associated with the incidence of renal events (HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.16-2.84, p=0.008). In GENESIS/GENEDIAB pooled study, end stage renal disease (ESRD) occurred during follow-up in 52 individuals. The same variant was associated with the incidence of ESRD (HR 3.34, 95% CI, 1.69-6.98, p=0.0004). The variant was also associated with higher plasma isoprostane concentration in GENEDIAB cohort: 2.02±0.12 (TT+CT) vs 1.75±0.13 (CC) ng/mL (p=0.009), and with higher plasma AOPP in the subset of participants with the baseline history of ESRD (TT+CT 67±6 vs CC 48±6μmol/L, p=0.006). The minor T-allele of rs3448 was associated with kidney complications (incidences of microalbuminuria, renal events and ESRD) in patients with type 1 diabetes. The risk allele was associated with higher plasma concentrations of isoprostane and AOPP. Our results are consistent with the implication of GPX1 in the

  14. Risk Factors for Macro- and Microvascular Complications among Older Adults with Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tracey, Marsha L

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore risk factors for macro- and microvascular complications in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50 years and over with type 2 diabetes in Ireland. Methods. Data from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) (2009-2011) was used in cross-sectional analysis. The presence of doctor diagnosis of diabetes, risk factors, and macro- and microvascular complications were determined by self-report. Gender-specific differences in risk factor prevalence were assessed with the chi-squared test. Binomial regression analysis was conducted to explore independent associations between established risk factors and diabetes-related complications. Results. Among 8175 respondents, 655 were classified as having type 2 diabetes. Older age, being male, a history of smoking, a lower level of physical activity, and a diagnosis of high cholesterol were independent predictors of macrovascular complications. Diabetes diagnosis of 10 or more years, a history of smoking, and a diagnosis of hypertension were associated with an increased risk of microvascular complications. Older age, third-level education, and a high level of physical activity were protective factors (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Early intervention to target modifiable risk factors is urgently needed to reduce diabetes-related morbidity in the older population in Ireland.

  15. Determining the amounts of urea and glucose in urine of patients with renal complications from diabetes mellitus and hypertension by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bispo, Jeyse A. M.; Silveira, Landulfo; Vieira, Elzo E. d. S.; Fernandes, Adriana B.

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus and hypertension diseases are frequently found in the same patient, which if untreated predispose to atherosclerotic and kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers in the urine of diabetic and hypertensive patients through dispersive near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Urine samples were collected from patients with diabetes and hypertension but no complications (LG), high degree of complications (HG), and control ones: one fraction was submitted to biochemical tests and another one was stored frozen (-20°C) until spectral analysis. Samples were warmed up and placed in an aluminum sample holder for Raman spectra collection using a dispersive spectrometer (830 nm wavelength, 300 mW laser power and 20 s exposure time). Spectra were then submitted to Principal Components Analysis. The PCA loading vectors 1 and 3 revealed spectral features of urea/creatinine and glucose, respectively; the PCA scores showed that patients with diabetes/hypertension (LG and HG) had higher amount of glucose in the urine compared to the normal group (p diabetes/hypertension (p diabetes/hypertension, can lead to early diagnostic information of complications and a possible disease prognosis in the patients where no complications from diabetes and hypertension were found.

  16. Glucose Fluctuations during Gestation: An Additional Tool for Monitoring Pregnancy Complicated by Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Dalfrà

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM gives a unique insight into magnitude and duration of daily glucose fluctuations. Limited data are available on glucose variability (GV in pregnancy. We aimed to assess GV in healthy pregnant women and cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes (GDM and its possible association with HbA1c. CGM was performed in 50 pregnant women (20 type 1, 20 GDM, and 10 healthy controls in all three trimesters of pregnancy. We calculated mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE, standard deviation (SD, interquartile range (IQR, and continuous overlapping net glycemic action (CONGA, as parameters of GV. The high blood glycemic index (HBGI and low blood glycemic index (LBGI were also measured as indicators of hyperhypoglycemic risk. Women with type 1 diabetes showed higher GV, with a 2-fold higher risk of hyperglycemic spikes during the day, than healthy pregnant women or GDM ones. GDM women had only slightly higher GV parameters than healthy controls. HbA1c did not correlate with GV indicators in type 1 diabetes or GDM pregnancies. We provided new evidence of the importance of certain GV indicators in pregnant women with GDM or type 1 diabetes and recommended the use of CGM specifically in these populations.

  17. Vegetarian Diets in the Prevention and Management of Diabetes and Its Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    IN BRIEF Epidemiological studies have found a lower prevalence of type 2 diabetes among vegetarians compared to nonvegetarians. This reduced risk is likely a function of improved weight status, higher intake of dietary fiber, and the absence of animal protein and heme iron in the diet. Interventional studies have shown that vegetarian diets, especially a vegan diet, are effective tools in glycemic control and that these diets control plasma glucose to a greater level than do control diets, including diets traditionally recommended for patients with diabetes (e.g., diets based on carbohydrate counting). Vegetarian diets are associated with improvement in secondary outcomes such as weight reduction, serum lipid profile, and blood pressure. Studies indicate that vegetarian diets can be universally used in type 2 diabetes prevention and as tools to improve blood glucose management. PMID:28588373

  18. Retinal vascular geometry and its association to microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M L; Broe, Rebecca; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine associations between retinal vascular geometry (tortuosity, branching coefficient [BC] and length-diameter ratio [LDR]) and diabetic proliferative retinopathy (PDR), nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). METHODS: A cohort...... of patients with T1DM participated in a clinical examination in 2011. Blood and urine analyses were done and retinal images taken. PDR was defined as Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study level 61 or above, nephropathy as albumin-creatinin ratio ≥300 mg/g, and neuropathy as vibration perception threshold.......8% were male. Prevalence of PDR, nephropathy, and neuropathy were 26.5%, 6.8%, and 10.1% , respectively. Patients with increased arteriolar BC had a higher risk of nephropathy (OR: 3.10, 95% CI: [1.01-9.54]). Patients with increased venular BC had a higher risk of neuropathy (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: [1...

  19. Role of calpain-10 in the development of diabetes mellitus and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pánico, Pablo; Salazar, Ana María; Burns, Anna L; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    Calpain activity has been implicated in several cellular processes such as cell signaling, apoptosis, exocytosis, mitochondrial metabolism and cytoskeletal remodeling. Evidence has indicated that the impairment of calpain expression and the activity of different calpain family members are involved in diverse pathologies. Calpain-10 has been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes, and polymorphisms in the CAPN10 gene have been associated with an increased risk of developing this disease. The present work focused on the molecular biology of calpain-10, supporting its key participation in glucose metabolism. Current knowledge regarding the role of calpain-10 in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetes-related diseases is additionally reviewed. Copyright © 2014 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lost opportunities to prevent early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Judith A; McCloskey, Lois; Gebel, Christina M; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes in the decade after delivery, but few women receive appropriately timed postpartum glucose testing (PPGT) or a referral to primary care (PC) for continued monitoring. This qualitative study was designed to identify barriers and facilitators to testing and referral from patient and providers' perspectives. We interviewed patients and clinicians in depth about knowledge, values, priorities, challenges, and recommendations for increasing PPGT rates and PC linkage. Interviews were coded with NVIVO data analysis software, and analyzed using an implementation science framework. Women reported motivation to address GDM for the health of the fetus. Most women did not anticipate future diabetes for themselves, and focused on delivery outcomes rather than future health risks. Patients sought and received reassurance from clinicians, and were unlikely to discuss early onset following GDM or preventive measures. PPGT barriers described by patients included provider not mentioning the test or setting it up, transportation difficulties, work responsibilities, fatigue, concerns about fasting while breastfeeding, and timing of the test after discharge from obstetrics, and no referral to PC for follow-up. Practitioners described limited communication among multiple care providers during pregnancy and delivery, systems issues, and separation of obstetrics from PC. Patients' barriers to PPGT included low motivation for self-care, structural obstacles, and competing priorities. Providers reported the need to balance risk with reassurance, and identified systems failures related to test timing, limitations of electronic medical record systems (EMR), lack of referrals to PC, and inadequate communication between specialties. Prevention of early onset has great potential for medical cost savings and improvements in quality of life.

  1. Increased serum oxidized low-density lipoprotein levels in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Ghaneei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated serum levels of oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (oxLDL have been found in type 2 and in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM has common features with type 2 diabetes. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the serum levels of oxLDL in women with GDM compared to normal pregnant women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, ninety-two subjects were randomly allocated to either GDM (n=46 or control (n=46 groups matched for age, body mass index and parity from March 2013 to March 2014. GDM was diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association criteria at 24-26 weeks of gestation. OxLDL was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. T-test and Pearson correlation coefficients were applied for analyzing the data by using SPSS version 17. Results: Compared to the controls, significantly higher oxLDL levels were found in the GDM group (17.16 ± 3.71 U/L vs. 8.77 ± 1.84 U/L, respectively, p < 0.001. No significant correlations were found between oxLDL and age and BMI of the patients in the groups. Conclusion: Our study found significant increase of oxLDL in GDM emphasizing the role of short-term hyperglycemia in the formation of oxLDL during GDM. The importance of aptly diagnosis of GDM in maternal health may also be concluded.

  2. Diabetic retinopathy is associated with mortality and cardiovascular disease incidence: the EURODIAB prospective complications study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hecke, M.V.; Dekker, J.M.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Polak, B.C.P.; Fuller, J.H.; Sjolie, A.K.; Kofinis, A.; Rottiers, R.; Porta, M.; Chaturvedi, N.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To study the relationship of nonproliferative and proliferative retinopathy with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence in type 1 diabetic patients and, additionally, the role of cardiovascular risk factors in these associations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This

  3. Psychological distress, cardiovascular complications and mortality among people with screen-detected type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Else-Marie; Vestergaard, Mogens; Skriver, Mette V

    2014-01-01

    Dette studie undersøger, om psykisk belastning øger risikoen for kardiovaskulær sygdom og død blandt personer med type 2-diabetes. Forfatterne ser også nærmere på, om forskelle i metabolisk kontrol og indtag af ordineret medicin kan forklare dele af en eventuel sammenhæng. Studiet fandt, at 18% af...... personer fundet med type 2-diabetes ved screening led af psykisk belastning. Studiet viser, at psykisk belastede personer har 70% højere risiko for at få CVD-event i 8.7 års follow-up og 80% højere dødelighed i 10.9 års follow-up sammenlignet med personer med type 2-diabetes uden psykisk belastning....... Psykisk belastning synes derimod ikke generelt at påvirke evnen til at opnå de opsatte mål for HbA1c, kolesterol og blodtryk. Studiet, bygger på data fra 1533 personer i alderen 40-69 år, som fik konstateret type 2-diabetes ved screening i almen praksis, 2001-2006. Undersøgelsen udgør en del af ADDITION...

  4. Association between microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and micro- and macrovascular complications in long-term type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blindbæk, S L; Schlosser, A; Green, A; Holmskov, U; Sorensen, G L; Grauslund, J

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) as a marker of micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes. This cross-sectional study included 203 persons with a long duration of type 1 diabetes from a population-based cohort ascertained in the former Funen County, Denmark. Detection of plasma-MFAP4 (pMFAP4) was performed by the AlphaLISA Technique. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was graded in accordance with the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study adaptation of the modified Airlie House classification. A monofilament test was used to test for neuropathy, and nephropathy was evaluated in a single spot urine sample. Data describing macrovascular disease were obtained from the Danish National Patient Register. Median age and duration of diabetes were 58.7 and 43 years, respectively, and 61% were males. High levels of pMFAP4 were found in participants of old age, in women and in non-smokers (p diabetic neuropathy (OR 2.47 for quartile 4 versus quartile 1, 95% CI 1.01-6.03). No association was found between pMFAP4 and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy or macrovascular disease. No association between pMFAP4 and macrovascular vascular complications was found. However, high levels of pMFAP4 correlated independently with diabetic neuropathy. Further studies on the predictive value of increased circulating MFAP4 in diabetic neuropathy are warranted.

  5. Severe Hypoglycemia Is a Serious Complication and Becoming an Economic Burden in Diabetes

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    Won Chul Ha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe prevalence of hypoglycemia is increasing due to the growing incidence of diabetes and the latest strict guidelines for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels under 7%. This study examined the clinical characteristics, causal factors, and medical costs of severely hypoglycemic patients in an emergency room (ER of Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital.MethodsThe study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the characteristics, risk factors, and medical costs of 320 severely hypoglycemic patients with diabetes who presented to an ER of Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009.ResultsMost hypoglycemic patients (87.5%, 280/320 were over 60 years old with a mean age of 69.5±10.9 years and a mean HbA1c level of 6.95±1.46%. Mean serum glucose as noted in the ER was 37.9±34.5 mg/dL. Renal function was decreased, serum creatinine was 2.0±2.1 mg/dL and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 48.0±33.6 mL/min/1.73 m2. In addition, hypoglycemic patients typically were taking sulfonylureas or insulin and a variety of other medications, and had a long history of diabetes.ConclusionSevere hypoglycemia is frequent in older diabetic patients, subjects with low HbA1c levels, and nephropathic patients. Therefore, personalized attention is warranted, especially in long-term diabetics with multiple comorbidities who may not have been properly educated or may need re-education for hypoglycemia.

  6. Scoring Mental Health Quality of Life With the SF-36 in Patients With and Without Diabetes Foot Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junho; Del Core, Michael A; Wukich, Dane K; Liu, George T; Lalli, Trapper; VanPelt, Michael D; La Fontaine, Javier; Lavery, Lawrence A; Raspovic, Katherine M

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if using orthogonal and oblique factor analysis detect changes in health-related quality of life differently in diabetic patients on the Short Form-36 (SF-36) survey. A total of 155 patients had diabetic foot complications (DFC), and 145 patients had no DFCs. The SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were calculated using scoring coefficients determined by orthogonal and oblique rotation principle component analyses of the subscales. The DFC group had lower orthogonal ( P < .00001) and oblique PCS scores ( P < .00001). However, despite lower Mental Health subscale scores in the patients with DFCs, orthogonal MCS scores ( P = .156) did not differ. In contrast, the oblique MCS scores reflected the difference in the Mental Health subscale ( P = .0005). Orthogonal and oblique PCS scores did not differ significantly. However, orthogonal MCS scores were significantly higher than oblique MCS scores in those with DFCs ( P = .0004) and without DFCs ( P = .005). The shorter, 12-item SF-12 survey demonstrated similar results. Poorer physical function leads to higher orthogonal MCS scores than if determined by oblique scoring coefficients since Physical Function, Bodily Pain, and General Health are weighted more negatively in orthogonal coefficients when calculating the MCS score. Oblique scoring coefficients may address this issue, but further study is necessary to confirm whether oblique MCS scores accurately represent the mental health of patients with diabetic foot disease.

  7. Long-Term Effects of Goshajinkigan in Prevention of Diabetic Complications: A Randomized Open-Labeled Clinical Trial

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    K. Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This clinical trial was designed to investigate whether goshajinkigan reduces the onset of diabetic complications or not. Materials and Methods. A total of 332 type 2 diabetic mellitus patients were registered from 9 clinical centers from March 2000 to August 2007. Patients were randomly assigned to take goshajinkigan extract powder, 2.5 grams for 3 times a day or no kampo therapy, additionally to the regular treatment. The primary endpoints were the onset of macrovascular diseases or progression of nephropathy or retinopathy. Statistical analysis was performed by the intention-to-treat method. Results. After 5 years of observation, 116 patients were submitted to analysis. Among them, no macrovascular events were observed in both groups. Although 43 participants had upstaging of retinopathy or nephropathy in total, there was no significant difference between goshajinkigan group and control group. Deterioration of ankle reflex was suppressed in goshajinkigan group. Also glycated hemoglobin, and fasting plasma glucose were decreased in the goshajinkigan group. Conclusion. Although the power of analysis was too low to demonstrate any effects of goshajinkigan on the progression of macrovascular diseases, retinopathy or nephropathy, goshajinkigan may be beneficial for diabetic neuropathy and glycemic control.

  8. Non-severe hypoglycaemia is associated with weight gain in patients with type 1 diabetes: Results from the Diabetes Control and Complication Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbu, Anisoara; Moutairou, Abdul; Matar, Odette; Fumeron, Frédéric; Velho, Gilberto; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Gautier, Jean-François; Marre, Michel; Roussel, Ronan; Potier, Louis

    2018-05-01

    It is unclear whether the frequent non-severe episodes of hypoglycaemia observed during intensive glucose control in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are associated with subsequent weight gain. We analysed the association between non-severe hypoglycaemia and weight gain in 1441 Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT) participants. Non-severe hypoglycaemia was assessed by hypo-score (ie, number of blood glucose values gain. The annual weight gain by hypo-score tertiles was 0.8 ± 1.2 (T1), 1.3 ± 1.5 (T2) and 1.4 ± 1.3 kg/y (T3), P gain of 1.8 kg/y was 2.14 (95% CI, 1.56-2.93) for T2, and 2.53 (95%CI, 1.85-3.45) for T3 vs T1. These differences in weight gain and in risk of weight gain remained significant after adjustment for sex, age, duration of diabetes, HbA1c at baseline and treatment arms. In conclusion, our analysis shows a significant association between non-severe hypoglycaemia and weight gain in individuals with T1D from the DCCT. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Risks of asphyxia-related neonatal complications in offspring of mothers with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: the impact of maternal overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnattingius, Sven; Lindam, Anna; Persson, Martina

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to compare the risks of severe asphyxia-related neonatal complications in the offspring of mothers with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and to assess the impact of maternal overweight/obesity on these risks. This was a population-based study of 1,343,751 live-born singleton infants in Sweden between 1997 and 2011, including 5941 and 711 infants of mothers with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. ORs with 95% CIs were calculated for low Apgar score (0-6) at 5 min after birth, hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy and neonatal seizures. The rates of a low Apgar score were 0.9%, 2.6% and 2.1% in the offspring of mothers without diabetes or with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, respectively. After controlling for maternal confounders (including BMI), the risk of a low Apgar score increased in the offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes (OR 2.67, 95% CI 2.23, 3.20) but not in the offspring of mothers with type 2 diabetes (OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.66, 2.35). The ORs of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy or neonatal seizures were increased in the offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes (OR 3.41, 95% CI 2.58, 4.49) and type 2 diabetes (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.13, 5.69). Maternal overweight/obesity was a risk factor for asphyxia-related neonatal complications and low Apgar scores in the offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes and mothers without diabetes. The risks of a low Apgar score and severe asphyxia-related neonatal complications are increased in the offspring of mothers with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Maternal overweight/obesity is an important contributing factor.

  10. Relationship between Sucralose Consumption and Serum Concentration of Glycosylated Hemoglobin in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus without Complications

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    María del Carmen Cortés-López

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available People who live with diabetes consume sucralose to control their blood glucose, but there is a controversy about this topic. To evaluate the relationship between sucralose consumption and serum concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin in people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus without complications. Cross-sectional study. Universe of 27 214 people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus without complications, users of a primary care unit from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Simple probabilistic sample, n = 194 (p = 0,05. Propositive sampling. Selection criteria: adults of any gender and education level who agreed to participate. Variables: sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical and dietary. Data collection instruments: Sociodemographic questionnaire, Tanita Fitscan© 585 scale, Tanita Fitscan© HR-200 stadiometer, Body Flex© tape-measure, Slim Guide© plicometer, Afinion© AS100 analyzer, and Frequency of Food Consumption Questionnaire. Information sources: clinical files and Mexican System of Equivalent Foods. Analysis: descriptive and inferential statistics (p ≤ 0,05. 194 people. Mean age 60,23 ± 11,16, interval 28-93 years. 56,2% females and 43,8% males. Difference between glycosilated hemoglobin means: sucralose consumers 7,5% ± 1,7%, no sucralose consumers 8,1% ± 2,1% (p < 0,01. Association force “sucralose consumption/high glycosilated hemoglobin concentration” OR = 1,42 (CI95% 0,63, 3,21. Lineal correlation “quarterly sucralose consumption/serum concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin” ρ = -0,754 (R2 = 0,0057, p = 0,333. This results were partially consistent to the pre-existing literature. Studies with representative stratified samples and control of dietary variables are required for better results.

  11. Current status of management, control, complications and psychosocial aspects of patients with diabetes in India: Results from the DiabCare India 2011 Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: DiabCare India 2011 was a cross-sectional study in patients with diabetes mellitus, undertaken to investigate the relationship between diabetes control, management and complications in a subset of urban Indian diabetes patients treated at referral diabetes care centres in India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, multicentre (330 centres survey in 6168 diabetes patients treated at general hospitals, diabetes clinics and referral clinics across India. Patient data, including medical and clinical examination reports during the past year were collected during their routine visit. The patients′ and physicians′ perceptions about diabetes management were recorded using a questionnaire. Results: A total of 6168 subjects with diabetes (95.8% type 2, mean age 51.9 ± 12.4 years and mean duration of diabetes, 6.9 ± 6.4 years were included. Mean HbA1c was 8.9 ± 2.1% and the mean fasting (FPG, post prandial (PPG and random (RBG plasma glucose levels were 148 ± 50 mg/dl 205 ± 66 mg/dl and 193 ± 68mg/dl respectively. Neuropathy was the most common complication (41.4%; other complications were: Foot (32.7%, eye (19.7%, cardiovascular (6.8% and nephropathy (6.2%. The number of diabetic complications increased with mean duration of diabetes. Most (93.2% of the patients were on oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and 35.2% were on insulin (±OADs. More than 15% physicians felt that the greatest barrier to insulin therapy from patient′s perspective were pain and fear of using injectable modality; 5.2% felt that the greatest barrier to insulin therapy from physician′s perspective was the treatment cost; 4.8% felt that the major barriers to achieve optimum diabetic care in practice was loss to follow-up followed by lack of counselling (3.9% and treatment compliance (3.6%. Conclusion: DiabCare India 2011 has shown that type 2 diabetes sets in early in Indians and glycaemic control is often sub-optimal in these patients. These

  12. Cardiovascular risk factors, micro and macrovascular complications at diagnosis in patients with young onset type 2 diabetes in India: CINDI 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Sosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in young adults is increasing in India. Data on the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV risk factors and complications associated with young-onset T2DM (YOD at the time of diagnosis of diabetes are limited. This data can aid in aggressive diabetes management, CV risk reduction, and prevention of complications. Aim: To determine the prevalence of CV risk factors, micro and macrovascular complications in patients with newly diagnosed YOD. To assess the percentage of patients who require statin therapy based on current American Diabetes Association (ADA guidelines. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study of 1500 patients with newly detected YOD across seven centers from 2013 to 2015. Designs and Methods: Patients were evaluated for complications of diabetes and CV risk factors such as body mass index (BMI, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking. Statistical Analysis: Measurements have been presented as mean ± standard deviation; results on categorical measurements have been presented in percentages. Results: The mean age, glycated hemoglobin and BMI were 34.7 ± 4.2 years, 9.9 ± 2.4%, and 26.8 ± 4.7 kg/m2. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, BMI >23 kg/m2, and smoking were presented in 27.6%, 62.4%, 84.2%, and 24%. Diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy were seen in 5.1%, 13.2%, and 0.9%. Ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke were presented in 0.7%, 2%, and 0.1%. As per current guidelines, 95.33% needed statin therapy. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with YOD have micro and macrovascular complications at diagnosis. Nearly, every patient required a statin to reduce CV risk. This highlights the importance of screening patients with YOD for CV risk factors and complications of diabetes at the time of diagnosis.

  13. Clinical worthlessness of genetic prediction of common forms of diabetes mellitus and related chronic complications: A position statement of the Italian Society of Diabetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, R; Prudente, S; Copetti, M; Dauriz, M; Zampetti, S; Garofolo, M; Penno, G; Trischitta, V

    2017-02-01

    We are currently facing several attempts aimed at marketing genetic data for predicting multifactorial diseases, among which diabetes mellitus is one of the more prevalent. The present document primarily aims at providing to practicing physicians a summary of available data regarding the role of genetic information in predicting diabetes and its chronic complications. Firstly, general information about characteristics and performance of risk prediction tools will be presented in order to help clinicians to get acquainted with basic methodological information related to the subject at issue. Then, as far as type 1 diabetes is concerned, available data indicate that genetic information and counseling may be useful only in families with many affected individuals. However, since no disease prevention is possible, the utility of predicting this form of diabetes is at question. In the case of type 2 diabetes, available data really question the utility of adding genetic information on top of well performing, easy available and inexpensive non-genetic markers. Finally, the possibility of using the few available genetic data on diabetic complications for improving our ability to predict them will also be presented and discussed. For cardiovascular complication, the addition of genetic information to models based on clinical features does not translate in a substantial improvement in risk discrimination. For all other diabetic complications genetic information are currently very poor and cannot, therefore, be used for improving risk stratification. In all, nowadays the use of genetic testing for predicting diabetes and its chronic complications is definitively of little value in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Continuing Disparities in Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Complications Between Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australians With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy M.E.; Hunt, Kerry; McAullay, Daniel; Chubb, Stephen A.P.; Sillars, Brett A.; Bruce, David G.; Davis, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether disparities in the nature and management of type 2 diabetes persist between Aboriginal and the majority Anglo-Celt patients in an urban Australian community. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Baseline data from the observational Fremantle Diabetes Study collected from 1993 to 1996 (phase I) and from 2008 to 2011 (phase II) were analyzed. Patients characterized as Aboriginal or Anglo-Celt by self-report and supporting data underwent comprehensive assessment, including questionnaires, examination, and biochemical testing in a single laboratory. Generalized linear modeling with age/sex adjustment was used to examine differences in changes in variables in the two groups between phases I and II. RESULTS The indigenous participants were younger at entry and at diabetes diagnosis than the Anglo-Celt participants in both phases. They were also less likely to be educated beyond primary level and were more likely to be smokers. HbA1c decreased in both groups over time (Aboriginal median 9.6% [interquartile range 7.8–10.7%] to 8.4% [6.6–10.6%] vs. Anglo-Celt median 7.1% [6.2–8.4%] to 6.7% [6.2–7.5%]), but the gap persisted (P = 0.65 for difference between phases I and II by ethnic group). Aboriginal patients were more likely to have microvascular disease in both phases. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index ≤0.90 or lower-extremity amputation) increased in Aboriginal but decreased in Anglo-Celt participants (15.8–29.7 vs. 30.7–21.5%; P = 0.055). CONCLUSIONS Diabetes management has improved for Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australian patients, but disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and complications persist. PMID:22815295

  15. Nutraceutical potential of Aerva lanata (L.) Juss. ex Schult ameliorates secondary complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riya, M P; Antu, K A; Pal, S; Srivastava, A K; Sharma, S; Raghu, K G

    2014-09-01

    Nutraceuticals provide health benefits beyond their basic nutrition by modulating a number of biochemical pathways. They are derived from natural products and have gained recognition worldwide as an adjuvant or therapy in the treatment of metabolic disorders such as diabetes. Although the regulation of blood glucose with drugs and insulin greatly reduces the incidence of secondary complications, the need for long-term treatment raises issues of tolerance and affordability. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to explore the nutraceutical potential of Aerva lanata, a herb widely used for its culinary and therapeutic potential in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Treatment with 70% ethanolic extract (ALE) at 500 mg per kg b.w per day for 21 days significantly improved the fasting blood glucose (120.33 ± 1.99 mg dL(-1)), insulin level (9.81 ± 0.38 mU L(-1)), HbA1c (7.3 ± 0.36%) and glycogen content in the liver (35.33 ± 1.38 mg g(-1) protein) and muscle (7.67 ± 0.11 mg g(-1) protein) compared to diabetic controls. The extract also showed a significant decrease in blood glucose by 47.29% towards the end of 2 h in oral glucose tolerance test on Day 21. Its therapeutic potential could be partly attributable to the presence of flavonoids, tannins and terpenes (alpha amyrin, betulin and beta sitosterol) along with micronutrients such as potassium, magnesium, calcium and zinc. Hence, we suggest the suitability of Aerva lanata as a nutraceutical for diabetic patients.

  16. Detection of autoantibodies against reactive oxygen species modified glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 in type 1 diabetes associated complications

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    Mashal Subhash N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoantibodies against glutamate decarboxylase-65 (GAD65Abs are thought to be a major immunological tool involved in pathogenic autoimmunity development in various diseases. GAD65Abs are a sensitive and specific marker for type 1 diabetes (T1D. These autoantibodies can also be found in 6-10% of patients classified with type 2 diabetes (T2D, as well as in 1-2% of the healthy population. The latter individuals are at low risk of developing T1D because the prevalence rate of GAD65Abs is only about 0.3%. It has, therefore, been suggested that the antibody binding to GAD65 in these three different GAD65Ab-positive phenotypes differ with respect to epitope specificity. The specificity of reactive oxygen species modified GAD65 (ROS-GAD65 is already well established in the T1D. However, its association in secondary complications of T1D has not yet been ascertained. Hence this study focuses on identification of autoantibodies against ROS-GAD65 (ROS-GAD65Abs and quantitative assays in T1D associated complications. Results From the cohort of samples, serum autoantibodies from T1D retinopathic and nephropathic patients showed high recognition of ROS-GAD65 as compared to native GAD65 (N-GAD65. Uncomplicated T1D subjects also exhibited reactivity towards ROS-GAD65. However, this was found to be less as compared to the binding recorded from complicated subjects. These results were further proven by competitive ELISA estimations. The apparent association constants (AAC indicate greater affinity of IgG from retinopathic T1D patients (1.90 × 10-6 M followed by nephropathic (1.81 × 10-6 M and uncomplicated (3.11 × 10-7 M T1D patients for ROS-GAD65 compared to N-GAD65. Conclusion Increased oxidative stress and blood glucose levels with extended duration of disease in complicated T1D could be responsible for the gradual formation and/or exposing cryptic epitopes on GAD65 that induce increased production of ROS-GAD65Abs. Hence regulation of ROS

  17. Continuing disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and complications between aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australians with type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy M E; Hunt, Kerry; McAullay, Daniel; Chubb, Stephen A P; Sillars, Brett A; Bruce, David G; Davis, Wendy A

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether disparities in the nature and management of type 2 diabetes persist between Aboriginal and the majority Anglo-Celt patients in an urban Australian community. Baseline data from the observational Fremantle Diabetes Study collected from 1993 to 1996 (phase I) and from 2008 to 2011 (phase II) were analyzed. Patients characterized as Aboriginal or Anglo-Celt by self-report and supporting data underwent comprehensive assessment, including questionnaires, examination, and biochemical testing in a single laboratory. Generalized linear modeling with age/sex adjustment was used to examine differences in changes in variables in the two groups between phases I and II. The indigenous participants were younger at entry and at diabetes diagnosis than the Anglo-Celt participants in both phases. They were also less likely to be educated beyond primary level and were more likely to be smokers. HbA(1c) decreased in both groups over time (Aboriginal median 9.6% [interquartile range 7.8-10.7%] to 8.4% [6.6-10.6%] vs. Anglo-Celt median 7.1% [6.2-8.4%] to 6.7% [6.2-7.5%]), but the gap persisted (P = 0.65 for difference between phases I and II by ethnic group). Aboriginal patients were more likely to have microvascular disease in both phases. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index ≤0.90 or lower-extremity amputation) increased in Aboriginal but decreased in Anglo-Celt participants (15.8-29.7 vs. 30.7-21.5%; P = 0.055). Diabetes management has improved for Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australian patients, but disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and complications persist.

  18. The Trp64Arg amino acid polymorphism of the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene does not contribute to the genetic susceptibility of diabetic microvascular complications in Caucasian type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Urhammer, S A; Mottlau, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The beta3-adrenergic receptor is involved in regulation of microvascular blood flow. A missense mutation (Trp64Arg) in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene has been suggested as a risk factor for proliferative retinopathy in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of the present study...... was to evaluate the contribution of this polymorphism to the development of microangiopathic complications in Caucasian type 1 diabetic patients. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied the relationship between the Trp64Arg polymorphism in type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy (204 men/132 women, age 42.8 +/- 11.......0 years, diabetes duration 28 +/- 9 years) and in type 1 diabetic patients with persistent normoalbuminuria (118 men/73 women, age 42.6 +/- 10.2 years, diabetes duration 27 +/- 8 years). Proliferative retinopathy was present in 254 patients (48%), while 66 patients (13%) had no diabetic retinopathy...

  19. Chronic Endotoxemia in Subjects with Type-1 Diabetes Is Seen Much before the Onset of Microvascular Complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanandhan Aravindhan

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/Endotoxin is hypothesized to play an important role in chronic inflammation associated with Type-1 diabetes (T1DM and its complications. Endotoxin core antibodies (EndoCAb, LPS binding protein (LBP and soluble CD14 (sCD14 act as modulators of LPS induced activation of innate immune system in vivo. For the present study we estimated the levels of LPS and its translocation markers in T1DM subjects with and without microvascular complications (MVC and correlate them with clinical parameters of T1DM and serum inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and GM-CSF.A total of 197 subjects (64 normal glucose tolerance (NGT subjects, 97 T1DM subjects without MVC and 36 with MVC were included in this study and the levels of serum LPS, its translocation markers and cytokines measured by immunoassays.Compared to NGT, T1DM subjects (both with and without MVC had significantly higher levels of LPS, reduced levels of LBP and EndoCAb along with significant increase in the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and GM-CSF (p<0.05. No significant change was seen in the levels of these biomarkers between T1DM subjects with and without MVC.Decreased levels of EndoCAb and LBP suggest sustained endotoxin activity in T1DM subjects even before the onset of microvascular complications.

  20. Study on the peripheral white blood cell count in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated with microangiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wenpin; Zhu Pinghui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible role played by peripheral white blood cells in the development of type 2 diabetes (DM2) and complication of microvascular pathological changes. Methods: White blood cell count and metabolism related parameters (FBG, 2hPBG, 2h Pinsulin, TCH, HDL, LDL, TG, HbA1c, BMI, age) were examined in 33 DM2 patients without complication, 41 DM2 patients with micro-angiopathy and 31 controls. Results: The white blood cell counts in both DM2 patients with no complication and the DM2 with microvascular pathological changes were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). The white blood cell counts were positively correlated with age,body metabolism index (BMI), triglyceride (TG), 2h glucose (PBG) and 2h insulin (the r value 0.248, 0.201, 0.435, 0.225, 0.352 respectively, P<0.05). Conclusion: Peripheral white blood cells possibly played some role in development of DM2 and microvascular pathological changes and might be of some predictive importance. (authors)

  1. The Thai DMS Diabetes Complications (DD.Comp.) project: prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in Thai patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsareejit, Amporn; Potisat, Somkiat; Krairittichai, Udom; Sattaputh, Charnvate; Arunratanachote, Woranut

    2013-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Thailand and their associated risk factors. A cross-sectional, multi-sites, hospital-based study was carried out between June and December 2006. Diabetic patients from the outpatient department of seven public hospitals (3 tertiary, 2 secondary and 2 community hospital) in Thailand were performed by retinal specialist. One thousand seven of 1,120 diabetic patients received retinal examination using indirect ophthalmoscope. Patients were divided into two groups (absent and present DR). Most patients in both groups were female (72.7 and 68.0%). The prevalence of DR was 24.0% (n = 242), mild NPDR 9.4% (n = 95), moderate NPDR 10.5% (n = 106), severe NPDR 1.3% (n = 13), and proliferative (PDR) 2.8% (n = 28). Age at onset, duration of DM, systolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, Triglyceride (TG), alcohol consumption, foot ulcer, and proteinuria were recorded. Metformin and insulin taking were statistically, significantly different among these groups. There is more prevalent NPDR and PDR in insulin-taking than non-insulin-taking groups. The grading of diabetic retinopathy is associated with the duration of diabetes. In multivariate regression analysis, associated risk factors of DR patients were the duration of DM, HbA1c levels, and proteinuria. Diabetic retinopathy was present in about one fourth of type 2 diabetic patients in this study. Associated risk factors of DR were the duration of DM, HbA1c levels, and proteinuria. Regular screening for DR especially in T2DM with associated risk factor should be done for early treatment.

  2. Relationship between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism and cardio-brain complications in patients with NIDDM (type 2 diabetes mellitus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qinfang; Zhu Yan; Ding Mingwei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism and cardio-brain complications in patients with NIDDM. Methods: The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in 174 patients with NIDDM and 62 controls were examined with PCR. Results: ACE gene I/D polymorphism was closely related to coronary heart disease (angina, cardiac infarction) and cerebral infarction in diabetic patients but not with hypertension. Plasma renin activity and plasma angiotensin II levels in complicated diabetic patients with ACE D/D gene were significantly higher than those in the controls (p < 0.01). Their aldosterone and endothelin contents were not significantly different. Conclusion: Examination of ACE gene I/D polymorphism was useful for the primary prevention of cardio-brain complications in diabetic patients and helpful in the early diagnosis and therapy of coronary heart disease and cerebral infarction

  3. Clinical significance of changes of serum levels of sICAM-1 and HA in patients with type-2 diabetes complicated with angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lixia; Li Yugang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the significance of changes of serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and hyaluronic acid (HA) levels in patients with type-2 diabetes complicated with angiopathy. Methods: Serum levels of sICAM-1 (by ELISA) and HA (by RIA) were measured in 66 cases of type-2 diabetes complicated with angiopathy and 35 controls. Contents of fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAIC) and urine microalbumin (MAlb) were also measured for correlation analysis studies. Results: Serum sICAM-1 and HA levels in patients with type-2 diabetic angiopathy were significantly higher than those in controls (p<0.01) and were closely positively correlated to the contents of FBG, HbAIC and MAlb (p<0.01). Conclusion: Higher serum sICAM-1 and HA levels may play some role in the pathogenesis of type-2 diabetic angiopathy

  4. Early enteral nutrition and total parenteral nutrition on the nutritional status and blood glucose in patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Zhao, Jiamin; Zhang, Yanling; Liu, Chong

    2018-07-01

    Effects of early enteral nutrition (EEN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support on nutritional status and blood glucose in patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy were investigated. One hundred and twenty-nine patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus type 2 admitted to the First People's Hospital of Jinan (Jinan, China), from June 2012 to June 2016 were selected into the study. According to different nutrition support pathways, these patients were randomly divided into the EEN group and the TPN group. The improvement of nutritional indexes, postoperative complications, gastrointestinal function recovery and perioperative blood glucose fluctuation were compared between the two groups. On the 4th day after operation, the improvement levels of total bilirubin (TBL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), total protein (TP), prealbumin (PAB), hemoglobin (HGB) and weight (Wt) in the EEN group were significantly higher than those in the conventional group (P0.05). No patients had complications in the EEN group, while a total of 29 patients in the TPN group suffered adverse reactions, indicating that the incidence rate of complications in the EEN group was significantly lower than that in the TPN group (Pnutrition for patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy, which is worthy of clinical promotion as it maintains good nutritional status, produces few postoperative complications and keeps the blood glucose level stable, by which the postoperative evacuation time is early, the hospitalization time is short and the cost is low.

  5. Delay between Onset of Symptoms and Seeking Physician Intervention Increases Risk of Diabetic Foot Complications: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norina A. Gavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a post hoc analysis of 17,530 questionnaires collected as part of the 2012 screening for neuropathy using Norfolk Quality of Life tool in patients with diabetes in Romania, to assess the impact on foot complications of time between the onset of symptoms of diabetes/its complications and the physician visit. Odds ratios (ORs for self-reporting neuropathy increased from 1.16 (95% CI: 1.07–1.25 in those who sought medical care in 1–6 months from symptoms of diabetes/its complications onset to 2.27 in those who sought medical care >2 years after symptoms onset. The ORs for having a history of foot ulcers were 1.43 (95% CI: 1.26–1.63 in those who sought medical care in 1–6 months and increased to 3.08 (95% CI: 2.59–3.66 in those who sought medical care after >2 years from symptoms of diabetes/its complications onset. The highest ORs for a history of gangrene (2.49 [95% CI: 1.90–3.26] and amputations (2.18 [95% CI: 1.60–2.97] were observed in those who sought medical care after >2 years following symptoms onset. In conclusion, we showed that waiting for >1 month after symptoms onset dramatically increases the risk of diabetic foot complications. These results show the need for accessible educational programs on diabetes and its chronic complications and the need to avoid delays in reporting.

  6. Spirulina platensis Extract Supplementation Attenuates Diabetic Complication in Gamma Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, R.M.; Sherif, N.H

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder, is becoming a major health problem. Although there are a number of drugs available on the market, long time use may cause a number of side effects. Spirulina is a microscopic and filamentous cyanobacterium that contains essential amino acids, essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidative components. The objective of this study was to analyze the possible hypo glycemic and hypolipidaemic effects of Spirulina intake against streptozotocin and/or radiation induced diabetes in male albino rats. In the experiment, a total of 60 rats were used and the rats were divided into six groups of ten rats each: group I, normal untreated rats (control) ; group II, animals of this group received only Spirulina (15 mg/kg) for 30 consecutive days; group III, animals were injected intraperitoneally with a freshly prepared solution of streptozotocin(STZ) (45 mg/kg i.p.) in 0.1 M citrate buffer, ph 4.5 for 30 consecutive days ; group IV, as group II then given Spirulina for 30 days , group V, same as group III then exposed to 6 Gy gamma radiation as a single dose shot ; and group VI, Spirulina + diabetic irradiated group, rats were given orally Spirulina (15 mg/kg) then injected in - traperitoneally with (STZ) followed by irradiation at a dose level of 6 Gy as a single dose shot. The results revealed that animal treated with STZ or/and exposed to gamma radiation showed an increase in fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (Tg), low density lipoprotein (LDL), plasma insulin and C- peptide in compared to control. Also, a marked increase in the liver tissue of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and a decrease in glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) was observed. Oral pretreatment of rats with aqueous extract of Spirulina (SPE) counteracted STZ or/and radiation induced lipid peroxidation and encouraging hypoglycemic and hypolipidaemic properties of the treated

  7. "Dead in bed": a tragic complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Reilly, M

    2010-12-01

    "Dead in bed" is a tragic description of a particular type of sudden death in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients are typically found dead in the early morning, lying in an undisturbed bed, having been well the previous evening. The incidence of "dead in bed" syndrome is not known but studies suggest figures of between 4.7 and 27.3% of all unexplained deaths in type 1 DM. The pathogenesis is unclear but patients typically have a preceding history of recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. We describe two cases of "dead in bed" syndrome which occurred at our institution within a 12-month period.

  8. Changes of serum leptin and their relationships with insulin resistance in patients with simple obesity and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Changzhou Wujin People's Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Changzhou; Shi Linlin; Lu Dan; Zhang Lei; Wang Qing; Yao Wenhua

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum leptin in patients with simple obesity and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity in order to explore the relationship of leptin and insulin resistance and the role of leptin in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 60 cases of simple obesity, 60 cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and 30 cases of normal control were included according to the diagnostic criteria of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. the levels of fasting serum leptin, fasting serum insulin, fasting glucose, fasting blood lipid were measured in all cases. The body mass index (BMI) and insulin action index were calculated. Results: The level of BMI, serum leptin, serum insulin, blood lipid were significantly higher in patients with simple obesity and with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity than in normal control cases, while (IAI) was significantly lower. The levels of free serum leptin, serum insulin, free glucose, and blood lipid were significantly higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity than in patients with simple obesity, while IAI was significantly lower. The level of serum leptin was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.48, P<0.55) and fasting serum leptin (r=0.55, P<0.05) and negatively correlated with IAI (r=-0.47, P<0.05) in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated with obesity. Conclusion: The overexpression of serum leptin may play an important role in the occurrence of the insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus in obesity patients. (authors)

  9. Estimated incidence of cardiovascular complications related to type 2 diabetes in Mexico using the UKPDS outcome model and a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Salinas Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate the incidence of complications, life expectancy and diabetes related mortality in the Mexican diabetic population over the next two decades using data from a nation-wide, population based survey and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS outcome model Methods The cohort included all patients with type 2 diabetes evaluated during the National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANut 2006. ENSANut is a probabilistic multistage stratified survey whose aim was to measure the prevalence of chronic diseases. A total of 47,152 households were visited. Results are shown stratified by gender, time since diagnosis (> or ≤ to 10 years and age at the time of diagnosis (> or ≤ 40 years. Results The prevalence of diabetes in our cohort was 14.4%. The predicted 20 year-incidence for chronic complications per 1000 individuals are: ischemic heart disease 112, myocardial infarction 260, heart failure 113, stroke 101, and amputation 62. Furthermore, 539 per 1000 patients will have a diabetes-related premature death. The average life expectancy for the diabetic population is 10.9 years (95%CI 10.7-11.2; this decreases to 8.3 years after adjusting for quality of life (CI95% 8.1-8.5. Male sex and cases diagnosed after age 40 have the highest risk for developing at least one major complication during the next 20 years. Conclusions Based on the current clinical profile of Mexican patients with diabetes, the burden of disease related complications will be tremendous over the next two decades.

  10. A group randomized trial of a complexity-based organizational intervention to improve risk factors for diabetes complications in primary care settings: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Noel Polly H; Culler Steven D; Pugh Jacqueline A; Parchman Michael L; Arar Nedal H; Romero Raquel L; Palmer Raymond F

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Most patients with type 2 diabetes have suboptimal control of their glucose, blood pressure (BP), and lipids – three risk factors for diabetes complications. Although the chronic care model (CCM) provides a roadmap for improving these outcomes, developing theoretically sound implementation strategies that will work across diverse primary care settings has been challenging. One explanation for this difficulty may be that most strategies do not account for the complex adapti...

  11. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications%2型糖尿病视网膜病变与糖尿病其他并发症的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑惠; 孟倩丽; 张敏; 郭海科; 刘清洋; 崔颖; 李达桔

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨2型糖尿病视网膜病变( diabetic retinopathy, DR)与糖尿病的全身并发症的相关性。方法:分析2型糖尿病住院患者702例,将其分为NDR组、DR组两组,DR组又分为非增生性糖尿病视网膜病变(non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy,NPDR)组和增生性糖尿病视网膜病变( proliferative diabetic retinopathy, PDR)组,分析DR与糖尿病大血管并发症、糖尿病肾病( diabetic nephropathy, DN )、糖尿病周围神经病变( diabetic peripheral neuropathy,DPN),糖尿病周围血管性疾病( peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus, PVD)、糖尿病足( diabetic foot,DF)、糖尿病酮症酸中毒( diabetic ketoacidosis,DKA)等糖尿病并发症的相关性。结果:DR的发生、发展与高血压、高血脂、颈部血管硬化、斑块,下肢动脉硬化、斑块, DN、DPN、DF及PVD等并发症有关。 PDR与高血压、DPN关系密切。结论:血管内皮损伤、微循环障碍是DR及糖尿病的全身大、小血管并发症的共同病理基础。糖尿病患者出现全身并发症时,DR的患病率增加,尤其是合并高血压、DPN时,PDR的患病率增加。所以糖尿病患者尤其是出现全身并发症者必需定期行眼底检查,以早期发现、早期治疗DR,降低致盲率。%Abstract•AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.• METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included.All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy ( NPDR ) and group proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR).The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy ( DN) , diabetic

  12. [Operative treatment of diabetics with vascular complications : Secondary data analysis of diagnosis-related groups statistics from 2005 to 2014 in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olm, M; Kühnl, A; Knipfer, E; Salvermoser, M; Eckstein, H-H; Zimmermann, A

    2018-03-27

    In Germany approximately 40,000 amputations per year are performed on patients with diabetes mellitus, often with accompanying vascular complications. The aim of this study was to present the various degrees of severity of the vascular complications and the temporal changes of the treatment options in diabetics with vascular complications in Germany. The microdata of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) statistics of the Federal Statistical Office were analyzed over the period from 2005 to 2014. All cases were included in which the main or secondary diagnosis of diabetes mellitus with concurrent vascular complications (diabetic angiopathy and peripheral arterial disease) was encrypted. The median age of the 1,811,422 cases was 73 years and 62% were male. While the total number of amputations remained stable over time, there was a 41% reduction in knee-preserving and a 31% reduction in non-knee preserving major amputations with an 18% increase in minor amputations. Revascularization increased by 33% from 36 procedures in 2005 to 48 procedures per 100,000 inhabitants. The increase in revascularization was evident in the area of endovascular therapy alone where there was an increase of 78%. Due to the significant increase in endovascular revascularization measures, there was a significant increase in the proportion of diabetes patients with vascular pathologies in whom revascularization was carried out. As a result, improved limb preservation was achieved despite equally high amputation rates due to increasing minor amputation rates.

  13. The Role of Vitamin D Deficiency in the Incidence, Progression, and Complications of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Chakhtoura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The “nonclassic” role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D3 has been recently widely recognized. In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, it plays an immunomodulatory role through the vitamin D receptor (VDR present on pancreatic and immune cells. Specific VDR allelic variants have been associated with T1D in many countries. Furthermore, vitamin D deficiency has been prevalent in T1D, and the seasonal and latitude variability in the incidence of T1D can be partly explained by the related variability in vitamin D level. In fact, retrospective studies of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy or infancy showed a lower incidence of T1D. We will review the different mechanisms of the vitamin D protective effect against insulitis and present the available data on the role of vitamin D deficiency in the control, progression, and complications of T1D.

  14. Enhanced Apoptosis of Monocytes from Complication-Free Juvenile-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 May Be Ameliorated by TNF-α Inhibitors

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    Jolanta Myśliwska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with an enhanced apoptosis of different cells and tissues, accelerating occurrence of diabetic microvascular complications. The aim of our study was to determine spontaneous apoptotic potential of the monocyte subsets in juvenile-onset complication-free diabetes mellitus type 1 and to compare them with the corresponding values of the healthy. Moreover, we wanted to assess effects of TNF-R1 blocking agents and those of general TNF-α blocker (Infliximab on spontaneous apoptosis of monocytes. Sixty randomly selected DM1 patients (14.5 ± 3.2 years and 30 healthy (13.5 ± 2.8 years volunteers were enrolled in the study. Our results indicate that three monocyte subsets are distinguishable in the groups of young diabetic patients and the healthy, similarly to in the blood of adults. DM1 patients were characterized by higher values of apoptotic monocytes than the healthy. The manipulation with drugs inhibiting TNF-R1 expression diminished the pool of CD16+ apoptotic monocytes. Infliximab reduced the apoptotic CD16− cells. In conclusion, diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with greater apoptosis of three monocyte subsets which may contribute to the development of microvascular complications. TNF-α modifiers appear to ameliorate monocyte apoptosis. They may be useful for controlling excessive monocyte apoptosis in diabetic patients.

  15. Microvascular abnormalities in capillaroscopy correlate with higher serum IL-18 and sE-selectin levels in patients with type 1 diabetes complicated by microangiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Górska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Microvascular abnormalities are one of the most important causes of persistent diabetic complications. The aim of this study was to compare microvascular changes examined by nailfold capillaroscopy with serum concentrations of soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin and IL-18 in type 1 diabetic patients with and without microangiopathy. Serum levels of sE-selectin and IL-18 were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 106 patients with type 1 diabetes and in 40 healthy controls. All diabetic patients were evaluated by extensive clinical, laboratory and capillaroscopic studies. Morphological changes were observed by nailfold capillaroscopy in 86 out of 106 (81% diabetic patients. Severe capillaroscopic changes were seen in 32 out of 54 (59% patients with microangiopathy, but in only seven out of 52 (13% patients without microangiopathy. Higher serum levels of sE-selectin (p < 0.001 and IL-18 (p < 0.05 were demonstrated in diabetic patients compared to controls. Significant differences of sE-selectin (p < 0.001 and IL-18 (p < 0.01 serum concentrations were observed between diabetic patients with microangiopathy and controls. Moreover, comparison between patients with and without microangiopathic complications showed a significantly higher capillaroscopic score and sE-selectin serum concentration in the group with microangiopathy (p < 0.001. Furthermore, diabetic patients with severe microvascular changes in capillaroscopy showed significantly higher IL-18 (p < 0.001 and sE-selectin (p < 0.05 serum levels than subgroups without changes or with mild abnormalities. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in nailfold capillaroscopy may reflect the extent of microvascular involvement and are associated with higher sE-selectin and IL-18 serum levels, as well as with microangiopathic complications in diabetic patients. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 104–110

  16. HbA1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Is there an optimal cut point to assess high risk of diabetes complications, and how well does the 6.5% cutoff perform?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowall B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bernd Kowall, Wolfgang Rathmann Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany Abstract: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c has recently been recommended for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM by leading diabetes organizations and by the World Health Organization. The most important reason to define T2DM is to identify subjects with high risk of diabetes complications who may benefit from treatment. This review addresses two questions: 1 to assess from existing studies whether there is an optimal HbA1c threshold to predict diabetes complications and 2 to assess how well the recommended 6.5% cutoff of HbA1c predicts diabetes complications. HbA1c cutoffs derived from predominantly cross-sectional studies on retinopathy differ widely from 5.2%–7.8%, and among other reasons, this is due to the heterogeneity of statistical methods and differences in the definition of retinopathy. From the few studies on other microvascular complications, HbA1c thresholds could not be identified. HbA1c cutoffs make less sense for the prediction of cardiovascular events (CVEs because CVE risks depend on various strong risk factors (eg, hypertension, smoking; subjects with low HbA1c levels but high values of CVE risk factors were shown to be at higher CVE risk than subjects with high HbA1c levels and low values of CVE risk factors. However, the recommended 6.5% threshold distinguishes well between subjects with and subjects without retinopathy, and this distinction is particularly strong in severe retinopathy. Thus, in existing studies, the prevalence of any retinopathy was 2.5 to 4.5 times as high in persons with HbA1c-defined T2DM as in subjects with HbA1c <6.5%. To conclude, from existing studies, a consistent optimal HbA1c threshold for diabetes complications cannot be derived, and the recommended 6.5% threshold has mainly been brought about

  17. A decade of temporal trends in overweight/obesity in youth with type 1 diabetes after the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Charumathi; Volkening, Lisa K; Diaz, Monica; Laffel, Lori M

    2015-06-01

    Youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at risk for weight gain due to the epidemic of childhood overweight/obesity and common use of intensive insulin therapy; the latter resulted in weight gain in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. To assess overweight/obesity prevalence and intensive insulin therapy use in youth with T1D over a decade and identify factors associated with weight status and glycemic control. We obtained cross-sectional data from four unique cohorts (1999, 2002, 2006, and 2009). Youth (N = 507, 49% male) were 8-16 yr old with T1D duration ≥6 months, A1c 6.0-12.0% (42-108 mmol/mol), and daily insulin dose ≥0.5 U/kg. Across cohorts, age, body mass index (BMI) percentile, and A1c ranged from 12.0 ± 2.2 to 12.8 ± 2.3 yr, 70 ± 22 to 72 ± 21, and 8.3 ± 1.0 (67 ± 11) to 8.5 ± 1.1% (69 ± 12 mmol/mol), respectively. Intensive insulin therapy use increased from 52 to 97% (p obesity remained similar, 27% (1999), 36% (2002), 33% (2006), and 31% (2009) (p = 0.54), as did z-BMI. In multivariate analysis, higher A1c was related to higher insulin dose (p obesity prevalence in youth with T1D remained stable over a decade, similar to the general pediatric population. However, A1c remained suboptimal, underscoring the need to optimize T1D treatment to reduce future complication risk. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Improving risk-stratification of Diabetes complications using temporal data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Lucia; Dagliati, Arianna; Segagni, Daniele; Leporati, Paola; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    To understand which factor trigger worsened disease control is a crucial step in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) patient management. The MOSAIC project, funded by the European Commission under the FP7 program, has been designed to integrate heterogeneous data sources and provide decision support in chronic T2D management through patients' continuous stratification. In this work we show how temporal data mining can be fruitfully exploited to improve risk stratification. In particular, we exploit administrative data on drug purchases to divide patients in meaningful groups. The detection of drug consumption patterns allows stratifying the population on the basis of subjects' purchasing attitude. Merging these findings with clinical values indicates the relevance of the applied methods while showing significant differences in the identified groups. This extensive approach emphasized the exploitation of administrative data to identify patterns able to explain clinical conditions.

  19. Posterior subtenon triamcinolone acetonide in gas-filled eyes as an adjunctive treatment for complicated proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongeun; Kang, Seungbum; Park, Young-Hoon

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of adjunctive subtenon injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in gas-filled eyes after vitrectomy for complicated proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). This nonrandomized comparative study included 27 patients (27 eyes) who underwent pars plana vitrectomy and gas tamponade for treatment of PDR with tractional or combined tractional-rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and who received subtenon injection of TA (40 mg) at the end of surgery. The study group was compared with the control group (29 eyes), which was matched with the study group for preoperative and intraoperative parameters, but underwent pars plana vitrectomy and gas tamponade without a subtenon injection of TA. Retinal reattachments without reoperation were achieved in 25 eyes (92.6%) and 26 eyes (89.7%) at 6 months (p = 1.000) in the study and control groups, respectively. The study group and the control group did not differ significantly in the frequency of postoperative proliferative vitreoretinopathy, retinal redetachment rate, reoperation rate, macular pucker formation, postoperative vitreous hemorrhage, gain in visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and intraocular inflammation (p > 0.05). The clinical results of pars plana vitrectomy for complicated PDR are not improved significantly by an adjunctive subtenon TA injection in gas-filled eyes.

  20. Serum 25(OH Vitamin D Levels in Polish Women during Pregnancies Complicated by Hypertensive Disorders and Gestational Diabetes

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    Piotr Domaracki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: An association between the level of vitamin D and the risk of pregnancy-related complications remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine concentrations of 25(OH vitamin D in Polish women with normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by gestational hypertension, preeclampsia or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Moreover, we analyzed an association between maternal serum 25(OHD and the risk of gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and GDM. Material and Methods: The study included 207 pregnant women, among them 171 with pregnancy-related complications: gestational hypertension (n = 45, preeclampsia (n = 23 or GDM (n = 103. The control group consisted of 36 women with normal pregnancies. Concentrations of serum 25(OHD were measured at admission to the hospital prior to delivery Results: Patients with hypertension did not differ significantly from the controls in terms of their serum 25(OHD concentrations (18.20 vs. 22.10 ng/mL, p = 0.15. Highly significant differences were found in 25(OHD concentrations of women with preeclampsia and the controls (14.75 vs. 22.10 ng/mL, p = 0.0021. GDM was not associated with significant differences in 25(OHD concentration. A low level of 25(OHD turned out to be associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia during pregnancy on both univariate and multivariate regression analysis, and was a significant predictor of this condition on ROC (receiver operating characteristic analysis (AUC = 0.70, p < 0.01. Conclusions: 25(OHD deficiency is common among pregnant Polish women. Low concentrations of 25(OHD may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of preeclampsia. Routine assessment of the 25(OHD level during pregnancy may be crucial for the identification of women at increased risk of preeclampsia.

  1. Baseline High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Predicts Macrovascular and Microvascular Complications of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Zahra; Ghajar, Alireza; Faghihi-Kashani, Sara; Afarideh, Mohsen; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2018-04-25

    This prospective study is aimed at examining the predictive value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) for coronary heart disease (CHD) events and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A population-based study (NCT02958579) was conducted on 1,301 participants with T2DM (mean follow-up of 7.5 years). Risk assessment for vascular events was done at baseline, and serum hs-CRP was measured. End points of this study include CHD events, diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic kidney disease. Individuals with unavailable data or hs-CRP >20 mg/L were excluded. The discrimination and reclassification improvement of study end points were tested after addition of hs-CRP to traditional risk factors. Median serum hs-CRP was 2.00 ranging from 0.1 to 17 mg/L. Hazards ratio of each SD increment in baseline hs-CRP was 1.028 (1.024-1.032) for CHD, 1.025 (1.021-1.029) for diabetic neuropathy, 1.037 (1.030-1.043) for diabetic retinopathy, and 1.035 (1.027-1.043) for diabetic kidney disease. The addition of hs-CRP to traditional risk factors of vascular complications of T2DM improved discrimination of all end points (p < 0.001). Net reclassification improvement ranged from 8% for diabetic neuropathy to 31% for diabetic kidney disease (p < 0.05). Baseline hs-CRP predicts both of CHD events and microvascular complications of patients with T2D. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Patient characteristics related to metabolic disorders and chronic complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients hospitalized at the Qingdao Endocrine and Diabetes Hospital from 2006 to 2012 in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanhu; Gao, Weiguo; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Jia; Hammar, Niklas; Cabrera, Claudia S; Wu, Xiaoli; Qiao, Qing

    2017-01-01

    To study the clinical characteristics related to metabolic disorders and complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients hospitalized in the Qingdao Endocrine and Diabetes Hospital from 2006 to 2012 in Qingdao, China. Data from 14,289 (51% males) type 2 diabetes mellitus patients hospitalized between 2006 and 2012 were collected and analysed. Information on patients' demographic, anthropometric, laboratory and disease histories were extracted from electronic medical records. The mean age of the patients was 60.5 years, with median diabetes duration of 9.0 years. Mean haemoglobin A1c was 8.4%, where 1.9% had hypertriglyceridaemia. Retinopathy was diagnosed in 51.1% of patients, nephropathy in 21.6%, neuropathy in 50.4%, hypertension in 77.4%, coronary heart disease in 27.6% and peripheral vascular disease in 58.6%. Once hospitalized, 71.1% of patients underwent insulin injection treatments, either mono-therapy or combined with other anti-diabetic drugs. Metformin was prescribed to 36.9% of patients, followed by acarbose 29.9%, thiazolidinediones 18.1%, meglitinides 14.8% and sulfonylureas 10.7%. Inadequate control of hyperglycaemia, poor metabolic profiles and diabetic complications were common challenges for long-term diabetes management in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapy and the Risk of Vascular Complications in Patients With Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ai-Lin; Chen, Bor-Chyuan; Mou, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Mao-Feng; Yen, Hung-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With an increasing use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), evidence of long-term benefit with adjunctive TCM treatment is limited. This study investigated whether the concurrent TCM treatment reduces the risk of vascular complications in T2DM patients by using a large population from National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We identified 33,457 adult patients with newly diagnosed T2DM using anti-diabetic agents from a random sample of one million beneficiaries in the NHIRD between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011. We recruited 1049 TCM users (received TCM over 30 days with a diagnosis of T2DM) and randomly selected 4092 controls as the non-TCM cohort at a ratio of 1:4 frequency-matched by age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and index year. We investigated the prescription pattern of TCM and conducted a Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of stroke, chronic kidney diseases (CKD), and diabetic foot between the 2 cohorts. In the TCM cohort, the prescription pattern of TCM was different between insulin and noninsulin patients. The most common herbs were Dan-Shen (Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae) in noninsulin group and Da-Huang (Radix et Rhizoma Rhei) in insulin group. The most common formulae were Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan in noninsulin group and Yu-Quan-Wan in insulin group. Although no significant reduction in the hazard ratio of CKD and diabetic foot, the incidence rate of stroke was 7.19 per 1000 person-years in the TCM cohort and 10.66 per 1000 person-years in the control cohort, respectively. After adjustment of age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and antidiabetes agent use (including sulfonylureas, α-glucosidase, metformin, meglitinide, thiazolidinediones, and insulin), TCM cohorts were found to have a 33% decreased risk of stroke (95% CI = 0.46–0.97; P < 0.05). This population-based retrospective study showed that the complementary TCM therapy might

  4. Management of Diabetes and Its Complications with Banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa L. and Corosolic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Miura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa L. extracts have been used for many years in folk medicine to treat diabetes, with the first published research study being reported in 1940. This paper summarizes the current literature regarding Banaba and its constituents. The hypoglycemic effects of Banaba have been attributed to both corosolic acid as well as ellagitannins. Studies have been conducted in various animal models, human subjects, and in vitro systems using water soluble Banaba leaf extracts, corosolic acid, and ellagitannins. Corosolic acid has been reported to decrease blood sugar levels within 60 min in human subjects. Corosolic acid also exhibits antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant activities. The beneficial effects of Banaba and corosolic acid with respect to various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism appear to involve multiple mechanisms, including enhanced cellular uptake of glucose, impaired hydrolysis of sucrose and starches, decreased gluconeogenesis, and the regulation of lipid metabolism. These effects may be mediated by PPAR and other signal transduction factors. Banaba extract, corosolic acid, and other constituents may be beneficial in addressing the symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome, as well as offering other health benefits.

  5. Role of the decreased nitric oxide bioavailability in the vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masha, Andi; Dinatale, Stefano; Allasia, Stefano; Martina, Valentino

    2011-09-01

    This mini-review takes into consideration the physiology, synthesis and mechanisms of action of the nitric oxide (NO) and, subsequently, the causes and effects of the NO bioavailability impairment. In diabetes mellitus the reduced NO bioavailability is caused by the increased free radicals production, secondary to hyperglycemia. The reactive oxygen species oxidize the cofactors of the nitric oxide synthase, diminishing their active forms and consequently leading to a decreased NO production. Furthermore the decreased concentration of reduced glutathione results in a diminished production of nitrosoglutathione. These molecules are important intermediates of the NO pathway and physiologically activate the soluble guanylate cyclase. Their decrease in oxidative states of the cell, therefore, leads to a reduced cGMP production which represents the principal molecule that carries out NO's major effects. Finally we considered the eventual therapeutic strategies to improve NO bioavailability by acting on the causes of its decrease. Therefore the treatments proposed are based on the possibility to counteract the oxidation and, in this context, the physiopathological mechanisms strongly support the treatment with thiols.

  6. [Delayed complications after pancreatic surgery: Pancreatic insufficiency, malabsorption syndrome, pancreoprivic diabetes mellitus and pseudocysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, U; Siveke, J; Friess, H; Kleeff, J

    2015-06-01

    Benign and malignant pathologies of the pancreas can result in a relevant chronic disease burden. This is aggravated by morbidities resulting from surgical resections as well as from progression of the underlying condition. The aim was to summarize the current evidence regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, as well as of pancreatic pseudocysts. A selective literature search was performed and a summary of the currently available data on the surgical sequelae after pancreatic resection is given. Reduction of healthy pancreatic parenchyma down to 10-15 % leads to exocrine insufficiency with malabsorption and gastrointestinal complaints. Orally substituted pancreatic enzymes are the therapy of choice. Loss of pancreatic islets and/or islet function leads to endocrine insufficiency and pancreoprivic diabetes mellitus. Inflammatory, traumatic and iatrogenic injuries of the pancreas can lead to pancreatic pseudocysts, which require endoscopic, interventional or surgical drainage if symptomatic. Finally, pancreatic surgery harbors the long-term risk of gastrointestinal anastomotic ulcers, bile duct stenosis, portal vein thrombosis and chronic pain syndrome. As the evidence is limited, an interdisciplinary and individually tailored approach for delayed pancreatic morbidity is recommended.

  7. CURCUMA LONGA AS MEDICINAL HERB IN THE TREATMENT OF DIABET- IC COMPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlowicz-Bodalska, Katarzyna; Han, Stanislaw; Freier, Julia; Smolenski, Michal; Bodalska, Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    Curcuma longa L. (turmeric) of ginger family (Zingiberaceae) belongs to the group of oldest cultivated spice plants in the south-east Asian countries. For many years rhizome of this plant has been used also as a safe and active drug for the treatment of various.chronic diseases, especially of diabetes mellitus (DM). The active substance of turmeric - curcumin (diferuloylmethane), possesses multiple therapeutic properties. In recent years, many detailed research (tests in vito and in vivo) along with clinical trials have revealed its very valuable biological activities related to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cancer preventive properties, which are presented in numerous publications (1-6). At the molecular level it has been stated that curcumin inhibits cell proliferation, metastasis creation and apoptosis. Currently, great attention has been focused on curcumin as a blocker of TNF-s, which are the principal mediators of most inflammation-related disturbances (7). The main cause of blocking the broadly extended pharmacological and clinical investigations of curcumin is its extremely low solubility in water and in organ fluids. This feature consequently limits its systemic bioavailability and makes use of curcumin as a therapeutic remedy (to date) difficult. The primary aim of presently conducted research is to achieve increased solubilization and bioavailability of this promising nontoxic agent.

  8. Poor Vitamin C Status Late in Pregnancy Is Associated with Increased Risk of Complications in Type 1 Diabetic Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Bente; Lauszus, Finn Friis; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin C (vitC) is essential for normal pregnancy and fetal development and poor vitC status has been related to complications of pregnancy. We have previously shown lower vitC status in diabetic women throughout pregnancy compared to that of non-diabetic controls. Here, we evaluate...... the relationship between vitC status late in diabetic pregnancy in relation to fetal outcome, complications of pregnancy, diabetic characteristics, and glycemic control based on data of 47 women from the same cohort. We found a significant relationship between the maternal vitC level > or ≤ the 50% percentile...... of 26.6 μmol/L, respectively, and the umbilical cord blood vitC level (mean (SD)): 101.0 μmol/L (16.6) versus 78.5 μmol/L (27.8), p = 0.02; n = 12/16), while no relation to birth weight or Apgar score was observed. Diabetic women with complications of pregnancy had significantly lower vitC levels...

  9. Skin autofluorescence and risk of micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus-a multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, M J; Mulder, D.J.; Oomen, P H N; Brouwer, T; Jager, J; Castro Cabezas, M; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, Andries

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Skin autofluorescence is a non-invasive marker of advanced glycation end product accumulation. In a previous study, skin autofluorescence correlated with and predicted micro- and macrovascular complications in Type 2 diabetes in a primary care setting. The present cross-sectional study aims to

  10. Estimation of the economic and health impact of complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the autonomous community of Madrid (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Francisco; Rubio-Terrés, Carlos; Rubio-Rodríguez, Darío; Magaña, Ana; Piñera, Marbella; Iglesias, Pedro; Nogales, Pedro; Calañas, Alfonso; Novella, Blanca; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio; Debán, Carlos; Zamarrón, Isabel; Mora, Gustavo; Balsa, José Antonio; Vázquez, Clotilde

    2014-04-01

    To estimate the economic and health impact of chronic complications (macrovascular and microvascular) of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the autonomous community of Madrid (Spain) (ACM). The number of expected complications was obtained from a descriptive, cross-sectional study on a cohort of 3,268 patients with T2DM from the ACM. Cost of complications (€, 2012) was assessed both at hospitals and in primary care. The number of medical visits in primary care and drug treatment for complications were collected by a panel of 21 physicians experienced in treatment of T2DM. Population and epidemiological data and healthcare costs were obtained from Spanish sources. Univariate sensitivity analyses were performed. It is estimated that there are 390,944 patients with T2DM in the ACM, and that they experience 172,406 and 212,283 macrovascular and microvascular complications respectively during their lifetimes. Mean cost of T2DM complications per patient is estimated at € 4,121.54 (66% due to macrovascular complications). The economic impact of T2DM complications in the ACM would be € 1,611 million (1,065 and 545 millions from macrovascular and microvascular complications respectively). The economic impact would range from € 1,249 and 2.509 million euro depending on T2DM prevalence. Complications of T2DM have a great health and economic impact in ACM. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. ANTI-HSP60 and ANTI-HSP70 antibody levels and micro/ macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes: the EURODIAB Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruden, G.; Bruno, G.; Chaturvedi, N.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The heat shock proteins 60 and 70 (HSP60, HSP70) play an important role in cytoprotection. Under stress conditions they are released into the circulation and elicit an immune response. Anti-HSP60 and anti-HSP70 antibody levels have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Type 1......-control study from the EURODIAB Study of 531 type 1 diabetic patients was performed. SUBJECTS: Cases (n = 363) were defined as those with one or more complications of diabetes; control subjects (n = 168) were all those with no evidence of any complication. We measured anti-HSP60 and anti-HSP70 antibody levels...... quartiles were associated with a 47% reduced odds ratio of micro/macrovascular complications, independently of conventional risk factors, markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction [odds ratio (OR) = 0.53, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.28-1.02]. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of type 1...

  12. Phase 3 Trial of Transplantation of Human Islets in Type 1 Diabetes Complicated by Severe Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Bernhard J.; Clarke, William R.; Bridges, Nancy D.; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Bellin, Melena D.; Chaloner, Kathryn; Czarniecki, Christine W.; Goldstein, Julia S.; Hunsicker, Lawrence G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Korsgren, Olle; Larsen, Christian P.; Luo, Xunrong; Markmann, James F.; Naji, Ali; Oberholzer, Jose; Posselt, Andrew M.; Rickels, Michael R.; Ricordi, Camillo; Robien, Mark A.; Senior, Peter A.; Shapiro, A.M. James; Stock, Peter G.; Turgeon, Nicole A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) and severe hypoglycemic events (SHEs) cause substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Current therapies are effective in preventing SHEs in 50–80% of patients with IAH and SHEs, leaving a substantial number of patients at risk. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of a standardized human pancreatic islet product in subjects in whom IAH and SHEs persisted despite medical treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This multicenter, single-arm, phase 3 study of the investigational product purified human pancreatic islets (PHPI) was conducted at eight centers in North America. Forty-eight adults with T1D for >5 years, absent stimulated C-peptide, and documented IAH and SHEs despite expert care were enrolled. Each received immunosuppression and one or more transplants of PHPI, manufactured on-site under good manufacturing practice conditions using a common batch record and standardized lot release criteria and test methods. The primary end point was the achievement of HbA1c transplant. RESULTS The primary end point was successfully met by 87.5% of subjects at 1 year and by 71% at 2 years. The median HbA1c level was 5.6% (38 mmol/mol) at both 1 and 2 years. Hypoglycemia awareness was restored, with highly significant improvements in Clarke and HYPO scores (P > 0.0001). No study-related deaths or disabilities occurred. Five of the enrollees (10.4%) experienced bleeds requiring transfusions (corresponding to 5 of 75 procedures), and two enrollees (4.1%) had infections attributed to immunosuppression. Glomerular filtration rate decreased significantly on immunosuppression, and donor-specific antibodies developed in two patients. CONCLUSIONS Transplanted PHPI provided glycemic control, restoration of hypoglycemia awareness, and protection from SHEs in subjects with intractable IAH and SHEs. Safety events occurred related to the infusion procedure and immunosuppression, including bleeding

  13. Stationary Treatment Compared with Individualized Chinese Medicine for Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Microvascular Complications: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Jian; Liu, Li-Sha; Jian, Wen-Yuan; Zeng, Jie-Ping; Duan, Jun-Guo; Lu, Xue-Jing; Yin, Shuo

    2018-06-18

    Microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), including diabatic retinopathy (DR), diabetic kidney disease (DKD), diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) are the leading causes of visual loss, end-stage renal disease or amputation, while the current therapies are still unsatisfactory. Chinese medicine (CM) has been widely used for treating diabetic mellitus. However, most of the previous studies focused on the single complication. The role of CM treatment in T2DM patients with 2 or multiple microvascular complications is not clear. To appraise the curative effect of CM in T2DM patients with 2 or multiple microvascular complications, and to compare the effects of stationary treatment and individualized treatment in T2DM patients with microvascular complications. This trial will be an 8-center, randomized, controlled study with 8 parallel groups. A total of 432 patients will be randomized to 8 groups: DR study group (32 cases) and a corresponding control group (32 cases), DR+DKD study group (64 cases) and a corresponding control group (64 cases), DR+DPN study group (64 cases) and a corresponding control group (64 cases), DR+DKD+DPN study group (56 cases) and a corresponding control group (56 cases). The control group will receive stationary treatment, and the study group will receive individualized treatment based on CM syndrome differentiation in addition to stationary treatment. The study duration will be 50 weeks, comprising a 2-week run-in period, 24 weeks of intervention, and 24 weeks of follow-up. The outcomes will assess efficacy of treatment, improvement in CM symptoms, safety assessments, adherence to the treatment, and adverse events. This study will provide evidence of evidence-based medicine for CM treatment in two or multiple microvascular complications caused by T2DM. (Registration No. ChiCTR-IPR-15007072).

  14. Extracts and compounds with anti-diabetic complications and anti-cancer activity from Castanea mollissina Blume (Chinese chestnut).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Gao, Hui-yuan; Baba, Masaki; Okada, Yoshihito; Okuyama, Toru; Wu, Li-jun; Zhan, Li-bin

    2014-10-28

    Castanea mollissima Blume (Chinese chestnut), as a food product is known for its various nutrients and functional values to the human health. The present study was carried out to analyze the anti-diabetic complications and anti-cancer activities of the bioactive compounds present in C. mollissima. The kernels (CK), shells (CS) and involucres (CI) parts of C. Blume were extracted with 90% alcohol. The water suspension of these dried alcohol extracts were extracted using EtOAc and n-BuOH successively. The n-BuOH fraction of CI (CI-B) was isolated by silica gel column, Sephadex LH 20 column and preparative HPLC. The isolated compounds were identified by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HMBC, HMQC and ESI-Q-TOF MS, All the fractions and compounds isolated were evaluated on human recombinant aldose reductase (HR-AR) assay, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation assay and human COLO 320 DM colon cancer cells inhibitory assay. CI-B was found to show a significant inhibitory effect in above biological screenings. Six flavonoids and three polyphenolic acids were obtained from CI-B. They were identified as kaempferol (1), kaempferol-3-O-[6''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), kaempferol-3-O-[6''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-galactopyranoside (3), kaempferol-3-O-[2''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), kaempferol-3-O-[2", 6"-di-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (5) and kaempferol-3-O-[2", 6"-di-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-galactopyranoside (6), casuariin (7), casuarinin (8) and castalagin (9). Compounds 2-9 were found to show higher activity than quercetin (positive control) in the AR assay. Compounds 3-6, 8, and 9 showed stronger inhibitory effects than amino guanidine (positive control) on AGEs production. Compounds 4-6, 7, and 8 showed much higher cytotoxic activity than 5-fluorouracil (positive control) against the human COLO 320 DM colon cancer cells. Our results suggest that flavonoids and polyphenolic acids possesses anti-diabetes complications and anti

  15. The European EUCCLID pilot study on care and complications in an unselected sample of people with type 2 diabetes in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorter, K.J.; Wens, J.; Khunti, K.

    2010-01-01

    indicators, UKPDS-risk engine, psychological and general well-being. RESULTS: We included 103 participants from 22 GPs in 11 countries. Central data and laboratory samples were successfully collected. Of the participants 54% were female, mean age was 66 years and mean duration of diabetes was 9.6 years......BACKGROUND: European studies on quality of diabetes care in an unselected primary care diabetes population are scarce. RESEARCH QUESTION: To test the feasibility of the set-up and logistics of a cross-sectional EUropean study on Care and Complications in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM......) in Primary Care (EUCCLID) in 12 European countries. METHOD: One rural and one urban practice from each country participated. The central coordinating centre randomly selected five patients from each practice. Patient characteristics were assessed including medical history, anthropometric measures, quality...

  16. Poor Vitamin C Status Late in Pregnancy Is Associated with Increased Risk of Complications in Type 1 Diabetic Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Juhl

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C (vitC is essential for normal pregnancy and fetal development and poor vitC status has been related to complications of pregnancy. We have previously shown lower vitC status in diabetic women throughout pregnancy compared to that of non-diabetic controls. Here, we evaluate the relationship between vitC status late in diabetic pregnancy in relation to fetal outcome, complications of pregnancy, diabetic characteristics, and glycemic control based on data of 47 women from the same cohort. We found a significant relationship between the maternal vitC level > or ≤ the 50% percentile of 26.6 μmol/L, respectively, and the umbilical cord blood vitC level (mean (SD: 101.0 μmol/L (16.6 versus 78.5 μmol/L (27.8, p = 0.02; n = 12/16, while no relation to birth weight or Apgar score was observed. Diabetic women with complications of pregnancy had significantly lower vitC levels compared to the women without complications (mean (SD: 24.2 μmol/L (10.6 vs. 34.6 μmol/L (14.4, p = 0.01; n = 19 and 28, respectively and the subgroup of women (about 28% characterized by hypovitaminosis C (<23 μmol/L had an increased relative risk of complications of pregnancy that was 2.4 fold higher than the one found in the group of women with a vitC status above this level (p = 0.02, 95% confidence interval 1.2–4.4. No correlation between diabetic characteristics of the pregnant women and vitC status was observed, while a negative association of maternal vitC with HbA1c at delivery was found at regression analysis (r = −0.39, p < 0.01, n = 46. In conclusion, our results may suggest that hypovitaminosis C in diabetic women is associated with increased risk of complications of pregnancy.

  17. False diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and its complications in Wolfram syndrome--is it the reason for the low number of reported cases of this abnormality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Katarzyna; Stefański, Adam; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Molęda, Piotr; Bryśkiewicz, Marta Ewa; Majkowska, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness), is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome (1/770,000 in the United Kingdom), characterised by juvenile onset of diabetes mellitus, optic nerve atrophy, diabetes insipidus, sensorineural deafness, renal tract and neurological abnormalities, and primary gonadal atrophy. WS is caused mainly by biallelic mutations in the WFS1 gene, which encodes wolframin. Wide tissue distribution of wolframin and many mutations in the wolframin gene resulting in Wolfram syndrome may contribute to different phenotypes and the unusual combinations of clinical features. We describe a female patient with Wolfram syndrome diagnosed at the age of 25, with a previous false diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and misdiagnosed diabetic complications. The patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for two novel mutations in exon 8 of WFS1 gene: a 2-bp deletion AT at nt 1539 leading to a frameshift (Y513fs) and a single-base substitution 1174C > T resulting in a stop codon (Q392X). A detailed analysis of the patient's medical history and a review of the literature suggest that many cases of Wolfram syndrome may remain undiagnosed due to misdiagnosis as type 1 diabetes mellitus and incorrect interpretation of clinical symptoms of neurodegenerative abnormalities, especially in their early stages.

  18. Relationship between insulin resistance and blood lipid and sport in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension%2型糖尿病合并高血压患者胰岛素低抗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丽艳; 杨红玉; 柴国禄; 沈凌元

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between insulin resistance and blood pressure and blood lipid in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Methods The serum concentration of fasting glucose,insulin,lipids and the level of blood pressure were measured in 56 patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hyperten