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Sample records for diabetes clinical pattern

  1. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PATTERN OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA AND ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Vijayrao Rajkondawar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present research was undertaken to study the pattern of dyslipidaemia and varied clinical manifestations of ischaemic heart disease, its risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Diabetes Mellitus (DM has become major public health problem in India. It is not only increasing in morbidity and mortality, but also decreases the quality of life. Also, disease and its complications are causing heavy economic burden for patients suffering from it.1,2 Diabetes is endemic globally with increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. Diabetes is a major cause of mortality, but several studies indicate that it is likely underreported as a cause of death. A recent estimate suggested that diabetes was the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and was responsible for almost 3 million deaths annually (1.7-5.2% of all deaths. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients attending the outpatient department or admitted to medical wards, ICU of tertiary care centre and fulfilling the inclusion criteria were evaluated clinically. A baseline Electrocardiogram (ECG was taken in all cases irrespective of clinical evidence of cardiac involvement. Patients with normal ECG pattern were further evaluated by Treadmill Testing (TMT or stress test for subclinical cardiac involvement. Risk factor evaluation was done in all cases. RESULTS Prevalence of IHD was found to be 41% with a male predominance (1.067:1. Evaluation of risk factors has shown its strong association with IHD. Incidence of IHD was high when low HDL (P 25 had negatively significant association with IHD in type 2 diabetics (P=0.072. Smoking was not statistically associated (P=0.577 and in male alcoholics, IHD had positive association with alcohol (P=0.193. CONCLUSION The current study points out that there exists an increased incidence of ischaemic heart disease in diabetics with few, but not all risk factors contributing to it. Early detection, optimal glycaemic

  2. Observation of clinical efficacy of pattern scan laser photocoagulation on diabetic retinopathy

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    Zhi-Hua Peng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of pattern scan laser photocoagulation(Pascalon proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS: A total of 93 patients with retinopathy(186 eyeswere randomly divided into treatment group(96 eyes of 48 patientswho treated with panretinal photocoagulation(PRPusing Pascal at one time and control group(90 eyes of 45 patientswho treated with PRP using multi-wavelength krypton laser in 4-5 times. The visual acuity, FFA, OCT, visual field will be evaluated of each patient before and after the treatment.RESULTS: The visual acuity findings were stated as below: the overall effective rate of visual acuity in treatment group is 85.4% while it is 82.2% in control group. The overall effective rate in two groups has no significant difference. The retinal sensitivity has no significant decrease in the treatment group while which decreased significantly in the control group.CONCLUSION: The clinical efficacy of Pascal on treating the PDR is better than which of the regular argon laser. The field of vision has no significant narrowed after the Pascal treatment which can efficiently shorten the length of treatment and reduce the pain sensation.

  3. The Effects of 6 Isocaloric Meals Pattern on Blood Lipid Profile, Glucose, Hemoglobin A1c, Insulin and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Moosa Salehi; Asma Kazemi; Jafar Hasan Zadeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present clinical trial study aims at investigating the effect of daily energy intake in 6 isocaloric meals in comparison with the current meal pattern (3 meals and 2 small snacks per day) on type 2 diabetes risk markers in diabetes during 3-month period. Methods: Eighty four type 2 diabetes patients were randomly divided into 6 isocaloric meal diet or a balanced diet (3 meals and 2 snacks previous meal pattern). The planned reduced calorie diets for both groups were identi...

  4. The clinical pattern of diabetes Insipidus in a large university hospital in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir M I; Al Jurayyan, Nasir A M; Al Jurayyan, Rushaid N A; Al Gadi, Iman; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare but serious endocrine disorder. Paediatric patients were evaluated for polyuria at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over a decade (2000-13). Relevant clinical examination and/or a triad of high serum osmolality, hypernatremia and low urine osmolality due to increased urine output confirmed the diagnosis. Water deprivation test was required in some cases with non-classic presentations. Appropriate brain imaging was performed whenever central diabetes insipidus (CDI) was suspected. Twenty-eight patients, 15 males (53.6%) and 13 females (46.4%), aged 0-17 years (mean: 6 years) were included. The calculated period prevalence was 7 in 10,000. In our cohort, 60.7% (17 of 28 patients) had CDI, 21.4% (6 of 28) were diagnosed with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and 17.9% (5 of 30) had psychogenic polydipsia. CDI was due to variable aetiology. Though CDI was the commonest, NDI was not a rare encounter in our community, possibly because of high consanguineous marriages. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

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    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  6. Clinical observation of one time short-pulse pattern scan laser pan-retinal photocoagulation for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

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    Xin Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the clinical efficacy and benefit of short-pulse pattern scan laser(PASCALphotocoagulation for proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS:Twenty-eight PDR patients(42 eyesunderwent short-pulse PASCAL pan-retinal photocoagulation(PRPwere analyzed.The best corrected visual acuity was ≥0.1 in 36 eyes, RESULTS: All the cases had no pain during the short-pulse PASCAL treatment.One year after treatments,the final visual acuity was improved in 6 eyes,kept stable in 28 eyes and decreased in 8 eyes; neovascularization were regressed in 18 eyes(43%, stable in 12 eyes(29%, uncontrolled in 12 eyes(29%. Five eyes(12%received vitrectomy due to vitreous hemorrhage.Compared with before operation, retina thickness in central fovea of macula and visual field had no obvious change after one-time PASCAL PRP(P>0.05. CONCLUSION:The one-time short-pulse PASCAL PRP could stabilize the progress of PDR safely, effectively and simply.

  7. The Effects of 6 Isocaloric Meals Pattern on Blood Lipid Profile, Glucose, Hemoglobin A1c, Insulin and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Salehi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present clinical trial study aims at investigating the effect of daily energy intake in 6 isocaloric meals in comparison with the current meal pattern (3 meals and 2 small snacks per day on type 2 diabetes risk markers in diabetes during 3-month period. Methods: Eighty four type 2 diabetes patients were randomly divided into 6 isocaloric meal diet or a balanced diet (3 meals and 2 snacks previous meal pattern. The planned reduced calorie diets for both groups were identical except for the meal pattern. Blood samples were analyzed before and after the investigation for fasting blood sugar (FBS, two-hour post-prandial glucose (2hPP, insulin, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-C, LDL-C, and molondialdehyde (MDA concentrations. Results: HbA1c (P=0.00 and body mass index (BMI (P=0.04 values decreased significantly in the 6 isocaloric meal pattern compared with the controls. There were no significant differences in fasting serum glucose (P=0.09, insulin (P=0.65, total cholesterol (P=0.32, LDL-C (P=0.43, HDL-C (P=0.40 cholesterol, triglyceride (P=0.40, MDA (P=0.13 and 2hPP serum glucose (P=0.30 concentrations between the 6 isocaloric meal and tradition meal pattern. Conclusion: Six isocaloric meal pattern in comparison with the current meal pattern led to weight loss and improved glycemic control. Serum lipid profile and MDA did not change significantly. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201205179780N1

  8. Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria | Lawan | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria. ... Background: The aim of the study is to determine the pattern of retinopathy seen in diabetic patients attending the outpatient clinic in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, ... A screening program needs to be developed to facilitate early detection and prompt treatment.

  9. Clinical Diabetes Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this series for medical professionals, specialists from pharmacy, podiatry, optometry, and dental professions discuss preventing diabetes complications and working as part of the diabetes care team.

  10. DERMATOGLYPHIC PATTERNS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... COMMENTARY. DERMATOGLYPHIC PATTERNS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES. MELLITUS ... contributions in diabetes mellitus and in various medical disorders. Hence dermatoglyphic .... female cases. These findings are similar to ...

  11. The role of genealogy and clinical family histories in documenting possible inheritance patterns for diabetes mellitus in the pre-insulin era: part 1. The clinical case of Josephine Imperato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H

    2009-10-01

    Establishing the role of heredity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) is challenging. While type 2 DM frequently displays a pattern of familial aggregation, many other risk factors are responsible for the clinical expression of the disease. This paper reviews a number of the early twentieth-century studies of inheritance patterns for type 2 DM and presents in detail the history of Josephine Foniciello Imperato (Maria Giuseppa Foniciello) who died from the disease in New York City at the age of 52 years on 14 November 1921, ten months before commercial insulin became available.

  12. Alcohol drinking patterns and risk of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Charlotte; Becker, Ulrik; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Alcohol consumption is inversely associated with diabetes, but little is known about the role of drinking patterns. We examined the association between alcohol drinking patterns and diabetes risk in men and women from the general Danish population. METHODS: This cohort study...... was based on data from the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008. Of the 76,484 survey participants, 28,704 men and 41,847 women were eligible for this study. Participants were followed for a median of 4.9 years. Self-reported questionnaires were used to obtain information on alcohol drinking patterns......, i.e. frequency of alcohol drinking, frequency of binge drinking, and consumption of wine, beer and spirits, from which we calculated beverage-specific and overall average weekly alcohol intake. Information on incident cases of diabetes was obtained from the Danish National Diabetes Register. Cox...

  13. Diabetes Nutrition Therapy: Effectiveness, Macronutrients, Eating Patterns and Weight Management.

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    Franz, Marion J

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes nutrition therapy provided for individuals with diabetes must be based on research documenting effectiveness. The roles of differing macronutrient percentages, eating patterns and weight loss interventions are controversial. A review of research related to these topics is summarized. Clinical trials as well as systematic reviews and Cochrane reviews report an approximately 1-2% lowering of hemoglobin A1c as well as other beneficial outcomes from nutrition therapy interventions, depending on the type and duration of diabetes and level of glycemic control. There are no ideal percentages of macronutrients or eating patterns or both that apply to all persons with diabetes. Clinical trials demonstrate the effectiveness of modest weight loss and physical activity for the prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes. However, as the disease progresses, weight loss interventions may or may not result in beneficial glycemic and other metabolic outcomes. To be effective, diabetes nutrition therapy must be individualized. Treatment goals, personal preferences (eg, tradition, culture, religion, health beliefs and economics) and the individual׳s ability and willingness to make lifestyle changes all must be considered when educating or counseling individuals with diabetes. A healthy eating pattern emphasizing nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes, regular physical activity and support are important. A reduced energy intake for persons with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes and matching insulin to planned carbohydrate intake for insulin users is nutrition therapy interventions shown to be effective in achieving glycemic and other metabolic outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prescription and Cost Consideration at a Diabetic Clinic in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    SUMMARY. Diabetes mellitus is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The high cost of treatment is a major concern to both physicians and patients. This study assessed pattern and cost of drugs prescribed at a diabetic clinic, and identified the commonest reasons militating against adherence to therapy.The study ...

  15. Audit in a diabetic clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, D F; Williams, C P

    1982-06-01

    Diabetic control was assessed in 82 established insulin-dependent diabetics using a microcapillary system for home preprandial blood glucose sampling. At initial assessment control in the majority (62%) was found to be unsatisfactory (at least 1 preprandial blood glucose greater than 13.0 mmol/l or frequent and severe hypoglycaemia). Sixty-three of these patients were assessed on more than one occasion. Only 24% were satisfactorily controlled at their first assessment, but this proportion had risen to 60% after 12 months. The ability of patients to perform unsupervised blood glucose levels using Ames Glucometers or BM-Glycemie 20-800 test strips was also assessed: 86% of the meter results were within one-third of the laboratory-based results, but there was evidence of bias towards the under-reading of higher glucose values using BM-Glycemie 20-800 test strips. Random blood glucose estimations performed in the diabetic clinic were of little value.

  16. Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pattern of Precipitating Causes

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    Ashraf Uddin Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is one of the most common acute complications of diabetes mellitus (DM. DKA is a recognised presenting feature of type 1 DM, but it commonly complicates previously diagnosed diabetic patients of all types, specially if they get infection or discontinue treatment. Objective: To describe the precipitating causes of DKA. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done from September to November, 2010 in Bangladesh Institute of Research & Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM. Diagnosed DKA cases were evaluated clinically and by laboratory investigations for identification of precipitating causes. Results: Out of 50 patients, 28 were female. Mean age was 38.3 years. Forty patients (80% were known diabetics and 10 (20% were detected diabetic first time during this admission. Severe DKA cases were less common. Infection (20, 40% was the commonest precipitating cause followed by noncompliance (14, 28%. In 7 (14% cases no cause could be identified. Other less common causes included acute myocardial infarction, acute pancreatitis, stroke and surgery. Conclusion: Infection and noncompliance were the major precipitants of DKA. So, it is assumed that many DKA cases might be prevented by proper counselling regarding adherence to medication and sick days’ management.

  17. Controlling type-2 diabetes by inclusion of Cr-enriched yeast bread in the daily dietary pattern: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanni, Amalia E; Stamataki, Nikoleta S; Konstantopoulos, Panagiotis; Stoupaki, Maria; Abeliatis, Athanasios; Nikolakea, Irene; Perrea, Despoina; Karathanos, Vaios T; Tentolouris, Nikolaos

    2018-02-01

    Chromium (Cr)-enriched yeast supplementation to whole wheat bread (WWCrB) has been shown to ameliorate postprandial glycemic response in healthy subjects. The present study investigates the long-term benefit of WWCrB consumption for patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thirty patients with T2DM were randomly assigned to a group receiving WWCrB or the plain whole wheat bread (WWB) group. Plasma glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) and insulin resistance were determined, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at the beginning and the end of the dietary intervention, which lasted for 12 weeks. Biochemical parameters related to the disease, markers of inflammation as well as body weight and energy balance were examined. At the end of the study, subjects of WWCrB group exerted lower levels of glucose, insulin and HbA 1c and improved insulin resistance (P < 0.05 against before treatment). Area under the glucose curve attained during OGTT decreased after the intervention (28,117.5 ± 1266.4 vs. 31,588.5 ± 1187.5 mg min/dL before treatment, P < 0.05) with significantly lower values of glucose concentration at 0 and 60 min. A significant reduction in body weight and systolic blood pressure (SBP) was observed (P < 0.05 against before treatment). Markers of inflammation and lipid profiles were not affected by WWCrB consumption. Inclusion of WWCrB in the daily dietary pattern of diabetic patients resulted in improvement of glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, significant reduction in HbA 1c , weight loss and lower SBP. Patients with inadequate glycemic control may benefit from the consumption of WWCrB.

  18. Gestational diabetes: A clinical update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Ulla; Madsen, Lene Ring; Skajaa, Gitte Oeskov

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in prevalence in tandem with the dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age. Much controversy surrounds the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes, emphasizing the importance and relevance...

  19. Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics

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    Arunpreet Singh Kahlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. Objective : To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. Materials and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Results : Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3% had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came

  20. Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Pathak, Rambha

    2011-07-01

    Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS) is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3%) had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came out to be .311. This correlation was found to be statistically

  1. Clinical study of diabetic dermoangiopathy

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    MPS Sawhney

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty three diabetic patients and 100 non- diabetic controls were examined for lesions of diabetic dermoangiopathy. Twenty two (17.9% lesions, while simildr lesions were found in only 2 (2% controls. Age of the patients with opathy was sipifirandy higher than those derm without dermopathy, and it was more common in the fifth to the seventh decade. No statistically siicant relationship could be established with the sex, type, serverity control or duration of diabetes, diatetic neuropathy, larize vessel disease like CAD, PVD or CVA or with metabolic complications of diabetes. However, a higher percentage (59.1% of patients with dermopathy were found to have a poor control of their diabetes as compared to those without microangiopathy (50.7%. Dermopathy was also more common (23% 9 the duration of diabetes was more than 5 years, than if it was less than 5 years (14.1%. The percentage (33.3% of patients with retinopathy having dermopathy. Rubeosis was seen in 4 (3.2% patients.

  2. Preventing diabetes in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Deborah L; Elliott, Lorrie D; Quinn, Michael T; Plaut, Andrea J; Schwartz, Mindy A; Chin, Marshall H

    2006-01-01

    Translating lessons from clinical trials on the prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes to populations in nonstudy settings remains a challenge. The purpose of this paper is to review, from the perspective of practicing clinicians, available evidence on lifestyle interventions or medication to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. A MEDLINE search identified 4 major diabetes prevention trials using lifestyle changes and 3 using prophylactic medications. We reviewed the study design, key components, and outcomes for each study, focusing on aspects of the interventions potentially adaptable to clinical settings. The lifestyle intervention studies set modest goals for weight loss and physical activity. Individualized counseling helped participants work toward their own goals; behavioral contracting and self-monitoring were key features, and family and social context were emphasized. Study staff made vigorous follow-up efforts for subjects having less success. Actual weight loss by participants was modest; yet, the reduction in diabetes incidence was quite significant. Prophylactic medication also reduced diabetes risk; however, lifestyle changes were more effective and are recommended as first-line strategy. Cost-effectiveness analyses have shown both lifestyle and medication interventions to be beneficial, especially as they might be implemented in practice. Strong evidence exists for the prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle changes. Components of these programs may be adaptable for use in clinical settings. This evidence supports broader implementation and increased reimbursement for provider services related to nutrition and physical activity to forestall morbidity from type 2 diabetes.

  3. Brief communication : Patterns of chronic complications of diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 283 diabetic patients (112 type -1 and the rest Type -2) were followed between September 1996 and July 1997 at the diabetic follow-up clinic of Menelik II Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The subjects were studied for evidence of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. One hundred and six patients (37.45%) ...

  4. Clinical diagnosis of gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Edmond A

    2013-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnosis remains controversial. ACOG criteria are based on the long-term risk of maternal diabetes. ADA recently suggested diagnosing GDM with 1 elevated value on an oral glucose tolerance test based on a 1.75-fold risk of large-for-gestational age infants resulting in a 17.8% rate of GDM. Given the lack of neonatal-based outcomes for the traditional position and problems of reproducibility and benefit/harm balance of the ADA approach, an alternative is presented herein based on a 2-fold risk of a large-for-gestational age baby, requiring 2 separate abnormalities to reduce false positives giving a more balanced benefit/harm ratio (10% GDM rate).

  5. The Pattern and Surgical Management of Diabetic Foot at Muhimbili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at determining the pattern and the surgical management of patients with Diabetic Foot at Muhimbili National Hospital, from March to December 2008. Methods: All in-patients with diabetic foot who were admitted in the hospital during the study period were included into the study. Results: A total of 67 ...

  6. Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.P. Nizhynska-Аstapenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leading criteria for laboratory diagnosis and determination of diabetic ketoacidosis severity are considered to be the levels of glucose, blood pH and blood bicarbonate. Technological capabilities of a family doctor are very limited. Therefore, knowledge of detailed clinical symptoms will help the physician to establish correctly a provisional diagnosis and refer a patient to a specialized institution. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and special features of certain clinical symptoms and basic laboratory parameters in order to establish the severity level of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and to reveal certain correlation between clinical symptoms and laboratory changes in the blood in patients with DKA. Materials and methods. The study involved 123 patients with acute critical decompensated diabetes aged from 9 to 65 years old. We studied the clinical symptoms, measured biochemical changes in blood, blood gas and acid-base state. Results. There was not determined the correlation between severity of diabetic ketoacidosis and clinical parameters and acid-base balance in patients. There were determined the peculiarities electrolyte changes and the emergence gas metabolic changes on the cell level under ketosis, which further deepened with the development of ketoacidosis. The results of the study indicate the need for a comparison of clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters of pathogenic treatment, taking into account the cumulative data. These recommendations in the protocols are often attached to a single laboratory value and can not always fully comply with the severity of the condition. Conclusions. Blood gas is the most sensitive criterion of metabolic changes in case of diabetic ketoacidosis. The level of blood potassium can be used as an indicator of DKA severity. The level of blood potassium at admission to hospital does not really reflect its deficiency in the tissues.

  7. Diabetes Changes Symptoms Cluster Patterns in Persons Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Julie Ann; Bose, Eliezer; Park, Jungmin; Lapiz-Bluhm, M Danet; García, Alexandra A

    Approximately 10-15% of persons living with HIV (PLWH) have a comorbid diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Both of these long-term chronic conditions are associated with high rates of symptom burden. The purpose of our study was to describe symptom patterns for PLWH with DM (PLWH+DM) using a large secondary dataset. The prevalence, burden, and bothersomeness of symptoms reported by patients in routine clinic visits during 2015 were assessed using the 20-item HIV Symptom Index. Principal component analysis was used to identify symptom clusters. Three main clusters were identified: (a) neurological/psychological, (b) gastrointestinal/flu-like, and (c) physical changes. The most prevalent symptoms were fatigue, poor sleep, aches, neuropathy, and sadness. When compared to a previous symptom study with PLWH, symptoms clustered differently in our sample of patients with dual diagnoses of HIV and diabetes. Clinicians should appropriately assess symptoms for their patients' comorbid conditions. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dermatoglyphic patterns in type 2 diabetes mellitus | Sehmi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dermatoglyphics is the study of epidermal ridge patterns on the palm, fingers, sole and toes. They are genetically determined and are useful in diagnosis of various genetic diseases like Diabetes mellitus. There are three types of fingerprint patterns: Arches, loops and whorls. Finger prints of both hands are not same and ...

  9. Clinical survey to detect diabetes mellitus, Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnick, P A; Anderson, Jr, P S

    1961-07-19

    Data from this study are in agreement with the general observations that diabetes is not uncommon in Japan. In an adult study population in Hiroshima 108 patients with diabetes were detected, yielding the prevalence rate of 3.02 percent. Nearly one-half of the patients were diagnosed initially as a result of the routine detection program. Although in females a trend with exposure is suggested by the raw data no statistically significant differences could be demonstrated. However, the size of the sample involved does not permit confident negative conclusions. Additional clinical and laboratory observations were completed in order to characterize the manifestation of diabetes in these subjects. Late manifestations of diabetes frequently were found, but atherosclerotic complications were nonexistent. This is considered to be related to the low fat, high carbohydrate diet of the Japanese. The lack of ketosis, apparently low prevalence rate for juveniles, and male preponderance suggest that diabetes in Japan differs from the disease found in many Western countries. 69 references, 1 figure, 9 tables.

  10. Clinical patterns in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooden, Stephanie Maria van

    2012-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients may reflect the existence of subtypes of the disease. PD subtypes have often been defined by a classification according to researcher-specified criteria, such as age-at-onset or predominant clinical motor features. The general objective

  11. Pattern of thyroid auto immunity in type 1 and type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, T.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the level of thyroid auto immunity among clinically euthyroid patients of type 1 and type 2 diabetics and to correlate the levels with pattern of diabetes. Blood samples were collected from 163 subjects (51 of type 1, 61 of type 2 diabetics and 51 non- diabetic controls) and sera were separated. They were all clinically euthyroid and selected conveniently. Thyroid profile (FT4, TSH and anti- TPO) was assessed in the three groups and compared. It was observed that at a cut off value of less than 100 units of anti-TPO level was normal, raised anti-TPO antibodies were found in 12% of normal control group, 61% in type 1 and 42.3% in type 2 diabetics. In type 1 diabetics, the TSH was higher in the younger age patients with progressive rise in anti-TPO antibodies level by age. The TSH, anti-TPO antibodies and BSF were significantly higher in type 1 diabetics than in the controls. In type 2 diabetics, TSH was moderately low but anti-TPO antibodies and BSF were higher than in the controls (author)

  12. Automatic classification of thermal patterns in diabetic foot based on morphological pattern spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Contreras, D.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; Ramirez-Cortes, J.; Renero-Carrillo, F.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to characterize and identify patterns of temperature in thermographic images of the human foot plant in support of early diagnosis and follow-up of diabetic patients. Composed feature vectors based on 3D morphological pattern spectrum (pecstrum) and relative position, allow the system to quantitatively characterize and discriminate non-diabetic (control) and diabetic (DM) groups. Non-linear classification using neural networks is used for that purpose. A classification rate of 94.33% in average was obtained with the composed feature extraction process proposed in this paper. Performance evaluation and obtained results are presented.

  13. Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic Patients ... Purpose: To examine body mass index (BMI), occupation, sex, age, and ... development of secondary failure in type 2 diabetics receiving metformin and glibenclamide.

  14. Stratification of type 2 diabetes based on routine clinical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safai, Narges; Ali, Ashfaq; Rossing, Peter

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: We hypothesized that patients with dysregulated type 2 diabetes may be stratified based on routine clinical markers. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, diabetes related clinical measures including age at onset, diabetes duration, HbA1c, BMI, HOMA2-β, HOMA2-IR and GAD65...... autoantibodies, were used for sub-grouping patients by K-means clustering and for adjusting. Probability of diabetes complications (95% confidence interval), were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Based on baseline data from patients with type 2 diabetes (n=2,290), the cluster analysis suggested up....... CONCLUSIONS: Patients with type 2 diabetes cluster into clinically relevant sub-groups based on routine clinical markers. The prevalence of diabetes complications seems to be sub-group specific. Our data suggests the need for a tailored strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes....

  15. Treatment Dosing Patterns and Clinical Outcomes for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Starting or Switching to Treatment with Insulin Glargine (300 Units per Milliliter) in a Real-World Setting: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shaloo; Wang, Hongwei; Skolnik, Neil; Tong, Liyue; Liebert, Ryan M; Lee, Lulu K; Stella, Peter; Cali, Anna; Preblick, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    Usage patterns and effectiveness of a longer-acting formulation of insulin glargine at a strength of 300 units per milliliter (Gla-300) have not been studied in real-world clinical practice. This study evaluated differences in dosing and clinical outcomes before and after Gla-300 treatment initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes starting or switching to treatment with Gla-300 to assess whether the benefits observed in clinical trials translate into real-world settings. This was a retrospective observational study using medical record data obtained by physician survey for patients starting treatment with insulin glargine at a strength of 100 units per milliliter (Gla-100) or Gla-300, or switching to treatment with Gla-300 from treatment with another basal insulin (BI). Differences in dosing and clinical outcomes before versus after treatment initiation or switching were examined by generalized linear mixed-effects models. Among insulin-naive patients starting BI treatment, no difference in the final titrated dose was observed in patients starting Gla-300 treatment versus those starting Gla-100 treatment [least-squares (LS) mean 0.43 units per kilogram vs 0.44 units per kilogram; P = 0.77]. Both groups had significant hemoglobin A 1c level reductions (LS mean 1.21 percentage points for Gla-300 and 1.12 percentage points for Gla-100 ; both P per kilogram before switch vs 0.58 units per kilogram after switch; P = 0.02). The mean hemoglobin A 1c level was significantly lower after switching than before switching (adjusted difference - 0.95 percentage points, 95% CI - 1.13 to - 0.78 percentage points ; P per patient-year were significantly lower (relative risk 0.17, 95% CI 0.11-0.26; P < 0.0001). Insulin-naive patients starting Gla-300 treatment had fewer hypoglycemic events, a similar hemoglobin A 1c level reduction, and no difference in insulin dose versus patients starting Gla-100 treatment. Patients switching to Gla-300 treatment from treatment with

  16. The role of genealogy and clinical family histories in documenting possible inheritance patterns for diabetes mellitus in the pre-insulin era: part 2. Genealogic evidence for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Josephine Imperato's paternal and maternal lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H

    2009-12-01

    Part 2 presents detailed genealogic information on Josephine Imperato's paternal and maternal lineages extending from four to seven generations into the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries. Among these lineages are some where early adult death over successive generations is perhaps indicative of type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). These lineages, all in the town of San Prisco in Italy, include both paternal and maternal ones with the following surnames: Casaccia, Casertano, Cipriano, de Angelis, de Paulis, Peccerillo, Foniciello, di Monaco, Vaccarella, Valenziano, Ventriglia, and Zibella. Genealogic studies of eighteenth and nineteenth century vital records in this area of Italy cannot definitively establish type 2 diabetes mellitus as either an immediate or contributory cause of death. This is because causes of death were not recorded and because disease diagnostic capabilities were largely absent. Genealogic studies of those who lived in Italy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries can at best provide data on approximate age at time of death. Early adult death in this era was not uncommon. However, its presence over several successive generations in a lineage raises the possibility of inherited diseases prominent among which is type 2 DM.

  17. Validating EHR clinical models using ontology patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Schulz, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Clinical models are artefacts that specify how information is structured in electronic health records (EHRs). However, the makeup of clinical models is not guided by any formal constraint beyond a semantically vague information model. We address this gap by advocating ontology design patterns as a mechanism that makes the semantics of clinical models explicit. This paper demonstrates how ontology design patterns can validate existing clinical models using SHACL. Based on the Clinical Information Modelling Initiative (CIMI), we show how ontology patterns detect both modeling and terminology binding errors in CIMI models. SHACL, a W3C constraint language for the validation of RDF graphs, builds on the concept of "Shape", a description of data in terms of expected cardinalities, datatypes and other restrictions. SHACL, as opposed to OWL, subscribes to the Closed World Assumption (CWA) and is therefore more suitable for the validation of clinical models. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the approach by manually describing the correspondences between six CIMI clinical models represented in RDF and two SHACL ontology design patterns. Using a Java-based SHACL implementation, we found at least eleven modeling and binding errors within these CIMI models. This demonstrates the usefulness of ontology design patterns not only as a modeling tool but also as a tool for validation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pattern and outcome of diabetic admissions at a federal medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing worldwide, with the major increases expected to occur in developing countries. It has been observed that the pattern of hospital admissions can be used to determine the effectiveness of outpatient care of DM. Objective:This study was aimed to examine ...

  19. Clinical and functional correlates of foot pain in diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Dekker, E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: patients with diabetes mellitus frequently suffer from foot pain. This pain seems to be a neglected area in studies on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical variables associated with foot pain in diabetic patients. In addition, the relationships between foot

  20. Clinical features of diabetes mellitus in Japan as observed in a hospital outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Sunao; Toda, Shintaro; Omori, Yoshiaki; Yamakido, Michio; Blackard, W G

    1963-04-18

    A university diabetes clinic in Japan was characterized by age at examination, age at onset, sex ratio, microangiopathies, atherosclerotic complications, weight, heredity, and diet. The findings in this clinic, along with those from other diabetes clinics in Japan, were compared with studies on Western diabetics. The similarities between the 2 diabetic populations far outnumbered the dissimilarities. However, diabetes mellitus in Japan is distinguished by infrequent occurrence of juvenile diabetes and ketosis, relative lack of atherosclerotic complications, and reversal of the sex ratio. 39 references, 7 tables.

  1. Who is Distressed Applying the Diabetes Related Distress Scale in a Diabetes Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    59 MDW /SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 7APR 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Who is Distressed? Applying the Diabetes -Related Distress...Scale in A Diabetes Clinic presented at/published to American Diabetes Association 2017 Meeting, San Francisco, CA (National Conference), 9-16 June...as a publication/presentation, a new 59 MOW Form 3039 must be submitted for review and approval.) Using the Diabetes -Related Distress Scale in

  2. Familial history of diabetes and clinical characteristics in Greek subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Sotiropoulos, Alexios; Skliros, Eystathios; Kardara, Marina; Kokolaki, Anthi; Apostolou, Ourania; Pappas, Stavros

    2009-04-27

    A lot of studies have showed an excess maternal transmission of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The aim, therefore, of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of familial history of T2D in Greek patients, and to evaluate its potential effect on the patient's metabolic control and the presence of diabetic complications. A total of 1,473 T2D patients were recruited. Those with diabetic mothers, diabetic fathers, diabetic relatives other than parents and no known diabetic relatives, were considered separately. The prevalence of diabetes in the mother, the father and relatives other than parents, was 27.7, 11.0 and 10.7%, respectively. Patients with paternal diabetes had a higher prevalence of hypertension (64.8 vs. 57.1%, P = 0.05) and lower LDL-cholesterol levels (115.12 +/- 39.76 vs. 127.13 +/- 46.53 mg/dl, P = 0.006) than patients with diabetes in the mother. Patients with familial diabetes were significantly younger (P Greek diabetic patients. However, no different influence was found between maternal and paternal diabetes on the clinical characteristics of diabetic patients except for LDL-cholesterol levels and presence of hypertension. The presence of a family history of diabetes resulted to an early onset of the disease to the offspring.

  3. Profile and analysis of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri J.E. Tarigan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus have a significant role in increasing morbidity, mortality, disability, and health cost. In the outpatient setting, the availability of data regarding to the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes is useful for evaluation of prevention, education, and patient’s treatment. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of type 2 diabetes chronic complications in outpatient diabetes clinic.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using 155 patients in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM, Jakarta in 2010. Secondary data were used from medical record based on history taking, physical examination, diabetic foot assessment, laboratory, neurologic, cardiology, opthalmology, ankle brachial index, and electrography of the patients. Characteristic profiles of the subjects, prevalence of the chronic complications, and its association with diabetes risk factors, such as glycemic control using HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes, and LDL cholesterol were analyzed using chi square test.Results: Among 155 subjects participated in the study, most of them were women (59% and elderly (46%. The prevalence of diabetes chronic complications was 69% from all subjects. These chronic complications included microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and mixed complications, with prevalence of 56%, 7% and 27% respectively. Microangiopathy included nephropathy (2%, retinopathy (7%, neuropathy (38% and mixed complications (53%. Macroangiopathy included coronary heart disease (46%, peripheral arterial disease (19%, stroke (18%, and mixed complication (17%. From the analysis, we found significant association between duration of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy (p = 0.003.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, mainly dominated by microvascular-related complications including nephropathy, retinopathy

  4. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS......: This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. RESULTS: The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two...... and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy: Clinical Findings and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Murray McGavin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic abnormality in which there is a failure to utilise glucose and hence a state of hyperglycaemia can occur. If hyperglycaemia continues uncontrolled over time, it will lead to significant and widespread pathological changes, including involvement of the retina, brain and kidney.In industrialised countries, approximately 1% of the population is diabetic, and at least another 1% are undiagnosed diabetics. Insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM, accounts for approximately 10-15% of cases, the remainder being maturity onset or non-insulin dependent diabetics (NIDDM. Diabetes mellitus is an international public health problem with estimated prevalences ranging from 2.0% to 11.7% in studied populations across the world.

  6. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS...... for offloading (83%). All centres use some form of a multidisciplinary team, with the most common permanent members being orthopaedic surgeons (71%), wound specialist nurses (76%), podiatrists (65%), endocrinologists (47%) and diabetes specialist nurses (41%). CONCLUSION: We conducted a survey of the diagnosis...

  7. Liver enzymes in diabetic and non diabetic subjects with clinically diagnosed hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan Chandra Sarkar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of liver disease and raised liver enzymes is common in diabetic patients and the increasing level of enzymes indicates the severity of hepatic injury. Very few studies have addressed this issue in Bangladesh though Bangladeshi population is very much susceptible to diabetes. This study investigated a total of 1400 diabetic patients and 100 non diabetic individuals to compare the level of liver enzymes between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. The comparisons were made among subjects who were referred to the department of Gastro-hepato-pancreatic diseases (GHPD of BIRDEM with the clinical diagnosis of chronic hepatitis and other gastro-intestinal disorders. The investigations included alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and bilirubin levels. The subjects were categorized with and without hepatitis based on these investigations. The biochemical markers (ALT, AST, ALP, bilirubin did not differ significantly between non-diabetic male and female subjects. Neither the differences were significant between diabetic males and females though the diabetic patients had higher level of markers. In contrast, when compared between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects there were striking differences in either sex. Compared with the non-diabetic the diabetic subjects had significantly higher level of ALT (48.3 vs. 277.0, AST (42.0 vs. 213.0 and ALP (148 vs. 302 in males (p<0.005 for all. Similarly, these values were found significantly higher in diabetic females than their non-diabetic counterparts (p<0.01. For bilirubin, it was also found significant in males (p<0.001. The study revealed that the liver enzymes were found elevated in both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects who were referred with clinically diagnosed hepatitis. The enzymes were found markedly elevated among the diabetic than non diabetic patients, which indicate hepatic injury was more marked among the diabetic patients. Further

  8. Do diabetes-specialty clinics differ in management approach and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate management approach and outcome in two endocrinologist-managed clinics using data on treatment adherence, diabetes specific parameters, prescribed medications and self-management practices among ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients. Opinion on cause(s) and perceived fear about ...

  9. Clinical features of diabetes retinopathy in elderly patients with type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective was to estimate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of diabetes retinopathy (DR) in elderly individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Northern Chinese. Materials and Methods: 595 eligible subjects (263 men, 332 women) assisted by the community health service center in Beijing, China ...

  10. Clinical presentation and precipitating factors of diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MoZarD

    among patients admitted to intensive care unit at a tertiary hospital in. Mwanza, Tanzania ... Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), one of the common emergencies in patient with diabetes mellitus is associated with .... Study area and data collection ... None of the patients presented with myocardial infarction, peripheral ...

  11. Development of the Clinic of Endocrinology, diabetes and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubeska Stratrova, S

    2013-01-01

    The Clinic of Endocrinology, diabetes and metabolic disorders was founded in 1975 by Prof d-r Alexandar Plashevski. Healthcare, educational and scientific activities in the Clinic of Endocrinology are performed in its departments. The Department for hospitalized diabetic and endocrine patients consists of the metabolic and endocrine intensive care unit, the department for diagnosis and treatment of diabetics and endocrine patients, day hospital, the department for education of diabetic patients, and the national center for insulin pump therapy. The Center for Diabetes was established in 1972 by Prof d-r Dimitar Arsov. In 1975, Prof d-r Alexandar Plasheski broadened the activities of the Center for Diabetes. It was dislocated in 1980, with new accommodation outside the clinic. Since then the Center has consisted of several organized units: two specialist outpatient clinics for diabetic patients, biochemical and endocrine laboratory, sub-departments for: diabetic foot, cardiovascular diagnosis, ophthalmology, and urgent interventions. The Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Disorders for outclinic endocrine patients was established in 1980, and it integrates the following sub-departments: thyrology, andrology, reproductive endocrinology, obesity and lipid disorders and sub-department for osteoporosis. The educational staff of the Clinic of Endocrinology organizes theoretical and practical education about Clinical Investigation and Internal Medicine with credit transfer system course of study of the Medical Faculty, Faculty of Stomatology, postgraduate studies, specializations and sub-specializations. Symposiums, 3 congresses, schools for diabetes and osteoporosis and continuous medical education were also organized. The Clinic of Endocrinology was initiator, organizer, founder and the seat of several medical associations.

  12. Familial history of diabetes and clinical characteristics in Greek subjects with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolou Ourania

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lot of studies have showed an excess maternal transmission of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The aim, therefore, of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of familial history of T2D in Greek patients, and to evaluate its potential effect on the patient's metabolic control and the presence of diabetic complications. Methods A total of 1,473 T2D patients were recruited. Those with diabetic mothers, diabetic fathers, diabetic relatives other than parents and no known diabetic relatives, were considered separately. Results The prevalence of diabetes in the mother, the father and relatives other than parents, was 27.7, 11.0 and 10.7%, respectively. Patients with paternal diabetes had a higher prevalence of hypertension (64.8 vs. 57.1%, P = 0.05 and lower LDL-cholesterol levels (115.12 ± 39.76 vs. 127.13 ± 46.53 mg/dl, P = 0.006 than patients with diabetes in the mother. Patients with familial diabetes were significantly younger (P 2, P = 0.08, higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (49.8 vs. 44.6%, P = 0.06 and retinopathy (17.9 vs. 14.5%, P = 0.08 compared with patients with no diabetic relatives. No difference in the degree of metabolic control and the prevalence of chronic complications were observed. Conclusion The present study showed an excess maternal transmission of T2D in a sample of Greek diabetic patients. However, no different influence was found between maternal and paternal diabetes on the clinical characteristics of diabetic patients except for LDL-cholesterol levels and presence of hypertension. The presence of a family history of diabetes resulted to an early onset of the disease to the offspring.

  13. Eating Patterns and Health Outcomes in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar Sarmento, Roberta; Peçanha Antonio, Juliana; Lamas de Miranda, Ingrid; Bellicanta Nicoletto, Bruna; Carnevale de Almeida, Jussara

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between eating patterns and therapeutic target's achieving in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, patients underwent clinical, laboratory, and nutritional evaluations. Dietary intake was assessed by a quantitative food frequency questionnaire and eating patterns identified by cluster analysis. The therapeutic targets were as follows: blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, 40 mg/dL for men and >50 mg/dL for women; LDL-cholesterol, studied. We identified two eating patterns: "unhealthy" (n = 100)-high consumption of refined carbohydrates, ultra-processed foods, sweets and desserts ( P fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and LDL-cholesterol than the unhealthy group. Poisson regression confirmed the association of healthy eating pattern with attaining the therapeutic target for fasting plasma glucose [PR, 1.59 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.34); P = 0.018], HbA1c [PR, 2.09 (95% CI, 1.17 to 3.74); P = 0.013], and LDL-cholesterol [PR, 1.37 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.86); P = 0.042]. A healthy eating pattern, including the frequent intake of whole carbohydrates, dairy, white meat, fish, fruits, and vegetables, is associated with reduced fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and LDL cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Diabetic mastopathy - clinical and mammographic findings | Movson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dependent diabetics. The condition simulates breast cancer and is often poorly recognised. One of the main reasons for reporting this well-described entity is to make radiologists and surgeons more aware of this condition, thereby reducing ...

  15. Clinical application of urodilatin in Type 2 diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yihua; Cao Xingjian; Chen Yuxiang; Zhang Kexia; Jin Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of urodilatin (URO) in tubular injury of DM2. Methods: 41 healthy controls, 33 type 2 diabetics without nephropathy, 37 patients with early stage of diabetic nephropathy and 26 patients with clinical diabetic nephropathy were enrolled in the study and categorized into four groups. Urodilatin was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The changes of urodilatin levels among four groups were analyzed, and correlation analyses were performed between urodilatin and urinary micro-albumin/urine creatinine(mA/UCr). The efficiency index of URO were evaluated by receiver operation characteristic (ROC). Results: Compared with those in the controls,diabetics without nephropathy, early stage of diabetic nephropathy and clinical diabetic nephropathy, the urodilatin level decreased significantly in the course of diabetic nephropathy (P<0.001). The value of URO was significantly correlated with mA/UCr (r=-0.626, P<0.01). In early phase of DM2, The area under curve was 0.759. When the cut-off vaule of URO was ≤51.5 pg/ml, The sensitivity and specificity were 67.14% and 70.29%, respectively. Furthermore, Urodilatin had similar diagnosis efficiency with mA/UCr. Conclusion: The decrease of urodilatin level had clinical value in pristine tubular injury of DM2 and can serve as an evaluation parameter. (authors)

  16. Diabetes treatment patterns and goal achievement in primary diabetes care (DiaRegis - study protocol and patient characteristics at baseline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeg Evelin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk for disease and treatment related complications after the initial approach of oral mono/dual antidiabetic therapy has failed. Data from clinical practice with respect to this patient group are however scarce. Therefore we set up a registry in primary care documenting the course and outcomes of this patient group. Methods Diabetes Treatment Patterns and Goal Achievement in Primary Diabetes Care (DiaRegis is a prospective, observational, German, multicenter registry including patients with type-2 diabetes in which oral mono/dual antidiabetic therapy has failed. Data were recorded at baseline and will be prospectively documented during visits at 6 ± 1, 12 ± 2 and 24 ± 2 months. The primary objective is to estimate the proportion of patients with at least 1 episode of severe hypoglycemia within one year. Results 313 primary care offices included 4,048 patients between June 2009 and March 2010 of which 3,810 patients fulfilled the in- and exclusion criteria. 46.7% of patients were female; patients had a median diabetes duration of 5.5 years and most were obese with respect to BMI or waist circumference. HbA1c at baseline was 7.4%, fasting plasma glucose 142 mg/dl and postprandial glucose 185 mg/dl. Co-morbidity in this patient population was substantial with 17.9% having coronary artery disease, 14.4% peripheral neuropathy, 9.9% heart failure and 6.0% peripheral arterial disease. 68.6% of patients received oral monotherapy, 31.4% dual oral combination therapy. The most frequent antidiabetic agent used as monotherapy was metformin (79.0% followed by sulfonylureas (14.8%. Conclusions DiaRegis is a large, prospective registry in primary diabetes care to document the course and outcomes of patients with type-2 diabetes in which the initial approach of oral mono/dual antidiabetic therapy has failed. The two year follow-up will allow for a prospective evaluation of these patients

  17. Mortality patterns among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-15

    Jan 15, 2010 ... Keywords: causes of death; longevity; type 2 diabetes; Nigeria. Introduction. The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) has continued ... accounted for the majority of deaths from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

  18. Migraine: Clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a common disorder which has psychiatric sequelae. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity of migraine. Materials and Methods: 100 cases of migraine seen over a period of one year were analysed to know the sociodemographic characteristics, clinical pattern and psychiatric morbidity. Results: Maximum patients were between 31-40 years of age group (40%, females (78.0%, married (76% and housewives (56.0%. Family history of migraine was present in 12% cases. Average age of onset was 22 years. Unilateral and throbbing type of headache was most common. The commonest frequency was one to two per week. Migraine without aura was commonest sub-type (80%. Generalized anxiety disorder (F41.1 was the most common psychiatric disorder (34%, followed by mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (F41.2 (18% and depressive episode (F32 (14%. In 22% cases, no psychiatric disorder could be elicited. Conclusion: The present study confirms that majority patients with migraine had psychiatric disorders. This needs timely detection and appropriate intervention to treat and control the migraine effectively.

  19. Diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus – clinical and biochemical differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krdžalić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this retrospective study was to establish differences in clinical picture, biochemical parametres and precipitating factors in patiens with diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A total number of 25 patients was hospitalised in the Intensive Case Unit of the Department for Internal Diseases of the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica in the period of 14 months. Most patients had type 1 diabetes whose ketoacidosis showed symptoms of vomiting, stomachache and it was most often caused by a discontinued application of insulin or an infection. In patients with type 2 diabetes an inadequate regulation of glycemia had been noticed before hospitalisation and diabetic ketoacidosis was manifested by polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia and weight loss. Precipitating factor in most patients with type 2 diabetes was an infection. In addition, a significant number of patients were newly discovered diabetics whose precipitating factor in most cases could not be found and the symptoms of the disease correspond to insulin dependent patients. The observed biochemical parameters did not show statistically significant differences between the groups of patients suffering from different types of diabetes. This study has shown that diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in type 2 diabetes. DKA can be prevented by education of patients, improvement of health care as well as improved communication between patients and doctors of family medicine.

  20. Familial forms of diabetes insipidus: clinical and molecular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babey, Muriel; Kopp, Peter; Robertson, Gary L

    2011-07-05

    Over the past two decades, the genetic and molecular basis of familial forms of diabetes insipidus has been elucidated. Diabetes insipidus is a clinical syndrome characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The most common type of diabetes insipidus is caused by lack of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (vasopressin), which is produced in the hypothalamus and secreted by the neurohypophysis. This type of diabetes insipidus is referred to here as neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. The syndrome can also result from resistance to the antidiuretic effects of vasopressin on the kidney, either at the level of the vasopressin 2 receptor or the aquaporin 2 water channel (which mediates the re-absorption of water from urine), and is referred to as renal or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Differentiation between these two types of diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia can be difficult owing to the existence of partial as well as complete forms of vasopressin deficiency or resistance. Seven different familial forms of diabetes insipidus are known to exist. The clinical presentation, genetic basis and cellular mechanisms responsible for them vary considerably. This information has led to improved methods of differential diagnosis and could provide the basis of new forms of therapy.

  1. Dietary patterns and the risk of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Florianne; Beulens, Joline W. J.; van der A, Daphne L.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte

    Although overweight is an important determinant of diabetes risk, it remains unclear whether food choices can still influence the risk for type 2 diabetes in overweight persons. In this paper, we aim to clarify the role of dietary patterns in the development of type 2 diabetes in overweight and

  2. Tobacco and diabetes: clinical relevance and approach to smoking cessation in diabetic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Zubizarreta, Marco; Hernández Mezquita, Miguel Ángel; Miralles García, José Manuel; Barrueco Ferrero, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Smoking is, together with diabetes mellitus, one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Diabetic patients have unique features and characteristics, some of which are not well known, that cause smoking to aggravate the effects of diabetes and impose difficulties in the smoking cessation process, for which a specificand more intensive approach with stricter controls is required. This review details all aspects with a known influence on the interaction between smoking and diabetes, both as regards the increased risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications of diabetes and the factors with an impact on the results of smoking cessation programs. The treatment guidelines for these smokers, including the algorithms and drug treatment patterns which have proved most useful based on scientific evidence, are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetes Is Associated with Worse Clinical Presentation in Tuberculosis Patients from Brazil: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gil-Santana

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM worldwide, especially in developing countries, and the persistence of tuberculosis (TB as a major public health issue in these same regions, emphasize the importance of investigating this association. Here, we compared the clinical profile and disease outcomes of TB patients with or without coincident DM in a TB reference center in Brazil.We performed a retrospective analysis of a TB patient cohort (treatment naïve of 408 individuals recruited at a TB primary care center in Brazil between 2004 and 2010. Data on diagnosis of TB and DM were used to define the groups. The study groups were compared with regard to TB disease presentation at diagnosis as well as to clinical outcomes such as cure and mortality rates upon anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT initiation. A composite score utilizing clinical, radiological and microbiological parameters was used to compare TB severity between the groups.DM patients were older than non-diabetic TB patients. In addition, diabetic individuals more frequently presented with cough, night sweats, hemoptysis and malaise than those without DM. The overall pattern of lung lesions assessed by chest radiographic examination was similar between the groups. Compared to non-diabetic patients, those with TB-diabetes exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli in sputum samples more frequently at diagnosis and at 30 days after ATT initiation. Notably, higher values of the TB severity score were significantly associated with TB-diabetes comorbidity after adjustment for confounding factors. Moreover, during ATT, diabetic patients required more frequent transfers to TB reference hospitals for complex clinical management. Nevertheless, overall mortality and cure rates were indistinguishable between the study groups.These findings reinforce the idea that diabetes negatively impacts pulmonary TB severity. Our study argues for the systematic screening for DM in TB reference centers in endemic

  4. Mixed Influence of Electronic Health Record Implementation on Diabetes Order Patterns for Michigan Medicaid Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corser, William; Yuan, Sha

    2015-08-20

    These 2011-2013 analyses examined the authors' hypothesis that relative diabetes care order changes would be measured after electronic health record (EHR) implementation for 291 Medicaid adults who received all of their office-based care at one midwestern federally qualified health center (FQHC) over a 24-month period (n = 2727 encounters, 2489 claims). Beneficiary sociodemographic, clinical, and claims data were validated with clinic EHR and state Medicaid claims linked to providers' national identifier numbers. Overall pre-post order rate comparisons, and a series of controlled within group binary logistic models were conducted under penalized maximum likelihood estimation terms. After EHR implementation, both the overall order rates and odds ratios of per beneficiary hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) orders increased significantly (ie, from mean of 0.65 [SD = 1.19] annual tests to 0.96 tests [SD = 1.24] [P order rates of dilated eye exams and microalbumin urine tests appeared fairly stable, the odds of eye exam orders being placed at the claims level decreased significantly (OR = 0.774, P = .0030). These mixed results provide evidence of the varied diabetes care ordering patterns likely seen from increased office use of EHR technologies. The authors attempt to explain these post-EHR differences (or lack of) that generally resemble some of the authors' results from another funded project. Ideally, these findings provide Medicaid and health care officials with a more realistic indication of how EHRs may, or may not, influence diabetes care ordering patterns for vulnerable lower-income primary health care consumers. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  5. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS IN CHILDREN- CLINICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME

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    Bindu Krishnan Padma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening condition, which accounts for the majority of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Early diagnosis and prompt management substantially reduces the mortality. The aim of the study is to assess the clinical characteristics and early outcome in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a descriptive study done in a tertiary care hospital. Fifty two episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis in children of age ≤12 years admitted during the period 2011 to 2016 were included in the study. Clinical details, investigations and complications were recorded in a pro forma and data was analysed using statistical tests. RESULTS Fifty two episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis were included in the study. Thirty three (63.5% children presented with DKA at first diagnosis of diabetes, whereas 19 (36.5% were DKA among children with established diabetes. Mean age at presentation was 9.048 ± 3.24. Female-to-male ratio was (1.36:1. The mean duration of onset of symptom before hospitalisation was 10.10 ± 9.52. Most commonly observed presenting symptoms were polyuria (63.46%, polydipsia (65.38%, tiredness (61.54%, vomiting (36.54% and pain abdomen (32.69%. Mild DKA occurred frequently than moderate and severe forms. Among these children, 40.4% had infection as the predisposing factor. Demographic variables like age, gender, socioeconomic status, family history of diabetes did not have any significant association with the severity of DKA. The clinical parameters like tachypnoea, Kussmaul breathing, shock, altered sensorium at presentation and dehydration had significant association with the severity of DKA. Similarly, hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia, hyponatraemia, acute kidney injury and cerebral oedema had significant association with the severity of DKA. All the patients recovered with therapy. No mortality was reported. CONCLUSION Diabetic

  6. Evaluation of diabetes care management in primary clinics based on the guidelines of American Diabetes Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrak, Ahmed Ismail; Mohammed, Rafiuddin; Assery, Bushra; Allam, Dalya; Morit, Sarah Al; Saleh, Reem Al; Zare'a, Reem

    2018-01-01

    There is a rapid increase in the incidence of diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia. Diabetes management is an essential constituent to prevent prognosis of diabetes complications. The main objective of this study was to assess diabetes care in primary clinics based on the guidelines of American Diabetes Association (ADA). A retrospective study at King Khaled University Hospitals, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 200 patients were randomly selected from the databases of primary care clinics. An evaluation checklist was created based on the ADA treatment guidelines such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory evaluation, and referrals. The result showed that elements achieving the ADA targets for overall care were medical history (44.9%), physical examination (59.6%), laboratory evaluation (36.3%), and referrals (19.3%). The other subelement indicators such as referral to diabetes self-management education clinics (10%), dental examination (2%), HbA1c regular monitoring (33.5%), and blood pressure determination (100%) were documented with adherence to ADA standards. Diabetes management standards are an essential element in the success of the management plan. Most of the elements examined are not in full compliance with the ADA standard. Continues monitoring and self-review are recommended.

  7. Clinical outcomes in hypertensive or diabetes patients who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of complementary medicines in addition to medical prescription by patients with hypertension, diabetes and other chronic diseases presents a challenge for healthcare providers in Nigeria and globally. There is very little data on the clinical outcomes in these patients. Objectives: To evaluate clinical ...

  8. Nosocomial Legionnaires’ Disease: Clinical and Radiographic Patterns

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    Thomas J Marrie

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1981 to 1991, 55 patients (33 males, 22 females, mean age 58.6 years with nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease were studied. The mortality rate was 64%. One-half of the patients developed nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease within three weeks of admission. A surprising clinical feature was the low rate of findings of consolidation on physical examination, despite the fact that 52% of patients had this finding on chest radiograph. More than one-half of patients had pre-existing lung disease, rendering a radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila impossible in 16% of cases despite microbiological confirmation. Nineteen per cent of patients who had blood cultures done had a pathogen other than L pneumophila isolated, suggesting dual infection in at least some of the patients. When the clinical and radiographic findings were combined it was noted that 40% of patients had one of three patterns suggestive of nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease: rapidly progressive pneumonia, lobar opacity and multiple peripheral opacities. However, in 60% of patients there were no distinctive features.

  9. Clinical diagnosis of diabetic polyneuropathy with the diabetic neuropathy symptom and diabetic neuropathy examination scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Lefrandt, J.D.; Links, T.P.; Smit, J.A.; Stewart, R.E.; van der Hoeven, J.H.; Hoogenberg, K.

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the discriminative power of the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) and Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE) scores for diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), as well as their relation with cardiovascular autonomic function testing (cAFT) and electro-diagnostic studies

  10. Pulmonary hydatidosis patterns and clinical outcomes

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    Shadi Hamouri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Pulmonary hydatidosis remains a significant health problem in endemic areas. The clinical patterns and presentation vary according to the size, number, location and integrity of the cyst. Aims The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the pattern and outcomes of patients diagnosed with pulmonary hydatidosis treated surgically in a tertiary hospital in northern Jordan. Methods A retrospective review of patients with pulmonary hydatidosis between December 2009 and December 2017 were performed. Data regarding demographic features, clinical presentation, serology testing, clinical outcomes and duration of medical treatment after surgery were obtained. Chest X-Ray and computerized tomography as well as liver ultrasound were the main methods of diagnosis. Parenchyma preserving excisions of the laminated membrane with capitonnage of the remaining cavity were performed in all patients. Albendazole was prescribed for 3– 6 months postoperatively. Results Eighty-eight patients were involved. Mean age was 29.5±16.7 years (range 8–75. Females comprised 52 per cent of the patients. The main presenting symptoms were cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Thirty-two (37 per cent patients had rupture of the cyst at the time of the presentation; 15 patients had direct rupture, 10 had communicating rupture and contained rupture was diagnosed in seven patients. Multiple and/or bilateral lesions were encountered in 25/88 (28.5 per cent and 15 (17 per cent patients respectively. Lower lobes were involved in 73.8 per cent of the cases. The mean hospital stay was 6.53±2.83 days. Post-operative morbidities were developed in 12/88 (13 per cent patients with air leak (5 per cent as the most common morbidity. No recurrences or mortalities were reported in the follow up period. Conclusion Parenchyma preserving cyst excision with capitonnage provides a low postoperative morbidity in patients with both intact and complicated pulmonary hydatidosis. To

  11. Best herbs for managing diabetes: a review of clinical studies

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    Ahmad Ghorbani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem which leads to serious complications over time. Experimentally, many herbs have been recommended for treating diabetes. In most cases, however, the recommendations are based on animal studies and limited pieces of evidence exist about their clinical usefulness. This review focused on the herbs, the hypoglycemic actions of which have been supported by three or more clinical studies. The search was done in Google Scholar, Medline and Science Direct databases using the key terms diabetes, plants, herbs, glucose and patients. According to the clinical studies, Aegle marmelos, Allium cepa, Gymnema sylvestre, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum, Nigella sativa, Ocimum sanctum, Panax quinquefolius, Salacia reticulate, Silybum marianum and Trigonella foenum-graecum have shown hypoglycemic and, in some cases, hypolipidemic activities in diabetic patients. Among them, Gymnema sylvestre, Momordica charantia, Silybum marianum and Trigonella foenum-graecum have acquired enough reputation for managing diabetes. Thus, it seems that physicians can rely on these herbs and advise for the patients to improve management of diabetes.

  12. Multicolor pattern scan laser for diabetic retinopathy with cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takao; Hirano; Yasuhiro; Iesato; Toshinori; Murata

    2014-01-01

    · AIM: To evaluate the ability of various laser wavelengths in delivering sufficient burns to the retina in eyes with cataract using a new multicolor pattern scan laser with green(532 nm), yellow(577 nm), and red(647 nm)lasers.·METHODS: The relationship between the Emery-Little(EL) degree of cataract severity and the laser wavelength required to deliver adequate burns was investigated in102 diabetic eyes. Treatment time, total number of laser shots, and intra-operative pain were assessed as well.·RESULTS: All EL-1 grade eyes and 50% of EL-2 eyes were successfully treated with the green laser, while 50%of EL-2 eyes, 96% of EL-3 eyes, and 50% of EL-4 eyes required the yellow laser. The red laser was effective in the remaining 4% of EL-3 and 50% of EL-4 eyes.·CONCLUSION: Longer wavelength lasers are more effective in delivering laser burns through cataract when we use a multicolor pattern scan laser system.

  13. Optical coherence tomography angiography discerns preclinical diabetic retinopathy in eyes of patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan; Yang, Dawei; Huang, Zhongning; Zeng, Yunkao; Wang, Jun; Hu, Yunyan; Zhang, Liang

    2018-05-01

    To investigate changes in retinal vascular plexuses and choriocapillaris in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) without diabetic retinopathy (DR) and healthy controls using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). A total of 71 DM2 and 67 healthy control subjects were included. All subjects underwent OCTA examination (RTVue-XR Avanti; Optovue, Fremont, CA, USA). Average vessel density in superficial capillary plexus (SCP), deep capillary plexus (DCP) and choriocapillaris, parafoveal vessel density in SCP and DCP, FAZ area (mm 2 ) in SCP, microaneurysms and capillary nonperfusion were taken into analysis. Parafoveal vessel density in both SCP and DCP decreased in the eyes without clinical DR compared to normal controls (p Diabetic patients with no signs of DR also had a significant reduction in average vessel density of SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris (p diabetic eyes, and capillary nonperfusion was noted in 18 of 71 diabetic eyes. We demonstrated that OCTA can identify preclinical DR before the manifestation of clinically apparent retinopathy in diabetic eyes. DM2 patients without DR have SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris impairment. Our results suggested that OCTA might be a promising tool for regular screening of diabetic eyes for DR.

  14. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Birhanu AM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anteneh Messele Birhanu,1 Fekadu Mazengia Alemu,2 Tesfaye Demeke Ashenafie,3 Shitaye Alemu Balcha,4 Berihun Assefa Dachew5 1School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, 2Department of Midwifery, 3Department of Nursing, 4Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results: A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI: 11.7–19.2. Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0 and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92 were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other

  15. Emotional disturbances among adult diabetic patients attending a diabetic clinic in a Malaysian general hospital

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    Ali SabriRadeef1, Ramli Musa, NikNurFatnoonBintiNik Ahmad, Ghasak Ghazi Faisal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional disturbances such as depression, anxiety and stress play an important role in the management of diabetes mellitus since their presence can adversely affect glycemic control, quality of life and compliance with medications. Despite this, emotional disturbances are consistently under-diagnosed and under-treated by physicians in general practice. Objectives: This study aims to determine the prevalence and severity of emotional disturbances among diabetic patients Methodology: This is a cross sectional study conducted on a sample of 200 patients with diabetes mellitus attending the diabetic clinic at the Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Pahang state, Malaysia. The prevalence and severity of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms were assessed in those diabetic patients by using the self-rating Bahasa Malaysia version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-42. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress among diabetic patients was 13.5%, 28%, 11% respectively. Most of the patients with emotional disturbances had moderate depression and anxiety symptoms. However, stress symptoms were mild. Although females showed higher prevalence of emotional disturbances, only anxiety was significantly higher than males. Conclusion: Diabetic patients are at risk to develop psychiatric illnesses in the form of depression, anxiety and stress. Anxiety symptoms were more prominent than depression and stress in diabetic patients

  16. Patterns of diabetic complications at Jimma University Specialized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Larger proportion, 189 (62.0%), of patients had type II diabetes and 163 ... of the patient but age had statistically significant association with hypertension, ... were significantly associated with the development of diabetic complications.

  17. Marketplace Clinics Complementing Diabetes Care for Urban Residing American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Robert; Hoye, Robert E; Thron, Raymond W; Kumar, Vibha

    2017-10-01

    For several decades, the Minneapolis American Indian population has experienced limited health care access and threefold diabetes health disparity. As part of an urban health initiative, the marketplace clinics located in nearby CVS, Target, and Supervalu stores committed financial support, providers, certified educators, and pharmacy staff for a community-based diabetes support group. To measure the extent to which collaborating marketplace clinics and the community-based support group expanded diabetes care and provided self-management education for this largely urban Indian neighborhood. A controlled quasi-experimental study and 3-years retrospective analysis of secondary data were used to test whether the Minneapolis marketplace clinics and the community diabetes support group participants (n = 48) had improved diabetes health outcomes relative to the comparison group (n = 87). The marketplace complemented intervention group employed motivational interviewing and the patient activation measure (PAM®) in coaching diabetes self-care and behavioral modification. The federally funded comparison group received only basic self-management education. T tests and effect sizes were used to quantify the difference between the study intervention and comparison groups. Statistical significance was determined for the following outcome variables: A1C ( P < .01), body mass index ( P < .04), and PAM® ( P < .001). Includes strengths, limitations, and future study recommendations. Positive effects of marketplace clinics and community health complementation were found with regard to improved blood glucose control, weight loss, and healthful lifestyle adaptation. Primary care and community health improvements could be realized by incorporating patient activation with diabetes prevention programs for the urban Indian two-thirds majority of the United States 5 million American Indian population.

  18. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  19. The prevalence, patterns and predictors of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a developing country

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    Katulanda Prasad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM has reached epidemic proportions in Sri Lanka. Presently there are studies on the community prevalence of distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN in Sri Lanka. We describe prevalence, patterns and predictors of DPN in patients with DM in Sri Lanka. Data were collected as part of a national study on DM. In new cases DPN was assessed using the Diabetic-Neuropathy-Symptom (DNS score, while in those with established diabetes both DNS and Toronto-Clinical-Scoring-System (TCSS were used. A binary logistic-regression analysis was performed with ‘presence of DPN’ as the dichomatous dependent variable and other independent co-variants. The study included 528 diabetic patients (191-new cases, with a mean age of 55.0 ± 12.4 years and 37.3% were males, while 18% were from urban areas. Prevalence of DPN according to DNS score among all patients, patients with already established diabetes and newly diagnosed patients were 48.1%, 59.1% and 28.8% respectively. Prevalence of DPN in those with established DM as assessed by TCSS was 24% and the majority had mild DPN (16.6%. The remainder of the abstract is based on subjects with established DM. The prevalence of DPN in males and female was 20.0% and 26.4% respectively. The mean age of those with and without DPN was 62.1 ± 10.8 and 55.1 ± 10.8 years respectively (p 

  20. 170 pattern of microbial colonization of the vagina of diabetics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    sensitivity of high vaginal swabs from 60 consecutive non-insulin-dependent diabetics and 20 non-diabetics attending Oluyoro Catholic ... tuberculosis and acute cholecystitis16. The lower genital flora may act .... TABLE I: AGE, FASTING PLASMA GLUCOSE, DURATION OF DIABETES AND MICROBIAL. ISOLATES FROM ...

  1. Presentations and complications of diabetes patients presenting to diabetic clinic of Eastern Nepal

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    Nabin Kumar Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Diabetes mellitus leads to damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs especially eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. The latency of occurence of hyperglycemia and diagnosis may be of long duration. This study was aimed to find out the mode of presetation of diabetes mellitus in diabetic patients attending out patients clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences. Associated complications and comorbid condition present at the time of presenation were also studied. Methods The diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Out Patient Clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences during June 2006 to June 2007 were included in this study.The patients details were collected from the predefined Proforma for diabetes patient from the database. This included demographic data, biochemical parameters and diabetic complications. For the purpose of study a total of 775 patients were randomly selected.The Data collected were entered and analysed using excel and SPSS(version 11.5 Results Out of 775 cases 436 (56.3% were male and 339(43.7% were female. Majority of patients 81.55% (n=632 had osmotic sympmtoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes at the time of presentation to the clinic. Asymptomatic patient constituted 18.45% (n=143. The most common presenting complaints were polyuria (44.58%, followed by polydypsia (39.62% and polyphagia (24.88%. About 54.97% (n=426 had symptoms of complications related to diabetes. Among them most common complication was neurological (39.67%, followed by renal (10.8% metabolic (4.93%, cardiac(4.46%, autonomic neuropathy (4.93% and peripheral vascular disease (3.99%. Conclusion Majority of the patients presenting in our OPD had osmotic symptoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes. Access to diabetes care and lack of awareness of the disease and its complication might had contributed to this. Community awareness, program for early detection and managemnet may help proper diabetes care

  2. Community to clinic navigation to improve diabetes outcomes

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    Nancy E. Schoenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rural residents experience rates of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM that are considerably higher than their urban or suburban counterparts. Two primary modifiable factors, self-management and formal clinical management, have potential to greatly improve diabetes outcomes. “Community to Clinic Navigation to Improve Diabetes Outcomes,” is the first known randomized clinical trial pilot study to test a hybrid model of diabetes self-management education plus clinical navigation among rural residents with T2DM. Forty-one adults with T2DM were recruited from two federally qualified health centers in rural Appalachia from November 2014–January 2015. Community health workers provided navigation, including helping participants understand and implement a diabetes self-management program through six group sessions and, if needed, providing assistance in obtaining clinic visits (contacting providers' offices for appointments, making reminder calls, and facilitating transportation and dependent care. Pre and post-test data were collected on T2DM self-management, physical measures, demographics, psychosocial factors, and feasibility (cost, retention, and satisfaction. Although lacking statistical significance, some outcomes indicate trends in positive directions, including diet, foot care, glucose monitoring, and physical health, including decreased HbA1c and triglyceride levels. Process evaluations revealed high levels of satisfaction and feasibility. Due to the limited intervention dose, modest program expenditures (~$29,950, and a severely affected population most of whom had never received diabetes education, outcomes were not as robust as anticipated. Given high rates of satisfaction and retention, this culturally appropriate small group intervention holds promise for hard to reach rural populations. Modifications should include expanded recruitment venues, sample size, intervention dosage and longer term assessment.

  3. Association between dietary patterns and blood lipid profiles in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Yeon-Sook; Chang, Hak Chul; Moon, Min Kyong; Song, YoonJu

    2011-09-01

    We aimed to explore the associations of dietary patterns with blood lipid profiles and obesity in adults with type 2 diabetes. The data were obtained from the Forth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2008. Adults 30 yr or older, from which had both biochemical and dietary data were obtained. Among them, 680 subjects were defined as having diabetes based on criteria of fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, anti-diabetic treatment, or previously diagnosed diabetes. Dietary data from a 24-hr recall were used to derive dietary patterns by factor analysis. Four dietary patterns by factor analysis were identified: 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol', 'Noodles & Seafood', 'Rice & Vegetables', and 'Korean Healthy' patterns. Serum cholesterol levels in the highest quartile of the 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol' pattern were significantly higher compared with those in the lowest quartile. In addition, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the highest quartile of the 'Korean Healthy' pattern were significantly lower after adjusting for potential confounders. Dietary patterns of adults with diabetes were found to be associated with blood lipid profiles. 'Korean Healthy' pattern including whole grains, legumes, vegetables, and fruits could thus improve lipid profiles among those with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Factors associated with clinical remission in cats with diabetes mellitus

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    Yu-Hsin Lien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disease in cats. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that are associated with clinical remission in diabetic cats, and those that might influence survival time. Medical records of 29 cats with diabetes mellitus were evaluated retrospectively. Data collected from each record included breed, age, and sex, types of diet before and after admission, degree of weight loss, duration of clinical signs before admission, elevation of alanine aminotransferase activity and ketonuria at the time of admission, concurrent pancreatitis or renal failure, glipizide administration, insulin supplement, and survival time. The diet after establishing diagnosis (restriction to non-carbohydrate canned food was the only factor that was significantly associated with achieving clinical remission (P P = 0.004 with clinical remission status and the type of diet after admission (P = 0.04 and negatively associated with the presence of chronic renal failure (P = 0.04. This was the first report of feline diabetes mellitus from Taiwan.

  5. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  6. Patterns and clinical outcomes of lithium treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Patterns and consequences of lithium use’. In chapter 2.1 we studied lithium use patterns in out-patients within the last decade. In line with the increase in alternatives and the Dutch guidelines, we observed an increase in use of atypical antipsychotics and valproic acid and a decrease in use

  7. Diabetic foot complications among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica: prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, T S; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Younger, N O M; Wright-Pascoe, R A; Boyne, M S; McFarlane, S R; Francis, D K; Wilks, R J

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diabetic foot complications among patients at a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica and identify factors associated with foot complications. A stratified random sample of 188 patients were interviewed and examined between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses obtained demographic and clinical data, measured anthropometrics and performedfoot examinations including inspection for amputations, ulcers or infection and assessment of pain, vibration and pressure perception. Participants included 143 women and 45 men (mean age 56years; mean diabetes duration 16 years). The prevalence of amputations was 8.5% (95% CI 4.5, 12.5%) and was higher among men (22.2%) compared to women (4.2%, p foot infections was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. Overall, 12% ofpatients had at least one of these foot complications. Foot complications were more prevalent among men, patients with high blood pressure (BP > or = 130/80 mmHg) or peripheral neuropathy In multivariable logistic regression models, factors associated with foot complications were: neuropathy (OR 9.3 [95% CI 2.8, 30.3]), high BP (OR 7.9 [1.3, 49.7]) and diabetes duration (OR 1.32 [1.02, 1.72]). Approximately one of every eight patients in this specialist clinic had a major foot complication. Associated factors were neuropathy, high blood pressure and longer duration of diabetes.

  8. Dietary Patterns and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a First Nations Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeds, Jacqueline; Mansuri, Sudaba; Mamakeesick, Mary; Harris, Stewart B; Zinman, Bernard; Gittelsohn, Joel; Wolever, Thomas M S; Connelly, Phillip W; Hanley, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a growing concern worldwide, particularly in Indigenous communities, which have undergone a marked nutrition transition characterized by reduced intakes of traditional foods and increased intakes of market foods. Few studies have assessed the relationships between differing dietary patterns and risk for type 2 diabetes in Indigenous communities in Canada. The objective of the study was to characterize dietary patterns using factor analysis (FA) and to relate these patterns to the incidence of type 2 diabetes after 10 years of follow up in a First Nations community in Ontario, Canada. We conducted a prospective analysis of 492 participants in the SLHDP who did not have diabetes at baseline (1993 to 1995) and were followed for 10 years. A food-frequency questionnaire was administered, and FA was used to identify patterns of food consumption. Multivariate logistic regression analyses determined associations of food patterns with incident type 2 diabetes, adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle confounders. At follow up, 86 participants had developed incident type 2 diabetes. FA revealed 3 prominent dietary patterns: Balanced Market Foods, Beef and Processed Foods and Traditional Foods. After adjustment for age, sex, waist circumference, interleukin-6 and adiponectin, the Beef and Processed Foods pattern was associated with increased risk for incident type 2 diabetes (OR=1.38; 95% CI 1.02, 1.86). In contrast, the Balanced Market Foods and Traditional Foods Patterns were not significantly associated with type 2 diabetes. Dietary interventions should encourage reduced consumption of unhealthful market foods, in combination with improvements in local food environments so as to increase access to healthful foods and reduce food insecurity in Indigenous communities. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antinuclear antibodies: clinical significance of fluorescence patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, S.L.; Habermann, F.; Franco, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four patients with 212 sera positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were studied to: 1) determine the immunofluorescent nuclear staining patterns using Burnham's technique and simplified classification; 2) note the specificity of fluorescence patterns among the various connective tissue diseases; 3) study comparatively the fluorescence paterns employing 5 different antigen substrates; 4) correlate ANA titers and fluorescence patterns with renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It was observed: 1) most of the sera gave nonparticulate fluorescent patterns: peripheral, homogeneous, or peripheral-homogeneneous; 2) 55,5% of the patients had LE and most of those sera showed nonparticulate fluorescent patterns; 3) the sera displayed no specificity for any of the following antigen substrates: imprints of human normal spleen, frozen rat liver and kidney sections, frozen mouse kidney sections and perypheral human blood smears; 4) imprints of normal human spleen were the best substrate for accurate identification of fluorescent patterns; 5) sera from SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher ANA titers in relation to patients without renal involvement; both groups of sera gave similar ANA fluorescent patterns. (Author) [pt

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment patterns in U.S. nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarowitz, Barbara; Allen, Carrie; O'Shea, Terrence; Dalal, Mehul R; Haumschild, Mark; DiGenio, Andres

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (diabetes) in nursing home residents (NHRs) is increasing, concurrently with obesity and other comorbid conditions. NHR would benefit greatly from antidiabetic medications that would improve glycemic control and give a lower risk of hypoglycemia but that do not contribute to weight gain in obese individuals. To examine the prescription patterns to NHRs with diabetes, including the use of newer injectable therapies such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. Treatment patterns of diabetes in NHR were analyzed using Minimum Data Set records and prescription claims from the Omnicare Senior Health Outcomes data repository (May 2011-September 2012). The prevalence of diabetes in this population of 229,283 NHRs was 35.4%. Among the 44,665 NHRs with diabetes and prescription claims data, the prevalence of obesity (40.3%) and multiple comorbidities (100%) was high. Approximately 20% of the NHRs with diabetes were aged diabetes that was untreated with medications during the study period. Insulin was the mainstay of treatment (>80%), followed by oral agents (54%). GLP-1 receptor agonist use was low (0.5%) and associated with poor treatment persistence. Considerations other than glycemic control may drive prescribing decisions, contrary to recommendations from the American Diabetes Association, American Medical Directors Association, and European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

  11. pattern of anti diabetic drug prescription at a health facility in jos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Jos Journal of Medicine, Volume 9 No. 1. PATTERN OF ANTI ... diabetic drug prescription at a private health facility in North Central Nigeria. Methodology: this was a ... Figure gender distribution of subjects ( 0 = males 1. = females ). Regimen.

  12. Pattern of diabetes admissions in a Northern Nigerian tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Of the 3,157 patients admitted, 204 (6.46%) were diabetics. ... There were more Type 2 DM 168 (82.4%) than Type 1 DM 36 (17.6%) patients, p< 0.05. ... accident 19(9.3%), DM foot ulcer 15(7.4%), diabetes ketoacidosis 15(7.4%), ...

  13. Clinical diabetes research using data mining: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Baiju R; Lipscombe, Lorraine L

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of the digitization of large amounts of information and the computer power capable of analyzing this volume of information, data mining is increasingly being applied to medical research. Datasets created for administration of the healthcare system provide a wealth of information from different healthcare sectors, and Canadian provinces' single-payer universal healthcare systems mean that data are more comprehensive and complete in this country than in many other jurisdictions. The increasing ability to also link clinical information, such as electronic medical records, laboratory test results and disease registries, has broadened the types of data available for analysis. Data-mining methods have been used in many different areas of diabetes clinical research, including classic epidemiology, effectiveness research, population health and health services research. Although methodologic challenges and privacy concerns remain important barriers to using these techniques, data mining remains a powerful tool for clinical research. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nutritional therapy for the management of diabetic gastroparesis: clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiya A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Amena SadiyaLifestyle Clinic, Rashid Centre for Diabetes and Research, Ministry of Health, Ajman, United Arab EmiratesAbstract: Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP, or slow emptying of the stomach, is a well-established complication of diabetes mellitus and is typically considered to occur in individuals with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical consequences of DGP include induction of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms (early satiety, abdominal distension, reflux, stomach spasm, postprandial nausea, vomiting, alteration in drug absorption, and destabilization of glycemic control (due to mismatched postprandial glycemic and insulin peaks. Effective nutritional management not only helps in alleviating the symptoms, but also in facilitating better glycemic control. Although there have been no evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the nutrition care process of the DGP, the current dietary recommendations are based on expert opinions or observational studies. The dietary management of gastroparesis needs to be tailored according to the severity of malnutrition and kind of upper GI symptom by changing the volume, consistency, frequency, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates in the meal. Small frequent meals, using more liquid calories, reducing high fat or high fiber, consuming bezoar forming foods, and adjusting meal carbohydrates based on medications or insulin helps in improving the upper GI symptoms and glycemic control. Enteral nutrition can be an option for patients who fail to stabilize their weight loss, or for those who cannot gain weight with oral feedings, while total parenteral nutrition is rarely necessary for the patient with gastroparesis.Keywords: diabetic gastroparesis, delayed gastric emptying, diabetes mellitus, bezoar, GI symptoms, glycemic control

  15. Barriers to diabetes education in urban patients: perceptions, patterns, and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Mary K; Cook, Curtiss B; El-Kebbi, Imad; Lyles, Robert H; Dunbar, Virginia G; Panayioto, Rita M; Berkowitz, Kathy J; Boyd, Barbara; Broussard, Sandra; George, Christopher D

    2005-01-01

    This study explored patients' perceptions of barriers to diabetes education among a mostly African American population of adults with diabetes. A survey was conducted among 605 new patients attending an urban outpatient diabetes clinic. The questionnaire gathered information on issues patients believed would adversely affect their ability to learn about diabetes. The type and frequency of education barriers were evaluated, and variables associated with reporting an obstacle were analyzed. Average patient age was 50 years, diabetes duration was 5.6 years, body mass index was 32 kg/m2, and hemoglobin A1C was 9.1%. The majority (56%) were women, 89% were African American, and 95% had type 2 diabetes. Most respondents (96%) had received some prior instruction in diabetes care; however, 53% anticipated future difficulties learning about diabetes. The most commonly cited concerns were poor vision (74%) and reading problems (29%). Patients with a perceived barrier to diabetes education were older (P barrier, and they differed in both employment and educational status (both P education or less were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of having a barrier to diabetes education, whereas having a college education decreased the odds. Higher hemoglobin A1C levels also tended to be associated with a greater chance of reporting an education barrier (P = .05). A substantial number of persons anticipated a barrier to diabetes education. Interventions at multiple levels that address the demographic and socioeconomic obstacles to diabetes education are needed to ensure successful self-management training.

  16. Early diagnosis of sub-clinical stage of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Hui Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the early diagnosis of sub-clinic stage of diabetic retinopathy.METHODS: This was cross sectional study,multifocal retina electroretinogram(mf-ERG, contrast sensitivity(CSand central retinal artery color Doppler examination were recorded from 30 cases(30 eyesmatched control subjects, 35 cases(35 eyeswith type 2 diabetes mellitus(DMwithout diabetic retinopathy(NDRand 38 cases(38 eyeswith non-prolifera tive diabetic retinopathy(NPDR. One-way ANOVA and SNK-q test were used for data analysis.RESULTS: P1 response density of NDR patients were found decrease, N1 implicit time were delayed. Which were related with the degree of retinopathy(PPPP>0.05, The differences between normal group, NDR group and NPDR group were found statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: mf-ERG and CS are sensitive indexes for early evaluation of visual function in patients with diabetes mellitus, with development of the disease, CRA blood flow also appears to decline.

  17. [Incidence and clinical risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Vigo, P; Álvarez-Silvares, E; Alves-Pérez M T; Domínguez-Sánchez, J; González-González, A

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes is considered a variant of diabetes mellitus as they share a common pathophysiological basis: insulin resistance in target and insufficient secretion of it by pancreatic p-cell bodies. Pregnancy is a unique physiological situation provides an opportunity to identify future risk of diabetes mellitus. To determine the long-term incidence of diabetes mellitus in women who have previously been diagnosed with gestational diabetes and identifying clinical risk factors for developing the same. nested case-control cohort study. 671 patients between 1996 and 2009 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes were selected. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was estimated and 2 subgroups were formed: Group A or cases: women who develop diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Group B or control: random sample of 71 women with a history of gestational diabetes in the follow-up period remained normoglycemic. Both groups were studied up to 18 years postpartum. By studying Kaplan Meier survival of the influence of different gestational variables it was obtained in the later development of diabetes mellitus with time parameter and COX models for categorical variables were applied. Significant variables were studied by multivariate Cox analysis. In all analyzes the Hazard ratio was calculated with confidence intervals at 95%. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was 10.3% in patients with a history of gestational diabetes. They were identified as risk factors in the index pregnancy to later development of diabetes mellitus: greater than 35 and younger than 27 years maternal age, BMI greater than 30 kg/m2, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, insulin therapy, poor metabolic control and more than a complicated pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Clinical factors have been identified in the pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes that determine a higher probability of progression to diabetes mellitus in the medium and long term.

  18. A pilot Diabetic Support Service based on family practice attenders: comparison with diabetic clinics in east London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, B J; Claff, H R; Edmonson, M; Evans, S; Harris, B T; Hull, S A; Jones, E J; Mellins, D H; Safir, J G; Taylor, B

    1987-01-01

    A pilot Diabetic Support Service (DSS) based on a computer register was devised for diabetic patients identified within three group practices in an inner city district of London. Of 159 eligible diabetics, 142 were followed over 2 years. Glycosylated haemoglobin (GHb) monitoring and adequacy of clinic reviews were audited. Care achieved by the DSS was compared with conventional Diabetic Clinic (DC) management of a sample of 200 diabetics from the same district. Serial GHb measurements were made on 66.2% of DSS and 44.5% of DC patients: GHb fell significantly only in DSS patients (13.1% to 11.4%). Proportional falls in GHb were comparable in each DSS treatment group (diet alone, oral hypoglycaemic agents, and insulin) and for hospital attenders and non-attenders equally. The planned clinical reviews were achieved in 40.1% of DSS patients entered (29% GP only, 54% of clinic attenders) and in 15% of DC patients (plus 75% fundal and blood pressure examination). The study led to provision of a formal diabetic clinic annual review system, diabetic mini-clinics in two of the three group practices, and the appointment of two Diabetic Liaison Sisters. With administrative simplification the system is to be made available to all diabetics in the District through their GPs during 1986-8.

  19. Resveratrol and diabetes: A critical review of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Ebru; Arslan, Ayşe Kübra Karaboğa; Yerer, Mükerrem Betül; Bishayee, Anupam

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia. The disease results from the defects of insulin secretion and/or action. Resveratrol is a non-flavonoid polyphenol that naturally occurs as phytoalexin. The shell and stem of Vitis vinifera L. (Vitaceae) are the richest source of this compound. In addition to various in vitro and in vivo studies revealing the effectiveness of resveratrol in DM, there are many clinical trials indicating that resveratrol has the potential to benefit in DM patients. The therapeutic action of this compound in relation to diabetes is complex and involves in several beneficial roles. In view of this, clinical studies are necessary to elucidate these roles. In the near future, the use of resveratrol, alone or in combination with current anti-diabetic therapies, might be a conventional approach to effectively manage DM or its complications. This mini-review provides a critical overview of currently available clinical studies examining the effects of resveratrol in DM last decade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of error patterns in clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklis, Roger; Meier, Tim; Barrett, Patricia; Weinhous, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Until very recently, prescription errors and adverse treatment events have rarely been studied or reported systematically in oncology. We wished to understand the spectrum and severity of radiotherapy errors that take place on a day-to-day basis in a high-volume academic practice and to understand the resource needs and quality assurance challenges placed on a department by rapid upswings in contract-based clinical volumes requiring additional operating hours, procedures, and personnel. The goal was to define clinical benchmarks for operating safety and to detect error-prone treatment processes that might function as 'early warning' signs. Methods: A multi-tiered prospective and retrospective system for clinical error detection and classification was developed, with formal analysis of the antecedents and consequences of all deviations from prescribed treatment delivery, no matter how trivial. A department-wide record-and-verify system was operational during this period and was used as one method of treatment verification and error detection. Brachytherapy discrepancies were analyzed separately. Results: During the analysis year, over 2000 patients were treated with over 93,000 individual fields. A total of 59 errors affecting a total of 170 individual treated fields were reported or detected during this period. After review, all of these errors were classified as Level 1 (minor discrepancy with essentially no potential for negative clinical implications). This total treatment delivery error rate (170/93, 332 or 0.18%) is significantly better than corresponding error rates reported for other hospital and oncology treatment services, perhaps reflecting the relatively sophisticated error avoidance and detection procedures used in modern clinical radiation oncology. Error rates were independent of linac model and manufacturer, time of day (normal operating hours versus late evening or early morning) or clinical machine volumes. There was some relationship to

  1. Glycosylation patterns of kidney proteins differ in rat diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravidà, Alessandra; Musante, Luca; Kreivi, Marjut; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Byrne, Barry; Saraswat, Mayank; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Clynes, Martin; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy often progresses to end-stage kidney disease and, ultimately, to renal replacement therapy. Hyperglycemia per se is expected to have a direct impact on the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycoproteins. This study aims to establish the link between protein glycosylation and progression of experimental diabetic kidney disease using orthogonal methods. Kidneys of streptozotocin-diabetic and control rats were harvested at three different time points post streptozotocin injection. A panel of 12 plant lectins was used in the screening of lectin blots. The lectins UEAI, PHA-E, GSI, PNA, and RCA identified remarkable disease-associated differences in glycoprotein expression. Lectin affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometric analyses led to the identification of several glycoproteins involved in salt-handling, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix degradation. Our data confirm a substantial link between glycosylation signature and diabetes progression. Furthermore, as suggested by our findings on dipeptidyl peptidase-IV, altered protein glycosylation may reflect changes in biochemical properties such as enzymatic activity. Thus, our study demonstrates the unexplored potential of protein glycosylation analysis in the discovery of molecules linked to diabetic kidney disease.

  2. The relationship between clinical indicators, coping styles, perceived support and diabetes-related distress among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Bjørg; Oftedal, Bjørg; Bru, Edvin

    2012-02-01

    This article is a report of a cross-sectional study examining the degree to which clinical indicators, coping styles and perceived support from healthcare professionals and family are related to diabetes-related distress. Many people with type 2 diabetes experience high levels of distress stemming from concerns and worries associated with their disease. Diabetes-related distress has predominantly been studied in relation to diabetes management and metabolic control, and to some extent in relation to coping styles and perceived social support. To date, little is known about the relative contribution of clinical indicators, coping styles and perceptions of social support to perceived distress among people with type 2 diabetes. A sample comprising 425 Norwegian adults, aged 30-70, with type 2 diabetes, completed questionnaires assessing coping styles, perceived social support from health professionals and family and diabetes-related distress assessed by the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale. Demographical and clinical data were collected by self-report. Data were collected in October 2008.   Results from the regression analyses showed a greater variance in emotional distress accounted for by coping styles (21·3%) and perceived support (19·7%) than by clinical indicators (5·8%). FINDINGS may indicate that healthcare providers should pay more attention to non-clinical factors such as coping styles and social support, when addressing diabetes-related distress. They should also be aware that interventions based on psychosocial approaches may primarily influence distress, and not necessarily metabolic control. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Nutrition Facts Panel use is associated with diet quality and dietary patterns among Latinos with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollannoor-Samuel, Grace; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Shebl, Fatma M; Hawley, Nicola L; Damio, Grace; Chhabra, Jyoti; Vega-López, Sonia; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2017-11-01

    The study aims were to (i) identify determinants of Nutrition Facts Panel (NFP) use and (ii) describe the association between NFP use and dietary intake among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Baseline cross-sectional data from a clinical trial were used to assess the association between NFP use and dietary intake. Diet was measured using two methods: (i) a diet quality score (the Healthy Eating Index-2010) derived from a single 24 h recall and (ii) dietary pattern (exploratory factor analyses) from an FFQ. Multivariable logistic and non-parametric quantile regressions were conducted, as appropriate. Settings Hartford County, Connecticut, USA. Latino adults (n 203), ≥21 years of age, with diagnosed type 2 diabetes, glycosylated Hb≥7 %, and without medical conditions limiting physical activity. Participants' education level, diabetes-related knowledge and English speaking were positively associated with NFP use. At the higher percentiles of diet quality score, NFP use was significantly associated with higher diet quality. Similarly, NFP users were more likely to consume a 'healthy' dietary pattern (P=0·003) and less likely to consume a 'fried snack' pattern (P=0·048) compared with NFP non-users. The association between reported NFP use and diet quality was positive and significantly stronger among participants who reported consuming a healthier diet. While NFP use was associated with a healthier dietary pattern, not using NFP was associated with a less-healthy, fried snack pattern. Longitudinal studies are needed to understand whether improving NFP use could be an effective intervention to improve diet quality among Latinos with type 2 diabetes.

  4. 75 FR 62844 - Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... state of device systems for autonomous systems for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, the challenges in...] Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial Pancreas (an... a public workshop entitled ``Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical...

  5. Clinical and CT patterns in phakomatosis after Bourneville-Pringle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobovschek, M.; Bone, G.; Landesnervenklinik, Salzburg

    1987-01-01

    The various clinical patterns of Bourneville's disease and/or Pringle's disease (pharkomatosis, or tuberous sclerosis combined with adenoma sebaceum) are described compared with CT morphology of the neurocranium. (orig.) [de

  6. Clinical and CT patterns in phakomatosis after Bourneville-Pringle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grobovschek, M.; Bone, G.

    1987-06-01

    The various clinical patterns of Bourneville's disease and/or Pringle's disease (pharkomatosis, or tuberous sclerosis combined with adenoma sebaceum) are described compared with CT morphology of the neurocranium.

  7. Identifying clinical course patterns in SMS data using cluster analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recently, there has been interest in using the short message service (SMS or text messaging), to gather frequent information on the clinical course of individual patients. One possible role for identifying clinical course patterns is to assist in exploring clinically important...... showed that clinical course patterns can be identified by cluster analysis using all SMS time points as cluster variables. This method is simple, intuitive and does not require a high level of statistical skill. However, there are alternative ways of managing SMS data and many different methods...

  8. Clinical Patterns of Candida Infections in Bombay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Pratiba Dalal

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred consecutive cases of candidiasis in Bombay were studied. In each case the suspicion was confirmed by isolation typing of the Candida species. The clinical was as follows: vulvo-vaginitis 30%; intertrigo 18%; onychia and paronychia 12%; thrush 16%; generalised cutaneous candidasis 8%, enteritis 3%; bronchitis 12% and urinary tract infection 1%. When compared to a study carried out in Bombay in 1966, there was an increase in the frequency of disseminated cutaneous candidiasis and a reduction in the cases of intertrigo and onychia and paronychia.

  9. Healthful dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Deirdre K; Hu, Frank B; Chavarro, Jorge; Rosner, Bernard; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Zhang, Cuilin

    2012-11-12

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has reached epidemic proportions. Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at high risk for T2DM after pregnancy. Adherence to healthful dietary patterns has been inversely associated with T2DM in the general population; however, whether these dietary patterns are associated with progression to T2DM among a susceptible population is unknown. Four thousand four hundred thirteen participants from the Nurses' Health Study II cohort with prior GDM were followed up from 1991 to 2005. We derived the alternate Mediterranean diet (aMED), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), and alternate Healthy Eating Index (aHEI) dietary pattern adherence scores from a post-GDM validated food-frequency questionnaire, with cumulative average updating every 4 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models estimated the relative risk (hazard ratios) and 95% confidence intervals. We observed 491 cases of incident T2DM during 52 743 person-years. All 3 patterns were inversely associated with T2DM risk with adjustment for age, total calorie intake, age at first birth, parity, ethnicity, parental diabetes, oral contraceptive use, menopause, and smoking. When we compared participants with the highest adherence (quartile 4) vs lowest (quartile 1), the aMED pattern was associated with 40% lower risk of T2DM (hazard ratio, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.44-0.82; P=.002]); the DASH pattern, with 46% lower risk (0.54 [0.39-0.73; P.001]); and the aHEI pattern, with 57% lower risk (0.43 [0.31-0.59; P.001]). Adjustment for body mass index moderately attenuated these findings. Adherence to healthful dietary patterns is associated with lower T2DM risk among women with a history of GDM. The inverse associations are partly mediated by body mass index.

  10. Changing pattern of cardiovascular risk with duration of Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a common chronic endocrine disorder of insulin secretion or function resulting in the disturbances of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism characterised by hyperglycemia. Cardiovascular complications are the most important cause of morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To assess the ...

  11. Mortality patterns among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: People living with diabetes mellitus (DM) are prone to varied forms of complications which often lead to their premature death. The vulnerability has the greatest impact in type 2 DM because of larger numerical strength, insidious onset and late recognition especially in resourcepoor nations like Nigeria. This study ...

  12. Clinical Implications of Glucose Variability: Chronic Complications of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Seung Jung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glucose variability has been identified as a potential risk factor for diabetic complications; oxidative stress is widely regarded as the mechanism by which glycemic variability induces diabetic complications. However, there remains no generally accepted gold standard for assessing glucose variability. Representative indices for measuring intraday variability include calculation of the standard deviation along with the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE. MAGE is used to measure major intraday excursions and is easily measured using continuous glucose monitoring systems. Despite a lack of randomized controlled trials, recent clinical data suggest that long-term glycemic variability, as determined by variability in hemoglobin A1c, may contribute to the development of microvascular complications. Intraday glycemic variability is also suggested to accelerate coronary artery disease in high-risk patients.

  13. Dietary Patterns, Insulin Resistance, and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the Whitehall II Study

    OpenAIRE

    McNaughton, Sarah A.; Mishra, Gita D.; Brunner, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?The aim of this study was to identify a dietary pattern associated with insulin resistance and investigate whether this pattern was prospectively associated with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?Analysis was based on 7,339 participants of the Whitehall II study. Dietary intake was measured using a 127-item food frequency questionnaire. We used the reduced rank regression method to determine dietary patterns using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance as ...

  14. Footwear dermatitis - Clinical patterns and contact allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa S

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty patients suspected of contact dermatitis to footwear studied to evaluate various clinical presentations and possible sensitizers. ′V′ chappals and sandals were suspected alone in 12, a combination of open and closed shoes in 15 and closed shoes alone in 3 patients. Commonest affected sites were dorsa of feet and toes in 14 and dorsa of feet corresponding to the shape of footwear in 12 patients. Patch tests were done using a battery of sixteen allergens. Positive patch tests were seen in 29 patients. Rubber chemicals were the commonest allergens detected in 26 patients, dyes in 10,leather in 6, glues and neoprene cements in 4 and rubber material from suspected footwear as such in 4 patients respectively.

  15. Clinical risk factors, DNA variants, and the development of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, Valeriya; Jonsson, Anna Elisabet; Almgren, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to develop from an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. We examined whether clinical or genetic factors or both could predict progression to diabetes in two prospective cohorts.......Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to develop from an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. We examined whether clinical or genetic factors or both could predict progression to diabetes in two prospective cohorts....

  16. Cut points for identifying clinically significant diabetes distress in adolescents with type 1 diabetes using the PAID-T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Cameron, Fergus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To establish cut point(s) for the Problem Areas in Diabetes-teen version (PAID-T) scale to identify adolescents with clinically meaningful, elevated diabetes distress. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were available from the Diabetes Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment...... variables were examined to identify a clinically meaningful threshold for elevated diabetes distress. ANOVA was used to test whether these variables differed by levels of distress. RESULTS Two cut points distinguished none-to-mild (90) diabetes distress.......Moderate distresswas experienced by 18%of adolescents and high distress by 36%. Mean depressive symptoms, self-reported HbA1c, and SMBG differed significantly across the three levels of diabetes distress (all P defined two...

  17. Distinct clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities for diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Yuji; Takano, Koji; Kishihara, Eriko; Watanabe, Michiko; Ichikawa, Raishi; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2017-02-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes often develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Reportedly, DKA in type 2 diabetes has higher mortality despite its limited occurrence. The exact clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities yielding successful outcomes in DKA type 2 diabetes remain unknown. This retrospective study compared the clinical features and detailed treatment of consecutive type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients hospitalized with DKA between January 2001 and December 2014. We report on 127 patients with type 1 and 74 patients with type 2 diabetes whose DKA was successfully treated. The most frequent precipitating cause for DKA was infectious disease for patients with type 1 diabetes and consumption of sugar-containing beverages for those with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes patients showed higher mean plasma glucose levels than those with type 1 diabetes (48.4±21.6, vs. 37.1±16.4mmol/l, P1) and higher serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and hemoglobin levels, which normalized after DKA resolution. Compared with type 1 diabetes patients, those with type 2 diabetes required distinctly higher daily total insulin dosage (35.9±37.0U, vs. 20.2±23.3U, P1), larger replacement fluid volumes (4.17±2.69L, vs. 2.29±1.57L, P1) and greater potassium supplementation (23.9±36.5mEq, vs. 11.2±17.9mEq, P1) to resolve DKA and reduce plasma glucose level to ≤16.7mmol/l. DKA patients with type 2 diabetes required management with a modified treatment protocol to resolve their profound hyperglycemia and dehydration compared with those with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Residential Racial Isolation and Spatial Patterning of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Durham, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Mercedes A; Anthopolos, Rebecca; Kimbro, Rachel T; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2018-05-14

    Neighborhood characteristics such as racial segregation may be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but studies have not examined these relationships using spatial models appropriate for geographically patterned health outcomes. We construct a local, spatial index of racial isolation (RI) for blacks, which measures the extent to which blacks are exposed to only one another, to estimate associations of diabetes with RI and examine how RI relates to spatial patterning in diabetes. We obtained 2007-2011 electronic health records from the Duke Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse. Patient data were linked to RI based on census block of residence. We use aspatial and spatial Bayesian models to assess spatial variation in diabetes and relationships with RI. Compared to spatial models with patient age and sex, residual geographic heterogeneity in diabetes in spatial models that also included RI was 29% and 24% lower for non-Hispanic whites and blacks, respectively. A 0.20 unit increase in RI was associated with 1.24 (95% credible interval: 1.17, 1.31) and 1.07 (1.05, 1.10) increased risk of diabetes for whites and blacks, respectively. Improved understanding of neighborhood characteristics associated with diabetes can inform development of policy interventions.

  19. Clinical pattern of heart diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.S.; Billoo, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    This study was done to determine various causes and clinical presentation of heart disease in children. It was a prospective hospital study conducted in Department of Pediatrics Civil Hospital, Karachi from August 1995 to February 1996. In this study, 70 patients of heart disease upto 12 years of age were inducted. There were 33 (47.14%) cases of congenital heart diseases and 37 (52.85%) cases of acquired heart diseases. The age distribution showed that heart disease was more frequent between 0-11 months of age (41.42%). Congenital heart diseases were also frequent between 0-11 months (28.57%). On the other hand acquired heart diseases were more common between 6-12 years (22.85%). In this study the males were predominantly involved, the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. In congenital heart disease it was 1.3:1 and in acquired heart diseases it was 0.85:1. Ventricular septal defect was the commonest congenital lesion reported (20%). Rheumatic fever and viral myocarditis were two frequently occurring acquired heart-diseases 17.14% each. The common presentation of heart diseases were respiratory distress (94.28%), fever (90%), feeding difficulty (57.14%) and failure to thrive (34.28%). In case of rheumatic fever, chorea was present in 8.57%, arthritis in 11.42% and S/C nodules (2.85%) cases respectively. The early management of the problem may help in decreasing morbidity and mortality due to these disease in children. Prenatal detection of congenital cardiac lesions by fetal echocardiography in high risk pregnancies, early intervention in neonatal period and counseling of the parents may help in prevention of congenital heart diseases in children. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal throat infection. (author)

  20. Clinical Features and Pattern of Presentation of Breast Diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To characterize the clinical features and pattern of presentation of breast diseases as observed in our practice. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 121 consecutive patients with breast complaints presenting in our Surgical Outpatient Clinics. The relevant data were collected by two surgeons using the ...

  1. Clinical Features and Patterns of Imaging in Cerebral Venous Sinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an uncommon neurological deficit. It shows a wide range of clinical manifestations that may mimic many other neurological disorders and lead to misdiagnosis. Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis. Objective: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and patterns ...

  2. Wolfram syndrome (diabetes insipidus, diabetes, optic atrophy, and deafness): clinical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Minuto, Nicola; D'Amato, Elena; de Toni, Teresa; Lombardo, Fortunato; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lorini, Renata

    2008-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes (nonautoimmune), optic atrophy, and deafness (a set of conditions referred to as DIDMOAD). The WFS1 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 4. Wolfram syndrome prevalence is 1 in 770,000 live births, with a 1 in 354 carrier frequency. We evaluated six Italian children from five unrelated families. Genetic analysis for Wolfram syndrome was performed by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Mutation screening revealed five distinct variants, one novel mutation (c.1346C>T; p.T449I) and four previously described, all located in exon 8. Phenotype-genotype correlation is difficult, and the same mutation gives very different phenotypes. Severely inactivating mutations result in a more severe phenotype than mildly inactivating ones. Clinical follow-up showed the progressive syndrome's seriousness.

  3. Diabetic polyneuropathy: pathogenesis, classification, clinical presentation, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Valentinovna Nesterova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a global epidemic followed by late complications as diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN and diabetic foot syndrome, leading to appreciable social and economic consequences. Virtually all patients with DM develop DPN in different periods. There is a clear correlation between the presence and magnitude of painful DPN and the duration of DM and the level of glycosylated hemoglobin and the severity of DPN. In spite of the abundance of theories of the development of DPN, its main identified pathogenetic factor is hyperglycemia. The literature gives no universal classification due to the variability of clinical symptoms. The main goals of treatment are to affect the pathogenesis of the disease and to prescribe symptomatic medications. The pathogenetic treatment of DPN includes compensation for carbohydrate metabolism and use of neurometabolic drugs. Pain from DPN may be controlled with antidepressants, anticonvulsants, local anesthetics and opioid analgesics. Although much evidence for the pathogenesis of peripheral nervous system injury has been recently accumulated, a universal standard for the effective therapy of DPN and the follow-up of these patients has not yet been developed.

  4. A diabetes management mentor program: outcomes of a clinical nurse specialist initiative to empower staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modic, Mary Beth; Canfield, Christina; Kaser, Nancy; Sauvey, Rebecca; Kukla, Aniko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to enhance the knowledge of the bedside nurse in diabetes management. A forum for ongoing support and exploration of clinical problems, along with the distribution of educational tools were the components of this program. Diabetes accounts for 30% of patients admitted to the hospital. It has become more challenging to manage as the treatment choices have increased. There are a number of researchers who have identified nurse and physician knowledge of diabetes management principles as suboptimal. DESCRIPTION OF THE INNOVATION: Staff nurses are educated for a role as a Diabetes Management Mentor and are expected to educate/dialogue with peers monthly, model advocacy and diabetes patient education skills, facilitate referrals for diabetes education, and direct staff to resources for diabetes management. Diabetes Management Mentors feel more confident in their knowledge of diabetes and their ability to resolve clinical issues as they arise. The Diabetes Management Mentor role is another avenue for nurses to refine their clinical knowledge base and acquire skills to share with colleagues while remaining at the bedside. The clinical nurse specialist is expertly prepared to foster the professional development of bedside nurses while simultaneously making a positive impact on disease management. Opportunity for future investigation includes efficacy of teaching tools on diabetes mastery, the effect of clinical nurse specialist mentoring on a select group of bedside nurses, and the Diabetes Management Mentor's impact on prevention of near-miss events.

  5. Determinants of sexual dysfunction among clinically diagnosed diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that can result in various medical, psychological and sexual dysfunctions (SD) if not properly managed. SD in men is a common under-appreciated complication of diabetes. This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of SD among diabetic patients in Tema, Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Method Sexual functioning was determined in 300 consecutive diabetic men (age range: 18-82 years) visiting the diabetic clinic of Tema General Hospital with the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) questionnaire, between November, 2010 and March, 2011. In addition to the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants, the level of glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum testosterone were assessed. All the men had a steady heterosexual relationship for at least 2 years before enrolment in the study. Results Out the 300 participants contacted, the response rate was 91.3% after 20 declined participation and 6 incomplete data were excluded All the respondents had at least basic education, 97.4% were married, 65.3% were known hypertensive, 3.3% smoked cigarettes, 27% took alcoholic beverages and 32.8% did some form of exercise. The 69.3% SD rate observed in this study appears to be related to infrequency (79.2%), non-sensuality (74.5%), dissatisfaction with sexual acts (71.9%), non-communication (70.8%) and impotence (67.9%). Other areas of sexual function, including premature ejaculation (56.6%) and avoidance (42.7%) were also substantially affected. However, severe SD was seen in only 4.7% of the studied population. The perceived "adequate", "desirable", "too short" and "too long intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) are 5-10, 5-10, 1-2 and 15-30 minutes respectively. Testosterone correlates negatively with glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c), FBS, perceived desirable, too short IELT, and weight as well as waist circumference. Conclusion SD rate from this study is high but similar to

  6. Determinants of sexual dysfunction among clinically diagnosed diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarpong Charity

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that can result in various medical, psychological and sexual dysfunctions (SD if not properly managed. SD in men is a common under-appreciated complication of diabetes. This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of SD among diabetic patients in Tema, Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Method Sexual functioning was determined in 300 consecutive diabetic men (age range: 18-82 years visiting the diabetic clinic of Tema General Hospital with the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS questionnaire, between November, 2010 and March, 2011. In addition to the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants, the level of glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS and serum testosterone were assessed. All the men had a steady heterosexual relationship for at least 2 years before enrolment in the study. Results Out the 300 participants contacted, the response rate was 91.3% after 20 declined participation and 6 incomplete data were excluded All the respondents had at least basic education, 97.4% were married, 65.3% were known hypertensive, 3.3% smoked cigarettes, 27% took alcoholic beverages and 32.8% did some form of exercise. The 69.3% SD rate observed in this study appears to be related to infrequency (79.2%, non-sensuality (74.5%, dissatisfaction with sexual acts (71.9%, non-communication (70.8% and impotence (67.9%. Other areas of sexual function, including premature ejaculation (56.6% and avoidance (42.7% were also substantially affected. However, severe SD was seen in only 4.7% of the studied population. The perceived "adequate", "desirable", "too short" and "too long intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT are 5-10, 5-10, 1-2 and 15-30 minutes respectively. Testosterone correlates negatively with glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c, FBS, perceived desirable, too short IELT, and weight as well as waist circumference. Conclusion SD rate from this study is high

  7. Clinical profile, knowledge, and beliefs about diabetes among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-19

    Nov 19, 2015 ... Conclusion: Knowing patients' beliefs and knowledge about diabetes is important to impart overall care ... 150 participants in our survey to increase the study power .... Glycemic control in patients with diabetes on anti‑diabetic.

  8. Clinical impact of the temporal relationship between depression and type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle diabetes study phase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Bruce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical features of type 2 diabetes may differ depending on whether first depression episode precedes or follows the diagnosis of diabetes. METHODS: Type 2 patients from the observational community-based Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II underwent assessment of lifetime depression using the Brief Lifetime Depression Scale (developed and validated for this study supplemented by information on current depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, 9-item version and use of antidepressants. Patients were categorized as never depressed (Group 1, having had depression before diabetes diagnosis (Group 2, diagnosed with depression and diabetes within 2 years of each other (Group 3 and having depression after diabetes diagnosis (Group 4. RESULTS: Of 1391 patients, 20.8% were assigned to Group 2, 6.0% to Group 3 and 14.5% to Group 4. In Group 2, depression occurred a median 15.6 years before diabetes onset at age 37.2±14.7 years. These patients had similar clinical characteristics to never depressed patients except for reduced self-care behaviours and having more symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. In Group 4, depression occurred a median 9.9 years after diabetes onset at age 59.8±13.0 years. These patients had long duration diabetes, poor glycaemic control, more intensive management and more diabetic complications. Group 4 patients had more current depression than Group 2 but were less likely to be receiving antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The clinical features of depression and type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous depending on their temporal relationship. There may be corresponding differences in the pathogenesis of depression in diabetes that have implications for diagnosis and management.

  9. The pattern of clinical advice sought by general practitioners from a medical consultant in clinical biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, D

    1997-01-01

    Clinical biochemistry departments can be a valuable source of clinical advice for further investigations and the need for referral to specialist clinics. This paper outlines the pattern of clinical advice sought by general practitioners in a district hospital setting, and addresses some of the issues regarding seeking such advice and the implications for continuing medical education and training. PMID:9196966

  10. A combination of process of care and clinical target among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in general medical clinics and specialist diabetes clinics at hospital levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieng, Sokha; Hurst, Cameron

    2017-08-07

    This study compares a combination of processes of care and clinical targets among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) between specialist diabetes clinics (SDCs) and general medical clinics (GMCs), and how differences between these two types of clinics differ with hospital type (community, provincial and regional). Type 2 diabetes mellitus patient medical records were collected from 595 hospitals (499 community, 70 provincial, 26 regional) in Thailand between April 1 to June 30, 2012 resulting in a cross-sectional sample of 26,860 patients. Generalized linear mixed modeling was conducted to examine associations between clinic type and quality of care. The outcome variables of interest were split into clinical targets and process of care. A subsequent subgroup analysis was conducted to examine if the nature of clinical target and process of care differences between GMCs and SDCs varied with hospital type (regional, provincial, community). Regardless of the types of hospitals (regional, provincial, or community) patients attending SDCs were considerably more likely to have eye and foot exam. In terms of larger hospitals (regional and provincial) patients attending SDCs were more likely to achieve HbA1c exam, All FACE exam, BP target, and the Num7Q. Interestingly, SDCs performed better than GMCs at only provincial hospitals for LDL-C target and the All7Q. Finally, patients with T2DM who attended community hospital-GMCs had a better chance of achieving the blood pressure target than patients who attended community hospital-SDCs. Specialized diabetes clinics outperform general medical clinics for both regional and provincial hospitals for all quality of care indicators and the number of quality of care indicators achieved was never lower. However, this better performance of SDC was not observed in community hospital. Indeed, GMCs outperformed SDCs for some quality of care indicators in the community level setting.

  11. Imbalanced target prediction with pattern discovery on clinical data repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Li, Yuxi; Chiau, Choo-Chiap; Zhu, Jane; Jiang, Jie; Huo, Yong

    2017-04-20

    Clinical data repositories (CDR) have great potential to improve outcome prediction and risk modeling. However, most clinical studies require careful study design, dedicated data collection efforts, and sophisticated modeling techniques before a hypothesis can be tested. We aim to bridge this gap, so that clinical domain users can perform first-hand prediction on existing repository data without complicated handling, and obtain insightful patterns of imbalanced targets for a formal study before it is conducted. We specifically target for interpretability for domain users where the model can be conveniently explained and applied in clinical practice. We propose an interpretable pattern model which is noise (missing) tolerant for practice data. To address the challenge of imbalanced targets of interest in clinical research, e.g., deaths less than a few percent, the geometric mean of sensitivity and specificity (G-mean) optimization criterion is employed, with which a simple but effective heuristic algorithm is developed. We compared pattern discovery to clinically interpretable methods on two retrospective clinical datasets. They contain 14.9% deaths in 1 year in the thoracic dataset and 9.1% deaths in the cardiac dataset, respectively. In spite of the imbalance challenge shown on other methods, pattern discovery consistently shows competitive cross-validated prediction performance. Compared to logistic regression, Naïve Bayes, and decision tree, pattern discovery achieves statistically significant (p-values repositories with imbalance and noise. The prediction results and interpretable patterns can provide insights in an agile and inexpensive way for the potential formal studies.

  12. Autoantibodies to N-terminally truncated GAD improve clinical phenotyping of individuals with adult-onset diabetes: Action LADA 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Peter; Hawa, Mohammed I; Krause, Stephanie; Lampasona, Vito; Jerram, Samuel T; Williams, Alistair J K; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette G; Leslie, R David

    2018-04-04

    Adult-onset type 1 diabetes, in which the 65 kDa isoform of GAD (GAD65) is a major autoantigen, has a broad clinical phenotype encompassing variable need for insulin therapy. This study aimed to evaluate whether autoantibodies against N-terminally truncated GAD65 more closely defined a type 1 diabetes phenotype associated with insulin therapy. Of 1114 participants with adult-onset diabetes from the Action LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) study with sufficient sera, we selected those designated type 1 (n = 511) or type 2 diabetes (n = 603) and retested the samples in radiobinding assays for human full-length GAD65 autoantibodies (f-GADA) and N-terminally truncated (amino acids 96-585) GAD65 autoantibodies (t-GADA). Individuals' clinical phenotypes were analysed according to antibody binding patterns. Overall, 478 individuals were f-GADA-positive, 431 were t-GADA-positive and 628 were negative in both assays. Risk of insulin treatment was augmented in t-GADA-positive individuals (OR 4.69 [95% CI 3.57, 6.17]) compared with f-GADA-positive individuals (OR 3.86 [95% CI 2.95, 5.06]), irrespective of diabetes duration. Of 55 individuals who were f-GADA-positive but t-GADA-negative, i.e. with antibody binding restricted to the N-terminus of GAD65, the phenotype was similar to type 2 diabetes with low risk of progression to insulin treatment. Compared with these individuals with N-terminal GAD65-restricted GADA, t-GADA-positive individuals were younger at diagnosis (p = 0.005), leaner (p N-terminally truncated GAD65 autoantibodies is associated with the clinical phenotype of autoimmune type 1 diabetes and predicts insulin therapy.

  13. Clinical efficacy of entecavir in treatment of hepatogenous diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOU Wei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo observe the clinical efficacy of entecavir in the treatment of hepatogenous diabetes (HD. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 72 HD patients, who were divided into treatment group (n=36 and control group (n=36. Both groups were given diabetic diet and received liver-protecting treatment, symptomatic treatment, and supportive treatment. In addition, the treatment group received oral entecavir (0.5 mg once daily. The therapeutic effect was assessed after 52 weeks of treatment; the serum hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA level, liver function (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and albumin, blood glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured before and after treatment. The two groups were compared by t test (for measurement data and chi-square test (for numeration data. ResultsAfter 52 weeks of treatment, 29 (80.56% of the patients in treatment group had virological response, versus 7 (19.44% of those in control group (χ2 = 18.00, P<0.01; 26 (72.22% of the patients in treatment group had liver function recovery and controlled diabetes, versus 16 (44.44% of those in control group (χ2=5.774, P<0.05. The treatment group showed significant improvements in liver function and blood glucose after treatment (P<0.05; the treatment group had significantly lower glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose than the control group (P<0.01. ConclusionIn the treatment of HBV DNA-positive hepatitis B cirrhosis with HD, entecavir not only can effectively inhibit the replication of viral DNA and promote the recovery of liver function, but also can effectively control HD.

  14. Usability and clinical efficacy of diabetes mobile applications for adults with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Helen; McMahon, Siobhan K; Gross, Cynthia R; Adam, Terrence J; Wyman, Jean F

    2017-09-01

    To assess the usability and clinical effectiveness of diabetes mobile applications (diabetes apps) developed for adults with type 2 diabetes. A systematic review of the usability and effectiveness of diabetes apps was conducted. Searches were performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, COMPENDEX, and IEEE XPLORE for articles published from January 1, 2011, to January 17, 2017. Search terms included: diabetes, mobile apps, and mobile health (mHealth). The search yielded 723 abstracts of which seven usability studies and ten clinical effectiveness studies met the inclusion criteria from 20 publications. Usability, as measured by satisfaction ratings from experts and patients, ranged from 38% to 80%. Usability problem ratings ranged from moderate to catastrophic. Top usability problems are multi-steps task, limited functionality and interaction, and difficult system navigation. Clinical effectiveness, measured by reductions in HbA1c, ranged from 0.15% to 1.9%. Despite meager satisfaction ratings and major usability problems, there is some limited evidence supporting the effectiveness of diabetes apps to improve glycemic control for adults with type 2 diabetes. Findings strongly suggest that efforts to improve user satisfaction, incorporate established principles of health behavior change, and match apps to user characteristics will increase the therapeutic impact of diabetes apps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DETECTION OF MICROVASCULAR CHANGES IN EYES OF PATIENTS WITH DIABETES BUT NOT CLINICAL DIABETIC RETINOPATHY USING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carlo, Talisa E; Chin, Adam T; Bonini Filho, Marco A; Adhi, Mehreen; Branchini, Lauren; Salz, David A; Baumal, Caroline R; Crawford, Courtney; Reichel, Elias; Witkin, Andre J; Duker, Jay S; Waheed, Nadia K

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography angiography to detect early microvascular changes in eyes of diabetic individuals without clinical retinopathy. Prospective observational study of 61 eyes of 39 patients with diabetes mellitus and 28 control eyes of 22 age-matched healthy subjects that received imaging using optical coherence tomography angiography between August 2014 and March 2015. Eyes with concomitant retinal, optic nerve, and vitreoretinal interface diseases and/or poor-quality images were excluded. Foveal avascular zone size and irregularity, vessel beading and tortuosity, capillary nonperfusion, and microaneurysm were evaluated. Foveal avascular zone size measured 0.348 mm² (0.1085-0.671) in diabetic eyes and 0.288 mm² (0.07-0.434) in control eyes (P = 0.04). Foveal avascular zone remodeling was seen more often in diabetic than control eyes (36% and 11%, respectively; P = 0.01). Capillary nonperfusion was noted in 21% of diabetic eyes and 4% of control eyes (P = 0.03). Microaneurysms and venous beading were noted in less than 10% of both diabetic and control eyes. Both diabetic and healthy control eyes demonstrated tortuous vessels in 21% and 25% of eyes, respectively. Optical coherence tomography angiography was able to image foveal microvascular changes that were not detected by clinical examination in diabetic eyes. Changes to the foveal avascular zone and capillary nonperfusion were more prevalent in diabetic eyes, whereas vessel tortuosity was observed with a similar frequency in normal and diabetic eyes. Optical coherence tomography angiography may be able to detect diabetic eyes at risk of developing retinopathy and to screen for diabetes quickly and noninvasively before the systemic diagnosis is made.

  16. [Clinical characteristics of 7 patients with gestational diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Qun; Xiong, Chun-Qiu; Wu, Min; Dong, Ruo-Lin; Chen, Yun-Qin; Gao, Jie; Chen, Ou-Jing; Huang, Yin-Ping

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the clinical feature, treatment and prognosis of both the mother and the fetus with gestational diabetes insipidus. A total of 7 cases of gestational diabetes insipidus collected in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou Combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine with Western Medicine Hospital, and Zhejiang Taizhou Hospital from June 1993 to June 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. Seven cases symptoms all characterized by excessive thirst polydipsia and polyuria. The average 24 h urinary output was between 11 L to 13 L and manifested of hypobaricuria. After effective treatment (three cases were treated with 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin, another three patients were managed with hydrochlorothiazide, and the last one was cured with antisterone), seven patients with gestational diabetes insipidus did not have any severe consequences. Their symptoms of excessive thirst, polyuria, and polydypsia disappeared from 7 days to 3 months after parturition. Urinary volume returned to normal standard of 1000-2000 ml during 24 hours. Specific gravity of urine recovered normally between a range 1.015-1.025 and serum sodium recovered between 135-147 mmol/L. The average duration of illness was 52 days. Eight newborn infants survived. Two of them were sent to neonatal intensive care unit for treatment. One was because of premature delivery caused by antepartum eclampsia, and the other case was one of the twins who had hydronephrosis. The baby of the first case left hospital after 3 weeks' treatment. The latter one's symptom disappeared 2 weeks after delivery. No obvious symptom was discovered among all the babies through follow-up telephone calls 42 days after childbirth. Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare endocrinopathy complicating pregnancy. This disorder is characterized by excessive thirst, polydypsia, polyuria, hypobaric urine and electrolyte disturbances usually manifesting in the third trimester of pregnancy or puerperium

  17. Adherence to predefined dietary patterns and incident type 2 diabetes in European populations: EPIC-InterAct Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröger, J.; Schulze, M.B.; Romaguera, D.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis - Few studies have investigated the relationship between predefined dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes incidence; little is known about the generalisability of these associations. We aimed to assess the association between predefined dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes risk in

  18. IMMUNOLOGICAL MARKERS OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN VARIOUS CLINICAL VARIANTS OF THE DISORDER

    OpenAIRE

    G. G. Baiburina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. We studied immune markers of diabetes mellitus, as well as their relations to clinical features at the onset of disease. The patients with newly diagnosed diabetes were examined. Antibodies to glutamate decarboxylase, islet-cell cytoplasm antigen, along with antibodies to insulin and basal C-peptide were tested. Immunological markers of type 1 diabetes mellitus have been identified in 58% of cases. The immune markers of type 2 diabetes mellitus have been discovered in 47.5% of cases...

  19. Patient- and Provider-Centered Design of an Outpatient Diabetes Technology Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, Angela M.; Scalzo, Patricia; Bach, Sarah M.; Kudva, Yogish C.

    2016-01-01

    The number of US patients using diabetes technology is increasing, and sophisticated technologies continue to emerge. Patients using diabetes technology require access to providers prepared to offer care in this rapidly changing field. The authors sought to identify factors important to both patients using diabetes technology and providers caring for such patients. They redesigned the Diabetes Technology Clinic at an academic group practice in response to the needs of patients and providers. ...

  20. AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY ON COMPLICATIONS OF CHRONIC DIABETES ENCOUNTERED IN A PULMONOLOGIST CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vinod Kumar Viswanathan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND With the ever increasing prevalence of diabetes, complications of diabetes are encountered across all specialities. Hence, it is imperative that all specialists should have a working knowledge of diabetes mellitus. This study was done to understand the prevalence and complications of diabetes among patients attending a pulmonologist OPD. Knowledge of diabetes and its complications will help pulmonary medicine specialists to identify and manage the complications of diabetes better. MATERIALS AND METHODS All patients attending a pulmonologist’s clinic for a period of one month were enquired regarding their diabetes status and patients with known history of diabetes were questioned using a standard questionnaire and their available records examined regarding their complications pertaining to diabetes and the results analysed. RESULTS In this study, 18.7% of patients attending pulmonologist clinic had diabetes mellitus and 13.5% of patients had diabetes of more than 10 years duration. Most of the patients were in the age group of 40 to 60 years and were predominantly male. Among the diabetic patients, 71.9% had complications due to diabetes. Infections were the most commonly associated complication followed by pulmonary and cardiovascular complications. Many cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were observed among these patients. Other respiratory infections observed included pneumonias and flu. Cardiovascular complications like systemic hypertension, coronary artery disease and dyslipidaemia were observed. CONCLUSION With the rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus, such cases are frequently observed across all medical specialities. Hence, it is vital that all specialists should be trained in a management of diabetes, which is a frequent comorbidity observed by all specialists. Knowledge of diabetes, identifying diabetes early and management of complications will go a long way in reducing the morbidity and mortality due to diabetes and also

  1. Cooking Schools Improve Nutrient Intake Patterns of People with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Jackson, K'Dawn; Bock, Margaret Ann; Eastman, Wanda; Powell, Jennifer; Titone, Michelle; Marr, Carol; Wells, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether cooking classes offered by the Cooperative Extension Service improved nutrient intake patterns in people with type 2 diabetes. Design: Quasi-experimental using pretest, posttest comparisons. Setting: Community locations including schools, churches, and senior centers. Participants: One hundred seventeen people with…

  2. Patterns of clinical mastitis manifestations in Danish organic dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Enevoldsen, C.

    1997-01-01

    and identifying characteristic patterns in these results. Clinical signs, inflammatory reactions and microbiological identifications were obtained from 367 cases of clinical mastitis occurring over 18 months. Cow characteristics and preincident values such as milk yield and somatic cell count were obtained...... for each cow. Signs of previous udder inflammation were present in two-thirds of the clinical mastitis cases. Severe local inflammatory reactions were found in 21% of the cases and some indication of generalized signs such as fever and reduced appetite were found in 35% of the cases. Logistic regression....... Streptococcus dysgalactiae (9% of the cases) mastitis was typically persistent, virulent and manifest in periods of lower cow resistance. More patterns of subclinical and clinical Str. uberis mastitis (23% of the cases) seemed to be present....

  3. Italian Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AME) & Italian Association of Clinical Diabetologists (AMD) Position Statement : Diabetes mellitus and thyroid disorders: recommendations for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Aglialoro, Alberto; Aiello, Antimo; Ianni, Lucia; Maccario, Mauro; Zini, Michele; Giorda, Carlo; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Betterle, Corrado; Attanasio, Roberto; Borretta, Giorgio; Garofalo, Piernicola; Papini, Enrico; Castello, Roberto; Ceriello, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus, the most common disorders in endocrine practice, are not infrequently associated in the same subject. An altered thyroid function may affect glucose tolerance and worsen metabolic control in patients with diabetes. Thyrotoxicosis increases the risk of hyperglycemic emergencies, while a clinically relevant hypothyroidism may have a detrimental effect on glycemic control in diabetic patients. The association of alterations in thyroid function with diabetes mellitus may adversely affect the risk of cardiovascular and microvascular complications resulting from diabetes. Moreover, the treatments used for both diabetes and thyroid disease, respectively, can impact one other. Finally, multinodular goiter, but not thyroid carcinoma, was shown to be more prevalent in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Aim of the present Position Statement is to focus on the evidence concerning the association of thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus and to provide some practical suggestions for an updated clinical management.

  4. Clinical characteristics of central diabetes insipidus in Taiwanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Yao; Tung, Yi-Ching; Lee, Cheng-Ting; Liu, Hon-Man; Peng, Shinn-Forng; Wu, Mu-Zon; Kuo, Meng-Fai; Tsai, Wen-Yu

    2013-10-01

    Data on the clinical features of children with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) are lacking in Taiwan. This study investigated the clinical manifestations and etiology of CDI in Taiwanese children. From 1983 to 2012, 62 children with permanent diabetes insipidus were enrolled in the study. They were diagnosed at the Department of Pediatrics of National Taiwan University Hospital. Their medical records were thoroughly reviewed and their clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory data, and etiologies were analyzed. The patients' median age at diagnosis was 10 years and the median interval between initial manifestations and diagnosis was 0.5 years. The most common symptoms and signs were polyuria, polydipsia, nocturia, and growth retardation. Most patients had low urine osmolality and elevated plasma osmolality on diagnosis. Absence of a posterior pituitary hyperintense signal and thickening of the pituitary stalk were common findings on magnetic resonance imaging. Approximately 80% of the patients had anterior pituitary hormone deficiency and all patients had growth hormone deficiency. Approximately 60% of patients had intracranial lesions, the most common causes of which were germ cell tumor and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Two patients were initially believed to have idiopathic CDI but intracranial lesions were detected during the follow-up period. Because a delayed diagnosis of CDI is common in Taiwanese children, a high index of suspicion is important. The underlying etiology of CDI in children may not initially be obvious. Long-term surveillance is therefore necessary, especially for the early detection of evolving treatable intracranial lesions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Ratio Is Improved When Using a Digital, Nonmydriatic Fundus Camera Onsite in a Diabetes Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Roser

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of onsite screening with a nonmydriatic, digital fundus camera for diabetic retinopathy (DR at a diabetes outpatient clinic. Research Design and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 502 patients, 112 with type 1 and 390 with type 2 diabetes. Patients attended screenings for microvascular complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN, diabetic polyneuropathy (DP, and DR. Single-field retinal imaging with a digital, nonmydriatic fundus camera was used to assess DR. Prevalence and incidence of microvascular complications were analyzed and the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting complications for all entities was calculated in order to differentiate natural progress from missed DRs. Results. For both types of diabetes, prevalence of DR was 25.0% (n=126 and incidence 6.4% (n=32 (T1DM versus T2DM: prevalence: 35.7% versus 22.1%, incidence 5.4% versus 6.7%. 25.4% of all DRs were newly diagnosed. Furthermore, the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting DR was higher than those for DN (p=0.12 and DP (p=0.03 representing at least 13 patients with missed DR. Conclusions. The results indicate that implementing nonmydriatic, digital fundus imaging in a diabetes outpatient clinic can contribute to improved early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.

  6. Implementation of a quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics: feasibility and initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggen, Kris; Van Acker, Kristien; Beele, Hilde; Dumont, Isabelle; Félix, Patricia; Lauwers, Patrick; Lavens, Astrid; Matricali, Giovanni A; Randon, Caren; Weber, Eric; Van Casteren, Viviane; Nobels, Frank

    2014-07-01

    This article aims to describe the implementation and initial results of an audit-feedback quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics. Using self-developed software and questionnaires, diabetic foot clinics collected data in 2005, 2008 and 2011, covering characteristics, history and ulcer severity, management and outcome of the first 52 patients presenting with a Wagner grade ≥ 2 diabetic foot ulcer or acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy that year. Quality improvement was encouraged by meetings and by anonymous benchmarking of diabetic foot clinics. The first audit-feedback cycle was a pilot study. Subsequent audits, with a modified methodology, had increasing rates of participation and data completeness. Over 85% of diabetic foot clinics participated and 3372 unique patients were sampled between 2005 and 2011 (3312 with a diabetic foot ulcer and 111 with acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy). Median age was 70 years, median diabetes duration was 14 years and 64% were men. Of all diabetic foot ulcers, 51% were plantar and 29% were both ischaemic and deeply infected. Ulcer healing rate at 6 months significantly increased from 49% to 54% between 2008 and 2011. Management of diabetic foot ulcers varied between diabetic foot clinics: 88% of plantar mid-foot ulcers were off-loaded (P10-P90: 64-100%), and 42% of ischaemic limbs were revascularized (P10-P90: 22-69%) in 2011. A unique, nationwide quality improvement initiative was established among diabetic foot clinics, covering ulcer healing, lower limb amputation and many other aspects of diabetic foot care. Data completeness increased, thanks in part to questionnaire revision. Benchmarking remains challenging, given the many possible indicators and limited sample size. The optimized questionnaire allows future quality of care monitoring in diabetic foot clinics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Animal models for clinical and gestational diabetes: maternal and fetal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ana Ci; Lima, Paula Ho; Sinzato, Yuri K; Takaku, Mariana; Takeno, Marisa A; Rudge, Marilza Vc; Damasceno, Débora C

    2009-10-19

    Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl) and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl) on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16), severe (n = 50) and mild diabetes (n = 30). At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy reproduced maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women

  8. Clinical relevance of quantified fundus autofluorescence in diabetic macular oedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, S; Murakami, T; Uji, A; Unoki, N; Dodo, Y; Horii, T; Yoshimura, N

    2015-05-01

    To quantify the signal intensity of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and evaluate its association with visual function and optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in diabetic macular oedema (DMO). We reviewed 103 eyes of 78 patients with DMO and 30 eyes of 22 patients without DMO. FAF images were acquired using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph 2, and the signal levels of FAF in the individual subfields of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study grid were measured. We evaluated the association between quantified FAF and the logMAR VA and OCT findings. One hundred and three eyes with DMO had lower FAF signal intensity levels in the parafoveal subfields compared with 30 eyes without DMO. The autofluorescence intensity in the parafoveal subfields was associated negatively with logMAR VA and the retinal thickness in the corresponding subfields. The autofluorescence levels in the parafoveal subfield, except the nasal subfield, were lower in eyes with autofluorescent cystoid spaces in the corresponding subfield than in those without autofluorescent cystoid spaces. The autofluorescence level in the central subfield was related to foveal cystoid spaces but not logMAR VA or retinal thickness in the corresponding area. Quantified FAF in the parafovea has diagnostic significance and is clinically relevant in DMO.

  9. Female Pattern Hair Loss: a clinical and pathophysiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paulo Müller; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Female Pattern Hair Loss or female androgenetic alopecia is the main cause of hair loss in adult women and has a major impact on patients' quality of life. It evolves from the progressive miniaturization of follicles that lead to a subsequent decrease of the hair density, leading to a non-scarring diffuse alopecia, with characteristic clinical, dermoscopic and histological patterns. In spite of the high frequency of the disease and the relevance of its psychological impact, its pathogenesis is not yet fully understood, being influenced by genetic, hormonal and environmental factors. In addition, response to treatment is variable. In this article, authors discuss the main clinical, epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of female pattern hair loss.

  10. Clinical profile, outcomes, and progression to type 2 diabetes among Indian women with gestational diabetes mellitus seen at a diabetes center in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manni Mohanraj Mahalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the clinical profile, maternal and fetal outcomes, and the conversion rates to diabetes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM seen at a tertiary care diabetes center in urban south India. Materials and Methods: Clinical case records of 898 women with GDM seen between 1991 and 2011 were extracted from the Diabetes Electronic Medical Records (DEMR of a tertiary care diabetes center in Chennai, south India and their clinical profile was analyzed. Follow-up data of 174 GDM women was available. To determine the conversion rates to diabetes, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was done in these women. Glucose tolerance status postpartum was classified based on World Health Organization (WHO 2006 criteria. Results: The mean maternal age of the women was 29 ± 4 years and mean age of gestation at first visit were 24 ± 8.4 weeks. Seventy percent of the women had a family history of diabetes. Seventy-eight percent of the women delivered full-term babies and 65% underwent a cesarean section. The average weight gain during pregnancy was 10.0 ± 4.2 kg. Macrosomia was present in 17.9% of the babies, hypoglycemia in 10.4%, congenital anomalies in 4.3%, and the neonatal mortality rate was 1.9%. Mean follow-up duration of the 174 women of whom outcome data was available was 4.5 years. Out of the 174, 101 women who were followed-up developed diabetes, of whom half developed diabetes within 5 years and over 90%, within 10 years of the delivery. Conclusions: Progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Indian women with GDM is rapid. There is an urgent need to develop standardized protocols for GDM care in India that can improve the maternal and fetal outcomes and help prevent future diabetes in women with GDM.

  11. Clinical and laboratory criteria for type 2 diabetes mellitus in children

    OpenAIRE

    T.V. Sorokman; O.V. Makarova; V.G. Ostapchuk

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this review was the analysis of literature data on clinical and laboratory criteria for type 2 diabetes mellitus in children. A review of scientific literature was conducted using Pubmed as the search engine by the keywords: diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, clinical picture, laboratory criteria, risk factors, taking into consideration studies conducted in the last 10 years, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, conference abstracts, personal files...

  12. Dietary patterns and the risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Remón, Alexander; Kirwan, Richard; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Estruch, Ramón

    2018-01-22

    Diet and lifestyle play a significant role in the development chronic diseases; however the full complexity of this relationship is not yet understood. Dietary pattern investigation, which reflects the complexity of dietary intake, has emerged as an alternative and complementary approach for examining the association between diet and chronic diseases. Literature on this association has largely focused on individual nutrients, with conflicting outcomes, but individuals consume a combination of foods from many groups that form dietary patterns. Our objective was to systematically review the current findings on the effects of dietary patterns on chronic diseases. In this review, we describe and discuss the relationships between dietary patterns, such as the Mediterranean, the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, Prudent, Seventh-day Adventists, and Western, with risk of obesity, type-2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and neurodegenearive diseases. Evidence is increasing from both observational and clinical studies that plant-based dietary patterns, which are rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, are valuable in preventing various chronic diseases, whereas a diet high in red and processed meat, refined grains and added sugar seems to increase said risk. Dietary pattern analysis might be especially valuable to the development and evaluation of food-based dietary guidelines.

  13. [Sex- and gender-aspects in regard to clinical practice recommendations for pre-diabetes and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Weitgasser, Raimund; Fasching, Peter; Hoppichler, Fritz; Lechleitner, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic diseases dramatically affect life of men and women from infancy up to old age and are a major challenge for clinicians. Health professionals are confronted with different needs of women and men. This article aims at an increase of gender awareness and the implementation of current knowledge of gender medicine in daily clinical practice with regard to pre-diabetes and diabetes. Sex and gender affect screening and diagnosis of metabolic diseases as well as treatment strategies and outcome. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of energy balance and body fat distribution are related to steroid hormones and therefore impose their influence on cardiovascular health in both men and women. Furthermore, education, income and psychosocial factors relate to development of obesity and diabetes differently in men and women. Males appear to be at greater risk of diabetes at younger age and at lower BMI compared to women, but women feature a dramatic increase of their cardiometabolic risk after menopause. The estimated future years of life lost owing to diabetes is somewhat higher in women than men, with higher increase of vascular death in women, but higher increase of cancer death in men. In women pre-diabetes or diabetes are more distinctly associated with a higher number of vascular risk factors, such as inflammatory parameters, unfavourable changes of coagulation and blood pressure. Pre-diabetic and diabetic women are at much higher relative risk for vascular disease. Women are more often obese and less physically active, but may even have greater benefit from increased physical activity than males. Whereas men predominantly feature impaired fasting glucose, women often show impaired glucose tolerance. A history of gestational diabetes or the presence of a PCOS or increased androgen levels in women, on the other hand the presence of erectile dysfunction (ED) or decreased testosterone levels in men are sex specific risk factors for diabetes development

  14. Pattern of dyslipidaemia and its association with hypovitaminosis d in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, F.; Seetlani, N.K.

    2017-01-01

    Macrovascular atherosclerosis is an important long-term complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Concurrent dyslipidaemia acts as an additional risk factor for these complications. Hypovitaminosis D has been associated with adverse cardiovascular events. These modifiable risk factors of cardiovascular disease are inter-related. In the presence of an increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic abnormalities and widespread vitamin D deficiency in Pakistan, this association needs to be investigated. The purpose of our study was to determine the pattern of dyslipidaemia and its association with low vitamin D levels in South Asian diabetics. Methods: The study was designed as a quantitative cross-sectional study. It was conducted at the Department of Medicine, Sir Syed College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Karachi from January to June 2014. A total of 168 adult consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of both the genders were included. Data was collected and analysed using SPSS-20.0. The association of dyslipidaemia with vitamin D status was computed through Chi-square test. Results: We found that dyslipidaemia is highly prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Pakistan. High total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides show significant association with vitamin D deficiency. Conclusion: In order to decrease the development of diabetic complications aggressive management of hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia is required. Vitamin D supplementation may play a dual role in these situations. (author)

  15. Blood Glucose Monitoring Before and After Type 1 Diabetes Clinic Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Kimberly A; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Wang, Yuxia; Wright, Nancy; Deeb, Larry C

    2017-12-23

    To determine patterns of blood glucose monitoring in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) before and after routine T1D clinic visits. Blood glucose monitoring data were downloaded at four consecutive routine clinic visits from children and adolescents aged 5-18 years. Linear mixed models were used to analyze patterns of blood glucose monitoring in patients who had at least 28 days of data stored in their blood glucose monitors. In general, the frequency of blood glucose monitoring decreased across visits, and younger children engaged in more frequent blood glucose monitoring. Blood glucose monitoring increased before the T1D clinic visits in younger children, but not in adolescents. It declined after the visit regardless of age. Members of the T1D care team need to consider that a T1D clinic visit may prompt an increase in blood glucose monitoring when making treatment changes and recommendations. Tailored interventions are needed to maintain that higher level of adherence across time. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Complications and characteristics of patients referred to a joint diabetes renal clinic in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thabit, H

    2012-12-01

    Joint diabetes renal (JDR) clinics are recommended as the appropriate model of care to manage advanced diabetic-associated renal failure. We performed a retrospective review of clinical data and records of the first 60 patients who attended our service and their follow-up at 12 months.

  17. The taxonomy statistic uncovers novel clinical patterns in a population of ischemic stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tukiendorf

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a simple taxonomic approach for clinical data mining elaborated by Marczewski and Steinhaus (M-S, whose performance equals the advanced statistical methodology known as the expectation-maximization (E-M algorithm. We tested these two methods on a cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The comparison of both methods revealed strong agreement. Direct agreement between M-S and E-M classifications reached 83%, while Cohen's coefficient of agreement was κ = 0.766(P < 0.0001. The statistical analysis conducted and the outcomes obtained in this paper revealed novel clinical patterns in ischemic stroke patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Marczewski-Steinhaus' taxonomic approach as a tool for the detection of novel patterns of data in ischemic stroke patients and the prediction of disease outcome. In terms of the identification of fairly frequent types of stroke patients using their age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, and diabetes mellitus (DM status, when dealing with rough characteristics of patients, four particular types of patients are recognized, which cannot be identified by means of routine clinical methods. Following the obtained taxonomical outcomes, the strong correlation between the health status at moment of admission to emergency department (ED and the subsequent recovery of patients is established. Moreover, popularization and simplification of the ideas of advanced mathematicians may provide an unconventional explorative platform for clinical problems.

  18. The taxonomy statistic uncovers novel clinical patterns in a population of ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Michalak, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple taxonomic approach for clinical data mining elaborated by Marczewski and Steinhaus (M-S), whose performance equals the advanced statistical methodology known as the expectation-maximization (E-M) algorithm. We tested these two methods on a cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The comparison of both methods revealed strong agreement. Direct agreement between M-S and E-M classifications reached 83%, while Cohen's coefficient of agreement was κ = 0.766(P statistical analysis conducted and the outcomes obtained in this paper revealed novel clinical patterns in ischemic stroke patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Marczewski-Steinhaus' taxonomic approach as a tool for the detection of novel patterns of data in ischemic stroke patients and the prediction of disease outcome. In terms of the identification of fairly frequent types of stroke patients using their age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and diabetes mellitus (DM) status, when dealing with rough characteristics of patients, four particular types of patients are recognized, which cannot be identified by means of routine clinical methods. Following the obtained taxonomical outcomes, the strong correlation between the health status at moment of admission to emergency department (ED) and the subsequent recovery of patients is established. Moreover, popularization and simplification of the ideas of advanced mathematicians may provide an unconventional explorative platform for clinical problems.

  19. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed by disc diffusion techniques according to Clinical and. Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: Of the 108 ..... antibiotics tested. This was in accordance with multidrug-resistant. Acinetobacter isolates from Bansal, et al. study.[4] The main limitations of our study are a ...

  20. Identification and Description of Healthcare Customer Communication Patterns Among Individuals with Diabetes in Clalit Health Services: A Retrospective Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benis, Arriel; Harel, Nissim; Barkan, Refael; Sela, Tomer; Feldman, Becca

    2017-01-01

    HMOs record medical data and their interactions with patients. Using this data we strive to identify sub-populations of healthcare customers based on their communication patterns and characterize these sub-populations by their socio-demographic, medical, treatment effectiveness, and treatment adherence profiles. This work will be used to develop tools and interventions aimed at improving patient care. The process included: (1) Extracting socio-demographic, clinical, laboratory, and communication data of 309,460 patients with diabetes in 2015, aged 32+ years, having 7+ years of the disease treated by Clalit Healthcare Services; (2) Reducing dimensions of continuous variables; (3) Finding the K communication-patterns clusters; (4) Building a hierarchical clustering and its associated heatmap to summarize the discovered clusters; (5) Analyzing the clusters found; (6) Validating results epidemiologically. Such a process supports understanding different communication-channel usage and the implementation of personalized services focusing on patients' needs and preferences.

  1. Assessment of quality of care given to diabetic patients at Jimma University Specialized Hospital diabetes follow-up clinic, Jimma, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudina Esayas K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-Saharan Africa is currently enduring the heaviest global burden of diabetes and diabetes care in such resource poor countries is far below standards. This study aims to describe the gaps in the care of Ethiopian diabetic patients at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods 329 diabetic patients were selected as participants in the study, aged 15 years or greater, who have been active in follow-up for their diabetes for more than 1 year at the hospital. They were interviewed for their demographic characters and relevant clinical profiles. Their charts were simultaneously reviewed for characters related to diabetes and related morbidities. Descriptive statistics was used for most variables and Chi-square test, where necessary, was used to test the association among various variables. P-value of Results Blood glucose determination was done for 98.5% of patients at each of the last three visits, but none ever had glycosylated haemoglobin results. The mean fasting blood sugar (FBS level was 171.7 ± 63.6 mg/dl and 73.1% of patients had mean FBS levels above 130 mg/dl. Over 44% of patients have already been diagnosed to be hypertensive and 64.1% had mean systolic BP of > 130 and/or diastolic > 80 mmHg over the last three visits. Diabetes eye and neurologic evaluations were ever done for 42.9% and 9.4% of patients respectively. About 66% had urine test for albumin, but only 28.2% had renal function testing over the last 5 years. The rates for lipid test, electrocardiography, echocardiography, or ultrasound of the kidneys during the same time were Conclusions The overall aspects of diabetes care at the hospital were far below any recommended standards. Hence, urgent action to improve care for patients with diabetes is mandatory. Future studies examining patterns and prevalence of chronic complications using appropriate parameters is strongly recommended to see the true burden of diabetes.

  2. Setting Priorities for Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research and Identifying Evidence Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jimmy T; Hutfless, Susan; Li, Tianjing; Bressler, Neil M; Heyward, James; Bittner, Ava K; Glassman, Adam; Dickersin, Kay

    2017-01-01

    Prioritizing comparative effectiveness research may contribute to obtaining answers that clinicians perceive they need and may minimize research that could be considered wasteful. Our objective was to identify evidence gaps and set priorities for new systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials for managing diabetic retinopathy (DR), including diabetic macular edema (DME). Cross-sectional study. Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) investigators. We provided recommendations from the American Academy of Ophthalmology's 2012 Preferred Practice Patterns for Diabetic Retinopathy as 91 answerable clinical research questions about intervention effectiveness to 410 DRCR.net investigators to rate each question's importance from 0 (not important) to 10 (very important) using a 2-round Delphi survey and to suggest additional questions. We considered questions as high priority if at least 75% of respondents to both rounds assigned an importance rating of 5 or more in round 2. We also extracted outcome measures relevant to DR and asked respondents to identify those that must be measured in all studies. We mapped Cochrane reviews published up to March 2016 to high-priority clinical research questions. Ranking of importance of each clinical question. Thirty-two individuals completed rounds 1 and 2 and suggested 15 questions. Among the final list of 106 clinical research questions, 22 questions met our definition of high priority: 9 of 22 concerned the effectiveness of anti-VEGF therapy, and 13 of 22 focused on how often patients should be followed up (re-examination) and treatment effectiveness in patients with specific characteristics (e.g., DME). Outcomes that 75% or more of respondents marked as "must be measured in all studies" included visual acuity and visual loss, death of participants, and intraocular pressure. Only 1 prioritized question was associated with conclusive evidence from a Cochrane systematic review. A limited response rate among

  3. MRI of the cuboid bone: Analysis of changes in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients and their clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Reyes, Emmanuel J.; Moncayo, Valeria; Chen, Zhengjia Nelson; Terk, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To investigate the association between diabetes and marrow changes in the cuboid; and (2) to evaluate the influence of age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and use of insulin in the occurrence of marrow changes in the cuboid. Research design and methods: MR and X-ray foot examinations of 237 patients [94 males, 143 females; mean age, 47.1 years (range 16–93 years)], five of whom underwent bilateral examinations, were reviewed. MR and radiographic studies were analyzed for the presence of marrow edema and fractures in the cuboid. Findings were correlated with demographic data (age, gender) and clinical information (BMI and use of insulin). Results: Two hundred and forty two feet – 69 diabetic and 173 non-diabetic – were retrospectively evaluated. There was a higher prevalence of marrow edema and fractures in the diabetic cuboid (n = 31, 45%) compared to non-diabetic cuboid (n = 25, 14%, p = 0.02). A fracture line was seen in fourteen (20%) diabetic cuboid bones compared to 4 (2%) in non-diabetic cuboid bones (p < 0.0001). Eleven (79%) cases of cuboid fractures in the diabetic population were radiographically occult. Multivariate data analysis revealed an adjusted odds ratio of 4.416 (95% CI; 2.307, 8.454) for the relationship between marrow changes (edema and fractures) in the cuboid and diabetes. For each year of age, the odds of changes in the cuboid increased by 2.2% (95% CI; 1.001, 1.044). Conclusion: Despite not bearing weight, the cuboid bone is more vulnerable to marrow edema and fractures in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Age seems to be an influential factor

  4. MRI of the cuboid bone: Analysis of changes in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients and their clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude, E-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Musculoskeletal Division, Orthopaedics and Spine Center, 59, Executive Park South, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Reyes, Emmanuel J.; Moncayo, Valeria; Chen, Zhengjia Nelson; Terk, Michael R. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Musculoskeletal Division, Orthopaedics and Spine Center, 59, Executive Park South, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Objectives: (1) To investigate the association between diabetes and marrow changes in the cuboid; and (2) to evaluate the influence of age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and use of insulin in the occurrence of marrow changes in the cuboid. Research design and methods: MR and X-ray foot examinations of 237 patients [94 males, 143 females; mean age, 47.1 years (range 16–93 years)], five of whom underwent bilateral examinations, were reviewed. MR and radiographic studies were analyzed for the presence of marrow edema and fractures in the cuboid. Findings were correlated with demographic data (age, gender) and clinical information (BMI and use of insulin). Results: Two hundred and forty two feet – 69 diabetic and 173 non-diabetic – were retrospectively evaluated. There was a higher prevalence of marrow edema and fractures in the diabetic cuboid (n = 31, 45%) compared to non-diabetic cuboid (n = 25, 14%, p = 0.02). A fracture line was seen in fourteen (20%) diabetic cuboid bones compared to 4 (2%) in non-diabetic cuboid bones (p < 0.0001). Eleven (79%) cases of cuboid fractures in the diabetic population were radiographically occult. Multivariate data analysis revealed an adjusted odds ratio of 4.416 (95% CI; 2.307, 8.454) for the relationship between marrow changes (edema and fractures) in the cuboid and diabetes. For each year of age, the odds of changes in the cuboid increased by 2.2% (95% CI; 1.001, 1.044). Conclusion: Despite not bearing weight, the cuboid bone is more vulnerable to marrow edema and fractures in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Age seems to be an influential factor.

  5. Clinical features of diabetes retinopathy in elderly patients with type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... elderly individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Northern Chinese. Materials and .... of DM, medical history of DM, body weight, height, waist circumference ..... Globalization of diabetes: The role of diet, lifestyle, and genes. Diabetes .... Each image should be less than 4096 kb (4 MB) in size. The size of ...

  6. Knowledge of complications of diabetes mellitus among patients visiting the diabetes clinic at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaa Obirikorang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM appears to be a global epidemic and an increasingly major non-communicable disease threatening both affluent and non-affluent society. The study aimed to determine the knowledge of diabetic complications among diabetes mellitus clients visiting the Diabetic Clinical at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana. Method This questionnaire-based descriptive study recruited a total 630 patients visiting the Diabetes Clinic at the Sampa Government Hospital. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information such as socio-demographic and knowledge on complications of diabetes. Results Out of a total of 630 participants, 325 (51.5 % knew diabetic foot as the most common complication followed by hypertension 223(35.4 %, neuropathy 184 (29.2 %, hypoactive sexual arousal 160(25.4 %, arousal disorder 135(21.5 %, eye diseases 112(17.7 %, heart disease 58(9.2 %, and renal disease 34(5.4 %. Comprehensive assessment of level of knowledge on the complications showed that majority 378(60.0 % of T2D patients did not have knowledge on diabetes complications, 169(26.9 % had inadequate knowledge on diabetics complication while 82(13.1 % had adequate knowledge. The risk factors associated with the level of knowledge of diabetic complications were female gender adjusted odd ratio (AOR =2.31 (1.56–3.41 married participants AOR = 3.37 (1.44–7.93, widowed AOR = 2.98 (1.10–8.08, basic level of education AOR =0.18 (0.082–0.50, Junior High School (JHS and above of education level AOR = 0.035(0.017–0.75, 5–9 years of T2D duration AOR = 0.31(0.018–0.57, ≥10 years T2D duration AOR = 0.042 (0.02–0.10 and urban dwellers AOR = 0.36 (0.22–0.68 respectively. Conclusion Participants knew the individual complication of diabetic mellitus but lack an in-depth knowledge on the complications. Further expansion of diabetic educative programs like using mass media and involving national curriculum

  7. Knowledge of complications of diabetes mellitus among patients visiting the diabetes clinic at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Anto, Enoch Odame; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Batu, Emmanuella Nsenbah; Stella, Agyemang Duah; Constance, Omerige; Brenya, Peter Kojo

    2016-07-26

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to be a global epidemic and an increasingly major non-communicable disease threatening both affluent and non-affluent society. The study aimed to determine the knowledge of diabetic complications among diabetes mellitus clients visiting the Diabetic Clinical at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana. This questionnaire-based descriptive study recruited a total 630 patients visiting the Diabetes Clinic at the Sampa Government Hospital. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information such as socio-demographic and knowledge on complications of diabetes. Out of a total of 630 participants, 325 (51.5 %) knew diabetic foot as the most common complication followed by hypertension 223(35.4 %), neuropathy 184 (29.2 %), hypoactive sexual arousal 160(25.4 %), arousal disorder 135(21.5 %), eye diseases 112(17.7 %), heart disease 58(9.2 %), and renal disease 34(5.4 %). Comprehensive assessment of level of knowledge on the complications showed that majority 378(60.0 %) of T2D patients did not have knowledge on diabetes complications, 169(26.9 %) had inadequate knowledge on diabetics complication while 82(13.1 %) had adequate knowledge. The risk factors associated with the level of knowledge of diabetic complications were female gender adjusted odd ratio (AOR) =2.31 (1.56-3.41) married participants AOR = 3.37 (1.44-7.93), widowed AOR = 2.98 (1.10-8.08), basic level of education AOR =0.18 (0.082-0.50), Junior High School (JHS) and above of education level AOR = 0.035(0.017-0.75), 5-9 years of T2D duration AOR = 0.31(0.018-0.57), ≥10 years T2D duration AOR = 0.042 (0.02-0.10) and urban dwellers AOR = 0.36 (0.22-0.68) respectively. Participants knew the individual complication of diabetic mellitus but lack an in-depth knowledge on the complications. Further expansion of diabetic educative programs like using mass media and involving national curriculum of education can improve self-regulatory awareness of

  8. Clinical outcomes of a diabetes education program for patients with diabetes mellitus in the Micronesian community in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mok Thoong

    2016-01-01

    Hawaii has diverse population made up of a cultural mix of different races. Due to different cultural and social influences and language barrier, many of the under-served population who migrated to Hawaii and having diabetes mellitus may be susceptible to long-term complications due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia and medication nonadherence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a diabetes education program on the clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus in the Micronesian community of Hawaii. This study included patients over age 18 years, with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The diabetes education program was customized for its weekly classes to fit to the under-served population. Data were collected on participants on the 1(st) day and then 6 months after attending the education program. Data on primary and secondary endpoints were collected and analyzed. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, fasting blood glucose, and triglyceride levels of participants fell significantly from baseline after attending the diabetes education program for 6 months. No significant changes were observed in other secondary outcomes during the study time period. Based on our findings, the diabetes education program that was tailored to the Micronesian population was successful in achieving glycemic goals, enhancing medication adherence, improving clinical outcomes, and also preventing long-term complications among its participants.

  9. Hospital admission patterns subsequent to diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children : a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waugh Norman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with type 1 diabetes are known to have a higher hospital admission rate than the underlying population and may also be admitted for procedures that would normally be carried out on a day surgery basis for non-diabetics. Emergency admission rates have sometimes been used as indicators of quality of diabetes care. In preparation for a study of hospital admissions, a systematic review was carried out on hospital admissions for children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, whilst under the age of 15. The main thrust of this review was to ascertain where there were gaps in the literature for studies investigating post-diagnosis hospitalisations, rather than to try to draw conclusions from the disparate data sets. Methods A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Cochrane LibrarMEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for the period 1986 to 2006, to identify publications relating to hospital admissions subsequent to the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes under the age of 15. Results Thirty-two publications met all inclusion criteria, 16 in Northern America, 11 in Europe and 5 in Australasia. Most of the studies selected were focussed on diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA or diabetes-related hospital admissions and only four studies included data on all admissions. Admission rates with DKA as primary diagnosis varied widely between 0.01 to 0.18 per patient-year as did those for other diabetes-related co-morbidity ranging from 0.05 to 0.38 per patient year, making it difficult to interpret data from different study designs. However, people with Type 1 diabetes are three times more likely to be hospitalised than the non-diabetic populations and stay in hospital twice as long. Conclusion Few studies report on all admissions to hospital in patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes whilst under the age of 15 years. Health care costs for type 1 patients are higher than those for the general population and information on associated patterns of

  10. Ketosis-prone atypical diabetes in Cameroonian people with hyperglycaemic crisis: frequency, clinical and metabolic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontchi-Yimagou, E; Nguewa, J L; Assah, F; Noubiap, J J; Boudou, P; Djahmeni, E; Balti, E V; Atogho-Tiedeu, B; Gautier, J F; Mbanya, J C; Sobngwi, E

    2017-03-01

    It is unclear whether ketosis-prone diabetes is a specific type or a subtype of Type 2 diabetes. We aimed to describe the clinical and metabolic features of ketosis-prone diabetes in a sub-Saharan population. We consecutively enrolled and characterized 173 people with non-autoimmune diabetes admitted for hyperglycaemic crisis at the Yaoundé Central Hospital, Cameroon. Blood samples were collected for fasting glucose, HbA 1c , lipid profile and C-peptide assays with insulin resistance and secretion estimation by homeostasis model assessment. People were classified as having Type 2 diabetes (n = 124) or ketosis-prone diabetes (n = 49). Ketosis-prone diabetes was sub-classified as new-onset ketotic phase (n = 34) or non-ketotic phase (n = 15). Ketosis-prone diabetes was found in 28.3% of the hyperglycaemic crises. Age at diabetes diagnosis was comparable in Type 2 and ketosis-prone diabetes [48 ± 14 vs 47 ± 11 years; P = 0.13] with a similar sex distribution. Overall BMI was 27.7 ± 13.4 kg/m 2 and was ≥ 25 kg/m 2 in 55.8% of those taking part, however, 73.5% of those with ketosis-prone diabetes reported weight loss of > 5% at diagnosis. Blood pressure and lipid profile were comparable in both types. Ketosis-prone diabetes in the ketotic phase was characterized by lower insulin secretion and higher serum triglycerides compared with non-ketotic ketosis prone and Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 and ketosis prone diabetes in the non-ketotic phase were comparable in terms of lipid profile, blood pressure, waist-to-hip ratio, BMI and fat mass, insulin secretion and insulin resistance indices. Ketosis-prone diabetes is likely to be a subtype of Type 2 diabetes with the potential to develop acute insulinopenic episodes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  11. Integration of Administrative, Clinical, and Environmental Data to Support the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: From Satellites to Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagliati, Arianna; Marinoni, Andrea; Cerra, Carlo; Decata, Pasquale; Chiovato, Luca; Gamba, Paolo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-12-01

    A very interesting perspective of "big data" in diabetes management stands in the integration of environmental information with data gathered for clinical and administrative purposes, to increase the capability of understanding spatial and temporal patterns of diseases. Within the MOSAIC project, funded by the European Union with the goal to design new diabetes analytics, we have jointly analyzed a clinical-administrative dataset of nearly 1.000 type 2 diabetes patients with environmental information derived from air quality maps acquired from remote sensing (satellite) data. Within this context we have adopted a general analysis framework able to deal with a large variety of temporal, geo-localized data. Thanks to the exploitation of time series analysis and satellite images processing, we studied whether glycemic control showed seasonal variations and if they have a spatiotemporal correlation with air pollution maps. We observed a link between the seasonal trends of glycated hemoglobin and air pollution in some of the considered geographic areas. Such findings will need future investigations for further confirmation. This work shows that it is possible to successfully deal with big data by implementing new analytics and how their exploration may provide new scenarios to better understand clinical phenomena. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  12. [Analysis of dietary pattern and diabetes mellitus influencing factors identified by classification tree model in adults of Fujian].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F L; Ye, Y; Yan, Y S

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To find out the dietary patterns and explore the relationship between environmental factors (especially dietary patterns) and diabetes mellitus in the adults of Fujian. Methods: Multi-stage sampling method were used to survey residents aged ≥18 years by questionnaire, physical examination and laboratory detection in 10 disease surveillance points in Fujian. Factor analysis was used to identify the dietary patterns, while logistic regression model was applied to analyze relationship between dietary patterns and diabetes mellitus, and classification tree model was adopted to identify the influencing factors for diabetes mellitus. Results: There were four dietary patterns in the population, including meat, plant, high-quality protein, and fried food and beverages patterns. The result of logistic analysis showed that plant pattern, which has higher factor loading of fresh fruit-vegetables and cereal-tubers, was a protective factor for non-diabetes mellitus. The risk of diabetes mellitus in the population at T2 and T3 levels of factor score were 0.727 (95 %CI: 0.561-0.943) times and 0.736 (95 %CI : 0.573-0.944) times higher, respectively, than those whose factor score was in lowest quartile. Thirteen influencing factors and eleven group at high-risk for diabetes mellitus were identified by classification tree model. The influencing factors were dyslipidemia, age, family history of diabetes, hypertension, physical activity, career, sex, sedentary time, abdominal adiposity, BMI, marital status, sleep time and high-quality protein pattern. Conclusion: There is a close association between dietary patterns and diabetes mellitus. It is necessary to promote healthy and reasonable diet, strengthen the monitoring and control of blood lipids, blood pressure and body weight, and have good lifestyle for the prevention and control of diabetes mellitus.

  13. Clinical and biochemical profile of lean type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Barma, Punyakrit Deb; Ranabir, Salam; Prasad, Lallan; Singh, Thangjam Premchand

    2011-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most prevalent form of diabetes worldwide. In western countries majority of the cases are obese. The scenario may be different in certain parts of India. Various studies have reported a high prevalence of lean type 2 diabetes mellitus with a body mass index < 19 kg/m 2 . Materials and Methods: We evaluated 100 cases of lean type 2 diabetes mellitus (62 males and 38 females). Results and Conclusion: The mean duration of diabetes was 51.7 months (rang...

  14. Glucose patterns during the OGTT and risk of future diabetes in an urban Indian population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulman, Adam; Gujral, Unjali P; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Traditionally, fasting and 2-hour post challenge plasma glucose have been used to diagnose diabetes. However, evidence indicates that clinically relevant pathophysiological information can be obtained by adding intermediate time-points to a standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). METHO...

  15. The role of diabetes on the clinical manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George Amani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes is associated with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), possibly due to impaired immunity, and diabetes may exacerbate the clinical manifestations of TB. Our aim was to assess the role of diabetes in the clinical manifestations of TB. Methods: We studied 1250 patients with pulmonary TB...... in an urban population in a cross-sectional study in Tanzania. All participants were tested for diabetes and HIV co-infection, and TB culture intensity was assessed. Levels of white blood cells, haemoglobin, acute phase reactants, CD4 count and HIV viral load were measured, and a qualitative morbidity...

  16. Clinical observation of intravitreal injection of Conbercept treating diabetic macularedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical efficiency of intravitreal conbercept on diabetic macular edema(DME. METHODS: This was a single arm, open-babel prospective study. Twenty eyes from 20 patients(12 males and 8 femaleswith DME diagnosed by fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAand optical coherence tomography(OCTwere enrolled. Before the injection, best-corrected visual acuity(BCVAof early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study(ETDRS, non-contact tonometer, ophthalmoscope, fundus photography, fundus fluoresein angiograph(FFA, and OCT were examined. All affected eyes were treated with intravitreal conbercept 0.05mL(10mg/mL. Patients were followed up for 6 to 11mo, with a mean duration of 8.55±1.96mo. Post-treatment BCVA, CMT, leakage of macular edema and complications were compared with baseline using repeat analysis. RESULTS: The initial average visual acuity(ETDRS letterswere 43.35±17.45, range from 9 to 70. The initial average central macular thickness(CMTwas 576.30±167.92μm, range from 337 to 987μm. The mean BCVA showed significant improvement during 1, 3, 6mo post-treatment and the latest follow up, with a mean increase of 11.2±5.9, 13.8±7.9, 15.7±6.8 and 14.7±8.6, respectively(PPPPCONCLUSION: Intravitreal conbercept significantly improve visual acuity and macular edema exudation.

  17. Factors associated with adherence to diabetes care recommendations among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a facility-based study in two urban diabetes clinics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyokunzire C

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Kyokunzire,1 Nicholas Matovu2,3 1Department of Community Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; 2Department of Community Health, Division of Noncommunicable Diseases, Ministry of Health – Uganda, Kampala, Uganda; 3Global Health Corps Fellowship Program 2017/2018, New York, NY, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of adherence and the factors associated with adherence to diabetes care recommendations among type 1 diabetic children and adolescents at two urban diabetes clinics in Kampala, Uganda.Research design and methods: A facility-based cross-sectional study was carried out among 200 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes at two major diabetes clinics in Kampala. Caretakers of the children and adolescents were interviewed using pretested questionnaires to provide information on sociodemographic characteristics, diabetes care, knowledge, attitudes, and adherence to diabetes care recommendations in type 1 diabetes. Prevalence rate ratios (PRRs at the 95% confidence interval (CI were used to establish the factors associated with adherence using modified Poisson regression, with robust standard errors. The data were analyzed by using STATA Version 13.0.Results: The overall prevalence of adherence to diabetes care recommendations was at 37%. However, evaluating adherence to specific treatment parameters showed that 52%, 76.5%, and 29.5% of the children and adolescents adhered to insulin, blood glucose monitoring, and dietary recommendations, respectively. In the final adjusted model, active diet monitoring (adjusted PRR [APRR]: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.01, 3.78, being under care of a sibling (APRR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.61, 1.71, being under care of a married caretaker (APRR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.14 and a separated or divorced caretaker (APRR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.27, taking three or less tests of blood glucose per day (APRR: 0

  18. Leveraging big data using a novel clinical database and analytic platform based on 323,145 individuals with and without of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Ranjit Mohan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Large volumes of biomedical data are being produced every day. Leveraging such voluminous amount of patient data using data science approaches help to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other insights of the disease. Integration of diverse genomic data with comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs exhibit challenges, but essentially, they provide a feasible opportunity to better understand the underlying diseases, treatment patterns and develop an efficient and effective approach to identify biomarkers for diagnosis and improve therapy. Here, we describe a big data solution for diabetes, providing an efficient and responsive scientific discovery platform for researchers. Clinical phenotype data was collected from EHR of a tertiary care diabetes centre across 20 locations in India. It encompasses >20 million data points on 323,145 patients registered over 25 years. The biomedical data includes diverse collection of information such as well characterized clinical phenotypes, biochemical investigations, drug prescriptions, genotype mapping, micro- macrovascular complications of diabetes, pedigree charts. Additionally, more than 3 million genomic variants from high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS were analyzed, annotated and integrated into the respective patient phenotype data. Statistical methods such as t-test, ANOVA were used to describe the significance of clinical variables between subject groups. Time based visualization methods for showing temporal patterns in key clinical variables such fasting glucose, HbA1c, Albuminuria, etc. are provided. It provides a novel clinical database of information on 323,145 patients with type 2 diabetes (n=294,371, type 1 diabetes (n=1,945, gestational diabetes (n=645, prediabetes (n=7,363, patients with miscellaneous forms of diabetes including monogenic forms of diabetes (n=4,601 and normal glucose tolerance (n=12,579. It has about 144,926 diabetes patients (44.8% of total

  19. Depression symptoms in people with diabetes attending outpatient podiatry clinics for the treatment of foot ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Sue; Nash, Toni; Ireland, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms, diabetes self-management, and quality of life in people with diabetes and foot ulcers. Ulcer status, mortality and amputations were also assessed at six months follow-up. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of people attending outpatient podiatry clinics at a major tertiary referral hospital. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Diabetes self-care was ass...

  20. Dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes among Ghanaian migrants in Europe and their compatriots in Ghana : the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galbete, Cecilia; Nicolaou, Mary; Meeks, Karlijn; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Addo, Juliet; Amoah, Stephen K; Smeeth, Liam; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Spranger, Joachim; Agyemang, Charles; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Beune, Erik; Stronks, Karien; Schulze, Matthias B; Danquah, Ina

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: We aimed to study the associations of dietary patterns (DPs) with type 2 diabetes (T2D) among Ghanaian adults. SUBJECTS/METHODS: In the multi-centre, cross-sectional RODAM (Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants) study (n = 4543), three overall DPs ("mixed",

  1. Analysis of the Financial Cost of Diabetes Mellitus in Four Cocoa Clinics of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaye, Ernest Attuquaye; Amporful, Edward O; Akweongo, Patricia; Aikins, Moses K

    2015-09-01

    To estimate the financial cost of managing diabetes mellitus in four Cocoa clinics of Ghana. A descriptive cross-sectional study of diabetes management was carried out in the four Cocoa clinics of Ghana from January to December 2009. The "cost-of-illness" approach from the institutional perspective was used. A pretested data extraction form was used to review the medical records of 304 randomly selected diabetic patients. The patients' mean age was 55.4 ± 9.4 years. The mean annual financial cost of managing one diabetic case at the clinics was estimated to be Ghana cedi (GHS) 540.35 (US $372.65). Service cost constituted 22% of the cost, whereas direct medical cost constituted 78% of the cost. Drug cost was 71% of the financial cost. The cost of hospitalization per patient-day at Cocoa clinics was estimated at GHS 32.78 (US $22.61). The total financial cost of diabetes management was estimated at GHS 420,087.67 (US $289,715.63). This accounted for 8% of the total expenditure for the clinics in the year 2009. The study showed that facility type, type of diabetes, and presence of complication are associated with the cost of diabetes management to Cocoa clinics. The mean age of detection suggests delay in diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and accompanying complications, which has cost implications. Policy that enhances early detection of diabetes in clinical practice would therefore improve management and reduce costs. The financial cost of managing diabetes can be used to forecast the economic burden of the disease in the area. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Are Adults Diagnosed with Diabetes achieving the American Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Cynthia M.; Febo-Vázquez, Isaedmarie; Guzmán, Manuel; Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Suárez, Erick

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the proportion of adults with previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) who met selected preventive practices and treatment goals according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) standards of medical care. Methods A secondary analysis of data collected for a previous epidemiologic study that used a probability cluster design to select 859 persons aged 21–79 years in the San Juan metropolitan area was undertaken. This study focused on 136 (15.8%) adults who self-reported DM. The Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes published by the ADA in 2011 were used to determine the proportion of adults achieving selected clinical practice recommendations. Results Less than half of adults achieved recommended treatment goals for LDL-cholesterol (47.8%), HDL-cholesterol (44.1%), blood pressure (41.2%) and HbA1c (28.7%). The percentage of adults achieving recommended levels of HbA1c, blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol simultaneously was 6.6%; the percentage achieving HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and albumin-to-creatinine ratio target levels was only 2.2%. More than half (60.2%) reported daily self-monitoring of foot ulcers and HbA1c testing at least twice over the past year (52.3%). However, less than half reported annual dilated eye examination (49.2%), annual comprehensive foot examination (43.8%), daily self-monitoring blood glucose (37.5%), moderate or vigorous physical activity (33.8%), and self-management DM education (28.9%). Conclusion This study showed that a substantial proportion of adults with DM did not achieve ADA recommendations on selected preventive practices and treatment goals. Strategies to improve DM medical care and surveillance of preventive-care practices and treatment goals among affected individuals are essential for planning further initiatives that contribute to reduce the burden of DM complications. PMID:22432404

  3. A clinical study of dermatoses in diabetes to establish its markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dependra Kumar Timshina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus generally appear subsequent to the development of the disease, but they may be the first presenting signs and in some cases they may precede the primary disease manifestation by many years. Aims : T0 he aim of our study was to study the spectrum of dermatoses in diabetics, to know the frequency of dermatoses specific to diabetes mellitus (DM, and to establish the mucocutaneous markers of DM. Material and Methods: The study was conducted at a diabetic clinic and our department between September 2008 and June 2010. Two hundred and twenty-four diabetic patients were included in the study group and those with gestational diabetes were excluded. Healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were taken as controls. Results: The male to female ratio was 1 : 1.21. Type 2 DM was seen in 89.7% and type 1 DM in 10.3% of the patients. Dermatoses were seen in 88.3% of the diabetics compared to 36% in non-diabetic controls (P<0.05. Cutaneous infections were the most common dermatoses followed by acanthosis nigricans and xerosis in diabetics. Type 2 DM was found to have an increased risk of complications than type 1 DM. Complications of diabetes were seen in 43.7% of the diabetic cases. Diabetic dermopathy, loss of hair over the legs, diabetic foot ulcer, and so on, were found to be the cutaneous markers of DM in our group of cases. Conclusion: Dermatoses were more common in diabetics than non-diabetics. Cutaneous infections formed the largest group of dermatoses in DM.

  4. Are the resources adoptive for conducting team-based diabetes management clinics? An explorative study at primary health care centers in Muscat, Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Kamila; Johansson, Helene; Al Mandhari, Ahmed; Norberg, Margareta

    2018-05-08

    AimThe aim of this study is to explore the perceptions among primary health center staff concerning competencies, values, skills and resources related to team-based diabetes management and to describe the availability of needed resources for team-based approaches. The diabetes epidemic challenges services available at primary health care centers in the Middle East. Therefore, there is a demand for evaluation of the available resources and team-based diabetes management in relation to the National Diabetes Management Guidelines. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 26 public primary health care centers in Muscat, the capital of Oman. Data were collected from manual and electronic resources as well as a questionnaire that was distributed to the physician-in-charge and diabetes management team members.FindingsThe study revealed significant differences between professional groups regarding how they perceived their own competencies, values and skills as well as available resources related to team-based diabetes management. The perceived competencies were high among all professions. The perceived team-related values and skills were also generally high but with overall lower recordings among the nurses. This pattern, along with the fact that very few nurses have specialized qualifications, is a barrier to providing team-based diabetes management. Participants indicated that there were sufficient laboratory resources; however, reported that pharmacological, technical and human resources were lacking. Further work should be done at public primary diabetes management clinics in order to fully implement team-based diabetes management.

  5. Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, and Factors Associated With Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Two Regional Hospitals in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindong, Maxime; Palle, John N; Nebongo, Daniel; Aminde, Leopold Ndemnge; Mboue-Djieka, Yannick; Mbarga, Nicole T Fouda; Dehayem, Mesmin Y; Choukem, Siméon-Pierre

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcer and high risk for ulceration, describe the clinical presentation, and identify factors associated with diabetic foot ulcer in the Southwest regional hospitals of Cameroon. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected using a structured questionnaire administered to consecutive patients with diabetes. Findings from detailed foot examination were recorded. Diabetic foot ulcer was diagnosed according to the International Working Group on Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) definition. Data were analyzed with Stata IC version 12. Of the 203 participants included, 63.1% were females. Age ranged from 26 to 96 years. The median duration of diabetes was 4.0 years (interquartile range 1.0-8.0 years). The prevalence of diabetic foot ulcer was 11.8% (24), of whom 29.2% (7) had high grade (grades 2 to 4), and most of the ulcers 58.3% (14) were located at the plantar region. The prevalence of high risk for ulceration was 21.8% (39). Loss of protective sensation (OR = 3.73, 95% CI = 1.43-9.71; P = .007), and peripheral arterial disease (OR = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.14-10.56; P = .028) were independently associated with diabetic foot. Diabetic foot ulcer is a common complication among patients with diabetes attending these regional hospitals. Loss of protective sensation, and peripheral arterial disease increase the odds of having diabetic foot ulcer, and we suggest them as the main target of interest for prevention.

  6. [The changes in vestibular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Tianyu; Shen, Jianzhong; Gong, Jingrong; Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Jimin; Pang, Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    To study the changes of vestibular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and its clinical significance. Electronystagmography (ENG) was used to examine 76 patients with diabetes mellitus and 60 healthy adults subjects. After clinical detection of vestibular function including spontaneous nystagmus, positional test, head shaking nystagmus, neck torsion test, caloric test, and sensory organization tests which consist of gaze, saccade and smooth pursuit test, the results of these two groups were recorded for qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis. The rate of vestibular dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus were 68.4%. and that of the controls were 8.3%. There was significant difference between these two groups (chi2 = 15.472, P Vertigo or dizziness occurred in patients with diabetes mellitus might be related to vestibular dysfunction. ENG test could be used as one of the objective clinical examinations in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  7. Determinants of misconceptions about diabetes among Saudi diabetic patients attending diabetes clinic at a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Alsunni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the determinants of misconceptions about diabetes in patients registered with a diabetes clinic at a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional survey was carried out at a diabetes clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2012. A total of 200 diabetic patients were interviewed using a questionnaire comprising 36 popular misconceptions. The total misconception score was calculated and categorized into low (0-12, moderate (13-24 and high (25-36 scores. The association of misconception score with various potential determinants was calculated using Chi-square test. Step-wise logistic regression was applied to the variables showing significant association with the misconception score in order to identify the determinants of misconceptions. Results: The mean age was 39.62 ± 16.7 and 112 (56% subjects were females. Type 1 diabetics were 78 (39%, while 122 (61% had Type 2 diabetes. Insulin was being used by 105 (52.5%, 124 (62% were self-monitoring blood glucose and 112 (56% were using diet control. Formal education on diabetes awareness had been received by 167 (83.5% before the interview. The mean misconception score was 10.29 ± 4.92 with 115 (57.5% subjects had low misconception scores (15 years since diagnosis, no self-monitoring, no dietary control and no diabetes education were all significantly (P 15 years since diagnosis, no self-monitoring, no diet control and no education about diabetes.

  8. Islet Microencapsulation: Strategies and Clinical Status in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omami, Mustafa; McGarrigle, James J; Reedy, Mick; Isa, Douglas; Ghani, Sofia; Marchese, Enza; Bochenek, Matthew A; Longi, Maha; Xing, Yuan; Joshi, Ira; Wang, Yong; Oberholzer, José

    2017-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease that results from the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells in the islets of Langerhans. Islet cell transplantation has become a successful therapy for specific patients with T1DM with hypoglycemic unawareness. The reversal of T1DM by islet transplantation is now performed at many major medical facilities throughout the world. However, many challenges must still be overcome in order to achieve continuous, long-term successful transplant outcomes. Two major obstacles to this therapy are a lack of islet cells for transplantation and the need for life-long immunosuppressive treatment. Microencapsulation is seen as a technology that can overcome both these limitations of islet cell transplantation. This review depicts the present state of microencapsulated islet transplantation. Microencapsulation can play a significant role in overcoming the need for immunosuppression and lack of donor islet cells. This review focuses on microencapsulation and the clinical status of the technology in combating T1DM.

  9. Radiological evaluation of swallowing and clinical patterns of systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesi, A.; Pesaresi, A.; Cavalli, M.L.; Serri, L.; Salmistraro, D.; Candela, M.; Gabrielli, A.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) were studied by means of videofluoroscopy in order to evaluate the abnormalities in the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition and to correlate the radiological patterns with the clinical features of the disease. Thirteen patients (25.5%) exhibited swallowing disorders such as oral leakage, retention, penetration, mild or moderate aspiration and abnormal upper esophageal sphincter behavior. These dysfunctions were more evident in patients with esophageal motility abnormalities. A normal radiological pattern in the esophagus was not associated with swallowing alterations. Remarkably, patients with oral-pharyngeal disorders had a higher incidence of lung diseases. Forty-five patients (88%) exhibited disorders of the esophageal phase of deglutition, such as mild or severe motility abnormalities or hiatal hernia, gastro-esophageal reflux, reflux esophagitis, and stricture. Radiological findings in the esophagus can be abnormal in the early stages of the disease. On the other hand, the radiological pattern of esophageal motility can be occasionally negative in advanced or extensive disease. This indicates a discrepancy between clinical symptoms and radiological picture of the esophagus. The radiological examination of the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition is important in patients with scleroderma in order to evaluate visceral involvement, motility disorders, and risk of aspiration. Such radiological information can be useful in preventing esophagitis and pulmonary complications

  10. Prevalence and Pattern of Traditional and Complementary Alternative Medicine Use in Diabetic Patients in Dubai, UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama ALAlami

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current study explored the prevalence and pattern of traditional and complementary alternative medicine (TCAM use, its perceived benefits and possible impact on health outcomes amongst diabetics in Dubai, UAE. Objectives: Diabetes is highly prevalent in the UAE, with diabetics potentially not complying with the prescribed conventional medicines, or preferring to use of traditional and complementary alternative medicines. The current study therefore sheds light on these two areas. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in 4 healthcare facilities in Dubai using quantitative data collection methods. Using a systematic random sampling method, 145 diabetic participants completed a self-reported questionnaire. Measures in the questionnaire included traditional and complementary alternative medicine use, and perceived benefits. SPSS version 21 was used for result analysis. Chi-square test was used to confirm significance amongst various groups. Results: Amongst 145 diabetic participants recruited, 66.9% were female, and 57.9% had undergraduate degree. Majority of participants (95.2% had type II diabetes. Participants age was between 20 to 79 years. The prevalence of TCAM use amongst the participants was 21.4%, with the majority of users being female (27.8%. TCAM use was more common amongst housewives (28.6%. None of the TCAM users had the intervention prescribed by a health specialist, and the majority (51.6% used it for the purpose of slowing the progression of the disease. More than half (58.1% of TCAM users reported receiving the desired effect, and 77.4% used TCAM in combination with the prescribed conventional medicine. Conclusion: The current study confirmed the un-prescribed use of TCAM amongst participants in Dubai, UAE. Further studies are required to elaborate on the interaction between TCAM and prescribed conventional medicines.

  11. Pattern of anti-diabetic drugs prescribed in a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zuhayer; Hafez, M A; Bari, M A; Akhter, Jesmin

    2016-01-01

    Globally, diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. This study was conducted for collecting the demographic details of diabetic patients and determining the pattern of drugs prescribed among them in outpatient department of a tertiary healthcare center. A descriptive type of cross-sectional study was carried out at the outpatient department of Endocrinology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh from 1 May to 31 July, 2015. Diabetic patients receiving the management for at least 6 months were enrolled and interviewed by the researchers after getting informed written consent. Structured case record form was used for demographic data & prescription details. Data were analysed using computer in SPSS 22 and Microsoft Excel 2010. Altogether 105 patients, 40 males (38.1%) and 65 females (61.9%) were enrolled with urban predominance (69.5%) where 51 (48.6%) were in the age group 47-61 years with a mean of 53.4 (SD±10.6) years. 70 (66.7%) had diabetic history of less than 5 years and 66 (62.9%) had at least one concurrent illness. Hypertension accounted for majority (34.3%) of complications. On an average, 5.62 (SD±3.16) drugs were advised per prescription for diabetes as well as associated co-morbidities and majority (23.8%) had 4 drugs. The majority of drugs (74.3%) were from local manufacturers. Most patients (62.9%) were prescribed with oral drugs singly. Metformin alone predominated in 41% prescriptions followed by the combination of Metformin and Sitagliptin (31.4%). The findings can serve as a guide to choose the formulation and combination of anti-diabetic drugs in this part of the world before developing & marketing any new drug.

  12. Diabetes guidelines and clinical practice: is there a gap? The South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-03

    Jan 3, 2012 ... Original Research: Diabetes guidelines and clinical practice. 85. 2012 Volume 17 No 2 ... endorsed by The Society of Endocrinology Metabolism and Diabetes of ... do not reach the target HbA1c value of < 7%.8-10 In striving to achieve ..... reflected the worst glycaemic control, as assessed by HbA1c levels.

  13. Dietary compliance among diabetes patients attending clinic at new ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a major public health issue. It is one of the most prevalent medical conditions affecting people and is responsible for high mortality and large amount of potential years of life lost. Diet is the cornerstone of diabetes management, without which its control is impossible. However, compliance to ...

  14. Longitudinal fasting blood glucose patterns and arterial stiffness risk in a population without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuntao; Yu, Junxing; Jin, Cheng; Li, Yun; Su, Jinmei; Wei, Guoqing; Zheng, Xiaoming; Gao, Jingsheng; Gao, Wenyuan; Wu, Shouling

    2017-01-01

    To identify long-term fasting blood glucose trajectories and to assess the association between the trajectories and the risk of arterial stiffness in individuals without diabetes. We enrolled 16,454 non-diabetic participants from Kailuan cohort. Fasting blood glucose concentrations were measured in 2006, 2008, and 2010 survey. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocities were measured during 2011 to 2016. Multivariate regression model was used to estimate the difference of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity levels and logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) of arterial stiffness risk, according to the fasting blood glucose trajectories. We identified five distinct fasting blood glucose trajectories and each of the trajectories was labeled according to its range and change over 2006-2010 survey: elevated-stable pattern (5.0% of participants), elevated-decreasing pattern (6.6%), moderate-increasing pattern (10.9%), moderate-stable pattern (59.3%), and low-stable pattern (18.2%). After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals with elevated-stable pattern had a 42.6 cm/s (95%CI: 24.7 to 60.6 cm/s) higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity level and a 37% (OR 1.37, 95%CI: 1.14 to 1.66) higher arterial stiffness risk, and individuals with moderate-increasing pattern had a 19.6 cm/s (95%CI: 6.9 to 32.3 cm/s) higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity level and a 17% (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03 to 1.33) higher arterial stiffness risk, related to individuals with moderate-stable pattern. We did not find significant associations of the elevated-decreasing or low-stable patterns with arterial stiffness. Consistently, the cumulative average, variability, and increased rate of fasting blood glucose during 2006-2010 survey were significantly associated with the arterial stiffness risk. Discrete fasting blood glucose trajectories were associated with the arterial stiffness risk in non-diabetic individuals.

  15. Clinical significance of intramammary arterial calcifications in diabetic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Zorica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that intramammary arterial calcifications diagnosed by mammography as a part of generalized diabetic macroangiopathy may be an indirect sign of diabetes mellitus. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the incidence of intramammary arterial calcifications, the patient’s age when the calcifications occur, as well as to observe the influence of diabetic polineuropathy, type, and the duration of diabetes on the onset of calcifications, in comparison with nondiabetic women. Methods. Mammographic findings of 113 diabetic female patients (21 with type 1 diabetes and 92 with type 2, as well as of 208 nondiabetic women (the control group were analyzed in the prospective study. The data about the type of diabetes, its duration, and polineuropathy were obtained using the questionnaire. Statistical differences were determined by Mann-Whitney test. Results. Intramammary arterial calcifications were identified in 33.3% of the women with type 1 diabetes, in 40.2% with type 2, and in 8.2% of the women from the control group, respectively. The differences comparing the women with type 1, as well as type 2 diabetes and the controls were statistically significant (p=0.0001. Women with intramammary arterial calcifications and type 1 diabetes were younger comparing to the control group (median age 52 years, comparing to 67 years of age, p=0.001, while there was no statistically significant difference in age between the women with calcifications and type 2 diabetes (61 years of age in relation to the control group (p=0.176. The incidence of polineuropathy in diabetic women was higher in the group with intramammary arterial calcifications (52.3% in comparison to the group without calcifications (26.1%, (p=0.005. The association between intramammary arterial calcifications and the duration of diabetes was not found. Conclusion. The obtained results supported the theory that intramammary arterial calcifications, detected by

  16. Changing patterns of clinical PET use - 5 years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binns, D.; Hicks, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Increasing clinical awareness and acceptance of the clinical role of positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to alter patterns of referral. To assess whether patterns of referral are changing in response to greater experience with this technique, we reviewed indications of new referrals to our facility for each of the past 5 years of operation. Of more than 6,183 studies performed since our facility began operation in September 1996, 4,401 were initial referrals. Of these referrals the most common indications were carcinoma of the lung (n = 970, 22.0 %), colorectal cancer (n = 631, 14.3 %), malignant melanoma (n = 506, 11.5 %), genito-urinary tract cancer (n = 427, 9.7 %), epilepsy (n = 366, 8.3 %), and lymphoma (n = 351, 8.0 %). Referrals for all these indications, other than malignant melanoma, continued to grow in absolute terms throughout the 5 year interval but in relative terms only lung cancer maintained a similar proportion of scans reflecting an expansion of other referral indications. Evaluation of intractable partial complex seizures demonstrated the most marked growth in both absolute and relative terms. Conversely, malignant melanoma referrals declined as patients with thick melanoma began to have sentinel lymph node biopsy rather than PET as their initial staging investigation. Our experience suggests that clinical PET referrals reflect the expanding evidence-base regarding both the strengths and weaknesses of PET. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. Diabetic ketoacidosis: clinical characteristics, precipitating factors and outcomes of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barski, Leonid; Nevzorov, Roman; Rabaev, Elena; Jotkowitz, Alan; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Zektser, Miri; Zeller, Lior; Shleyfer, Elena; Almog, Yaniv

    2012-05-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common and serious complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). To evaluate the clinical characteristics, hospital management and outcomes of patients with DKA. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with DKA during the period 1 January 2003 to 1 January 2010. Three groups were compared: patients with mild DKA, with moderate DKA, and with severe DKA. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The secondary outcomes were 30 days all-cause mortality, length of hospital stay, and complication rate. The study population comprised 220 patients with DKA. In the mild (78 patients) and moderate (116 patients) groups there was a higher proportion of patients with type 1 DM (75.6%, 79.3%) compared with 57.7% in the severe group (26 patients, P = 0.08). HbA1c levels prior to admission were high in all three groups, without significant difference (10.9 +/- 2.2, 10.7 +/- 1.9, and 10.6 +/- 2.4 respectively, P = 0.9). In all groups the most frequent precipitating factors were related to insulin therapy and infections. The patients with severe DKA had more electrolyte abnormalities (hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypophosphatemia) compared with the mild and moderate forms of the disease. While 72.7% of the entire cohort was hospitalized in the general medical ward, 80.8% of those with severe DKA were admitted to the intensive care unit. The in-hospital mortality rate for the entire cohort was 4.1%, comparable with previous data from experienced centers. Advanced age, mechanical ventilation and bedridden state were independent predictors associated with 30 day mortality: hazard ratio (HR) 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.11; HR 6.8, 95% CI 2.03-23.1; and HR 3.8, 95% CI 1.13-12.7, respectively. Patients with DKA in our study were generally poorly controlled prior to their admission, as reflected by high HbA1c levels. Type 2 DM is frequently associated with DKA including the severe form of the disease. The

  18. “Silent” Diabetes and Clinical Outcome After Treatment With Contemporary Drug-Eluting Stents : The BIO-RESORT Silent Diabetes Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Birgelen, Clemens; Kok, Marlies M.; Sattar, Naveed; Zocca, Paolo; Doelman, Cees; Kant, Gert D.; Löwik, Marije M.; van der Heijden, Liefke C.; Sen, Hanim; van Houwelingen, Gert K.; Stoel, Martin G.; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.; Hartmann, Marc; de Man, Frits H.A.F.; Linssen, Gerard C.M.; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Tandjung, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess the prevalence and clinical impact of silent diabetes and pre-diabetes in “nondiabetic” percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) all-comers. Background: Patients with undetected and thus untreated (silent) diabetes may have higher event risks after PCI with

  19. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillebrands Jan-Luuk

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  20. Adherence of Healthcare Professionals to American Diabetes Association 2004 guidelines for the care of patients with type 2 diabetes at Peripheral Diabetes Clinics in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Farzana; Fatima, Nimra; Fawwad, Asher; Riaz, Mussarat

    2013-04-01

    To observe the adherence of Healthcare Professionals to American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2004 guidelines for the care of patients with type 2 diabetes at Peripheral Diabetes Clinics (PDCs) in Karachi, Pakistan. The study was conducted using a retrospective medical chart review of patients with type 2 diabetes at four PDCs in four townships of Karachi district from January 2005 to December 2006. Entire medical records of patients were evaluated for the evidence of documentation of testing and treatment. Medical records of 691 patients (332 males and 359 females) with type 2 diabetes were reviewed. Mean age of the patients was 50.79 ± 10.75 years. Deficiencies were observed in most areas of diabetes care. Blood pressure was documented in 85.81% patients, whereas, serum creatinine, HbA1c and lipid profile were noted in 56%, 44.57% and 40.08% of the patients respectively. Similarly, lower leg examination was registered in 44% patients, while in 30.53% of the patients fundoscopic examination was recorded. Co-morbid conditions like hypertension and hyperlipidemia were documented in 92.7% and 84.6% patients respectively. HbA1c guidelines was suboptimal. Moreover, insufficient documentation of medical records reflected inadequate care of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Limits of clinical tests to screen autonomic function in diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, M; Bertram, D; Sagnol, I; Cerutti, C; Thivolet, C; Fauvel, J P

    2001-11-01

    A precocious detection of cardiac autonomic dysfunction is of major clinical interest that could lead to a more intensive supervision of diabetic patients. However, classical clinical exploration of cardiac autonomic function is not easy to undertake in a reproducible way. Thus, respective interests of autonomic nervous parameters provided by both clinical tests and computerized analysis of resting blood pressure were checked in type 1 diabetic patients without orthostatic hypotension and microalbuminuria. Thirteen diabetic subjects matched for age and gender to thirteen healthy subjects volunteered to participate to the study. From clinical tests (standing up, deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, handgrip test), autonomic function was scored according to Ewing's methodology. Analysis of resting beat to beat blood pressure provided autonomic indices of the cardiac function (spectral analysis or Z analysis). 5 of the 13 diabetic patients exhibited a pathological score (more than one pathological response) suggesting the presence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. The most discriminative test was the deep breathing test. However, spectral indices of BP recordings and baro-reflex sensitivity (BRS) of these 5 subjects were similar to those of healthy subjects and of remaining diabetic subjects. Alteration in Ewing's score given by clinical tests may not reflect an alteration of cardiac autonomic function in asymptomatic type 1 diabetic patients, because spectral indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic (including BRS) function were within normal range. Our results strongly suggest to confront results provided by both methodologies before concluding to an autonomic cardiac impairment in asymptomatic diabetic patients.

  2. Study the Prevalence of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Referring to Kerman Diabetes Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mirzaie

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous disorder that affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age patients with this syndrome one of the high risk groups for type 2 diabetes mellitus in future. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PCOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials & Methods: One hundred women under 45 years with type 2 diabetes treating with diet or hypoglycemic drugs, referred to Kerman diabetic center in 2005 were identified. Women with galactorrhea or history of thyroid dysfunction were excluded from the study. Data were collected through interview and then data of 92 women were analyzed using t-test and x2. Results: Ninety two women enrolled in the study and 18 cases (19.5% had clinical symptoms of PCOS. The mean of age was 38 years (38.76±5.92 years. The mean age of women with PCOS was 34.89±3.96 and that of normal women was 39.7±5.96 years (P0.05. Conclusion: This study indicated women with type 2 diabetes mellitus had a higher prevalence of polycystic syndrome. Android obesity is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS.

  3. [Optimizing the managment of patients with diabetes mellitus: selected clinical trials from the 2004 Congress of the American Diabetes Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Radermecker, R P; Philips, J C

    2004-06-01

    The 64th scientific congress of the American Diabetes Association had a special session devoted to the presentation of the results from three clinical trials: 1) the first multicentre international trial of pancreatic islet transplantation according to the so-called Edmonton protocol with the primary endpoint of restoring insulin independence in type 1 diabetic patients; 2) three pivotal studies of 30 weeks testing both the efficacy and safety of exenatide (exendin-4), a new insulin secretagogue that is a long-acting analogue of glucagon-like peptide-1, in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with either metformin, or a sulfonylurea, or a metformin-sulfonylurea combination; and 3) the "Collaborative AtoRvastatin Diabetes Study" (CARDS), a placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of cardiovascular complications using atorvastatin 10 mg in 2 838 at risk patients with type 2 diabetes. The main results and conclusions of these trials are briefly presented as they open new perspectives in the management of patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Study the Prevalence of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Referring to Kerman Diabetes Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzaie

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous disorder that affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age patients with this syndrome one of the high risk groups for type 2 diabetes mellitus in future. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PCOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials & Methods: One hundred women under 45 years with type 2 diabetes treating with diet or hypoglycemic drugs, referred to Kerman diabetic center in 2005 were identified. Women with galactorrhea or history of thyroid dysfunction were excluded from the study. Data were collected through interview and then data of 92 women were analyzed using t-test and x2. Results: Ninety two women enrolled in the study and 18 cases (19.5% had clinical symptoms of PCOS. The mean of age was 38 years (38.76±5.92 years. The mean age of women with PCOS was 34 and that of normal women was 39 years (P0.05. Conclusion: This study indicated women with type 2 diabetes mellitus had a higher prevalence of polycystic syndrome. Android obesity is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS.

  5. Value of self-monitoring blood glucose pattern analysis in improving diabetes outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Christopher G; Davidson, Jaime A

    2009-05-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an important adjunct to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) testing. This action can distinguish between fasting, preprandial, and postprandial hyperglycemia; detect glycemic excursions; identify and monitor resolution of hypoglycemia; and provide immediate feedback to patients about the effect of food choices, activity, and medication on glycemic control. Pattern analysis is a systematic approach to identifying glycemic patterns within SMBG data and then taking appropriate action based upon those results. The use of pattern analysis involves: (1) establishing pre- and postprandial glucose targets; (2) obtaining data on glucose levels, carbohydrate intake, medication administration (type, dosages, timing), activity levels and physical/emotional stress; (3) analyzing data to identify patterns of glycemic excursions, assessing any influential factors, and implementing appropriate action(s); and (4) performing ongoing SMBG to assess the impact of any therapeutic changes made. Computer-based and paper-based data collection and management tools can be developed to perform pattern analysis for identifying patterns in SMBG data. This approach to interpreting SMBG data facilitates rational therapeutic adjustments in response to this information. Pattern analysis of SMBG data can be of equal or greater value than measurement of HbA1c levels. 2009 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Prevalence of Hypothyroidism and Its Association with Diabetes Mellitus in Patients of an Ambulatory Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Mariela; Escobar, Eddy; Rodríguez González, Carmen E

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most common thyroid disorder in the adult population. Studies have found a higher prevalence of overt hypothyroidism in type 2 diabetic population than in the general population, but the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus 2 is still controversial. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence rate of hypothyroidism in the adult population receiving services in an ambulatory clinic and to determine if there is an association between hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus. From the database of all adult patients who attended the outpatient clinic at Family Medicine Center Policlínica Bella Vista in Mayagüez, P.R. during 2014, a random sample of 200 subjects was obtained and the medical records were reviewed. The prevalence rate of diabetes mellitus in this group was 22% and the prevalence rate of hypothyroidism was 17%. The prevalence rate of hypothyroidism in diabetic patients was 10/44 (22.7%). The prevalence rate of hypothyroidism in non-diabetic patients was 24/156 (15.4%). The prevalence ratio was 1.48 (95% CI: 0.77, 2.85; X2 = 1.31, p = 0.25). The results of this cross-sectional study showed a non-statistically significant tendency for a higher prevalence of hypothyroidism in diabetic patients, which suggest that screening for hypothyroidism among patients with diabetes should be considered. More studies with more patients are necessary to investigate the association between thyroid dysfunction and diabetic patients.

  7. Clinical and laboratory parameters in adult diabetics with and without calcific shoulder periarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrikakis, M E; Sfikakis, P P; Kontoyannis, S A; Antoniades, L G; Kontoyannis, D A; Moulopoulou, D S

    1991-10-01

    The clinical and laboratory parameters of calcific shoulder periarthritis (CSP) were examined in 900 patients with type II diabetes mellitus as well as in 350 age- and sex-matched control subjects. A threefold increased prevalence of CSP in diabetics compared with the control group was associated with the presence of longstanding and poorly controlled diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia suggesting pronounced diabetic angiopathy, as well as with minor trauma and hypomagnesemia. Aging and serum calcium concentrations were not related to the presence of CSP. Thirty-two percent of diabetics with CSP were symptomatic; 15% of them presented with severe pain and restriction of shoulder movement. These findings confirm a close pathogenetic interrelation between CSP and diabetes mellitus.

  8. Clinical Course and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seung Yun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated clinical course and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.MethodsA total of 759 patients with T2DM without DR were included from January 2001 to December 2004. Retinopathy evaluation was performed at least annually by ophthalmologists. The severity of the DR was classified into five categories according to the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scales.ResultsOf the 759 patients, 523 patients (68.9% completed the follow-up evaluation. During the follow-up period, 235 patients (44.9% developed DR, and 32 patients (13.6% progressed to severe nonproliferative DR (NPDR or proliferative DR (PDR. The mean duration of diabetes at the first diagnosis of mild NPDR, moderate NPDR, and severe NPDR or PDR were 14.8, 16.7, and 17.3 years, respectively. After adjusting multiple confounding factors, the significant risk factors for the incidence of DR risk in patients with T2DM were old age, longer duration of diabetes, higher mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and albuminuria. Even in the patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes for longer than 10 years at baseline, a decrease in HbA1c led to a significant reduction in the risk of developing DR (hazard ratio, 0.73 per 1% HbA1c decrement; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.91; P=0.005.ConclusionThis prospective cohort study demonstrates that glycemic control, diabetes duration, age, and albuminuria are important risk factors for the development of DR. More aggressive retinal screening for T2DM patients diagnosed with DR should be required in order to not miss rapid progression of DR.

  9. Comparison of the clinical parameters of benign prostate hyperplasia in diabetic and non diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Ozcan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the correlation between benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH measures and diabetes mellitus in men with benign prostate hyperplasia in a prospective study. Materials and methods: Between 2008-2012, 100 diabetic and 200 non diabetic patients undergoing surgery due to benign prostate hyperplasia were enrolled in the study. The parameters evaluated for each patients included prostate volume, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, total testosterone, total prostatic specific antigen (T-PSA, triglicerides, total cholesterol and body mass index (BMI. A questionnaire including international prostate symptom score (IPSS was sdministered and uroflow test measuring the peak urinary flow rate was performed to appreciate the complaints of the patients objectively. Results: Diabetic patients are more likely to have larger prostate volume. The symptom score evaluated by IPSS and post micturition residual volume were also significantly higher in diabetic groups. The other statistically significant different parameter between two groups was total testosterone that diabetic patients tend to have lower levels. Diabetic counterparts were established to have higher BMI. No statistically significant differentiation was observed about trigliceryde and total cholesterol levels and uroflow rates. Conclusions: Our study suggests a positive correlation between high prostate volume and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also observed a positive correlation between symptom scores and post micturion residual volumes and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus suggesting that the presence of diabetes is related to both static and dynamic components of benign prostate hyperplasia. Additionally testosterone levels were lower in diabetic patients. Further studies need to confirm these relationship in a larger population.

  10. Action research as a method for changing patient education practice in a clinical diabetes setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Jane Rohde; Hansen, Ulla M.; Glindorf, Mette

    2014-01-01

    with researchers developed and implemented a participatory, group-based diabetes education program in a diabetes clinic in the Danish health care system. The research process included a variety of qualitative methods: workshops, classroom observations, video recordings and semi-structured interviews. These methods......Action research is potentially a useful method for changing clinical practice by involving practitioners in the process of change. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of action research in bridging the gap between research and practice. Diabetes educators in collaboration...... aimed at obtaining contextual sensitivity, allowing dynamic interactions with educators and people with diabetes. Despite challenges, the study demonstrates how action research methods contribute to development and change of diabetes education practice while simultaneously adding knowledge to the action...

  11. Animal models for clinical and gestational diabetes: maternal and fetal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Ana CI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. Methods On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16, severe (n = 50 and mild diabetes (n = 30. At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Results Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Conclusion Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy

  12. Clinical implication of blood glucose monitoring in general dental offices: the Ehime Dental Diabetes Study

    OpenAIRE

    Harase, Tadahiro; Nishida, Wataru; Hamakawa, Tomohiro; Hino, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Kenji; Kobayashi, Satoru; Sako, Hirofumi; Ito, Shirou; Murakami, Hajime; Nishida, Kei; Inoue, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Masahito; Yoshizu, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined whether general dentists can contribute to the detection of patients with undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes by monitoring blood glucose in dental clinics. Research design and methods A total of 716 patients who visited clinics for dental treatment were enrolled and classified into 3 groups (mild, moderate, and severe) according to Kornman's criteria for periodontitis. The correlations between the casual blood glucose level, presence or absence of the history of diabet...

  13. A Dietary Pattern Derived by Reduced Rank Regression is Associated with Type 2 Diabetes in An Urban Ghanaian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K. Frank

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reduced rank regression (RRR is an innovative technique to establish dietary patterns related to biochemical risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but has not been applied in sub-Saharan Africa. In a hospital-based case-control study for type 2 diabetes in Kumasi (diabetes cases, 538; controls, 668 dietary intake was assessed by a specific food frequency questionnaire. After random split of our study population, we derived a dietary pattern in the training set using RRR with adiponectin, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides as responses and 35 food items as predictors. This pattern score was applied to the validation set, and its association with type 2 diabetes was examined by logistic regression. The dietary pattern was characterized by a high consumption of plantain, cassava, and garden egg, and a low intake of rice, juice, vegetable oil, eggs, chocolate drink, sweets, and red meat; the score correlated positively with serum triglycerides and negatively with adiponectin. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of type 2 diabetes for the highest quintile compared to the lowest was 4.43 (95% confidence interval: 1.87–10.50, p for trend < 0.001. The identified dietary pattern increases the odds of type 2 diabetes in urban Ghanaians, which is mainly attributed to increased serum triglycerides.

  14. [Clinical parameters for molecular testing of Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datz, N; Nestoris, C; von Schütz, W; Danne, T; Driesel, A J; Maringa, M; Kordonouri, O

    2011-05-01

    Monogenic forms of diabetes are often diagnosed by chance, due to the variety of clinical presentation and limited experience of the diabetologists with this kind of diabetes. Aim of this study was to evaluate clinical parameters for an efficient screening. Clinical parameters were: negative diabetes-specific antibodies at onset of diabetes, positive family history of diabetes, and low to moderate insulin requirements after one year of diabetes treatment. Molecular testing was performed through sequencing of the programming regions of HNF-4alpha (MODY 1), glucokinase (MODY 2) and HNF-1alpha/TCF1 (MODY 3) and in one patient the HNF-1beta/TCF2 region (MODY 5). 39 of 292 patients treated with insulin were negative for GADA and IA2A, and 8 (20.5%) patients fulfilled both other criteria. Positive molecular results were found in five (63%) patients (two with MODY 2, two with MODY 3, one with MODY 5). At diabetes onset, the mean age of the 5 patients with MODY was 10.6 ± 5.3 yrs (range 2.6-15 yrs), HbA(1c) was 8.4 ± 3.1 % (6.5-13.9%), mean diabetes duration until diagnosis of MODY was 3.3 ± 3.6 yrs (0.8-9.6 yrs) with insulin requirements of 0.44 ± 0.17 U/kg/d (0.2-0.6 U/kg/d). Patients with MODY 3 were changed from insulin to repaglinide, those with MODY 2 were recommended discontinuing insulin treatment. In patients with negative diabetes-specific antibodies at onset of diabetes, with a positive family history, and low to moderate insulin needs a genetic screening for MODY is indicated. Watchful consideration of these clinical parameters may lead to an early genetic testing, and to an adequate treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. The sleep patterns and problems of clinically anxious children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jennifer L; Gradisar, Michael; Gamble, Amanda; Schniering, Carolyn A; Rebelo, Ivone

    2009-04-01

    Childhood sleep problems have been associated with a range of adverse cognitive and academic outcomes, as well as increased impulsivity and emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression. The aim of the study was to examine subjective reports of sleep-related problems in children with anxiety disorders during school and weekend nights. Thirty-seven children with clinically-diagnosed anxiety disorders and 26 non-clinical children aged 7-12 years completed an on-line sleep diary to track sleep patterns across school nights and weekend nights. Anxious children reported going to bed significantly later (p=0.03) and had significantly less sleep (p=0.006) on school nights compared to non-anxious children. No significant differences in sleep onset latency, number of awakenings or time awake during the night, daytime sleepiness, or fatigue were found between the two groups. On the weekends, anxious children fell asleep quicker and were less awake during the night than on weeknights. School-aged anxiety disordered children showed a sleep pattern that differs from their non-anxious peers. Although the mean 30 min less sleep experienced by anxious children may initially seem small, the potential consequences on daytime performance from an accumulation of such a sleep deficit may be significant, and further investigation is warranted.

  16. Do diabetes-specialty clinics differ in management approach and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-02

    Jun 2, 2016 ... Diabetes Study Group recommended target for intensive ... and documented accordingly for individual participant. ... frequency of verbal instructions and counseling from ... >4 versus ≤4 medications (as cut-off) to indicate.

  17. Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    contributory factors in treatment failure in type 2 diabetic patients taking metformin and glibenclamide in a tertiary ... that took metformin and glibenclamide for a minimum of 1 year were examined. Patients ..... obesity in adults and children.

  18. The Vital Capacity Is Vital: Epidemiology and Clinical Significance of the Restrictive Spirometry Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Mark S; Jankowich, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic research has revealed a substantial portion of the general population with abnormal spirometry results that are characterized by decreased FEV1 and FVC but a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio. This restrictive spirometry pattern (RSP) is inconsistently defined in the literature and not well addressed by current guidelines; there is an accumulating body of evidence, however, that RSP is prevalent to a similar degree as airflow obstruction. Genetic and other risk factors for RSP, such as inhalational injuries and early life exposures, continue to be actively described. Although it seems that RSP is closely associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and systemic inflammation, it is not a simple marker of obesity. RSP is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as well as mortality, and it may be an underappreciated cause of functional impairments and respiratory symptoms. Improvement in outcomes in this population will require that clinicians have an appreciation for the significance of this spirometry pattern; additional research into the clinical and radiologic phenotype of these subjects is also needed. This article provides an overview of the recent developments in our understanding of this prevalent and highly morbid spirometry pattern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Diabetic Kidney Disease: From Epidemiology to Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Whee Park

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With worldwide epidemic of diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy which is one of the major causes of microvascular complication has become a serious concern in Korea as well as the rest of the world. In view of its significance, there is an urgent and paramount need for proper managements that could either deter or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Despite advances in care, ever increasing number of patients suffering from diabetic kidney disease and from end-stage renal disease implies that the current management is not adequate in many aspects. The reasons for these inadequacies compromise lack of early diagnosis, failure to intervene with timely and aggressive manner, and lack of understanding on the kind of interventions required. Another issue equally important for the adequate care of patients with diabetic nephropathy is an understanding of past, present and future epidemiology of diabetic nephropathy which serves, especially in Korea, as a material determining standard diagnosis and treatment and a national health-policy decision.

  20. Hypoglycaemia in diabetes mellitus: epidemiology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frier, Brian M

    2014-12-01

    Hypoglycaemia is a frequent adverse effect of treatment of diabetes mellitus with insulin and sulphonylureas. Fear of hypoglycaemia alters self-management of diabetes mellitus and prevents optimal glycaemic control. Mild (self-treated) and severe (requiring help) hypoglycaemia episodes are more common in type 1 diabetes mellitus but people with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus are also exposed to frequent hypoglycaemic events, many of which occur during sleep. Hypoglycaemia can disrupt many everyday activities such as driving, work performance and leisure pursuits. In addition to accidents and physical injury, the morbidity of hypoglycaemia involves the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Whereas coma and seizures are well-recognized neurological sequelae of hypoglycaemia, much interest is currently focused on the potential for hypoglycaemia to cause dangerous and life-threatening cardiac complications, such as arrhythmias and myocardial ischaemia, and whether recurrent severe hypoglycaemia can cause permanent cognitive impairment or promote cognitive decline and accelerate the onset of dementia in middle-aged and elderly people with diabetes mellitus. Prevention of hypoglycaemia is an important part of diabetes mellitus management and strategies include patient education, glucose monitoring, appropriate adjustment of diet and medications in relation to everyday circumstances including physical exercise, and the application of new technologies such as real-time continuous glucose monitoring, modified insulin pumps and the artificial pancreas.

  1. Inter- and intra-examiner reliability of footprint pattern analysis obtained from diabetics using the Harris mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Lígia de Loiola; Fonseca, Tiago H S; Abreu, Vivianni C

    2010-01-01

    High plantar pressure is a proven risk factor for ulceration among individuals with diabetes mellitus. The Harris and Beath footprinting mat is one of the tools used in screening for foot ulceration risk among these subjects. There are no reports in the literature on the reliability of footprint analysis using print pattern criteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of the analysis of footprint patterns obtained using the Harris and Beath footprinting mat. Footprints were taken from 41 subjects using the footprinting mat. The images were subjected to analysis by three independent examiners. To investigate the intra-examiner reliability, the analysis was repeated by one of the examiners one week later. The weighted kappa coefficient was excellent (K(w) > 0.80) for the inter- and intra-examiner analyses for most of the points studied on both feet. The criteria for analyzing footprint patterns obtained using the Harris and Beath footprinting mat presented good reliability and high to excellent inter- and intra-examiner agreement. This method is reliable for analyses involving one or more examiners. Article registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) under the number ACTRN12609000693224.

  2. Clinical and sociodemographic variables associated with diabetes-related distress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Flávia Cristina; Trevisan, Danilo Donizetti; Apolinario, Priscila Peruzzo; Silva, Juliana Bastoni da; Lima, Maria Helena de Melo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relation between diabetes-related distress and the clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A cross-sectional study based on a secondary analysis of data collected at a specialized care outpatient center in Brazil. Participants completed a questionnaire on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Distress Scale (B-DDS). About 31% of the 130 eligible patients reported diabetes distress, and the mean B-DDS score was 2.6. Multiple regression analysis showed the B-DDS score was positively correlated with marital status (p=0.0230), use of diet and physical activities for diabetes management (p=0.0180), and use of insulin therapy (p=0.0030). The "emotional burden", "regimen-related distress", and "interpersonal distress" domains from B-DDS were associated with the use of insulin therapy (p=0.0010), marital status (p=0.0110), and the presence of three or more comorbidities (p=0.0175). These findings suggest the clinical and sociodemographic variables are relatively weak predictors of diabetes-related distress. The highest scores in the B-DDS were observed in the emotional burden domain, indicating the presence of diabetes distress among the participants of the study. Avaliar a relação entre o estresse relacionado ao diabetes e as características clínicas e sociodemográficas de pacientes com diabetes mellitus do tipo 2. Estudo transversal com base na análise secundária de dados coletados em um ambulatório de atendimento terciário no Brasil. Os participantes preencheram um questionário sobre as características sociodemográficas e clínicas, e a versão brasileira da Diabetes Distress Scale (B-DDS). Aproximadamente 31% dos 130 pacientes elegíveis relataram estresse relacionado ao diabetes, e a média do escore da B-DDS foi de 2,6. O modelo de regressão múltipla mostrou que a pontuação B-DDS foi positivamente correlacionada com o estado civil (p=0

  3. Diabetes guidelines may delay timely adjustments during treatment and might contribute to clinical inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimazoni-Netto, Augusto; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Clinical inertia and poor knowledge by many physicians play an important role in delaying diabetes control. Among other guidelines, the Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes on Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes is a respected guideline with high impact on this subject in terms of influencing physicians in the definition of strategic approach to overcome poor glycemic control. But, on the other hand, it carries a recommendation that might contribute to clinical inertia because it can delay the needed implementation of more vigorous, intensive, and effective strategies to overcome poor glycemic control within a reasonable time frame during the evolution of the disease. The same is true with other respected algorithms from different diabetes associations. Together with pharmacological interventions, diabetes education and more intensive blood glucose monitoring in the initial phases after the diagnosis are key strategies for the effective control of diabetes. The main reason why a faster glycemic control should be implemented in an effective and safe way is to boost the confidence and the compliance of the patient to the recommendations of the diabetes care team. Better and faster results in glycemic control can only be safely achieved with educational strategies, structured self-monitoring of blood glucose, and adequate pharmacological therapy in the majority of cases.

  4. Clinical study on insulin receptors of mononuclear cells in diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalimunthe, D [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-12-01

    /sup 125/I-insulin binding activity to mononuclear cells was studied in 75 noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and 31 normal subjects and the following results were obtained. 1. /sup 125/I-insulin binding is directly proportional to the mononuclear cell concentrations. There is a linear increase of specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. 2. The binding of /sup 125/I-insulin to mononuclear cells is displaced by the increasing concentration of native insulin. 3. The /sup 125/I-insulin degradation in the incubation medium after incubation of mononuclear cells for 24 hours at 4/sup 0/C was almost 5% in this study. 4. The insulin binding activity in diabetic subjects was lower than that in normal subjects (P < 0.001) without any significant difference in affinity constant. 5. The relationship of binding activity to age of diabetics (r = 0.06, N.S), relative body weitht (r = 0.06, N.S) and duration of diabetes from onset was not significant. 6. In untreated noninsulin-dependent diabetics the insulin binding activity was inversely correlated to fasting blood glucose level (r = 0.78, P < 0.001) and slightly inversely correlated to serum insulin level (r = 0.47, P < 0.01). A slight inverse correlation was also observed in serum triglyceride level (r = 0.53, P < 0.01) and in total cholesterol level (r = 0.29, P < 0.05). 7. No significant difference between the binding activity was observed by grade of diabetic retinopathy. 8. After treatment with diet and/or sulfonylurea, the diabetics exhibited a significant increase in insulin binding activity (P < 0.005) but no significant difference in plasma insulin level, body weight and plasma lipid levels was observed.

  5. Bone regeneration in cranioplasty and clinical complications in rabbits with alloxan-induced diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanice Menezes Marçal Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the bone repair process in surgical defects created on the parietal bones of diabetic rabbits using the guided bone regeneration technique to observe the effects of alloxan in the induction of diabetes mellitus. Twenty-four adult rabbits were divided into three study groups: control (C, diabetic (D and diabetic associated to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membrane (D-PTFE. For diabetes induction the animals received one dose of monohydrated alloxan (90 mg/kg by intravenous administration in the auricular or femoral vein. In group D-PTFE the membrane covered both the floor and the surface of the bone defect. In groups D and C, the bone defect was filled up with blood clot. The specimens were fixed in 10% formol and prepared for histomorphometric analysis. The results showed that the 90 mg/kg dose of monohydrate alloxan was sufficient to promote diabetes mellitus when administered in the auricular vein. Bone regeneration was slower in the diabetic group when compared with the control and diabetic-PTFE groups, but there was no significant statistical difference between the two experimental groups (D and D-PTFE. The oral and general clinical complications among the diabetics were weight loss, polyuria, polyphagia and severe chronic gingivitis.

  6. Brain alterations and clinical symptoms of dementia in diabetes: Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes affects cognitive function and increases the incidence of dementia. However, the mechanisms by which diabetes modifies cognitive function still remains unclear. Morphologically, diabetes is associated with neuronal loss in the frontal and temporal lobes including the hippocampus, and aberrant functional connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and medial frontal/temporal gyrus. Clinically, diabetic patients show decreased executive function, information processing, planning, visuospatial construction, and visual memory. Therefore, in comparison with the characteristics of AD brain structure and cognition, diabetes seems to affect cognitive function through not only simple AD pathological feature-dependent mechanisms, but also independent mechanisms. As an Abeta/tau-independent mechanism, diabetes compromises cerebrovascular function, increases subcortical infarction and might alter the blood brain barrier (BBB. Diabetes also affects glucose metabolism, insulin signaling and mitochondrial function in the brain. Diabetes also modifies metabolism of Abeta and tau and causes Abeta/tau-dependent pathological changes. Moreover, there is evidence that suggests an interaction between Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms. Therefore, diabetes modifies cognitive function through Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms. Interaction between these two mechanisms forms a vicious cycle.

  7. Time to do more: addressing clinical inertia in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, W D; Cos, X; Hirst, M; Vencio, S; Mohan, V; Vokó, Z; Yabe, D; Blüher, M; Paldánius, P M

    2014-09-01

    Clinical inertia, the tendency to maintain current treatment strategies despite results demanding escalation, is thought to substantially contribute to the disconnect between clinical aspirations for patients with diabetes and targets achieved. We wished to explore potential causes of clinical inertia among physicians and people with diabetes. A 20-min online survey of 652 adults with diabetes and 337 treating physicians in six countries explored opinions relating to clinical inertia from both perspectives, in order to correlate perceptions and expectations relating to diagnosis, treatment, diabetes complications and therapeutic escalation. Physicians had low expectations for their patients, despite the belief that the importance of good glycaemic control through lifestyle and pharmacological interventions had been adequately conveyed. Conversely, people with diabetes had, at best, a rudimentary understanding of the risks of complications and the importance of good control; indeed, only a small proportion believed lifestyle changes were important and the majority did not intend to comply. The principal findings of this survey suggest that impairments in communication are at the heart of clinical inertia. This manuscript lays out four key principles that we believe are achievable in all environments and can improve the lives of people with diabetes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency, clinical characteristics and outcome of diabetic ketoacidosis in children with type-1 diabetes at a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, S.W.; Siddiqui, E.U.; Muhammed, F.; Atta, I.; Ibrahim, M.N.; Raza, J.

    2010-01-01

    To observe the frequency, demographic data and outcome of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children with established type 1 diabetes and newly diagnosed diabetes at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The case record review was done of children admitted with the diagnosis of DKA at The National Institute of Child Health, Karachi from 1 June, 2008 till 31 May, 2009. All records with the diagnosis of DKA were reviewed and those children with only hyperglycaemia, or who did not fulfill the criteria of DKA were excluded. The demographic data and laboratory investigations which included blood sugar monitoring, arterial blood gases, urine analysis especially for ketones, serum electrolytes, complete blood count and blood culture were reviewed. The previous numbers of admissions in children with established DKA were also noted with reasons. The duration of symptoms and fluids required, time of recovery, complications, and outcome were noted and compared between those with established diabetes and children with newly diagnosed diabetes. Data was entered and analyzed on SPSS version 15. Results: Out of 124 case records, 117 were included which fulfilled the criteria of DKA. A large number, 65 (55.5%) children were in the > 10 years age group with a female predominance. Out of 117 children 50 (42.7%) had established Type 1 diabetes and 67 (57.2 %) children had newly diagnosed diabetes. The commonest presenting complaints in both groups were respiratory distress (87.1%) and vomiting (77.7%). The symptoms of polyuria, polydipsia and nocturia were more among the newly diagnosed children as compared to those with established diabetes with a significant p value <0.001. The comparison of clinical features and laboratory investigations of the two groups showed no difference except that those children with established diabetes improved earlier, required lesser duration of intravenous fluids and their insulin was changed to subcutaneous in less time compared with newly diagnosed

  9. Coronary heart disease in the diabetic African: frequency clinical and angiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touze, J E; Ekra, A; Darracq, R; Mardelle, T; Adoh, A; Ake, E; Chauvet, J; Bertrand, E

    1987-01-01

    The frequency and clinical and coronarographic features of coronary heart disease (CHD) in black African diabetic patients were assessed in a two-part study. The aim of part I was to determine the frequency of CHD in 50 diabetic patients selected by the following criteria: male, age between 40 and 60 years, diabetes history less than 20 years, no history of CHD and normal E.K.G. All 50 of these patients underwent a stress test and those who failed or for whom results were inconclusive were submitted to coronary arteriography. Part II was a retrospective study of 104 patients with CHD. Its aim was to compare the clinical and coronarographic features of CHD patients with (27 cases) and without (77 cases) diabetes mellitus. The frequency of CHD in the 50 diabetics selected for this study was 10% (31 negative exercise tests, 19 inconclusive exercise tests, 5 coronary arteriographies with significant narrowing). Of these 5 diabetics with CHD, 3 had single vessel involvement (left descending artery: 2 cases, circumflex artery: 1 case), 1 patient had double vessel involvement (right coronary circumflex artery) and 1 had triple vessel involvement (left descending, circumflex, and right coronary artery). In the retrospective study the clinical profile of the diabetic and non-diabetic CHD patients was the same with respect to sex, age, angina, myocardial infarction, and death rate. As regard the risk factors, blood cholesterol level was higher in diabetics while cigarette smoking was higher in non-diabetics. The frequency of hypertension was the same in both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Increased length of inpatient stay and poor clinical coding: audit of patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daultrey, Harriet; Gooday, Catherine; Dhatariya, Ketan

    2011-11-01

    People with diabetes stay in hospital for longer than those without diabetes for similar conditions. Clinical coding is poor across all specialties. Inpatients with diabetes often have unrecognized foot problems. We wanted to look at the relationships between these factors. A single day audit, looking at the prevalence of diabetes in all adult inpatients. Also looking at their feet to find out how many were high-risk or had existing problems. A 998-bed university teaching hospital. All adult inpatients. (a) To see if patients with diabetes and foot problems were in hospital for longer than the national average length of stay compared with national data; (b) to see if there were people in hospital with acute foot problems who were not known to the specialist diabetic foot team; and (c) to assess the accuracy of clinical coding. We identified 110 people with diabetes. However, discharge coding data for inpatients on that day showed 119 people with diabetes. Length of stay (LOS) was substantially higher for those with diabetes compared to those without (± SD) at 22.39 (22.26) days, vs. 11.68 (6.46) (P coding was poor with some people who had been identified as having diabetes on the audit, who were not coded as such on discharge. Clinical coding - which is dependent on discharge summaries - poorly reflects diagnoses. Additionally, length of stay is significantly longer than previous estimates. The discrepancy between coding and diagnosis needs addressing by increasing the levels of awareness and education of coders and physicians. We suggest that our data be used by healthcare planners when deciding on future tariffs.

  11. Assessing diabetes practices in clinical settings: precursor to building community partnerships around disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, John D; Mier, Nelda; Bolin, Jane N; Hora, Kerrie L; Clark, Heather R; Ory, Marcia G

    2009-12-01

    Many recommended best practices exist for clinical and community diabetes management and prevention. However, in many cases, these recommendations are not being fully utilized. It is useful to gain a sense of currently utilized and needed practices when beginning a partnership building effort to ameliorate such practice problems. The purpose of this study was to assess current practices in clinical settings within the Brazos Valley in preparation for beginning a community-based participatory research project on improving diabetes prevention and management in this region. Fifty-seven physicians with admission privileges to a regional health system were faxed a survey related to current diabetes patient loads, knowledge and implementation of diabetes-related best practices, and related topics. Both qualitative and quantitative examination of the data was conducted. Fifteen percent of responding providers indicated they implemented diabetes prevention best practices, with significant differences between primary-care physicians and specialists. Respondents indicated a need for educational and counseling resources, as well as an increased health-care workforce in the region. The utilization of a faxed-based survey proved an effective means for assessing baseline data as well as serving as a catalyst for further discussion around coalition development. Results indicated a strong need for both clinical and community-based services regarding diabetes prevention and management, and provided information and insight to begin focused community dialogue around diabetes prevention and management needs across the region. Other sites seeking to begin similar projects may benefit from a similar process.

  12. The research for the clinical curative effect through combing traditional Chinese medicine with insulin to cure diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianfeng; Fan, Hongxia

    2014-07-01

    The clinical curative effect is observed through curing type 2 diabetes mellitus with the therapy of combing Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with insulin. Both the insulin prescription and the treatment of traditional Chinese medicine prescription are applied as mutual comparison. And the dosage, time, blood sugar level and curative effect etc are recorded. Healthy human body is taken as comparison for monitoring physical indicators. Through comparing insulin prescription and the combing therapy of insulin and traditional Chinese medicine, the insulin treatment group is better than contrast group (Pblending use group, the ISI in each group is significantly lower than that of health control group (P<0.01), where accumulation of damp heat in spleen type is the lowest; the BM I, H bA1C of type 2 diabetic patient is higher than health control group, its accumulation of damp heat in spleen type is the highest, TC, TG typical accumulation of damp heat in spleen are higher than other pattern of syndrome. the treatment method of combing TCM with insulin in curing type 2 diabetes mellitus has better effect than using insulin treatment alone; the resistance degree of insulin demonstrates the changing trend of first increase and later decrease with the development of disease course. Accumulation of damp heat in spleen type accounts for the highest proportion in type 2 diabetic patients, and there exists serious insulin resistance.

  13. Effect of zinc gluconate, sage oil on inflammatory patterns and hyperglycemia in zinc deficient diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Ali, Abdel-Moniem A; Elabidine, Nabila Zein; Mursey, Nada M

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between zinc homeostasis and pancreatic function had been established. In this study we aimed firstly to configure the inflammatory pattern and hyperglycemia in zinc deficient diabetic rats. Secondly to illustrate the effect of two selected agents namely Zinc gluconate and sage oil (Salvia Officinalis, family Lamiaceae). Rats were fed on Zinc deficient diet, deionized water for 28days along with Zinc level check up at intervals to achieve zinc deficient state then rats were rendered diabetic through receiving one dose of alloxan monohydrate (120mg/kg) body weight, classified later into 5 subgroups. Treatment with sage oil (0.042mg/kg IP) and Zinc gluconate orally (150mg/kg) body weight daily for 8 weeks significantly reduced serum glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- α), interleukins-6 1 β, inflammatory8 (IFN ȣ), pancreatic 1L1-β along with an increase in serum Zinc and pancreatic Zinc transporter 8 (ZNT8). Histopathological results of pancreatic tissues showed a good correlation with the biochemical findings. Both sage oil and zinc gluconate induced an improvement in the glycemic and inflammatory states. This may be of value like the therapeutic agent for diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Social inequality in diabetes patients' morbidity patterns from diagnosis to death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortsø, Camilla; Lauridsen, Jørgen; Emneus, Martha

    2018-01-01

    AIM: Measuring socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care, and understanding determinants of such inequalities, are critical for achieving higher equity in health. Equity in health is a prerequisite for public health and welfare. The aim of the paper is (1) to quantify inequality in dia...... that diabetes impacts harder on patients of lower SES; these patients experience more severe complications and die earlier. Hence to reduce inequality in health, it is important to invest in efforts targeted towards socially vulnerable groups.......AIM: Measuring socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care, and understanding determinants of such inequalities, are critical for achieving higher equity in health. Equity in health is a prerequisite for public health and welfare. The aim of the paper is (1) to quantify inequality...... in diabetes morbidity patterns over patients' entire life span, and (2) to compare levels of inequality measured through income and educational level, respectively, as proxies for socioeconomic status (SES). METHOD: Historic individual register data on the entire Danish diabetes population alive in 2011 were...

  15. Prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia in Nepalese individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Daya Ram; Khadka, Dipendra; Sigdel, Manoj; Yadav, Naval Kishor; Acharya, Shreedhar; Kafle, Ramchandra; Sapkota, Ravindra Mohan; Sigdel, Tara

    2017-04-04

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease among patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Timely detection and characterization of this condition help clinicians estimate future risk of cardiovascular disease and take appropriate preventive measures. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, pattern and predictors of dyslipidemia in a cohort of Nepalese patients with type 2 diabetes. We found mixed dyslipidemia as the most prevalent (88.1%) and isolated dyslipidemia (10.1%) as the least prevalent forms of dyslipidemia in our patients. The most prevalent form of single dyslipidemia was high LDL-C (73.8%) and combined dyslipidemia was high TG, high LDL-C and low HDL-C (44.7%). Prevalence of all single and mixed dyslipidemia was higher in patients with poor glycemic control and hypertension. The glycemic status of patients correlated with their fasting serum lipid profile. Dyslipidemia was associated mainly with male gender, poor glycemic control and hypertension. Atherogenic dyslipidemia is associated mainly with male gender, poor glycemic control and hypertension. It is highly prevalent in Nepalese patients with type 2 diabetes. Urgent lifestyle modification, sustained glycemic control and aggressive lipid lowering treatment plans are necessary to minimize the future risk of cardiovascular disease in this population.

  16. Lifestyle patterns in early pregnancy linked to gestational diabetes mellitus diagnoses when using IADPSG criteria. The St Carlos gestational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Gracia, Teresa; Duran, Alejandra; Fuentes, Manuel; Rubio, Miguel A; Runkle, Isabelle; Carrera, Evelyn F; Torrejón, María J; Bordiú, Elena; Valle, Laura Del; García de la Torre, Nuria; Bedia, Ana R; Montañez, Carmen; Familiar, Cristina; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2016-06-01

    Early-pregnancy lifestyle (EPL) could influence the development of gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM), depending on the diagnostic criteria used. We studied EPL in 1750 pregnant women using Carpenter-Coustan criteria(CCc), and in 1526 with the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria(IADPSGc). GDM risk factors were assessed in women between 24 and 28 weeks of gestational age during two consecutive years. A semiquantitative frequent-food-consumption questionnaire was used to evaluate lifestyle during pregnancy. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess GDM risk with different lifestyle patterns. Using IADPSGc, the GDM ORs (95%CI) for intake/week were: nuts >3 times: 0.59 (0.39-0.91; p < 0.015), refined cereals ≤1 serving: 0.72(0.58-0.89; p < 0.003), juices <4 servings: 0.77 (0.62-0.95; p < 0.017), cookies and pastries <4 servings: 0.71(0.57-0.89; p < 0.003) as compared to opposite habits. No significant nutritional patterns were found to be significant using CCc. The OR (95%CI) for GDM with none of the four risk patterns as compared to having three-four risk factors was 0.21(0.07-0.62; p < 0.005), remaining significant after stratification by BMI, age, obstetric events, parity and family history. The multiple logistic regression model including nutritional categories and pregestational BMI, age, obstetric history, parity, personal/family history, had an area under the curve(AUC) of the receiver operating curve(ROC) for the probability to predict GDM of 0.66 (CI 95%: 0.63-0.69; p < 0.001). Our study is the first to identify four early-pregnancy nutritional patterns associated with the GDM when using IADPSGc. Adherence to a low-risk nutritional pattern from early pregnancy on could be an effective strategy for GDM prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Family physician clinical inertia in glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralić Lang, Valerija; Bergman Marković, Biserka; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-02-05

    Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15-25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control.

  18. [Clinical profile of patients diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represas Carrera, Francisco Jesús; Carrera García, Álvaro; Clavería Fontán, Ana

    2018-03-09

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease that represent an important problem of public health. The objective of this study was to describe the sociodemographic, anthropometric, metabolic control, comorbidity and cardiovascular risk characteristics of patients diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 in the health area of Vigo. Retrospective observational descriptive study. Between March and September 2016, it did telephone interview and an audit of electronic medical records to 195 patients ≥ 18 years old from the health area of Vigo diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. It selected by random sampling with replacement. It evaluated the cardiovascular risk using the method "United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study", the metabolic control with the recommendations of the "American Diabetes Association" 2016, and the comorbidity using the Charlson index. It performed a descriptive and bivariate analysis with R statistical package. The glycemic control was adequate (HbA1c less than 7.0%) in the 61.03% of the patients. The 58.46% had a blood pressure under 140/90mmHg, 52.82% had a total cholesterol under 185mg/dl and 66.15% had a triglyceride level under 150mg/dl. The 49.74% presented a high comorbidity (Charlson larger or the same as 3 points). The risk of suffering and/or dying of heart disease was 37.81%, and 23.50% of suffering and/or dying of a stroke in the next 10 years. Most diabetic patients of the health area of Vigo have a good control of their disease but they present a high index of comorbidity and high cardiovascular risk.

  19. Pattern and presentation of odontogenic jaw cysts: a clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, M.U.A.; Ibrahim, M.W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pattern and presentations of odontogenic jaw cysts in patients reporting at the Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, from Jan to Dec 2007. Material and Methods: Hundred patients including 70 males and 30 females with the age range 5-65 years were included in the study. History, clinical examination, radiographic examination and histopathologic examination of lesion were carried out for each patient. A proforma was filled for each patient for all relevant information, presentation and pattern. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 10. Results: Out of total 100 patients, 58 percent were diagnosed with radicular cysts, 25 percent with dentigerous cysts, 15 percent with odontogenic keratocyst, 1 percent patient with calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst and 1 percent patient was diagnosed with eruption cyst. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that radicular cyst was the most common odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous and odontogenic keratocysts respectively in our study sample. (author)

  20. Glucose control and diabetic neuropathy: lessons from recent large clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lynn; Jaiswal, Mamta; Martin, Catherine; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral and autonomic neuropathies are common complications of diabetes with broad spectrums of clinical manifestations and high morbidity. Studies using various agents to target the pathways implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy were promising in animal models. In humans, however, randomized controlled studies have failed to show efficacy on objective measures of neuropathy. The complex anatomy of the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, the multitude of pathogenic mechanisms involved, and the lack of uniformity of neuropathy measures have likely contributed to these failures. To date, tight glycemic control is the only strategy convincingly shown to prevent or delay the development of neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes and to slow the progression of neuropathy in some patients with type 2 diabetes. Lessons learned about the role of glycemic control on distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy are discussed in this review.

  1. Acknowledging and allocating responsibility for clinical inertia in the management of Type 2 diabetes in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, A; Stone, M A; Davies, M J; Khunti, K

    2015-03-01

    Failure to intensify treatment in patients with Type 2 diabetes with suboptimal blood glucose control has been termed clinical inertia and has been shown to contribute to poorer patient outcomes. We aimed to identify and explore perceptions about clinical inertia from the perspective of primary healthcare providers. A qualitative study was conducted in Leicestershire and Northamptonshire, UK. Purposive sampling was based on healthcare providers working in primary care settings with 'higher' and 'lower' target achievement based on routine data. Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted, face-to-face or by telephone. Thematic analysis was informed by the constant comparative approach. An important broad theme that emerged during the analysis was related to attribution and explanation of responsibility for clinical inertia. This included general willingness to accept a degree of responsibility for clinical inertia. In some cases, however, participants had inaccurate perceptions about levels of target achievement in their primary care centres, as indicated by routine data. Participants sought to lessen their own sense of accountability by highlighting patient-level barriers such as comorbidities and human fallibility, and also system-level barriers, particularly time constraints. Perceptions about ways of addressing the problem of clinical inertia were not seen as straightforward, further emphasizing a complex and cumulative pattern of barriers. In order to understand and address the problem of clinical inertia, provider, patient- and system-level barriers should be considered together rather than as separate issues. Acknowledgement of responsibility should be regarded positively as a motivator for change. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  2. Eating patterns in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Associations with metabolic control, insulin omission, and eating disorder pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisting, Line; Reas, Deborah Lynn; Bang, Lasse; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Rø, Øyvind

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate eating patterns among male and female adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and the associations with age, zBMI, eating disorder (ED) pathology, intentional insulin omission, and metabolic control. The sample consisted of 104 adolescents (58.6% females) with child-onset T1D, mean age of 15.7 years (SD 1.8) and mean zBMI of 0.4 (SD 0.8). The Child Eating Disorder Examination (ChEDE) assessed meal/snack frequency and ED pathology. T1D clinical data was obtained from the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry. A significantly lower proportion of females than males (73.8% vs 97.7%) consumed breakfast on a daily basis. Approximately 50% of both genders ate lunch and 90% ate dinner daily. Among females, skipping breakfast was significantly associated with higher global ED psychopathology, shape concerns, self-induced vomiting, binge eating, insulin omission due to shape/weight concerns, and poorer metabolic control. Less frequent lunch consumption was significantly associated with poorer metabolic control. Skipping dinner was significantly associated with older age, higher dietary restraint, eating concerns, self-induced vomiting, and insulin omission. Among males, less frequent consumption of lunch and evening snacks was associated with attitudinal features of ED, including shape/weight concerns and dietary restraint. Among adolescents with T1D, irregular or infrequent meal consumption appears to signal potential ED pathology, as well as being associated with poorer metabolic control. These findings suggest the importance of routinely assessing eating patterns in adolescents with T1D to improve detection of ED pathology and to facilitate improved metabolic control and the associated risk of somatic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and medication profiles stratified by household income in patients referred for diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenson Lawrence W

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low income individuals with diabetes are at particularly high risk for poor health outcomes. While specialized diabetes care may help reduce this risk, it is not currently known whether there are significant clinical differences across income groups at the time of referral. The objective of this study is to determine if the clinical profiles and medication use of patients referred for diabetes care differ across income quintiles. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted using a Canadian, urban, Diabetes Education Centre (DEC database. Clinical information on the 4687 patients referred to the DEC from May 2000 – January 2002 was examined. These data were merged with 2001 Canadian census data on income. Potential differences in continuous clinical parameters across income quintiles were examined using regression models. Differences in medication use were examined using Chi square analyses. Results Multivariate regression analysis indicated that income was negatively associated with BMI (p Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that low income patients present to diabetes clinic older, heavier and with a more atherogenic lipid profile than do high income patients. Overall medication use was higher among the lower income group suggesting that differences in clinical profiles are not the result of under-treatment, thus invoking lifestyle factors as potential contributors to these findings.

  4. Objective measurements of activity patterns in people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes demonstrate a sedentary lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, S L; Fleischer, J; Hoeyem, P; Laugesen, E; Poulsen, P L; Christiansen, J S; Ejskjær, N; Hansen, T K

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate physical activity in people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes using objective measures. We analysed data from a study aimed at assessing carotid femoral pulse wave velocity in which a piezoelectric accelerometer was worn by 100 people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes and by 100 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Differences in physical activity patterns were investigated. Compared with the control group, the people with Type 2 diabetes spent significantly more time engaged in sedentary or lower level activities during the day, with a mean (sd) time of 926 (44) vs 898 (70) min, P sedentary lifestyle compared with well-matched controls. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  5. The complex interplay between clinical and person-centered diabetes outcomes in the two genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maria Chiara; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Pintaudi, Basilio; Bulotta, Angela; Gentile, Sandro; Scardapane, Marco; Skovlund, Soren Eik; Vespasiani, Giacomo; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2017-02-21

    New approaches to cope with clinical and psychosocial aspects of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are needed; gender influences the complex interplay between clinical and non-clinical factors. We used data from the BENCH-D study to assess gender-differences in terms of clinical and person-centered measures in T2DM. Clinical quality of care indicators relative to control of HbA1c, lipid profile, blood pressure, and BMI were derived from electronic medical records. Ten self-administered validated questionnaires (SF-12 Health Survey; WHO-5 well-being index; Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) 5, Health Care Climate Questionnaire, Patients Assessment of Chronic Illness Care, Diabetes Empowerment Scale, Diabetes Self-care Activities, Global Satisfaction for Diabetes Treatment, Barriers to Taking Medications, Perceived Social Support) were adopted as person-centered outcomes indicators. Overall, 26 diabetes clinics enrolled 2,335 people (men: 59.7%; women: 40.3%). Lower percentages of women reached HbA1c levels men. Women had statistically significant poorer scores for physical functioning, psychological well-being, self-care activities dedicated to physical activities, empowerment, diabetes-related distress, satisfaction with treatment, barriers to medication taking, satisfaction with access to chronic care and healthcare communication, and perceived social support than men; 24.8% of women and 8.8% of men had WHO-5 women and 55.1% of men had PAID-5 > 40 (high levels of diabetes-related distress) (p men and women, e.g. having PAID-5 levels >40 was associated with a higher likelihood of HbA1c ≥8.0% in women (OR = 1.15; 95%CI 1.05-1.25) but not in men (OR = 1.00; 95%CI 0.93-1.08). In T2DM, women show poorer clinical and person-centered outcomes indicators than men. Diabetes-related distress plays a role as a correlate of metabolic control in women but not in men. The study provides new information about the interplay between clinical and person-centered indicators

  6. Relationship between homocysteine and non-dipper pattern in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Serdal; Yilmaz, Abdulkerim; Yildiz, Gürsel; Kiliçli, Fatih; Içağasioğlu, Serhat

    2012-07-01

    The rate of reduction of nocturnal blood pressure (NBP) is lesser than normal in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHC) disrupts vascular structure and function, no matter the underlying causes. The risk of development of vascular disease is greater in diabetic patients with hyperhomocysteinemia than in patients with normal homocystein levels. The aim of the study was to investigate whether there are differences of homocystein levels in dipper and non-dippers patients with type 2 DM. We compared 50 patien-ts (33 females, 17 males) with type 2 DM and 35 healthy individuals (18 females, 17 males ) in a control group. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed and homocysteine levels were measured in all patients. We found that the percentage of non-dipper pattern was 72% in patients with type 2 DM and 57% in control group. In diabetic and control individuals, homocystein levels were higher in non-dipper (respectively 13.4 ± 8.1 µmol/L and 11.8 ± 5 µmol/L) than in dipper subjects (respectively, 11.8 ± 5.8 µmol/L and 10.1 ± 4.2 µmol/L), but there was no significant difference between the two groups (respectively, p = 0.545, p = 0.294). In both groups, homocystein levels were higher in non-dipper than in dipper participants, but there was no significant difference between the groups. High homocystein levels and the non-dipper pattern increases cardiovascular risk. Therefore, the relationship between nocturnal blood pressure changes and homocystein levels should be investigated in a larger study.

  7. Association between healthy maternal dietary pattern and risk for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryggvadottir, E A; Medek, H; Birgisdottir, B E; Geirsson, R T; Gunnarsdottir, I

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with negative health effects for mother and child. The aim was to investigate the association between maternal dietary patterns and GDM. Prospective observational study including 168 pregnant women aged 18-40 years, recruited at routine 20-week ultrasound. All participants kept a 4-day weighed food record following recruitment (commencement: gestational weeks 19-24). Principal component analysis was used to extract dietary patterns from 29 food groups. A Healthy Eating Index (HEI) was constructed. All women underwent an oral glucose tolerance test in weeks 23-28. One clear dietary pattern (Eigenvalue 2.4) was extracted with positive factor loadings for seafood; eggs; vegetables; fruits and berries; vegetable oils; nuts and seeds; pasta; breakfast cereals; and coffee, tea and cocoa powder, and negative factor loadings for soft drinks and French fries. This pattern was labeled a prudent dietary pattern. Explained variance was 8.2%. The prevalence of GDM was 2.3% among women of normal weight before pregnancy (n=86) and 18.3% among overweight/obese women (n=82). The prudent dietary pattern was associated with lower risk of GDM (OR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.98). When adjusting for age, parity, prepregnancy weight, energy intake, weekly weight gain and total metabolic equivalent of task the association remained (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.94). Similar results were found when only including overweight or obese women (OR: 0.31; 95% CI: 0.13, 0.75). Adhering to a prudent dietary pattern in pregnancy was clearly associated with lower risk of GDM, especially among women already at higher risk because of overweight/obesity before pregnancy.

  8. Association of dietary pattern with biochemical blood profiles and bodyweight among adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Darani Zad, Nasrin; Mohd Yusof, Rokiah; Esmaili, Haleh; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Mohseni, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to identify dietary patterns and evaluated their association with biochemical blood profiles and body weight among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted among 400 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Tehran from March to August 2013. Biochemical blood profiles, socio-demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric measurements, and dietary data were obtained. Dietary data from food frequency questionnaire were ...

  9. Trends in frequency of type 2 diabetes in Mexico and its relationship to dietary patterns and contextual factors

    OpenAIRE

    Guadalupe Soto-Estrada; Laura Moreno Altamirano; Juan José García-García; Iván Ochoa Moreno; Martín Silberman

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the evolution of the frequency of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its relationship to eating patterns in Mexico from 1961 to 2013, and the Gini coefficient, Human Development Index (HDI) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Mexico ranked sixth in world prevalence of diabetes in 2015 with an estimated 11.4 million Mexicans affected. Method: Using data from the Balance Sheets Food published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the means of apparent ...

  10. Clinical characteristics, drug resistance, and treatment outcomes among tuberculosis patients with diabetes in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, M J; Bloss, E; Shin, S S; Contreras, C; Huaman, H Arbanil; Ticona, J Calderon; Bayona, J; Bonilla, C; Yagui, M; Jave, O; Cegielski, J P

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for active tuberculosis (TB). Data are limited regarding the association between diabetes and TB drug resistance and treatment outcomes. We examined characteristics of TB patients with and without diabetes in a Peruvian cohort at high risk for drug-resistant TB. Among TB patients with diabetes (TB-DM), we studied the association between diabetes clinical/management characteristics and TB drug resistance and treatment outcomes. During 2005-2008, adults with suspected TB with respiratory symptoms in Lima, Peru, who received rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST), were prospectively enrolled and followed during treatment. Bivariate and Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to examine the relationships of diabetes characteristics with drug-resistant TB and TB outcomes. Of 1671 adult TB patients enrolled, 186 (11.1%) had diabetes. TB-DM patients were significantly more likely than TB patients without diabetes to be older, have had no previous TB treatment, and to have a body mass index (BMI) >18.5 kg/m(2) (pdiabetes, and 12% and 28%, respectively, among TB-DM patients. Among 149 TB-DM patients with DST results, 104 (69.8%) had drug-susceptible TB and 45 (30.2%) had drug-resistant TB, of whom 29 had multidrug-resistant TB. There was no association between diabetes characteristics and drug-resistant TB. Of 136 TB-DM patients with outcome information, 107 (78.7%) had a favorable TB outcome; active diabetes management was associated with a favorable outcome. Diabetes was common in a cohort of TB patients at high risk for drug-resistant TB. Despite prevalent multidrug-resistant TB among TB-DM patients, the majority had a favorable TB treatment outcome. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical profile, knowledge, and beliefs about diabetes among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Knowing patients' beliefs and knowledge about diabetes is important to impart overall care for them. Health education about a disease should be planned to address beliefs and knowledge of patients about their medical condition to address misinformation and misconceptions about their disease conditions.

  12. Cardiovascular biomarkers in clinical studies of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldassarre, M P A; Andersen, A; Consoli, A

    2018-01-01

    biomarkers and 3) novel biomarkers (oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction biomarkers). Within each category we present the currently best validated biomarkers with special focus on the population of interest (type 2 diabetes). For each individual biomarker, the physiological role, the validation...

  13. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P V Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM. T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis, usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c 200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  14. Physical activity in type II Diabetes Mellitus, an effective therapeutic element: review of the clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Iván Arias-Vázquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A review was conducted in databases (PubMed, PEDro of type studies clinical trial, cohort study, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines based on evidence they have studied the benefits of physical activity in the prevention , treatment and decreased risk of complications and death in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Realization regular physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing Diabetes Mellitus; likewise was associated with decrease in glycated hemoglobin percentage A1C values. Diabetic patients undergoing high levels of physical activity had decreased risk of complications and death from cardiovascular disease and all causes. At present the scientific evidence on the impact of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of Diabetes Mellitus is solid, so it must be emphasized promoting physical activity as a fundamental part of the therapeutic regimens for this disease.

  15. [Differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in Jewish and Bedouin patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaev, Elena; Sagy, Iftach; Zaid, Eed Abu; Nevzorov, Roman; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Zeller, Lior; Barski, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in the Jewish and Bedouin populations. A retrospective analysis was conducted of hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis in adult patients between 2003 and 2010. The clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis patients of Jewish origin were compared with those of Bedouin origin. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The study cohort included 220 consecutive patients for whom the admission diagnosis was diabetic ketoacidosis. The cohort was categorized according to Jewish and Bedouin origin as follows: 177 (80.5%) Jewish and 43 (19.5%) Bedouin patients. The Jewish patients were significantly older than the Bedouin patients (45.8 +/- 18.9 vs. 32.9 +/- 15.3, p ventilation and bed-ridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality in both ethnic groups.

  16. Observing health professionals' workflow patterns for diabetes care - First steps towards an ontology for EHR services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, M; Lasierra, N; Hoerbst, A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the flexibility from a user-perspective and enabling a workflow based interaction, facilitates an easy user-friendly utilization of EHRs for healthcare professionals' daily work. To offer such versatile EHR-functionality, our approach is based on the execution of clinical workflows by means of a composition of semantic web-services. The backbone of such architecture is an ontology which enables to represent clinical workflows and facilitates the selection of suitable services. In this paper we present the methods and results after running observations of diabetes routine consultations which were conducted in order to identify those workflows and the relation among the included tasks. Mentioned workflows were first modeled by BPMN and then generalized. As a following step in our study, interviews will be conducted with clinical personnel to validate modeled workflows.

  17. Integrating substance abuse care with community diabetes care: implications for research and clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghitza UE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Udi E Ghitza,1 Li-Tzy Wu,2 Betty Tai11Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cigarette smoking and alcohol use are prevalent among individuals with diabetes in the US, but little is known about screening and treatment for substance use disorders in the diabetic population. This commentary discusses the scope and clinical implications of the public health problem of coexisting substance use and diabetes, including suggestions for future research. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, and is associated with many severe health complications like cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney damage, and limb amputations. There are an estimated 24 million adults in the US with type 2 diabetes. Approximately 20% of adults aged 18 years or older with diabetes report current cigarette smoking. The prevalence of current alcohol use in the diabetic population is estimated to be around 50%–60% in epidemiological surveys and treatment-seeking populations. Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in a dose-dependent manner and is an independent modifiable risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic patients with an alcohol or other drug use disorder show a higher rate of adverse health outcomes. For example, these patients experience more frequent and severe health complications as well as an increased risk of hospitalization, and require longer hospital stays. They are also less likely to seek routine care for diabetes or adhere to diabetes treatment than those without an alcohol or other drug use disorder. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Mental Health Parity Act and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 provide opportunities for facilitating integration of

  18. Use of and Beliefs About Mobile Phone Apps for Diabetes Self-Management: Surveys of People in a Hospital Diabetes Clinic and Diabetes Health Professionals in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Leah; Grainger, Rebecca; Hall, Rosemary M; Krebs, Jeremy D

    2017-06-30

    People with diabetes mellitus (DM) are using mobile phone apps to support self-management. The numerous apps available to assist with diabetes management have a variety of functions. Some functions, like insulin dose calculators, have significant potential for harm. The study aimed to establish (1) whether people with DM in Wellington, New Zealand, use apps for DM self-management and evaluate desirable features of apps and (2) whether health professionals (HPs) in New Zealand treating people with DM recommend apps to patients, the features HPs regard as important, and their confidence with recommending apps. A survey of patients seen at a hospital diabetes clinic over 12 months (N=539) assessed current app use and desirable features. A second survey of HPs attending a diabetes conference (n=286) assessed their confidence with app recommendations and perceived usefulness. Of the 189 responders (35.0% response rate) to the patient survey, 19.6% (37/189) had used a diabetes app. App users were younger and in comparison to other forms of diabetes mellitus, users prominently had type 1 DM. The most favored feature of the app users was a glucose diary (87%, 32/37), and an insulin calculator was the most desirable function for a future app (46%, 17/37). In non-app users, the most desirable feature for a future app was a glucose diary (64.4%, 98/152). Of the 115 responders (40.2% response rate) to the HPs survey, 60.1% (68/113) had recommended a diabetes app. Diaries for blood glucose levels and carbohydrate counting were considered the most useful app features and the features HPs felt most confident to recommend. HPs were least confident in recommending insulin calculation apps. The use of apps to record blood glucose was the most favored function in apps used by people with diabetes, with interest in insulin dose calculating function. HPs do not feel confident in recommending insulin dose calculators. There is an urgent need for an app assessment process to give

  19. CLINICAL VALUE OF METFORMIN IN APPLICATION AGAINST DIABETES AND OBESITY IN CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.E. Petryaikina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus spread is growing up among children. This article highlights the data on the disease epidemiology, etiology, risk factors of the progression, clinical run and complications. Special attention is paid to the obesity as a condition, which most often accompanies insulin resistance and diabetes formation; the authors consider also prevention opportunities. The tactics of the management of patient with the said pathology is also highlighted here.Key words: diabetes, insulin resistance, disturbed tolerance to glucose, obesity, treatment, children.

  20. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Tofte JI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes, T1D, or because body tissues do not respond to the hormone (type 2 diabetes, T2D. T1D patients currently need exogenous insulin for life, while for T2D patients who do not respond to diet and exercise regimes, oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and sometimes insulin are administered to help keep their blood glucose as normal as possible. As neither the administration of insulin nor OADs is curative, many patients develop tissue degenerative processes that result in life-threatening diabetes comorbidities. Several surveys of medicinal plants used as anti-diabetic agents amongst different peoples have been published. Some of this interest is driven by the ongoing diabetes pandemic coupled with the inadequacies associated with the current state of-the-art care and management of the syndrome. However, there is a huge cleft between traditional medicine and modern (Western medicine, with the latter understandably demanding meaningful and scientific validation of anecdotal evidence for acceptance of the former. The main problems for clinical evaluation of medicinal plants with promising anti-diabetic properties reside both with the complexity of components of the plant materials and with the lack of full understanding of the diabetes disease etiology. This review is therefore focused on why research activities involving an integration of Systems Biology-based technologies of pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics with standard clinical data

  1. A clinical case study of a Wolfram syndrome-affected family: pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials and electroretinography analysis.

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    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Broniek-Kowalik, Karina; Szulborski, Kamil

    2012-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS), or DIDMOAD, is a rare (1/100 000 to 1/770 000), progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In its early stages, it is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and loss of sensorineural hearing-this is followed by diabetes insipidus, progressive neurological abnormalities and other endocrine abnormalities, which occur in later years. The aim of this study was to report on the clinical and electrophysiological findings from a family with the WFS1 mutation. The five family members were subjected to a complete ophthalmic examination, which included a flash full-field electroretinogram and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) performed according to ISCEV standards. Optic atrophy was confirmed in two homozygotic patients, where P100 latencies were significantly delayed-up to 146 ms in PVEP. P100 latencies were normal in the three heterozygotic patients we examined. Curve morphology abnormalities were observed in all five patients we examined. No literature describing the morphology of PVEP in Wolfram syndrome patients was found. In flash electroretinography, scotopic and photopic responses appeared in normal morphology and value. Diabetic retinopathy was not observed in the diabetes mellitus patients.

  2. Development of a clinical decision support system for diabetes care: A pilot study.

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    Livvi Li Wei Sim

    Full Text Available Management of complex chronic diseases such as diabetes requires the assimilation and interpretation of multiple laboratory test results. Traditional electronic health records tend to display laboratory results in a piecemeal and segregated fashion. This makes the assembly and interpretation of results related to diabetes care challenging. We developed a diabetes-specific clinical decision support system (Diabetes Dashboard interface for displaying glycemic, lipid and renal function results, in an integrated form with decision support capabilities, based on local clinical practice guidelines. The clinical decision support system included a dashboard feature that graphically summarized all relevant laboratory results and displayed them in a color-coded system that allowed quick interpretation of the metabolic control of the patients. An alert module informs the user of tests that are due for repeat testing. An interactive graph module was also developed for better visual appreciation of the trends of the laboratory results of the patient. In a pilot study involving case scenarios administered via an electronic questionnaire, the Diabetes Dashboard, compared to the existing laboratory reporting interface, significantly improved the identification of abnormal laboratory results, of the long-term trend of the laboratory tests and of tests due for repeat testing. However, the Diabetes Dashboard did not significantly improve the identification of patients requiring treatment adjustment or the amount of time spent on each case scenario. In conclusion, we have developed and shown that the use of the Diabetes Dashboard, which incorporates several decision support features, can improve the management of diabetes. It is anticipated that this dashboard will be most helpful when deployed in an outpatient setting, where physicians can quickly make clinical decisions based on summarized information and be alerted to pertinent areas of care that require

  3. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes: clinical impact, assessment, diagnosis, and management.

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    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy; Bernardi, Luciano; Frontoni, Simona; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Stevens, Martin; Kempler, Peter; Hilsted, Jannik; Tesfaye, Solomon; Low, Phillip; Valensi, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of the Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control in the setting of diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The prevalence of confirmed CAN is around 20%, and increases up to 65% with age and diabetes duration. Established risk factors for CAN are glycaemic control in type 1 and a combination of hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity, and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: (1) one abnormal cardiovagal test result identifies possible or early CAN; (2) at least two abnormal cardiovagal test results are required for definite or confirmed CAN; and (3) the presence of orthostatic hypotension in addition to abnormal heart rate test results identifies severe or advanced CAN. Progressive stages of CAN are associated with increasingly worse prognosis. CAN assessment is relevant in clinical practice for (1) diagnosis of CAN clinical forms, (2) detection and tailored treatment of CAN clinical correlates (e.g. tachycardia, orthostatic hypotension, non-dipping, QT interval prolongation), (3) risk stratification for diabetic complications and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and (4) modulation of targets of diabetes therapy. Evidence on the cost-effectiveness of CAN testing is lacking. Apart from the preventive role of intensive glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes, recommendations cannot be made for most therapeutic approaches to CAN. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain clinical utility of pregabalin

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    Vinik AI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aaron I Vinik, Carolina M Casellini Strelitz Diabetes Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Abstract: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy

  5. Diabetes Mellitus in Neonates and Infants: Genetic Heterogeneity, Clinical Approach to Diagnosis, and Therapeutic Options

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    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Ellard, Sian

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed major advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of neonatal and infancy-onset diabetes. It is now widely accepted that diabetes presenting before 6 months of age is unlikely to be autoimmune type 1 diabetes. The vast majority of such patients will have a monogenic disorder responsible for the disease and, in some of them, also for a number of other associated extrapancreatic clinical features. Reaching a molecular diagnosis will have immediate clinical consequences for about half of affected patients, as identification of a mutation in either of the two genes encoding the ATP-sensitive potassium channel allows switching from insulin injections to oral sulphonylureas. It also facilitates genetic counselling within the affected families and predicts clinical prognosis. Importantly, monogenic diabetes seems not to be limited to the first 6 months but extends to some extent into the second half of the first year of life, when type 1 diabetes is the more common cause of diabetes. From a scientific perspective, the identification of novel genetic aetiologies has provided important new knowledge regarding the development and function of the human pancreas. PMID:24051999

  6. Education as prescription for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: compliance and efficacy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Yeon; Suh, Sunghwan; Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Se Won; Bae, Ji Cheol; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Sung Hye; Rha, Mi Yong; Cho, Young Yun; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes self-management education has an important role in diabetes management. The efficacy of education has been proven in several randomized trials. However, the status of diabetes education programs in real Korean clinical practice has not yet been evaluated in terms of patient compliance with the education prescription. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and laboratory data from all patients who were ordered to undergo diabetes education during 2009 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (n=2,291). After excluding ineligible subjects, 588 patients were included in the analysis. Among the 588 patients, 433 received education. The overall compliance rate was 73.6%, which was significantly higher in the subjects with a short duration or living in a rural area compared to those with a long duration (85.0% vs. 65.1%, respectively; Ppatients refuse to get education despite having a prescription from their physician. This refusal rate was higher in the patients with long-standing diabetes or in urban residence. Furthermore, education was more effective in patients with a short duration of diabetes in clinical practice.

  7. Dietary patterns and odds of Type 2 diabetes in Beirut, Lebanon: a case–control study

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    Naja Farah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Lebanon, Type 2 diabetes (T2D has a major public health impact through high disease prevalence, significant downstream pathophysiologic effects, and enormous financial liabilities. Diet is an important environmental factor in the development and prevention of T2D. Dietary patterns may exert greater effects on health than individual foods, nutrients, or food groups. The objective of this study is to examine the association between dietary patterns and the odds of T2D among Lebanese adults. Methods Fifty-eight recently diagnosed cases of T2D and 116 population-based age, sex, and place of residence matched control participants were interviewed. Data collection included a standard socio-demographic and lifestyle questionnaire. Dietary intake was evaluated by a semi-quantitative 97-item food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements including weight, height, waist circumference, and percent body fat were also obtained. Dietary patterns were identified by factor analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations of extracted patterns with T2D. Pearson correlations between these patterns and obesity markers, energy, and nutrient intakes were also examined. Results Four dietary patterns were identified: Refined Grains & Desserts, Traditional Lebanese, Fast Food and Meat & Alcohol. While scores of the “Refined Grains & Desserts” had the highest correlations with energy (r = 0.74 and carbohydrates (r = 0.22, those of the “Fast Food” had the highest correlation with fat intake (r = 0.34. After adjustment for socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, scores of the Refined Grains & Desserts and Fast Food patterns were associated with higher odds of T2D (OR: 3.85, CI: 1.13-11.23 and OR: 2.80, CI: 1.14-5.59; respectively and scores of the Traditional Lebanese pattern were inversely associated with the odds of T2D (OR: 0.46, CI: 0.22-0.97. Conclusions The

  8. Relevance of the body mass index in the cognitive status of diabetic patients with different alcohol-drinking patterns

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    Lacramioara Serban Ionela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the general relevance of alcohol consumption in diabetes is extremely controversial. There are recent reports that alcohol consumption could result in a decreased incidence of diabetes, as well as other studies demonstrating a positive association between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes; there are also reports arguing for an inverse association between the two or for no correlation at all. The different results obtained in these studies could be explained by the existence of several confounders that could influence the outcome of the aforementioned studies. In this paper, we studied the possible relevance of BMI as a confounder in the relationship between alcohol consumption in diabetes and cognitive function, by analyzing the correlations between BMI values in diabetic patients with different alcohol drinking patterns and the subdomains from some main psychometric tests, such as MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination and MOCA (Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Our results provide evidence for BMI as a possible confounder of the relationship between alcohol consumption in diabetes and cognitive function. We found a significant increase (p<0.0001 in BMI values in patients with diabetes compared to our control group. Most importantly, significant correlations between BMI parameters in alcohol-consuming diabetic patients and most of the subdomains for psychometric testing.

  9. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment Patterns Across Europe: A Population-based Multi-database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeek, Jetty A; Heintjes, Edith M; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Blin, Patrick; Lassalle, Régis; Hall, Gillian C; Lapi, Francesco; Bianchini, Elisa; Hammar, Niklas; Bezemer, Irene D; Herings, Ron M C

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the similarities and differences of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatment patterns in daily practice in 5 European countries and whether these reflect differences in guidelines. Prescriptions for drugs used in diabetes treatment during a 5-year study period were obtained from electronic databases. Patients initiating T2DM treatment during the study period were included. An SAS analysis tool was developed to create episodes of use of drug classes, which resulted in treatment patterns. A total of 253,530 patients initiating T2DM treatment during the study period were included; 52% to 55% were male, and the mean age ranged from 62 to 67 years. Metformin was the most common initial treatment in all countries. After initial therapy, most patients in the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom switched to a combination of metformin + a sulfonylurea derivative (SU). In Italy, metformin in combination with an SU was outnumbered by "other treatment," mainly because of repaglinide use. In France, treatments including dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors were most frequent as second- and fourth-line treatment. Metformin monotherapy was again most commonly observed as the third line of treatment in all countries. Fourth treatment was a combination of metformin + an SU in the Netherlands and Spain; in the United Kingdom and France, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors were the most frequently used fourth line of treatment. This study provides a comprehensive overview of T2DM treatment patterns among patients initiating T2DM treatment in 5 European countries. There were differences, especially regarding the uptake of newer incretin-based treatments, which are usually prescribed as a second and/or third treatment in agreement with local guidelines. These variations reflect the differences between the national guidelines of these countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased endothelial apoptotic cell density in human diabetic erectile tissue--comparison with clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Carla; Soares, Raquel; Castela, Angela; Adães, Sara; Hastert, Véronique; Vendeira, Pedro; Virag, Ronald

    2009-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes. Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is one of the main mechanisms of diabetic ED. However, loss of EC integrity has never been assessed in human diabetic corpus cavernosum. To identify and quantify apoptotic cells in human diabetic and normal erectile tissue and to compare these results with each patient's clinical data and erection status. Eighteen cavernosal samples were collected, 13 from diabetics with ED and 5 from nondiabetic individuals. Cavernosal structure and cell proliferation status were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Tissue integrity was assessed by terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay, an index of apoptotic cell density (ACD) established and compared with each patient age, type of diabetes, arterial risk factors number, arterial/veno-occlusive disease, response to intracavernous vasoactive injections (ICI), and penile nitric oxide release test (PNORT). Establish an index of ACD and correlate those results with patient clinical data. Nondiabetic samples presented few scattered cells in apoptosis and an ACD of 7.15 +/- 0.44 (mean apoptotic cells/tissue area mm(2) +/- standard error). The diabetic group showed an increased ACD of 23.82 +/- 1.53, and apoptotic cells were located specifically at vascular sites. Rehabilitation of these endothelial lesions seemed impaired, as no evidence of EC proliferation was observed. Furthermore, higher ACD in diabetic individuals correlated to poor response to PNORT and to ICI. We provided evidence for the first time that loss of cavernosal EC integrity is a crucial event involved in diabetic ED. Furthermore, we were able to establish a threshold between ACD values and cavernosal tissue functionality, as assessed by PNORT and vasoactive ICI.

  11. Using both principal component analysis and reduced rank regression to study dietary patterns and diabetes in Chinese adults.

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    Batis, Carolina; Mendez, Michelle A; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Adair, Linda; Popkin, Barry

    2016-02-01

    We examined the association between dietary patterns and diabetes using the strengths of two methods: principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the eating patterns of the population and reduced rank regression (RRR) to derive a pattern that explains the variation in glycated Hb (HbA1c), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and fasting glucose. We measured diet over a 3 d period with 24 h recalls and a household food inventory in 2006 and used it to derive PCA and RRR dietary patterns. The outcomes were measured in 2009. Adults (n 4316) from the China Health and Nutrition Survey. The adjusted odds ratio for diabetes prevalence (HbA1c≥6·5 %), comparing the highest dietary pattern score quartile with the lowest, was 1·26 (95 % CI 0·76, 2·08) for a modern high-wheat pattern (PCA; wheat products, fruits, eggs, milk, instant noodles and frozen dumplings), 0·76 (95 % CI 0·49, 1·17) for a traditional southern pattern (PCA; rice, meat, poultry and fish) and 2·37 (95 % CI 1·56, 3·60) for the pattern derived with RRR. By comparing the dietary pattern structures of RRR and PCA, we found that the RRR pattern was also behaviourally meaningful. It combined the deleterious effects of the modern high-wheat pattern (high intakes of wheat buns and breads, deep-fried wheat and soya milk) with the deleterious effects of consuming the opposite of the traditional southern pattern (low intakes of rice, poultry and game, fish and seafood). Our findings suggest that using both PCA and RRR provided useful insights when studying the association of dietary patterns with diabetes.

  12. Necrobiosis lipoidica in diabetic patients: pathogenetic and clinical features

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    Daria Alexandrovna Semenova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Necrobiosis lipoidica (NL is a chronic skin disease (dermatosis associated with various metabolic disorders including carbohydrate metabolism.In the last years, NL has been increasingly frequently diagnosed by practitioners probably due to the rise in type 2 diabetes mellitus morbidity in thegeneral population. Moreover, association of NL with autoimmune thyroid diseases, Crohns disease, ulcerative colitis, sarcoidosis, and vitiligo hasbeen documented. Such cases may be attributed to phenotypic and functional defects of cellular immunity.

  13. Clinical investigation of proximate exposed group. 1. A study for prevalence rate of diabetes mellitus

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    Ito, Chikako; Hasegawa, Kazuyo; Kato, Masafumi; Kumasawa, Toshihiko

    1984-11-01

    In order to investigate effects of the A-bombing on prevalence of diabetes mellitus, follow-up studies were made on 5907 A-bomb survivors who received glucose tolerance test (GTT) during 20 years between 1963 and 1983. The A-bomb survivors were divided into the group A (1899 men and 1165 women exposed within 1.9 km from the hypocenter) and the group B (1725 men and 1118 women exposed 3.0 km or farther from it). Among non-obese survivors, 21.9% and 21.8% were being treated for diabetes mellitus or were evaluated as having diabetic type on GTT in the group A and the group B, respectively; while this was seen in 52.1% of obese survivors in the group A and 49.9% in the group B. There was no difference between the groups. In non-obese survivors, the annual development rate from the normal type to the diabetic type was 0.89% in the group A and 0.65% in the group B; the annual development rate from the borderline type to the diabetic type was 5.73% in the group A and 5.49% in the group B, showing no differences between the groups. The annual development rate from the normal or borderline type to the diabetic type was two times or higher in obese survivors than in non-obese survivors irrespective of exposure status. Regarding the number of diabetic survivors who became non-diabetic type in spite of having no treatment, and prevalence of diabetic complications, no difference was seen between the groups. These results suggest that the A-bombing has scarcely influenced the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and clinical course.

  14. Islet Autoantibody Patterns in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Aged 60 and Higher: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Chinese Hospital

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    Rumei Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSome elderly citizens with a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes had evidence of positive islet autoantibodies. We aimed to discover their islet autoantibody patterns and independent correlative factors that might lead to a better understanding of significance of islet autoimmunity in the progression of elderly diabetes.MethodsA total of 541 inpatients of clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes aged 60 and over were recruited. Three islet autoantibodies including insulin autoantibody (IAA, islet cell antibody (ICA, and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA as well as clinical and biochemical characteristics were tested and collected in Huashan Hospital. Associations between these antibodies and clinical features were analyzed by Spearman correlation and binary logistic analyses.ResultsIn our current study, total positive rate of islet autoantibodies (IAA, ICA, and GADA was 35.67% with 26.62% for individual IAA, 5.55% for ICA, and 5.91% for GADA, in elderly with type 2 diabetes. None of combinations of such autoantibodies were observed, with the exception of IAA + ICA (0.74%, n = 4, IAA + GADA (1.48%, n = 8, and ICA + GADA (0.18%, n = 1. Compared with GADA negative group, patients in positive group tended to have lower level of fasting and postprandial C peptide, fasting blood glucose (FBG, and body mass index (BMI. After adjusted for the BMI, FBG, and postprandial C peptide, fasting C peptide seemed to be an independent factor related to GADA positivity (OR = 0.52, p = 0.02. As for patients with positive IAA, they were more likely to have insulin treatment with longer duration of diabetes, higher level of BMI, and lower level of postprandial C peptide. After adjusted for the duration of diabetes, BMI, and postprandial C peptide, insulin treatment was a significant predictor for IAA positivity (OR = 5.20, p < 0.0001. Furthermore, hs-CRP was positively related to ICA positivity, and hs

  15. [Erectile dysfunction and diabetes in Conakry (Guinea): frequency and clinical characteristics from 187 diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, N M; Diallo, A B; Baldé, M C; Kaké, A; Diallo, M M; Diallo, M B; Maugendre, D

    2006-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction is frequent in the diabetic population. In Africa, medical care for erectile dysfunction is underprovided, profoundly altering the quality of life of the patients. We report the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in 187 diabetic patients followed in the department of Endocrinology of the Conakry teaching hospital. Prevalence was estimated from the French version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Erectile dysfunction concerned 90 patients (48%) of whom a severe form was observed in 54%, a moderate form in 35% and a mild form in 12%. The patients who presented erectile dysfunction were significantly older, displayed longer duration of diabetes with more complications (sensorial neuropathy and macroangiopathy) and often took drugs for associated cardiovascular diseases. In 28% of the cases, erectile dysfunction was associated with a decline in libido and in 26% with ejaculation disorders. In conclusion, erectile dysfunction is frequent and severe among diabetic patients in Guinea. The medical staff plays an essential role to initiate early diagnosis, promote psychological support and provide medication, if possible.

  16. Clinical and laboratory criteria for type 2 diabetes mellitus in children

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    T.V. Sorokman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review was the analysis of literature data on clinical and laboratory criteria for type 2 diabetes mellitus in children. A review of scientific literature was conducted using Pubmed as the search engine by the keywords: diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, clinical picture, laboratory criteria, risk factors, taking into consideration studies conducted in the last 10 years, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, conference abstracts, personal files, and contact with expert informants. The criterion for the selection of articles for the study was based on their close relevance to the topic, thus, out of 213 analyzed articles, the findings of the researchers covered in 21 articles were crucial. Type 2 mellitus is a multifactorial di­sease with hereditary predisposition. The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus indicate the presence of such a disease in the immediate family; in the presence of type 2 diabetes in one of the parents, the risk of its development during the life of the descendant is 40 %. In most cases, severe clinical manifestations are absent, and the diagnosis is established at a routine determination of glycemia level. The disease usually starts at the age of 10 years, with the overwhelming majority of patients having obesity and other components of the metabolic syndrome. Criteria for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes are proposed by the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes. With a purpose of differential diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the onset of the disease, the level of insulin and C-peptide in the blood is determined both fasting, and during an oral glucose tolerance test.

  17. Clinical characteristics of patients with diabetes mellitus and fatty liver diagnosed by liver/spleen Hounsfield units on CT scan

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    Sakitani, Kosuke; Enooku, Kenichiro; Kubo, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Akifumi; Arai, Hisakatsu; Kawazu, Shoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Objective The leading cause of liver injuries in diabetes mellitus may be associated with fatty liver. We aimed to elucidate the relationship between fatty liver and diabetes characteristics. Methods Retrospectively, 970 patients with diabetes were analysed. Fatty liver was diagnosed when the liver/spleen Hounsfield unit ratio by computed tomography was below 0.9. Clinical diabetes characteristics were compared between patients with and without fatty liver. Results Of 970 patients (717 male a...

  18. Clinical effect comparison of different surgical methods for treating diabetic retinopathy

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    Qing Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the clinical results of different surgical methods for diabetic antipathy. METHODS: Eighty cases(102 eyeswith diabetic antipathy were selected in our hospital from January 2012 to December 2013. Thirty-eight cases(48 eyesin group A received joint surgical treatment, 42 cases(54 eyesin group B took staging of surgical treatment. The clinical effect was observed in both groups.RESULTS: The vision after surgery was improved than that of before surgery in two groups, there were no significant differences(P>0.05. A postoperative complication rate was 16.7% in group A and 22.2% in group B, showed no significant difference(P>0.05. CONCLUSION: Surgery and staging joint surgery are both feasible for diabetic retinopathy patients, can, improve the visionr. Both of them are worthy of clinical application.

  19. Retrieving clinically relevant diabetic retinopathy images using a multi-class multiple-instance framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandakkar, Parag S.; Venkatesan, Ragav; Li, Baoxin

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a vision-threatening complication from diabetes mellitus, a medical condition that is rising globally. Unfortunately, many patients are unaware of this complication because of absence of symptoms. Regular screening of DR is necessary to detect the condition for timely treatment. Content-based image retrieval, using archived and diagnosed fundus (retinal) camera DR images can improve screening efficiency of DR. This content-based image retrieval study focuses on two DR clinical findings, microaneurysm and neovascularization, which are clinical signs of non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors propose a multi-class multiple-instance image retrieval framework which deploys a modified color correlogram and statistics of steerable Gaussian Filter responses, for retrieving clinically relevant images from a database of DR fundus image database.

  20. Improving diabetic foot care in a nurse-managed safety-net clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joann M; Virden, Mary D

    2013-05-01

    This article is a description of the development and implementation of a Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Care Program and assessment tool in an academically affiliated nurse-managed, multidisciplinary, safety-net clinic. The assessment tool parallels parameters identified in the Task Force Foot Care Interest Group of the American Diabetes Association's report published in 2008, "Comprehensive Foot Examination and Risk Assessment." Review of literature, Silver City Health Center's (SCHC) 2009 Annual Report, retrospective chart review. Since the full implementation of SCHC's Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Care Program, there have been no hospitalizations of clinic patients for foot-related complications. The development of the Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Assessment tool and the implementation of the Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Care Program have resulted in positive outcomes for the patients in a nurse-managed safety-net clinic. This article demonstrates that quality healthcare services can successfully be developed and implemented in a safety-net clinic setting. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Tuberculosis screening at a diabetes clinic in the Republic of the Marshall Islands

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    R.M. Trinidad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Setting: Tuberculosis (TB and diabetes mellitus (DM are prominent public health problems in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, a small island nation with high rates of tuberculosis and diabetes. Objective: Evaluate the rate of active and latent TB in a Pacific Island DM clinic. Design: In one DM clinic on the island of Ebeye, 213 adult patients aged 27–86 years completed tuberculin skin testing and TB work-up between April 2010 and March 2012. Results: Screening for TB led to the diagnosis of 77 patients with TB infection and 11 patients with TB disease. From these data, the prevalence of TB disease among DM patients in the clinic exceeded 5% (95% CI 2.2%–8.1%. All patients who completed TB screening were at high risk of TB disease, and those with DM aged ≤50 years had a higher risk of TB disease than those with DM over age 50 (RR 3.1, C.I. 1.0–9.7, p= 0.05. Conclusion: The experience at the Ebeye Diabetes Clinic demonstrates that screening DM patients for TB can identify significant rates of TB infection and TB disease, and should be considered for other settings with a high background TB incidence. Further assessment of TB risks should explore age, gender, and level of diabetes control. Keywords: Tuberculosis, Diabetes, Pacific Islands, Bi-directional screening

  2. Current Status of Clinical and Experimental Researches on Cognitive Impairment in Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical and experimental researches on cognitive impairment related to diabetes in the recent decade. Most clinical studies indicate that the cognitive impairment in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus is related to recurrent hypoglycemia closely. There is little research about whether or not hyperglycemia is related to cognitive impairment in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Most studies indicate that the cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes involves multiple factors through multiple mechanisms, including blood glucose, blood lipid, blood pressure, level of insulin, medication, chronic complication, etc. But, there has been no large-scale, multi-center, randomized controlled clinical trial in China recently. And what is more, some problems exist in this field of research, such as the lack of golden criterion of cognitive function measurement, different population of studied objects, and incomprehensive handling of confounding factors. Experimental studies found that hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was impaired,which were manifested by impairment of spatial memory and decreased expression of LTP, but its relation to hyperglycemia, the duration of diabetes, learning and memory has always been differently reported by different researches. Thus, there are a lot of unknown things to be explored and studied in order to clarify its mechanism. TCM has abundant clinical experience in treating cerebral disease with medicine that enforces the kidney and promotes wit. However, there has been no research on treating diabetic cognitive impairment,which requires work to be done actively and TCM to be put into full play, in order to improve the treatment of diabetes and enhance living quality of patients.

  3. Clinical studies of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects. Analysis with brain MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Makoto; Tanahashi, Hideo; Nomura, Makoto; Yamada, Yoshio; Abe, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the clinical characteristics of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects, brain MRI studies were conducted in diabetic patients and healthy subjects. The subjects were 93 diabetic patients without symptoms and signs of cerebral infarction (49 males and 44 females) with a mean age of 59 years and 73 healthy subjects (43 males and 30 females) with a mean age of 57 years. The MRI studies were performed on a General Electric 1.5-T signa system. The spin-echo technique (T2-weighted image) was used with a pulse repetition time (TR) of 2,500 msec and echo time (TE) of 80 msec. The quantitative evaluation of cerebral infarction was assessed using personal computer and image-scanner. By MRI, the incidence of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (30.1% vs. 13.7%, respectively, p<0.05). The mean age of the diabetic patients with cerebral infarctions was higher than that of those without cerebral infarctions. Hypertension and diabetic nephropathy were present more frequently in the subjects with cerebral infarctions. These data suggest that it is important to delay the onset and slow the progression of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients by strict blood glucose control and management of blood pressure. (author)

  4. Epidemiology, Clinical and complications profile of diabetes in Saudi Arabia: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhadd, Tarik A.; Al-Amoudi, Abdallah; Alzahrani, Ali S.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is emerging as a public health problem in Saudi Arabia in parallel with the world wide diabetes pandemic, which is having a particular impact on upon the Middle East and the third world. This pandemic has accompanied the adoption of a modern life style and the abandonment of a traditional lifestyle, with a resultant increase in rates of obesity and other chronic non-communicable diseases. The indigenous Saudi population seems to have a special genetic predisposition to develop type 2 diabetes, which is further amplified by a rise in obesity rates, a high rate of consanguinity and the presence of other variables of the insulin resistance syndrome. We highlight the epidemiology, clinical and complication profile of diabetes in Saudi people. Diabetes is well studied in Saudi Arabia: however, there seems to be little research in the area of education and health acre delivery. This is of paramount importance to offset the perceived impact on health care delivery services, to lessen chronic diabetes complications and to reduce the expected morbidity and mortality from diabetes. (author)

  5. Association of Major Dietary Patterns with General and Abdominal Obesity in Iranian Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane Basiri, Marjan; Sotoudeh, Gity; Djalali, Mahmood; Reza Eshraghian, Mohammad; Noorshahi, Neda; Rafiee, Masoumeh; Nikbazm, Ronak; Karimi, Zeinab; Koohdani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify dietary patterns associated with general and abdominal obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. We included 728 patients (35 - 65 years) with type 2 diabetes mellitus in this cross-sectional study. The usual dietary intake of individuals over 1 year was collected using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Weight, height, and waist circumference were measured according to standard protocol. The two major dietary patterns identified by factor analysis were healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns. After adjustment for potential confounders, subjects in the highest quintile of the healthy dietary pattern scores had a lower odds ratio for the general obesity when compared to the lowest quintile (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI = 0.26 - 0.79, P for trend = 0.02), while patients in the highest quintile of the unhealthy dietary pattern scores had greater odds for the general obesity (OR = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.8 - 5.9, P for trend diabetes mellitus, a healthy dietary pattern is inversely associated and an unhealthy dietary pattern is directly associated with general obesity.

  6. Clinical review: Current state and future perspectives in the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Wiebke; Allolio, Bruno

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of diabetes insipidus (DI) is often challenging but essential, because treatment may vary substantially. This article analyzes the database and performance of currently used differential diagnostic tests for DI and discusses future perspectives for diagnostic improvement. A review of electronic and print data comprising original and review articles retrieved from the PubMed or Cochrane Library database up to January 2012 was conducted. The search term "polyuria polydipsia syndrome" was cross-referenced with underlying forms of disease and associated clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic MeSH terms. In addition, references from review articles and textbook chapters were screened for papers containing original data. Search results were narrowed to articles containing primary data with a description of criteria for the differential diagnosis of DI. Fifteen articles on differential diagnosis of DI were identified, mainly consisting of small series of patients, and mostly covering only part of the differential diagnostic spectrum of DI. Test protocols differed, and prospective validation of diagnostic criteria was consistently missing. Inconsistent data were reported on the diagnostic superiority of direct plasma arginine vasopressin determination over the indirect water deprivation test. Both test methods revealed limitations, especially in the differentiation of disorders with a milder phenotype. The available data demonstrate limitations of current biochemical tests for the differential diagnosis of DI, potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis and treatment. The newly available assay for copeptin, the C terminus of the vasopressin precursor, holds promise for a higher diagnostic specificity and simplification of the differential diagnostic protocol in DI.

  7. Associated tuberculosis and diabetes in Conakry, Guinea: prevalence and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, N M; Camara, A; Camara, L M; Diallo, M M; Kaké, A; Bah-Sow, O Y

    2006-09-01

    Anti-tuberculosis centres in Conakry. To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with tuberculosis (TB), identify the associated risk factors and describe the clinical signs of the association of TB and diabetes. A total of 388 patients with TB selected by simple random sampling from the register of cases diagnosed in Conakry were examined and administered a capillary blood glycaemia test to detect diabetes. Thirteen cases of diabetes were identified, giving a prevalence rate of 3.35% (95%CI 1.35-5.35). Four (31%) had not been diagnosed before the survey. The diagnosis of diabetes preceded that of TB by an average of 5 years (range 1-9 years). The clinical characteristics of TB (frequent exposure to infection, site and proportion of new and retreated cases) did not differ from one group to another. Increased age (P Guinea. Because of frequent co-morbidity, systematic testing for diabetes among TB patients may be recommended, particularly if risk factors are present.

  8. An assessment of aspirin use in a Nigerian diabetes outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawole, B A; Adebayo, R A; Aloba, O O

    2004-01-01

    We have conducted this study to assess the use of aspirin among adult diabetic outpatients in our hospital. The records of all patients attending the weekly Diabetes clinic of the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa, Osun state, Nigeria over one month were reviewed and aspirin use evaluated in light of the American Diabetes Association position statement (2003) on aspirin therapy in diabetes. Eighty-two patients in all were studied. Fourty three (52.4%) were males, 39 (47.6%) were females. Their mean age was 59.1 +/- 10.7 yrs (range 31-81). All were type 2 and had been diabetic for a mean of 5.2 +/- 5.7 yrs (1-26yrs). Concurrent hypertension, another major risk factor for cardiovascular disease was found in 71.9% and 12.2% were obese. Aspirin use was contraindicated in 1.2%. All other patients had at least one indication for the use of aspirin based on the ADA criteria but only 39% were taking aspirin regularly. The results of this present study suggest that aspirin is still grossly under utilised in clinic patients with diabetes despite proven benefits. There is need to stimulate awareness amongst health care providers.

  9. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria from diabetic foot infections Haji Adam Malik central general hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulolo, B. A.; Pase, M. A.; Ginting, F.

    2018-03-01

    Increasing rate of Diabetic Foot Infections (DFIs) caused by multi-drug-resistance pathogens plays a huge role in the duration of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality of diabetic patients. The aim of the study is to assess the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacteria in DFIs and causative microorganisms. Using cross-sectional retrospective study, data were collected from medical records of DFIs patients previously hospitalized atHaji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan from January to July 2017. 33 patients met the criteria and got enrolled in the study. The classification of DFIs was evaluated according to Wagner’s Classification. Evaluation of antibiotic sensitivity and identification of causative microorganisms were performed in standard microbiologic methods. The most common grade of DFIs was Grade-4 (48.5%), followed by Grade-3 (39.4%) and Grade-5 (9.1%). A total of 12 pathogens were identified. The most common infecting microorganism isolated on pus cultures was Klebsiella pneumonia (33.3%), followed by Escherichia coli (24.2%), Acinetobacter baumanni (12.1%), and Staphylococcus aureus (9.1%). Frequent susceptible antibiotics were Amikacin (88.8%), Imipenem (87%), Meropenem (84.6%), Erythromycin (75%), and Cefoperazone/Sulbactam (68.9%). DFIs are polymicrobial infections in this study K. pneumonia was the most common cause microorganism.

  10. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayeon Shin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16–41 years included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2003–2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI, dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: “high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice”, “high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese”, and “high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood”. GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation <24 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for GDM, after controlling for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP. All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14% had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4–17.0 for “high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice” pattern, 7.5 (1.8–32.3 for “high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese” pattern, and 22.3 (3.9–127.4 for “high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood” pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational

  11. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dayeon; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O

    2015-11-12

    Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16-41 years) included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice", "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese", and "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood". GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP). All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14%) had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4-17.0) for "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice" pattern, 7.5 (1.8-32.3) for "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese" pattern, and 22.3 (3.9-127.4) for "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood" pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake and log-transformed CRP. These findings suggest that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with risk of GDM after controlling for potential confounders. The observed connection between a high

  12. Medicine on demand, medication patterns and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, E.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease that currently affects approximately 5% of the general population in Western countries. Type 2 diabetes mellitus accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases. In the last decades, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has increased steeply due to a combination of

  13. Impact of clinical inertia on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, David L; Al-Anjawi, Hussam A; Al-Baharna, Marwa M

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether clinical inertia is associated with simpler interventions occurring more often than complex changes and the association between clinical inertia and outcomes. Prevalence of clinical inertia over a 30 month period for hyperglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia was calculated in a random sample (n=334) of patients attending a diabetes clinic. Comparisons between prevalence of clinical inertia and outcomes for each condition were examined using parametric tests of association. There was less clinical inertia in hyperglycaemia (29% of consultations) compared with LDL (80% of consultations) and systolic BP (68% of consultations). Consultations where therapy was intensified had a greater reduction in risk factor levels than when no change was made. No association was found between treatment intensity scores and changes in HbA1c, LDL or blood pressure over 30 months. Physicians are no more likely to intervene in conditions where simple therapeutic changes are necessary as opposed to complex changes. Greater clinical inertia leads to poorer outcomes. There continues to be substantial clinical inertia in routine clinical practice. Physicians should adopt a holistic approach to cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with diabetes, adhere more closely to established management guidelines and emphasize personal individualized target setting. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical significance of biochemical markers of bone metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bashan; Zeng Longhong; Lai Fudi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of levels of biochemical markers of bone metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Serum osteocalcin (BGP, with RIA), Ca alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and random specimen urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD, with chemiluminescence assay), Ca, creatinine levels were measured in 40 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 31 controls. Results: Serum BGP levels in diabetic patients were much lower than those in the controls (P<0.05); while urinary DPD/Cr ratio and Ca/Cr ratio were significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P<0.05, P<0.05). Serum Ca and ALP levels were about the same in the two groups. Conclusion: Loss of bone mass in diabetic patients are due to both decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption. Determination of the levels of the biochemical markers of bone metabolism (BGP, DPD......) could be applied for early detection of osteoporosis. (authors)

  15. Prognostic clinical and molecular biomarkers of renal disease in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    biomarkers address the predictive performance of novel biomarker panels in addition to the classical panel in type 2 diabetes. However, the prospective studies conducted so far have small sample sizes, are insufficiently powered and lack external validation. Adequately sized validation studies of multiple......Diabetic kidney disease occurs in ∼ 25-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the high risk of progressive renal function loss and end-stage renal disease, early identification of patients with a renal risk is important. Novel biomarkers may aid in improving renal risk stratification...... and metabolomics biomarkers. We focus on multiple biomarker panels since the molecular processes of renal disease progression in type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous, rendering it unlikely that a single biomarker significantly adds to clinical risk prediction. A limited number of prospective studies of multiple...

  16. Clinical inertia causing new or progression of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osataphan, Soravis; Chalermchai, Thep; Ngaosuwan, Kanchana

    2017-03-01

    Clinical inertia is a failure to intensify treatment according to evidence-based guidelines, and can have both short- and long-term adverse effects for type 2 diabetes (T2D). The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the effects of clinical inertia on glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a university-based hospital in Thailand. Medical records were evaluated retrospectively from January 2010 to December 2014. Patients were classified into two groups: clinical inertia and non-inertia. Clinical inertia was defined as failure to initiate insulin within 3 months in patients with HbA1c ≥9 % who were already taking two oral antidiabetic agents. From 1206 records, 98 patients with mean HbA1c of 10.3 % were identified and enrolled in the study. The median follow-up time of these patients was 29.5 months and 68.4 % were classified into the clinical inertia group. The mean (± SD) HbA1c decrement in the clinical inertia and non-inertia groups was 0.82 ± 1.50 % and 3.02 ± 1.80 %, respectively, at 6 months (P inertia was associated with a significantly shorter median time to progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR); log rank test, P = 0.02 and a higher incidence of DR progression (10 vs 2.2 cases per 1000 person-months; P = 0.003). The adjusted incidence rate ratio for DR progression in the clinical inertia group was 4.92 (95 % confidence interval 1.11-21.77; P = 0.036). Being treated by general practitioners was the strongest risk factor associated with clinical inertia. Clinical inertia can cause persistently poor glycemic control and speed up the progression of DR in T2D. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain: clinical utility of pregabalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Aaron I; Casellini, Carolina M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as "pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system." Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy, painful diabetic neuropathy and pain in diabetes. In addition, recent reviews addressing this issue were adopted as necessary. In particular, reports from the American Academy of Neurology

  18. Beverage-consumption patterns and associations with metabolic risk factors among low-income Latinos with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Monica L; Lemon, Stephenie C; Olendzki, Barbara; Rosal, Milagros C

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, Latinos experience disproportionately higher rates of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications than non-Latino whites. Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is strongly associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing caloric intake, particularly from energy-dense, low-nutrient foods or beverages, can be an effective and key strategy for metabolic and weight control. However, little is known about the contribution of various types of beverages, including but not limited to SSBs, to total caloric intake among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Low-income Latinos (87.7% Puerto Rican) participating in a diabetes self-management intervention trial (N=238) provided cross-sectional, descriptive data on beverage-consumption patterns, anthropometric outcomes, and metabolic characteristics. Beverages accounted for one fifth of the total daily caloric intake. SSBs and milk beverages, respectively, contributed 9.6% of calories to overall daily caloric intake. Interventions directed at diabetes risk factors among low-income Latinos with diabetes can benefit from consideration of beverage-consumption behaviors as an important strategy to reduce caloric and sugar intake. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of administrative and clinical case definitions for gestational diabetes mellitus against laboratory results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, S L; Savu, A; Donovan, L E; Johnson, J A; Kaul, P

    2017-06-01

    To examine the validity of International Classification of Disease, version 10 (ICD-10) codes for gestational diabetes mellitus in administrative databases (outpatient and inpatient), and in a clinical perinatal database (Alberta Perinatal Health Program), using laboratory data as the 'gold standard'. Women aged 12-54 years with in-hospital, singleton deliveries between 1 October 2008 and 31 March 2010 in Alberta, Canada were included in the study. A gestational diabetes diagnosis was defined in the laboratory data as ≥2 abnormal values on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test or a 50-g glucose screen ≥10.3 mmol/l. Of 58 338 pregnancies, 2085 (3.6%) met gestational diabetes criteria based on laboratory data. The gestational diabetes rates in outpatient only, inpatient only, outpatient or inpatient combined, and Alberta Perinatal Health Program databases were 5.2% (3051), 4.8% (2791), 5.8% (3367) and 4.8% (2825), respectively. Although the outpatient or inpatient combined data achieved the highest sensitivity (92%) and specificity (97%), it was associated with a positive predictive value of only 57%. The majority of the false-positives (78%), however, had one abnormal value on oral glucose tolerance test, corresponding to a diagnosis of impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy. The ICD-10 codes for gestational diabetes in administrative databases, especially when outpatient and inpatient databases are combined, can be used to reliably estimate the burden of the disease at the population level. Because impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy and gestational diabetes may be managed similarly in clinical practice, impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy is often coded as gestational diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  20. [Bacterial and fungal flora in some clinical materials in children with diabetes type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Maria; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2002-01-01

    Children with poorly controlled diabetes are exposed to infections often caused by endogenous flora. To estimate incidence of pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria and fungi of Candida species. The urine, smears from the oral cavity and the pharynx as well as from the urogenital tract were examined in 130 children (62 boys and 68 girls) hospitalised because of newly diagnosed (53 children) or poorly controlled diabetes (77 patients). 29 children with short stature were the control group, in these children only the urine and smears from the oral cavity and the pharynx were only examined. Culture and identification of microorganisms were performed according to the methods used in microbiological diagnosis. Antifungal susceptibility testing was estimated with FUNGITEST Sanofi Pasteur and ATB Fungus bioMérieux. Staphylococcus aureus in 43 diabetic children (33%) was observed. Staphylococcus aureus from different clinical materials was isolated; there was no difference in the frequency of occurrence of S. aureus in flora of the oral cavity and the pharynx in diabetic children in comparison with healthy children. Streptococcus group B in 29 (22.3%) was isolated, among them in 10 children from the pharynx. In healthy children Streptococcus group B was not observed. A significant bacteriuria was observed in 15 diabetic children (11.5%) and in 2 healthy children (6.9%). Fungi in 58 diabetic children (44.6%) were observed. Most often isolated species was Candida albicans (49 children), rarely other species. Candida spp. from different clinical materials was isolated, also in a non significant amount from the urine. Microbial analysis of vagina should be routinely performed in diabetic adolescents. Urine of diabetics should be examined towards fungi.

  1. Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Omani Children - Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Al-Yaarubi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the demographic characteristics and clinical presentation of Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman. Methods: A retrospective analysis of all children with type 1 diabetes mellitus attending the Pediatric Endocrine Unit at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman from June 2006 to May 2013. Results: One hundred and forty-four patients were included in the study. The mean±SD of age at diagnosis was 6.7 ± 3.7 years. The median duration of symptoms was 10 days (IQR; 5-14. The most commonly reported presenting symptoms were polyuria (94%, polydipsia (82%, and weight loss (59%. Diabetic ketoacidosis at initial presentation was diagnosed in 31% of the patients. Different insulin regimens were prescribed: multiple daily injections in 109 (76% patients, twice daily insulin regimen in 23 (16% patients, and insulin pump therapy in 12 (8% patients. Family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus was present in 31 (22% patients. There were no significant differences in presenting complaints (polyuria, p=0.182; polydipsia, p=0.848, duration of symptoms (p=0.331, reported weight loss (p=0.753, or diabetic ketoacidosis at presentation (p=0.608 between patients with and without family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Polyuria, polydipsia and weight loss are the most common presenting symptoms. Family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent among the studied patients. Diabetic ketoacidosis was found to be less common in Oman compared to other diabetes centers in the Middle East.

  2. Exploring correlates of diabetes-related stress among adults with Type 1 diabetes in the T1D exchange clinic registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Matthew Tyler; Gala, Sasha

    2018-04-01

    To explore relations between diabetes-related stress and multiple sociodemographic, diabetes health, other health, and treatment-related variables among a large sample of adults with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). The sample consisted of 10,821 adults (over 18 years old) enrolled in the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry. The T1D Exchange clinic network consists of 67 diabetes clinical centers throughout the United States selected to broadly represent pediatric and adult patients with T1D. Variables were assessed through participant self-report and extraction of clinic chart data. Univariate and multiple linear regression (with simultaneous entry of all predictors) analyses were conducted. Robustly associated with increased diabetes-related stress across analyses were multiple sociodemographic (female [vs. male], native Hawaiian/other Pacific islander [vs. white/Caucasian], decreased age and diabetes duration), diabetes health (higher HbA1c), other health (lower general health, presence of major life stress and depression, less physical activity), and treatment related variables (use of injections/pen or combination injection/pen/pump [vs. pump], use of CGM, increased frequency of missing insulin doses and BG checking, decreased frequency of BG checking prior to bolus, receipt of mental health treatment). We replicated and extended research demonstrating that diabetes-related stress among people with T1D occurs at higher levels among those with particular sociodemographic characteristics and is associated with a range poorer diabetes health and other health variables, and multiple treatment-related variables. The strong incremental prediction of diabetes-related stress by multiple variables in our study suggests that a multi-variable, personalized approach may increase the effectiveness of treatments for diabetes-related stress. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The association between circulating endostatin and a disturbed circadian blood pressure pattern in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuopio, Jonas; Östgren, Carl Johan; Länne, Toste; Lind, Lars; Ruge, Toralph; Carlsson, Axel C; Larsson, Anders; Nyström, Fredrik H; Ärnlöv, Johan

    2018-02-28

    Endostatin, cleaved from collagen XVIII in the extracellular matrix, is a promising circulating biomarker for cardiovascular damage. It possesses anti-angiogenic and anti-fibrotic functions and has even been suggested to be involved in blood pressure regulation. Less is known if endostatin levels relate to circadian blood pressure patterns. In the present paper we studied the association between circulating levels of endostatin and nocturnal dipping in blood pressure. We used the CARDIPP-study, a cohort of middle aged, type 2 diabetics (n = 593, 32% women), with data on both 24-hour and office blood pressure, serum-endostatin, cardiovascular risk factors, and incident major cardiovascular events. Nocturnal dipping was defined as a >10% difference between day- and night-time blood pressures. Two-hundred four participants (34%) were classified as non-dippers. The mean endostatin levels were significantly higher in non-dippers compared to dippers (mean ± standard deviation: 62.6 ± 1.8 µg/l vs. 58.7 ± 1.6 µg/l, respectively, p = .007). Higher serum levels of endostatin were associated with a diminished decline in nocturnal blood pressure adjusted for age, sex, HbA1c, mean systolic day blood pressure, hypertension treatment, glomerular filtration rate, and prevalent cardiovascular disease (regression coefficient per SD increase of endostatin -0.01, 95% CI, -0.02-(-0.001), p = .03). Structural equation modelling analyses suggest that endostatin mediates 7% of the association between non-dipping and major cardiovascular events. We found an independent association between higher circulating levels of endostatin and a reduced difference between day- and night-time systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes. Yet endostatin mediated only a small portion of the association between non-dipping and cardiovascular events arguing against a clinical utility of our findings.

  4. Design, development and deployment of a Diabetes Research Registry to facilitate recruitment in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Meng H; Bernstein, Steven J; Gendler, Stephen; Hanauer, David; Herman, William H

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge in conducting clinical trials/studies is the timely recruitment of eligible subjects. Our aim is to develop a Diabetes Research Registry (DRR) to facilitate recruitment by matching potential subjects interested in research with approved clinical studies using study entry criteria abstracted from their electronic health records (EHR). A committee with expertise in diabetes, quality improvement, information technology, and informatics designed and developed the DRR. Using a hybrid approach, we identified and consented patients interested in research, abstracted their EHRs to assess common eligibility criteria, and contacted them about their interest in participating in specific studies. Investigators submit their requests with study entry criteria to the DRR which then provides a list of potential subjects who may be directly contacted for their study. The DRR meets all local, regional and federal regulatory requirements. After 5 years, the DRR has over 5000 registrants. About 30% have type 1 diabetes and 70% have type 2 diabetes. There are almost equal proportions of men and women. During this period, 31 unique clinical studies from 19 unique investigators requested lists of potential subjects for their studies. Eleven grant applications from 10 unique investigators used aggregated counts of potentially eligible subjects in their applications. The DRR matches potential subjects interested in research with approved clinical studies using study entry criteria abstracted from their EHR. By providing large lists of potentially eligible study subjects quickly, the DRR facilitated recruitment in 31 clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients at the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadike, B.C.; Akpan, N.A.; Essien, I.O.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is emerging as a major health challenge with the incidence and prevalence of the disease on the increase. It also contributes to overall morbidity and mortality with complications like cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy and lower extremity amputation. There are few local studies on the clinical characteristics of the disease in our wet up and this study therefore set out to characterize the clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients in a health facility in Nigeria. It is a cross sectional, descriptive study carried out at the diabetes clinic of the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital between January 2007 and September 2008. Data obtained included age, sex, anthropometric indices, symptomatology, co-morbidities, complications and treatment of diabetes. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. A total of two hundred and seventy patients were studied (120 males, 150 females). About 89.2% were Type 2 DM patients and majority of the study subjects were overweight. Diabetic neuropathy was the commonest complication present in 38.8% of the subjects. Polyuria was the commonest symptom and hypertension the commonest comorbidity. Majority of the subjects were on oral hypolgycaemic agents for the management of their disease with the sulphonyureas and biguanides being the most common medication that was taken by them. A few of the patients were also taking herbal medication for treatment of their disease. Majority of the patients presenting in our facility have Type 2 diabetes, were hypertensive and overweight. Hypertension was the commonest co-morbidity and diabetic neuropathy the commonest complication. Adequate health education, subsidies on medications and proper funding of the health sector is necessary to stem the tide of the burden attributable to the disease. (author)

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy in Nnewi, Nigeria | Nwosu | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to determine the incidence and pattern of diabetic retinopathy in a clinic population of diabetics in Nnewi. All consecutive new patients seen at the Diabetic Eye Clinic, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, between March 1997 and September 1998 were examined.

  7. Diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2014-08-07

    In recent years, most Dutch general practitioners started working under the umbrella of diabetes care groups, responsible for the organisation and coordination of diabetes care. The quality management of these new organisations receives growing interest, although its association with quality of diabetes care is yet unclear. The best way to measure quality management is unknown and it has not yet been studied at the level of outpatient clinics or care groups. We aimed to assess quality management of type 2 diabetes care in care groups and outpatient clinics. Quality management was measured with online questionnaires, containing six domains (see below). They were divided into 28 subdomains, with 59 (care groups) and 57 (outpatient clinics) questions respectively. The mean score of the domains reflects the overall score (0-100%) of an organisation. Two quality managers of all Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics were invited to fill out the questionnaire.Sixty care groups (response rate 61.9%) showed a mean score of 59.6% (CI 57.1-62.1%). The average score in 52 outpatient clinics (response rate 50.0%) was 61.9% (CI 57.5-66.8%).Mean scores on the six domains for care groups and outpatient clinics respectively were: 'organisation of care' 71.9% (CI 68.8-74.9%), 76.8% (CI 72.8-80.7%); 'multidisciplinary teamwork' 67.1% (CI 62.4-71.9%), 71.5% (CI 65.3-77.8%); 'patient centeredness' 46.7% (CI 42.6-50.7%), 62.5% (CI 57.7-67.2%); 'performance management' 63.3% (CI 61.2-65.3%), 50.9% (CI 44.2-57.5%); 'quality improvement policy' 52.6% (CI 49.2-56.1%), 50.9% (CI 44.6-57.3%); and 'management strategies' 56.0% (CI 51.4-60.7%), 59.0% (CI 52.8-65.2%). On subdomains, care groups scored highest on 'care program' (83.3%) and 'measured outcomes' (98.3%) and lowest on 'patient safety' (15.1%) and 'patient involvement' (17.7%). Outpatient clinics scored high on the presence of a 'diabetic foot team' (81.6%) and the support in 'self-management' (81.0%) and low on 'patient

  8. The metabolic syndrome: validity and utility of clinical definitions for cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Adrian

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of clinical definitions of the metabolic syndrome is frequently misunderstood. While the metabolic syndrome as a physiological process describes a clustering of numerous age-related metabolic abnormalities that together increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, clinical definitions include obesity which is thought to be a cause rather than a consequence of metabolic disturbance, and several elements that are routinely measured in clinical practice, including high blood pressure, high blood glucose and dyslipidaemia. Obesity is frequently a central player in the development of the metabolic syndrome and should be considered a key component of clinical definitions. Previous clinical definitions have differed in the priority given to obesity. Perhaps more importantly than its role in a clinical definition, however, is obesity in isolation before the hallmarks of metabolic dysfunction that typify the syndrome have developed. This should be treated seriously as an opportunity to prevent the consequences of the global diabetes epidemic now apparent. Clinical definitions were designed to identify a population at high lifetime CVD and type 2 diabetes risk, but in the absence of several major risk factors for each condition, are not optimal risk prediction devices for either. Despite this, the metabolic syndrome has several properties that make it a useful construct, in conjunction with short-term risk prediction algorithms and sound clinical judgement, for the identification of those at high lifetime risk of CVD and diabetes. A recently published consensus definition provides some much needed clarity about what a clinical definition entails. Even this, however, remains a work in progress until more evidence becomes available, particularly in the area of ethnicity-specific waist cut-points. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Medicine and Curative Treatment for Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Divya

    2017-10-01

    According to latest technology and facts there is a possible way to give a complete cure for this unconditional disease. Use of Nano-robots from a sprouted seeds or germinated seed of a Synsepalum dulcificum plant will take as a sample that has the main function of the antidote which has the ability to induce and control the production rate of insulin in pancreas. It has the new form of Nano-robots that are present naturally in it which is in understudies. A possible way of research through the samples will provide a clear solution with Nano-robots that will cure Diabetes. Creation of Nano-robots with onivyde in combination with the samples prepared and Nano-robot is designed with the nano-electric biosensor.

  10. Pattern of dental caries in Mulago Dental School clinic, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on dental caries among patients attending Mulago Hospital is scarce. Yet knowledge of the pattern of caries can be used to plan preventive and treatment interventions. This study describes the pattern of dental caries (in terms of age group, tooth and tooth surface and gender) among patients attending the ...

  11. Pattern of mental illness among women attending an infertility clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Female infertility is highly co-morbid with mental illness. In Nigeria, very few studies have been conducted to determine the pattern of mental illness among women with infertility. We aimed to determine the pattern of mental illness in a sample of women with female infertility as well as its associated correlates.

  12. Diabetic foot ulcer management in clinical practice in the UK: costs and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Julian F; Fuller, Graham W; Vowden, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the patterns of care and annual levels of health care resource use attributable to managing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in clinical practice by the UK's National Health Service (NHS), and the associated costs of patient management. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of the records of 130 patients with a newly diagnosed DFU in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. Patients' characteristics, wound-related health outcomes and health care resource use were quantified, and the total NHS cost of patient management was estimated at 2015-2016 prices. Patients were predominantly managed in the community by nurses, with minimal clinical involvement of specialist physicians. 5% of patients saw a podiatrist, and 5% received a pressure-offloading device. Additionally, 17% of patients had at least one amputation within the first 12 months from initial presentation of their DFU. 14% of DFUs were documented as being clinically infected at initial presentation, although an additional 31% of patients were prescribed an antimicrobial dressing at the time of presentation. Of all the DFUs, 35% healed within 12 months, and the mean time to healing was 4·4 months. Over the study period, 48% of all patients received at least one prescription for a compression system, but significantly more patients healed if they never received compression (67% versus 16%; P cost of wound care over 12 months was an estimated £7800 per DFU (of which 13% was attributable to amputations), ranging from £2140 to £8800 per healed and unhealed DFU, respectively, and £16 900 per amputated wound. Consolidated medical records from a primary care held database provided 'real-world evidence' highlighting the consequences of inefficient and inadequate management of DFUs in clinical practice in the UK. Clinical and economic benefits to both patients and the NHS could accrue from strategies that focus on (i) wound prevention, (ii) improving wound-healing rates

  13. Pattern scan laser versus single spot laser in panretinal photocoagulation treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the efficacy of 577-nm pattern scan laser in panretinal photocoagulation(PRPtreatment in newly diagnosed proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS:Prospective and comparative observation was performed in totally 32 patients with high-risk PDR. They were randomly divided into group 1(using pattern scan laser, PSLand 2(using single spot laser, SSL, each containing 16 subjects to which totally 20 eyes received PRP. Non-perfusion region was identified with fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAbefore and 3mo after final PRP. The advantage of PSL was verified in terms of the number and the duration of PRP sessions needed for satisfactory outcomes, and the pain score.RESULTS: Three PRP sessions were needed for each eye to complete the treatment using PSL, while 4 sessions were needed using SSL. The duration of each session with PSL in group 1 was 7.3±2.3min, which was significantly shorter than that with SSL in group 2(13.2±4.1, t38=5.596, PPCONCLUSION: PSL showed clear advantages over SSL in the PRP treatment of PDR, not only in the improved efficacy, but also in the reduction of pain and the improvement of effectiveness.

  14. Prognostic interaction patterns in diabetes mellitus II: A random-matrix-theory relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aparna; Pawar, Amit Kumar; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    We analyze protein-protein interactions in diabetes mellitus II and its normal counterpart under the combined framework of random matrix theory and network biology. This disease is the fifth-leading cause of death in high-income countries and an epidemic in developing countries, affecting around 8 % of the total adult population in the world. Treatment at the advanced stage is difficult and challenging, making early detection a high priority in the cure of the disease. Our investigation reveals specific structural patterns important for the occurrence of the disease. In addition to the structural parameters, the spectral properties reveal the top contributing nodes from localized eigenvectors, which turn out to be significant for the occurrence of the disease. Our analysis is time-efficient and cost-effective, bringing a new horizon in the field of medicine by highlighting major pathways involved in the disease. The analysis provides a direction for the development of novel drugs and therapies in curing the disease by targeting specific interaction patterns instead of a single protein.

  15. Immigration and dietary patterns in South Asian Canadians at risk for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandola, Kirandeep; Sandhu, Supna; Tang, Tricia

    To examine the relationship between immigration and dietary patterns among South Asian adults at risk for diabetes and living in Canada. We recruited 428 South Asian adults affiliated with Sikh and Hindu temples in Metro Vancouver. Of the total sample, 422 completed self-report surveys including demographic background information, and two brief food screeners (fruit/vegetable/fiber intake and fat intake). Food screeners were culturally tailored to include traditional foods consumed in the South Asian community. Multiple linear regressions examined the relationship between diet and immigration. All models were adjusted for age, sex, marital status, education, income, and employment. Participants reported low levels of meat, fruit and vegetable consumption. Intake of whole milk products, traditional South Asian desserts and snacks were relatively high in comparison to other fat-containing food items. Specific trends in diet were seen in relation to time following immigration with the longer duration of years living in Canada the greater consumption of fruit/vegetable/fiber, non-starchy vegetables, total fat and meat reported; and lower intake of whole milk. Acculturation appears to influence some dietary patterns in our sample of South Asian Canadian adults. These findings should be considered when designing culturally tailored lifestyle modification interventions for this community. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical significance of nuclide renal dynamic imaging and urine microalbumin inspection of type II diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Jin Yaoge; Shi Xueying; Gao Yong

    2011-01-01

    To investigate clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine microalbumin in early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, GFR in 60 patients with type II diabetes mellitus and a control group of 20 were determined using 99 Tc m DTPA renal dynamic imaging and urine microalbumin. The following results were obtained.Among the 60 patients with diabetes, 5 patients had increased GFRs of, 142.0±13.6 mg/min, which was 35% higher than that of controls and differed significantly from the control (P<0.01); 20 patients had GFRs of 102.2±10.2 mg/min, which differed little from the control; and 35 patients had declined GFRs of 57.2±18.0 mg/min, which was 54.3% lowered than the control and differed significantly from the control (P<0.01). The urine microalbumin in diabetes patients was significantly higher than the control. In conclusion, the GFR is a good index of the early kidney injury in diabetic patients. The combined detection of GFR and urine microalbumin can improve the early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, and may help to monitor the treatment response and assess prognosis. (authors)

  17. Low Plasma alpha-Tocopherol Concentrations and Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espe, K.M.; Raila, J.; Henze, A.; Blouin, K.; Schneider, A.; Schmiedeke, D.; Krane, V.; Pilz, S.; Schweigert, F.J.; Hocher, B.; Wanner, C.; Drechsler, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Trials with the antioxidant vitamin E have failed to show benefit in the general population. Considering the different causes of death in ESRD, this study investigated the association between plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol and specific clinical outcomes in diabetic

  18. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  19. Prediction of preeclampsia in type 1 diabetes in early pregnancy by clinical predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestgaard, Marianne; Sommer, Miriam Colstrup; Ringholm, Lene

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and possible clinical predictors of preeclampsia present in early pregnancy among women with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A systematic search of PubMed was conducted in April 2017. Inclusion criteria were largely unselected cohort, inc...

  20. Secondary Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome - Clinical Characteristics at Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Căpăţînă Cristina; Baciu Ionela; Greere Daniela; Caragheorgheopol Andra; Poiană Cătălina

    2018-01-01

    Background and aims. Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disease associated with severe morbidity and increased mortality if untreated. Diabetes mellitus is a frequent initial complaint of these patients. Our aim was to investigate the clinical characteristics at the time of diagnosis in a cohort of patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome (CS).

  1. External validation of a clinical scoring system for the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Opmeer, B. C.; Zweers, E. J. K.; van Ballegooie, E.; ter Brugge, H. G.; de Valk, H. W.; Visser, G. H. A.; Mol, B. W. J.

    Aim: A prediction rule for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) could be helpful in early detection and increased efficiency of screening. A prediction rule by means of a clinical scoring system is available, but has never been validated externally. The aim of this study was to validate the scoring

  2. Clinical features and differential diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Leonidovna Kuraeva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This review was designed to evaluate prevalence, specific clinical features, and differential diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 in childrenand adolescents. Special emphasis is laid on the importance of immunological and molecular-genetic studies for the verification of diagnosis and activecase detection in h groups.

  3. Using Clinical Data, Hypothesis Generation Tools and PubMed Trends to Discover the Association between Diabetic Retinopathy and Antihypertensive Drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senter, Katherine G [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Chaum, Ed [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness and common complication of diabetes. Many diabetic patients take antihypertensive drugs to prevent cardiovascular problems, but these drugs may have unintended consequences on eyesight. Six common classes of antihypertensive drug are angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, alpha blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), -blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics. Analysis of medical history data might indicate which of these drugs provide safe blood pressure control, and a literature review is often used to guide such analyses. Beyond manual reading of relevant publications, we sought to identify quantitative trends in literature from the biomedical database PubMed to compare with quantitative trends in the clinical data. By recording and analyzing PubMed search results, we found wide variation in the prevalence of each antihypertensive drug in DR literature. Drug classes developed more recently such as ACE inhibitors and ARBs were most prevalent. We also identified instances of change-over-time in publication patterns. We then compared these literature trends to a dataset of 500 diabetic patients from the UT Hamilton Eye Institute. Data for each patient included class of antihypertensive drug, presence and severity of DR. Graphical comparison revealed that older drug classes such as diuretics, calcium channel blockers, and -blockers were much more prevalent in the clinical data than in the DR and antihypertensive literature. Finally, quantitative analysis of the dataset revealed that patients taking -blockers were statistically more likely to have DR than patients taking other medications, controlling for presence of hypertension and year of diabetes onset. This finding was concerning given the prevalence of -blockers in the clinical data. We determined that clinical use of -blockers should be minimized in diabetic patients to prevent retinal damage.

  4. Need for Outcome Scenario Analysis of Clinical Trials in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Verdugo, Rosa; Erbach, Michael; Schnell, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    Since the FDA requirement for cardiovascular safety of all new antihyperglycemic drugs to enter the market, the number and extent of phase 3 clinical trials has markedly increased. Unexpected trial results imply an enormous economic, personal and time cost and has deleterious effects over R&D. To prevent unforeseen developments in clinical trials, we recommend performing a comprehensive prospective outcome scenario analysis before launching the trial. In this commentary, we discuss the most important factors to take in consideration for prediction of clinical trial outcome scenarios and propose a theoretical model for decision making.

  5. Clinical Profile and Etiology of Diabetes Mellitus With Onset at Less Than 6 Months of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Valamparampil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical profile and etiology of diabetes mellitus (DM with onset at < 6 months of age. All children aged < 6 months diagnosed with DM at a tertiary referral center between 2005 and 2008 were included in the study. Three cases of DM with onset at < 6 months of age were identified. All patients were female and of the same ethnic origin, with nonconsanguineous parents. Intrauterine growth retardation was noted in all three patients, and diabetic ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridemia in two of the three. Blood samples from all three patients and their parents were analyzed for mutations in the KCNJ11 gene (inwardly-rectifying potassium channel, subfamily J, member 11 gene; OMIM 600937. A heterozygous de novo mutation in the KCNJ11 gene was detected in one patient, which confirmed the diagnosis of permanent neonatal DM. Neither C-peptide secretion nor circulating islet cell antibodies were detected in any patient during diagnosis, but C-peptide elevation was detected in the patient with permanent neonatal DM after treatment with sulfonylurea. One infant had clinical and immunological evidence of congenital cytomegalovirus infection while the diabetes in another case was postulated to be syndromic. DM within the first 6 months of life is a rare condition with various etiologies. The high prevalence of Kir6.2 mutations in neonatal diabetes means that all children < 6 months of age diagnosed with diabetes should be tested for Kir6.2 mutations at diagnosis.

  6. Pattern of breast diseases: preliminary report of breast clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, K.; Rasool, I.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To find out the pattern of breast disease in this part of the county and create public awareness about breast diseases especially cancer. Design: Ac cross sectional and cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Department of Surgery, Jinnah Hospital /Allama Iqbal Medical College, Lahore from March 1999 to July 2000. Subjects and Methods: All the female patients reported were included in this study. They were diagnosed by history, physical examination and rel event investigations like ultrasonography, mammography, FNAS and biopsy. Appropriate medical and surgical management was carried out. The breast cancer was treated according to TNA staging system by multidisciplinary approach. Method of breast self examination (BSE) was taught with the help of charts and brochures. Results: The age ranged from 10 years to 75 years. Maximum number of patients (30%) was seen between 20-29 years of age while 15 (1%) cases did not suffer from any disease. Among 1485 patients the common conditions were non cyclical mastalgia in 362 (24.37%), fibroadenoma in 289 (19.46%), fibrocystic disease in 276(17.98%) breast abscess in 149 (10%) and breast cancer (6.19%). Other diseases were puberty mastitis 49(3.2%), galactocele 40(2.69%), accessory breast 45(3%) and nipple discharge 28(1.88%). Among the palpable lumps, breast caner accounted for 11.75%. The commonest age of presentation of breast cancer was 5th decade (31%) followed by 4th decade (26%). Majority of cancer patients (45%) presented in stage III. All the women with beast abscesses were lactating. Non cyclical mastalgia was commonly seen in 4th decade (30.66%) while 44.63% patients of fibroadenoma reported in the 2nd decade. Fibrocystic disease was reported between 3rd and 4th decade (62.17%). Conclusion: Commonest being conditions were non cyclical mastalgia followed by fibroadenoma while breast cancer contributed a significant percentage of palpable lumps. Due to effective public awareness

  7. Clinical evaluation of treatment for diabetic foot with PTA and PTA combined cinepazide maleate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jue; Cheng Yingsheng; Zhu Yueqi; Tan Huaqiao; Zhao Jungong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value for treatment of diabetic foot with PTA and PTA combined cinepazide maleate. Methods: In 24 cases of diabetic associated vascular disease of lower limb, 12 cases were treated with PTA and other 12 cases were treated with PTA combined cinepazide maleate. We analysed and compared clinical effects before and after the procedure, together with 3 months follow up. Results: In patients treated with PTA, the clinical symptom scores of posttreatment and follow-up decreased; ABI and TcPO 2 increased significantly. The clinical symptom score and ABI of follow-up remained, stable, but TcPO 2 decreased significantly. Control angiography showed improvement in degree of vascular stenosis and peripheral staining of 11 patients after treatment. The vascular patency remained in 12 patients and the peripheral staining decreased in 7 patients on follow-up. In patients treated with PTA combined cinepazide maleate, the clinical symptom score, ABI and TcPO 2 after treatment and on follow-up showed no significant changes compared with those in patients treated by PTA. Control angiography showed that the degree of vascular stenosis and peripheral staining were improved in 12 patients after treatment. The vascular patency was maintained and peripheral staining was improved on follow-up. Before and after treatment, there were no significant differences in clinical symptom score, ABI and TcPO 2 between patients treated with PTA and PTA combined cinepazide maleate, however, there were significant differences in clinical symptom score and TcPO 2 on follow-up. Conclusion: PTA can significantly improve clinical symptom of diabetic foot and the application of cinepazide maleate is a beneficial and necessary supplement. PTA combined cinepazide maleate can be taken as one of the conventional treatment plans for diabetic foot. (authors)

  8. Patients newly diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes during oral glucocorticoid treatment and observed for 14 years: all-cause mortality and clinical developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Dyring-Andersen, B.

    2011-01-01

    and sex and to 1.39 (0.92-2.11, p = 0.12, n = 1086) when risk factors, complications and cancer were added to the model. Apart from differences in age and overweight, patients in this relatively small sample of those diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes during GC treatment were comparable at diagnosis...... treatment. A population-based sample of 1369 people newly diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes underwent a clinical examination at diagnosis, and surviving patients were followed up 6 and 14 years later. Patients receiving oral GC treatment at diagnosis were compared with the other patients. Of 1369......Chronic exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs) has many side effects including glucose intolerance and diabetes and may accelerate the occurrence of cardiovascular disease and increase mortality. We studied the 14-year clinical development of diabetes in patients diagnosed with diabetes during GC...

  9. User Assessment of "InsuOnLine," a Game to Fight Clinical Inertia in Diabetes: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Leandro Arthur; de Souza, Rodrigo Martins; Gordan, Pedro Alejandro; Esteves, Roberto Zonato; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister

    2015-10-01

    We performed a pilot study to assess usability and playability of "InsuOnLine," a serious game for education of primary care physicians on insulin therapy for diabetes mellitus. A multidisciplinary team has designed and developed "InsuOnLine," using Andragogy and Problem-Based Learning principles, with game elements to improve players' motivation. The prototype was tested by four medical doctors and two medical students, using the System Usability Scale (SUS) and a questionnaire to assess playability. These results were used to guide corrections, after which the beta version was retested by 14 medical students and 6 residents. Out of a maximum score of 100 on the SUS, the "InsuOnLine" prototype was rated 88, and some areas for improvement were identified (game instructions, controls). After corrections, the beta version was rated 92.5 on the SUS. Users have found the beta version to be fun, engaging, challenging, relevant, and realistic. Users said that the game has increased their knowledge on diabetes and insulin, that it has made them feel more confident for prescribing insulin, and that it would have impact on how they treated patients with diabetes. Most users said they have learned more from the game than they would have from a lecture. Lessons learned were the need of early piloting, preferably by users with very little or very much gaming experience, on their own computers and free patterns of use. "InsuOnLine" was rated by users as easy to play, fun, and useful for learning. Further studies will assess its educational effectiveness. "InsuOnLine" is a promising tool for large-scale continuing medical education on insulin, helping to fight clinical inertia in diabetes.

  10. Dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome factors in a non-diabetic Italian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Léa Corrêa; Nicolosi, Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    To examine the relationship between dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome. Population-based cross-sectional study. The K-means clustering method was used to identify dietary patterns and logistic regression models were used to compare the adjusted prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome factors, stratifying by obesity status. The 1992-3 Italian Bollate Eye Study, a population-based survey carried out in the town of Bollate (Milan), Italy. A total of 1052 non-diabetic Italian subjects, 527 men and 525 women, aged 42-74 years. Five dietary clusters were identified: common, animal products, starch, vegetal/fat and vitamin/fibre. After adjusting for potential confounders, the starch group showed the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome (36%) followed by the animal products group (30%); the vitamin/fibre (20%) and vegetal/fat groups (19%) showed the lowest prevalence. The starch group had more dyslipidaemia (higher TAG and lower HDL cholesterol levels) and the animal products group had a higher prevalence of impaired fasting glucose. The vitamin/fibre group had the lowest prevalence of abdominal obesity. The beneficial effect of the vegetal/fat and vitamin/fibre dietary patterns seemed stronger among the obese. Our results confirm the deleterious effect of a very-low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and also of high intakes of animal products. The consumption of a diet high in vegetal fats or rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with a healthier metabolic profile. Reducing obesity is essential to prevent metabolic syndrome, but even among the obese dietary habits are important for preserving healthy lipid and glycaemic profiles.

  11. Prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a rural tertiary care centre, southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayarama N

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a common secondary cause of hyperlipidaemia, particularly, if glycaemic control is poor, which in-turn is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The spectrum of dyslipidemia in diabetes mellitus can include all the various types of dyslipidemia identified in the general population Objectives: To study the prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes. Methods: This is a cross sectional study, done on type 2 diabetes patients attending medicine outpatient department of RL Jalappa hospital, Kolar between March 2010 to April 2012 . All the patients were interviewed with pre-designed Performa. Fasting lipid profile and Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c of patients were measured. Patients suffering from other causes of secondary dyslipidemia were excluded. Patients having one or more parameters outside the targets recommended by American Diabetes Association (ADA were considered to have dyslipidemia. Results: A total of 820 type 2 DM patients (533 males and 287 females were studied. Prevalence of dyslipidemia among diabetic males was 95.4 % and 86.75% in females. Among males with dyslipidemia the proportion of patients with mixed dyslipidemia, combined two parameter dyslipidemia and isolated single parameter dyslipidemia were 24.5%, 44.2%, and 31.2% respectively. Figures for the same among female patients stood at 27.3%, 42.97% and 29.7% respectively. Conclusion: Majority of type 2 diabetic patients were dyslipidimic. The most common pattern of dyslipidemia among males was combined dyslipidemia with high triglycerides (TG and low High density lipoprotein (HDL and in females it was high Low density lipoprotein (LDL and low HDL. The most prevalent lipid abnormality in our study was low HDL followed by high TG. No significant relation was found between HbA1c and serum lipid parameters

  12. Prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a rural tertiary care centre, southern India.

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    Jayarama N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a common secondary cause of hyperlipidaemia, particularly, if glycaemic control is poor, which in-turn is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The spectrum of dyslipidemia in diabetes mellitus can include all the various types of dyslipidemia identified in the general population Objectives: To study the prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes. Methods: This is a cross sectional study, done on type 2 diabetes patients attending medicine outpatient department of RL Jalappa hospital, Kolar between March 2010 to April 2012 . All the patients were interviewed with pre-designed Performa. Fasting lipid profile and Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c of patients were measured. Patients suffering from other causes of secondary dyslipidemia were excluded. Patients having one or more parameters outside the targets recommended by American Diabetes Association (ADA were considered to have dyslipidemia. Results: A total of 820 type 2 DM patients (533 males and 287 females were studied. Prevalence of dyslipidemia among diabetic males was 95.4 % and 86.75% in females. Among males with dyslipidemia the proportion of patients with mixed dyslipidemia, combined two parameter dyslipidemia and isolated single parameter dyslipidemia were 24.5%, 44.2%, and 31.2% respectively. Figures for the same among female patients stood at 27.3%, 42.97%and29.7%respectively. Conclusion: Majority of type 2 diabetic patients were dyslipidimic. The most common pattern of dyslipidemia among males was combined dyslipidemia with high triglycerides (TG and low High density lipoprotein (HDL and in females it was high Low density lipoprotein (LDL and low HDL. The most prevalent lipid abnormality in our study was low HDL followed by high TG. No significant relation was found between HbA1c and serum lipid parameters.

  13. T-helper cytokine patterns and related antibodies in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus

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    Etaati Z

    2012-04-01

    Conclusion: The changes in T-helper 1 and 2 associated antibodies and cytokines are not associated with gestational diabetes mellitus and could not be considered as a predictor for gestational diabetes mellitus.

  14. Frequency of common bacteria and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in diabetics presenting with foot ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, F.; Ishfaq, M.; Rahman, S.U.; Afridi, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Foot ulcers are one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus and often lead to lower limb amputation. Diabetic foot ulcers are susceptible to infection. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of common bacteria infecting these ulcers and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery, Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar from April, 2011 to February, 2012. Specimens collected from ulcers of 131 patients were inoculated on Blood Agar and MacConkey Agar, and antibiotic sensitivity was tested using standard disc diffusion method. Results: Out of 131, specimens from 120 patients yielded 176 bacteria. Sixty-six patients had monomicrobial infection while polymicrobial growth was obtained in 54 patients. Overall, Staphylococcus aureus (38.6%) was the most common isolate followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (27.3%). Staphylococcus aureus was most often sensitive to Moxifloxacin, Imipenem/Meropenem, Vancomycin and Linezolid while it showed varying sensitivity to Penicillins and Cephalosporins. 47.1% isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to Methicillin. Most of the gram negative rods were sensitive to Imipenem/Meropenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Ticarcillin-Clavulanate. Majority of gram negative bacteria were found resistant to Cephalosporins and Moxifloxacin except Pseudomonas which showed variable sensitivity to Ceftriaxone, Ceftazidime and Moxifloxacin. Conclusions: Majority of isolates were found resistant to the commonly used antibiotics. Most commonly isolated bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus was most often sensitive to Moxifloxacin, Imipenem/Meropenem, Vancomycin and Linezolid, while majority isolated gram negative rods were sensitive to Imipenem/Meropenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Ticarcillin-Clavulanate. (author)

  15. Machine Learning Approaches for Detecting Diabetic Retinopathy from Clinical and Public Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, Omolola; Kermah, Dulcie

    2015-01-01

    Annual eye examinations are recommended for diabetic patients in order to detect diabetic retinopathy and other eye conditions that arise from diabetes. Medically underserved urban communities in the US have annual screening rates that are much lower than the national average and could benefit from informatics approaches to identify unscreened patients most at risk of developing retinopathy. Using clinical data from urban safety net clinics as well as public health data from the CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examined different machine learning approaches for predicting retinopathy from clinical or public health data. All datasets utilized exhibited a class imbalance. Classifiers learned on the clinical data were modestly predictive of retinopathy with the best model having an AUC of 0.72, sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 55.9%. Classifiers learned on public health data were not predictive of retinopathy. Successful approaches to detecting latent retinopathy using machine learning could help safety net and other clinics identify unscreened patients who are most at risk of developing retinopathy and the use of ensemble classifiers on clinical data shows promise for this purpose.

  16. Identification and Clinical Characterization of Adult Patients with Multigenerational Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Ornella Ludovico

    Full Text Available Some patients diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are, instead, affected by multigenerational diabetes whose clinical characteristics are mostly undefined.1. To identify among patients who had been previously defined as affected by T2DM those, in fact, affected by multigenerational diabetes; 2. After excluding patients carrying the most common MODY genes and mitochondrial mutations, we compared clinical features of remaining patients with those of patients with T2DM.Among 2,583 consecutive adult patients who had been defined as affected by T2DM, we looked for those with diabetes in ≥3 consecutive generations. All probands were screened for mutations in six MODY genes (HNF4A, GCK, HNF1A, PDX1, HNF1B and NeuroD1 and for the A3243G mitochondrial mutation. After excluding patients with mutations in one of such genes, we compared clinical features of the remaining 67 patients (2.6% of the whole initial sample affected by multigenerational "familial diabetes of the adulthood" (FDA and of their diabetic relatives (n = 63 to those with T2DM (n = 1,028 by generalized hierarchical linear models followed by pairwise comparisons.Age, age at diagnosis, proportion of hypertension (all p<0.001, and waist circumference (p<0.05 were lower in FDA than T2DM. Nonetheless, the two groups had similar age-adjusted incidence rate of all-cause mortality.Beside younger age at diagnosis, FDA patients show lower waist circumference and reduced proportion of hypertension as compared to those with T2DM; despite such reduced potential cardiovascular risk factors, FDA patients did not show a reduced mortality risk than patients with T2DM.

  17. Education as Prescription for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Compliance and Efficacy in Clinical Practice

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    Mi Yeon Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetes self-management education has an important role in diabetes management. The efficacy of education has been proven in several randomized trials. However, the status of diabetes education programs in real Korean clinical practice has not yet been evaluated in terms of patient compliance with the education prescription.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed clinical and laboratory data from all patients who were ordered to undergo diabetes education during 2009 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (n=2,291. After excluding ineligible subjects, 588 patients were included in the analysis.ResultsAmong the 588 patients, 433 received education. The overall compliance rate was 73.6%, which was significantly higher in the subjects with a short duration or living in a rural area compared to those with a long duration (85.0% vs. 65.1%, respectively; P<0.001 or living in an urban area (78.2% vs. 70.4%, respectively; P=0.037. The hemoglobin A1c decreased greater in the compliant group (from 7.84±1.54 at baseline to 6.79±1.06 at 3 months and 6.97±1.20 at 12 months after prescription in the compliant group vs. from 7.74±1.25 to 7.14±1.02 and 7.24±1.24 in the non-compliant group; P=0.001. The decrease in hemoglobin A1c was greater in the subjects with a short duration (P=0.032.ConclusionIn our study a large percent of patients refuse to get education despite having a prescription from their physician. This refusal rate was higher in the patients with long-standing diabetes or in urban residence. Furthermore, education was more effective in patients with a short duration of diabetes in clinical practice.

  18. Clinical evaluation of Dyslipidemia among type II diabetic patients at Public hospital Penang, Malaysia

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    Zaki Nada F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global views emphasize the need for early; effective intervention against the atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular diseases. Our aim was to determine the clinical practices and compliance among dyslipidemia with type II diabetes and hypertension in multiracial society. Method(s Study was carried out in out-patient department of General hospital Penang over a period of ten months (Jan - Oct 2008. Study reflects the retrospective data collection covering a period of three years from Jan 2005 - Dec 2007. Universal sampling technique was used to select all the patients' undergone treatment for diabetes type II and dyslipidemia. All the concerned approvals were obtained from Clinical research Committee (CRC. Data was analyzed by using SPSS 15®. Result(s A total of 501 diabetes type 2 patients with dyslipidemia were identified in this study. The demographic data showed that 55.9% (n = 280 were female patients and 44.1% (n = 221 were males. Patients on combination therapy of metformin with other antidiabetic agent were 79%, while 21% were on monotherapy. Lovastatin was received as monotherapy in 83% of study population, while only 17% were on combination with gemfibrozil. Means of FPG and lipid profile were reduced from the initial (2005 to the latest level (2007 significantly (p Conclusion Metformin and lovastatin use among patients of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia is significantly improved the clinical outcomes. No significant association of metformin or lovastatin is found against the hypertension. Metformin and calcium channel blocker combination therapy was found to be the best choice in the co-treatment of diabetes and hypertension.

  19. [Growth patterns of appropriate for gestational age infants of gestational diabetic mothers during the first year].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y L; Ma, R M; Zhang, Y; Mo, Y X; Chen, Z; Sun, Y H; Ding, Z B

    2016-08-02

    To explore the growth pattern of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants of mother with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The objects of this study were offspring of women who delivered in our hospital from January to December 2011. The GDM group included 70 AGA infants (36 male cases and 34 female cases) of mother with GDM. The control group included 154 AGA infants (66 male cases and 88 female cases) of women with normal glucose tolerance. The data of demographic characteristics of mothers of two groups were collected. Body weight and length of infants in two groups were measured at 3, 6 and 12 months age respectively. Body mass index (BMI), weight and height gain during infancy (0-3 months, 3-6 months and 6-12 months) of infants in two groups were also calculated. Body weight, length and BMI of male AGA infants in GDM group were less than that of control group at 3 months and 6 months age, but more than that of control group at 12 months age, however, there were no significant differences between two group(P>0.05). The weight and height gain during infancy (0-3 months, 3-6 months) of male AGA infants in GDM group were lower than that of control group, but the difference was statistically significant only at 3-6 months[(1.1±0.4) vs (1.4±0.4) kg, P=0.040; (4.9±2.3) vs (6.3±1.2) cm, P=0.026]. The weight and height gain during infancy (6-12 months) of male AGA infants of gestational diabetic mothers were higher than that of control group, but the difference was not statistically significant[(2.1±0.5) vs (1.8±0.5) kg, P=0.361; (8.4±1.3) vs (7.8±1.4) cm, P=0.464]. Male infants of gestational diabetic mothers grew slowly during their infancy of 0-6 months, and then their growth became increasingly fast, which suggested that the influence of intrauterine hyperglycemia environment of GDM mothers on fetal growth might continue after birth.

  20. Diabetes management patterns in a palliative care unit in Saudi Arabia

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    Sami Ayed Alshammary

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Diabetes management varied among PCU patients. There is a real need for evidence-based guidelines for diabetes management among patients at the end of life. These guidelines should be tailored to patients' individual preferences in goals of care. Advance care planning should include discussion about patient preferences for management of diabetes at the end of life.

  1. Three Patterns of Rising type 2 Diabetes Prevalence in the World: Need to Widen the Concept of Prevention in Individuals into Control in the Community

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    Madhur Dev Bhattarai

    2009-04-01

    for Asian and other similar populations. The population-based approaches with examples, considering developing countries, are outlined. The paper emphasizes the importance of keeping prepregnancy weight optimum, preferably below the middle of recommended BMI range, to avoid even sub-clinical maternal hyperglycemia, for prevention and control of accelerated rise in any population. Key Words: diabetes, diabetes control, diabetes epidemiology, diabetes prevention, prepregnancy weight

  2. Diabetes mellitus and abnormal glucose tolerance development after gestational diabetes: A three-year, prospective, randomized, clinical-based, Mediterranean lifestyle interventional study with parallel groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferre, Natalia; Del Valle, Laura; Torrejón, Maria José; Barca, Idoya; Calvo, María Isabel; Matía, Pilar; Rubio, Miguel A; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2015-08-01

    Women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in later life. The study aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention for the prevention of glucose disorders (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or DM2) in women with prior GDM. A total of 260 women with prior GDM who presented with normal fasting plasma glucose at six to twelve weeks postpartum were randomized into two groups: a Mediterranean lifestyle intervention group (n = 130) who underwent an educational program on nutrition and a monitored physical activity program and a control group (n = 130) with a conventional follow-up. A total of 237 women completed the three-year follow-up (126 in the intervention group and 111 in the control group). Their glucose disorders rates, clinical and metabolic changes and rates of adherence to the Mediterranean lifestyle were analyzed. Less women in the intervention group (42.8%) developed glucose disorders at the end of the three-year follow-up period compared with the control group (56.75%), p Lifestyle intervention was effective for the prevention of glucose disorders in women with prior GDM. Body weight gain and an unhealthy fat intake pattern were found to be the most predictive factors for the development of glucose disorders. Current Controlled trials: ISRCTN24165302. http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/pf/24165302. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of a web portal by adult patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus seen in a family medicine outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Heboyan, Vahé; Young, Lufei; De Leo, Gianluca; Wilkins, Thad

    2018-05-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of web portals by patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Studies of web portal use by patients with pre-diabetes have not been reported. To plan studies of web portal use by adult clinic patients seen for pre-diabetes and T2DM at an academic medical center, we examined characteristics of those who had or had not registered for a web portal. Electronic records were reviewed to identify web portal registration by patients treated for pre-diabetes or T2DM by age, sex, race and ethnicity. A total of 866 patients with pre-diabetes and 2,376 patients with T2DM were seen in a family medicine outpatient clinic. About 41.5% of patients with pre-diabetes and 34.7% of those with T2DM had registered for the web portal. In logistic regression analysis, web portal registration among patients with T2DM was significantly associated with age 41-45 years, and with Hispanic ethnicity. Similar results were obtained for pre-diabetes except that the positive association with age 41-45 years and inverse association with Hispanic ethnicity were not statistically significant. Among patients with pre-diabetes or T2DM, Black men and Black women were less likely to have registered than their white counterparts. Patients who were aged 18-25 and >65 years were less likely to have registered for the web portal than those 26-65 years. Additional research is needed to identify portal design features that improve health outcomes for patients with pre-diabetes and T2DM and interventions that will increase use of patient portals by pre-diabetic and diabetic patients, especially among Black patients and older patients.

  4. Australian Diabetes Foot Network: management of diabetes-related foot ulceration - a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Shan M; Gurr, Joel M; Allard, Bernard P; Holland, Emma L; Horsley, Mark W; Kamp, Maarten C; Lazzarini, Peter A; Nube, Vanessa L; Sinha, Ashim K; Warnock, Jason T; Alford, Jan B; Wraight, Paul R

    2012-08-20

    Appropriate assessment and management of diabetes-related foot ulcers (DRFUs) is essential to reduce amputation risk. Management requires debridement, wound dressing, pressure off-loading, good glycaemic control and potentially antibiotic therapy and vascular intervention. As a minimum, all DRFUs should be managed by a doctor and a podiatrist and/or wound care nurse. Health professionals unable to provide appropriate care for people with DRFUs should promptly refer individuals to professionals with the requisite knowledge and skills. Indicators for immediate referral to an emergency department or multidisciplinary foot care team (MFCT) include gangrene, limb-threatening ischaemia, deep ulcers (bone, joint or tendon in the wound base), ascending cellulitis, systemic symptoms of infection and abscesses. Referral to an MFCT should occur if there is lack of wound progress after 4 weeks of appropriate treatment.

  5. Disturbance of inorganic phosphate metabolism in diabetes mellitus: clinical manifestations of phosphorus-depletion syndrome during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis

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    Lervang H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Jørn Ditzel, Hans-Henrik LervangDepartment of Endocrinology, and Center for Prevention of Struma and Metabolic Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aarhus University, DenmarkAbstract: The acute effects of intracellular phosphate depletion and hypophosphatemia on organs and tissues in and during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA have been reviewed. When insufficient phosphate and/or oxygen are available for high energy phosphate synthesis, cell homeostasis cannot be maintained and cell integrity may be impaired. The clinical consequences are recognized as occasional cause of morbidity and mortality. Although phosphate repletion has not been routinely recommended in the treatment of DKA, physicians should be aware of these clinical conditions and phosphate repletion in such situations should be considered.Keywords: high energy phosphates, hypoxia, fructose 1,6-diphosphate

  6. Clinical and bacteriological characteristics of pyogenic liver abscess in non-diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han-Chuan; Chen, Te-Li; Chiang, Dung-Hung; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Huang, Ling-Ju; Wang, Fu-Der; Fung, Chang-Phone; Liu, Cheng-Yi

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess, but many patients with pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) do not have diabetes. This study was conducted to compare the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of K. pneumoniae PLA with that caused by other organisms in non-diabetic patients. The medical charts of patients with a diagnosis of PLA were retrospectively reviewed from January 2005 to December 2007. The clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory data, and risk factors were analyzed. There were 50 patients in the K. pneumoniae group and 34 patients in the non-K. pneumoniae group. The clinical presentations did not differ between the 2 groups. The patients in the non-K. pneumoniae group had a higher prevalence of malignant disease than those in the K. pneumoniae group (58.8% vs 6.0%; p factors included chronic renal failure (p = 0.005), abscess rupture (p = 0.036), and right lower lung infiltration (p = 0.049). Hepatobiliary malignancy and newly diagnosed malignancy were risk factors for non-K. pneumoniae liver abscess in non-diabetic patients. Physicians should ascertain the presence of underlying malignancy in patients with non-K. pneumoniae PLA.

  7. A clinically useful diabetes electronic medical record: lessons from the past; pointers toward the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, C; Looker, J; Fisk, T; Oelke, W; Erickson, D; Smith, S; Zimmerman, B

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed the deficiencies of paper medical records in facilitating the care of patients with diabetes and have developed an electronic medical record that corrects some of them. The diabetes electronic medical record (DEMR) is designed to facilitate the work of a busy diabetes clinic. Design principles include heavy reliance on graphic displays of laboratory and clinical data, consistent color coding and aggregation of data needed to facilitate the different types of clinical encounter (initial consultation, continuing care visit, insulin adjustment visit, dietitian encounter, nurse educator encounter, obstetric patient, transplant patient, visits for problems unrelated to diabetes). Data input is by autoflow from the institutional laboratories, by desk attendants or on-line by all users. Careful attention has been paid to making data entry a point and click process wherever possible. Opportunity for free text comment is provided on every screen. On completion of the encounter a narrative text summary of the visit is generated by the computer and is annotated by the care giver. Currently there are about 7800 patients in the system. Remaining challenges include the adaptation of the system to accommodate the occasional user, development of portable laptop derivatives that remain compatible with the parent system and improvements in the screen structure and graphic display formats.

  8. Clinical Significance of Hemostatic Parameters in the Prediction for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Lianlian Pan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It would be important to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and diabetic nephropathy (DN. This study was aimed at evaluating the predicting significance of hemostatic parameters for T2DM and DN. Plasma coagulation and hematologic parameters before treatment were measured in 297 T2DM patients. The risk factors and their predicting power were evaluated. T2DM patients without complications exhibited significantly different activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, platelet (PLT, and D-dimer (D-D levels compared with controls (P<0.01. Fibrinogen (FIB, PLT, and D-D increased in DN patients compared with those without complications (P<0.001. Both aPTT and PLT were the independent risk factors for T2DM (OR: 1.320 and 1.211, P<0.01, resp., and FIB and PLT were the independent risk factors for DN (OR: 1.611 and 1.194, P<0.01, resp.. The area under ROC curve (AUC of aPTT and PLT was 0.592 and 0.647, respectively, with low sensitivity in predicting T2DM. AUC of FIB was 0.874 with high sensitivity (85% and specificity (76% for DN, and that of PLT was 0.564, with sensitivity (60% and specificity (89% based on the cutoff values of 3.15 g/L and 245 × 109/L, respectively. This study suggests that hemostatic parameters have a low predicting value for T2DM, whereas fibrinogen is a powerful predictor for DN.

  9. Characterization of sleep breathing pattern in patients with type 2 diabetes: sweet sleep study.

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    Albert Lecube

    Full Text Available Although sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS is highly prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, it is unknown whether or not subjects with and without T2D share the same sleep breathing pattern.A cross-sectional study in patients with SAHS according to the presence (n = 132 or not (n = 264 of T2D. Both groups were matched by age, gender, BMI, and waist and neck circumferences. A subgroup of 125 subjects was also matched by AHI. The exclusion criteria included chronic respiratory disease, alcohol abuse, use of sedatives, and heart failure. A higher apnea hypopnea index (AHI was observed in T2D patients [32.2 (10.2-114.0 vs. 25.6 (10.2-123.4 events/hours; p = 0.002. When sleep events were evaluated separately, patients with T2D showed a significant increase in apnea events [8.4 (0.1-87.7 vs. 6.3 (0.0-105.6 e/h; p = 0.044, as well as a two-fold increase in the percentage of time spent with oxygen saturation <90% [15.7 (0.0-97.0 vs. 7.9 (0.0-95.6 %; <0.001], higher rates of oxygen desaturation events, and also higher daily sleepiness [7.0 (0.0-21.0 vs. 5.0 (0.0-21.0; p = 0.006] than subjects without T2D. Significant positive correlations between fasting plasma glucose and AHI, the apnea events, and CT90 were observed. Finally, multiple linear regression analyses showed that T2D was independently associated with AHI (R2 = 0.217, the apnea index (R2 = 0.194, CT90 (R2 = 0.222, and desaturation events.T2D patients present a different pattern of sleep breathing than subject without diabetes. The most important differences are the severity of hypoxemia and the number of apneas whereas the incidence of hypopnea episodes is similar.

  10. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type ...

  11. Living With Diabetes

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    ... Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Managing Diabetes You can manage your diabetes and live a ... you have diabetes. How can I manage my diabetes? With the help of your health care team, ...

  12. Outcome prediction in pneumonia induced ALI/ARDS by clinical features and peptide patterns of BALF determined by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Jochen; Gessner, Christian; Sandvoss, Torsten; Hammerschmidt, Stefan; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Sack, Ulrich; Eschrich, Klaus; Wirtz, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Peptide patterns of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were assumed to reflect the complex pathology of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) better than clinical and inflammatory parameters and may be superior for outcome prediction. A training group of patients suffering from ALI/ARDS was compiled from equal numbers of survivors and nonsurvivors. Clinical history, ventilation parameters, Murray's lung injury severity score (Murray's LISS) and interleukins in BALF were gathered. In addition, samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by means of hydrophobic chromatography and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for each clinical and cytokine parameter revealed interleukin-6>interleukin-8>diabetes mellitus>Murray's LISS as the best outcome predictors. Outcome predicted on the basis of BALF levels of interleukin-6 resulted in 79.4% accuracy, 82.7% sensitivity and 76.1% specificity (area under the ROC curve, AUC, 0.853). Both clinical parameters and cytokines as well as peptide patterns determined by MALDI-ToF MS were analyzed by classification and regression tree (CART) analysis and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms. CART analysis including Murray's LISS, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in combination was correct in 78.0%. MALDI-ToF MS of BALF peptides did not reveal a single identifiable biomarker for ARDS. However, classification of patients was successfully achieved based on the entire peptide pattern analyzed using SVM. This method resulted in 90% accuracy, 93.3% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity following a 10-fold cross validation (AUC = 0.953). Subsequent validation of the optimized SVM algorithm with a test group of patients with unknown prognosis yielded 87.5% accuracy, 83.3% sensitivity and 90.0% specificity. MALDI-ToF MS peptide patterns of BALF, evaluated by appropriate mathematical methods can be of value in predicting outcome in pneumonia induced

  13. Evaluation of pharmacists' educational and counselling impact on patients' clinical outcomes in a diabetic setting

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    Winifred Aitalegbe Ojieabu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigeria had the highest number of people living with diabetes mellitus in the African region in year 2013. Previous researchers have found that patients with knowledge of their diseases including their treatment methods have a high likelihood to succeed in managing the disease conditions. Many pharmaceutical care programmes which have been successfully applied in various countries to enhance clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life are not very common in Nigeria. Objective: This study was to evaluate pharmacist's educational and counselling impact on diabetic patients' outcomes in a diabetic setting. Materials and Methods: The 4-month randomised controlled study involved 150 elderly Type 2 diabetic patients. Sociodemographic and clinical parameters were measured. We educated and counselled the 75 patients in our intervention group at least four times during the study period, but the control group was deprived of the pharmacist's intervention. Results: Female to male participants was in the ratio of 9:6 and 9:5 in both control and intervention groups, respectively. Majority (>40% of the patients in both groups had primary education. Baseline and 4-month mean fasting blood sugar in the control group was 162.2 ± 69.1 and 159.9 ± 57.2, respectively (P = 0.825, whereas the intervention group had 156.7 ± 30.5 and 131.8 ± 40.4, respectively (P < 0.001. Mean systolic blood pressure in both groups was 146.4 ± 13.9 and 133.8 ± 18.5 (P < 0.001, respectively. Adherence levels to medication taking in both groups were 42.7%:94.7%, respectively (P = 0.001. Conclusion: This study encourages the inclusion of clinical pharmacists into multidisciplinary healthcare groups in hospital and clinic settings as well as incorporation of this type of intervention into diabetic management programmes for optimal patients' outcomes.

  14. Assessing the Effect of High Performance Inulin Supplementation via KLF5 mRNA Expression in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Placebo Controlled Clinical Trail

    OpenAIRE

    Abed Ghavami; Neda Roshanravan; Shahriar Alipour; Meisam Barati; Behzad Mansoori; Faezeh Ghalichi; Elyas Nattagh- Eshtivan; Alireza Ostadrahimi

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The worldwide prevalence of metabolic disorders such as diabetes is increasing rapidly. Currently, the complications of diabetes are the major health concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high performance (HP) inulin supplementation on glucose homeostasis via KLF5 mRNA expression in adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods: In the present clinical trial conducted for a duration of 6 weeks, 46 volunteers diabetic patients referring to diabetes clinic in Tabriz, I...

  15. Impact of Diabetes E-Consults on Outpatient Clinic Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Brian; Parikh, Pratik J; Gallimore, Jennie; Harrell, Stephen; Burke, Brian

    2015-08-01

    An e-consult is an electronic communication system between clinicians, usually a primary care physician (PCP) and a medical or surgical specialist, regarding general or patient-specific, low complexity questions that would not need an in-person consultation. The objectives of this study were to understand and quantify the impact of the e-consult initiative on outpatient clinic workflow and outcomes. We collected data from 5 different Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient clinics and interviewed several physicians and staff members. We then developed a simulation model for a primary care team at an outpatient clinic. A detailed experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of factors, such as e-consult demand, view-alert notification arrivals, walk-in patient arrivals, and PCP unavailability, on e-consult cycle time. Statistical tests indicated that 4 factors related to outpatient clinic workflow were significant, and levels within each of the 4 significant factors resulted in statistically different e-consult cycle times. The arrival rate of electronic notifications, along with patient walk-ins, had a considerable effect on cycle time. Splitting the workload of an unavailable PCP among the other PCPs, instead of the current practice of allocating it to a single PCP, increases the system's ability to handle a much larger e-consult demand. The full potential of e-consults can only be realized if the workflow at the outpatient clinics is designed or modified to support this initiative. This study furthers our understanding of how e-consult systems can be analyzed and alternative workflows tested using statistical and simulation modeling to improve care delivery and outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Use of a Relational Database to Support Clinical Research: Application in a Diabetes Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomatch, Diane; Truax, Terry; Savage, Peter

    1981-01-01

    A database has been established to support conduct of clinical research and monitor delivery of medical care for 1200 diabetic patients as part of the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center (MDRTC). Use of an intelligent microcomputer to enter and retrieve the data and use of a relational database management system (DBMS) to store and manage data have provided a flexible, efficient method of achieving both support of small projects and monitoring overall activity of the Diabetes Center Unit (DCU). Simplicity of access to data, efficiency in providing data for unanticipated requests, ease of manipulations of relations, security and “logical data independence” were important factors in choosing a relational DBMS. The ability to interface with an interactive statistical program and a graphics program is a major advantage of this system. Out database currently provides support for the operation and analysis of several ongoing research projects.

  17. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis associated with maternally inherited diabetes and deafness: Clinical pathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ying Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD, which is caused by an A to G substitution at position 3243 (m.3243A>G in the transfer ribonucleic acid leucine gene, is characterized by diabetes and hearing loss. Patients with MIDD frequently have renal disease, which may precede the diagnosis of either diabetes or deafness or may be the sole manifestation of the m.3243A>G mutation. Recently, progressive renal failure was reported in adults, and a number of childhood cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS of MIDD have been reported. However, little is known about the glomerular lesions in FSGS in MIDD. In the present study, we reported two cases of FSGS associated with MIDD and studied the clinical features of the proband and her mother.

  18. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a review of the diagnosis, clinical implications and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Wing-Ming Wong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a condition that affects the wellbeing of mother and fetus. Women with GDM are at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the future, while fetal exposure to hyperglycaemia in-utero may affect their glycometabolic profile later in life. Appropriate screening and management of this problem is important in ensuring good pregnancy outcomes. In this review, the clinical implications, the various ways to screen and diagnose GDM, and management strategies during pregnancy will be discussed. For years, insulin is the mainstay of treatment if medical nutrition therapy fails to maintain adequate glycaemic control, but use of other oral pharmacotherapy may gain greater acceptance in the future. Following delivery, ongoing follow-up of these women is worthwhile as early intervention through lifestyle or pharmacotherapy may prevent the development of diabetes.

  19. The clinical management of diabetic foot in the elderly and medico-legal implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Claudio; Bruttocao, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot is a complex and challenging pathological state, characterized by high complexity of management, morbidity and mortality. The elderly present peculiar problems which interfere on one hand with the patient's compliance and on the other with their diagnostic-therapeutic management. Difficult clinical management may result in medico-legal problems, with criminal and civil consequences. In this context, the authors present a review of the literature, analysing aspects concerning the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot in the elderly which may turn out to be a source of professional responsibility. Analysis of these aspects provides an opportunity to discuss elements important not only for clinicians and medical workers but also experts (judges, lawyers, medico-legal experts) who must evaluate hypotheses of professional responsibility concerning diabetic foot in the elderly.

  20. Clinical effect and necessity of interventional treatment in diabetic foot before and after amputation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chun; Li Minghua; Cheng Yingsheng; Zhang Peilei; Wang Wu; Cheng Yongde

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical effect and necessity of interventional treatment in diabetic foot before and after amputation. Methods: Combined intravascular angioplasty with intraarterial medicine perfusing were carried out in fourteen patients with diabetic foot including 10 patients treated before amputation and 4 after amputation involving superficial femoral, deep femoral, tibial and fitular arteries. Among them seventeen vessels with irregular stenosis and obstruction were treated by intravascular angioplasty through balloon dilation. Results: The technical successful rate was 100%, no complication happened. The symptoms were relieved in all patients after treatment, including promotion of lower extremity arterial blood perfusion, reducing range of amputation and wound healing after amputation. Conclusions: Intravascular interventional treatment is safe, effective and valuable in diabetic foot before and after amputation. (authors)

  1. Risk stratification by endocrinologists of patients with type 2 diabetes in a Danish specialised outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Lene; Arreskov, Anne B; Sperling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To target optimised medical care the Danish guidelines for diabetes recommend stratification of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) into three levels according to risk and complexity of treatment. The aim was to describe the T2D population in an outpatient clinic, measure the compliance......, the endocrinologists stratified less patients at level 3 compared to objective assessments (p Type 2 diabetes patients, newly referred to or allocated for long-term follow-up in the out...... contained the following criteria: HbA1c, blood pressure, metabolic complications, microvascular and macrovascular complications. Stratification levels encompassed: level 1 (uncomplicated), level 2 (intermediate risk) and level 3 (high risk). Objective assessments were conducted independently by two health...

  2. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes: Insights into the Pathogenesis and Its Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapidly increasing prevalence, diabetes has become one of the major causes of mortality worldwide. According to the latest studies, genetic information makes substantial contributions towards the prediction of diabetes risk and individualized antidiabetic treatment. To date, approximately 70 susceptibility genes have been identified as being associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D at a genome-wide significant level (P<5×10-8. However, all the genetic loci identified so far account for only about 10% of the overall heritability of T2D. In addition, how these novel susceptibility loci correlate with the pathophysiology of the disease remains largely unknown. This review covers the major genetic studies on the risk of T2D based on ethnicity and briefly discusses the potential mechanisms and clinical utility of the genetic information underlying T2D.

  3. Number and Frequency of Albuminuria Measurements in Clinical Trials in Diabetic Nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kröpelin, Tobias F; de Zeeuw, Dick; Andress, Dennis L

    2015-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: Increasing the number of urine collections per study visit and the number of visits over time does not change the average drug effect estimate but markedly increases the precision, thereby enhancing statistical power. Thus, clinical trial designs in diabetic nephropathy using albuminuria...... data from three randomized intervention trials (Aliskiren Combined with Losartan in Type 2 Diabetes and Nephropathy, Selective Vitamin D Receptor Activation for Albuminuria Lowering, and Residual Albuminuria Lowering with Endothelin Antagonist Atrasentan) including patients with type 2 diabetes...... of urine collections per visit were increased. Using all albuminuria measurements at all study visits led to a 4- to 6-fold reduction in sample size to detect a 30% albuminuria-lowering treatment effect with 80% power compared with using baseline and end-of-treatment albuminuria measurements alone...

  4. Drug usage patterns and treatment costs in newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus cases, 2007 vs 2012: findings from a large US healthcare claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, W; Liang, Y; Kimball, E S; Hobbs, T; Kong, S; Sakurada, B; Bouchard, J

    2016-07-01

    Objective To explore trends in demographics, comorbidities, anti-diabetic drug usage, and healthcare utilization costs in patients with newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using a large US claims database. Methods For the years 2007 and 2012, Truven Health Marketscan Research Databases were used to identify adults with newly-diagnosed T2DM and continuous 12-month enrollment with prescription benefits. Variables examined included patient demographics, comorbidities, inpatient utilization patterns, healthcare costs (inpatient and outpatient), drug costs, and diabetes drug claim patterns. Results Despite an increase in the overall database population between 2007-2012, the incidence of newly-diagnosed T2DM decreased from 1.1% (2007) to 0.65% (2012). Hyperlipidemia and hypertension were the most common comorbidities and increased in prevalence from 2007 to 2012. In 2007, 48.3% of newly-diagnosed T2DM patients had no claims for diabetes medications, compared with 36.2% of patients in 2012. The use of a single oral anti-diabetic drug (OAD) was the most common diabetes medication-related claim (46.2% of patients in 2007; 56.7% of patients in 2012). Among OAD monotherapy users, metformin was the most commonly used and increased from 2007 (74.7% of OAD monotherapy users) to 2012 (90.8%). Decreases were observed for sulfonylureas (14.1% to 6.2%) and thiazolidinediones (7.3% to 0.6%). Insulin, predominantly basal insulin, was used by 3.9% of patients in 2007 and 5.3% of patients in 2012. Mean total annual healthcare costs increased from $13,744 in 2007 to $15,175 in 2012, driven largely by outpatient services, although costs in all individual categories of healthcare services (inpatient and outpatient) increased. Conversely, total drug costs per patient were lower in 2012 compared with 2007. Conclusions Despite a drop in the rate of newly-diagnosed T2DM from 2007 to 2012 in the US, increased total medical costs and comorbidities per individual patient suggest that

  5. Type 2 diabetes: identifying high risk Asian American subgroups in a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Elsie J; Wong, Eric C; Dixit, Anjali A; Fortmann, Stephen P; Linde, Randolph B; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2011-08-01

    We compared the prevalence and treatment of type 2 diabetes across Asian American subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and Non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) in a Northern California healthcare system. A three-year, cross-sectional sample of patient electronic health records was accessed to compare diabetes prevalence in 21,816 Asian and 73,728 NHWs aged 35+ years. Diabetes was classified through ICD-9 codes, abnormal laboratory values, or use of oral anti-diabetic medication. Multivariate adjusted prevalence rates for each Asian subgroup, and adjusted odds ratios (OR) relative to NHWs, were compared. Age-adjusted prevalence ranged from 5.8% to 18.2% (women) and 8.1 to 25.3% (men). Age-adjusted ORs of Asian subgroups ranged 1.11-3.94 (women) and 1.14-4.56 (men). The odds of diabetes were significantly higher in Asian Indians (women OR 3.44, men OR 3.54) and Filipinos (women OR 3.94, men OR 4.56), compared to NHWs. Results for Asian Indians and Filipinos were similar with age-and-BMI adjustment. Treatment rates across subgroups were 59.7-82.0% (women) and 62.9-79.4% (men). Heterogeneity exists in the prevalence of diabetes across Asian subgroups, independent of obesity prevalence. Asian Indian and Filipino subgroups had particularly high prevalence of diabetes when compared to NHWs. Future studies should explore these clinically important differences among Asian subgroups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Depression symptoms in people with diabetes attending outpatient podiatry clinics for the treatment of foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Sue; Nash, Toni; Ireland, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms, diabetes self-management, and quality of life in people with diabetes and foot ulcers. Ulcer status, mortality and amputations were also assessed at six months follow-up. This was a cross-sectional survey of people attending outpatient podiatry clinics at a major tertiary referral hospital. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Diabetes self-care was assessed using the Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities (SDSCA) measure. Health-related quality of life was measured using the physical component summary score (PCS) and the mental component summary score (MCS) of the SF-12. Of the 60 participants in the study 14 (23.3%) reported mild symptoms of depression (PHQ score 5-9) and 17 (28.3%) moderate to severe depressive symptoms (PHQ score > 9). Twenty-one (35%) met the criteria for previously recognized depression (on antidepressants and/or a diagnosis of depression in the last 12 months) and 17 (28.3%) for depression not previously recognized (PHQ > 4). Seventeen (28%) participants had been receiving antidepressant treatment for a median duration of 104 weeks (IQR 20, 494 weeks). Despite antidepressant treatment 12 participants (70.6% of those taking antidepressants) still reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms at the time of the study. Patients with PHQ scores > 4 reported poorer adherence to diabetes self-care activities including general diet, exercise, blood sugar monitoring and foot care when compared to those participants with PHQ scores  4 compared with no deaths and 2 amputations in participants with PHQ scores diabetes and foot ulcers. Depressive symptoms were associated with overall poorer diabetes self-management and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). There was no association between depressive symptoms and ulcer outcomes at six-months follow-up.

  7. Accounting for clinical action reduces estimates of gender disparities in lipid management for diabetic veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimalananda, Varsha G; Miller, Donald R; Hofer, Timothy P; Holleman, Robert G; Klamerus, Mandi L; Kerr, Eve A

    2013-07-01

    Women with diabetes have higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels than men, resulting in apparent disparities between genders on quality indicators tied to LDL thresholds. To investigate whether gender disparities persist when accounting for clinical action with statins or cardiovascular risk. Retrospective cohort study. Veterans Health Administration patients (21,780 women and 646,429 men) aged 50-75 with diabetes. Threshold measure: LDL < 100 mg/dL; clinical action measure: LDL < 100 mg/dL; or LDL ≥ 100 mg/dL and the patient was prescribed a moderate or high-dose statin at the time of the test; or LDL ≥ 100 mg/dL and the patient received other appropriate clinical action within 90 days; adherence: continuous multiple interval measure of gaps in dispensed medication (CMG). Women were much less likely to have LDL < 100 mg/dL than were men (55 % vs. 68 %). This disparity narrowed from 13 % to 6 % for passing the clinical action measure (79 % vs. 85 %). These gender differences persisted among those with ischemic heart disease (IHD). Women had a lower odds of passing the clinical action measure (odds ratio 0.68, 95 % confidence interval 0.66-0.71). Among those with IHD, the gender gap increased with age. Differences in pass rates were explained by women's higher LDL levels, but not by their slightly worse adherence (3 % higher CMG). Women and men veterans receive more similar quality of care for lipids in diabetes than previously indicated. Less reassuringly, the remaining gender differences appear to be as common in women at high cardiovascular risk as in those at low risk. Rather than focus on simply improving LDL levels in all women with diabetes, future efforts should ensure that patients with high cardiovascular risk are appropriately treated with statins when clinically indicated, feasible, and concordant with patient preferences.

  8. Prevalence and pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiza Lona

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Gastrointestinal (GI disorders are contributor of increased morbidity and poor quality of life in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM. Racial, nutritional and life style may influence GI disorders to a large extent. Thus, the burden of GI disorders and its determinants warrant investigation in individual population. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to explore the types of GI symptoms in Bangladeshi population with DM for more than 10 years of duration. Methodology: This observational study was conducted on patients with DM for more than 10 years of duration at the outpatient department of BIRDEM general hospital from July 2009 to June 2010. A total of 301 DM patients responded to self-reporting questionnaire (Bengali adaptation of Rome III diagnostic questionnaire. Then 91 participants were further studied for glycemic status, liver function, kidney function and basic defects of diabetes through homeostasis model assessment. Results: The median age of 301 study population was 55 years (range 25 to 84 years and the male female ratio was 1: 0.74. Out of 301 DM cases, 273 (90.7% had GI symptoms. Significantly (p<0.05 higher number of males (93.6% had GI symptoms compared to females (86.7%. Among the clinical conditions, unspecified functional bowel disorder (UFBD was present in 88.3% cases, followed by cyclic vomiting syndrome (38.1% and functional fecal incontinence (20.9%. Single GI symptom was present in 123 (45.1% cases while 32.6%, 12.5% and 9.9% had two, three and more than three GI symptoms respectively. No significant difference was found in any biochemical parameter between cases with and without GI symptoms. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed sex and residence as poor predictors of UFBD while other variables did not show any significant relation/risk to UFBD. Conclusion: A large proportion of patients with long duration of DM had GI symptoms. A comprehensive management of diabetes

  9. Liver cirrhosis and diabetes: Risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical implications and management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego Garcia-Compean; Joel Omar Jaquez-Quintana; Jose Alberto Gonzalez-Gonzalez; Hector Maldonado-Garza

    2009-01-01

    About 30% of patients with cirrhosis have diabetes mellitus (DM). Nowadays, it is a matter for debate whether type 2 DM in the absence of obesity and hypertriglyceridemia may be a risk factor for chronic liver disease. DM,which develops as a complication of cirrhosis, is known as "hepatogenous diabetes". Insulin resistance in muscular and adipose tissues and hyperinsulinemia seem to be the pathophysiologic bases of diabetes in liver disease. An impaired response of the islet β-cells of the pancreas and hepatic insulin resistance are also contributory factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and hemochromatosis are more frequently associated with DM. Insulin resistance increases the failure of the response to treatment in patients with CHC and enhances progression of fibrosis. DM in cirrhotic patients may be subclinical.Hepatogenous diabetes is clinically different from that of type 2 DM, since it is less frequently associated with microangiopathy and patients more frequently suffer complications of cirrhosis. DM increases the mortality of cirrhotic patients. Treatment of the diabetes is complex due to liver damage and hepatotoxicity of oral hypoglycemic drugs. This manuscript will review evidence that exists in relation to: type 2 DM alone or as part of the metabolic syndrome in the development of liver disease;factors involved in the genesis of hepatogenous diabetes;the impact of DM on the clinical outcome of liver disease; the management of DM in cirrhotic patients and the role of DM as a risk factor for the occurrence and exacerbation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Microbiological profile and clinical outcome of severe foot ulcers of diabetic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marivaldo Loyola Aragão(

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the microbiological profile and clinical outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers of inpatients of a tertiary university hospital, at Ceara, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical charts data of all diabetic inpatients of the Endocrine and Diabetes Unit of Walter Cantídio University Hospital (Federal University of Ceará, admitted from January, 2006 to June, 2007 for severe foot ulcers (minimum of grade 2 of Wagner`s classification, which were refractory to ambulatory treatment. Clinical data from each patient were recorded (sex, age, diabetes duration, and comorbidities as well as microbiological characteristics of foot ulcers and surgical (amputations material. Results: We identified 17 diabetic patients, all type 2, aged 58.11 ± 10.8 years and 12.4 ± 8.4 years of disease, 58.8% male. Of ulcers, 41.1% were grade 2; 35.2% grade 3; 11.7% grade 4 and 11.7% grade 5 of Wagner; 64.7% with less than 3 months of evolution. Debridement was performed in 82.3% of patients and amputation in 47%; osteomyelitis was identified in 47% of cases. All patients started empiric antibiotic therapy, where ciprofloxacin/metronidazole was the most used scheme (76.5%. Cultures were negative in 12.5% of the patients. In the positive ones, the most prevalent bacterial pathogens detected in the culture materials were: S. aureus (57.1%; S. viridans (28.7%; P. aeruginosas (28.7%; M. morganii (28.7%. The majority (75% of isolated S. aureus were methicillin-resistant, but were sensitive to vacomicin. Conclusion: We observed the presence of polymicrobial flora with a large number of multiresistant pathogens and high prevalence of osteomyelitis and amputations in diabetic patients with severe ulcers, neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.

  11. The prevention of diabetic foot ulceration: how biomechanical research informs clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank E. DiLiberto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Implementation of interprofessional clinical guidelines for the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration has demonstrated positive effects regarding ulceration and amputation rates. Current foot care recommendations are primarily based on research regarding the prevention of ulcer recurrence and focused on reducing the magnitude of plantar stress (pressure overload. Yet, foot ulceration remains to be a prevalent and debilitating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus. There is limited evidence targeting the prevention of first-time ulceration, and there is a need to consider additional factors of plantar stress to supplement current guidelines. Objectives The first purpose of this article is to discuss the biomechanical theory underpinning diabetic foot ulcerations and illustrate how plantar tissue underloading may precede overloading and breakdown. The second purpose of this commentary is to discuss how advances in biomechanical foot modeling can inform clinical practice in the prevention of first-time ulceration. Discussion Research demonstrates that progressive weight-bearing activity programs to address the frequency of plantar stress and avoid underloading do not increase ulceration risk. Multi-segment foot modeling studies indicate that dynamic foot function of the midfoot and forefoot is compromised in people with diabetes. Emerging research demonstrates that implementation of foot-specific exercises may positively influence dynamic foot function and improve plantar stress in people with diabetes. Conclusion Continued work is needed to determine how to best design and integrate activity recommendations and foot-specific exercise programs into the current interprofessional paradigm for the prevention of first-time ulceration in people with Diabetes Mellitus.

  12. Suprasellar ganglioglioma presenting with diabetes insipidus in a young boy: a rare clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchika; Suri, Vaishali; Arora, Raman; Sharma, Mehar C; Mishra, Shashwat; Singh, Manmohan; Sarkar, Chitra

    2010-02-01

    Gangliogliomas are rare tumors composed of an admixture of glial and neuronal components. These usually occur in young patients, who present with therapy-resistant seizures. Clinical presentation of ganglioglioma with diabetes insipidus is extremely rare with only one case reported earlier in the available literature. Due to this rarity, ganglioglioma is not considered in the differential diagnosis in a patient with diabetes insipidus. A 7-year boy presented with polyuria, polydipsia, and progressive visual loss for 18 months. Investigations revealed diabetes insipidus. Radiographic studies of the brain showed a solid and cystic mass in the suprasellar region effacing the third ventricle. Intraoperatively, diffuse thickening of bilateral optic nerves and optic chiasma was noted and a diagnosis of optic glioma was considered. A biopsy of the mass was taken, which on histopathological examination showed features of ganglioglioma. The patient was referred for further radiotherapy but was lost to follow-up. Diabetes insipidus as a presenting symptom of ganglioglioma is extremely rare. This benign tumor should be kept in mind in patients with central diabetes insipidus and a suprasellar mass lesion. This report describes the second such case in the literature.

  13. Clinical implications of ST segment time-course recovery patterns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    Journal home page: http://www.akspublication.com/ijmu. Original Work. 3. Copyrighted © by Dr. ... KEY WORDS: Exercise stress test; ST segment time course patterns. INTRODUCTIONᴪ .... using simple descriptive statistics (mean ± SD) and contingency .... two patients who had the recovery time of less than. 3 minutes, had ...

  14. Prevalence and Susceptibility Patterns of Clinical Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of Escherichia coli as an aetiologic agent in bacterial infections and its antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, perfloxacin, gentamycin and cotrimoxazole as a guide for empiric therapy. A retrospective study was carried out using a ...

  15. Pattern of Clinical Presentation of Eclampsia at Nnamdi Azikiwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Eclampsia contributes significantly to maternal and perinatal mortalities globally. The objective of this study is to review the pattern of Eclampsia in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, Nigeria. METHOD: A retrospective study that reviewed records from labour ward and the ...

  16. The prevalence and clinical pattern of infertility in Bauchi, northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Infertility is a common condition and is now viewed as a global reproductive health issue. The causes of infertility vary widely, both among and within countries. Objectives: To describe the magnitude, pattern, aetiology, outcome of infertility and its associated factors in Bauchi, northern Nigeria. Methods: This was a ...

  17. HbA1c as a Predictor of Diabetes and as an Outcome in the Diabetes Prevention Program: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a standard measure of chronic glycemia for managing diabetes, has been proposed to diagnose diabetes and identify people at risk. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 3.2-year randomized clinical trial of preventing type 2 diabetes with a 10-year follow-up study, the DPP Outcomes Study (DPPOS). We evaluated baseline HbA1c as a predictor of diabetes and determined the effects of treatments on diabetes defined by an HbA1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomized 3,234 nondiabetic adults at high risk of diabetes to placebo, metformin, or intensive lifestyle intervention and followed them for the development of diabetes as diagnosed by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postload glucose (2hPG) concentrations (1997 American Diabetes Association [ADA] criteria). HbA1c was measured but not used for study eligibility or outcomes. We now evaluate treatment effects in the 2,765 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline according to FPG, 2hPG, or HbA1c (2010 ADA criteria). RESULTS Baseline HbA1c predicted incident diabetes in all treatment groups. Diabetes incidence defined by HbA1c ≥6.5% was reduced by 44% by metformin and 49% by lifestyle during the DPP and by 38% by metformin and 29% by lifestyle throughout follow-up. Unlike the primary DPP and DPPOS findings based on glucose criteria, metformin and lifestyle were similarly effective in preventing diabetes defined by HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS HbA1c predicted incident diabetes. In contrast to the superiority of the lifestyle intervention on glucose-defined diabetes, metformin and lifestyle interventions had similar effects in preventing HbA1c-defined diabetes. The long-term implications for other health outcomes remain to be determined. PMID:25336746

  18. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet: A Multifaceted Approach to Bringing Disease-Modifying Therapy to Clinical Use in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingley, Polly J; Wherrett, Diane K; Shultz, Ann; Rafkin, Lisa E; Atkinson, Mark A; Greenbaum, Carla J

    2018-04-01

    What will it take to bring disease-modifying therapy to clinical use in type 1 diabetes? Coordinated efforts of investigators involved in discovery, translational, and clinical research operating in partnership with funders and industry and in sync with regulatory agencies are needed. This Perspective describes one such effort, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, a National Institutes of Health-funded and JDRF-supported international clinical trials network that emerged from the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1). Through longitudinal natural history studies, as well as trials before and after clinical onset of disease combined with mechanistic and ancillary investigations to enhance scientific understanding and translation to clinical use, TrialNet is working to bring disease-modifying therapies to individuals with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, TrialNet uses its expertise and experience in clinical studies to increase efficiencies in the conduct of trials and to reduce the burden of participation on individuals and families. Herein, we highlight key contributions made by TrialNet toward a revised understanding of the natural history of disease and approaches to alter disease course and outline the consortium's plans for the future. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  19. Barriers and facilitators associated with attendance at hospital diabetes clinics among young adults (15-30 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Lisa; Byrne, Molly; Dinneen, Sean F; McGuire, Brian E; O'Donnell, Máire; Mc Sharry, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    Regular clinic attendance is recommended to facilitate self-management of diabetes. Poor attendance is common among young adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). This systematic review aimed to produce a narrative synthesis of the evidence regarding factors which promote or impede regular attendance at adult diabetes clinics among young adults (15-30 years) with type 1 DM. Studies reporting facilitators and barriers to clinic attendance were identified by searching four electronic databases, checking reference lists, and contacting diabetes research networks. A total of 12 studies (8 quantitative and 4 qualitative) met the inclusion criteria. Young adult's experiences transitioning from paediatric to adult diabetes care can influence attendance at the adult clinic positively if there is a comprehensive transition programme in place, or negatively if the two clinics do not communicate and provide adequate support. Post-transition, relationship development and perceptions of the value of attending the clinic are important for regular attendance. Controlled research is required to better understand decisions to attend or not attend outpatient services among people with chronic conditions. Service delivery must be sensitive to the developmental characteristics of young adults and tailored support may be required by young adults at greatest risk of non-attendance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  1. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  2. Clinical Approach to the Standardization of Oriental Medical Diagnostic Pattern Identification in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jung Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, many stroke patients receive oriental medical care, in which pattern-identification plays a major role. Pattern-identification is Oriental Medicine's unique diagnostic system. This study attempted to standardize oriental medical pattern-identification for stroke patients. This was a community-based multicenter study that enrolled stroke patients within 30 days after their ictus. We assessed the patients' general characteristics and symptoms related to pattern-identification. Each patient's pattern was determined when two doctors had the same opinion. To determine which variables affect the pattern-identification, binary logistic regression analysis was used with the backward method. A total of 806 stroke patients were enrolled. Among 480 patients who were identified as having a certain pattern, 100 patients exhibited the Fire Heat Pattern, 210 patients the Phlegm Dampness Pattern, nine patients the Blood Stasis Pattern, 110 patients the Qi Deficiency Pattern, and 51 patients the Yin Deficiency Pattern. After the regression analysis, the predictive logistic equations for the Fire Heat, Phlegm Dampness, Qi Deficiency, and Yin Deficiency patterns were determined. The Blood Stasis Pattern was omitted because the sample size was too small. Predictive logistic equations were suggested for four of the patterns. These criteria would be useful in determining each stroke patient's pattern in clinics. However, further studies with large samples are necessary to validate and confirm these criteria.

  3. Quality of Diabetes Care at Outpatient Clinic, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital

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    Sawsan Al-Sinani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the clinical care of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D patients at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, a countrywide tertiary referral center in Muscat, Oman.  Methods: We performed a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study using a total of 673 Omani T2D patients from the Diabetes and Family Medicine Clinics at SQUH. We collected patient data from June 2010 to February 2012 from the Hospital Information System (HIS. Patients had to be Omani, aged more than 18 years old, and have T2D with active follow-up and at least three visits within one year to be included in the study. Ninety-three percent of the patients (n=622 were on oral hypoglycemic drugs and/or insulin, and 70% were on statins. Patients’ anthropometric data, biochemical investigations, blood pressure, and duration of diabetes were recorded from the HIS.  Results: Using the recommended standards and guidelines of medical care in diabetes (American Diabetes Association and the American National Cholesterol Education Program III NCDP NIII standards, we observed that 22% of the patients achieved a HbA1C goal of 1.0; females >1.3mmol/L. Almost 60% of the patients had urinary microalbumin/creatinine ratio within the normal range.  Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of the care that T2D patients get at SQUH were lower than those reported in Europe and North America. However, it is similar to those reported in other countries in the Arabian Gulf.

  4. Glycaemic control and associated factors among patients with diabetes at public health clinics in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, M I; Daud, Faiz; Ismail, Aniza

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of glycaemic control and factors associated with poor glycaemic control [glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥6.5%] among patients with type 2 diabetes treated in public health clinics in Johor, Malaysia. Cross-sectional study. A review of all patients aged over 18 years and with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for >1 year. The National Diabetic Registry was used as the database for attendees at public health clinics in Johor Bahru between January and December 2013. A required sample of 660 was calculated, and a random sampling method was applied to acquire patient information across the 13 public health clinics in Johor Bahru. All relevant information (e.g. HbA1c, type of treatment and other parameters for glycaemic control) were abstracted from the registry. Sixty-eight percent of 706 patients had HbA1c >6.5%, and mean HbA1c was 7.8%. Younger patients (72.3%) had poorer glycaemic control than older patients (63.0%), and most patients with poor glycaemic control were obese (79.2%). Approximately 31.7% of patients did not achieve the target blood pressure 5 years), body mass index (obese), type of treatment (diet therapy vs combination therapy) and abnormal lipid profile were significantly associated with increased odds of HbA1C >6.5%. More than half (68%) of the patients with diabetes had HbA1c >6.5%. This highlights the importance of providing organized care to manage patients with diabetes in the primary care setting, such as weight reduction programmes, proper prescribing treatment, and age- and gender-specific groups to ensure good glycaemic control. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain functional networks. Correlation analysis with clinical indexes in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Su; Wang, Ximing; Li, Yonggang; Hu, Chunhong; Lai, Lillian; Shen, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between parameters of brain functional networks and clinical indexes is unclear so far in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). This paper is to investigate this. Twenty-one patients with different grades of DR and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled from August 2012 to September 2014. The clinical indexes recorded included DR grade, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, insulin sensitive index (ISI), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and patient sex and age. Subjects were scanned using 3-T MR with blood-oxygen-level-dependent and 3D-FSPGR sequences. MR data was analyzed via preprocessing and functional network construction, and quantified indexes of network (clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, global efficiency, degree distribution, and small worldness) were evaluated. Statistics consisted of ANOVA and correlation. There were significant differences between patients and controls among clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, degree distribution, and small worldness parameters (P < 0.05). MMSE scores negatively correlated with characteristic path length, and Hb1Ac negatively correlated with small worldness. MMSE, duration of diabetes, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, ISI, DR grade, and patient age, except from Hb1Ac, correlated with degree distribution in certain brain areas. Brain functional networks are altered, specifically in the areas of visual function and cognition, and these alterations may reflect the severity of visual weakness and cognitive decline in DR patients. Moreover, the brain networks may be affected both by long-standing and instant clinical factors. (orig.)

  6. Brain functional networks. Correlation analysis with clinical indexes in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Su; Wang, Ximing; Li, Yonggang; Hu, Chunhong [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Department of Radiology, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lai, Lillian [LAC+USC Medical Center, Department of Neuroradiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Shen, Hailin [Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-11-15

    The relationship between parameters of brain functional networks and clinical indexes is unclear so far in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). This paper is to investigate this. Twenty-one patients with different grades of DR and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled from August 2012 to September 2014. The clinical indexes recorded included DR grade, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, insulin sensitive index (ISI), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and patient sex and age. Subjects were scanned using 3-T MR with blood-oxygen-level-dependent and 3D-FSPGR sequences. MR data was analyzed via preprocessing and functional network construction, and quantified indexes of network (clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, global efficiency, degree distribution, and small worldness) were evaluated. Statistics consisted of ANOVA and correlation. There were significant differences between patients and controls among clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, degree distribution, and small worldness parameters (P < 0.05). MMSE scores negatively correlated with characteristic path length, and Hb1Ac negatively correlated with small worldness. MMSE, duration of diabetes, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, ISI, DR grade, and patient age, except from Hb1Ac, correlated with degree distribution in certain brain areas. Brain functional networks are altered, specifically in the areas of visual function and cognition, and these alterations may reflect the severity of visual weakness and cognitive decline in DR patients. Moreover, the brain networks may be affected both by long-standing and instant clinical factors. (orig.)

  7. Heterogeneity in Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes – A Clinical Trial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyky, Jennifer B.; Xu, Ping; Butte, Atul J.; Wilson, Darrell M.; Beam, Craig A.; Greenbaum, Carla J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is an NIH-sponsored clinical trial network aimed at altering the disease course of type 1 diabetes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate age-dependent heterogeneity in clinical, metabolic, and immunologic characteristics of individuals with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D), to identify cohorts of interest and to aid in planning of future studies. Methods 883 individuals with recent onset T1D involved in five TrialNet studies were categorized by age as: ≥ 18, age 12-17, ages 8-12, and age TrialNet studies, including C-peptide >0.2 pmol/ml, varies by age. Lower C-peptide level requirements for younger participants should be considered in the design of future trials. These data also highlight subgroups of type 1 diabetes patients, such as those with abnormal WBC or who are overweight, which allow for targeted studies of etiopathology and interventions. PMID:25689602

  8. Clinical coaching in primary care: Capable of improving control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guajardo, Eduardo Enrique; Salinas-Martínez, Ana María; Botello-García, Antonio; Mathiew-Quiros, Álvaro

    2016-06-01

    Few clinical coaching studies are both endorsed by real cases and focused on reducing suboptimal diabetes control. We evaluated the effectiveness of coaching on improving type 2 diabetes goals after 3 years of implementation in primary care. A cross-sectional study with follow up was conducted during 2008-2011. Coaching consisted of guiding family doctors to improve their clinical abilities, and it was conducted by a medical doctor trained in skill building, experiential learning, and goal setting. Effectiveness was assessed by means of fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin outcomes. The main analysis consisted of 1×3 and 2×3 repeated measures ANOVAs. A significant coaching×time interaction was observed, indicating that the difference in glucose between primary care units with and without coaching increased over time (Wilks' lambda multivariate test, PCoaching increased 1.4 times (95%CI 1.3, 1.5) the possibility of reaching the fasting glucose goal after controlling for baseline values. There was also a significant improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin (Bonferroni-corrected p-value for pairwise comparisons, Pcoaching was found to be worth the effort to improve type 2 diabetes control in primary care. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Family physicians clinical aptitude for the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Guadalajara, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Pivaral, C E; Gutiérrez Roman, E A; Gonzalez Pérez, G; Gonzalez Reyes, F; Valadez Toscano, F; Gutiérrez Ruvalcaba, C; Rios Riebeling, C D

    2008-02-01

    There are 180,000 new Diabetes Mellitus cases in Mexico each year (1). This chronic, complex and multifactor disease requires an adequate nutritional management plan to be prescribed by family physicians. They should be trained to identify the potential difficulties in the patient's dietary schedule and orientate their management from an integrative point of view. The purpose of this study was to detect and measure family physician's clinical aptitudes for the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, in a representative family physician's sample from five Family Medicine Units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. A structured and validated instrument was applied to 117 physicians from a total of 450 in Guadalajara, Jalisco. The main study variable was clinical aptitude for nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes. Aptitude levels were defined by an ordinal scale and related to the other variables using the median, Mann-Whitney's U test and Kruskal Wallis (KW) test. Global results showed a median of 30 points that relates to a low and a very low aptitude level for the 72% of physicians without statistical significance (KW: p>0.05) with the rest of variables. These results reflect family physician's difficulties to orientate the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, as well as the lack of work environments that facilitate case reflection and formative educational strategies.

  10. Peculiarities of clinical course of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva E.l.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the clinical course of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in patients with type 2 diabetes and evaluation of the parameters of the esophagus 24-hour pH-metry. Material and Methods. In the examination of patients with GERD, three groups of patients were selected for 50 people each. The first group includes patients with GERD with combined course of obesity and type 2 diabetes (mean age 54.6±2.73 year; 32 females and 18 males. The second group included patients with GERD against obesity (mean age 42.3±2.11 year; 30 females and 20 males. The control group consisted of patients with GERD without excess body weight and concomitant pathology (average age43.6±2.11 year; 29 females and 21 males. In addition to collecting complaints and anamnesis, the patients and the control group underwent a 24-hour pH-metric study of the esophagus according to a conventional method. Results. Patients suffering from GERD in the background of type 2 diabetes have a clinically asymptomatic or asymptomatic course; there is a significant increase in the daily pH-metry, indicating a more pronounced nature of the changes. Conclusion. Patients suffering from GERD in the background of type 2 diabetes require a comprehensive examination of the upper digestive tract to identify GERD, even if there are no complaints characteristic of the disease.

  11. Clinical Prospective Study on the Use of Subcutaneous Carboxytherapy in the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiat, Lynda; Leibaschoff, Gustavo H

    2018-03-22

    Diabetic footfoot ulcer (DFU) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus, and possibly the major morbidity of the diabetic foot. It is the most common foot injury in diabetic patients and can lead to lower-extremity amputation. Management of DFU requires a systematic knowledge of the major risk factors for amputation, frequent routine evaluation, scrupulous preventive maintenance, and correction of peripheral arterial insufficiency. Carboxytherapy refers to the subcutaneous injection of CO2 to improve the microcirculation and promote wound-healing by stimulating the microcirculation. Since optimal ulcer-healing requires adequate tissue perfusion, it is considered that carboxytherapy could be useful in the treatment of DFU. The present prospective clinical study included 40 patients with different sizes and types of chronic DFU. In addition to cleaning of the wound, antibiotics and debridement as necessary, the treatment protocol included blood sugar control, medication, healthy habits, no weight-bearing, and carboxytherapy. The results showed that this treatment that included carboxytherapy promoted wound-healing and prevented amputation. These positive effects should be confirmed through a complete study that includes different clinical and instrumental parameters.

  12. Clinical significance of DVM and its prevalence in pre-gestational diabetes cases versus normal pregnancies

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    Farideh Akhlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-gestational diabetes mellitus affects less than 1% of all pregnancies and is a significant cause of fetal morbidity and mortality. It is hypothesized that impaired placental function, in the form of abnormal placental weight and/or abnormal placental histology, may be responsible for this event in such pregnancies. Delayed villous maturation of placental villi, which is one of the findings associated with pre-gestational diabetes increases the rate of perinatal mortality. There is limited literature regarding the delayed maturation of placental villous. This review included trials (randomized and non-randomized, cohort and case-control studies registered in Medline/PubMed database, from January 2001 to September 2012 that evaluated the clinical significance of delayed villous maturation and its prevalence in pre-gestational diabetic cases compared to normal pregnancies.It emphasizes that further studies with focus on possible clinical or ultrasound markers of placental delayed villous maturation, especially in a high risk-group such as women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus are highly recommended.

  13. The clinical and cost effectiveness of bee honey dressing in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghazy, A M; Shams, M E; Adly, O A; Abbas, A H; El-Badawy, M A; Elsakka, D M; Hassan, S A; Abdelmohsen, W S; Ali, O S; Mohamed, B A

    2010-09-01

    Honey is known, since antiquity, as an effective wound dressing. Emergence of resistant strains and the financial burden of modern dressings, have revived honey as cost-effective dressing particularly in developing countries. Its suitability for all stages of wound healing suggests its clinical effectiveness in diabetic foot wound infections. Thirty infected diabetic foot wounds were randomly selected from patients presenting to Surgery Department, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. Honey dressing was applied to wounds for 3 months till healing, grafting or failure of treatment. Changes in grade and stage of wounds, using University of Texas Diabetic Wound Classification, as well as surface area were recorded weekly. Bacterial load was determined before and after honey dressing. Complete healing was significantly achieved in 43.3% of ulcers. Decrease in size and healthy granulation was significantly observed in another 43.3% of patients. Bacterial load of all ulcers was significantly reduced after the first week of honey dressing. Failure of treatment was observed in 6.7% of ulcers. This study proves that commercial clover honey is a clinical and cost-effective dressing for diabetic wound in developing countries. It is omnipresence and concordance with cultural beliefs makes it a typical environmentally based method for treating these conditions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association patterns of volatile metabolites in urinary excretions among Type-2 Non-Insulin dependent diabetes patients

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    Muhammad Saqib Shahzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patterns of volatile metabolites in urine are important to detect abnormalities associated with diabetes. Present study was conducted to find out the excretion patterns of endogenously produced alcohols in urine for type 2 (Non-Insulin Dependent diabetes mellitus. A cross sectional analytical study was conducted with duration extended from Jan to Mar 2015. Methods: The current study included 40 patients with chronic type 2 diabetes mellitus. In total, 10 sex and age matched subjects with no history of any disease were considered as controls. Blood sugar was estimated by autoanalyzer using standard kit of Merck following manufacturer`s instructions. Urine sugar was quantitatively detected by biuret reagent using titration technique. Urinary alcohol was identified and estimated by gas chromatography. Urinary ketone bodies were estimated by urinary strip. Results: It was observed that level of fasting blood sugar was significantly increased (P<0.001 in patients as compared to their controls. The blood sugar and urinary alcohol in patients were 3.0% and 6.0% respectively. Urinary ketone bodies were found to be 2+. On the other hand urine sugar, alcohol and ketone bodies were not detected in the negative control subjects. Conclusions: It is concluded that urinary alcohol is endogenously produced in patients with type 2 diabetes due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia. However further work is needed to find out the ratio of urinary and blood alcohol which may confirm the present findings.

  15. Gait pattern alteration by functional sensory substitution in healthy subjects and in diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S C; Helm, P A; Lavery, L A

    1997-08-01

    To evaluate the ability of diabetic and nondiabetic individuals to learn to use a lower extremity sensory substitution device to cue gait pattern changes. Case-control study. Gait laboratory. Thirty diabetic persons and 20 age- and education-matched nondiabetic controls responded to advertisements for study participation. Participants walked on a treadmill at three speeds (1, 2, and 2.5mph) with auditory sensory feedback to cue ground contact greater than 80% duration of baseline. The variables measured included gait cycle (steps per minute) and number of times per minute that any step during a trial exceeded 80% duration of ground contacted compared with a measured baseline step length for each speed. Persons in both groups were able to rapidly and significantly alter their gait patterns in response to signals from the sensory substitution device, by changing their gait cycles (nondiabetic group, F(17,124) = 5.27, p gait cycle modification and error reduction among both groups. The nondiabetic group learned to use the device significantly more quickly than the diabetic group during the slow (1mph, t = 3.57, p gait trainer malfunction occurred during the study. Diabetic persons with neuropathy effectively used lower extremity sensory substitution, and the technology is now available to manufacture a durable, effective lower extremity sensory substitution system.

  16. Prevalence of Bacteriuria and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns among Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients Attending at Debre Tabor Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Seble Worku

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Urinary tract infection is a major health problem especially in developing countries. Information about bacterial pathogens isolated from urinary tract infection in diabetic patients and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns is limited in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study aimed at isolating bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Methods. A hospital based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted at Debre Tabor. Urine sample was inoculated onto cysteine lysine electrolyte deficient (CLED medium. Bacterial pathogens were identified using standard bacteriological methods. The data were cleaned and entered into SPSS version 20. P value less than 0.05 is considered statistically significant. Result. A total of 384 study participants were included in the study. Of them, 21 (10.9% were from diabetics and 9 (4.7% of them were from nondiabetics. Large proportion of gram positive bacteria at 18 (58.1% were isolated compared to gram negatives at 13 (41.9%. Gram positive isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole 10 (58.8%. Conclusion. The isolation rates of bacterial pathogens were higher in diabetic than nondiabetic patients. Bacteriuria was significantly associated with sex and type of diabetes. Multidrug resistance to two or more antibiotics was observed in 56.7% of bacterial isolates. Rational use of antimicrobial agent should be thought of to prevent the emergence of multidrug resistance.

  17. Therapeutic inertia and intensified treatment in diabetes mellitus prescription patterns: A nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Ying; Yeh, Hseng-Long; Yang, Ming-Chin; Shau, Wen-Yi; Su, Syi; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2016-12-01

    Objective To measure therapeutic inertia by characterizing prescription patterns using secondary data obtained from the nationwide diabetes mellitus pay-for-performance (DM-P4P) programme in Taiwan. Methods Using reimbursement claims from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, a nationwide retrospective cohort study was undertaken of patients with diabetes mellitus who participated in the DM-P4P programme from 2006-2008. Glycosylated haemoglobin results were used to evaluate modifications in therapy in response to poor diabetes control. Prescription patterns were used to assign patients to either a therapeutic inertia group or an intensified treatment group. Therapeutic inertia was defined as the failure to act on a known problem. Results The research sample comprised of 168 876 patients with diabetes mellitus who had undergone 899 135 tests. Of these, 37.4% (336 615 visits) of prescriptions were for a combination of two types of drug and 27.7% (248 788 visits) were for a combination of three types of drug. The proportion of patients in the intensified therapy group who were prescribed more than two types of drug was considerably higher than that in the therapeutic inertia group. Conclusion In many cases in the therapeutic inertia group only a single type of hypoglycaemic drug was prescribed or the dosage remained unchanged.

  18. Diabetic and Obese Patient Clinical Outcomes Improve During a Care Management Implementation in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Piatt, Gretchen; Green, Lee A; Chen, Qiaoling; Piette, John

    2017-10-01

    To address the increasing burden of chronic disease, many primary care practices are turning to care management and the hiring of care managers to help patients coordinate their care and self-manage their conditions. Care management is often, but not always, proving effective at improving patient outcomes, but more evidence is needed. In this pair-matched cluster randomized trial, 5 practices implemented care management and were compared with 5 comparison practices within the same practice organization. Targeted patients included diabetic patients with a hemoglobin A1c >9% and nondiabetic obese patients. Clinical values tracked were A1c, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, microalbumin, and weight. Clinically important improvements were demonstrated in the intervention versus comparison practices, with diabetic patients improving A1c control and obese patients experiencing weight loss. There was a 12% relative increase in the proportion of patients meeting the clinical target of A1c management practices lost 5% or more of their body weight as compared with 10% of comparison patients (adjusted relative improvement, 15%; CI, 2%-28%). These findings add to the growing evidence-base for the effectiveness of care management as an effective clinical practice with regard to improving diabetes- and obesity-related outcomes.

  19. Prevalence and clinical profile of celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Rajesh Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM in follow-up in a Tertiary Care Referral Centre in Western India and to describe the clinical features indicative of CD in screened patients of TIDM. Study Design: In this single center observational cross-sectional study, 71 children who were diagnosed with TIDM were subjected to screening for CD with tissue transglutaminase antibody testing. Those who tested positive were offered intestinal biopsy for the confirmation of diagnosis. Clinical profiles of both groups of patients were compared and manifestations of CD were delineated. Results: The study revealed the prevalence of CD (based on serology in children with Type 1 diabetes as 15.49%. The prevalence of biopsy-confirmed CD was 7.04%. Of the diagnosed CD patients, one-third were symptomatic at the time of screening while the majority was asymptomatic. The major clinical features indicative of CD were intestinal symptoms, anemia, rickets, and short stature. Autoimmune thyroid disease was prevalent in 29.6% of the patients with TIDM followed by CD. Conclusions: The high prevalence of CD in children with Type 1 diabetes emphasizes the need for routine screening programs to be in place for these high-risk populations. The clinical profile of patients with CD further elaborates the indicators of CD and the need to screen for them.

  20. Clinical measures of balance in people with type two diabetes: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, C J; Knight, T; Binns, E; Ihaka, B; O'Brien, D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 422 million people have diabetes mellitus worldwide, with the majority diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The complications of diabetes mellitus include diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and retinopathy, both of which can lead to balance impairments. Balance assessment is therefore an integral component of the clinical assessment of a person with T2DM. Although there are a variety of balance measures available, it is uncertain which measures are the most appropriate for this population. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on clinical balance measures used with people with T2DM and DPN. Databases searched included: CINAHL plus, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, Dentistry and Oral Sciences source, and SCOPUS. Key terms, inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to identify appropriate studies. Identified studies were critiqued using the Downs and Black appraisal tool. Eight studies were included, these studies incorporated a total of ten different clinical balance measures. The balance measures identified included the Dynamic Balance Test, balance walk, tandem and unipedal stance, Functional Reach Test, Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance, Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment, Activity-Specific Balance Confidence Scale, Timed Up and Go test, and the Dynamic Gait Index. Numerous clinical balance measures were used for people with T2DM. However, the identified balance measures did not assess all of the systems of balance, and most had not been validated in a T2DM population. Therefore, future research is needed to identify the validity of a balance measure that assesses these systems in people with T2DM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinic Workload, the Quality of Staff Relationships and Diabetes Management in Community Health Centers Catering to Latino and Chinese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Martinez, Ana; Chen, Xiao; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2017-06-01

    We examine whether workplace climate-quality of staff relationships (QSR) and manageable clinic workload (MCW) are related to better patient care experiences and diabetes care in community health centers (CHCs) catering to Latino and Chinese patients. Patient experience surveys of adult patients with type 2 diabetes and workplace climate surveys of clinicians and staff from CHCs were included in an analytic sample. Comparisons of means analyses examine patient and provider characteristics. The associations of QSR, MCW and the diabetes care management were examined using regression analyses. Diabetes care process were more consistently provided in CHCs with high quality staff relations and more manageable clinic workload, but HbA1c, LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure outcomes were no different between clinics with high vs. low QSR and MCW. Focusing efforts on improvements in practice climate may lead to more consistent provision of important processes of diabetes care for these patients.

  2. Retinal layer location of increased retinal thickness in eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema in diabetes type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandello, Francesco; Tejerina, Amparo Navea; Vujosevic, Stela

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the retinal layer predominantly affected in eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema in diabetes type 2. METHODS: A cohort of 194 type 2 diabetic eyes/patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (ETDRS levels 20/35) were examined with Cirrus spectral......-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) at the baseline visit (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01145599). Automated segmentation of the retinal layers of the eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema was compared with a sample of 31 eyes from diabetic patients with normal OCT and an age......-matched control group of 58 healthy eyes. RESULTS: From the 194 eyes in the study, 62 had subclinical macular edema and 12 had clinical macular edema. The highest increases in retinal thickness (RT) were found in the inner nuclear layer (INL; 33.6% in subclinical macular edema and 81.8% in clinical macular edema...

  3. Clinical application of OCTA in observation of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy

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    Xiang Xiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Using optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTAto observe the changes and clinical significance of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy(DR.METHODS: Totally 47 eyes(28 patientswith diabetic retinopathy(DRwere enrolled in the DR group. According to the international clinical grading criteria of diabetic retinopathy, 30 eyes(19 patientswith non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as the NPDR group, and 17 eyes(11 patientswith proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as PDR group. A total of 46(27 subjectshealthy eyes with matched age were enrolled in the control group. All the subjects underwent the 3mm×3mm scanning of macular retina by optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTA, obtaining 4 levels of macular blood flow density map. The macular blood flow density at 3 levels, including superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer, were measured. RESULTS: The macular blood flow density of superfical retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer in DR group were 0.4963±0.0840, 0.4798±0.0801 and 0.5290±0.0528, respectively. Among them, the blood flow density of each layer were 0.5064±0.0843,0.4983±0.0766,0.5345±0.0529, respectively, for the NPDR group, and were 0.4786±0.0830, 0.4473±0.0778,0.5192±0.0526, respectively, for the PDR group. For the control group, the density of each layers were 0.5919±0.0704, 0.6301±0.0527, 0.5691±0.0169, respectively. The macular blood flow density was significantly different in the superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillary layer between the control group and the NPDR group, as well as the PDR group and the DR group(total PP=0.029, but not in the superficial retina layer and choroid capillary layer(P=0.236, 0.268. CONCLUSION: Compared with the control group, the macular blood flow density of superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillary

  4. Diabetes Mellitus: Aptitud clínica del médico de atención primaria Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical aptitude of the doctor of primary care

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    Víctor Manuel Gómez-López

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar la aptitud clínica del médico de las Unidades de Medicina Familiar, en la atención de la diabetes mellitus. Material y métodos: Diseño transversal y comparativo. Se aplicó un instrumento de evaluación validado previamente por un grupo de expertos, a 78 médicos familiares que se desempeñan en el primer nivel de atención. Dentro de los indicadores explorados con el instrumento de evaluación se incluyen: I Reconocimiento de factores de riesgo, II Reconocimiento de signos y síntomas, III Utilización e interpretación de recursos de laboratorio y gabinete, IV Integración diagnóstica, V Utilización de medidas terapéuticas y VI Medidas de seguimiento. Para el análisis estadístico, se utilizó la prueba de Kruskall-Wallis y la Ji cuadrada con un nivel de significancia de 0.05 Resultados: El puntaje que correspondió a lo explicable por efectos del azar fue Objective: to compare the clinic aptitude of the doctor in the unities of familiar medicine in the care of the diabetes mellitus. Material and Methods: Transversal and comparative pattern. A evaluation previously validated by a group of experts was apply to 78 specialist in familiar medicine who redeem in the first level of attention. The indicators explored in the evaluation are. I recognition of cause of risk. II recognition of signs and symptoms. III utilization and interpretation of laboratory studies and consultation studies. IV diagnostic integration. V utilization of terapeutic measures and VI following measures. For the statistical analysis, it was used the Kruskall-Wallis and chi-square with a level of important of 0.05 Results: the points to the explainable for effects of chance were of < 24 in global grade. According to the scale used, the 64 % (IC 95 % de 53 a 70 % of the results in the grades was situated in the low scale (49-73. In general it didn´t appear significative differences in the results of clinic aptitude by indicator and academic degree

  5. The assessment of clinical distal symmetric polyneuropathy in type 1 diabetes: A comparison of methodologies from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Pambianco, G.; Costacou, T.; Strotmeyer, Elsa; Orchard, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, but often difficult to diagnose reliably. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between three point-of-care devices, Vibratron II, NC-stat®, and Neurometer®, and two clinical protocols, MNSI and monofilament, in identifying those with DSP, and/or amputation/ulcer/neuropathic pain (AUP), the two outcomes of major concern. This report presents data from 195 type 1 diabetic participants of the Epidemio...

  6. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus : Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B; Sumnik, Z; Schober, E; Waldhor, T; Battelino, T; Bratanic, N; Kurti, K; Lebl, J; Limbert, C; Madacsy, L; Odink, RJH; Paskova, M; Soltesz, G

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  7. Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular clinical characteristics of Spanish women with stable ischaemic heart disease: Data from the SIRENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, José M; Masmiquel, Luis; Ripoll, Tomás; Barrios, Vivencio; Anguita, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes and the cardiovascular clinical characteristics of Spanish women with stable ischaemic heart disease was studied in a nationwide cross-sectional study. Diabetes was related to a higher burden of risk factors, comorbidity, multivessel disease and coronary surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical potential of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Y

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Yoojin Kim, Ambika R BabuDivision of Endocrinology, John Stroger Jr Hospital of Cook County and Rush University, Chicago, IL, USABackground: The kidney plays an important role in glucose metabolism, and has been considered a target for therapeutic intervention. The sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2 mediates most of the glucose reabsorption from the proximal renal tubule. Inhibition of SGLT2 leads to glucosuria and provides a unique mechanism to lower elevated blood glucose levels in diabetes. The purpose of this review is to explore the physiology of SGLT2 and discuss several SGLT2 inhibitors which have clinical data in patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: We performed a PubMed search using the terms "SGLT2" and "SGLT2 inhibitor" through April 10, 2012. Published articles, press releases, and abstracts presented at national and international meetings were considered.Results: SGLT2 inhibitors correct a novel pathophysiological defect, have an insulin-independent action, are efficacious with glycosylated hemoglobin reduction ranging from 0.5% to 1.5%, promote weight loss, have a low incidence of hypoglycemia, complement the action of other antidiabetic agents, and can be used at any stage of diabetes. They are generally well tolerated. However, due to side effects, such as repeated urinary tract and genital infections, increased hematocrit, and decreased blood pressure, appropriate patient selection for drug initiation and close monitoring after initiation will be important. Results of ongoing clinical studies of the effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on diabetic complications and cardiovascular safety are crucial to determine the risk-benefit ratio. A recent decision by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has recommended approval of dapagliflozin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes as an adjunct to diet and exercise, in combination with other glucose-lowering medicinal products, including

  9. Glucose patterns during an oral glucose tolerance test and associations with future diabetes, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulman, Adam; Vistisen, Dorte; Glümer, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    classes. Results: Four distinct glucose patterns during the OGTT were identified. One pattern was characterised by high 30 min but low 2 h glucose values. Participants with this pattern had an increased risk of developing diabetes compared with participants with lower 30 min and 2 h glucose levels (HR 4...

  10. Central diabetes insipidus: clinical profile that suggests organicity in Peruvian children: Lima - Peru 2001-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Santos, Miguel Angel; Águila, Carlos Manuel Del; Rojas, Maria Isabel; Falen, Juan Manuel; Nuñez, Oswaldo; Chávez, Eliana Manuela; Espinoza, Oscar Antonio; Pinto, Paola Marianella; Calagua, Martha Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a heterogeneous disease caused by arginine vasopressin deficiency; its management implies a profound understanding of the pathophysiology and the clinical spectrum. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical characteristics that indicate organicity in children and adolescents with central diabetes insipidus treated at the Department of Endocrinology from The Child Health's Institute during 2001 to 2013. Cross-sectional, retrospective study. 79 cases of patients diagnosed with CDI (51 males and 28 females) from 1 month to 16 years of age were reviewed. For the descriptive analysis, measures of central tendency and dispersion were used; groups of organic and idiopathic CDI were compared using χ2-test and t-test. A p-valuediabetes insipidus were headache and visual disturbances; furthermore, anterior pituitary hormonal abnormalities suggest an underlying organic etiology.

  11. Gemigliptin: An Update of Its Clinical Use in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ho Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are a new class of oral antidiabetic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. They increase endogenous levels of incretin hormones, which stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion, decrease glucagon secretion, and contribute to reducing postprandial hyperglycemia. Although DPP-4 inhibitors have similar benefits, they can be differentiated in terms of their chemical structure, pharmacology, efficacy and safety profiles, and clinical considerations. Gemigliptin (brand name: Zemiglo, developed by LG Life Sciences, is a potent, selective, competitive, and long acting DPP-4 inhibitor. Various studies have shown that gemigliptin is an optimized DPP-4 inhibitor in terms of efficacy, safety, and patient compliance for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of gemigliptin and discuss its potential benefits in clinical practice.

  12. Complex Multi-Block Analysis Identifies New Immunologic and Genetic Disease Progression Patterns Associated with the Residual β-Cell Function 1 Year after Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Marie Louise Max; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Pörksen, Sven; Svensson, Jannet; Vikre-Jørgensen, Jennifer; Thomsen, Jane; Hertel, Niels Thomas; Johannesen, Jesper; Pociot, Flemming; Petersen, Jacob Sten; Hansen, Lars; Mortensen, Henrik Bindesbøl; Nielsen, Lotte Brøndum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Danish children 12 months after diagnosis using Latent Factor Modelling. We include three data blocks of dynamic paraclinical biomarkers, baseline clinical characteristics and genetic profiles of diabetes related SNPs in the analyses. This method identified a model explaining 21.6% of the total variation in the data set. The model consists of two components: (1) A pattern of declining residual β-cell function positively associated with young age, presence of diabetic ketoacidosis and long duration of disease symptoms (P = 0.0004), and with risk alleles of WFS1, CDKN2A/2B and RNLS (P = 0.006). (2) A second pattern of high ZnT8 autoantibody levels and low postprandial glucagon levels associated with risk alleles of IFIH1, TCF2, TAF5L, IL2RA and PTPN2 and protective alleles of ERBB3 gene (P = 0.0005). These results demonstrate that Latent Factor Modelling can identify associating patterns in clinical prospective data – future functional studies will be needed to clarify the relevance of these patterns. PMID:23755131

  13. Trend of glycated hemoglobin testing in diabetic patients: to assess compliance with clinical practice guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghayur, S.; Tariq, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine appropriate use of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing in accordance with current recommended guidelines. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Chemical Pathology Department Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad from Oct 2011 to Oct 2012. Material and Methods: We randomly selected 170 known diabetic patients' data from our Laboratory Information System (LIS) who were retrospective analyzed for HbA1c to check for intervals and test frequency for each patient in one year. Patients with follow-up for at least one year at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad and having their routine investigations in our chemical pathology laboratory were included. The concentrations of HbA1c for all the specimens were measured immunoturbidimetrically using a microparticle agglutination inhibition method. Four guidelines namely World Health Organization (WHO), American Diabetic Association (ADA), Canadian Diabetic Association (CDA) and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) about HbA1c testing were utilized for data interpretation. All tests ordered within a 2 months period or more than 6 months following the previous order were labeled as inappropriate. Results: Only 35.8% of the patients were being properly monitored as per guidelines. Out of 64% patients who were inappropriately monitored, 12.9% had repeat orders within 2 months while 51.1% of patients were being monitored at longer interval against recommended guidelines. Conclusions: Glycated hemoglobin is a useful tool to objectively assess the prior glycemic control of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The study highlights that in large proportion of diabetic patients, HbA1c is not utilized properly as a tool to assess the risk of diabetic complications but in a small proportion is also tested unnecessarily which adds to avoidable health expenditure. (author)

  14. PREVALENCE OF MEIBOMIAN GLAND DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETIC PATIENTS & ITS CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Pathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS : To study the prevalence of the meibomian gland disease in typ e 2 diabetic patients and its clinical presentations. SETTING AND DESIGN : A hospital based cross sectional descriptive study of 100 type 2 diabetic patients attending a medical college was conducted. METHODS : Detailed diabetic history was recorded. Assessment of ocular surface i.e. the lid margins , conjunctiva , corneal surface was done via slit lamp biomicroscopy. Meibomian gland disease (MGD severity was assessed by the quality and expressibility of the meibomian secretion. Dry eye tests like schir mer’s test and tear film breakup time were done. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED : SPSS statistical software version 17 was used. RESULTS : 56% of the patients out of 100 diabetic patients had MGD. The most common symptom was burning (46.9% , followed by dryness ( 23.5% , 5.6% had conjunctival injection , 7.14% had corneal erosions , 25% had mucus debris , 53.65% had dry eye which was statistically significant (p=0.001 , 56.25% males and 72.2% females had the disease which was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION : The prevalence of Meibomian gland disease in the diabetic population was 56% which is more than the general population prevalence. Apart from other disorders diabetics are also more prone for ocular surface diseases like Meibomian gland disease. MGD is an important pre disposer for severe diseases like Dry eye in this subgroup of patients which can lead to complications like conjunctival keratinisations , corneal erosions and perforations. Careful examination of these patients for ocular surface disease and prompt treatment is required.

  15. Prevalence and clinical profile of metabolic syndrome among type 1 diabetes mellitus patients in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billow, Amy; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ngai, Michelle; Amutha, Anandakumar; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Jebarani, Saravanan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Michael, Edwin; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus(T1DM) and to look at prevalence of diabetes complications in T1DM with and without MetS. We studied 451 T1DM patients attending a tertiary diabetes centre in Chennai, South India. T1DM was diagnosed based on absence of beta cell reserve and requirement of insulin from the time of diagnosis. Data on clinical and biochemical characteristics as well as complications details to study the prevalence were also extracted from electronic records. T1DM patients were divided into those with and without MetS[diagnosed according to the harmonizing the metabolic syndrome criteria(IDF/NHLBI/AHA/WHF/IAS/IASO)]. The overall prevalence of MetS among T1DM was 22.2%(100/451). Patients with MetS were older, had longer diabetes duration, acanthosis nigricans, and increased serum cholesterol. In the unadjusted logistic regression analysis, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy were associated with MetS. However after adjustment for age, gender, diabetes duration, HbA1C and BMI significant association was seen only between MetS and retinopathy [odds ratio (OR) 2.82, 95% CI 1.18-6.74, p = 0.020] and nephropathy [OR 4.92, 95% CI 2.59-9.33, p < 0.001]. Prevalence of MetS is high among Asian Indian T1DM patients, and its presence is associated with increased risk of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical significance of determination of changes of plasma ET and serum TNF content after treatment in patients with diabetes millitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Wu Jiaming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the changes of plasma ET and serum TNF levels after treatment in patients with diabetes millitus. Methods: Plasma ET and serum TNF contents were determined with RIA in 54 patients with diabetes mellitus both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the plasma ET and serum TNF levels were significantly in the diabetics higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). After 3 months treatment, the levels remained significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusion: Development and progression of diabetes millitus were closely related to the plasma ET and serum TNF levels. (authors)

  17. Clinical pattern of gynaecological / early pregnancy complaints and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complaints of vaginal bleeding with or without pains, history of amenorrhea or infertility ; clinical and ultrasound impressions of early pregnancy complaints including ectopic pregnancies and pelvic inflammatory diseases (PID) with exclusion of uro-genital and gastrointestinal complaints/ cases. Pregnancies greater than 12 ...

  18. Clinical pattern of gynecological/early pregnancy complaints and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... complaints of vaginal bleeding, with or without pain, history of amenorrhea or infertility, clinical and ultrasound impression of early pregnancy complaints, including ectopic pregnancies and pelvic inflammatory diseases (PID), with exclusion of urogenital and gastrointestinal complaints/cases. Pregnancies greater than 12 ...

  19. Pattern Of Sexually Transmitted Infections In A Reference Clinic Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A prospective study with respect to the spectrum of STIs among patients who attended the Skin/STI clinic and who were physically examined and ... of STI recorded followed by HIV/AIDS 13 (14.44%), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) 12 (13.33%), genital warts 9 (10%) and non – gonococcal urethritis (NGU), ...

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of E. coli from clinical sources in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Escherichia coli is the leading cause of urinary tract, ear, wound and other infections in humans. Increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli is a growing concern worldwide. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli from clinical ...

  1. Retrospective review of clinical and pathological pattern of prostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatic cancer and prostatitis are the most common conditions mainly presenting with lower urinary symptoms or symptoms related to ... The likelihood of making correct clinical diagnosis of BPH and cancer of prostate was consistently low (66.3% and 51.9% respectively).

  2. Pattern of astigmatism in a clinical setting in Maldives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Marasini

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, this study inferred that among patients with relatively higher magnitude of astigmatism attending to the clinics in Maldives, younger patients are affected more, which could possibly link to the environment, genetics and nutrition. The probable association between nutrition and astigmatism needs to be investigated to fill the gap in literature.

  3. Peripheral arterial disease among adult diabetic patients attending a large outpatient diabetic clinic at a national referral hospital in Uganda: a descriptive cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Mbayo Mwebaze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is one of the recognised diabetic macro vascular complications. It is a marker of generalised systemic atherosclerosis and is closely associated with symptomatic coronary and cerebrovascular disease, hence significant morbidity and mortality. Among African adult diabetic populations, screening and diagnosis of PAD is frequently suboptimal. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated clinical factors of PAD in adult ambulatory diabetic patients attending the outpatient diabetic clinic of Mulago national referral and teaching hospital, Kampala Uganda. METHODS: In this descriptive cross sectional study, 146 ambulatory adult diabetic patients were studied. Information about their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, fasting lipid profile status, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels and presence of albuminuria was collected using a pre tested questionnaire. Measurement of ankle brachial index (ABI to assess for PAD, defined as a ratio less than 0.9 was performed using a portable 5-10 MHz Doppler device. Clinical factors associated with PAD were determined by comparing specific selected characteristics in patients with PAD and those without. RESULTS: The mean age/standard deviation of the study participants was 53.9/12.4 years with a male predominance (75, 51.4%. PAD was prevalent in 57 (39% study participants. Of these, 34 (59.6% had symptomatic PAD. The noted clinical factors associated with PAD in this study population were presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS: This study documents a high prevalence of PAD among adult ambulatory Ugandan diabetic patients. Aggressive screening for PAD using ABI measurement in adult diabetic patients should be emphasised in Uganda especially in the presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria.

  4. Clinical characteristics of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus among southwestern American Indian youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, D A; Hisnanick, J J

    2001-03-01

    The clinical characteristics and presentation of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) among 22 youths, aged less than 20 years, of an American Indian tribe Tohono O'odham Nation in the southwestern United States were studied. Ten males and 12 females (7-20 years old) were identified with a 13.7-year mean age of onset of diabetes. Over 80% (18/22) of the patients were obese at diagnosis having a body mass index greater than the 95th percentile for their age and sex, and there was a strong family history of NIDDM; eight patients were born to mothers who had gestational diabetes, and 19 patients had at least one parent with NIDDM. At the time of diagnosis, plasma glucose levels ranged from 10.3 mmol/L to 33 mmol/L, with nearly 60% (13/22) of the patients having a glucose reading greater than 16.8 mmol/L. C-peptide levels were done on 10 patients, and these were in the normal to elevated range. Clinical management of the 22 patients varied. To control hyperglycaemia and symptoms, such as nocturia and polyuria, 14 patients were on oral hypoglycaemic medication, and five were on insulin therapy. Compliance with dietary management was very difficult for these patients as evidenced by the fact that only three patients were on dietary control for their diabetes. The cases described in this series demonstrate NIDDM in childhood and illustrate the importance of accurate classification of diabetes during childhood, particularly in children from populations at high risk for NIDDM.

  5. Radiological and clinical pattern of pulmonary Tuberculosis in selected TB clinics in Khartoum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongola, Nagwa Ali Mohammad [Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1998-12-31

    160 adult tuberculous patients were selected randomly from Al shaab and Abu Anja hospital, to (1) study the clino-radiological pattern of the disease, (2) to determine the percentage of radiologically-positive patients and (3) to study the frequency of the initial presenting symptoms and to correlate them with their x-ray findings. A flow-sheet was filled and proper clinical examination was conducted for each patient. Tuberclin test, 3 sputa examinations, ESR and chest x-ray were done for every patient. Three quarters of the patients were males in the young age group and most of the patients were of low socioeconomic status. The main presenting symptoms were productive cough, chest pain, dysnoea, fever, weight loss and malaise. Patients presented rather late, with a mean period of four months. 57 % of patients were sputum positive, 80% Tuberclin-positive and 98% had a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). 15% of patients had radiological features of primary diseases of which hilar lymph-adenopathy was the commonest, while consolidation was the commonest parenchymal lesion. In post-primary disease fibrocavitory type was the commonest and together with exudative lesions constituted 98% of parenchymal lesions. 90% of patients had typical upper or middle zone infiltrates and 10% had lower lung field tuberculosis. 14% of patients had pleural effusion. 60% of patients had moderate disease extent in the chest, 30% far-advanced and 10% minimal lesions in their chest x-ray.(Author) 134 ref. , 17 tabs. , 23 fig.

  6. Radiological and clinical pattern of pulmonary Tuberculosis in selected TB clinics in Khartoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongola, Nagwa Ali Mohammad

    1997-01-01

    160 adult tuberculous patients were selected randomly from Al shaab and Abu Anja hospital, to (1) study the clino-radiological pattern of the disease, (2) to determine the percentage of radiologically-positive patients and (3) to study the frequency of the initial presenting symptoms and to correlate them with their x-ray findings. A flow-sheet was filled and proper clinical examination was conducted for each patient. Tuberclin test, 3 sputa examinations, ESR and chest x-ray were done for every patient. Three quarters of the patients were males in the young age group and most of the patients were of low socioeconomic status. The main presenting symptoms were productive cough, chest pain, dysnoea, fever, weight loss and malaise. Patients presented rather late, with a mean period of four months. 57 % of patients were sputum positive, 80% Tuberclin-positive and 98% had a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). 15% of patients had radiological features of primary diseases of which hilar lymph-adenopathy was the commonest, while consolidation was the commonest parenchymal lesion. In post-primary disease fibrocavitory type was the commonest and together with exudative lesions constituted 98% of parenchymal lesions. 90% of patients had typical upper or middle zone infiltrates and 10% had lower lung field tuberculosis. 14% of patients had pleural effusion. 60% of patients had moderate disease extent in the chest, 30% far-advanced and 10% minimal lesions in their chest x-ray.(Author)

  7. Adjunctive naturopathic care for type 2 diabetes: patient-reported and clinical outcomes after one year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Ryan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several small, uncontrolled studies have found improvements in self-care behaviors and reductions in clinical risk in persons with type 2 diabetes who received care from licensed naturopathic physicians. To extend these findings and determine the feasibility and promise of a randomized clinical trial, we conducted a prospective study to measure the effects of adjunctive naturopathic care (ANC in primary care patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes were invited from a large integrated health care system to receive up to eight ANC visits for up to one year. Participants were required to have hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values between 7.5-9.5 % and at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia or overweight. Standardized instruments were administered by telephone to collect outcome data on self-care, self-efficacy, diabetes problem areas, perceived stress, motivation, and mood. Changes from baseline scores were calculated at 6- and 12-months after entry into the study. Six and 12-month changes in clinical risk factors (i.e., HbA1c, lipid and blood pressure were calculated for the ANC cohort, and compared to changes in a cohort of 329 eligible, non-participating patients constructed using electronic medical records data. Between-cohort comparisons were adjusted for age, gender, baseline HbA1c, and diabetes medications. Six months was pre-specified as the primary endpoint for outcome assessment. Results Participants made 3.9 ANC visits on average during the year, 78 % of which occurred within six months of entry into the study. At 6-months, significant improvements were found in most patient-reported measures, including glucose testing (P = 0.001, diet (P = 0.001, physical activity (P = 0.02, mood (P = 0.001, self-efficacy (P = 0.0001 and motivation to change lifestyle (P = 0.003. Improvements in glucose testing, mood, self-efficacy and

  8. Trends in frequency of type 2 diabetes in Mexico and its relationship to dietary patterns and contextual factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Soto-Estrada

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse the evolution of the frequency of type 2 diabetes (T2D and its relationship to eating patterns in Mexico from 1961 to 2013, and the Gini coefficient, Human Development Index (HDI and Gross Domestic Product (GDP. Mexico ranked sixth in world prevalence of diabetes in 2015 with an estimated 11.4 million Mexicans affected. Method: Using data from the Balance Sheets Food published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO, the means of apparent food consumption (kcal/person/day were grouped by decades. Data for mortality rate for diabetes were obtained from 1990 until 2015. Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated between the diabetes mellitus mortality rate and all food groups. Pearson's correlation explored the relationship between socio economic indicators and the prevalence of T2D diabetes. Results: The mortality rate for T2D has increased over the last decades. An increase of 647.9 kcal/person/day in apparent food consumption was observed. Cereal and legume consumption decreased, while apparent sugar, animal food and animal fat and vegetable oil consumption increased substantially. HDI and GDP showed a directly proportional relationship to diabetes. Spearman's correlation coefficient was statistically significant only for sugar. The Gini coefficient suggests that in lower inequalities there is an increased frequency of diabetes. Conclusions: The increase in the mortality rate of type 2 diabetes was constant during the study period, which coincides with the increase in energy density of Mexican eating patterns from 1961 to 2013. The higher the Gini coefficient, HDI and GDP, the higher the mortality observed for diabetes. Resumen: Objetivo: Analizar la evolución de la frecuencia de la diabetes tipo 2 y su relación con los patrones alimentarios en México de 1961 a 2013, así como el coeficiente de Gini, el índice de desarrollo humano (IDH y el producto interno bruto (PIB. México ocup

  9. Confocal microscopy patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Sánchez, V; González-Rodríguez, A; Parrado, C; Ullrich, M

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is currently the most promising noninvasive diagnostic tool for studying cutaneous structures between the stratum corneum and the superficial reticular dermis. This tool gives real-time images parallel to the skin surface; the microscopic resolution is similar to that of conventional histology. Numerous studies have identified the main confocal features of various inflammatory skin diseases and tumors, demonstrating the good correlation of these features with certain dermatoscopic patterns and histologic findings. Confocal patterns and diagnostic algorithms have been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Possible present and future applications of this noninvasive technology are wide ranging and reach beyond its use in noninvasive diagnosis. This tool can also be used, for example, to evaluate dynamic skin processes that occur after UV exposure or to assess tumor response to noninvasive treatments such as photodynamic therapy. We explain the characteristic confocal features found in the main nonmelanoma skin tumors and discuss possible applications for this novel diagnostic technique in routine dermatology practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  11. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  12. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus in a North American community: prevalence, serologic screening, and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Farid H; Murray, Joseph A; Kudva, Yogish C; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Dierkhising, Ross A; Lahr, Brian D; Dyck, Peter J; Kyle, Robert A; El-Youssef, Mounif; Burgart, Lawrence J; Van Dyke, Carol T; Brogan, Deanna L; Melton, L Joseph

    2005-11-01

    To estimate the prevalence of cellac disease (CD) in pediatric and adult type 1 diabetes melitus in a defined population and to describe clinical features and HLA class II genotypes predictive of CD in screened patients with type 1 diabetes. All residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, with type 1 diabetes mellitus on the prevalence date January 1, 2001, were identified with the use of an established medical records linkage system (Rochester Epidemiology Project) and defined clinical criteria. Consenting patients underwent serologic screening with endomyslal antibody and tissue transglutaminase antibody testing and Intestinal biopsies to confirm the diagnosis of CD. A subset of screened patients also underwent HLA class II genotyping. Quality-of-life screening (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) was completed in a subset of patients at the time of serologic screening. Overall, 392 Olmsted County residents with type 1 diabetes on January 1, 2001, were Identified. A total of 158 patients with type 1 diabetes were tested, representing 40% (158/392) of the enumerated diabetic population, and 11 had biopsy-proven CD for an estimated point prevalence of 7.0% (95% confidence Interval, 3.5%-12.1%). Most CD-positive diabetic patients were asymptomatic and expressed an at-risk CD haplotype with at least one of but not both HLA DQ2 or DQ8. Celiac disease Is not rare In North American patients with type 1 diabetes, and most CD-positive diabetic patients are asymptomatic Irrespective of age at screening.

  13. Inverse Association between Vitamin D Status and Diabetes in a Clinic Based Sample of Hispanic Adults in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Trautmann, Grisel; González, Lilliana; Díaz-Luquis, Giselle; Pérez, Cynthia M; Palacios, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a public health problem around the world. Diabetes has been associated with vitamin D deficiency. We aimed to examine the association between the vitamin D status and diabetes in a clinic based sample of Hispanic adults in Puerto Rico. Demographics and laboratory test results for serum 25(OH)D, Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG), and Haemoglobin A1C (HbAlc) were extracted from medical records. Vitamin D status was classified as deficient (diabetics (41.1%). Those with diabetes had lower 25(OH)D levels compared to pre-diabetic and normal glucose status (pdiabetes, but not prediabetes, in those with serum 25(OH)D levels Diabetes risk significantly increased as serum 25(OH)D levels decreased in this group of Hispanic adults, underscoring the importance of routinely screening high risk individuals for vitamin D deficiency and offer supplementation to normalize serum levels.

  14. The islet autoantibody titres: their clinical relevance in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and the classification of diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deutekom, A.W.; Heine, R.J.; Simsek, S.

    2008-01-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA) is a slowly progressive form of autoimmune diabetes, characterized by diabetes-associated autoantibody positivity. A recent hypothesis proposes that LADA consists of a heterogeneous population, wherein several subgroups can be identified based on their

  15. Patient and Provider Factors Affecting Clinical Inertia in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes on Metformin Monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaleshwarkar, Rohan; Gohs, Frank; Mulder, Holly; Wilkins, Nick; DeSantis, Andrea; Anderson, William E; Ejzykowicz, Flavia; Rajpathak, Swapnil; Norton, H James

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to determine the extent of clinical inertia and the associated patient and provider factors in patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin monotherapy (MM) at a large integrated health care system in the United States. The study cohort included patients with type 2 diabetes aged 18 to 85 years, on MM between January 2009 and September 2013, who experienced MM failure (had an uncontrolled glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA 1c ] reading (≥8.0% [64 mmol/mol]) after at least 90 days of MM). Clinical inertia was defined as absence of treatment intensification with an add-on therapy within 180 days after the MM failure (index date). The impact of patient and provider factors on clinical inertia was determined using generalized estimating equations. The study cohort consisted of 996 patients; 58% were men and 59% were white, with a mean age of 53 (11.8) years. Of these, 49.8% experienced clinical inertia. Lower HbA 1c at index date, absence of liver diseases, absence of renal diseases, and greater provider age were associated with clinical inertia. The clinical inertia rate in a secondary analysis considering HbA 1c inertia. Considerable clinical inertia rates were observed in our real-world patient population, suggesting the need of interventions to reduce clinical inertia in clinical practice. Information about patient and provider factors affecting clinical inertia provided by this study could help healthcare policymakers plan and implement such interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical informatics to improve quality of care: a population-based system for patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Chaudhry

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions A clinical informatics system, used to deliver proactive, co-ordinated care to a population of patients with diabetes mellitus, can improve process and also quality outcome measures. Larger studies are needed to confirm these early findings.

  17. Ovarian tumors: pathogenia, clinical pattern, echographic and histopathological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons Porrata, Laura Maria; Garcia Gomez, Odalis; Salmon Cruzata, Acelia

    2012-01-01

    Two case reports of young patients, who were treated in the Otolaryngology Department from 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba are presented. One of the cases presented nasal obstruction, rhinorrhoea and facial pain, for 7 months; the other one presented an increase of volume in the right ocular globe. In both, the results of the biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of differentiated nasosinusal epidermoid carcinoma

  18. Current Concepts in Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Liver Disease: Clinical Outcomes, Hepatitis C Virus Association, and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Compeán, Diego; González-González, José Alberto; Lavalle-González, Fernando Javier; González-Moreno, Emmanuel Irineo; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor J

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for chronic liver disease, and ~30 % of patients with liver cirrhosis develop diabetes. Diabetes mellitus has been associated with cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic hepatitis C virus liver infection, can aggravate the course the liver infection, and can induce a lower sustained response to antiviral treatment. Evidences that HCV may induce metabolic and autoimmune disturbances leading to hypobetalipoproteinemia, steatosis, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, thyroid disease, and gonadal dysfunction have been found. Prospective studies have demonstrated that diabetes increases the risk of liver complications and death in patients with cirrhosis. However, treatment of diabetes in these patients is complex, as antidiabetic drugs can promote hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis. There have been few therapeutic studies evaluating antidiabetic treatments in patients with liver cirrhosis published to date; thus, the optimal treatment for diabetes and the impact of treatment on morbidity and mortality are not clearly known. As numbers of patients with chronic liver disease and diabetes mellitus are increasing, largely because of the global epidemics of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, evaluation of treatment options is becoming more important. This review discusses new concepts on hepatogenous diabetes, the diabetes mellitus–hepatitis C virus association, and clinical implications of diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, the effectiveness and safety of old and new antidiabetic drugs, including incretin-based therapies, will be described.

  19. Incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian patients: Analysis of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melva Louisa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To review the effi cacy and safety data on incretin-based therapies currently available (exenatide, liraglutide, sitagliptin, vildagliptin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian population.Methods We conducted Medline search of all relevant randomized clinical trials of incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian populations. Data pertinent to the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 mimetics and DPP-4 inhibitors were extracted and used.Results We found 14 randomized controlled trials of incretin based-therapy which included 3567 type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian population (Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Indian. It was shown that incretin-based therapies improved HbA1c at higher extent (up to -1.42% in exenatide 10 mcg bid, -1.85% for liraglutide 0.9 mg qd, -1.4% for sitagliptin 100 mg and -1.4% for vildagliptin 50 mg bid compared to the effects observed in studies with Caucasian population, with comparable safety profile.Conclusion The efficacy of incretin-based therapies in Asian patients improved glycemic parameters in a higher magnitude on some glycemic parameters compared with those in Caucasian population. These results indicate that incretin-based therapies may be more effective in Asian population than in Caucasian. (Med J Indones 2010; 19: 205-12Key words: exenatide, incretin, liraglutide, sitagliptin, type-2 diabetes, vildagliptin

  20. ACE Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Diabetic Nephropathy: Clinical Implications of Genetic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Kyu Ha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20–40% of diabetic patients develop nephropathy which is the leading cause of ESRD in developed countries. The ACE I/D polymorphism is thought to be a marker for functional polymorphism which regulates circulating and tissue ACE activity. While the initial study found a protective effect of the II genotype on the development of nephropathy in IDDM patients, subsequent studies have addressed the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. RAAS blockers are the first line drugs for the treatment hypertension associated with diabetes and have been widely used in everyday clinical practice for the purpose of reducing proteinuria in patients with various renal diseases. However, the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockers is variable and the percentage of reducing proteinuria is in the range of 20–80%. The antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockers may be related to a number of factors: the type or the dose of RAAS blockers, the duration of therapy, the level of sodium intake, and the type of patient’s ACE I/D genotype. Besides the nongenetic factors, drug responses, can be influenced by ACE gene polymorphism. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and diabetic nephropathy and therapeutic response of RAAS blockers.

  1. Early pregnancy clinical risk factors for preeclampsia in women with type 1 and type 2 diabete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Sidse Kjærhus; Vestergaard, Marianne; Ásbjörnsdóttir, Björg

    Aim: To assess the prevalence of pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders and to identify early clinical, modifiable predictors of preeclampsia in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Methods: A population-based cohort study of 494 women with pre-existing diabetes (307 type 1 and 187 type 2...... diabetes), included at their first antenatal visit at 11±6 gestational weeks (mean±SD) from 2012 to 2016. Predictors of preeclampsia present at first antenatal visit were sought identified. Results: At the first antenatal visit HbA1c was 6.9±2.3 % (51±10 mmol/mol) vs. 6.8±2.6 % (49±14 mmol/mol) and blood...... pressure 120±12/76±8 mmHg vs. 122±14/79±10 mmHg, (p=0.16/p=0.001) in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Preeclampsia developed in 40 women at 36±3 gestational weeks with delivery 8±9 days later. The prevalence of preeclampsia was 8% (9% vs. 7%) and gestational hypertension 8% (9% vs. 6...

  2. Stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus: a review of recent clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couri Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell therapy is one of the most promising treatments for the near future. It is expected that this kind of therapy can ameliorate or even reverse some diseases. With regard to type 1 diabetes, studies analyzing the therapeutic effects of stem cells in humans began in 2003 in the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto - SP USP, Brazil, and since then other centers in different countries started to randomize patients in their clinical trials. Herein we summarize recent data about beta cell regeneration, different ways of immune intervention and what is being employed in type 1 diabetic patients with regard to stem cell repertoire to promote regeneration and/or preservation of beta cell mass. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT was a 7-year longitudinal study that demonstrated the importance of the intensive insulin therapy when compared to conventional treatment in the development of chronic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This study also demonstrated another important issue: there is a reverse relationship between C-peptide levels (endogenous indicator of insulin secretion chronic complications - that is, the higher the C-peptide levels, the lower the incidence of nephropathy, retinopathy and hypoglycemia. From such data, beta cell preservation has become an additional target in the management of T1DM 1.

  3. Pancreas Islet Transplantation for Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Evidence Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is caused by the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta (β) cells, resulting in severe insulin deficiency. Islet transplantation is a β-cell replacement therapeutic option that aims to restore glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness of islet transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes, with or without kidney disease. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes, including relevant health technology assessments, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and observational studies. We used a two-step process: first, we searched for systematic reviews and health technology assessments; second, we searched primary studies to update the chosen health technology assessment. The Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews measurement tool was used to examine the methodological quality of the systematic reviews and health technology assessments. We assessed the quality of the body of evidence and the risk of bias according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Our searched yielded 1,354 citations. One health technology assessment, 11 additional observational studies to update the health technology assessment, one registry report, and four guidelines were included; the observational studies examined islet transplantation alone, islet-after-kidney transplantation, and simultaneous islet-kidney transplantation. In general, low to very low quality of evidence exists for islet transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes with difficult-to-control blood glucose levels, with or without kidney disease, for these outcomes: health-related quality of life, secondary complications of diabetes, glycemic control, and adverse events. However, high quality of evidence exists for the specific glycemic control outcome of insulin independence compared with

  4. A review of randomized controlled trials of medical record powered clinical decision support system to improve quality of diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Mustafa; Giordano, Richard; Lakhani, Saima; Walker, Dawn Marie

    2016-03-01

    A gap between current diabetes care practice and recommended diabetes care standards has consistently been reported in the literature. Many IT-based interventions have been developed to improve adherence to the quality of care standards for chronic illness like diabetes. The widespread implementation of electronic medical/health records has catalyzed clinical decision support systems (CDSS) which may improve the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, the objective of the review is to evaluate the effectiveness of CDSS in improving quality of type II diabetes care. Moreover, the review aims to highlight the key indicators of quality improvement to assist policy makers in development of future diabetes care policies through the integration of information technology and system. Setting inclusion criteria, a systematic literature search was conducted using Medline, Web of Science and Science Direct. Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tools were used to evaluate the quality of studies. Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected for the review. In the selected studies, seventeen clinical markers of diabetes care were discussed. Three quality of care indicators were given more importance in monitoring the progress of diabetes care, which is consistent with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. The presence of these indicators in the studies helped to determine which studies were selected for review. Clinical- and process-related improvements are compared between intervention group using CDSS and control group with usual care. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), low density lipid cholesterol (LDL-C) and blood pressure (BP) were the quality of care indicators studied at the levels of process of care and clinical outcome. The review has found both inconsistent and variable results for quality of diabetes care measures. A significant improvement has been found in the process of care for all three measures of quality of diabetes care

  5. Human resources requirements for diabetic patients healthcare in primary care clinics of the Mexican Institute of Social Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Doubova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the requirements of human resources (HR of two models of care for diabetes patients: conventional and specific, also called DiabetIMSS, which are provided in primary care clinics of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. Materials and methods. An evaluative research was conducted. An expert group identified the HR activities and time required to provide healthcare consistent with the best clinical practices for diabetic patients. HR were estimated by using the evidence-based adjusted service target approach for health workforce planning; then, comparisons between existing and estimated HRs were made. Results. To provide healthcare in accordance with the patients’ metabolic control, the conventional model required increasing the number of family doctors (1.2 times nutritionists (4.2 times and social workers (4.1 times. The DiabetIMSS model requires greater increase than the conventional model. Conclusions. Increasing HR is required to provide evidence-based healthcare to diabetes patients.

  6. Quality of glycaemic control in ambulatory diabetics at the out-patient clinic of Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, C F; Kariuki, M; Ng'ang'a, L

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of diabetes mellitus is based on the evidence that lowering blood glucose as close to normal range as possible is a primary strategy for reducing or preventing complications or early mortality from diabetes. This suggests poorer glycaemic control would be associated with excess of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. This presumption is suspected to reach high proportions in developing countries where endemic poverty abets poor glycaemic control. There is no study published on Kenyan patients with diabetes mellitus about their glycaemic control as an audit of diabetes care. To determine the glycaemic control of ambulatory diabetic patients. Cross-sectional study on each clinic day of a randomly selected sample of both type 1 and 2 diabetic patients. Kenyatta National Hospital. Over a period of six months, January 1998 to June 1998. During routine diabetes care in the clinic, mid morning random blood sugar and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were obtained. A total of 305 diabetic patients were included, 52.8% were females and 47.2% were males. 58.3% were on Oral Hypoglycaemic Agent (OHA) only, 22.3% on insulin only; 9.2% on OHA and insulin and 4.6% on diet only. 39.5% had mean HbA1c or = 8%. Patients on diet-only therapy had the best mean HbA1c = 7.04% while patients on OHA-only had the worst mean HbA1c = 9.06%. This difference was significant (p=0.01). The former group, likely, had better endogenous insulin production. The influence of age, gender and duration of diabetes on the level of glycaemic control observed did not attain statistically significant proportions. The majority of ambulatory diabetic patients attending the out-patient diabetic clinic had poor glycaemic control. The group with the poorest level of glycaemic control were on OHA-only, while best control was observed amongst patients on diet-only, because of possible fair endogenous insulin production. Poor glycaemic control was presumed to be due to sub-optimal medication and

  7. Challenging recruitment of youth with type 2 diabetes into clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Jayadeva, Vikas; Cizza, Giovanni; Brown, Rebecca J; Nandagopal, Radha; Rodriguez, Luisa M; Rother, Kristina I

    2014-03-01

    To better understand and overcome difficulties with recruitment of adolescents with type 2 diabetes into clinical trials at three United States institutions, we reviewed recruitment and retention strategies in clinical trials of youth with various chronic conditions. We explored whether similar strategies might be applicable to pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes. We compiled data on recruitment and retention of adolescents with type 2 diabetes at three centers (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; and Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC) from January 2009 to December 2011. We also conducted a thorough literature review on recruitment and retention in adolescents with chronic health conditions. The number of recruited patients was inadequate for timely completion of ongoing trials. Our review of recruitment strategies in adolescents included monetary and material incentives, technology-based advertising, word-of-mouth referral, and continuous patient-research team contact. Cellular or Internet technology appeared promising in improving participation among youths in studies of various chronic conditions and social behaviors. Adolescents with type 2 diabetes are particularly difficult to engage in clinical trials. Monetary incentives and use of technology do not represent "magic bullets," but may presently be the most effective tools. Future studies should be conducted to explore motivation in this population. We speculate that (1) recruitment into interventional trials that address the main concerns of the affected youth (e.g., weight loss, body image, and stress management) combined with less tangible outcomes (e.g., blood glucose control) may be more successful; and (2) study participation and retention may be improved by accommodating patients' and caregivers' schedules, by scheduling study visits before and after working hours, and in more convenient locations than in medical facilities

  8. Healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Hatzigeorgiou, Christos; Anglin, Judith; Xie, Ding; Besenyi, Gina M; De Leo, Gianluca; Stewart, Jessica; Wilkins, Thad

    2017-01-01

    Diet and exercise therapy have been reported to be effective in improving blood glucose control and are an important part of treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The goal of this study is to examine the efficacy of a healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, as measured by Hgb-A1c, cardiovascular indicators, physical activity, weight, and BMI. Also of interest are optimal strategies for subject recruitment, the number of intervention sessions attended, and participant use of the Fitbit watch to monitor their physical activity and track food and beverage consumption. A pre/post-test design will be used in this pilot study. Non-institutionalized adult patients (n=50) aged 18-65 years who have been seen at the Augusta Health outpatient clinics (General Internal Medicine or Family Medicine) for type 2 diabetes in the past 12 months, and who are interested in reducing their risk of disease recurrence through healthy lifestyle behaviors, will be eligible to participate. At orientation visit, eligible individuals will be asked to provide written informed consent. Consenting volunteers (n=50) will be asked to complete the baseline and 6-month follow-up questionnaire and to participate in 12 weekly group sessions of 90 min duration, involving physical activity and to meet with a dietitian (baseline, one month, 90 days) to receive individualized advice on diet and nutrition. The technology-based intervention will use wrist-worn Fitbit Blaze physical activity monitoring devices. This pilot study will provide important information about the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of consumer-facing devices such as the Fitbit watch has the potential advantage over the use of research accelerometers, pedometers, or actigraphs in increasing the likelihood that the intervention will be sustainable after the study ends.

  9. HANSENS DISEASE : STUDY OF CLINICAL, NEUROPATHOLOGICAL, NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL PATTERN OF LEPROUS NEUROPATHY

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar; Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A need still exists to determine the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of leprosy neuropathy at distinct times of the disease by different methods that measure the various nerve fiber functions. A prospective clinical study was performed 100 patients of clinically proven Hansen’s will take in study and given diagnosis is made by dermatologist and neurologist. For Study of Clinical, Neuropathological , Neurophysiological Pattern of leprous neuropathy and r...

  10. Prevalence and Ethnic Pattern of Diabetes and Prediabetes in China in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Gao, Pei; Zhang, Mei; Huang, Zhengjing; Zhang, Dudan; Deng, Qian; Li, Yichong; Zhao, Zhenping; Qin, Xueying; Jin, Danyao; Zhou, Maigeng; Tang, Xun; Hu, Yonghua; Wang, Linhong

    2017-06-27

    Previous studies have shown increasing prevalence of diabetes in China, which now has the world's largest diabetes epidemic. To estimate the recent prevalence and to investigate the ethnic variation of diabetes and prediabetes in the Chinese adult population. A nationally representative cross-sectional survey in 2013 in mainland China, which consisted of 170 287 participants. Fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels were measured for all participants. A 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was conducted for all participants without diagnosed diabetes. Primary outcomes were total diabetes and prediabetes defined according to the 2010 American Diabetes Association criteria. Awareness and treatment were also evaluated. Hemoglobin A1c concentration of less than 7.0% among treated diabetes patients was considered adequate glycemic control. Minority ethnic groups in China with at least 1000 participants (Tibetan, Zhuang, Manchu, Uyghur, and Muslim) were compared with Han participants. Among the Chinese adult population, the estimated standardized prevalence of total diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes was 10.9% (95% CI, 10.4%-11.5%); that of diagnosed diabetes, 4.0% (95% CI, 3.6%-4.3%); and that of prediabetes, 35.7% (95% CI, 34.1%-37.4%). Among persons with diabetes, 36.5% (95% CI, 34.3%-38.6%) were aware of their diagnosis and 32.2% (95% CI, 30.1%-34.2%) were treated; 49.2% (95% CI, 46.9%-51.5%) of patients treated had adequate glycemic control. Tibetan and Muslim Chinese had significantly lower crude prevalence of diabetes than Han participants (14.7% [95% CI, 14.6%-14.9%] for Han, 4.3% [95% CI, 3.5%-5.0%] for Tibetan, and 10.6% [95% CI, 9.3%-11.9%] for Muslim; P prediabetes for Tibetan Chinese and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.63-0.85) for diabetes and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.71-0.86) for prediabetes in Muslim Chinese. Among adults in China, the estimated overall prevalence of diabetes was 10.9%, and that for prediabetes was 35.7%. Differences from previous estimates for 2010 may

  11. Are personality patterns and clinical syndromes associated with patients' motives and perceived outcome of orthognathic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper Øland; Jensen, John; Melsen, Birte

    2010-01-01

    A study of surgical-orthodontic patients was performed to assess whether signs of personality patterns and psychologically defined clinical syndromes influenced patients' motives for treatment, perceived oral function, self-concept, social interaction, and overall satisfaction with treatment....

  12. Young persons' contraceptive clinic, 1975 to 1980: patterns of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, L; Bury, J K; McGlew, T

    1983-03-01

    From 1975 specific information has been collected for every 5th client who attends the Edinburgh Brook Advisory Center for the 1st time. The Center is a clinic providing contraceptive advice, pregnancy advice, and counseling on sexual concerns and oriented particularly to the needs of young people. As a result of the sustained and systematic data collection, there is a 1 in 5 sample from 1975-80 of new clients to the clinic. Background characteristics are recorded along with details concerning clients' service use and information about how the client learned about the clinic. The data is currently held on computer and is analyzed using the software package Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Throughout the discussion, specific reference is made to younger clients, that is to clients under age 20. Due to the fact that Brook users may be unrepresentative of the age group as a whole, generalizations may not be made. It is only pssible to generalize about the type of teenager seen at the Brook Center. The Center sees about 2000 new clients each year and serves an almost exclusively female population. Approximately 20 men attend the clinic each year. Throughout the 1975-80 period, the new client population varied little with regard to age, marital status, and residence. About 86% of women paying a 1st visit were single, and the majority were 21 years of age or under. Around 40% were teenagers. 84% were nulliparous in 1980. Most of the young women came from Edinburgh, but roughly 1/4 came from outside the city. 2/3 of the clients heard about the clinic from someone they knew, a friend or relative who was often a Brook client. In 1975 Brook publicity accounted for 17% of the referrals. In 1980 general practitioner referrals accounted for 7% of new clients. The majority of clients came to the clinic to receive contraception, but a substantial minority attended because they were pregnant or suspected they might be pregnant. Of those clients obtaining contraception

  13. Do evidence-based guidelines change clinical practice patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities published a National Clinical Guideline on the treatment of age-related cataracts. The guideline provided evidence-based recommendations on the indication for cataract surgery, cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration......, on the use of toric intraocular lenses (IOLs) to correct preoperative corneal astigmatism, the use of intracameral and topical antibiotics to prevent endophthalmitis, choice of anti-inflammatory medication to control postoperative inflammation and prevent cystoid macular oedema, the use of immediate...

  14. Translating U-500R Randomized Clinical Trial Evidence to the Practice Setting: A Diabetes Educator/Expert Prescriber Team Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Paula M; Kruger, Davida F; Taylor, April D; Eid, Wael E; Bhan, Arti; Jackson, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to provide recommendations to the diabetes educator/expert prescriber team for the use of human regular U-500 insulin (U-500R) in patients with severely insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes, including its initiation and titration, by utilizing dosing charts and teaching materials translated from a recent U-500R clinical trial. Conclusions Clinically relevant recommendations and teaching materials for the optimal use and management of U-500R in clinical practice are provided based on the efficacy and safety results of and lessons learned from the U-500R clinical trial by Hood et al, current standards of practice, and the authors' clinical expertise. This trial was the first robustly powered, randomized, titration-to-target trial to compare twice-daily and three-times-daily U-500R dosing regimens. Modifications were made to the initiation and titration dosing algorithms used in this trial to simplify dosing strategies for the clinical setting and align with current glycemic targets recommended by the American Diabetes Association. Leveraging the expertise, resources, and patient interactions of the diabetes educator who can provide diabetes self-management education and support in collaboration with the multidisciplinary diabetes team is strongly recommended to ensure patients treated with U-500R receive the timely and comprehensive care required to safely and effectively use this highly concentrated insulin.

  15. Standardizing Clinically Meaningful Outcome Measures Beyond HbA1c for Type 1 Diabetes: A Consensus Report of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiostratidou, Gina; Anhalt, Henry; Ball, Dana; Blonde, Lawrence; Gourgari, Evgenia; Harriman, Karen N; Kowalski, Aaron J; Madden, Paul; McAuliffe-Fogarty, Alicia H; McElwee-Malloy, Molly; Peters, Anne; Raman, Sripriya; Reifschneider, Kent; Rubin, Karen; Weinzimer, Stuart A

    2017-12-01

    To identify and define clinically meaningful type 1 diabetes outcomes beyond hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) based upon a review of the evidence, consensus from clinical experts, and input from researchers, people with type 1 diabetes, and industry. Priority outcomes include hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). While priority outcomes for type 1 and type 2 diabetes may overlap, type 1 diabetes was the focus of this work. A Steering Committee-comprising representatives from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange-was the decision-making body for the Type 1 Diabetes Outcomes Program. Their work was informed by input from researchers, industry, and people with diabetes through Advisory Committees representing each stakeholder group. Stakeholder surveys were used to identify priority outcomes. The outcomes prioritized in the surveys were hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, DKA, and PROs. To develop consensus on the definitions of these outcomes, the Steering Committee relied on published evidence, their clinical expertise, and feedback from the Advisory Committees. The Steering Committee developed definitions for hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, and DKA in type 1 diabetes. The definitions reflect their assessment of the outcome's short- and long-term clinical impact on people with type 1 diabetes. Knowledge gaps to be addressed by future research were identified. The Steering Committee discussed PROs and concluded that further type 1 diabetes-specific development is needed. The Steering Committee recommends use of the defined clinically meaningful outcomes beyond HbA 1c in the research, development, and evaluation of type 1 diabetes

  16. The association between Western and Prudent dietary patterns and fasting blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes and normal glucose metabolism in older Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Erin I; Jacka, Felice N; Butterworth, Peter; Anstey, Kaarin J; Cherbuin, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    High blood glucose and type 2 diabetes are associated with a range of adverse health and cognitive outcomes. One factor that contributes to high blood glucose and type 2 diabetes is dietary intake. This study investigated the relationship between dietary patterns, fasting blood glucose and diabetes status in a sample of 209 participants aged 60-65. Blood plasma glucose was measured from venous blood samples. Individual Prudent and Western dietary patterns were estimated from a self-completed food frequency questionnaire. The relationship between dietary patterns, diabetes, and blood glucose was assessed via general linear model analyses controlling for age, sex, height, and total caloric intake. Results indicated that there was no association between Prudent diet and fasting blood glucose levels, or type 2 diabetes. In contrast, an individual in the upper tertile for Western dietary score had a significantly higher risk of having diabetes than an individual in the lower tertile for Western dietary score. However, there was no significant association between Western diet and fasting blood glucose. Western diet may be associated with type 2 diabetes through mechanisms beyond impacting blood plasma glucose directly. The fact that the association between Western diet and type 2 diabetes remained even when total caloric intake was controlled for highlights the need for policy and population health interventions targeting the reduction of unhealthy food consumption.

  17. Skull Base Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Diabetes Insipidus and Panhypopituitarism- A Rare Clinical Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    Case Report A 16 year old male presented with diminished vision, bilateral ptosis, left sided lateral rectus palsy, hypoesthesia of trigeminal nerve with nasal obstruction for last 5 months. There was polypoidal, bleeding mass in both nasal cavities. Contrast enhanced CT Scan showed a large homogenous mass arising from sphenoid extending into cavernous sinus and the suprasellar region. Endoscopic nasal biopsy revealed abundant Langerhans cell histiocytes, macrophages, neutrophils. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were administered. But within 2 months the patient presented with Cushingoid features and further diminution of vision. Detailed work-up revealed Hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and diabetes insipidus. Debulking of the tumour was done and left optic nerve decompression was done. PET scan was performed and showed large, well defined mass with increased FDG uptake in the skull base with suprasellar extension, reaching upto petrous temporal bone and causing bony erosion of ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. Patient was then advised adjuvant chemotherapy.   Discussion Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare group of disorders characterised by abnormal clonal proliferation and accumulation of abnormal dendritic cells. Involvement of base of skull is even rarer. Though diabetes insipidus has been reported in Langerhans cell histiocytosis involving pituitary, panhypopituitarism is rare. These combinations of extensive Langerhans cell histiocytosis of base skull with clinical features of Diabetes insipidus and panhypopituitarism makes this case a rare clinical entity.

  18. Use of self-monitoring tools in a clinic sample of adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Molly L; Bhatt, Harikrashna B; Thomas, Valerie A; Wing, Rena R

    2017-06-01

    Self-monitoring is an effective strategy for chronic disease management; many readily available mobile applications allow tracking of diabetes-related health behaviors but their use has not yet been integrated into routine clinical care. How patients engage with these applications in the real world is not well understood. The specific aim of this study is to survey adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) regarding self-monitoring behaviors, including mobile application use. In 2015, we surveyed an adult diabetes clinic population (n = 96) regarding self-monitoring behaviors: diet, physical activity, weight, and blood glucose. Self-monitoring with any method ranged from 20-90 %. About half of the participants owned smartphones; few had mobile applications. The most common app-tracked behavior was physical activity, then weight and diet. Despite numerous available mobile health-tracking applications, few T2D adults from our sample used them, though many reported self-monitoring with other methods.

  19. The sensitivity of clinical diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onde, M E; Ozge, A; Senol, M G; Togrol, E; Ozdag, F; Saracoglu, M; Misirli, H

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the sensitivity of various methods for the clinical diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A total of 147 randomly selected patients with diabetes mellitus and 65 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated by various clinical (the neuropathy symptom score [NSS], the neuropathy disability score [NDS], vibration perception thresholds [VPTs], Tinel's sign and Phalen's sign), laboratory (fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin levels) and electro-physiological (nerve conduction studies, H-reflex and F-wave measurements) methods. In the patient group, 8.2% had an abnormal NSS, 28.5% had a positive Phalen's sign, 32.6% had a positive Tinel's sign, 42.8% had an abnormal VPT and 57.1% had an abnormal NDS. Significant correlations were found between electro-physiologically confirmed neuropathy and the two provocation tests and abnormal VPTs. In conclusion, assessment with a complete neurological examination and standard electrophysiological tests is very important for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the prevention of morbidity in patients with or without symptoms.

  20. Automation of the consensus guidelines in diabetes care: potential impact on clinical inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisser, A Michael; Inhaber, Francine

    2010-01-01

    To propose that automation of the consensus guidelines and mandated targets (CG&MT) in glycemia, hemoglobin A1c, and body weight will facilitate optimal clinical management of patients with diabetes. (1) A simplified method for capturing diabetes outcomes at home was devised, (2) relevant portions of the CG&MT were translated into computer code and automated, and (3) algorithms were applied to transform data from self-monitoring of blood glucose into circadian profiles and hemoglobin A1c levels. (4) The resulting procedures were integrated into a USB memory drive for use by health-care providers at the point of care. For input from patients, a simple form is used to capture data on diabetes outcomes, including blood glucose measurements before and after meals and at bedtime, medication, and lifestyle events in a structured fashion. At each encounter with a health-care provider, the patient's data are transferred into the device and become available to assist in identifying deviations from mandated targets, potential risks of hypoglycemia, and necessary prescription changes. Preliminary observations during a 2 1/2-year period from a community support group dedicated to glycemic control on 20 unselected patients (10 with and 10 without use of the device) are summarized. With use of the automated information, the health professional is supported at the point of care to achieve better, safer outcomes and practice evidence-based medicine entirely in lockstep with the CG&MT. This automation helps to overcome clinical inertia.

  1. Clinical Use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, David; Choudhary, Pratik

    2017-05-01

    With the emphasis on intensive management of type 1 diabetes, data from studies support frequent monitoring of glucose levels to improve glycemic control and reduce glucose variability, which can be related to an increase in macro and microvascular complications. However, few perform capillary blood glucose that frequently. There are currently two available alternatives that this review will discuss, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and flash glucose monitoring. CGM has become an important diagnostic and therapeutic option in optimizing diabetes management. CGM systems are now more accurate, smaller, and easier to use compared to original models. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated that CGM can improve Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C) and reduce glucose variability in both continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injection users. When used in an automated "insulin-suspend" system, reduced frequency of hypoglycemia and shorter time spent in hypoglycemic range have been demonstrated. Despite the potential benefits CGM has to offer in clinical practice, concerns exist on the accuracy of these devices and patient compliance with therapy, which may prevent the true clinical benefit of CGM being achieved, as observed in RCTs. Flash glucose monitoring systems FreeStyle ® Libre™ (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) are as accurate as many CGM systems available and have the added benefit of being factory calibrated. Studies have shown that flash glucose monitoring systems are very well tolerated by patients and effectively reduce glucose variability, increasing time in range.

  2. An intensive nurse-led, multi-interventional clinic is more successful in achieving vascular risk reduction targets than standard diabetes care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacMahon Tone, J

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this research was to determine whether an intensive, nurse-led clinic could achieve recommended vascular risk reduction targets in patients with type 2 diabetes as compared to standard diabetes management.

  3. Dietary patterns associated with HbA1c and LDL cholesterol among individuals with type 1 diabetes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Crandell, Jamie; Mendez, Michelle A.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Liu, Wei; Ji, Linong; Du, Shufa; Rosamond, Wayne; Popkin, Barry M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To identify dietary patterns that influence cardiometabolic risk among individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in China. Methods Data are from a cross-sectional study of T1D in China (n=99). Dietary intake was assessed using three 24-hour recalls. Reduced rank regression was used to identify dietary patterns from a set of 20 food groups that maximized the explained variation in glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Results Dietary pattern 1 was characterized by low intakes of wheat products and high-fat cakes, and high intakes of beans and pickled vegetables. Dietary pattern 2 was characterized by low intakes of high-fat cakes, nuts/seeds, fish/shellfish, and teas/coffee, and high intakes of rice and eggs. Participants in the highest tertile of dietary pattern 1 had significantly (pfor age and household income. Dietary pattern 2 was not associated with HbA1c or LDL cholesterol. Conclusions We identified a dietary pattern that is significantly related to HbA1c and LDL cholesterol. These findings provide support for behavioral strategies to prevent complications in individuals with T1D in China. PMID:25630525

  4. Prevalence of obesity and systemic hypertension among diabetes mellitus patients attending an out-patient diabetes clinic in a Ghanaian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Victor; Abedandi, Robert; Salifu, Zenabankara S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is now a prevalent disease in both developed and developing countries. Overweight/obesity and hypertension are potential modifiable risk factors for diabetes mellitus and persist during the course of the disease. This study was aimed at reporting the prevalence of overweight/obesity and systemic hypertension and their association to blood glucose levels in persons with diabetes mellitus attending a diabetic clinic in Ghanaian Teaching Hospital. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients attending a diabetic clinic at the Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Anthropometric variables of age, weight and height were measured with appropriate instruments, computed into BMI and classified according to WHO classifications. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured by an appropriate instrument and classified by WHO standards. Fasting plasma glucose levels of the study participants were recorded from their personal health folder. All data was analysed by GraphPad prism version 5. In general, 7.0% of the participants were underweight and 32.0% were overweight or obese. The mean±SD weight, height and BMI of the participants were 67.53±13.32, 1.68±0.12 and 24.18±5.32. Twenty-one percent of the studied participants were hypertensive. Mean±SD fasting plasma glucose of 7.94±2.82 was observed among the diabetic patients. As the prevalence of hyperglycaemia was higher among patients aged ≤40 years (88.9% vs. 75.8%), normoglycaemia (11.1% vs. 24.2%) was higher among those over 40 years. The differences were not significant. The prevalence of hyperglycaemia was significantly higher in participants with overweight/obese (0.0% vs. 41.6%, phypertension was found. Hyperglycaemia was more prevalent among overweight/obese participants. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel telemonitoring device for improving diabetes control: protocol and results from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Alice R; Kinoshita, Linda; Kirk, Susan; Barbosa, Gina Monraz; Chou, Cathy; Minkoff, Jerome

    2014-02-01

    Telemedicine is one approach to managing patients with chronic illness. Several telephone-based monitoring studies of diabetes patients have shown improved glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an investigational in-home telemetry device for improving glucose and BP control over 6 months for patients with type 2 diabetes. The device was used to transmit weekly blood glucose, weight, and BP readings to a diabetes care manager. We conducted a two-arm, parallel-comparison, single-blind, randomized controlled trial among Kaiser Permanente Northern California members 18-75 years old with type 2 diabetes mellitus and entry HbA1c levels between 7.5% and 10.0%. Participants were randomly assigned to either the telemonitoring arm or the usual care arm. We observed very small, nonsignificant changes in fructosamine (telemonitoring, -54.9 μmol; usual care, -59.4 μmol) and systolic BP (telemonitoring, -6.3 mm Hg; usual care, -3.2 mm Hg) from baseline to 6 weeks in both groups. At 6 months, we observed no significant intergroup differences in change from baseline for HbA1c, fructosamine, or self-efficacy. However, LDL cholesterol in the telemonitoring arm decreased more than in the usual care arm (-17.1 mg/dL versus -5.4 mg/dL; P=0.045). Although HbA1c improved significantly over 6 months in both groups, the difference in improvement between the groups was not significant. This lack of significance may be due to the relatively healthy status of the volunteers in our study and to the high level of care provided by the care managers in the Santa Rosa, CA clinic. Further study in subgroups of less healthy diabetes patients is recommended.

  6. Can Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Clinical Trials Close the Risk Management Gap Between Diabetes and Prediabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perreault, Leigh; Færch, Kristine; Gregg, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We reviewed published literature to determine the relationship between A1c and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and summarize the need and implications for CVD risk reduction with interventions, focusing in the prediabetic A1c range (... a continuous relationship between A1c and CVD-even below the current levels of A1c-defined prediabetes and after adjustment for known risk factors for CVD. Clinical trials have demonstrated a reduction in CV morbidity and/or mortality when interventions are invoked in the prediabetic A1c range. Guidelines...... advocating CV risk factor management in prediabetes have not been widely adopted, subsequently leading to comparable coronary heart disease risk between people with prediabetes (HR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.7-2.1 vs normoglycemia) and diabetes itself (HR=2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.2 vs no diabetes). This review highlights...

  7. Comparison of Two Sources of Clinical Audit Data to Assess the Delivery of Diabetes Care in Aboriginal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Timothy; Paul, Christine; Ishiguchi, Paul; D'Este, Catherine; Koller, Claudia; Forshaw, Kristy; Noble, Natasha; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Bisquera, Alessandra; Eades, Sandra

    2017-10-17

    The objective of this study was to determine the concordance between data extracted from two Clinical Decision Support Systems regarding diabetes testing and monitoring at Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Australia. De-identified PenCAT and Communicare Systems data were extracted from the services allocated to the intervention arm of a diabetes care trial, and intra-class correlations for each extracted item were derived at a service level. Strong to very strong correlations between the two data sources were found regarding the total number of patients with diabetes per service (Intra-class correlation [ICC] = 0.99), as well as the number (ICC = 0.98-0.99) and proportion (ICC = 0.96) of patients with diabetes by gender. The correlation was moderate for the number and proportion of Type 2 diabetes patients per service in the group aged 18-34 years (ICC = 0.65 and 0.8-0.82 respectively). Strong to very strong correlations were found for numbers and proportions of patients being tested for diabetes, and for appropriate monitoring of patients known to have diabetes (ICC = 0.998-1.00). This indicated a generally high degree of concordance between whole-service data extracted by the two Clinical Decision Support Systems. Therefore, the less expensive or less complex option (depending on the individual circumstances of the service) may be appropriate for monitoring diabetes testing and care. However, the extraction of data about subgroups of patients may not be interchangeable.

  8. COMPARISON OF CLINICAL PROFILE OF DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS WITH OR WITHOUT NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a spectrum of conditions, which is characterised histologically by significant macrovesicular hepatic steatosis that occurs in those who do not consume alcohol in amounts considered to be harmful to liver and in the absence of known toxins, drugs, viral disease, etc. This disease is quite frequently seen in diabetes especially type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is probably related to altered glucose metabolism. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is quite variable from mild alteration of transaminases, which is a benign disease to one with high morbidity and mortality. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for NAFLD and the prevalence of NAFLD in diabetic patients have been shown to be between 30-80%. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, normative survey technique was selected. Duration of the study was one year. The sample comprised of 100 diabetic patients age ranged 31-70 years. The sample was selected on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. The tools such as clinical profile and checklist were administered. RESULTS The study found out that NAFLD is very common in diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients with NAFLD has a longer duration of diabetes compared to that of diabetic patients without NAFLD diabetic patients with NAFLD had higher BMI, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure than that of patients without NAFLD. CONCLUSION All the patients within the spectrum of NAFLD should be considered potentially affected not only by a liver disease, but by a multisystem disease. Clinicians should be aware of the importance of a complete clinical evaluation for early diagnosis and treatment of liver disease as well as the different manifestations. All type 2 diabetic patients should be monitored for the development of NAFLD. Early diagnosis of NAFLD can prevent the progression to NASH and its complications.

  9. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet--an international collaborative clinical trials network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyler, Jay S; Greenbaum, Carla J; Lachin, John M; Leschek, Ellen; Rafkin-Mervis, Lisa; Savage, Peter; Spain, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is an international consortium of clinical research centers aimed at the prevention or delay of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The fundamental goal of TrialNet is to counter the T1D disease process by immune modulation and/or enhancement of beta cell proliferation and regeneration. To achieve this goal, TrialNet researchers are working to better understand the natural history of the disease, to identify persons at risk, and to clinically evaluate novel therapies that balance potential risks and benefits. The particular focus is on studies of preventive measures. In addition, TrialNet evaluates therapies in individuals with newly diagnosed T1D with preserved beta cell function to help determine the risk/benefit profile and gain an initial assessment of potential efficacy in preservation of beta cell function, so that promising agents can be studied in prevention trials. In addition, TrialNet evaluates methodologies that enhance the conduct of its clinical trials, which includes tests of outcome assessment methodology, the evaluation of surrogate markers, and mechanistic studies laying the foundation for future clinical trials.

  10. Care of the Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, William B; Subauste, Jose S

    2016-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from a highly specific immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells, resulting in chronic hyperglycemia. For many years, one of the mainstays of therapy for patients with T1DM has been exercise balanced with appropriate medications and medical nutrition. Compared to healthy peers, athletes with T1DM experience nearly all the same health-related benefits from exercise. Despite these benefits, effective management of the T1DM athlete is a constant challenge due to various concerns such as the increased risk of hypoglycemia. This review seeks to summarize the available literature and aid clinicians in clinical decision-making for this patient population. PubMed searches were conducted for "type 1 diabetes mellitus AND athlete" along with "type 1 diabetes mellitus AND exercise" from database inception through November 2015. All articles identified by this search were reviewed if the article text was available in English and related to management of athletes wi