WorldWideScience

Sample records for developmental toxicity studies

  1. Developmental toxicity study of pentachlorophenol in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, B K; Ranpuria, A K; Hoberman, A M

    2001-01-01

    The potential for developmental toxicity of pentachlorophenol (penta) was studied in New Zealand white rabbits at doses of 0 (corn oil), 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg/day administered by gavage on days 6 to 18 of gestation. The rabbits were sacrificed on day 29 of presumed gestation and necropsied. Measurements included number of corpora lutea, pregnancy, number and distribution of implantations, early and late resorptions, live and dead fetuses, fetal weight, gender, and gross external, soft tissue, and skeletal alterations. The mid and high doses reduced maternal body weight gain; the high dose caused transient weight loss and reduced feed consumption. There were no effects on embryofetal development at any of the doses evaluated. Based on these data, the maternal no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) is 7.5 mg/kg/day, while the developmental NOAEL is 30 mg/kg/day. Penta is not a developmental toxicant in a nonrodent animal model.

  2. Review of reproductive and developmental toxicity studies with isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Willem D; Pavkov, Kenneth L; Gingell, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Published studies for reproductive and developmental toxicity conducted with isopropanol have been conducted by the inhalation and oral gavage routes of administration. Interpretation of the data from these studies has resulted in discussions regarding NOAELs and additional benchmark dose modeling publications. Unpublished reproductive and developmental toxicity studies administered in the drinking water were also conducted by BIBRA, and the results of those studies are presented here. In addition, all of the reproductive and developmental toxicity studies conducted with isopropanol are summarized and evaluated for concordance of effects and NOAELs. Endpoints of concern for regulatory agencies were decreases in male mating index and reductions in postnatal pup survival. Original study reports were evaluated and data collated to address these two endpoints, and the data summarized. Data are presented suggesting that there were technical problems in the study that implied a decrease in male mating index, and based on the results from the drinking water studies, the weight of evidence suggests that isopropanol does not affect male mating or fertility at dose levels of up to 1000 mg/kg/day. The weight of evidence suggests that isopropanol can cause decreases in postnatal pup survival following oral gavage administration of 1000-1200 mg/kg/day to the dams. The NOAEL for this endpoint with oral gavage administration was 700 mg/kg/day. Indications of maternal toxicity were also an important predictor for decreased postnatal survival. Decreased postnatal pup survival was also noted in the drinking water studies with isopropanol with a LOAEL of 2278 mg/kg/day and a NOAEL of 1947 mg/kg/day.

  3. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  4. Subchronic (13-week) toxicity and prenatal developmental toxicity studies of dietary astaxanthin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Katherine; Edwards, James; Beilstein, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Two studies examined the effects of dietary astaxanthin on Hanlbm Wistar (SPF) rats. Male and female rats receiving astaxanthin concentrations up to 1.52% of the feed for 13 weeks showed no evidence of toxicity; no effects were noted in the offspring of female rats exposed to astaxanthin at up to 1.39% of the feed during the period of organogenesis (GD 7-16). Discoloration of the feces and yellow pigmentation of adipose tissue was seen in the 13-week study, an intrinsic property of the substance, and not a sign of toxicity. Differences between the control and astaxanthin groups, some of which reached statistical significance, were generally sporadic (i.e., transient and/or not related to astaxanthin concentration) and not considered of biological or toxicological significance. Blood cholesterol levels, for example, were greater in animals receiving astaxanthin for 13 weeks, but remained within the normal range. The highest dietary concentration of astaxanthin in each of the studies is proposed as a no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). Specifically, 1.52% for the 13-week study, corresponding to a mean intake of 1033 mg/kg bw/day (range: 880-1240 mg/kg bw/day), and 1.39% for the developmental toxicity study, corresponding to a mean intake of approximately 830 mg/kg bw/day (range: 457-957 mg/kg bw/day).

  5. Studies of the developmental toxicity of polycarboxylate dispersing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, G A; Monroe, A; Hassall, C D; Iavicoli, J; Jamieson, R A; Daston, G P

    1989-06-01

    Three linear polycarboxylate compounds, two linear polyacrylates (90,000 MW and 4,500 MW) and one linear polyacrylate-maleate copolymer (12,000 MW), were tested for their teratogenic potential in female Sprague Dawley rats. These polymers, which were tested as sodium salts, are used as dispersing agents in detergent formulations at levels of 1-5%. All compounds were administered by gavage during organogenesis (days 6-15 of pregnancy). No adverse effects on development were seen with any of the three compounds at any of the doses tested. The highest dose, and therefore the minimum no-effect dose, for the three linear polymers was 1125 mg/kg/day for the 90,000 MW polyacrylate, 3000 mg/kg/day for the 4,500 MW polyacrylate, and 6670 mg/kg/day for the polyacrylate-maleate copolymer. Based on these data, these compounds are not developmentally toxic, even at very high dose levels.

  6. Weight-of-the-evidence review of acrylonitrile reproductive and developmental toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Barbara H; Collins, James J; Strother, Dale E; Lamb, James C

    2009-01-01

    Risk assessment of acrylonitrile (AN) toxicity to humans has focused on potential carcinogenicity and acute toxicity. Epidemiological studies from China reported reproductive and developmental effects in AN workers, including infertility, birth defects, and spontaneous abortions. A weight-of-the-evidence (WoE) evaluation of the AN database assessed study strength, characterized toxicity, and identified no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs). The epidemiological studies do not demonstrate causality and are not sufficiently robust to be used for risk assessment. Rodent developmental studies showed fetotoxicity and malformations at maternally toxic levels; there was no unique developmental susceptibility. NOAELs for oral and inhalation exposures were 10 mg/kg/day and 12 ppm (6 h/day), respectively. Drinking-water and inhalation reproductive toxicity studies showed no clear effects on reproductive performance or fertility. Maternally toxic concentrations caused decreased pup growth. The drinking-water reproductive NOAEL was 100 ppm (moderate confidence due to study limitations). The inhalation exposure reproductive and neonatal toxicity high confidence NOAEL was 45 ppm (first generation 90 ppm) (6 h/day). The inhalation reproductive toxicity study provides the most robust data for risk assessment. Based on the WoE evaluation, AN is not expected to be a developmental or reproductive toxicant in the absence of significant maternal toxicity.

  7. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... experimental animals, one dose level being used per group. Shortly before the expected date of delivery, the... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue Toxicity § 798.4900... weight of test substance (g, mg) per unit weight of a test animal (e.g., mg/kg). (3) No-observed-effect...

  8. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... organogenesis, to several groups of pregnant experimental animals, one exposure level being used per group...) Test procedures—(1) Animal selection—(i) Species and strain. Testing shall be performed in at least two... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue Toxicity § 798...

  9. Prenatal developmental toxicity study with 7-hydroxymatairesinol potassium acetate (HMRlignan) in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Roberts, A.; Korte, H.; Unkila, M.; Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Plant lignan 7-hydromatairesinol, a novel precursor of the mammalian lignan enterolactone was evaluated in a prenatal developmental toxicity study conducted in the Wistar rat. Mated female rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.25, 1, and 4% (w/w) of 7-hydroxymatairesinol in the form of potassium aceta

  10. Developmental Toxicity Studies with Atrazine and its Major Metabolites in Rats and Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialli, Anthony R; DeSesso, John M; Breckenridge, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR), hydroxyatrazine (OH-ATR), and the three chloro metabolites of ATR (deethylatrazine [DEA], deisopropylatrazine [DIA], diaminochlorotriazine [DACT]) were evaluated for developmental effects in rats and rabbits. Three developmental toxicity studies were conducted on ATR in rats (two studies) and rabbits and a developmental toxicity study was conducted in rats for each of the four ATR metabolites DEA, DIA, DACT, and OH-ATZ. ATR administration by gavage to pregnant rats and rabbits from implantation (gestation day [GD] 6 in rat, GD 7 in rabbit) through closure of the palate (GD 15 in rat and GD 19 in rabbit) did not statistically significantly alter the incidence of developmental abnormalities or malformations at dose levels up to 100 (rat) or 75 (rabbit) mg/kg bw/day. There were no effects on developmental toxicity parameters for DEA, DIA, DACT, or OH-ATR at oral dose levels up to 100, 100, 150, or 125 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, with the exception of reductions in fetal body weight by DACT and OH-ATR in the presence of decreased maternal body weight gain. ATR did not adversely affect developmental end points in a two-generation study conducted in rats exposed to dose levels up to 500 ppm (38.7 mg/kg/day) in the diet. The 500-ppm dose level resulted in significantly reduced maternal body weight gain. Overall, data show that neither ATR nor its metabolites statistically significantly affected rat or rabbit embryo-fetal development even at dose levels producing maternal toxicity. PMID:24797531

  11. Predictive Modeling of Developmental Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of alternative methods in conjunction with traditional in vivo developmental toxicity testing has the potential to (1) reduce cost and increase throughput of testing the chemical universe, (2) prioritize chemicals for further targeted toxicity testing and risk assessment,...

  12. Developmental toxicity studies of methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO) in rats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derelanko, Michael J; Rinehart, William E; Rodwell, Dean E

    2003-08-01

    The developmental toxicity of methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO), an industrial antioxidant used primarily as an antiskinning agent in alkyd paint, was investigated in rats and rabbits. Following preliminary dose range finding studies, groups of 25 pregnant rats or 18 pregnant rabbits were dosed by gavage with aqueous solutions of MEKO at 0, 60, 200, or 600 mg/kg (rats) or 0, 8, 14, 24, or 40 mg/kg (rabbits) on gestation days 6-15 or 6-18, respectively. In rats, dose-dependent clinical signs of maternal toxicity including reduced body weight gains were noted at 200 and 600 mg/kg. At 60 mg/kg and above enlarged spleens were observed at necropsy. The preliminary study found methemoglobin formation and reticulocytosis indicative of anemia at these dose levels. No treatment-related gestational effects, malformations or developmental variations were observed in the rats. In rabbits, 3 females aborted and 8 females were found dead at 40 mg/kg between gestation days 11 and 24. Clinical signs of maternal toxicity were present in surviving doses at this dose level. Body weight gains were reduced at 24 and 40 mg/kg. The preliminary study indicated maternal hematological effects in the rabbits similar to the rats at dose levels as low as 10 mg/kg. MEKO was not considered to have produced any treatment-related gestational effects, malformations or developmental variations in the rabbit at dose levels at or below 24 mg/kg. Because of excessive maternal mortality and abortions at the 40 mg/kg dose level, only 6 rabbits produced litters. The severe maternal toxicity and limited number of litters precluded a full assessment of developmental toxicity at 40 mg/kg. Nonetheless, MEKO did not appear to be teratogenic to the rabbit at this dose level.

  13. Study on the developmental toxicity of combined artesunate and mefloquine antimalarial drugs on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boareto, Ana Cláudia; Müller, Juliane Centeno; de Araujo, Samanta Luiza; Lourenço, Ana Carolina; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Gomes, Caroline; Minatovicz, Bruna; Lombardi, Natália; Paumgartten, Francisco Roma; Dalsenter, Paulo Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Antimalarial drug combinations containing artemisinins (ACTs) have become first choice therapies for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Data on safety of ACTs in pregnancy are limited and no previous study has been conducted on the developmental toxicity of artesunate-mefloquine combinations on the first trimester of gestation. To evaluate the developmental toxicity of an artesunate/mefloquine combination, pregnant rats were treated orally with artesunate (15 and 40 mg/kg bwt/day), mefloquine (30 and 80 mg/kg bwt/day) and artesunate/mefloquine (15/30 and 40/80 mg/kg bwt/day) on gestation days 9-11. Dams were C-sectioned on day 20, and their uteri and fetuses removed and examined for soft tissue and skeleton abnormalities. Artesunate increased embryolethality and the incidence of limb long bone malformations on the absence of overt maternal toxicity. Mefloquine (80 mg/kg bwt/day) was maternally toxic and enhanced fetal variations. Combination of artesunate and mefloquine did not enhance their toxicity compared to the toxicity observed after its separate administration. Embryotoxicity of artesunate was apparently attenuated when it is co-administered with mefloquine.

  14. Developmental and reproductive toxicity of inorganic arsenic: animal studies and human concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M S; Macintosh, M S; Baumrind, N

    1998-01-01

    Information on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of inorganic arsenic is available primarily from studies in animals using arsenite and arsenate salts and arsenic trioxide. Inorganic arsenic has been extensively studied as a teratogen in animals. Data from animal studies demonstrate that arsenic can produce developmental toxicity, including malformation, death, and growth retardation, in four species (hamsters, mice, rats, rabbits). A characteristic pattern of malformations is produced, and the developmental toxicity effects are dependent on dose, route, and the day of gestation when exposure occurs. Studies with gavage and diet administration indicate that death and growth retardation are produced by oral arsenic exposure. Arsenic is readily transferred to the fetus and produces developmental toxicity in embryo culture. Animal studies have not identified an effect of arsenic on fertility in males or females. When females were dosed chronically for periods that included pregnancy, the primary effect of arsenic on reproduction was a dose-dependent increase in conceptus mortality and in postnatal growth retardation. Human data are limited to a few studies of populations exposed to arsenic from drinking water or from working at or living near smelters. Associations with spontaneous abortion and stillbirth have been reported in more than one of these studies, but interpretation of these studies is complicated because study populations were exposed to multiple chemicals. Thus, animal studies suggest that environmental arsenic exposures are primarily a risk to the developing fetus. In order to understand the implications for humans, attention must be given to comparative pharmacokinetics and metabolism, likely exposure scenarios, possible mechanisms of action, and the potential role of arsenic as an essential nutrient.

  15. Sensitivity of different generations and developmental stages in studies on reproductive toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, F; Batke, M; Mangelsdorf, I; Pohlenz-Michel, C; Simetska, N; Lewin, G

    2014-04-21

    Numerous studies on reproductive toxicity are expected to be necessary under the EU program on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). Therefore, it is important to analyse existing testing strategies including also the recently implemented extended one-generation reproduction toxicity study (EOGRTS, OECD guideline 443). For this purpose the responsiveness of the different generations and developmental stages in studies on reproductive toxicity is analysed and critical targets of reproductive toxicity are identified by using the Fraunhofer FeDTex database. The F1 generation is identified as most responsive generation in more than 50% of one-generation and multi-generation reproduction studies. Within the F1 generation the adult stage is mostly affected compared to the prenatal or postnatal stage. The target analysis in F1 has revealed alterations in body weight as highly sensitive for all developmental stages. Other important targets are the liver, kidney, testes, prostate, sperm parameters as well as developmental landmarks. The findings in the F2 generation have shown a higher responsiveness than F1 only in 3% of the studies. Although in 29 studies new effects are observed in F2 offspring compared to F1 irrespective of dose levels, overall no severe new effects have emerged that would change classification and labelling and justify an F1 mating. The presented data support the importance of F1 for risk assessment and demonstrate that the study design of the EOGRTS is a suitable alternative to two-generation studies. However, compared to a conventional one-generation study the EOGRTS may identify additional effects but will change risk assessment with respect to NOELs only in rare cases.

  16. Comparing rat and rabbit embryo-fetal developmental toxicity studies for 379 pharmaceuticals: On systemic dose and developmental effects (Critical Reviews in Toxicology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A database of embryo-fetal developmental toxicity (EFDT) studies of 379 pharmaceutical compounds in rat and rabbit was analyzed for species differences based on toxicokinetic parameters of area under the curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (Cmax) at the developmental adverse ef...

  17. Numeric Estimates of Teratogenic Severity from Embryo-Fetal Developmental Toxicity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, L David

    2016-02-01

    A developing organism exposed to a toxicant will have a response that ranges from none to severe (i.e., death or malformation). The response at a given dosage may be termed teratogenic (or developmental toxic) severity and is dependent on exposure conditions. Prenatal/embryo-fetal developmental (EFD) toxicity studies in rodents and rabbits are the most consistent and definitive assessments of teratogenic severity, and teratogenesis screening assays are best validated against their results. A formula is presented that estimates teratogenic severity for each group, including control, within an EFD study. The developmental components include embryonic/fetal death, malformations, variations, and mean fetal weight. The contribution of maternal toxicity is included with multiplication factors to adjust for the extent of mortality, maternal body weight change, and other parameters deemed important. The derivation of the formula to calculate teratogenic severity is described. Various EFD data sets from the literature are presented to highlight considerations to the calculation of the various components of the formula. Each score is compared to the concurrent control group to obtain a relative teratogenic severity. The limited studies presented suggest relative scores of two- to

  18. Herbs of interest to the Brazilian Federal Government: female reproductive and developmental toxicity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Verissimo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2009 the Brazilian Ministry of Health published a document named RENISUS that lists 71 herbs traditionally used in Brazil that could result in phytomedicines to be dispensed by the governmental health care program. This manuscript reviews female reproductive and/or developmental toxicity information of these herbs. More than half (35 of the herbs lack information regarding female reproductive and/or developmental effects. From the fourteen herbs used traditionally to disturb female reproduction, five present experimental data corroborating their actions as abortifacients (Maytenus ilicifolia, Momordica charantia, Plectranthus barbatus, Ruta graveolens or labour facilitator (Bidens pilosa. For 23 of the herbs evaluated experimentally for any type of female reproductive endpoint, only a single study was retrieved and at least twelve of these studies were conducted with a single dose. This scenario suggests that the scientific power of the published information is very low and that a scientifically-based risk/benefit analysis about the use of these herbs during pregnancy is not possible. Considering the appeal that phytomedicines have for pregnant women, usually aware and afraid of the risks that synthetic drugs may have in their pregnancy and progeny, well designed studies evaluating reproductive and/or developmental toxicity of these herbs urge.

  19. Developmental toxicity study of sodium molybdate dihydrate administered in the diet to Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay Murray, F; Tyl, Rochelle W; Sullivan, Frank M; Tiwary, Asheesh K; Carey, Sandra

    2014-11-01

    Molybdenum is an essential nutrient for humans and animals and is a constituent of several important oxidase enzymes. It is normally absorbed from the diet and to a lesser extent from drinking water and the typical human intake is around 2μg/kg bodyweight per day. No developmental toxicity studies to contemporary standards have been published and regulatory decisions have been based primarily on older studies where the nature of the test material, or the actual dose levels consumed is uncertain. In the current study the developmental toxicity of sodium molybdate dihydrate as a representative of a broad class of soluble molybdenum(VI) compounds, was given in the diet to Sprague Dawley rats in accordance with OECD Test Guideline 414. Dose levels of 0, 3, 10, 20 and 40mgMo/kgbw/day were administered from GD6 to GD20. No adverse effects were observed at any dose level on the dams, or on embryofetal survival, fetal bodyweight, or development, with no increase in malformations or variations. Significant increases in serum and tissue copper levels were observed but no toxicity related to these was observed. The NOAEL observed in this study was 40mgMo/kgbw/day, the highest dose tested.

  20. Developmental and testicular toxicity of butyl benzyl phthalate in the rat and the impact of study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma AH; Verhoef A; Dormans JAMA; Elvers LH; Valk V de; Biesebeek JD te; Pieters MN; Slob W; LEO

    1999-01-01

    The developmental toxicity of butyl benzyl phthalate was investigated in the rat in an alternative study design using ten treatment groups. The effect of exposure period was studied, and a comparison of reaction to treatment in pregnant versus non-pregnant females was made. The classical data

  1. Prenatal developmental toxicity study of ethyl tertiary-butyl ether in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Sunao; Miyata, Katsumi; Takakura, Saori; Hoshuyama, Satsuki; Muroi, Takako; Kusune, Yuji; Ajimi, Shozo; Furukawa, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE) is commonly used as an oxygenated gasoline additive. In this study, we evaluated its developmental toxicity in rats. ETBE was administered by gavage to 21 or 22 pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats per group at dose levels of 0, 100, 300 and 1000 mg/kg/day from days 5 through 19 postcoitum to assess its effects on pregnant animals and their embryos and fetuses applied to the OECD testing guideline (no. 414) correspondingly. There were no toxicological effects attributable to ETBE regarding clinical signs, body weight, food intake, necropsy or examination at caesarean section in pregnant animals. There were also no toxicological effects on external, visceral and skeletal examinations of embryos and fetuses. These results indicate that, under the conditions of this study, ETBE had no toxicological effects on pregnant rats or their embryos and fetuses and that the no observed adverse effect level was 1000 mg/kg/day both for pregnant rats and their embryos and fetuses.

  2. A developmental toxicity study of 3S, 3'S-Astaxanthin in New Zealand white rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steffen; Mellert, Werner; Schulte, Stefan; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2016-04-01

    Astaxanthin, a naturally occurring pigment used to give the characteristic orange-pink colour to salmonid fish reared in aquaculture, is also marketed as a dietary supplement. Synthetic 3S, 3'S-Astaxanthin was tested for potential harmful effects on the in utero development of New Zealand white rabbits in a study according to international regulatory guidelines. There were two control groups, one being a placebo administration and three dose levels corresponding to 100, 200, and 400 mg of 3S, 3'S-Astaxanthin per kg body weight/day. The group sizes varied from 23 to 27 litters, providing approximately 200 fetuses per group for evaluation of developmental toxicity. There were no significant effects on the health of the does, nor on the size and viability of the litters. Malformations, both external and internal, were rare and occurred in all groups, including controls with no indication of a treatment relationship. Variations were much more common, being found in all litters. However, when examined by type and frequency, no pattern emerged indicating a relationship to administration of the test substance. It is concluded that administration of 3S, 3'S-Astaxanthin in a gelatin/carbohydrate powder formulation throughout pregnancy up to 400 mg/kg body weight/day is without harmful effects on reproduction or fetal development.

  3. Prenatal developmental toxicity study of ethyl tertiary-butyl ether in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yuzo; Ishikura, Toshikazu; Kudoh, Kayoko; Haneda, Ryo; Endoh, Takako

    2011-07-01

    Ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE) is commonly used as an oxygenated gasoline additive. In this study, the prenatal developmental toxicity of ETBE was determined in rabbits. New Zealand white rabbits were given ETBE by gavage at 100, 300, or 1,000 mg/kg/day on gestational days (GDs) 6-27, and the pregnancy outcome was determined on GD 28. Neither death nor abortion occurred in the pregnant rabbits at any dose. Slightly and significantly suppressed maternal body-weight gain and transiently decreased maternal food consumption were found at 1,000 mg/kg/day during the administration period. At this dose, no changes in clinical or macroscopic finding were noted in dams. No treatment-related changes were observed in any dam treated at 300 mg/kg/day or less. There was no significant effect of ETBE on the numbers of corpora lutea, implantations, live fetuses, resorptions and dead fetuses, incidences of pre- and postimplantation loss, viability of fetuses, fetal body weight, sex ratio of fetuses, or weights of gravid uteri. No significant difference was detected in the incidences of fetuses with malformations or variations between the ETBE-treated and control groups. Also, no adverse effects on the progress of ossification were noted in fetuses of dams given ETBE. Based on these findings, it is concluded that the no observed adverse effect levels of ETBE were 300 mg/kg/day for dams and 1,000 mg/kg/day for fetuses in rabbits.

  4. Developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-05-15

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in rodents. The developmental toxicity of ENMs included not only structural abnormalities, but also death, growth retardation, and behavioral and functional abnormalities. Most studies were performed on mice using an injection route of exposure. Teratogenic effects were indicated when multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and TiO2-nanoparticles were administered to mice during early gestation. Reactive oxygen species levels were increased in placentas and malformed fetuses and their placentas after prenatal exposure to MWCNTs and SWCNTs, respectively. The pre- and postnatal mortalities and growth retardation in offspring increased after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Histopathological and functional abnormalities were also induced in placentas after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Maternal exposure to ENMs induced behavioral alterations, histopathological and biochemical changes in the central nervous system, increased susceptibility to allergy, transplacental genotoxicity, and vascular, immunological, and reproductive effects in offspring. The size- and developmental stage-dependent placental transfer of ENMs was noted after maternal exposure. Silver accumulated in the visceral yolk sac after being injected with Ag-NPs during early gestation. Although currently available data has provided initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of ENMs, that on the developmental toxicity of ENMs is still very limited. Further studies using well-characterized ENMs, state-of the-art study protocols, and appropriate routes of exposure are required in order to clarify these developmental effects and provide information suitable for risk assessments of ENMs.

  5. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental...... neurotoxicants-manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested...... chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new...

  6. Alternative testing strategies for predicting developmental toxicity of antifungal compound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.

    2016-01-01

    Determination of safe human exposure levels of chemicals in toxicological risk assessments largely relies on animal toxicity data. In these toxicity studies, the highest number of animals are used for reproductive and developmental toxicity testing. Because of economic and ethical reasons, there is

  7. Developmental and reproductive toxicity testing of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The majority of new preventative and therapeutic vaccines are now assessed for developmental toxicity according to guidelines issued by the FDA in 2006. Despite the absence of confirmed effects in humans, vaccines are frequently suspected of having adverse side-effects on the development of children. Such suspicions are perhaps unavoidable considering the extremely widespread use of vaccines. The preclinical developmental toxicology studies are designed to assess possible influences of each component of the vaccine formulation-and the induced antibodies-on the development of the conceptus, neonate and suckling organism. Immune modulation by a vaccine or an adjuvant could, for instance, affect the outcome of pregnancy by interfering with the natural shift in immune balance of the mother during gestation. Maternal immunoglobulins are transferred from the mother to the offspring in order to confer passive immunity during early life. This maternal antibody transport is prenatal in humans and monkeys, but tends to be delayed until after birth in other species. Therefore, a suitable model species needs to be chosen for preclinical studies in order to ensure exposure of the foetus to the induced maternal antibodies following vaccination. Rabbits are the best laboratory model for prenatal immunoglobulin transfer, but rodents are more practical for the necessary postnatal investigations. Non-human primates are the only appropriate models for the testing of vaccines that are not immunogenic in lower species. It is advisable to test new adjuvants separately according to the ICH S5(R2) guidelines. Preclinical paediatric investigations are not currently required for vaccines, even though most vaccines are given to children. Other areas of regulatory concern include developmental immunotoxicity and effects on the preimplantation embryo. Because of the limitations of the available animal models for developmental toxicity testing, pharmacovigilance is essential. Copyright © 2011

  8. Characterization of a developmental toxicity dose-response model.

    OpenAIRE

    Faustman, E M; Wellington, D G; Smith, W P; Kimmel, C A

    1989-01-01

    The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling the dichotomous response data from developmental toxicity studies. Modifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biological events underlying developmental toxicity. Data sets used for the evaluation were obtained from the National Toxicology Program and U.S. EPA laboratories. The studies included ...

  9. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    neurotoxicants-manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested...

  10. Reproductive and developmental toxicity of phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyche, Jan L; Gutleb, Arno C; Bergman, Ake; Eriksen, Gunnar S; Murk, AlberTinka J; Ropstad, Erik; Saunders, Margaret; Skaare, Janneche U

    2009-04-01

    The purposes of this review are to (1) evaluate human and experimental evidence for adverse effects on reproduction and development in humans, produced by exposure to phthalates, and (2) identify knowledge gaps as for future studies. The widespread use of phthalates in consumer products leads to ubiquitous and constant exposure of humans to these chemicals. Phthalates were postulated to produce endocrine-disrupting effects in rodents, where fetal exposure to these compounds was found to induce developmental and reproductive toxicity. The adverse effects observed in rodent models raised concerns as to whether exposure to phthalates represents a potential health risk to humans. At present, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) have been demonstrated to produce reproductive and developmental toxicity; thus, this review focuses on these chemicals. For the general population, DEHP exposure is predominantly via food. The average concentrations of phthalates are highest in children and decrease with age. At present, DEHP exposures in the general population appear to be close to the tolerable daily intake (TDI), suggesting that at least some individuals exceed the TDI. In addition, specific high-risk groups exist with internal levels that are several orders of magnitude above average. Urinary metabolites used as biomarkers for the internal levels provide additional means to determine more specifically phthalate exposure levels in both general and high-risk populations. However, exposure data are not consistent and there are indications that secondary metabolites may be more accurate indicators of the internal exposure compared to primary metabolites. The present human toxicity data are not sufficient for evaluating the occurrence of reproductive effects following phthalate exposure in humans, based on existing relevant animal data. This is especially the case for data on female reproductive toxicity, which are

  11. Developmental toxicity of endocrine disruptors in early life stages of zebrafish, a genetic and embryogenesis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Dércia; Matos, Manuela; Coimbra, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are capable of interfering with the endocrine system and are increasingly widespread in the aquatic environments. In the present study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae were used to assess how EDCs may interfere with embryogenesis. Therefore, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2: 0.4, 2, 4 and 20 ng/L), genistein (Gen: 2, 20, 200 and 2000 ng/L) and fadrozole (Fad: 2, 10, 50 and 250 μg/L), between 2 and 144 h post-fertilization (hpf). Somite development, heartbeat, malformations, mortality and hatching rates were evaluated. In parallel, the expression patterns of hormone receptors (esr1, esr2a, esr2b and ar) and apoptotic pathways related genes (p53 and c-jun) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that EE2, Gen and Fad caused a higher mortality and also malformations in larvae compared with control. A significant toxic effect was observed in the heartbeat rate, at 144 hpf, in larvae exposed to EE2 and Fad. QPCR revealed alterations in the expression levels of all the evaluated genes, at different time points. esr1 and c-jun genes were upregulated by EE2 and Gen exposure while the expression of esr2a, esr2b and ar genes was downregulated. Fad exposure decreased esr1, p53 and c-jun expression levels. This study shows a toxic effect of EE2, Gen and Fad to vertebrate embryogenesis and a relation between hormones action and apoptosis pathways.

  12. Developmental Toxicity Potential of Nitroguanidine in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    profile for nitroguanidine, related intermediates/by- products of its manufacture, and its environmental degradation products . The rat developmental toxicity...The vehicle for nitroguanidine was a 1% solution of carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt, high viscosity (Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, MO...Nitroguanidine is not soluble in water at the dose levels tested. Carboxymethylcellulose holds nitroguanidine in a homogeneous suspension and is not

  13. Phthalates as developmental reproductive toxicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    PE are a large family ofcompounds used in a wide array ofconsumer, industrial and medical products. Studies have shown that in utero treatment with PE such as diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP) during the critical period offetal reproductive development produced male reproductive mal...

  14. Reproductive and developmental toxicity of dioxin in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Heiden, Tisha C; Mehta, Vatsal; Xiong, Kong M; Lanham, Kevin A; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Ganser, Alissa; Heideman, Warren; Peterson, Richard E

    2012-05-06

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin) is a global environmental contaminant and the prototypical ligand for investigating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-mediated toxicity. Environmental exposure to TCDD results in developmental and reproductive toxicity in fish, birds and mammals. To resolve the ecotoxicological relevance and human health risks posed by exposure to dioxin-like AHR agonists, a vertebrate model is needed that allows for toxicity studies at various levels of biological organization, assesses adverse reproductive and developmental effects and establishes appropriate integrative correlations between different levels of effects. Here we describe the reproductive and developmental toxicity of TCDD in feral fish species and summarize how using the zebrafish model to investigate TCDD toxicity has enabled us to characterize the AHR signaling in fish and to better understand how dioxin-like chemicals induce toxicity. We propose that such studies can be used to predict the risks that AHR ligands pose to feral fish populations and provide a platform for integrating risk assessments for both ecologically relevant organisms and humans.

  15. Developmental toxicity testing for safety assessment: new approaches and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Kavlock, Robert J; Daston, George P; Stedman, Donald; Hixon, Mary; Kim, James H

    2011-10-01

    The ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee held a 2-day workshop entitled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions" in April 2009. The fourth session of this workshop focused on new approaches and technologies for the assessment of developmental toxicology. This session provided an overview of the application of genomics technologies for developmental safety assessment, the use of mouse embryonic stem cells to capture data on developmental toxicity pathways, dynamical cell imaging of zebrafish embryos, the use of computation models of development pathways and systems, and finally, high-throughput in vitro approaches being utilized by the EPA ToxCast program. Issues discussed include the challenges of anchoring in vitro predictions to relevant in vivo endpoints and the need to validate pathway-based predictions with targeted studies in whole animals. Currently, there are 10,000 to 30,000 chemicals in world-wide commerce in need of hazard data for assessing potential health risks. The traditional animal study designs for assessing developmental toxicity cannot accommodate the evaluation of this large number of chemicals, requiring that alternative technologies be utilized. Though a daunting task, technologies are being developed and utilized to make that goal reachable. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Feasibility study of the zebrafish assay as an alternative method to screen for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity using a training set of 27 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selderslaghs, Ingrid W T; Blust, Ronny; Witters, Hilda E

    2012-04-01

    To anticipate to increased testing needs for reproductive toxicity and 3R approaches, we studied zebrafish embryo/larva as an alternative for animal testing for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity and evaluated a training set of 27 compounds with a standardized protocol. The classification of compounds in the zebrafish embryo/larva assay, based on a prediction model using a TI (teratogenic index) cut-off value of 2, was compared to available animal and human data. When comparing the classification of compounds in the zebrafish embryo/larva assay to available animal classification, a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 100% were obtained. The predictive values obtained in comparison to a limited set of human data were 50, 60% respectively for teratogens, non-teratogens. Overall, we demonstrated that the zebrafish embryo/larva assay, may be used as screening tool for prioritization of compounds and could contribute to reduction of animal experiments in the field of developmental toxicology.

  17. Maternal and developmental toxicity of ayahuasca in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carolina Dizioli Rodrigues; Moreira, Camila Queiroz; de Sá, Lilian Rose Marques; Spinosa, Helenice de Souza; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2010-06-01

    Ayahuasca is a psychotropic plant beverage initially used by shamans throughout the Amazon region during traditional religious cult. In recent years, ayahuasca has also been used in ceremonies of a number of modern syncretic religious groups, including pregnant women. However, no documented study has been performed to evaluate the risk of developmental toxicity of ayahuasca. In the present work, maternal and developmental toxicity was evaluated in Wistar rats. Ayahuasca was administered to pregnant rats in three different doses [the equivalent typical dose (TD) administered to humans, five-fold TD and 10-fold TD] during the gestational period (6-20 days). Dams treated with the highest ayahuasca dose showed maternal toxicity with decrease of weight gain and food intake. Visceral fetal findings were observed in all treatment groups. Skeletal findings were observed in the intermediate- and high-dose groups. The fetuses deriving from the highest dose group also presented a decrease in body weight. From these results, it is possible to conclude that there is a risk of maternal and developmental toxicity following ayahuasca exposure and that the level of toxicity appears to be dose-dependent.

  18. Regulatory Forum opinion piece: New testing paradigms for reproductive and developmental toxicity--the NTP modified one generation study and OECD 443.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Paul M D

    2014-12-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) has developed a new flexible study design, termed the modified one generation (MOG) reproduction study. The MOG study will encompass measurements of developmental and reproductive toxicity parameters as well as enable the setting of appropriate dose levels for a cancer bioassay through evaluation of target organ toxicity that is based on test article exposure that starts during gestation. This study design is compared and contrasted with the new Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 443 test guideline, the extended one generation reproduction study. The MOG study has a number of advantages, with a focus on F 1 animals, the generation of adequately powered, robust data sets that include both pre and postnatal developmental toxicity information, and the measurement of effects on reproductive structure and function in the same animals. This new study design does not employ the use of internal triggers in the design structure for the use of animals already on test and is also consistent with the principles of the 3R's. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  19. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: Influence of Gestation Length and Timing of Neonatal Examinations on Litter Data in Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies with rodents use varied protocols for determining the timing of neonatal litter examinations and subsequent measurements. Most laboratories determine timing based on the day of birth (DOB); l.e., gestation le...

  20. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: Influence of Gestation Length and Timing of Neonatal Examinations on Litter Data in Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies with rodents use varied protocols for determining the timing of neonatal litter examinations and subsequent measurements. Most laboratories determine timing based on the day of birth (DOB); l.e., gestation le...

  1. Toward in vitro biomarkers for developmental toxicity and their extrapolation to the in vivo situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Verwei, M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Reliable in vitro and in silico assays as alternatives for in vivo developmental toxicity studies are urgently needed, for the replacement, reduction and refinement (3Rs) of animal use in toxicological research. Therefore, relevant biomarkers for in vivo developmental toxicity in in

  2. Dynamic changes in energy metabolism upon embryonic stem cell differentiation support developmental toxicant identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dartel, van D.A.M.; Schulpen, S.H.; Theunissen, P.T.; Bunschoten, A.; Piersma, A.H.; Keijer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are widely used to study embryonic development and to identify developmental toxicants. Particularly, the embryonic stem cell test (EST) is well known as in vitro model to identify developmental toxicants. Although it is clear that energy metabolism plays a crucial role in

  3. Developmental toxicity studies with 6 forms of titanium dioxide test materials (3 pigment-different grade & 3 nanoscale) demonstrate an absence of effects in orally-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, D B; Boatman, R; Brown, S C

    2015-12-01

    Six different commercial forms and sizes of titanium dioxide particles were tested in separate developmental toxicity assays. The three pigment-grade (pg) or 3 ultrafine (uf)/nanoscale (anatase and/or rutile) titanium dioxide (TiO2) particle-types were evaluated for potential maternal and developmental toxicity in pregnant rats by two different laboratories. All studies were conducted according to OECD Guideline 414 (Prenatal Developmental Toxicity Study). In addition, all test materials were robustly characterized. The BET surface areas of the pg and uf samples ranged from 7 to 17 m(2)/g and 50-82 m(2)/g respectively (see Table 1). The test substances were formulated in sterile water. In all of the studies, the formulations were administered by oral gavage to time-mated rats daily beginning around the time of implantation and continuing until the day prior to expected parturition. In 3 of the studies (uf-1, uf-3, & pg-1), the formulations were administered to Crl:CD(SD) rats beginning on gestation day (GD) 6 through GD 20. In 3 additional studies (uf-2, and pg-2, pg-3 TiO2 particles), the formulations were administered to Wistar rats beginning on GD 5 through 19. The dose levels used in all studies were 0, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day; control group animals were administered the vehicle. During the in-life portions of the studies, body weights, food consumption, and clinical observations before and after dosing were collected on a daily basis. All dams were euthanized just prior to expected parturition (GD 21 for Crl:CD(SD) rats and GD 20 for Wistar rats). The gross necropsies included an examination and description of uterine contents including counts of corpora lutea, implantation sites, resorptions, and live and dead fetuses. All live fetuses were sexed, weighed, and examined externally and euthanized. Following euthanasia, fresh visceral and head examinations were performed on selected fetuses. The fetal carcasses were then processed and examined for skeletal

  4. The reproductive and developmental toxicity of High Flash Aromatic Naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, R H; Wong, Z A; Schmitt, S; Beatty, P; Swanson, M; Schreiner, C A; Schardein, J L

    1990-01-01

    Catalytic reforming is a refining process that converts naphthenes to aromatics by dehydrogenation to make higher octane gasoline blending components. A portion of this wide boiling range hydrocarbon stream can be separated by distillation and used for other purposes. One such application is a mixture of predominantly 9-carbon aromatic molecules (C9 aromatics, primarily isomers of ethyltoluene and trimethylbenzene), which is removed and used as a solvent--High Flash Aromatic Naphtha. A program was initiated to assess the toxicological properties of High Flash Aromatic Naphtha since there may be human exposure through inhalation or external body contact. The current study was conducted to assess the potential for developmental toxicity in the mouse and for reproductive toxicity in the rat. In the developmental toxicity study in CD-1 mice, exposure of dams by inhalation to near lethal levels (1500 ppm) resulted in fetal mortality, reduced weight, delayed ossification, and an increased incidence of cleft palate. At 500 ppm, a level at which maternal weight gain was slightly reduced, fetal weight gain was also reduced, but there was no other evidence of developmental effects. The lowest exposure level (100 ppm) did not cause any maternal or developmental toxicity. There was no consistent evidence of reproductive toxicity in rats, even at exposure levels which resulted in significantly reduced parental weight gain. In addition, when parental exposure was stopped on GD (gestation day) 20, birth weights as well as postnatal survival were generally similar to control values, even in the 1500 ppm exposure group. Postnatal weight gain was also similar to controls early in weaning, but, if maternal exposure was reinitiated, weight gain was reduced in the high exposure group. However, when exposure was continued until delivery, pups in the high exposure group exhibited reduced litter size, birth weight and poor survival. Thus it was likely that the reduction in fetal weight

  5. In vivo evaluation and comparison of developmental toxicity and teratogenicity of perfluoroalkyl compounds using Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miran; Son, Jungeun; Park, Mi Seon; Ji, Yurim; Chae, Soomin; Jun, Changduk; Bae, Jong-Sup; Kwon, Taek Kyu; Choo, Yun-Sik; Yoon, Hosung; Yoon, Duhak; Ryoo, Jaewoong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Mae-Ja; Lee, Hyun-Shik

    2013-10-01

    Perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) are environmental toxicants that persistently accumulate in human blood. Their widespread detection and accumulation in the environment raise concerns about whether these chemicals might be developmental toxicants and teratogens in ecosystem. We evaluated and compared the toxicity of PFCs of containing various numbers of carbon atoms (C8-11 carbons) on vertebrate embryogenesis. We assessed the developmental toxicity and teratogenicity of various PFCs. The toxic effects on Xenopus embryos were evaluated using different methods. We measured teratogenic indices (TIs), and investigated the mechanisms underlying developmental toxicity and teratogenicity by measuring the expression of organ-specific biomarkers such as xPTB (liver), Nkx2.5 (heart), and Cyl18 (intestine). All PFCs that we tested were found to be developmental toxicants and teratogens. Their toxic effects were strengthened with increasing length of the fluorinated carbon chain. Furthermore, we produced evidence showing that perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFuDA) are more potent developmental toxicants and teratogens in an animal model compared to the other PFCs we evaluated [perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)]. In particular, severe defects resulting from PFDA and PFuDA exposure were observed in the liver and heart, respectively, using whole mount in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, pathologic analysis of the heart, and dissection of the liver. Our studies suggest that most PFCs are developmental toxicants and teratogens, however, compounds that have higher numbers of carbons (i.e., PFDA and PFuDA) exert more potent effects.

  6. What happens in the skin? Integrating skin permeation kinetics into studies of developmental and reproductive toxicity following topical exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Bigliardi, Paul L; Bigliardi-Qi, Mei

    2015-12-01

    Animal-based developmental and reproductive toxicological studies involving skin exposure rarely incorporate information on skin permeation kinetics. For practical reasons, animal studies cannot investigate the many factors which can affect human skin permeation and systemic uptake kinetics in real-life scenarios. Traditional route-to-route extrapolation is based on the same types of experiments and requires assumptions regarding route similarity. Pharmacokinetic modeling based on skin physiology and structure is the most efficient way to incorporate the variety of intrinsic skin and exposure-dependent parameters occurring in clinical and occupational settings into one framework. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models enable the integration of available in vivo, in vitro and in silico data to quantitatively predict the kinetics of uptake at the site of interest, as needed for 21st century toxicology and risk assessment. As demonstrated herein, proper interpretation and integration of these data is a multidisciplinary endeavor requiring toxicological, risk assessment, mathematical, pharmaceutical, biological and dermatological expertise.

  7. Developmental toxicity of cartap on zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengli; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Li, Shaonan; Guo, Jiangfeng; Wang, Xingxing; Zhu, Guonian

    2009-12-13

    Cartap is a widely used insecticide which belongs to a member of nereistoxin derivatives and acts on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor site. Its effects on aquatic species are of grave concern. To explore the potential developmental toxicity of cartap, zebrafish embryos were continually exposed, from 0.5 to 144h post-fertilization, to a range of concentrations of 25-1000microg/l. Results of the experiment indicated that cartap concentrations of 100microg/l and above negatively affected embryo survival and hatching success. Morphological analysis uncovered a large suite of abnormalities such as less melanin pigmentation, wavy notochord, crooked trunk, fuzzy somites, neurogenesis defects and vasculature defects. The most sensitive organ was proved to be the notochord which displayed defects at concentrations as low as 25microg/l. Both sensitivity towards exposure and localization of the defect were stage specific. To elucidate mechanisms concerning notochord, pigmentation, and hatching defects, enzyme assay, RT Q-PCR, and different exposure strategies were performed. For embryos with hatching failure, chorion was verified not to be digested, while removing cartap from exposure at early pre-hatching stage could significantly increase the hatching success. However, cartap was proved, via vitro assay, to have no effect on proteolytic activity of hatching enzyme. These findings implied that the secretion of hatching enzyme might be blocked. We also revealed that cartap inhibited the activity of melanogenic enzyme tyrosinase and matrix enzyme lysyl oxidase and induced expression of their genes. These suggested that cartap could impaired melanin pigmentation of zebrafish embryos through inhibiting tyrosinase activity, while inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was responsible for notochord undulation, which subsequently caused somite defect, and at least partially responsible for defects in vasculature and neurogenesis.

  8. Developmental toxicity of cigarette butts - An underdeveloped issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wenjau; Lee, Chih Chun

    2015-03-01

    Cigarette butts (CBs) littering is not just an unsightly nuisance but also a public health problem, because chemicals contained in cigarettes can leach into aquatic environments and pose a risk to the health of humans and wildlife. However, this risk is largely unrecognized or ignored by the public, and toxicological evidence of CBs is scarce. Therefore, we used medaka embryos (Oryzias latipes) to explore developmental toxicity of CBs. The embryos were exposed to various concentrations of leachates from smoked and unsmoked cigarette tobacco (ST and UST) and filters (SF and USF), and observed from 1 to 3 days post-fertilization. The images were recorded and several developmental endpoints analyzed. The values from these endpoints were then used to calculate the Integrated Biomarker Response and evaluate overall effects of the leachates. Some of the embryos were allowed to hatch, and the hatchlings were tested for anxiety-like behavior. Our results showed that low concentrations of the leachates from ST, UST, and SF raised the heart rate, accelerated development, and changed behavior, while high concentrations lowered the heart rate, suppressed development, and increased mortality. The lowest observed effect concentration for the leachates was ≤0.2piece (pc)/L. The USF leachate had no effect at the concentration of 20pc/L. Developmental toxicity of the leachates was ranked as: ST>UST>SF>USF. This study has demonstrated for the first time that CB leachates affect fish development, and provided toxicological evidence to better assess ecological impacts of CBs.

  9. Developmental toxicity of indium: embryotoxicity and teratogenicity in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mikio; Usami, Makoto; Nakazawa, Ken; Arishima, Kazuyoshi; Yamamoto, Masako

    2008-12-01

    Indium, a precious metal classified in group 13 (IIIB) in the periodic table, has been used increasingly in the semiconductor industry. Because indium is a rare metal, technology for indium recycling from transparent conducting films for liquid crystal displays is desired, and its safety evaluation is becoming increasingly necessary. The developmental toxicity of indium in experimental animals was summarized. The intravenous or oral administration of indium to pregnant animals causes growth inhibition and the death of embryos in hamsters, rats, and mice. The intravenous administration of indium to pregnant animals causes embryonic or fetal malformation, mainly involving digit and tail deformities, in hamsters and rats. The oral administration of indium also induces fetal malformation in rats and rabbits, but requires higher doses. No teratogenicity has been observed in mice. Caudal hypoplasia, probably due to excessive cell loss by increased apoptosis in the tailbud, in the early postimplantation stage was considered to account for indium-induced tail malformation as a possible pathogenetic mechanism. Findings from in vitro experiments indicated that the embryotoxicity of indium could have direct effects on the conceptuses. Toxicokinetic studies showed that the embryonic exposure concentration was more critical than the exposure time regarding the embryotoxicity of indium. It is considered from these findings that the risk of the developmental toxicity of indium in humans is low, unless an accidentally high level of exposure or unknown toxic interaction occurs because of possible human exposure routes and levels (i.e. oral, very low-level exposure).

  10. Exposure-based validation list for developmental toxicity screening assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daston, George P.; Beyer, Bruce K.; Carney, Edward W.; Chapin, Robert E.; Friedman, Jan M.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Rogers, John M.; Scialli, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Validation of alternative assays requires comparison of the responses to toxicants in the alternative assay with in vivo responses. Chemicals have been classified as "positive" or "negative" in vivo, despite the fact that developmental toxicity is conditional on magnitude of exposure. We developed a

  11. 40 CFR 799.9370 - TSCA prenatal developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true TSCA prenatal developmental toxicity. 799.9370 Section 799.9370 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... control shall be used. Healthy animals shall be randomly assigned to the control and treatment groups,...

  12. Evaluation of developmental toxicity of guaifenesin using pregnant female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Arham; Shamsi, Sadia; Shahzad, Muhammad; Butt, Hajra Ikram; Aamir, Khurram; Iqbal, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Guaifenesin possesses expectorant, muscle relaxant, and anticonvulsive properties. To the best of our knowledge, the promising data regarding the developmental toxicity of guaifenesin are scarce. The current study investigates the developmental toxic effects of guaifenesin in detail using female rats. Twenty-five dams were divided into five groups. Group 1 served as a control, while Group-2, -3, -4, and -5 were administered with 250, 350, 500, and 600 (mg/kg b.w.) doses of guaifenesin, respectively, starting from gestation day 6 to day 17. Half of the total recovered fetuses was subjected to morphologic and morphometric analysis, while other half was subjected to skeletal examination. A significant reduction in maternal weight, and food/water intake, was observed, however, no mortality and morbidity were observed. About 14 dead fetuses were found in Group-3 and -4 each, while 26 in Group 5. Morphological analysis revealed 21.2%, 45.4%, 67.2%, and 86.9% of total fetuses having hemorrhagic spots in Group-2, -3, -4, and -5, respectively. Dropping wrist/ankle and kinky tail were found in Group-4 and -5 only. Morphometric analysis showed a significant decline in fetal weight, full body length, skull length, forelimb length, hindlimb length, and tail length in all guaifenesin treated groups. Skeletal examination displayed that only Group 5 fetuses had increased intercostal space between 7(th) and 8(th) rib. We also observed improper development of carpals, metacarpals, tarsals, and metatarsals of the Group 5 fetuses. Guaifenesin showed a significant developmental toxicity at selected test doses; therefore, a careful use is suggested during pregnancy.

  13. Evaluation of developmental toxicity of guaifenesin using pregnant female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Arham; Shamsi, Sadia; Shahzad, Muhammad; Butt, Hajra Ikram; Aamir, Khurram; Iqbal, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Guaifenesin possesses expectorant, muscle relaxant, and anticonvulsive properties. To the best of our knowledge, the promising data regarding the developmental toxicity of guaifenesin are scarce. The current study investigates the developmental toxic effects of guaifenesin in detail using female rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five dams were divided into five groups. Group 1 served as a control, while Group-2, -3, -4, and -5 were administered with 250, 350, 500, and 600 (mg/kg b.w.) doses of guaifenesin, respectively, starting from gestation day 6 to day 17. Half of the total recovered fetuses was subjected to morphologic and morphometric analysis, while other half was subjected to skeletal examination. Results: A significant reduction in maternal weight, and food/water intake, was observed, however, no mortality and morbidity were observed. About 14 dead fetuses were found in Group-3 and -4 each, while 26 in Group 5. Morphological analysis revealed 21.2%, 45.4%, 67.2%, and 86.9% of total fetuses having hemorrhagic spots in Group-2, -3, -4, and -5, respectively. Dropping wrist/ankle and kinky tail were found in Group-4 and -5 only. Morphometric analysis showed a significant decline in fetal weight, full body length, skull length, forelimb length, hindlimb length, and tail length in all guaifenesin treated groups. Skeletal examination displayed that only Group 5 fetuses had increased intercostal space between 7th and 8th rib. We also observed improper development of carpals, metacarpals, tarsals, and metatarsals of the Group 5 fetuses. Conclusion: Guaifenesin showed a significant developmental toxicity at selected test doses; therefore, a careful use is suggested during pregnancy. PMID:27298495

  14. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D; Ali, Syed F; Paule, Merle G; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2015-03-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources.

  15. Critical Duration of Exposure for Developmental Chlorpyrifos-Induced Neurobehavioral Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sledge, Damiyon; Yen, Jerry; Morton, Terrell; Dishaw, Laura; Petro, Ann; Donerly, Susan; Linney, Elwood; Levin, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental exposure of rats to the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) causes persistent neurobehavioral impairment. In a parallel series of studies with zebrafish, we have also found persisting behavioral dysfunction after developmental CPF exposure. We have developed a battery of measures of zebrafish behavior, which are reliable and sensitive to toxicant-induced damage. This study determined the critical duration of developmental CPF exposure for causing persisting neurobehavioral effects. Tes...

  16. Developmental toxicity of intravenously injected zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinsoo; Yu, Wook-Joon; Song, Jeongah; Sung, Changhyun; Jeong, Eun Ju; Han, Ji-Seok; Kim, Pilje; Jo, Eunhye; Eom, Ikchun; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Choi, Kyunghee; Choi, Jonghye; Kim, Heyjin; Lee, Handule; Park, Juyoung; Jin, Seon Mi; Park, Kwangsik

    2016-12-01

    Recent toxicity studies of zinc oxide nanoparticles by oral administration showed relatively low toxicity, which may be resulted from low bioavailability. So, the intrinsic toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles needs to be evaluated in the target organs by intravenous injection for full systemic concentration of the administered dosage. Although the exposure chance of injection route is low compared to oral and/or inhalation route, it is important to see the toxicity with different exposure routes to get better risk management tool. In this study, the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on dams and fetuses were investigated in rats after intravenous injection (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) from gestation day 6 to 20. Two of 20 dams in the 20 mg/kg treatment group died during the treatment period. Hematological examination and serum biochemistry showed dose-dependent toxicity in treated dams. Histopathological analysis of treated dams revealed multifocal mixed cell infiltration and thrombosis in lung, tubular dilation in kidneys, and extramedullary hemopoiesis in liver. Total dead fetuses (post-implantation loss) were increased and the body weight of fetus was decreased in the 20 mg/kg treatment group. Statistical differences in corpora lutea, resorption, placental weight, morphological alterations including external, visceral and skeletal malformations were not observed in treated groups. Based on the data, lowest observed adverse effect level of injection route was suggested to be 5 mg/kg in dams and no observed adverse effect level was suggested to be 10 mg/kg in fetal developmental toxicity.

  17. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF IBUPROFEN TREATED MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. SAHU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ibuprofen – an anti-inflammatory, analgesic drug was tested on pregnant females at different developmental phases. The fetus was collected on 12th, 15th and 18th gestation days (gd. Embryos on the day of parturition and 5 day old new born were considered for experimental study. Ovary and uterus of the mother was also taken into account for histopathological examination. The adverse effects on pregnancy outcome included a significant reduction in the number of implantation and significant increase in percentage of post implantation loss. The body weight as well as physical characteristics varied due to the treatment at different phases of gestation. The concentrations of brain DNA and RNA of the fetus and the pups were also lower compared to controls. A major change in the histological architecture was seen in the sections of ovary and uterus of the mother. These findings suggest the susceptibility of the drug to the mother as well as to the embryo.

  18. Preliminary Validation of Tumor Cell Attachment Inhibition Assay for Developmental Toxicants With Mouse S180 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU RONG-ZHU; CHEN CHUAN-FEN; LIN HUI-FEN; HUANG LEI-MING; JIN Xl-PENG

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the possibility of using ascitic mouse sarcoma cell line(S180) to validate the mouse tumor cell attachment assay for developmental toxicants, and to test the inhibitory effects of various developmental toxicants. The results showed that 2 of 3 developmental toxicants under consideration, sodium pentobarbital and ethanol, significantly inhibited S180cells attachment to Concanavalin A-coated surfaces. Inhibition was dependent on concentration, and the IC5o(the concentration that reduced attachment by 50% ), of these 2 chemicals was 1.2 ×10-3 mol/L and 1.0 mol/L, respectively. Another developmental toxicant, hydrocortisone, did not show inhibitory activity. Two non-developmental toxicants, sodium chloride and glycine were also testedand these did not decrease attachment rates. The main results reported here were generally similar to those obtained with ascitic mouse ovarian tumor cells as a model. Therefore, this study added further evidence to the conclusion that cell specificity does not limit attachment inhibition to Con A-coated surfaces, so S180 cell may serve as an alternative cell model, especially when other cell lines are unavailable. Furthermore, after optimal validation, it can be suggested that an S180 cell attachment assay may be a candidate for a series of assays to detect developmental toxicants.

  19. Developmental Toxicity of Dextromethorphan in Zebrafish Embryos/Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Williams, Frederick E.; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2012-01-01

    Dextromethorphan is widely used in over-the-counter cough and cold medications. Its efficacy and safety for infants and young children remains to be clarified. The present study was designed to use the zebrafish as a model to investigate the potential toxicity of dextromethorphan during the embryonic and larval development. Three sets of zebrafish embryos/larvae were exposed to dextromethorphan at 24 hours post fertilization (hpf), 48 hpf, and 72 hpf, respectively, during the embryonic/larval development. Compared with the 48 and 72 hpf exposure sets, the embryos/larvae in the 24 hpf exposure set showed much higher mortality rates which increased in a dose-dependent manner. Bradycardia and reduced blood flow were observed for the embryos/larvae treated with increasing concentrations of dextromethorphan. Morphological effects of dextromethorphan exposure, including yolk sac and cardiac edema, craniofacial malformation, lordosis, non-inflated swim bladder, and missing gill, were also more frequent and severe among zebrafish embryos/larvae exposed to dextromethorphan at 24 hpf. Whether the more frequent and severe developmental toxicity of dextromethorphan observed among the embryos/larvae in the 24 hpf exposure set, as compared with the 48 and 72 hpf exposure sets, is due to the developmental expression of the Phase I and Phase II enzymes involved in the metabolism of dextromethorphan remains to be clarified. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, nevertheless, revealed developmental stage-dependent expression of mRNAs encoding SULT3 ST1 and SULT3 ST3, two enzymes previously shown to be capable of sulfating dextrorphan, an active metabolite of dextromethorphan. PMID:20737414

  20. Predictive models of prenatal developmental toxicity from ToxCast high-throughput screening data

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemicals to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that correlate with observed in vivo toxicity. We hypothesized that developmental toxicity in guideline animal studies captured in the ToxRefDB database wou...

  1. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: lnfluence of Gestation Length on Measurements of Offspring Body Weight and Puberty in Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies in rodents assign age by defining postnatal day (PND) 0 or 1 as the day of birth (DOB); i.e., gestation length affects PND and the timing of postnatal measurements. Some laboratories, however, define age...

  2. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: lnfluence of Gestation Length on Measurements of Offspring Body Weight and Puberty in Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies in rodents assign age by defining postnatal day (PND) 0 or 1 as the day of birth (DOB); i.e., gestation length affects PND and the timing of postnatal measurements. Some laboratories, however, define age...

  3. Designing prospective cohort studies for assessing reproductive and developmental toxicity during sensitive windows of human reproduction and development – the LIFE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Germaine M. Buck; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Sweeney, Anne M.; Wilcosky, Timothy C.; Gore-Langton, Robert E.; Lynch, Courtney D.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Schrader, Steven M.; Kim, Sungduk; Chen, Zhen; Sundaram, Rajeshwari

    2014-01-01

    Summary Buck Louis GM, Schisterman EF, Sweeney AM, Wilcosky TC, Gore-Langton RE, Lynch CD, Boyd Barr D, Schrader SM, Kim S, Chen Z, Sundaram R, on behalf of the LIFE Study. Designing prospective cohort studies for assessing reproductive and developmental toxicity during sensitive windows of human reproduction and development – the LIFE Study. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2011; 25: 413–424. The relationship between the environment and human fecundity and fertility remains virtually unstudied from a couple-based perspective in which longitudinal exposure data and biospecimens are captured across sensitive windows. In response, we completed the LIFE Study with methodology that intended to empirically evaluate a priori purported methodological challenges: implementation of population-based sampling frameworks suitable for recruiting couples planning pregnancy;obtaining environmental data across sensitive windows of reproduction and development;home-based biospecimen collection; anddevelopment of a data management system for hierarchical exposome data. We used two sampling frameworks (i.e. fish/wildlife licence registry and a direct marketing database) for 16 targeted counties with presumed environmental exposures to persistent organochlorine chemicals to recruit 501 couples planning pregnancies for prospective longitudinal follow-up while trying to conceive and throughout pregnancy. Enrolment rates varied from <1% of the targeted population (n = 424 423) to 42% of eligible couples who were successfully screened; 84% of the targeted population could not be reached, while 36% refused screening. Among enrolled couples, ~85% completed daily journals while trying; 82% of pregnant women completed daily early pregnancy journals, and 80% completed monthly pregnancy journals. All couples provided baseline blood/urine samples; 94% of men provided one or more semen samples and 98% of women provided one or more saliva samples. Women successfully used urinary fertility

  4. Developmental toxicity of isomalt in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalkens-Berendsen, D H; Koëter, H B; Schlüter, G; Renhof, M

    1989-10-01

    The sugar replacer isomalt, a 1:1 mixture of the disaccharides glucopyranosylsorbitol and glucopyranosylmannitol, was incorporated in the diet of rats. Female Bay FB:30 rats were adapted to isomalt by feeding them a diet containing a gradually increasing amount of isomalt for several days, prior to mating. Subsequently, they were mated. Isomalt was fed continuously in concentrations of 2.5, 5 and 10% up to day 20 of pregnancy. In addition, one group of female Wistar rats was mated and fed 10% isomalt incorporated in the diet from day 0 up to day 20 of pregnancy, without previous adaptation to isomalt. Finally, one group of untreated female Wistar rats served as controls. Half of the number of females in each group was selected for caesarian section on day 20 of pregnancy. The other half was allowed to litter and rear their pups for 2 weeks (Wistar rats) or 3 weeks (Bay FB:30 rats). In the females of the Bay FB:30 rats, a decreased body-weight gain and food consumption were observed in the 5 and 10% isomalt group. Minor retardation in the development of the foetuses was observed in the 10% isomalt group only with the Bay FB:30 rats and was therefore considered to be related to maternal toxicity. In addition, a dose-related increase in the incidence of wavy ribs occurred in foetuses of the Bay FB:30 rats. However, none of the observed effects were persistent in neonates. Isomalt appeared to have slight toxic effects in the dams of the Bay FB:30 strain but no toxicity in the offspring. In Wistar rats no toxicity and no effects on maternal performance or on embryonic, foetal or neonatal development were seen. Isomalt, when fed at dietary levels up to 10%, did not induce structural or functional teratogenic effects in rats of either the Wistar or the Bay FB:30 strain.

  5. Computer Simulation of Developmental Processes and Toxicities (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Recent progress in systems toxicology and synthetic biology have paved the way to new thinking about in vitro/in silico modeling of developmental processes and toxicities, both for embryological and reproductive impacts. Novel in vitro platforms such as 3D organotypic ...

  6. Identifying Structural Alerts Based on Zebrafish Developmental Morphological Toxicity (TDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrafish constitute a powerful alternative animal model for chemical hazard evaluation. To provide an in vivo complement to high-throughput screening data from the ToxCast program, zebrafish developmental toxicity screens were conducted on the ToxCast Phase I (Padilla et al., 20...

  7. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies.

  8. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Phthalates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyche, J.L.; Gutleb, A.C.; Bergman, A.; Eriksen, G.S.; Murk, A.J.; Ropstad, E.; Saunders, M.; Skaare, J.U.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this review are to (1) evaluate human and experimental evidence for adverse effects on reproduction and development in humans, produced by exposure to phthalates, and (2) identify knowledge gaps as for future studies. The widespread use of phthalates in consumer products leads to ubi

  9. Developmental toxicity of UV filters and environmental exposure: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumpf, Margret; Durrer, Stefan; Faass, Oliver; Ehnes, Colin; Fuetsch, Michaela; Gaille, Catherine; Henseler, Manuel; Hofkamp, Luke; Maerkel, Kirsten; Reolon, Sasha; Timms, Barry; Tresguerres, Jesus A F; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2008-04-01

    Several ultraviolet (UV) filters exhibit estrogenic, some also anti-androgenic activity. They are present in waste water treatment plants, surface waters and biosphere including human milk, suggesting potential exposure during development. Developmental toxicity was studied in rats for the UV filters 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC, 0.7, 7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) and 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC, 0.07, 0.24, 0.7, 2.4, 7 mg/kg/day) administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during pregnancy and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. Neonates exhibited enhanced prostate growth after 4-MBC and altered uterine gene expression after both chemicals. 4-MBC and 3-BC delayed male puberty and affected reproductive organ weights of adult offspring. Effects on the thyroid axis were also noted. Expression and oestrogen sensitivity of oestrogen-regulated genes and nuclear receptor coregulator levels were altered at mRNA and protein levels in adult uterus, prostate and brain regions involved in gonadal control and sexual behaviour. Female sexual behaviour was impaired by both filters; 3-benzylidene camphor caused irregular cycles. Classical endpoints exhibited lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAELs) and no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) of 7/0.7 mg/kg for 4-MBC and 0.24/0.07 mg/kg for 3-BC. Molecular endpoints were affected by the lowest doses studied. Our data indicate that the potential risk posed by endocrine active UV filters warrants further investigations.

  10. A review of reproductive and developmental toxicity of silver nanoparticles in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Makoto; Okuda, Hirokazu; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2017-01-01

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in laboratory animals. AgNPs showed testicular/sperm toxicity in males and ovarian and embryonic toxicity in females. Maternal injection of AgNPs delayed physical development and impaired cognitive behavior in offspring. Ag was accumulated in the testes after administration of AgNPs. AgNPs were identified in the visceral yolk sac after administration during early gestation in mice. Radiolabeled AgNPs were detected in placenta, breast milk, and pre- and postnatal offspring after injection during late gestation in rats. Ag in the ionic form, and possibly also particles, was suggested to be bioavailable. Although this review provides initial information on the potential reproductive and developmental toxicity of AgNPs, data is still very limited. Further studies using state-of-the-art methodologies and the relevant routes and doses for human exposure are required.

  11. Developmental toxicity from exposure to various forms of mercury compounds in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wei, Lixin; Jingfeng, Yang; Chernick, Melissa; Hinton, David E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental toxicity of different mercury compounds, including some used in traditional medicines. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos were exposed to 0.001–10 µM concentrations of MeHg, HgCl2, α-HgS (Zhu Sha), and β-HgS (Zuotai) from stage 10 (6–7 hpf) to 10 days post fertilization (dpf). Of the forms of mercury in this study, the organic form (MeHg) proved the most toxic followed by inorganic mercury (HgCl2), both producing embryo developmental toxicity. Altered phenotypes included pericardial edema with elongated or tube heart, reduction of eye pigmentation, and failure of swim bladder inflation. Both α-HgS and β-HgS were less toxic than MeHg and HgCl2. Total RNA was extracted from survivors three days after exposure to MeHg (0.1 µM), HgCl2 (1 µM), α-HgS (10 µM), or β-HgS (10 µM) to examine toxicity-related gene expression. MeHg and HgCl2 markedly induced metallothionein (MT) and heme oxygenase-1 (Ho-1), while α-HgS and β-HgS failed to induce either gene. Chemical forms of mercury compounds proved to be a major determinant in their developmental toxicity. PMID:27635309

  12. Developmental toxicity from exposure to various forms of mercury compounds in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Dong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined developmental toxicity of different mercury compounds, including some used in traditional medicines. Medaka (Oryzias latipes embryos were exposed to 0.001–10 µM concentrations of MeHg, HgCl2, α-HgS (Zhu Sha, and β-HgS (Zuotai from stage 10 (6–7 hpf to 10 days post fertilization (dpf. Of the forms of mercury in this study, the organic form (MeHg proved the most toxic followed by inorganic mercury (HgCl2, both producing embryo developmental toxicity. Altered phenotypes included pericardial edema with elongated or tube heart, reduction of eye pigmentation, and failure of swim bladder inflation. Both α-HgS and β-HgS were less toxic than MeHg and HgCl2. Total RNA was extracted from survivors three days after exposure to MeHg (0.1 µM, HgCl2 (1 µM, α-HgS (10 µM, or β-HgS (10 µM to examine toxicity-related gene expression. MeHg and HgCl2 markedly induced metallothionein (MT and heme oxygenase-1 (Ho-1, while α-HgS and β-HgS failed to induce either gene. Chemical forms of mercury compounds proved to be a major determinant in their developmental toxicity.

  13. Pyridostigmine Synergistic Toxicity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-31

    AND DEET IN THE LABORATORY RAT 1. Executive Sum m ary .............................................................................................. 2 2...TOXICOLOGICAL STUDY 75-48-2665 ACUTE ORAL TOXICITY STUDY OF PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE. PERMETHRIN. AND DEET IN THE LABORATORY RAT 1. REFERENCES: See Appendix A... LABORATORY RAT 1. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine potential toxic interactions when pyridostigmine bromide. permethrin. and DEET are given

  14. Developmental toxicity evaluation of three hexabromocyclododecane diastereoisomers on zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Miaomiao [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Dandan; Yan Changzhou [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Zhang Xian, E-mail: xzhang@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Structural dissimilarities of hexabromocyclododecane diastereoisomers could raise substantial differences in physicochemical, biological and toxicological properties. In order to fully assess the environmental safety and health risk of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), zebrafish embryos were used to evaluate the developmental toxicity of individual HBCD diastereoisomers ({alpha}-HBCD, {beta}-HBCD and {gamma}-HBCD). Four-hour post-fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos were exposed to different concentrations of HBCD diastereoisomers (0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg/l) until 120 hpf. The results showed that exposure to HBCDs can affect the development of zebrafish embryos/larvae in a dose-dependent and diastereoselective manner. The diastereoisomers {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}-HBCD at 0.01 mg/l had little effect on the development of zebrafish embryos except that exposure to 0.01 mg/l {gamma}-HBCD significantly delayed hatching (P < 0.05). At 0.1 mg/l, {alpha}-HBCD resulted in depressed heart rate of larvae (96 hpf) and delayed hatching, whereas {beta}- and {gamma}-HBCD both caused significant hatching delay and growth inhibition (P < 0.05). In addition, a remarkable and significant increase in mortality and malformation rate was noted at 0.1 mg/l {gamma}-HBCD exposure groups (P < 0.05). At 1.0 mg/l, {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}-HBCD significantly affected all of the endpoints monitored (P < 0.05). Additionally, HBCD diastereoisomers could induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicated that HBCD diastereoisomers could cause developmental toxicity to zebrafish embryos through inducing apoptosis by ROS formation. The overall results showed a good agreement confirming that the order of developmental toxicity of HBCD diastereoisomers in zebrafish is {gamma}-HBCD > {beta}-HBCD > {alpha}-HBCD.

  15. Relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem cell test compared with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Gönen, S.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Verwei, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study determines the relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cell differentiation assay of the embryonic stem cell test, and compares the outcomes with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicit

  16. Developmental mechanisms of arsenite toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dan [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Lu Cailing [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Wang Ju; Hu Wei; Cao Zongfu; Sun Daguang [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xia Hongfei [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China); Ma Xu [Department of Genetics, National Research Institute for Family Planning, Beijing (China) and Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China) and Department of Reproductive Genetics, WHO Collaborative Center for Research in Human Reproduction, Beijing (China)], E-mail: genetic@263.net.cn

    2009-02-19

    Arsenic usually accumulates in soil, water and airborne particles, from which it is taken up by various organisms. Exposure to arsenic through food and drinking water is a major public health problem affecting some countries. At present there are limited laboratory data on the effects of arsenic exposure on early embryonic development and the mechanisms behind its toxicity. In this study, we used zebrafish as a model system to investigate the effects of arsenite on early development. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of sodium arsenite concentrations (0-10.0 mM) between 4 and 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Survival and early development of the embryos were not obviously influenced by arsenite concentrations below 0.5 mM. However, embryos exposed to higher concentrations (0.5-10.0 mM) displayed reduced survival and abnormal development including delayed hatching, retarded growth and changed morphology. Alterations in neural development included weak tactile responses to light (2.0-5.0 mM, 30 hpf), malformation of the spinal cord and disordered motor axon projections (2.0 mM, 48 hpf). Abnormal cardiac function was observed as bradycardia (0.5-2.0 mM, 60 hpf) and altered ventricular shape (2.0 mM, 48 hpf). Furthermore, altered cell proliferation (2.0 mM, 24 hpf) and apoptosis status (2.0 mM, 24 and 48 hpf), as well as abnormal genomic DNA methylation patterning (2.0 mM, 24 and 48 hpf) were detected in the arsenite-treated embryos. All of these indicate a possible relationship between arsenic exposure and developmental failure in early embryogenesis. Our studies suggest that the negative effects of arsenic on vertebrate embryogenesis are substantial.

  17. Fipronil-induced enantioselective developmental toxicity to zebrafish embryo-larvae involves changes in DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi; Wang, Cui; Wang, Jinghua; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Meirong; Lu, Chensheng

    2017-05-23

    Enantioselectivity in the aquatic toxicity of chiral pesticides has been widely investigated, while the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Thus far, few studies has focused on genomic expression related to selective toxicity in chiral pesticide, nor on epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation. Here, we used fipronil, a broad-spectrum insecticide, as a model chemical to probe its enantioselective toxicity in embryo development. Our results showed that S-(+)-fipronil caused severer developmental toxicity in embryos. The MeDIP-Seq analysis demonstrated that S-(+)-fipronil dysregulated a higher level of genomic DNA methylation than R-(-)-fipronil. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that S-(+)-fipronil caused more differentially methylated genes that are involved in developmental processes. Compared with R-(-)-fipronil, S-(+)-fipronil significantly disrupted 7 signaling pathways (i.e., mitogen-activated protein kinases, tight junctions, focal adhesion, transforming growth factor-β, vascular smooth muscle contraction, and the hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways) by hyper-methylation of developmentally related genes, which further induced the downregulation of those genes. Together, these data suggest that differences in DNA methylation may partly explain the enantioselectivity of fipronil to zebrafish embryos. The application of epigenetics to investigate the enantioselective toxicity mechanism of chiral chemicals would provide a further understanding of their stereoselectivity biological effects.

  18. Embryonic exposure to butachlor in zebrafish (Danio rerio): endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenqing; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping; Xu, Chao

    2013-03-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide widely employed in weeding important crops. Recently, the study of the possible toxic effects of butachlor in non-target organisms has increased substantially. However, the endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity effects of butachlor in fish have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of butachlor concentrations from 4 to 20 μM to evaluate the embryonic toxicity of butachlor until 84 hours postfertilization (hpf). The results demonstrated that butachlor was highly toxic to zebrafish embryos, hindering the hatching process, resulting in a series of malformations and followed by mortality. The malformations observed included pericardial edema (PE) and yolk sac edema (YSE), which showed concentration-dependent responses. The analysis of endocrine gene transcription indicated that butachlor significantly induced the expression of the estrogen-responsive gene Vtg1 but had no effect on the expression of the ERα gene. The innate immune system appeared to be another possible target of butachlor. At 72 hpf, butachlor significantly up-regulated the innate immune system-related genes, including IL-1β, CC-chem, CXCL-C1c and IL-8. These data suggest that butachlor causes developmental toxicity, endocrine disruption and immune toxicity in the zebrafish embryo. Bidirectional interactions between the endocrine system and the immune system might be present, and further studies are needed to determine these possible pathways.

  19. Comparative developmental toxicity of environmentally relevant oxygenated PAHs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Andrea L., E-mail: andrea.knecht@tanguaylab.com [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, the Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Goodale, Britton C., E-mail: goodaleb@onid.orst.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, the Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Truong, Lisa, E-mail: lisa.truong.888@gmail.com [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, the Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Simonich, Michael T., E-mail: mtsimonich@oregonstate.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, the Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Swanson, Annika J., E-mail: swansoan@onid.orst.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, the Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Matzke, Melissa M., E-mail: melissa.matzke@pnl.gov [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Kim A., E-mail: kim.anderson@oregonstate.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, the Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Waters, Katrina M., E-mail: katrina.waters@pnl.gov [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Tanguay, Robert L., E-mail: robert.tanguay@oregonstate.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, the Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) are byproducts of combustion and photo-oxidation of parent PAHs. OPAHs are widely present in the environment and pose an unknown hazard to human health. The developing zebrafish was used to evaluate a structurally diverse set of 38 OPAHs for malformation induction, gene expression changes and mitochondrial function. Zebrafish embryos were exposed from 6 to 120 h post fertilization (hpf) to a dilution series of 38 different OPAHs and evaluated for 22 developmental endpoints. AHR activation was determined via CYP1A immunohistochemistry. Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PHEQ), 1,9-benz-10-anthrone (BEZO), xanthone (XAN), benz(a)anthracene-7,12-dione (7,12-B[a]AQ), and 9,10-anthraquinone (9,10-ANTQ) were evaluated for transcriptional responses at 48 hpf, prior to the onset of malformations. qRT-PCR was conducted for a number of oxidative stress genes, including the glutathione transferase(gst), glutathione peroxidase(gpx), and superoxide dismutase(sod) families. Bioenergetics was assayed to measure in vivo oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in 26 hpf embryos exposed to OPAHs. Hierarchical clustering of the structure-activity outcomes indicated that the most toxic of the OPAHs contained adjacent diones on 6-carbon moieties or terminal, para-diones on multi-ring structures. 5-carbon moieties with adjacent diones were among the least toxic OPAHs while the toxicity of multi-ring structures with more centralized para-diones varied considerably. 9,10-PHEQ, BEZO, 7,12-B[a]AQ, and XAN exposures increased expression of several oxidative stress related genes and decreased oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a measurement of mitochondrial respiration. Comprehensive in vivo characterization of 38 structurally diverse OPAHs indicated differential AHR dependency and a prominent role for oxidative stress in the toxicity mechanisms. - Highlights: • OPAHs are byproducts of combustion present in the environment. • OPAHs pose a largely

  20. Developmental toxicity of cypermethrin in embryo-larval stages of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiangguo; Gu, Aihua; Ji, Guixiang; Li, Yuan; Di, Jing; Jin, Jing; Hu, Fan; Long, Yan; Xia, Yankai; Lu, Chuncheng; Song, Ling; Wang, Shoulin; Wang, Xinru

    2011-10-01

    Cypermethrin, a type II pyrethroid insecticide, is widely used throughout the world in agriculture, forestry, horticulture and homes. Though the neurotoxicity of cypermethrin has been thoroughly studied in adult rodents, little is so far available regarding the developmental toxicity of cypermethrin to fish in early life stages. To explore the potential developmental toxicity of cypermethrin, 4-h post-fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos were exposed to various concentrations of cypermethrin (0, 25, 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg L⁻¹) until 96 h. Among a suite of morphological abnormalities, the unique phenotype curvature was observed at concentrations as low as 25 μg L⁻¹. Studies revealed that 400 μg L⁻¹ cypermethrin significantly increased malondialdehyde production. In addition, activity of antioxidative enzymes including superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly induced in zebrafish larvae in a concentration-dependent manner. To further investigate the toxic effects of cypermethrin on fish, acridine orange (AO) staining was performed at 400 μg L⁻¹ cypermethrin and the result showed notable signs of apoptosis mainly in the nervous system. Cypermethrin also down-regulated ogg1 and increased p53 gene expression as well as the caspase-3 activity. Our results demonstrate that cypermethrin was able to induce oxidative stress and produce apoptosis through the involvement of caspases in zebrafish embryos. In this study, we investigated the developmental toxicity of cypermethrin using zebrafish embryos, which could be helpful in fully understanding the potential mechanisms of cypermethrin exposure during embryogenesis and also suggested that zebrafish could serve as an ideal model for studying developmental toxicity of environmental contaminants.

  1. Enhancement of developmental toxicity effects of chemicals by gestational stress. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin S; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2007-01-01

    Risk assessment of developmental toxicants is almost exclusively based on single chemicals studied in animals under controlled experimental conditions, as to reduce stress. Although humans may be exposed simultaneously to numerous hazards, little is known about the interaction of prenatal chemica...... studies are recommended to investigate compounds, for which maternal stress was already proven as an enhancer, at lower dose levels. Interactive response seems to depend on stressor severity and timing of chemical exposure relative to maternal stress which should be further scrutinized....

  2. Integrating (Q)SAR models, expert systems and read-across approaches for the prediction of developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, M; Ellison, C M; Enoch, S J; Madden, J C; Cronin, M T D

    2010-08-01

    It has been estimated that reproductive and developmental toxicity tests will account for a significant proportion of the testing costs associated with REACH compliance. Consequently, the use of alternative methods to predict developmental toxicity is an attractive prospect. The present study evaluates a number of computational models and tools which can be used to aid assessment of developmental toxicity potential. The performance and limitations of traditional (quantitative) structure-activity relationship ((Q)SARs) modelling, structural alert-based expert system prediction and chemical profiling approaches are discussed. In addition, the use of category formation and read-across is also addressed. This study demonstrates the limited success of current modelling methods when used in isolation. However, the study also indicates that when used in combination, in a weight-of-evidence approach, better use may be made of the limited toxicity data available and predictivity improved. Recommendations are provided as to how this area could be further developed in the future.

  3. Taking action on developmental toxicity: Scientists’ duties to protect children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrader-Frechette Kristin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although adaptation and proper biological functioning require developmental programming, pollutant interference can cause developmental toxicity or DT. Objectives This commentary assesses whether it is ethical for citizens/physicians/scientists to allow avoidable DT. Methods Using conceptual, economic, ethical, and logical analysis, the commentary assesses what major ethical theories and objectors would say regarding the defensibility of allowing avoidable DT. Results The commentary argues that (1 none of the four major ethical theories (based, respectively, on virtue, natural law, utility, or equity can consistently defend avoidable DT because it unjustifiably harms, respectively, individual human flourishing, human life, the greatest good, and equality. (2 Justice also requires leaving “as much and as good” biological resources for all, including future generations possibly harmed if epigenetic change is heritable. (3 Scientists/physicians have greater justice-based duties, than ordinary/average citizens, to help stop DT because they help cause it and have greater professional abilities/opportunities to help stop it. (4 Scientists/physicians likewise have greater justice-based duties, than ordinary/average citizens, to help stop DT because they benefit more from it, given their relatively greater education/consumption/income. The paper shows that major objections to (3-(4 fail on logical, ethical, or scientific grounds, then closes with practical suggestions for implementing its proposals. Conclusions Because allowing avoidable DT is ethically indefensible, citizens---and especially physicians/scientists---have justice-based duties to help stop DT.

  4. Enantioselective developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity of pyraclofos toward zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Shulin, E-mail: shulin@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Organic Pollution Process and Control, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhang, Zhisheng [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhang, Wenjing; Bao, Lingling [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Organic Pollution Process and Control, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Chao, E-mail: chaoxu@zjut.edu.cn [Research Center of Environmental Science, College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Zhang, Hu [Institute of Quality and Standard for Agro-products, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou 210021 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Pyraclofos has significant enantioselective aquatic toxicities to zebrafish. • Pyraclofos induces time- and concentration-dependent developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity. • The mRNA level of IL-1β gene was significantly up-regulated by pyraclofos. • Pyraclofos binds potently to IL-1β, potentially affecting IL-1β-dependent proinflammatory signal transduction. • Our in vitro and in silico studies help to understand the molecular basis for aquatic toxicity of pyraclofos. - Abstract: Pyraclofos, a relatively new organophosphorus pesticide, has shown potential ecotoxicities, however, its aquatic toxicity, especially enantioselective aquatic toxicity, remains largely unknown. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a preeminent vertebrate aquatic model, the enantioselective differences in the developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity of pyraclofos were evaluated. Following 96-h exposure, pyraclofos enantiomers exhibited acute toxicity and showed lethal concentration 50 of 2.23 and 3.99 mg/L for (R)-Pyraclofos and (S)-Pyraclofos, respectively. Exposure to pyraclofos caused time- and concentration-dependent malformations such as pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, crooked bodies and hatching during the embryonic development, with markedly higher percentages of malformation at higher concentrations. The concentration-dependent immunotoxicity to zebrafish embryo exposed to low level pyraclofos was induced with significant up-regulation of mRNA levels of immune-related interleukin-1β (IL-1β) gene. (R)-Pyraclofos was consistently more toxic than (S)-Pyraclofos for the acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity to zebrafish. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that at the atomic level, (R)-Pyraclofos binds more potently to IL-1β protein than (S)-Pyraclofos. This enantioselective binding is mainly contributed by the distinct binding mode of pyraclofos enantiomers and their electrostatic interactions with IL-1β, which potentially

  5. A systematic evaluation of chemicals in hydraulic-fracturing fluids and wastewater for reproductive and developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Elise G; Ettinger, Adrienne S; Leaderer, Brian P; Bracken, Michael B; Deziel, Nicole C

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic-fracturing fluids and wastewater from unconventional oil and natural gas development contain hundreds of substances with the potential to contaminate drinking water. Challenges to conducting well-designed human exposure and health studies include limited information about likely etiologic agents. We systematically evaluated 1021 chemicals identified in hydraulic-fracturing fluids (n=925), wastewater (n=132), or both (n=36) for potential reproductive and developmental toxicity to triage those with potential for human health impact. We searched the REPROTOX database using Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers for chemicals with available data and evaluated the evidence for adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Next, we determined which chemicals linked to reproductive or developmental toxicity had water quality standards or guidelines. Toxicity information was lacking for 781 (76%) chemicals. Of the remaining 240 substances, evidence suggested reproductive toxicity for 103 (43%), developmental toxicity for 95 (40%), and both for 41 (17%). Of these 157 chemicals, 67 had or were proposed for a federal water quality standard or guideline. Our systematic screening approach identified a list of 67 hydraulic fracturing-related candidate analytes based on known or suspected toxicity. Incorporation of data on potency, physicochemical properties, and environmental concentrations could further prioritize these substances for future drinking water exposure assessments or reproductive and developmental health studies.

  6. Enhancing the applicability and predictability of the embryonic stem cell test for developmental toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, E.

    2012-01-01

    Within the full risk assessment of a chemical, developmental toxicity testing is one of the endpoints that require the highest percentage of experimental animals. With the high number of experimental animals, cost and time involved in in vivo developmental toxicity testing there is an urgent need

  7. Developmental toxicity of Clarified Slurry Oil applied dermally to rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuston, M.H.; Kerstetter, S.L.; Singer, E.J.; Mehlman, M.A. (Mobil Oil Corporation, Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Clarified Slurry Oil (CSO), the heavy residual fraction from the fluidized catalytic cracker, was applied to the shaven backs of groups of 10 pregnant rats at doses of 0, 4, 8, 30, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day. All groups received the test material on gestation days 0-19. CSO was applied undiluted and left uncovered on the skin; collars were placed on the rats to minimize ingestion of the test material. Signs of maternal toxicity, some of which were seen at dose levels as low as 8 mg/kg/day, included vaginal bleeding, decreased body weight gain, reduced food consumption, death, increased relative liver weights, atrophy of the thymus, and aberrant serum chemistry. The number of fetal resorptions/deaths was markedly increased and the number of viable offspring decreased by CSO at dosages of 30 mg/kg/day and above. The group receiving 250 mg/kg/day carried no viable offspring. Fetuses from pregnant females exposed to CSO at dose levels in excess of 8 mg/kg/day were smaller than those from control and 4 mg/kg/day groups, and their skeletons showed decreased ossification. Abnormal external development and visceral development were observed in living and dead fetuses exposed in utero to CSO at dose levels as low as 8 mg/kg/day. Based on these data, 4 mg/kg/day represents the No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Level for both maternal and developmental toxicity.

  8. Enantioselective developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity of pyraclofos toward zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Wenjing; Bao, Lingling; Xu, Chao; Zhang, Hu

    2015-02-01

    Pyraclofos, a relatively new organophosphorus pesticide, has shown potential ecotoxicities, however, its aquatic toxicity, especially enantioselective aquatic toxicity, remains largely unknown. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a preeminent vertebrate aquatic model, the enantioselective differences in the developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity of pyraclofos were evaluated. Following 96-h exposure, pyraclofos enantiomers exhibited acute toxicity and showed lethal concentration 50 of 2.23 and 3.99 mg/L for (R)-Pyraclofos and (S)-Pyraclofos, respectively. Exposure to pyraclofos caused time- and concentration-dependent malformations such as pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, crooked bodies and hatching during the embryonic development, with markedly higher percentages of malformation at higher concentrations. The concentration-dependent immunotoxicity to zebrafish embryo exposed to low level pyraclofos was induced with significant up-regulation of mRNA levels of immune-related interleukin-1β (IL-1β) gene. (R)-Pyraclofos was consistently more toxic than (S)-Pyraclofos for the acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity to zebrafish. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that at the atomic level, (R)-Pyraclofos binds more potently to IL-1β protein than (S)-Pyraclofos. This enantioselective binding is mainly contributed by the distinct binding mode of pyraclofos enantiomers and their electrostatic interactions with IL-1β, which potentially affects IL-1β-dependent proinflammatory signal transduction. Our in vitro and in silico studies provided a better insight into the molecular basis for aquatic toxicity and thus improved the risk assessment for pyraclofos and other chiral organophosphorus pesticides.

  9. Evaluation of 90 day repeated dose oral toxicity and reproductive/developmental toxicity of 3'-hydroxypterostilbene in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Muhammed; Bani, Sarang; Natarajan, Sankaran; Pandey, Anjali; S, Naveed

    2017-01-01

    3'-Hydroxypterostilbene (3'-HPT) is one of the active constituents of Sphaerophysa salsula and Pterocarpus marsupium. Despite many proposed therapeutic applications, the safety profile of 3'-HPT has not been established. The present work investigated 90 day repeated oral dose and reproductive (developmental) toxicity of 3'-HPT as a test substance in rats as per OECD guidelines. 90 day toxicity was conducted in sixty Sprague Dawley rats of each sex (120 rats), grouped into six dosage groups of 0 (control), 0 (control recovery), 20 (low dose), 80 (mid dose), 200 (high dose) and 200 (high dose recovery) mg/kg bwt/day (body weight/day) respectively. For the reproductive toxicity study forty Wistar rats of each sex (80 rats) divided into four dosage groups received 0 (vehicle control), 20 (low dose), 100 (mid dose) and 200 (high dose) mg/kg bwt/day of 3'-HPT respectively for a period of two weeks while pre-mating, mating, on the day before sacrifice, in females during pregnancy and four days of lactation period. Results showed no significant differences in body weight, food intake, absolute organ weight, haematology, with no adverse effects (toxicity) on biochemical values nor any abnormal clinical signs or behavioural changes were observed in any of the control/treatment groups, including reproductive and developmental parameters, gross and histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested a No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Level (NOAEL) of 200 mg/kg bwt/day in rats after oral administration, implying 3'-HPT did not exhibit any toxicity under the study conditions employed.

  10. The embryonic stem cell test combined with toxicogenomics as an alternative testing model for the assessment of developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dartel, Dorien A M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2011-09-01

    One of the most studied in vitro alternative testing methods for identification of developmental toxicity is the embryonic stem cell test (EST). Although the EST has been formally validated, the applicability domain as well as the predictability of the model needs further study to allow successful implementation of the EST as an alternative testing method in regulatory toxicity testing. Genomics technologies have already provided a proof of principle of their value in identification of toxicants such as carcinogenic compounds. Also within the EST, gene expression profiling has shown its value in the identification of developmental toxicity and in the evaluation of factors critical for risk assessment, such as dose and time responses. It is expected that the implementation of genomics into the EST will provide a more detailed end point evaluation as compared to the classical morphological scoring of differentiation cultures. Therefore, genomics may contribute to improvement of the EST, both in terms of definition of its applicability domain as well as its predictive capacity. In the present review, we present the progress that has been made with regard to the prediction of developmental toxicity using the EST combined with transcriptomics. Furthermore, we discuss the developments of additional aspects required for further optimization of the EST, including kinetics, the use of human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and computational toxicology. Finally, the current and future use of the EST model for prediction of developmental toxicity in testing strategies and in regulatory toxicity evaluations is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of repeated dose (90 day oral toxicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity and mutagenic potential of ‘Calebin A’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Majeed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigated repeated dose and reproductive toxicity of Calebin A in Wistar rats. A study for assessing the mutagenic potential of Calebin A through an AMES test is also described. Calebin A was orally administered to groups of 10 male and/or 10 female Wistar rats each, assigned to three dose levels (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg/body weight once daily for 90 consecutive days. None of the animals in any of the treatment/control groups exhibited any abnormal clinical signs/behavioral changes, reproductive as well as developmental parameters, or gross and microscopic changes in both male and female rats. Calebin A was also evaluated for its ability to induce reverse mutations at selected loci of Salmonella typhimurium in the presence and absence of Aroclor 1254 induced rat liver S9 cell lines. In conclusion, 100 mg/kg/d of Calebin A is not likely to produce any significant toxic effects in male and female Wistar rats and no reproductive or developmental toxicity was observed at the same dose and hence Calebin A at 100 mg/kg was determined as “No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL” under the test conditions.

  12. Developmental toxicity of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (PPD10558) in rats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faqi, Ali S; Prohaska, David; Lopez, Rocio; McIntyre, Gail

    2012-02-01

    PPD10558 is an orally active, lipid-lowering 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statin) being developed as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia in patients who have not been able to tolerate statins because of statin-associated myalgia. We have studied the potential developmental toxicity effects of PPD10558 in pregnant rats and rabbits given daily oral doses during the period of organogenesis. Rats were dosed with 0, 20, 80, or 320 mg/kg/day from Gestation Day (GD) 6 to 17 and rabbits received dose levels of 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg/day from GD 6 to 18. Additional groups in both studies served as toxicokinetic animals and received the PPD10558 in the same manner as the main study groups at the same dose levels. Blood samples were collected from toxicokinetic animals at designated time points on GD 6 and 17 in rats and GD 6 and 18 in rabbits. Fetal exposure in rats was assessed on GD 20. Maternal and developmental parameters were evaluated in rats and rabbits on GD 20 and GD 29, respectively. No maternal and developmental toxicity was observed at any of the dose levels used in the rat study. Evidence of fetal exposure was determined in fetal plasma with mean fetal concentrations of PPD10558 and the metabolite (PPD11901) found to be between 1 and 6% of the mean maternal concentrations. In rabbits, marked maternal toxicity including mortality (eight deaths; 1 dose at 25 and 7 at 50 mg/kg/day), abortions (2 at 25 mg/kg/day and 6 at 50 mg/kg/day) and reduction in gestation body weight, gestation body weight changes and decreased food consumption were observed. In addition, fetal body weights of the combined sexes were significantly reduced at 50 mg/kg/day in comparison with the controls. Mean peak exposure (Cmax) and total exposure (AUC(0-24)) of PPD11901 in both rats and rabbits were higher than that of PPD10558 on GD 6 and GD 17 at each of the three dose levels.. Based on the results of these studies, the no observed adverse effect

  13. Lack of selective developmental toxicity of three butanol isomers administered by inhalation to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B K; Brightwell, W S; Khan, A; Burg, J R; Goad, P T

    1989-04-01

    As part of an ongoing study of the developmental toxicology of industrial alcohols, this report presents the results of the teratology assessments of 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and t-butanol administered by inhalation to rats. Groups of approximately 15 Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed at 8000, 6000, 3500, or 0 ppm 1-butanol, 7000, 5000, 3500, or 0 ppm 2-butanol, or 5000, 3500, 2000, or 0 ppm t-butanol for 7 hr/day on Gestation Days 1-19 (sperm = 0). In each case, the highest concentration was selected to produce maternal toxicity. Dams were sacrificed on Gestation Day 20, and fetuses were individually weighed, tagged, and examined for external malformations. One-half of the fetuses were stained and examined for skeletal abnormalities, and the other half were examined for visceral defects using the Wilson technique. For each butanol isomer examined, the highest concentration (and the intermediate in some cases) was maternally toxic, as manifest by reduced weight gain and feed intake. Even at a maternally toxic dose, and in spite of a dose-dependent reduction in fetal weights for each isomer, the only teratogenicity observed was a slight increase in skeletal malformations (primarily rudimentary cervical ribs), seen with the highest concentration of 1-butanol. Thus, although teratogenicity was observed at 8000 ppm 1-butanol, and developmental toxicity was observed with each of the butyl alcohol isomers studied, concentrations 50 times the current permissible exposure limits for these three butanol isomers do not produce teratogenicity in rats.

  14. Specific Association of Teratogen and Toxicant Metals in Hair of Newborns with Congenital Birth Defects or Developmentally Premature Birth in a Cohort of Couples with Documented Parental Exposure to Military Attacks: Observational Study at Al Shifa Hospital, Gaza, Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Manduca

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken in Gaza, Palestine, in a cohort of babies born in 2011. Hair samples of newborns were analyzed for metal load by DRC-ICP-MS. We report specific level of contamination by teratogen/toxicants metals of newborn babies, environmentally unexposed, according to their phenotypes at birth: normal full term babies, birth defects or developmentally premature. The occurrence of birth defects was previously shown to be correlated in this cohort to documented exposure of parents to weapons containing metal contaminants, during attacks in 2009. We detect, in significantly higher amounts than in normal babies, different specific teratogen or toxicant elements, known weapons’ components, characteristic for each of birth defect or premature babies. This is the first attempt to our knowledge to directly link a phenotype at birth with the in utero presence of specific teratogen and/or toxicant metals in a cohort with known episodes of acute exposure of parents to environmental contamination by these same metals, in this case delivered by weaponry The babies were conceived 20–25 months after the major known parental exposure; the specific link of newborn phenotypes to war-remnant metal contaminants, suggests that mothers’ contamination persists in time, and that the exposure may have a long term effect.

  15. Developmental Toxicity of Carbon Quantum Dots to the Embryos/Larvae of Rare Minnow (Gobiocypris rarus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Zeng, Yu-Lian

    2016-01-01

    The toxic effects of CDs on rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) embryos at different developmental stages were investigated. The results showed that rare minnow embryos had decreased spontaneous movements, body length, increased heart rate, pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, tail/spinal curvature, various morphological malformations, and decreased hatching rate. Biochemical analysis showed the CDs exposure significantly inhibited the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase and increased the MDA contents and the activity of SOD, CAT, and GPX. Further examination suggested that the CDs exposure induced serious embryonic cellular DNA damage. Moreover, the CDs exposure induced upregulation of development related genes (Wnt8a and Mstn) along with the downregulation of Vezf1. Overall, the present study revealed that the CDs exposure has significant development toxicity on rare minnow embryos/larvae. Mechanistically, this toxicity might result from the pressure of induced oxidative stress coordinate with the dysregulated development related gene expression mediated by the CDs exposure. PMID:27872851

  16. Developmental Toxicity of Carbon Quantum Dots to the Embryos/Larvae of Rare Minnow (Gobiocypris rarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The toxic effects of CDs on rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus embryos at different developmental stages were investigated. The results showed that rare minnow embryos had decreased spontaneous movements, body length, increased heart rate, pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, tail/spinal curvature, various morphological malformations, and decreased hatching rate. Biochemical analysis showed the CDs exposure significantly inhibited the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase and increased the MDA contents and the activity of SOD, CAT, and GPX. Further examination suggested that the CDs exposure induced serious embryonic cellular DNA damage. Moreover, the CDs exposure induced upregulation of development related genes (Wnt8a and Mstn along with the downregulation of Vezf1. Overall, the present study revealed that the CDs exposure has significant development toxicity on rare minnow embryos/larvae. Mechanistically, this toxicity might result from the pressure of induced oxidative stress coordinate with the dysregulated development related gene expression mediated by the CDs exposure.

  17. Assessing developmental toxicity and estrogenic activity of halogenated bisphenol A on zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Maoyong; Liang, Dong; Liang, Yong; Chen, Minjie; Wang, Fengbang; Wang, Hailin; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-10-01

    Halogenated bisphenol A (H-BPAs), widely used in industrial production, have been identified in various environmental matrices and detected in human serum and breast milk. The persistence and prevalence of H-BPAs in the environment underscore the need to in-depth understand their adverse effects to humans and other organisms. In the present study, zebrafish embryos/larvae were used as models to investigate the developmental toxicities of three H-BPAs, namely tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrachlorobisphenol A (TCBPA), and bisphenol AF (BPAF). The half lethal concentration (LC50) values indicated that the rank order of toxicities of the chemicals were TCBPA>TBBPA>BPAF. Three H-BPAs exposure resulted in a variety of developmental lesions in the embryos/larvae, such as a delay in time to hatch, edema, and hemorrhage. The estrogenic activities of H-BPAs were determined by means of in vivo vitellogenin (vtg) assay and in vitro MVLN assay. Here only BPAF specifically shows a stronger estrogenic activity than BPA both in in vivo and in vitro. These data suggest that TCBPA, TBBPA, and BPAF are more potent toxicants than BPA, and indicate that further research of the mechanisms on their toxicities is required.

  18. Reproductive and developmental toxicity of amitraz in sprague-dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Kang-Hyeon; Park, Na-Hyeong; Shin, In-Sik; Moon, Changjong; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2010-03-01

    The present study was conducted to obtain information on the effects of amitraz on reproductive and developmental parameters in rats. The test chemical was administered via the drinking water containing 0, 40, 120, and 360 ppm to male rats from 2 weeks before mating to the end of 14-day mating period and to females from 2 weeks before mating, throughout mating, gestation and up to lactational day 4. During the study period, clinical signs, body weights, food intake, organ weights, reproductive and littering findings, necropsy findings, sperm parameters, and histopathology were examined. At 360 ppm, decreases in the body weight gain, food consumption, and the number of live pups and an increase in the post-implantation loss were observed. In addition, decreases in the seminal vesicle weight and sperm motility were found in males. At 120 ppm, a decrease in the food consumption was found transiently in both males and females, but no reproductive and developmental toxicity was observed in both sexes. There were no signs of either general or reproductive and developmental toxicity in the 40 ppm group. Based on these results, it was concluded that the repeated oral administration of amitraz to rats resulted in a decrease in the food consumption at 120 ppm and decreases in the seminal vesicle weight, sperm motility, and the number of live pups and an increase in the post-implantation loss at 360 ppm in rats. Under these experimental conditions, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of amitraz for general and reproduction/developmental toxicity was believed to be 120 ppm, and the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of amitraz was believed to be 40 ppm in rats.

  19. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Raftery, Tara D. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M. [Division of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Volz, David C., E-mail: volz@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Triphenyl phosphate-induced toxicity in zebrafish embryos is enhanced in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate uptake or metabolism within zebrafish embryos is not altered in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate decreases expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 in zebrafish embryos. • Triphenyl phosphate inhibits retinoic acid-induced activation of human retinoic acid receptors. - Abstract: Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5–72 h post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite – were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may

  20. Light catalytically cracked naphtha: subchronic toxicity of vapors in rats and mice and developmental toxicity screen in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbey, W E; Feuston, M H; Yang, J J; Kommineni, C V; Roy, T A

    1996-01-01

    Both a subchronic inhalation study and a developmental toxicity screen were performed with vapors of light catalytically cracked naphtha (LCCN). In the subchronic study, four groups of mice and rats (10 animals per sex per species) were exposed for approximately 13 wk (6 h/d, 5 d/wk) to concentrations of LCCN vapors of 0, 530, 2060, or 7690 mg/m3. An untreated control group was also included. Animals were observed daily and body weights were taken weekly. No significant treatment-related changes were found in clinical signs, body weight, serum chemistry, hematology, histopathology of 24 tissues, or weights of 12 organs. A marginal decrease was noted in the number of sperm per gram of epididymis. In the developmental toxicity screen, presumed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 2150, or 7660 mg/m3 of LCCN vapors, 6 h/d on d 0-19 of gestation. Females were sacrificed on d 20; dams and fetuses were examined grossly and fetuses were later evaluated for skeletal and visceral effects. The number of resorptions was increased by approximately 140% in the group receiving 7660 mg/m3; no other definite treatment-related changes were observed. Overall, the effects of exposure to partially vaporized LCCN were minimal.

  1. Application of the tukey trend test procedure to assess developmental and reproductive toxicity. I. Measurement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, J M; Clark, R L; Heyse, J F

    1993-07-01

    Developmental and reproductive (DAR) toxicity studies typically include a series of increasing doses of a compound and a zero dose control. Given this framework, Tukey et al. (Biometrics, 41, 295-301, 1985) proposed a procedure (referred to as either the Tukey trend or TCH test procedure) for detecting a nonzero trend in response to increasing doses of the test compound. The procedure considers three candidate dosage scalings to ensure high power against relatively common dose-response patterns and appreciable power against most reasonable patterns. For toxicologic effects with near monotonic dose-response patterns, simulation studies have shown the TCH test to be overall more powerful than pairwise comparison procedures. The TCH test can be applied sequentially, eliminating the highest dose each time a statistically significant trend is observed, until a no-statistical-significance-of-trend dose is reached. This is the highest dose through which there is no statistically trustworthy evidence of the compound's impact on the response. Since DAR toxicity usually exhibits a progressive (monotonic) dose-response, we advocate routine use of Tukey's trend test for the evaluation of treatment effects in these studies. In this article, we discuss the procedure in detail and apply it to fetal body weight, a continuous measurement variable, from a developmental toxicity study.

  2. Review of Systems Biology Approach to Study on Developmental Toxicity Mechanism of Environmental Pollutants%环境污染物发育毒性机制研究的系统生物学方法进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐挺; 赵静; 胡霞林; 尹大强

    2011-01-01

    基因调控网络(gene regulatory network,GRN)是用于研究基因调控的一种新兴的系统生物学方法,尤其适合描述生物体早期发育的调控系统和机制.由于它能体现出调控过程的网络特性和动态关系,从整体的角度全面审视环境扰动所造成的真实影响,因此有望在内分泌干扰物等环境污染物的发育毒性机制研究中发挥重要作用,解决多年来一直困扰相关研究的种种难题.针对基因调控网络的结构、研究方法、应用成果和案例进行综述,并对将这一方法应用于污染物发育毒性机制研究的前景做出展望.%Gene regulatory network (GRN) was a novel systematical biology approach for the study on gene regulation mechanism, especially helpful in describing the early development of animal body. Because GRNs can present the networks and dynamics of regulatory processing and the true impacts from the environmental perturbation, they were expected to play a key role in studying developmental toxicity mechanisms of environmental pollutants including endocrine disrupting chemicals with resolving many problems which existed for a long time. The structures, methodologies, current application cases of GRNs are rewiewed. The application of GRNs into mechanism researches of developmental toxicity of pollutants is previewed in this paper.

  3. Reproductive and developmental toxicity of toluene: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald, J.M.; Hooper, K.; Hopenhayn-Rich, C. (California Dept. of Health Services, Sacramento (United States))

    1991-08-01

    Toulene is a widely used industrial solvent, and humans may also have high exposures to toulene from the deliberate inhalation (sniffing) of paint reducer, paint thinner, or paint for their narcotic effects. A number of case reports describe neonatal effects that have been attributed to toulene abuse during pregnancy. These effects may include intrauterine growth retardation, premature delivery, congenital malformations, and postnatal developmental retardation. The possibility of exposures to other fetotoxic agents, either as impurities or admixtures in toulene-containing products, or by deliberate or accidental exposures to other chemicals or drugs, cannot be excluded in these cases. The fetotoxic effects of toulene have been demonstrated in controlled studies in animals and are comparable to those observed in humans who have abused toulene-containing products before or during pregnancy. Intrauterine developmental retardation is the most clearly established effect in animals, as evidenced by decreased late fetal weight and retarded skeletal development. There is also limited evidence in rodents for skeletal and kidney abnormalities, as well as some evidence for effects on postnatal physical and possibly neurobehavioral development. Estimated daily exposures from experimental studies in animals are compared to estimated human daily intakes at the occupational permissible exposure level and at the level reported to produce euphoria in humans. Acceptable human intakes under California's Proposition 65 and under US Environmental Protection Agency procedures are discussed.

  4. Phenanthrene causes ocular developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos and the possible mechanisms involved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lixing [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Chonggang [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Zhang, Youyu; Wu, Meifang [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zuo, Zhenghong, E-mail: zuozhenghong@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Phe exposure caused obvious morphological changes in the retina. • Phe exposure caused apoptosis and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. • Phe causes ocular toxicity might be via the AhR/Zeb1/Mitf/Pax6 signaling pathway. • AhR is a repressor of Zeb1. -- Abstract: Recent studies show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be a candidate cause of developmental defects of the retina, but the mechanism is still unclear. We evaluated the mechanism(s) underlying PAH-induced retinal development defects due to exposure to environmental concentrations of Phenanthrene (Phe) in zebrafish. We found that exposure to environmental concentrations of Phe caused obvious morphological changes, developmental retardation, apoptosis, and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. Our results indicated that Phe could cause visual system developmental defects. Phe exposure up-regulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mtif) expression, and down-regulated zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (Zeb1) and paired box 6 (Pax6). Moreover, we demonstrated that AhR was a repressor of Zeb1. We propose that Phe's ocular toxicity is mediated by up-regulating AhR, which then down-regulates Zeb1, in turn inducing Mitf expression while inhibiting Pax6 expression.

  5. 40 CFR 799.9355 - TSCA reproduction/developmental toxicity screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true TSCA reproduction/developmental toxicity screening test. 799.9355 Section 799.9355 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... developmental defects should not be used. Healthy virgin animals, not subjected to previous...

  6. Ethyl t-butyl ether: review of reproductive and developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Peyster, Ann

    2010-06-01

    Ethyl t-butyl ether (ETBE) is a motor fuel oxygenate used in reformulated gasoline. Knowledge of developmental and reproductive toxicity potential of ETBE is critical for making informed decisions about acceptance and regulations. This review discusses toxicology studies providing information about effects on reproduction and the conceptus. Seven GLP-compliant studies following widely accepted protocols have focused specifically on developmental and reproductive toxicity (DART) in rats and rabbits exposed to ETBE by gavage with doses up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight/day, the limit specified in standardized test guidelines. Other repeat-dose general toxicology studies have administered ETBE to rodents for up to 180 days, and included reproductive organ weights, histology, or other indications of reproductive system structure or function. DART potential of the main ETBE metabolite t-butyl alcohol and class-related MTBE has also been studied. More GLP-compliant studies exist for evaluating ETBE using well-established, currently recommended protocols than are available for many other chemicals used today. The database for determining ETBE DART potential is adequate, although not all study details are currently easily accessible for peer-review. ETBE does not appear to be selectively toxic to reproduction or embryofetal development in the absence of other manifestations of general toxicity. Studies using recommended methods for sample preservation and analysis have shown no targeted effect on the reproductive system. No embryofetal effects were observed in rabbits. Early postnatal rat pup deaths show no clear dose-response and have largely been attributed to total litter losses with accompanying evidence of maternal neglect or frank maternal morbidity.

  7. Review of reproductive and developmental toxicity induced by organotins in aquatic organisms and experimental animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, A.; Takagi, A.; Nishimura, T.; Kanno, J.; Ema, M. [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Widespread use of organotins has caused increasing amounts to be released into the environment. The most important non-pesticidal route of entry of organotins into the environment is through leaching of organotin-stabilized PVC in water, and the use in antifouling agents, resulting in the introduction of organotin into the aquatic environment. Data are available regarding the detection of butyltins and phenyltins in aquatic marine organisms and marine products. Food chain bioamplification of butyltin in oysters, mud crabs, marine mussels, chinook salmons, dolphins, tunas, and sharks and of phenyltin in carps and horseshoe crabs has been reported. These findings indicate that organotins accumulate in the food chain and are bioconcentrated, and that humans can be exposed to organotins via seafood. The levels of organotin compounds in seafood are not considered to be sufficiently high to affect human health. However, Belfroid et al. (2000) noted that more research on residual TBT levels in seafood was needed before a definitive conclusion on possible health risks could be drawn. Although the toxicity of organotins has been extensively reviewed, the reproductive and developmental toxicity of organotins is not well understood. We summarized the data of the studies on reproductive and developmental toxicity of organotins in aquatic organisms and experimental animals.

  8. An abbreviated repeat dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity test for high production volume chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, R.A.; Bevan, C.; Beyer, B.K. (Exxon Biomedical Sciences, Inc., East Millstone, NJ (United States))

    1992-08-01

    A novel protocol is described for obtaining preliminary data on repeated dose systemic effects and reproductive/developmental toxicity. The test protocol was developed by a group of experts at the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use as part of a Screening Information Data Set on high production volume chemicals. Interest in this protocol is shared by several regulatory agencies, including the Organization for Economic Cooperation, the European Community, and the EPA. To validate the study protocol, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) was used. After a dosing period of approximately 6 weeks, EGME showed both systemic and reproductive/developmental effects similar to those previously reported using standard protocols. Thus, this test protocol may be used as a screening tool for high production volume chemicals.

  9. Embryonic stem cells: An alternative approach to developmental toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells in the body have a unique ability to renew themselves and give rise to more specialized cell types having functional commitments. Under specified growth conditions, these cell types remain unspecialized but can be triggered to become specific cell type of the body such as heart, nerve, or skin cells. This ability of embryonic stem cells for directed differentiation makes it a prominent candidate as a screening tool in revealing safer and better drugs. In addition, genetic variations and birth defects caused by mutations and teratogens affecting early human development could also be studied on this basis. Moreover, replacement of animal testing is needed because it involves ethical, legal, and cost issues. Thus, there is a strong requirement for validated and reliable, if achievable, human stem cell-based developmental assays for pharmacological and toxicological screening.

  10. Embryonic stem cells: An alternative approach to developmental toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, S; Jyoti, S

    2012-04-01

    Stem cells in the body have a unique ability to renew themselves and give rise to more specialized cell types having functional commitments. Under specified growth conditions, these cell types remain unspecialized but can be triggered to become specific cell type of the body such as heart, nerve, or skin cells. This ability of embryonic stem cells for directed differentiation makes it a prominent candidate as a screening tool in revealing safer and better drugs. In addition, genetic variations and birth defects caused by mutations and teratogens affecting early human development could also be studied on this basis. Moreover, replacement of animal testing is needed because it involves ethical, legal, and cost issues. Thus, there is a strong requirement for validated and reliable, if achievable, human stem cell-based developmental assays for pharmacological and toxicological screening.

  11. Developmental toxicity of PAH mixtures in fish early life stages. Part II: adverse effects in Japanese medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihanic, Florane; Clérandeau, Christelle; Le Menach, Karyn; Morin, Bénédicte; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier; Cachot, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    In aquatic environments, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mostly occur as complex mixtures, for which risk assessment remains problematic. To better understand the effects of PAH mixture toxicity on fish early life stages, this study compared the developmental toxicity of three PAH complex mixtures. These mixtures were extracted from a PAH-contaminated sediment (Seine estuary, France) and two oils (Arabian Light and Erika). For each fraction, artificial sediment was spiked at three different environmental concentrations roughly equivalent to 0.5, 4, and 10 μg total PAH g(-1) dw. Japanese medaka embryos were incubated on these PAH-spiked sediments throughout their development, right up until hatching. Several endpoints were recorded at different developmental stages, including acute endpoints, morphological abnormalities, larvae locomotion, and genotoxicity (comet and micronucleus assays). The three PAH fractions delayed hatching, induced developmental abnormalities, disrupted larvae swimming activity, and damaged DNA at environmental concentrations. Differences in toxicity levels, likely related to differences in PAH proportions, were highlighted between fractions. The Arabian Light and Erika petrogenic fractions, containing a high proportion of alkylated PAHs and low molecular weight PAHs, were more toxic to Japanese medaka early life stages than the pyrolytic fraction. This was not supported by the toxic equivalency approach, which appeared unsuitable for assessing the toxicity of the three PAH fractions to fish early life stages. This study highlights the potential risks posed by environmental mixtures of alkylated and low molecular weight PAHs to early stages of fish development.

  12. Predicting Developmental Toxicity of ToxCast Phase I Chemicals Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s ToxRefDB contains prenatal guideline study data from rats and rabbits for over 240 chemicals that overlap with the ToxCast in vitro high throughput screening project. A subset of these compounds were tested in Stemina Biomarker Discovery's developmental toxicity platform, a...

  13. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, M.V.; Annema, W.; Salvati, A.; Lesniak, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Barnes, C.; McKerr, G.; Howard, C.; Lynch, I.; Dawson, K.; Piersma, A.H.; de Jong, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining

  14. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, M.V.; Annema, W.; Salvati, A.; Lesniak, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Barnes, C.; McKerr, G.; Howard, C.; Lynch, I.; Dawson, K.; Piersma, A.H.; de Jong, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining thei

  15. A comparison of potency differences among thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibitors to induce developmental toxicity and other thyroid gland-linked toxicities in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motonaga, Kozo; Ota, Mika; Odawara, Kyoko; Saito, Shoji; Welsch, Frank

    2016-10-01

    The potencies of resorcinol, 6-propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole (MMI) for inducing developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity were compared in pregnant rats, regarded as valid model for human thyroid toxicity. Profound differences on maternal thyroid hormone levels (THs), maternal toxicity as well as developmental and neurotoxicity sequelae occurred. Resorcinol affected none of those end points. PTU and MMI caused significant effects. Therapy with either PTU or MMI during the first trimester of human pregnancy can cause reductions of maternal THs, accompanied by disruptions of prenatal development. Clinical MMI studies show sporadic evidence of teratogenic effects, with equivocal relation to thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibition. In recent decades no MMI associated prenatal toxicity has been reported, an outcome possibly related to carefully managed therapy. Orally administered resorcinol was rapidly absorbed, metabolized and excreted and was undetectable in the thyroid. In contrast, PTU or MMI accumulated. Resorcinol's potency to inhibit TPO was profoundly lower than that of PTU or MMI. Quantum chemical calculations may explain low resorcinol reactivity with TPO. Thus, distinctions in the target organ and the TPO inhibitory potency between these chemicals are likely contributing to different reductions of maternal THs levels and affecting the potency to cause developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Critical evaluation of current developmental toxicity testing strategies: a case of babies and their bathwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Edward W; Ellis, Amy L; Tyl, Rochelle W; Foster, Paul M D; Scialli, Anthony R; Thompson, Kary; Kim, James

    2011-10-01

    This review is the second in a series of four papers emanating from a workshop entitled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions," which was sponsored by the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee. The present review analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of current developmental safety testing approaches in an effort to identify those strengths that should be retained in the future versus the weaknesses that should be eliminated. Workshop participants considered the following to be key strengths of current testing approaches: the integrated biology of pregnant animal models including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic processes, the ability to detect low incidence malformations as well as maternally mediated toxicity, and the long history of use coupled with extensive historical data. A number of weaknesses were related to the resource-intensive nature of developmental toxicity testing (e.g., large number of animals, high costs, low throughput, the inability to keep pace with the demand for more toxicity data). Other weaknesses included the use of very high dose levels that often far exceed human exposure levels, the confounding influence of maternal toxicity, sparse understanding of basic developmental mechanisms and genetics of standard animal models relative to mouse or lower organisms, difficulties interpreting low incidence findings, and issues surrounding the interpretation of minor skeletal variations. An appreciation of these strengths and weaknesses is critical for the design of new approaches to developmental toxicity testing in the 21st century. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Developmental toxicity of thyroid-active compounds in a zebrafish embryotoxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Barae; Hermsen, Sanne A B; Kessels, Maurijn Y; van den Berg, Johannes H J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Piersma, Aldert H; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish embryos were exposed to concentration ranges of selected thyroid-active model compounds in order to assess the applicability of zebrafish-based developmental scoring systems withinan alternative testing strategy to detect the developmental toxicity ofthyroid-active compounds. Model compounds tested included triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU), methimazole (MMI), sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) and amiodarone hydrochloride (AMI), selected to represent different modes of action affecting thyroid activity. Tested time windows included 48-120 hours post fertilization (hpf), 0-72 hpf and 0-120 hpf. All tested compounds resulted in developmental changes, with T3 being the most potent. The developmental parameters affected included reflective iridophores, beat and glide swimming, inflated swim bladders, as well as resorbed yolk sacs. These effects are only evident by 120 hpf and therefore an existing General Morphology Score (GMS) system was extended to create a General Developmental Score(GDS) that extends beyond the 72 hpfscoring limit of GMS and includes additional parameters that are affected by exposure to model thyroid-active compounds. Moreover, the GDS is cumulative as it includes not only the scoring of developmental morphologies but also integrates developmental dysmorphologies. Exposures from 48-120 hpf did not provide additional information to exposures from 0-120 hpf. The results indicate that the zebrafish GDS can detect the developmental toxicity of thyroid toxicants and may be of use in an integrated testing strategy to reduce, refine and in certain cases replace animal testing.

  18. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisig, Karin; Taxvig, Camilla; Birkhøj Kjærstad, Mia; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same conazoles were evaluated on the basis of data from a battery of cell assays for endocrine activity, including assays for AR, ER, AhR, and sex hormone synthesis, and data were compared to in vivo developmental toxicity data. Overall, the ranking of the five conazole fungicides based on in vitro data were in reasonably good agreement with available in vivo effects. Ketoconazole and epoxiconazole are the most potent embryotoxic compounds, whereas prochloraz belongs to the most potent developmental toxicants. In conclusion, a rough prediction of the ranking of these conazole fungicides for in vivo toxicity data was possible by a holistic evaluation of data from a panel of cell-based assays.

  19. Developmental toxicity of polyethylene glycol-g-polyvinyl alcohol grafted copolymer in rats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuschmid, Franziska F; Schneider, Steffen; Schuster, Paul; Lauer, Birthe; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2013-07-01

    Polyethylene glycol-g-polyvinyl alcohol (PEG-PVA) grafted copolymer was evaluated in developmental toxicity studies with Wistar rats and Himalayan rabbits. Pregnant Wistar rats were gavaged with 0 (vehicle control), 100, 300, or 1000 mg PEG-PVA grafted copolymer/kg bw/day from gestation day (GD) 6-15. Pregnant Himalayan rabbits received the same treatment from GD 6 to 19. On GD 20 and 29 for rats and rabbits, respectively, the animals were euthanized and were examined grossly. For each dam, corpora lutea were counted and number and distribution of implantation sites were determined. The fetuses were removed, sexed, weighed, and evaluated for any external, soft tissue, and skeletal findings. No significant findings were found that could be attributed to administration of PEG-PVA grafted copolymer. Under the conditions of these studies, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for maternal and developmental toxicity in both species was the highest dose tested of 1000 mg/kg bw/day.

  20. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal

  1. Establishment of a molecular embryonic stem cell developmental toxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Brannen, Kimberly C; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Cindy X; Flint, Oliver P; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Augustine-Rauch, Karen A

    2013-02-01

    The mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a 10-day screen for teratogenic potential developed to reduce animal use for embryotoxicity testing of chemicals (Spielmann, 2005; Spielmann et al., 1997). In this study, we used the cytotoxicity IC(50) values and transcriptional expression changes as primary endpoints in a shorter 4-day version of the EST, the molecular embryonic stem cell assay. Mouse D3 embryonic stem cells were used for cytotoxicity assessment (monolayers) or grown as embryoid bodies in low attachment plates for transcriptional profiling. Sixty-five compounds with known in vivo teratogenicity (33 teratogens and 32 nonteratogens) were evaluated to develop a model for classifying compounds with teratogenic potential. The expression of 12 developmentally regulated gene targets (nanog, fgf5, gsc, cd34, axin2, apln, chst7, lhx1, fgf8, sox17, foxa2, and cxcr4) was measured following exposure of embryoid bodies to a single compound concentration (0.1 × the cytotoxicity IC(20)) for 4 days. In the decision-tree model, compounds with IC(50) values teratogens, whereas compounds in the two groups with IC(50) values between 22-200 µM and > 200 µM were categorized as teratogens if ≥ 8 and 12 genes, respectively, were deregulated by at least 10%. Forty-seven of 65 compounds of the training set were correctly identified (72% total concordance). In a test set of 12 additional compounds (5 teratogens, 7 nonteratogens), 10 were correctly classified by this approach (83% concordance). The false positive rate in the training and test sets was 24 and 0%, respectively, indicating that this assay has potential to identify teratogens.

  2. Developmental toxicity to PbCl[sub 2] in the echinoid Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnau, M. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)); Pagano, G. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium) Instituto Nazionale Tumori, Naples (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Heavy metals are known or suspected to be hazardous for the marine environment; 13 of them are listed in the official list drawn up by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In marine waters, lead is generally one of the most concentrated heavy metals; the main sources of lead input into the marine environment are rivers (domestic and industrial wastes) and atmosphere (mainly tetraethyl lead from automobile exhaust). Heavy metal toxicity for the marine environment is currently assessed by means of various biological tests based on different marine species. Among these, toxicity bioassays using sea urchin gametes and embryos appear to be quite sensitive and informative, offering a wide range of endpoints. Hence, sea urchin bioassays are now widely used in studies involved in the toxicological characterization of xenobiotics and in environmental monitoring. Some previous reports focused on different aspects of lead toxicity in sea urchin development; only Congiu et al. (1984) and Brunetti et al. (1991) investigated lead toxicity in Paracentroutus lividus. This sea urchin is widely distributed in the Mediterranean and European Atlantic coasts and is currently used in toxicological assessments. Its development was shown to be very sensitive to various heavy metals. In particular, Congiu et al. (1984) and Brunetti et al. (1991) reported that P. lividus development was sensitive to a lead concentration of 2.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6]M (developmental retardation) and of 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]7]M (skeletal anomalies), respectively. The purpose of the present study was to extend available information on lead toxicity in P. lividus, by testing the effects on the fertilizing capacity of sperm and on offspring quality, as well as the effects on developing embryos. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Effect of allyl isothiocyanate on developmental toxicity in exposed Xenopus laevis embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Russell Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pungent natural compound allyl isothiocyanate isolated from the seeds of Cruciferous (Brassica plants such as mustard is reported to exhibit numerous beneficial health-promoting antimicrobial, antifungal, anticarcinogenic, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. Because it is also reported to damage DNA and is toxic to aquatic organisms, the objective of the present study was to determine whether it possesses teratogenic properties. The frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX was used to determine the following measures of developmental toxicity of the allyl isothiocyanate: (a 96-h LC50, defined as the median concentration causing 50% embryo lethality; (b 96-h EC50, defined as the median concentration causing 50% malformations of the surviving embryos; and (c teratogenic malformation index (TI, equal to 96-h LC50/96-h EC50. The quantitative results and the photographs of embryos before and after exposure suggest that allyl isothiocyanate seems to exhibit moderate teratogenic properties. The results also indicate differences in the toxicity of allyl isothiocyanate toward exposed embryos observed in the present study compared to reported adverse effects of allyl isothiocyanate in fish, rodents, and humans. The significance of the results for food safety and possible approaches to protect against adverse effects of allyl isothiocyanate are discussed.

  4. Developmental toxicity and oxidative stress induced by gamma irradiation in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Miao; Hu, Nan; Ding, Dexin; Zhao, Weichao; Feng, Yongfu; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guangyue; Wang, Yongdong [University of South China, Key Discipline Laboratory for National Defense for Biotechnology in Uranium Mining and Hydrometallurgy, Hengyang, Hunan Province (China)

    2016-11-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the biological effects of gamma irradiation on zebrafish embryos. Different doses of gamma rays (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 Gy) were used to irradiate zebrafish embryos at three developmental stages (stage 1, 6 h post-fertilization (hpf); stage 2, 12 hpf; stage three, 24 hpf), respectively. The survival, malformation and hatching rates of the zebrafish embryos were measured at the morphological endpoint of 96 hpf. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were assayed. Morphology analysis showed that gamma irradiation inhibited hatching and induced developmental toxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, after irradiation the malformation rate changed not only in a dose-dependent manner but also in a developmental stage-dependent manner, indicating that the zebrafish embryos at stage 1 were more sensitive to gamma rays than those at other stages. Biochemical analysis showed that gamma irradiation modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes in a dose-dependent manner. A linear relationship was found between GPx activity and irradiation dose in 0.1-1 Gy group, and GPx was a suitable biomarker for gamma irradiation in the dose range from 0.1 to 1 Gy. Furthermore, the activities of SOD, CAT, GR and GPx of the zebrafish embryos at stage 3 were found to be much higher than those at other stages, indicating that the zebrafish embryos at stage 3 had a greater ability to protect against gamma rays than those at other stages, and thus the activities of antioxidant enzymes changed in a developmental stage-dependent manner. (orig.)

  5. Comparative developmental toxicity of planar PCB congeners by egg injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Melancon, M.J.; Eisemann, J.D.; Klein, P.N. [National Biological Service, Laurel, MD (United States). Patuxent Environmental Science Center

    1995-12-31

    The utility of egg injection studies for predicting potential embryotoxicity of PCBs and TCDD compares favorably with feeding studies. The effects of PCB congeners 3,3{prime}4,4{prime}-tetraCB (PCB 77), 2,3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-pentaCB (PCB 105), 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentaCB (PCB 126) and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexaCB (PCB 153) were examined on embryonic development in chickens (Gallus gallus), northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), American kestrels (Falco sparverius), and common terns (Sterna hirundo) through hatching following air cell injections on day 4. The estimated LD{sub 50}s for these congeners in chickens were approximately 0.4 ppb, 2.6 ppb, 3326 ppb, and greater than 14,000 ppb, respectively; low effect levels (10--20% embryonic mortality) were 0.2 ppb, 1.2 ppb, 900 ppb, and 14,000 ppb respectively. The estimated LD{sub 50} for PCB 126 was 48 ppb for bobwhite, 65 ppb for American kestrels, and 104 ppb for common terns. The estimated LD{sub 50} for PCB 77 was 688 ppb for American kestrels. one or more hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450-linked monooxygenases including ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase was assayed for each species. For PCB 126, the order of responsiveness of cytochrome P450 induction was: chicken > common tern > American kestrel > bobwhite, with chicken being approximately 100 times more responsive than common tern. These values are compared to existing Toxic Equivalency Factors (TEFs) including bioassay-derived ones.

  6. Developmental toxicity and DNA damaging properties of silver nanoparticles in the catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din H; Soliman, Hamdy A M

    2017-10-01

    Although, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in many different products, little information is known about their toxicity in tropical fish embryos. Therefore, this study evaluated the developmental toxicity of waterborne silver nanoparticles in embryos of Clarias gariepinus. Embryos were treated with (0, 25, 50, 75ng/L silver nanoparticles) in water up to 144h postfertilization stage (PFS). Results revealed various morphological malformations including notochord curvature and edema. The mortality rate, malformations, and DNA fragmentation in embryos exposed to silver nanoparticles increased in a dose- and embryonic stage-dependent manner. The total antioxidant capacity and the activity of catalase in embryos exposed to 25ng/L silver nanoparticles were decreased significantly while the total antioxidant capacity and the activity of catalase were insignificantly increased with increasing concentrations in the embryos from 24 to 144 h-PFS exposed to 50 and 75ng/L silver nanoparticles. Lipid peroxidation values showed fluctuations with doses of silver nanoparticles. Histopathological lesions including severely distorted and wrinkled notochord were observed. The current data propose that the toxicity of silver nanoparticles in C. gariepinus embryos is caused by oxidative stress and genotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF ANATOXIN-A, A CYANOBACTERIAL TOXIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatoxin-a acts as a neuro-muscular blocking agent. Acute toxicity is characterized by rapid onset of paralysis, tremors, convulsions, and death. Human exposures may occur from recreational water activities and dietary supplements, but are primarily through drinking water. The...

  8. Parental dietary seleno-L-methionine exposure and resultant offspring developmental toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Chernick, Melissa; Ware, Megan; Albright, Elizabeth; Kwok, Kevin W.H.; Dong, Wu; Zheng, Na; Hinton, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) leaches into water from agricultural soils and from storage sites for coal fly ash. Se toxicity causes population and community level effects in fishes and birds. We used the laboratory aquarium model fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), an asynchronous breeder, to determine aspects of uptake in adults and resultant developmental toxicity in their offspring. The superior imaging properties of the model enabled detailed descriptions of phenotypic alterations...

  9. A proposal for case-by-case principle in reproductive and developmental toxicity studies%药物非临床生殖发育毒性试验中逐案原则的建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙祖越; 周莉; 闫晗; 韩玲

    2012-01-01

    本文围绕药物非临床生殖发育毒性试验中逐案原则展开讨论,认为:①不同的研究目的决定着不同的研究策略.②受试物的种类不同选择试验种类亦各异.③在特定的研究机构需要设立阳性对照组.④实验动物的选择需要考虑受试物的特点.⑤实验动物的给药途径需要考虑实际可行.⑥根据受试物特色增设特异性指标的检测.⑦适时开展生殖毒性伴随毒代动力学试验.⑧基于多方面实际资料综合分析得出结论.因此,既要依从药物生殖发育毒性非临床安全性评价研究的通则,又要在对受试物充分认识的基础上,遵循“具体问题具体分析”的原则,避免因循守旧和循规蹈矩,最终经仔细观测、审慎分析,综合多方面信息对试验结果进行全面分析评价,以至能准确地下达结论.%This paper focuses on how to conduct nonclinical studies on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of drugs based on case-by-case principle. We discussed various issues and suggested that; ① The research strategy should be designed based on the research purposes. ② The experimental methods should be decided according to the type of a drug, ③ A positive control group is important in specific research institutions. ④ The characteristics of the tested drug should be considered when deciding experimental animals. ⑤ The administration route , to the experimental animals should be practicable. ⑥ Tests specific to the tested drug should be included.⑦ The drug toxicity on reproduction and development should be conducted together with toxicokinetics and others in due time. ⑧ Conclusion should be made only based on the comprehensive analysis of the experimental data. Investigators should not only comply with the guidelines for reproductive and developmental toxicity testing for drugs, but also should fully understand the properties of the tested drug case by case. Careful observation and comprehensive a

  10. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: developmental toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, L G; Gray, T M; Marr, M C; Tyl, R W; Trimmer, G W; Hoffman, G M; Murray, F J; Clark, C R; Schreiner, C A

    2014-11-01

    CD-1 mice were exposed to baseline gasoline vapor condensate (BGVC) alone or to vapors of gasoline blended with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE). Inhalation exposures were 6h/d on GD 5-17 at levels of 0, 2000, 10,000, and 20,000mg/m(3). Dams were evaluated for evidence of maternal toxicity, and fetuses were weighed, sexed, and evaluated for external, visceral, and skeletal anomalies. Exposure to 20,000mg/m(3) of BGVC produced slight reductions in maternal body weight/gain and decreased fetal body weight. G/MTBE exposure did not produce statistically significant maternal or developmental effects; however, two uncommon ventral wall closure defects occurred: gastroschisis (1 fetus at 10,000mg/m(3)) and ectopia cordis (1 fetus at 2000mg/m(3); 2 fetuses/1 litter at 10,000mg/m(3)). A second study (G/MTBE-2) evaluated similar exposure levels on GD 5-16 and an additional group exposed to 30,000mg/m(3) from GD 5-10. An increased incidence of cleft palate was observed at 30,000mg/m(3) G/MTBE. No ectopia cordis occurred in the replicate study, but a single observation of gastroschisis was observed at 30,000mg/m(3). The no observed adverse effect levels for maternal/developmental toxicity in the BGVC study were 10,000/2000mg/m(3), 20,000/20,000 for the G/MTBE study, and 10,000/20,000 for the G/MTBE-2 study.

  11. Toxic effects of magnesium oxide nanoparticles on early developmental and larval stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadian, Mehdi; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Parivar, Kazem; Fathi, Mojtaba; Pazooki, Jamileh

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgONPs) are used in medicine, manufacturing and food industries. Because of their extensive application in our daily lives, environmental exposure to these nanoparticles is inevitable. The present study examined the effects of MgONPs on zebrafish (Danio rerio) early developmental stages. The results showed that, at different concentrations, MgONPs induced cellular apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species. The hatching rate and survival of embryos decreased in a dose dependent manner. The 96-h LC50 value of MgONPs on zebrafish survival was 428 mg/l and the 48-h EC50 value of MgONPs on zebrafish embryo hatching rate was 175 mg/l. Moreover different types of malformation were observed in exposed embryos. The results demonstrate the toxic effects of MgONPs on zebrafish embryos and emphasize the need for further studies.

  12. Developmental toxicity of TCDD and related compounds: Species sensitivities and differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birnbaum, L.S.

    1991-01-01

    The issue of the developmental toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds has been the subject of two recent reviews (Morrissey and Schwetz, 1989; Couture et al., 1990a). There is little doubt that TCDD is one of the most potent developmental toxins known, yet its production of frank structural malformations in species other than in the mouse are poorly described. The objective of the review is to critically address the role which TCDD and its approximate isostereomers have in causing a wide array of developmental effects in various species, including some very recent results. The bias of the author is that the teratogenic response of the mouse is a reflection of extreme sensitivity of the species to the induction of frank teratogenic responses in two epithelial tissues. That is, that the mouse is an outlier in the field of developmental toxicity, possibly in parallel to the exquisite sensitivity of the guinea pig vs the resistance of the hamster to the lethal effects of TCDD, or in the resistance of haired rodents to the induction of chloracne. The crucial point is that most species respond similarly to TCDD; for any given endpoint outliers will exist. However, no species is an outlier for all responses. In terms of developmental toxicity, essentially all species critically examined to date demonstrate potent developmentally toxic effects following exposure to TCDD and related chemicals. Relatively low doses to the dam (varying within an order of magnitude) result in embryo/fetal toxicity. The actual induction of terata is an extremely rare response. (Copyright (c) 1991 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.)

  13. Comparison of rat and rabbit embryo-fetal developmental toxicity data for 379 pharmaceuticals: on the nature and severity of developmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Peter T; Beken, Sonja; Beyer, Bruce K; Breslin, William J; Cappon, Gregg D; Chen, Connie L; Chmielewski, Gary; De Schaepdrijver, Luc; Enright, Brian; Foreman, Jennifer E; Harrouk, Wafa; Hew, Kok-Wah; Hoberman, Alan M; Hui, Julia Y; Knudsen, Thomas B; Laffan, Susan B; Makris, Susan L; Martin, Matt; McNerney, Mary Ellen; Siezen, Christine L; Stanislaus, Dinesh J; Stewart, Jane; Thompson, Kary E; Tornesi, Belen; Van der Laan, Jan Willem; Weinbauer, Gerhard F; Wood, Sandra; Piersma, Aldert H

    2016-11-01

    Regulatory non-clinical safety testing of human pharmaceuticals typically requires embryo-fetal developmental toxicity (EFDT) testing in two species (one rodent and one non-rodent). The question has been raised whether under some conditions EFDT testing could be limited to one species, or whether the testing in a second species could be decided on a case-by-case basis. As part of a consortium initiative, we built and queried a database of 379 compounds with EFDT studies (in both rat and rabbit animal models) conducted for marketed and non-marketed pharmaceuticals for their potential for adverse developmental and maternal outcomes, including EFDT incidence and the nature and severity of adverse findings. Manifestation of EFDT in either one or both species was demonstrated for 282 compounds (74%). EFDT was detected in only one species (rat or rabbit) in almost a third (31%, 118 compounds), with 58% (68 compounds) of rat studies and 42% (50 compounds) of rabbit studies identifying an EFDT signal. For 24 compounds (6%), fetal malformations were observed in one species (rat or rabbit) in the absence of any EFDT in the second species. In general, growth retardation, fetal variations, and malformations were more prominent in the rat, whereas embryo-fetal death was observed more often in the rabbit. Discordance across species may be attributed to factors such as maternal toxicity, study design differences, pharmacokinetic differences, and pharmacologic relevance of species. The current analysis suggests that in general both species are equally sensitive on the basis of an overall EFDT LOAEL comparison, but selective EFDT toxicity in one species is not uncommon. Also, there appear to be species differences in the prevalence of various EFDT manifestations (i.e. embryo-fetal death, growth retardation, and dysmorphogenesis) between rat and rabbit, suggesting that the use of both species has a higher probability of detecting developmental toxicants than either one alone.

  14. [Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol ethers - Reproductive and developmental toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starek-Świechowicz, Beata; Starek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Both ethylene and propylene glycol alkyl ethers (EGAEs and PGAEs, respectively) are widely used, mainly as solvents, in industrial and household products. Some EGAEs demonstrate gonadotoxic, embriotoxic, fetotoxic and teratogenic effects in both humans and experimental animals. Due to the noxious impact of these ethers on reproduction and development of organisms EGAEs are replaced for considerably less toxic PGAEs. The data on the mechanisms of testicular, embriotoxic, fetotoxic and teratogenic effects of EGAEs are presented in this paper. Our particular attention was focused on the metabolism of some EGAEs and their organ-specific toxicities, apoptosis of spermatocytes associated with changes in the expression of various genes that code for oxidative stress factors, protein kinases and nuclear hormone receptors.

  15. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mallard ducklings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho was examined on posthatching development of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 6 weeks. Day-old ducklings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 ug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet containing lead acetate equivalent to that found in 24% CDARB. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 1.41 ppm (WW) with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over threefold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.56 ppm with over sixfold elevation of protoporphyrin and lower brain weight. In this group the liver lead concentration was 7.92 ppm (WW), and there was a 40% increase in hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 7.97 ppm, and acid-fast inclusion bodies were present in the kidneys of four of nine ducklings. The lead acetate positive control group was more adversely affected in most respects than the 24% CDARB group. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet), CDARB sediment was more toxic; blood lead levels were higher, body growth and liver biochemistry (TBARS) were more affected, and prevalence of acid-fast inclusion bodies increased. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated more readily in duckling blood and liver than reported in goslings, but at given concentrations was generally less toxic to ducklings. Many of these effects are similar to ones reported in wild mallards and geese within the CDARB.

  16. Developmental toxicity of lead contaminated sediment to mallard ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho was examined on posthatching development of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 6 weeks. Day-old ducklings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 I?g/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet containing lead acetate equivalent to that found in 24% CDARB. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 1.41 ppm (WW) with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over threefold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.56 ppm with over sixfold elevation of protoporphyrin and lower brain weight. In this group the liver lead concentration was 7.92 ppm (WW), and there was a 40% increase in hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 7.97 ppm, and acid-fast inclusion bodies were present in the kidneys of four of nine ducklings. The lead acetate positive control group was more adversely affected in most respects than the 24% CDARB group. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet), CDARB sediment was more toxic; blood lead levels were higher, body growth and liver biochemistry (TBARS) were more affected, and prevalence of acid-fast inclusion bodies increased. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated more readily in duckling blood and liver than reported in goslings, but at given concentrations was generally less toxic to ducklings. Many of these effects are similar to ones reported in wild mallards and geese within the CDARB.

  17. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karin Dreisig; Taxvig, Camilla; Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same...

  18. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COPPER SULFATE AND METHYLENE CHLORIDE TO SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water-soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil which indicates they may be a useful test species in estuarine developmental toxicity tests. Detailed concentration-response curves for copper sulfate an...

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF 2-CHLORO-2'-DEOXYADENOSINE IN THE RAT: INDUCTION OF LUMBAR HERNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF 2-CHLORO-2'DEOXYADENOSINE IN THE RAT: INDUCTION OF LUMBAR HERNIA. C. Lau1, M.G. Narotsky1, D. Lui1, D. Best1, R.W. Setzer2, T.B. Knudsen3. 1Reprod. Tox. Div., 2Exp. Tox. Div., NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 3Dept. Path. Anat. Cell Bio...

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COPPER SULFATE AND METHYLENE CHLORIDE TO SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water-soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil which indicates they may be a useful test species in estuarine developmental toxicity tests. Detailed concentration-response curves for copper sulfate an...

  1. Preventive Effect of Vitamin B6 on Developmental Toxicity of Carbamazepine in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afshar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sCarbamazepine (CBZ is an antiepileptic drug that is used widely for the treatment of epileptic seizures. Neural tube defects (NTDs, growth retardation, and nail hypoplasia are the most common features of teratogenic effects of this drug. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of vitamin B6 on the developmental toxicity of CBZ on mice.Materials and MethodsSixty BALB/c pregnant mice were divided into four experimental and two control groups. Two experimental groups received daily intraperitoneal injection (IP of 30 mg/kg (I or 60 mg/kg (II of CBZ on gestational days (GD 6 to 15. Two other experimental groups received daily IP injection of 30 mg/kg (III or 60 mg/kg (IV of CBZ with 10 mg/kg/day vitamin B6 by gavage 10 days prior to gestation and on GD 6 to 15. Two control groups received normal saline or Tween 20. Dams underwent Cesarean section on GD 18 and embryos were harvested. External/macroscopic observation of fetuses was done by stereomicroscope and external examination for malformations was recorded. Data analyzed by ANOVA and X2 test using SPSS software.ResultsThe mean weight and crown-rump of the fetuses in both CBZ-treated experimental groups were significantly reduced compared with those of the control groups. Various malformations were detected such as brachygnathia, eye malformations, NTDs, vertebral deformity, brachydactyly and growth retardation. Vitamin B6 treatment significantly reduced various CBZ-induced malformations.ConclusionThis study showed that vitamin B6 has a preventive effect on the developmental toxicity of CBZ in mice that can be pursued further for clinical research.

  2. Developmental toxicity of the dithiocarbamate pesticide sodium metam in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendel, Melissa A; Tilton, Fred; Bailey, George S; Tanguay, Robert L

    2004-10-01

    Sodium metam (NaM), a dithiocarbamate, is a general agricultural biocide applied prior to planting for the elimination of nematodes, soil pathogens, and weeds. There is a remarkable paucity of information about the mechanism of action and the risk that dithiocarbamates may pose to developing vertebrates. We have characterized NaM toxicity during early life stage exposure in zebrafish. Zebrafish embryos are most sensitive to NaM exposure during gastrulation and early segmentation (4-14 hours post fertilization, hpf). For mortality, the dose response curve is steep with an LC(50) estimate of 1.95 microM (248 ppb) at 48 hpf. The most notable malformation among surviving embryos was a severely twisted notochord, which became evident by 24 hpf. Surprisingly, this notochord defect was not immediately lethal and the animals continued to grow despite delays in hatching, apparent paralysis, and an inability to feed. We have characterized the notochord malformation using histological and in situ hybridization techniques. collagen 2a1 mRNA expression is normally localized to the notochord sheath cells at 24 hpf, whereas in NaM-exposed embryos it is misexpressed in the notochord cells. Histological staining and myoD expression indicate that the myotomes of the NaM-exposed embryos are less defined, compacted and block-shaped compared to controls. The degradation product of NaM, methyl isothiocyanate (MITC), causes similar malformations at similar concentrations as NaM, suggesting that MITC or another common product may be the active toxicant. Our results indicate that developing zebrafish are sensitive to NaM and MITC and we believe that this model is ideal to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) and etiology of NaM toxicity in vertebrates.

  3. Metabolomics approach reveals metabolic disorders and potential biomarkers associated with the developmental toxicity of tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrachlorobisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guozhu; Chen, Yajie; Wang, Hong-Ou; Ye, Ting; Lin, Yi; Huang, Qiansheng; Chi, Yulang; Dong, Sijun

    2016-10-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrachlorobisphenol A are halogenated bisphenol A (H-BPA), and has raised concerns about their adverse effects on the development of fetuses and infants, however, the molecular mechanisms are unclear, and related metabolomics studies are limited. Accordingly, a metabolomics study based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to elucidate the molecular developmental toxicology of H-BPA using the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigmas) embryo model. Here, we revealed decreased synthesis of nucleosides, amino acids and lipids, and disruptions in the TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle, glycolysis and lipid metabolism, thus inhibiting the developmental processes of embryos exposed to H-BPA. Unexpectedly, we observed enhanced neural activity accompanied by lactate accumulation and accelerated heart rates due to an increase in dopamine pathway and a decrease in inhibitory neurotransmitters following H-BPA exposure. Notably, disorders of the neural system, and disruptions in glycolysis, the TCA cycle, nucleoside metabolism, lipid metabolism, glutamate and aspartate metabolism induced by H-BPA exposure were heritable. Furthermore, lactate and dopa were identified as potential biomarkers of the developmental toxicity of H-BPA and related genetic effects. This study has demonstrated that the metabolomics approach is a useful tool for obtaining comprehensive and novel insights into the molecular developmental toxicity of environmental pollutants.

  4. Developmental toxicity of CdTe QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo [School of Public Health, Capital Medical University (China); Li, Yang [School of Public Health, Jilin University (China); Yu, Yang; Li, Yanbo; Huang, Peili; Zhou, Xianqing [School of Public Health, Capital Medical University (China); Peng, Shuangqing, E-mail: pengsq@hotmail.com [Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Evaluation and Research Centre for Toxicology (China); Sun, Zhiwei, E-mail: zwsun@ccmu.edu.cn [School of Public Health, Capital Medical University (China)

    2013-07-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have widely been used in biomedical and biotechnological applications. However, few studies focus on the assessing toxicity of QDs exposure in vivo. In this study, zebrafish embryos were treated with CdTe QDs (4 nm) during 4-96 h post-fertilization (hpf). Mortality, hatching rate, malformation, heart rate, and QDs uptake were detected. We also measured the larval behavior to analyze whether QDs had persistent effects on larvae locomotor activity at 144 hpf. The results showed that as the exposure dosages increased, the hatching rate and heart rate of zebrafish embryos were decreased, while the mortality increased. Exposure to QDs caused embryonic malformations, including head malformation, pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, bent spine, and yolk not depleted. QDs fluorescence was mainly localized in the intestines region. The larval behavior testing showed that the total swimming distance was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The lowest dose (2.5 nM QDs) produced substantial hyperactivity while the higher doses groups (5, 10, and 20 nM QDs) elicited remarkably hypoactivity in dark periods. In summary, the data of this article indicated that QDs caused embryonic developmental toxicity, resulted in persistent effects on larval behavior.

  5. Developmental toxicity and DNA damage to zebrafish induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate in the presence of ZnO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jia; Wang, Shutao; You, Hong; Jiang, Rui; Zhuang, Changlu; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) are frequently detected in the environment, but few studies have assessed their joint toxicity. In this study, the acute toxicity and chronic toxicity to zebrafish (Danio rerio) induced by PFOS in the presence of ZnO-NPs were investigated, including developmental toxicity and DNA damage. The embryos were exposed to PFOS (only) (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mg/L) and PFOS plus ZnO-NPs (0.4 + 50, 0.8 + 50, and 1.6 + 50 mg/L) solutions to evaluate mortality (96 h), body length (96 h), hatch rate (72 h), heart rate (48 h),and malformation rate (96 h). The results revealed that the co-treatment could cause more severe developmental toxicity compared with the control and single-treatments, and the toxic effects generally increased in a dose-response manner. In addition, adult zebrafish were exposed to single and mixed solutions of PFOS and ZnO-NPs (at the concentrations mentioned above) for 30 days. DNA damage to zebrafish was evaluated by the comet assay and micronucleus test. We found that the PFOS single-treatment at all doses (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mg/L) could strongly induce DNA damage to peripheral blood cells and that ZnO-NPs could aggravate the formation of DNA damage in co-treatments. Histological examination of liver, testicle, and ovary showed that the presence of ZnO-NPs (50 mg/L) could also cause more serious histological damage to adult zebrafish than PFOS alone. As a result, the synergistic effects played an important role during joint exposure. Our observations provide a basic understanding of the joint toxicity of PFOS and ZnO-NPs to aquatic organisms.

  6. The relative teratogenic index and teratogenic potency: proposed components of developmental toxicity risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabro, S; Shull, G; Brown, N A

    1982-01-01

    Teratogenicity tests should provide answers to three questions: (1) Can the agent induce developmental defects? ("teratogenic potential"); (2) What are the effective doses? ("teratogenic potency"); and (3) Are effective doses below adult toxic doses? ("teratogenic hazard"). The answers to (2) and (3) should be quantitative in nature, but there are no accepted parameters to express these properties. In this paper we propose parameters for the description of teratogenic potency and hazard in quantitative terms. Derivation and calculation of the parameters are illustrated by the analysis of adult lethality and teratogenicity data of eight structurally related anhydrides and imides, following testing in the CD-1 mouse. Teratogenicity was evaluated following treatment on Days 8-10 of gestation, using an average of four dose groups per compound and at least 10 dams per group. Adult lethality was estimated following a similar 3-day dosage schedule with an average of 6 dose groups per compound and at least 8 animals per group. Dose-response relationships of teratogenicity were fitted to a probit model from which tD50 (median effective dose), and other effective doses were computed. It is proposed that tD05, as a minimum teratogenic dose, best represents teratogenic potency. In this study, potency ranged from 0.17 mmol/kg/day for phenytoin to 5.2 mmol/kg/day for ethosuximide. In order to measure teratogenic hazard a ratio between adult toxic (lethality was chosen as the most appropriate measure) and teratogenic responses was made. Since the dose-response slopes of lethality and teratogenicity were different, a simple ratio between median effective doses could not be used. It is shown that a ratio of LD01 to tD05 provides a "Relative Teratogenic Index" (RTI) which reflects the teratogenic hazard of a test agent. The following RTI values (LD01/tD05) were computed in this study: phthalic anhydride, 0.9; phensuximide, 1.0; succinic anhydride, 1.0; ethosuximide, 1.2; phenytoin

  7. The developmental toxicity of 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium bromide on Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan-Rui; Li, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Bang-Jun; Sun, Zhen-Jun; Wang, Jian-Ji

    2008-12-01

    The developmental toxicity of 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium bromide ([C(8)mim]Br) on Daphnia magna was investigated. The 24 and 48 h LC(50) values for [C(8)mim]Br in D. magna were 1.99 and 0.95 mg/L, respectively. A series of multigenerational toxicity tests were then used to explore [C(8)mim]Br effects in D. magna. [C(8)mim]Br significantly inhibited the body lengths of the F0 and F1 1st generations. After 21 days of exposure, [C(8)mim]Br lowered the reproductive ability of the F0 and F1 1st generations. In F1 3rd generation, 21 days of [C(8)mim]Br exposure prolonged the time to bear the first egg and the time to the first brood compared with the control, but the number of first-brood offspring and the number of broods produced by these animals were reduced. After the recovery period all the reproductive parameters returned to normal in F1 1st generation except for the number of broods. The dead neonates increased with prolonged exposure and increasing concentrations, and the dead neonates of the F1 3rd generation went far beyond that of the F1 1st and F0 generations. The intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) values of the three D. magna generations significantly decreased after exposure to higher concentrations of [C(8)mim]Br compared with control groups. Collectively, these results suggest that [C(8)mim]Br exerts a toxic effect on the development of D. magna. This study also highlights the importance of systematically evaluating the potential effects of aquatic ecosystems of ionic liquids that may be released into bodies of water.

  8. Student Development and Developmental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champaigne, John

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the nine-stage Perry Scheme of Intellectual and Ethical Development, detailing three major student orientations--dualism, multiplicity, and commitments in relativism. Suggests techniques developmental educators can use to communicate with, support, and challenge students to promote intellectual development. Underscores the importance of…

  9. Ntp technical report on toxicity, reproductive, and developmental studies of 60-Hz magnetic fields, administered by whole body exposure to F344/N rats, Sprague-Dawley rats, and B6C3F1 mice. Toxicity report series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Electric and magnetic fields are associated with the production, transmission, and use of electricity; thus the potential for human exposure is high. These electric and magnetic fields are predominantly of low frequency (60 Hz) and generally of low intensity. The prevailing view among physicists is that exposure to these low-frequency, low-intensity fields does not pose a health hazard. However, this view has been challenged by reports linking magnetic field exposure to the development of leukemia and other cancers. Because multiple epidemiologic studies suggested a potential for increased cancer rates with increasing exposure, and because of public concern, the effects of 60-Hz magnetic field exposure were examined in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice in 8-week full-body-exposure studies. Animals were evaluated for hematology and clinical chemistry (rats only) parameters, pineal gland hormone concentrations, and histopathology. Additional studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats to examine teratologic and reproductive effects of magnetic field exposure.

  10. Developmental toxicity and molecular responses of marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) embryos to ciguatoxin P-CTX-1 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meng; Leung, Priscilla T Y; Ip, Jack C H; Cheng, Jin-Ping; Wu, Jia-Jun; Gu, Jia-Rui; Lam, Paul K S

    2017-02-10

    Ciguatoxins are produced by toxic benthic dinoflagellates and cause ciguatera fish poisoning worldwide, but the toxic effects on developing marine fish have not been well investigated. The Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX-1), is a potent sodium channel agonist, which is one of the most toxic members among all CTXs. This study evaluated the toxic effects of microinjecting purified Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) on embryonic development of marine medaka Oryzias melastigma. A lower 96h-LD50 value was estimated for eleuthero-embryos (1.32ngg(-1)) than that for embryos (1.71ngg(-1)), indicating that P-CTX-1 is more lethal to newly hatched medaka larvae. P-CTX-1 induced detrimental effects during embryonic development, including hatching failure, abnormalities in physical development (caudal fin malformation and spinal deformities), internal damage (green coloration of the gall bladder and hemorrhaging), immune dysfunction, and altered muscle physiology (bradycardia and hyperkinetic twitching). The results of a transcriptional expression analysis of genes related to the stress/immune responses, cardiac and bone development, and apoptosis supported the observed developmental abnormalities. This study advanced the understanding of P-CTX-1 mediated toxic mechanisms in the development of early life stages of a fish, and thus contributed to the toxicity assessment of CTXs in marine ecosystems.

  11. Prediction of mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, developmental toxicity, and skin sensitisation with Caesar program for a set of conazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolčič-Tavčar, Mateja; Vračko, Marjan

    2012-09-01

    This article presents models to predict mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, developmental toxicity, and skin sensitisation for a set of 27 conazoles. The predictions were performed with the program package CAESAR, which is available on the Internet. The CAESAR programs were developed to support the European Community Regulation on chemicals and their safe use (REACH) and follow the OECD principles for (Q)SAR models used for regulatory purposes. The programs provide a number of information, including a binary classification of a compound as toxic or non-toxic and information on similar compounds from the model's training sets (similarity sets). In this study we analysed conazole sets using principal component analysis (PCA). The predictions were compared to the currently valid classification of these substances in the European Union (EU) or to the classification proposed at expert meetings of the Pesticide Risk Assessment and Peer Review (PRAPeR) group. The predicted classification for mutagenicity was in good agreement with regulatory classification, the predictions for carcinogenicity and developmental toxicity showed some discrepancy in particular cases, while the predictions for skin sensitisation showed even greater discrepancy.

  12. A category approach to predicting the developmental (neuro) toxicity of organotin compounds: the value of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryotoxicity test (ZET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Wolterbeek, André; Te Brake, Lindsey; Snel, Cor; Menke, Aswin; Rubingh, Carina; de Groot, Didima; Kroese, Dinant

    2013-11-01

    Zebrafish embryos were exposed to different organotin compounds during very early development (embryotoxic compound at all time points and endpoints studied. In fact, we observed a clear concordance between the effects observed in our zebrafish embryo model, and those observed with these compounds in full rodent in vivo studies. All organotin compounds classified as developmental (neuro) toxicants in vivo, were correctly classified in the present assay. Together, our results support the ZET model as a valuable tool for providing biological verification for a grouping and a read-across approach to developmental (neuro) toxicity.

  13. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides.

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Karin Dreisig; Taxvig, Camilla; Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same conazoles were evaluated on the basis of data from a battery of cell assays for endocrine activity, including assays for AR, ER, AhR, and sex hormone synthesis, and data were compared to in vivo develo...

  14. Relative developmental toxicity of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihua; Li, Yifan; Coelhan, Mehmet; Chan, Hing Man; Ma, Wanli; Liu, Liyan

    2016-12-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are ubiquitous in the environment and might cause adverse environmental and human health effects. Little is known about the relative toxicity of different SCCP compounds especially during development. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare effects of seven SCCP groups at environmentally relevant levels, using a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Observations on malformation, survival rates at 96 h post fertilization (hpf), and hatching rates at 72 hpf indicated that the C10- groups (C10H18Cl4, 1,2,5,6,9,10-C10H16Cl6 and C10H15Cl7) were more toxic than the C12- groups (C12H22Cl4, C12H19Cl7 and 1,1,1,3,10,12,12,12-C12H18Cl8) and Cereclor 63L. The C10- groups were also more potent than C12- groups and Cereclor 63L in decreasing thyroid hormone levels. Among the three compounds within the C10- group, the compounds with less chlorine content had stronger effects on sub-lethal malformations but less effects on triiodothyronine (T3) and tetraiodothyronine (T4). Only C10H18Cl4 significantly decreased the mRNA expression of tyr, ttr, dio2 and dio3 at a dose-dependent manner suggesting that the specific mode of actions differ with different congeners. The mechanisms of disruption of thyroid status by different SCCPs could be different. C10H18Cl4 might inhibit T3 production through the inhibition effect on dio2. These results indicate that SCCP exposure could alter gene expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and thyroid hormone levels. The mechanisms of disruption of thyroid status by different SCCPs could be different. Our results on the relative developmental toxicities of SCCPs will be useful to reach a better understanding of SCCP toxicity supporting environmental risk evaluation and regulation and used as a guidance for environmental monitoring of SCCPs in the future.

  15. A perspective on the developmental toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Campagnolo, Luisa; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Tarrade, Anne; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Valentino, Sarah; Park, Margriet V D Z; de Jong, Wim H; Wolterink, Gerrit; Piersma, Aldert H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071276947; Ross, Bryony L; Hutchison, Gary R; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Vogel, Ulla; Jackson, Petra; Slama, Rémy; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Cassee, Flemming R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143038990

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to clarify whether maternal inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) may constitute a hazard to pregnancy and fetal development, primarily based on experimental animal studies of NP and air pollution particles. Overall, it is plausible that NP may translocate from the respiratory

  16. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: reproductive and developmental effects of light catalytic cracked naphtha distillate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, C; Bui, Q; Breglia, R; Burnett, D; Koschier, F; Podhasky, P; Lapadula, E; White, R; Schroeder, R E

    1999-11-26

    A distillate of light catalytic cracked naphtha (CAS number 64741-55-5, LCCN-D), administered by inhalation, was tested for reproductive and developmental toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats, following a modified OECD Guideline 421, Reproductive/Developmental Toxicity Screening Protocol. LCCN-D was administered as a vapor, 6 h/d, 7 d/wk at target concentrations of 0, 750, 2500 or 7500 ppm to female rats for approximately 7 wk from 2 wk prior to mating, during mating through gestational d 19, and to males beginning 2 wk prior to mating for 8 consecutive weeks. Dams and litters were sacrificed on postnatal d 4, and males were sacrificed within the following week. Parental systemic effects observed at the 7500 ppm exposure level were increased kidney weights and relative liver weights in males and increased spleen weights in high-dose females. Livers and spleens from rats in the high-dose group were normal in appearance at necropsy. IncreaSed kidney weights in high-dose males were indicative of male-rat-specific light hydrocarbon nephropathy. No test-related microscopic changes were observed in the reproductive organs or nasal turbinate tissues of either sex. Reproductive performance was unaffected by treatment with LCCN-D. Fertility index was > or =90% in all dose groups. There were no exposure-related differences in implantation sites and live pups per litter, and no gross abnormalities were observed. Pups born from treated dams showed comparable body weights and weight gains to controls. The viability index on postpartum d 4 was > or =97%; the high-dose group had more male than female pups at birth and at d 4 postpartum. Under the conditions of this study, the no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for exposure to light catalytic cracked naphtha distillate for parental toxicity was 2500 ppm and the NOAEL for reproductive performance and developmental toxicity was 7500 ppm.

  17. A perspective on the developmental toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Campagnolo, Luisa; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to clarify whether maternal inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) may constitute a hazard to pregnancy and fetal development, primarily based on experimental animal studies of NP and air pollution particles. Overall, it is plausible that NP may translocate from the respirat......This paper aimed to clarify whether maternal inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) may constitute a hazard to pregnancy and fetal development, primarily based on experimental animal studies of NP and air pollution particles. Overall, it is plausible that NP may translocate from...... the respiratory tract to the placenta and fetus, but also that adverse effects may occur secondarily to maternal inflammatory responses. The limited database describes several organ systems in the offspring to be potentially sensitive to maternal inhalation of particles, but large uncertainties exist about...

  18. Comparative Developmental Toxicity of Environmentally Relevant Oxygenated PAHs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Andrea; Goodale, Britton; Truong, Lisa; Simonich, Michael; Swanson, Annika; Matzke, Melissa M.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants in urban air, dust and in the soil of most industrial coal gassification, coal burning, coke production and wood preservation sites (Howsam and Jones 1998). It is widely recognized that PAHs pose risks to human health,having been associated with increased risks of systemic inflammation (Delfino et al. 2010), cardiopulmonary mortality (Lee et al. 2011; Lewtas 2007) and lung cancer mortality (Grant 2009; Hoshuyama et al. 2006). The potential risks may be especially acute for the developing fetus and infant where PAH exposures have been linked to low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation, in-utero mortality and lower intelligence (Dejmek et al. 1999; Dejmek et al. 2000; Perera et al. 1999; Perera et al. 2009; Perera et al. 2006; Perera et al. 1998; Wu et al. 2010). Despite the more than two decades of intensive study devoted to parent PAHs, they are only part of the hazard spectrum from PAH contamination.

  19. Developmental toxicity of selenium to Dolly Varden char (Salvelinus malma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Blair G; deBruyn, Adrian M H; Elphick, James R F; Davies, Martin; Bustard, David; Chapman, Peter M

    2010-12-01

    Gametes were collected from Dolly Varden char (Salvelinus malma) from waterbodies in a region exposed to mining-related selenium (Se) releases in British Columbia, Canada. Fertilized eggs were incubated in a laboratory and deformities were assessed on newly-hatched alevins using a graduated severity index. No effects were observed on egg or alevin survival or larval weight across the studied exposure range of 5.4 to 66 mg/kg dry weight in egg. Length of some larvae was reduced at the highest egg Se concentrations and a clear residue-response relationship was observed for larval deformity. The egg concentration corresponding to a 10% increase in the frequency of deformity (EC10) was 54 mg/kg dry weight, which is substantially higher than reported for other cold-water fish species.

  20. Continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies in developmental toxicology: Report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity, 14-16 May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Roland; Rauch, Martina; Gall, Andrea; Buschmann, Jochen; Clark, Ruth; Fuchs, Antje; Kan, Haidong; Heinrich, Verena; Kellner, Rupert; Knudsen, Thomas B; Li, Weihua; Makris, Susan L; Ooshima, Yojiro; Paumgartten, Francisco; Piersma, Aldert H; Schönfelder, Gilbert; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Schaefer, Christof; Shiota, Kohei; Ulbrich, Beate; Ding, Xuncheng; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    This article is a report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity held in May 2014. The main aim of the workshop was the continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies used in the assessment of embryo- and fetotoxic findings. The following main topics were discussed: harmonized categorization of external, skeletal, visceral and materno-fetal findings into malformations, variations and grey zone anomalies, aspects of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals, and innovations for new methodologies in developmental toxicology. The application of Version 2 terminology in the DevTox database was considered as a useful improvement in the categorization of developmental anomalies. Participants concluded that initiation of a project for comparative assessments of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals could support regulatory risk assessment and university-based training. Improvement of new methodological approaches for alternatives to animal testing should be triggered for a better understanding of developmental outcomes.

  1. FUNCTIONAL-ASPECTS OF DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF POLYHALOGENATED AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS IN EXPERIMENTAL-ANIMALS AND HUMAN INFANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, A; AHLBORG, UG; VANDENBERG, M; BIRNBAUM, LS; BOERSMA, ER; BOSVELD, B; DENISON, MS; GRAY, LE; HAGMAR, L; HOLENE, E; HUISMAN, M; JACOBSON, SW; JACOBSON, JL; KOOPMANESSEBOOM, C; KOPPE, JG; KULIG, BM; MORSE, DC; MUCKLE, G; PETERSON, RE; SAUER, PJJ; SEEGAL, RF; SMITSVANPROOIJE, AE; TOUWEN, BCL; WEISGLASKUPERUS, N; WINNEKE, G

    1995-01-01

    A scientific evaluation was made of functional aspects of developmental toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in experimental animals and in human infants. Persistent neurobehavioral, reproductive and endocri

  2. Optimization and Performance Assessment of the Chorion-Off [Dechorinated] Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Zhang, Cindy X; Augustine-Rauch, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    The Dechorinated Zebrafish Embryo Developmental toxicity assay was originally developed from a training set of 31 compounds and reported to be 87% concordant with in vivo teratogenicity data (Brannen, K. C., Panzica-Kelly, J. M., Danberry, T. L., and Augustine-Rauch, K. A. (2010). Development of a zebrafish embryo teratogenicity assay and quantitative prediction model. Birth Defects Res. 89, 66-77.). The assay includes scoring larva treated in a concentration range for malformations of specific morphological structures/organ systems. The model includes identifying a no-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and the concentration resulting in 25% lethality (LC25) at 5 days postfertilization. An LC25/NOAEL ratio ≥10 classifies a compound positive for teratogenic potential. A consortium effort evaluated a modified version of this assay which involved enzymatic chorion treatment instead of manual dissection and used experimental replicates for final classification. The modified assay achieved an 85% overall predictivity (Gustafson, A. L., Stedman, D. B., Ball, J., Hillegass, J. M., Flood, A., Zhang, C. X., Panzica-Kelly, J., Cao, J., Coburn, A., Enright, B. P., et al. (2012). Inter-laboratory assessment of a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay - progress report on phase I. Reprod. Toxicol. 33, 155-164.). The objective of this study was to perform a thorough performance evaluation of the dechorinated assay by repeating the original training set and testing additional compounds in experimental replicates. When the initial training set was repeated with inclusion of experimental replicates, the overall predictivity was 83%. Model performance was tested with an additional 34 compounds and achieved overall predictivity of 74%. When the training and test sets were combined (63 compounds) the assay's final sensitivity was 83% and the specificity was 71%. Total predictivity was 78% with relatively balanced predictivity for nonteratogens (77%) and teratogens (78%). The

  3. Developmental Toxicity of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-10

    developmental toxicity tests with embryos of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis used to evaluate four individual DWDB; bromodichloromethane...SUBJECT TERMS Developmental toxicity; FETAX; water disinfection by-products; frogs ; Xenopus laevis; embryo malformations; embryo mortality...Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis) L. M. Brennan,1 M. W. Toussaint,1 D. M. Kumsher,1 W. E. Dennis,’ A. B

  4. Influence of developmental stage, salts and food presence on various end points using Caenorhabditis elegans for aquatic toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donkin, S.G.; Williams, P.L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This study used a randomized block design to investigate the importance of several variables in using the free-living soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, for aquatic toxicity testing. Concentration-response data were obtained on nematodes of various developmental stages exposed to four metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, and Hg) and a water-soluble organic toxicant, sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP), under conditions of varied solvent medium (with or without salts and with or without a bacterial food source). The end points measured were 24- and 96-h mortality LC50 value, as well as development of larval stages to adulthood and evidence of reproduction. The results suggest that nematodes of various ages respond similarity to a given toxicant for all end points measured, although adults cultured from eggs appeared more sensitive than adults cultured from dauer larvae. The most important environmental variable in determining toxicity was the medium in which the tests were conducted. The presence of potassium and sodium salts in the medium significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the toxicity of many test samples. The presence of bacteria had little effect on 24-h tests with salts, but was important in 96-h survival and development. Based on sensitivity and ease of handling, adults cultured from eggs are recommended in both 24h and 96-h tests.

  5. Synergistic interaction of glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine on developmental toxicity in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, J R; Friedman, M; Bantle, J A

    1995-12-01

    The embryo toxicities of two major potato glycoalkaloids, alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine, were examined individually and in mixtures using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus. Calculations of toxic units (TUs) were used to assess possible antagonism, synergism or response addition of several mixtures ranging from approximately 3:1 to 1:20 TUs of alpha-chaconine to alpha-solanine. Some combinations exhibited strong synergism in the following measures of developmental toxicity: (a) 96-hr LC50, defined as the median concentration causing 50% embryo lethality; (b) 96-hr EC50 (malformation), defined as the concentration causing 50% malformation of the surviving embryos; and (c) teratogenic index which is equal to LC50/EC50 (malformation). The results indicated that each of the mixtures caused synergistic mortality or malformation. Furthermore, these studies suggested that the synergism observed for a specific mixture cannot be used to predict possible synergism of other mixtures with different ratios of the two glycoalkaloids; toxicities observed for individual glycoalkaloids may not be able to predict toxicities of mixtures; and specific combinations found in different potato varieties need to be tested to assess the safety of a particular cultivar.

  6. Computational systems analysis of developmental toxicity: design, development and implementation of a Birth Defects Systems Manager (BDSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amar V; Knudsen, Kenneth B; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2005-01-01

    Birth defects and developmental disabilities remain an important public health issue worldwide. With the availability of genomic sequences from a growing number of human and model organisms and the rapid expansion of the public repositories holding large-scale gene expression datasets, a computational systems analysis of developmental toxicology can incorporate this vast digital information toward the realization of predictive models for complex disease. Here we describe the initial design, development and implementation of a Birth Defects Systems Manager (BDSM). The project was motivated by the need for a computational-bioinformatics infrastructure to manage vast digital information from functional genomics and for a new knowledge environment specifically engineered for the analysis of developmental processes and toxicities. Proof-of-concept tested BDSM using meta-analysis of gene expression data collected from different laboratories, technology platforms, and study models. The composite dataset incorporated 232 microarray comparisons of RNA samples by single or dual microarray platforms, cDNA or oligonucleotide based probes, and human or mouse sequence information. Preliminary results identified system-level features in the embryonic transcriptome as it reacted to various developmental-teratological stimuli. BDSM is open access through the worldwide web (http://systemsanalysis.louisville.edu/) and can be integrated with other bioinformatics tools and resources to advance the pace of discovery in birth defects research.

  7. Current challenges in toxicological research: Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of manufactured nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Fernandes Delgado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are particles or fibers with at least one of the three dimensions in the size range between 1 and 100 nm. Owing to unique physical and chemical properties, na-no-sized particles (NPs have a variety of industrial uses and are more and more preva-lent in everyday life. However, despite the growing number of nanotechnology products, health risk assessment of NPs is in its early infancy. The potential adverse effects of NPs on prenatal development are even less well investigated. This article summarizes the literature on the developmental toxicity of NPs. Generally, the studies are very recent and include ex vivo experiments using non-mammalian species, in vitro assays (mouse embryonic stem cell test and in vivo investigations using rodents. Very little has been published on the effects of NPs on the development and function of the human placenta or on the transference of NPs into the human embryo and fetus. Some limitations of using ex vivo and in vitro assays to predict adverse effects of NPs on human prenatal development are discussed in this overview. The structural and functional differences between the rodent and human placenta in early pregnancy and their possible relevance to the transplacental passage of NPs are also commented upon.

  8. Developmental toxic effects of monocrotophos, an organophosphorous pesticide, on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamanji, Rajesh; Bethu, M S; Yashwanth, B; Leelavathi, S; Venkateswara Rao, J

    2015-05-01

    The present study examined the response of zebrafish embryos exposed to different concentrations (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mg/L) of monocrotophos under static conditions for 96 h. We found that mortality had occurred within 48 h at all test concentrations, later insignificant mortality was observed. Monocrotophos (MCP) can be rated as moderately toxic to the Zebrafish embryos with a 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of 37.44 ± 3.32 mg/L. In contrast, it greatly affected the development of zebrafish embryos by inducing several developmental abnormalities like pericardial edema, altered heart development, spinal and vertebral anomalies in a concentration-dependent manner. A significant percent reduction in length by 9-48% and heart beats by 18-51% was observed in hatchlings exposed to LC10 and LC50 concentrations at 96 h when compared to controls. The process of looping formation of heart at embryonic stage was greatly affected by the LC50 concentration of MCP. The neurotoxic potentiality of MCP was assessed by using a marker enzyme, acetylcholinesterase in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. MCP was found to be the most potent inhibitor of AChE in vitro with an IC50 value of 4.3 × 10(-4) M. The whole-body AChE enzyme activity in vivo was significantly inhibited during the exposure tenure with the maximum inhibition of 62% at 24 h.

  9. Developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity of two matrine-type alkaloids, matrine and sophocarpine, in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos/larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhao-Guang; Li, Ming-Hui; Wang, Jun-Song; Wei, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qing-Wang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Matrine and sophocarpine are two major matrine-type alkaloids included in the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Kushen (the root of Sophora flavescens Ait.). They have been widely used clinically in China, however with few reports concerning their potential toxicities. This study investigated the developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity of matrine and sophocarpine on zebrafish embryos/larvae from 0 to 96/120h post fertilization (hpf). Both drugs displayed teratogenic and lethal effects with the EC50 and LC50 values at 145 and 240mg/L for matrine and 87.1 and 166mg/L for sophocarpine, respectively. Exposure of matrine and sophocarpine significantly altered spontaneous movement and inhibited swimming performance at concentrations below those causing lethality and malformations, indicating a neurotoxic potential of both drugs. The results are in agreement with most mammalian studies and clinical observations.

  10. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: reproductive and developmental effects of light catalytic reformed naphtha distillate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, C; Bui, Q; Breglia, R; Burnett, D; Koschier, F; Podhasky, P; White, R; Hoffman, G; Schroeder, R

    2000-06-09

    A distillate of light catalytic reformed naphtha (CAS number 64741-63-5, LCRN-D) administered by inhalation was tested for reproductive and developmental toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats, following a modified OECD Guideline 421, Reproductive/Developmental Toxicity Screening protocol. LCRN-D was administered as a vapor, 6 h/d, 7 d/wk at target concentrations of 0, 750, 2500 or 7500 ppm to female rats for approximately 6 wk from 2 wk prior to mating, during mating through gestational d 19, and to males beginning 2 wk prior to mating for approximately 7 consecutive weeks. Dams and litters were sacrificed on postnatal d 4 and males were sacrificed within the week after the last litter was necropsied. Parental systemic effects observed at the 7500 ppm exposure level included slightly lower body weights for males throughout the study. Increased kidney to body weight and increased liver to body weight ratio in male rats exposed to 7500 ppm LCRN-D may be related to slightly lower final mean body weights. Body and organ weight data for female rats in all exposure groups were comparable to controls. No test-material-related microscopic changes were observed in the reproductive organs or nasal turbinate tissue of either sex. Reproductive performance was unaffected by exposure to LCRN-D. The mating and fertility indices were 100% in all groups. There were no significant exposure-related differences in implantation sites or live pups per litter, and no gross abnormalities were observed in pups from treated dams. Pups born from LCRN-D-exposed dams showed comparable body weights and weight gain to control pups. The viability index on postpartum d 4 was > or =97%. Under conditions of this study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for exposure to light catalytic reformed naphtha distillate for parental effects was 2500 ppm and the NOAEL for reproductive and developmental toxicity was 7500 ppm.

  11. The role of metabolic biomarkers in drug toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolic profiling is a technique that can potentially provide more sensitive and specific biomarkers of toxicity than the current clinical measures benefiting preclinical and clinical drug studies. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) platforms have been used for metabolic profiling studies of drug toxicity. Not only can both techniques provide novel biomarker(s) of toxicity but the combination of both techniques gives a broader range of metabolites evaluated. Changes in metabolic patterns can provide insight into mechanism(s) of toxicity and help to eliminate a potentially toxic new chemical entity earlier in the developmental process. Metabolic profiling offers numerous advantages in toxicological research and screening as sample collection and preparation are relatively simple. Further, sample throughput, reproducibility, and accuracy are high. The area of drug toxicity of therapeutic compounds has already been impacted by metabolic profiling studies and will continue to be impacted as new, more specific biomarker(s) are found. In order for a biomarker or pattern of biomarkers to be accepted, it must be shown that they originate from the target tissue of interest. Metabolic profiling studies are amenable to any biofluid or tissue sample making it possible to link the changes noted in urine for instance as originating from renal injury. Additionally, the ease of sample collection makes it possible to follow a single animal or subject over time in order to determine whether and when the toxicity resolves itself. This review focuses on the advantages of metabolic profiling for drug toxicity studies.

  12. Developmental exposure to organophosphate flame retardants elicits overt toxicity and alters behavior in early life stage zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishaw, Laura V; Hunter, Deborah L; Padnos, Beth; Padilla, Stephanie; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-12-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are common replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and have been detected at high concentrations in environmental samples. OPFRs are structurally similar to organophosphate pesticides and may adversely affect the developing nervous system. This study evaluated the overt toxicity, uptake, and neurobehavioral effects of tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), and tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TDBPP) in early life stage zebrafish. Chlorpyrifos was used as a positive control. For overt toxicity and neurobehavioral assessments, zebrafish were exposed from 0 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf). Hatching, death, or malformations were evaluated daily. Teratogenic effects were scored by visual examination on 6 dpf. To evaluate uptake and metabolism, zebrafish were exposed to 1 µM of each organophosphate (OP) flame retardant and collected on 1 and 5 dpf to monitor accumulation. Larval swimming activity was measured in 6 dpf larvae to evaluate neurobehavioral effects of exposures below the acute toxicity threshold. TDBPP elicited the greatest toxicity at >1 µM. TDCPP and chlorpyrifos were overtly toxic at concentrations ≥10 µM, TCEP, and TCPP were not overtly toxic at the doses tested. Tissue concentrations increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the parent chemical after 24 h exposures. TDCPP and TDBPP and their respective metabolites were detected in embryos on 5 dpf. For all chemicals tested, developmental exposures that were not overtly toxic significantly altered larval swimming activity. These data indicate that OPFRs adversely affect development of early life stage zebrafish.

  13. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general.

  14. The use of in vitro toxicity data and physiologically based kinetic modeling to predict dose-response curves for in vivo developmental toxicity of glycol ethers in rat and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisse, Jochem; de Jong, Esther; van de Sandt, Johannes J M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Woutersen, Ruud A; Piersma, Aldert H; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Verwei, Miriam

    2010-12-01

    At present, regulatory assessment of systemic toxicity is almost solely carried out using animal models. The European Commission's REACH legislation stimulates the use of animal-free approaches to obtain information on the toxicity of chemicals. In vitro toxicity tests provide in vitro concentration-response curves for specific target cells, whereas in vivo dose-response curves are regularly used for human risk assessment. The present study shows an approach to predict in vivo dose-response curves for developmental toxicity by combining in vitro toxicity data and in silico kinetic modeling. A physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model was developed, describing the kinetics of four glycol ethers and their embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites in rat and man. In vitro toxicity data of these metabolites derived in the embryonic stem cell test were used as input in the PBK model to extrapolate in vitro concentration-response curves to predicted in vivo dose-response curves for developmental toxicity of the parent glycol ethers in rat and man. The predicted dose-response curves for rat were found to be in concordance with the embryotoxic dose levels measured in reported in vivo rat studies. Therefore, predicted dose-response curves for rat could be used to set a point of departure for deriving safe exposure limits in human risk assessment. Combining the in vitro toxicity data with a human PBK model allows the prediction of dose-response curves for human developmental toxicity. This approach could therefore provide a means to reduce the need for animal testing in human risk assessment practices.

  15. Dose-rate effects of ethylene oxide exposure on developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, E; Long, N; Smith, A; Williams, P; Ravi, S; Gill, J; Henessey, R; Skornik, W; Brain, J; Kimmel, C; Kimmel, G; Holmes, L; Ryan, L

    1999-08-01

    In risk assessment, evaluating a health effect at a duration of exposure that is untested involves assuming that equivalent multiples of concentration (C) and duration (T) of exposure have the same effect. The limitations of this approach (attributed to F. Haber, Zur Geschichte des Gaskrieges [On the history of gas warfare], in Funf Vortrage aus den Jahren 1920-1923 [Five lectures from the years 1920-1923], 1924, Springer, Berlin, pp. 76-92), have been noted in several studies. The study presented in this paper was designed to specifically look at dose-rate (C x T) effects, and it forms an ideal case study to implement statistical models and to examine the statistical issues in risk assessment. Pregnant female C57BL/6J mice were exposed, on gestational day 7, to ethylene oxide (EtO) via inhalation for 1.5, 3, or 6 h at exposures that result in C x T multiples of 2100 or 2700 ppm-h. EtO was selected because of its short half-life, documented developmental toxicity, and relevance to exposures that occur in occupational settings. Concurrent experiments were run with animals exposed to air for similar periods. Statistical analysis using models developed to assess dose-rate effects revealed significant effects with respect to fetal death and resorptions, malformations, crown-to-rump length, and fetal weight. Animals exposed to short, high exposures of EtO on day 7 of gestation were found to have more adverse effects than animals exposed to the same C x T multiple but at longer, lower exposures. The implication for risk assessment is that applying Haber's Law could potentially lead to an underestimation of risk at a shorter duration of exposure and an overestimation of risk at a longer duration of exposure. Further research, toxicological and statistical, are required to understand the mechanism of the dose-rate effects, and how to incorporate the mechanistic information into the risk assessment decision process.

  16. Fluoride-elicited developmental testicular toxicity in rats: Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shun [Department of Environmental Health and MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hangkong Road 13, Wuhan 430030, Hubei (China); Jiang, Chunyang [Department of Environmental Health and MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hangkong Road 13, Wuhan 430030, Hubei (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tianjin Union Medicine Centre, 190 Jieyuan Road, Hongqiao District, Tianjin 300121, Tianjin (China); Liu, Hongliang [Tianjin Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Huayue Road 6, Hedong Region, Tianjin 300011, Tianjin (China); Guan, Zhizhong [Department of Pathology, Guiyang Medical College, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China); Zeng, Qiang [Tianjin Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Huayue Road 6, Hedong Region, Tianjin 300011, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Gao, Hui; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei [Department of Environmental Health and MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hangkong Road 13, Wuhan 430030, Hubei (China); Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu [Tianjin Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Huayue Road 6, Hedong Region, Tianjin 300011, Tianjin (China); Wang, Zhenglun [Department of Environmental Health and MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hangkong Road 13, Wuhan 430030, Hubei (China); Wang, Aiguo, E-mail: wangaiguo@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Health and MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hangkong Road 13, Wuhan 430030, Hubei (China)

    2013-09-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can damage a variety of organs and tissues in the human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity are not well understood. In this study, we used a rat model to simulate the situations of human exposure and aimed to evaluate the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory response in fluoride-induced testicular injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 25, 50 and 100 mg/L via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to gestation, birth and finally to post-puberty. And then the testes of male offspring were studied at 8 weeks of age. Our results demonstrated that fluoride treatment increased MDA accumulation, decreased SOD activity, and enhanced germ cell apoptosis. In addition, fluoride elevated mRNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1 (IRE1), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), indicating activation of ER stress signaling. Furthermore, fluoride also induced testicular inflammation, as manifested by gene up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent manner. These were associated with marked histopathological lesions including injury of spermatogonia, decrease of spermatocytes and absence of elongated spermatids, as well as severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that ER stress and inflammation would be novel and significant mechanisms responsible for fluoride-induced disturbance of spermatogenesis and germ cell loss in addition to oxidative stress. - Highlights: • We used a rat model to simulate the situations of human fluoride (F) exposure. • Developmental F exposure induces testicular damage related with oxidative stress.

  17. Target organ specific activity of drosophila MRP (ABCC1) moderates developmental toxicity of methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Lisa; Korbas, Malgorzata; Davidson, Philip; Broberg, Karin; Rand, Matthew Dearborn

    2014-08-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous and persistent neurotoxin that poses a risk to human health. Although the mechanisms of MeHg toxicity are not fully understood, factors that contribute to susceptibility are even less well known. Studies of human gene polymorphisms have identified a potential role for the multidrug resistance-like protein (MRP/ABCC) family, ATP-dependent transporters, in MeHg susceptibility. MRP transporters have been shown to be important for MeHg excretion in adult mouse models, but their role in moderating MeHg toxicity during development has not been explored. We therefore investigated effects of manipulating expression levels of MRP using a Drosophila development assay. Drosophila MRP (dMRP) is homologous to human MRP1-4 (ABCC1-4), sharing 50% identity and 67% similarity with MRP1. A greater susceptibility to MeHg is seen in dMRP mutant flies, demonstrated by reduced rates of eclosion on MeHg-containing food. Furthermore, targeted knockdown of dMRP expression using GAL4>UAS RNAi methods demonstrates a tissue-specific function for dMRP in gut, Malpighian tubules, and the nervous system in moderating developmental susceptibility to MeHg. Using X-ray synchrotron fluorescence imaging, these same tissues were also identified as the highest Hg-accumulating tissues in fly larvae. Moreover, higher levels of Hg are seen in dMRP mutant larvae compared with a control strain fed an equivalent dose of MeHg. In sum, these data demonstrate that dMRP expression, both globally and within Hg-targeted organs, has a profound effect on susceptibility to MeHg in developing flies. Our findings point to a potentially novel and specific role for dMRP in neurons in the protection against MeHg. Finally, this experimental system provides a tractable model to evaluate human polymorphic variants of MRP and other gene variants relevant to genetic studies of mercury-exposed populations.

  18. Comparison of rat and rabbit embryo-fetal developmental toxicity data for 379 pharmaceuticals: on the nature and severity of developmental effects (Critical Reviews in Toxicology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory non-clinical safety testing of human pharmaceutical compounds typically requires embryo fetal developmental toxicity (EFDT) testing in two species, (one rodent and one non-rodent, usually the rat and the rabbit). The question has been raised whether under some conditio...

  19. In Silico Model for Developmental Toxicity: How to Use QSAR Models and Interpret Their Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Marco; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Kulkarni, Sunil; Barton-Maclaren, Tara S; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Modeling developmental toxicity has been a challenge for (Q)SAR model developers due to the complexity of the endpoint. Recently, some new in silico methods have been developed introducing the possibility to evaluate the integration of existing methods by taking advantage of various modeling perspectives. It is important that the model user is aware of the underlying basis of the different models in general, as well as the considerations and assumptions relative to the specific predictions that are obtained from these different models for the same chemical. The evaluation on the predictions needs to be done on a case-by-case basis, checking the analogs (possibly using structural, physicochemical, and toxicological information); for this purpose, the assessment of the applicability domain of the models provides further confidence in the model prediction. In this chapter, we present some examples illustrating an approach to combine human-based rules and statistical methods to support the prediction of developmental toxicity; we also discuss assumptions and uncertainties of the methodology.

  20. Leeward Community College: Developmental Education Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, William A.

    Five programs in developmental reading at Leeward Community College (Hawaii) were studied to determine their effectiveness. The programs were: (1) general reading using individualized exercises; (2) an integrated skills approach combining reading and basic English skills; (3) a curriculum designed for each student from diagnostic testing; (4) a…

  1. Reproductive toxicity in Xenopus tropicalis after developmental exposure to environmental concentrations of ethynylestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenhammar, Irina; Holm, Lena; Eklund, Rosita; Berg, Cecilia

    2009-01-31

    Reproductive disorders in wildlife and humans have been linked to developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. In frog tadpoles, environmental concentrations of ethynylestradiol (EE(2)) disrupt gonadal differentiation which results in female-biased sex ratios at metamorphosis indicating sex-reversal of genotypic males. It is not known if developmental exposure to estrogens results in reduced reproductive success in amphibians. The objective of this work was to investigate if exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of EE(2) during sex differentiation impairs reproductive organ development, fertility, and sexual behavior in adult frogs. A specific aim was to evaluate if testicular structure and function was affected in males that were not sex-reversed. Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles were exposed until metamorphosis to 6, 60, and 600 pM EE(2). Eight months after metamorphosis, reproductive organ morphology and fertility were evaluated. Larval EE(2)-exposure caused an increased proportion of phenotypic females indicating that sex-reversal of genotypic males is persistent. Sex-reversal was implied at concentrations as low as 6 pM (1.8 ng/l), which is comparable to levels observed in the environment. EE(2)-exposed males that were not sex-reversed had a significantly reduced fertilization rate compared with control males. Histological evaluation revealed that EE(2)-exposed males had a reduced amount of spermatozoa in the testis. Among frogs with ovaries there was a significantly higher percentage that lacked oviducts in the group exposed to 600 pM EE(2) compared with control females. No effect of EE(2) on sexual behavior was noted. The results indicate that reproduction in wild frogs might be impaired by estrogenic environmental pollutants. Similarities between the present effects and those reported in fish, birds and mammals after developmental exposure to estrogens suggest that X. tropicalis is a promising animal model for research on developmental

  2. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Developmental Toxicity Assays for Chemical Safety Screening and Systems Biology Data Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Klima, Stefanie; Sureshkumar, Perumal Srinivasan; Meganathan, Kesavan; Jagtap, Smita; Rempel, Eugen; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan Georg; Waldmann, Tanja; Hescheler, Jürgen; Leist, Marcel; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2015-06-17

    Efficient protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells to various tissues in combination with -omics technologies opened up new horizons for in vitro toxicity testing of potential drugs. To provide a solid scientific basis for such assays, it will be important to gain quantitative information on the time course of development and on the underlying regulatory mechanisms by systems biology approaches. Two assays have therefore been tuned here for these requirements. In the UKK test system, human embryonic stem cells (hESC) (or other pluripotent cells) are left to spontaneously differentiate for 14 days in embryoid bodies, to allow generation of cells of all three germ layers. This system recapitulates key steps of early human embryonic development, and it can predict human-specific early embryonic toxicity/teratogenicity, if cells are exposed to chemicals during differentiation. The UKN1 test system is based on hESC differentiating to a population of neuroectodermal progenitor (NEP) cells for 6 days. This system recapitulates early neural development and predicts early developmental neurotoxicity and epigenetic changes triggered by chemicals. Both systems, in combination with transcriptome microarray studies, are suitable for identifying toxicity biomarkers. Moreover, they may be used in combination to generate input data for systems biology analysis. These test systems have advantages over the traditional toxicological studies requiring large amounts of animals. The test systems may contribute to a reduction of the costs for drug development and chemical safety evaluation. Their combination sheds light especially on compounds that may influence neurodevelopment specifically.

  3. Prediction of in vivo developmental toxicity of all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro toxicity data and in silico physiologically based kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisse, Jochem; Bosgra, Sieto; Blaauboer, Bas J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Verwei, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    The use of laboratory animals for toxicity testing in chemical safety assessment meets increasing ethical, economic and legislative constraints. The development, validation and application of reliable alternatives for in vivo toxicity testing are therefore urgently needed. In order to use toxicity data obtained from in vitro assays for risk assessment, in vitro concentration-response data need to be translated into in vivo dose-response data that are needed to obtain points of departure for risk assessment, like a benchmark dose (BMD). In the present study, we translated in vitro concentration-response data of the retinoid all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), obtained in the differentiation assay of the embryonic stem cell test, into in vivo dose-response data using a physiologically based kinetic model for rat and human that is mainly based on kinetic model parameter values derived using in vitro techniques. The predicted in vivo dose-response data were used for BMD modeling, and the obtained BMDL10 values [lower limit of the 95 % confidence interval on the BMD at which a benchmark response equivalent to a 10 % effect size (BMR10) is reached (BMD10)] for rat were compared with BMDL10 values derived from in vivo developmental toxicity data in rats reported in the literature. The results show that the BMDL10 values from predicted dose-response data differ about sixfold from the BMDL10 values obtained from in vivo data, pointing at the feasibility of using a combined in vitro-in silico approach for defining a point of departure for toxicological risk assessment.

  4. Considerations for conducting imaging studies in support of developmental toxicology studies for regulatory submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Colena A; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Wise, L David

    2014-09-01

    Preclinical imaging technologies are increasingly being applied to developmental toxicology studies in drug development to determine potential compound toxicity. Although most of these studies are conducted in a non-regulatory setting, there is interest in performing these imaging studies under applicable regulations, for example Good Laboratory Practices (GLP), to support regulatory decisions concerning drug safety. This manuscript will describe regulations and processes to consider when bringing an imaging technology into GLP compliance.

  5. Developmental toxicity of inhaled methanol in the CD-1 mouse, with quantitative dose-response modeling for estimation of benchmark doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.M.; Mole, M.L.; Chernoff, N.; Barbee, B.D.; Turner, C.I.

    1993-01-01

    Pregnant CD-1 mice were exposed to 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, 7,500, 10,000, or 15,000 ppm on methanol for 7 hr/day on days 6-15 of gestation. On day 17 of gestation, remaining mice were weighed, killed and the gravid uterus was removed. Numbers of implantation sites, live and dead fetuses and resorptions were counted, and fetuses were examined externally and weighed as a litter. Significant increases in the incidence of exencephaly and cleft palate were observed at 5,000 ppm and above, increased postimplantation mortality at 7,500 ppm and above (including an increasing incidence of full-litter resorption), and reduced fetal weight at 10,000 ppm and above. A dose-related increase in cervical ribs or ossification sites lateral to the seventh cervical vertebra was significant at 2,000 ppm and above. Thus, the NOAEL for the developmental toxicity in this study is 1,000 ppm. The results of this study indicate that inhaled methanol is developmentally toxic in the mouse at exposure levels which were not maternally toxic. Litters of pregnant mice gavaged orally with 4 g methanol/kg displayed developmental toxic effects similar to those seen in the 10,000 ppm methanol exposure group. (Copyright (c) 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.)

  6. Prevention of maternal and developmental toxicity in rats via dietary inclusion of common aflatoxin sorbents: potential for hidden risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayura, K; Abdel-Wahhab, M A; McKenzie, K S; Sarr, A B; Edwards, J F; Naguib, K; Phillips, T D

    1998-02-01

    In earlier work, we have reported that a phyllosilicate clay (HSCAS or NovaSil) can tightly and selectively bind the aflatoxins in vitro and in vivo. Since then, a variety of untested clay and zeolitic minerals have been added to poultry and livestock feeds as potential "aflatoxin binders." However, the efficacy and safety of these products have not been determined. A common zeolite that has been frequently added to animal feed is clinoptilolite. Our objectives in this study were twofold: (1) to utilize the pregnant rat as an in vivo model to compare the potential of HSCAS and clinoptilolite to prevent the developmental toxicity of aflatoxin B1 (AfB1), and (2) to determine the effect of these two sorbents on the metabolism and bioavailability of AfB1. Clay and zeolitic minerals (HSCAS or clinoptilolite) were added to the diet at a level of 0.5% (w/w) and fed to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats throughout pregnancy (i.e., day 0 to 20). Treatment groups (HSCAS or clinoptilolite) alone and in combination with AfB1 were exposed to sorbents in the feed as well as by gavage. Untreated and AfB1 control animals were fed the basal diet without added sorbent. Between gestation days 6 and 13, animals maintained on diets containing sorbent were gavaged with corn oil in combination with an amount of the respective sorbent equivalent to 0.5% of the estimated maximum daily intake of feed. Animals receiving AfB1 were dosed orally (between days 6 and 13) with AfB1 (2 mg/kg body wt) either alone or concomitantly with a similar quantity of the respective sorbent. Evaluations of toxicity were performed on day 20. These included: maternal (mortality, body weights, feed intake, and litter weights), developmental (embryonic resorptions and fetal body weights), and histological (maternal livers and kidneys). Sorbents alone were not toxic; AfB1 alone and with clinoptilolite resulted in significant maternal and developmental toxicity. Animals treated with HSCAS (plus AfB1) were comparable to

  7. Studies in developmental immunogenetics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R D

    1976-05-26

    Progress is reported on studies of genetic regulation, mainly in complex organisms, and with an emphasis on the immune system as a model for developmental analysis and as a tool for following the development of other systems, especially the brain. Results are reported from studies of biochemical genetics, primarily from a developmental viewpoint and with particular regard to defense mechanisms; cellular aspects of the immune system; the area of cancer immunology and cell specificities as related to tumor systems, primarily from an immunogenetic viewpoint and with particular reference to leukemias in the mouse; and the disruptions of genetic control mechanisms in tumor development, especially as approached through the reappearance of fetal antigens associated with tumor development.

  8. Prospective Power Calculations for the Four Lab Study of A Multigenerational Reproductive/Developmental Toxicity Rodent Bioassay Using A Complex Mixture of Disinfection By-Products in the Low-Response Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Ellen Simmons

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In complex mixture toxicology, there is growing emphasis on testing environmentally representative doses that improve the relevance of results for health risk assessment, but are typically much lower than those used in traditional toxicology studies. Traditional experimental designs with typical sample sizes may have insufficient statistical power to detect effects caused by environmentally relevant doses. Proper study design, with adequate statistical power, is critical to ensuring that experimental results are useful for environmental health risk assessment. Studies with environmentally realistic complex mixtures have practical constraints on sample concentration factor and sample volume as well as the number of animals that can be accommodated. This article describes methodology for calculation of statistical power for non-independent observations for a multigenerational rodent reproductive/developmental bioassay. The use of the methodology is illustrated using the U.S. EPA’s Four Lab study in which rodents were exposed to chlorinated water concentrates containing complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection by-products. Possible experimental designs included two single-block designs and a two-block design. Considering the possible study designs and constraints, a design of two blocks of 100 females with a 40:60 ratio of control:treated animals and a significance level of 0.05 yielded maximum prospective power (~90% to detect pup weight decreases, while providing the most power to detect increased prenatal loss.

  9. Prospective Power Calculations for the Four Lab Study of A Multigenerational Reproductive/Developmental Toxicity Rodent Bioassay Using A Complex Mixture of Disinfection By-Products in the Low-Response Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingus, Cheryl A.; Teuschler, Linda K.; Rice, Glenn E.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Narotsky, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    In complex mixture toxicology, there is growing emphasis on testing environmentally representative doses that improve the relevance of results for health risk assessment, but are typically much lower than those used in traditional toxicology studies. Traditional experimental designs with typical sample sizes may have insufficient statistical power to detect effects caused by environmentally relevant doses. Proper study design, with adequate statistical power, is critical to ensuring that experimental results are useful for environmental health risk assessment. Studies with environmentally realistic complex mixtures have practical constraints on sample concentration factor and sample volume as well as the number of animals that can be accommodated. This article describes methodology for calculation of statistical power for non-independent observations for a multigenerational rodent reproductive/developmental bioassay. The use of the methodology is illustrated using the U.S. EPA’s Four Lab study in which rodents were exposed to chlorinated water concentrates containing complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection by-products. Possible experimental designs included two single-block designs and a two-block design. Considering the possible study designs and constraints, a design of two blocks of 100 females with a 40:60 ratio of control:treated animals and a significance level of 0.05 yielded maximum prospective power (~90%) to detect pup weight decreases, while providing the most power to detect increased prenatal loss. PMID:22073030

  10. Developmental toxic effects in suckling pups of rats from dams treated with betamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Shindala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Suckling pups of rats from dams treated with betamethasone 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 mg/kg, i.p. given once daily for 10 consecutive days (first nursing period demonstrated in a dose – dependent manner significant decreased (P<0.05 the percentage of survival of the pups to weaning, body weight, index of development, whereas brain, heart, kindey, lung,liver / body weight ratio significantly increased (P<0.05 as well as delays in physical maturation (ear opening, fur development, tooth eruption, eye opening in the pups. Swimming scores on postnatal day 9, 13, 15, 17, 20 was significantly decreased (P<0.05 in offspring from mothers treated with betamethasone 1.2 mg/kg, i.p. In conclusion, the results suggest that betamethasone induced developmental toxic effects in suckling pups exposed to its through the milk.

  11. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: developmental toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Linda G; Gray, Thomas M; Trimmer, Gary W; Parker, Robert M; Murray, F Jay; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Clark, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    Gasoline-vapor condensate (BGVC) or condensed vapors from gasoline blended with methyl t-butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME) diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA) were evaluated for developmental toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed via inhalation on gestation days (GD) 5-20 for 6h/day at levels of 0 (control filtered air), 2000, 10,000, and 20,000mg/m(3). These exposure durations and levels substantially exceed typical consumer exposure during refueling (gasoline and gasoline blended with the ether or alcohol oxygenates.

  12. Toxicity of dioxin to developing teeth and salivary glands : An experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Dioxins are ubiquitous environmental poisons having unequivocal adverse health effects on various species. The majority of their effects are thought to be mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Developing human teeth may be sensitive to dioxins and the most toxic dioxin congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), is developmentally toxic to rodent teeth. Mechanisms of TCDD toxicity can be studied only experimentally. The aim of the present thesis work was to delineate...

  13. Development of a Combined In Vitro Physiologically Based Kinetic (PBK) and Monte Carlo Modelling Approach to Predict Interindividual Human Variation in Phenol-Induced Developmental Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Spenkelink, Bert; Woutersen, Ruud A; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2017-06-01

    With our recently developed in vitro physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling approach, we could extrapolate in vitro toxicity data to human toxicity values applying PBK-based reverse dosimetry. Ideally information on kinetic differences among human individuals within a population should be considered. In the present study, we demonstrated a modelling approach that integrated in vitro toxicity data, PBK modelling and Monte Carlo simulations to obtain insight in interindividual human kinetic variation and derive chemical specific adjustment factors (CSAFs) for phenol-induced developmental toxicity. The present study revealed that UGT1A6 is the primary enzyme responsible for the glucuronidation of phenol in humans followed by UGT1A9. Monte Carlo simulations were performed taking into account interindividual variation in glucuronidation by these specific UGTs and in the oral absorption coefficient. Linking Monte Carlo simulations with PBK modelling, population variability in the maximum plasma concentration of phenol for the human population could be predicted. This approach provided a CSAF for interindividual variation of 2.0 which covers the 99th percentile of the population, which is lower than the default safety factor of 3.16 for interindividual human kinetic differences. Dividing the dose-response curve data obtained with in vitro PBK-based reverse dosimetry, with the CSAF provided a dose-response curve that reflects the consequences of the interindividual variability in phenol kinetics for the developmental toxicity of phenol. The strength of the presented approach is that it provides insight in the effect of interindividual variation in kinetics for phenol-induced developmental toxicity, based on only in vitro and in silico testing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  15. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  16. Evaluation of 1066 ToxCast Chemicals in a human stem cell assay for developmental toxicity (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To increase the diversity of assays used to assess potential developmental toxicity, the ToxCast chemical library was screened in the Stemina devTOX quickPREDICT assay using human embryonic stem (hES) cells. A model for predicting teratogenicity was based on a training set of 23 ...

  17. Computational Approach using Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells to Define a Mechanistic Applicability Domain for Prenatal Developmental Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of mechanisms responsible for adverse developmental effects is the first step in creating predictive toxicity models. Identification of putative mechanisms was performed by co-analyzing three datasets for the effects of ToxCast phase Ia and II chemicals: 1.In vitro...

  18. Review of Ammonium Dinitramide Toxicity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    reproductive toxicant in rats, causing implantation failure in early gestation; follow-on studies implied that ADN is embryotoxic . EPR studies indicated that...mutagenic. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ammonium dinitramide, ADN, toxicity, reproductive, embryotoxic , genotoxicity 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17...reproductive studies, reproduction and fertility, pre-implantation and post-implantation studies, implied that ADN is embryotoxic . A mouse embryo

  19. Parental dietary seleno-L-methionine exposure and resultant offspring developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernick, Melissa; Ware, Megan; Albright, Elizabeth; Kwok, Kevin W H; Dong, Wu; Zheng, Na; Hinton, David E

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) leaches into water from agricultural soils and from storage sites for coal fly ash. Se toxicity causes population and community level effects in fishes and birds. We used the laboratory aquarium model fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), an asynchronous breeder, to determine aspects of uptake in adults and resultant developmental toxicity in their offspring. The superior imaging properties of the model enabled detailed descriptions of phenotypic alterations not commonly reported in the existing Se literature. Adult males and females in treatment groups were exposed, separately and together, to a dry diet spiked with 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 μg/g (dry weight) seleno-L-methionine (SeMet) for 6 days, and their embryo progeny collected for 5 days, maintained under controlled conditions and observed daily for hatchability, mortality and/or developmental toxicity. Sites of alteration included: craniofacial, pericardium and abdomen (Pc/Ab), notochord, gall bladder, spleen, blood, and swim bladder. Next, adult tissue Se concentrations (liver, skeletal muscle, ovary and testis) were determined and compared in treatment groups of bred and unbred individuals. No significant difference was found across treatment groups at the various SeMet concentrations; and, subsequent analysis compared exposed vs. control in each of the treatment groups at 10 dpf. Increased embryo mortality was observed in all treatment groups, compared to controls, and embryos had a decreased hatching rate when both parents were exposed. Exposure resulted in significantly more total altered phenotypes than controls. When altered phenotypes following exposure of both parents were higher than maternal only exposure, a male role was suggested. The comparisons between treatment groups revealed that particular types of phenotypic change may be driven by the sex of the exposed parent. Additionally, breeding reduced Se concentrations in some adult tissues, specifically the liver of exposed females

  20. The role of apoptosis in MCLR-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Cheng [College of Fisheries, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Sun, Hong [Hubei Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xie, Ping [Donghu Experimental Station of Lake Ecosystems, State Key Laboratory for Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology of China, Institute of Hydrobiology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang, Jianghua; Zhang, Guirong; Chen, Nan [College of Fisheries, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yan, Wei, E-mail: Yanwei75126@163.com [Institute of Agricultural Quality Standards and Testing Technology, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan 430064 (China); Li, Guangyu, E-mail: ligy2001@163.com [College of Fisheries, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Freshwater Aquaculture Collaborative Innovation Center of Hubei Province, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • MCLR-induced apoptosis in the heart of developing embryos leads to the growth delay in zebrafish. • MCLR-triggered apoptosis might be induced by ROS. • P53–Bax–Bcl-2 and caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway contribute greatly to MCLR-induced apoptosis. Abstract: We previously demonstrated that cyanobacteria-derived microcystin–leucine–arginine (MCLR) is able to induce developing toxicity, such as malformation, growth delay and also decreased heart rates in zebrafish embryos. However, the molecular mechanisms by which MCLR induces its toxicity during the development of zebrafish remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluate the role of apoptosis in MCLR-induced developmental toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to various concentrations of MCLR (0, 0.2, 0.5, 2, and 5.0 mg L⁻¹ for 96 h, at which time reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly induced in the 2 and 5.0 mg L⁻¹ MCLR exposure groups. Acridine orange (AO) staining and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxy-UTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay showed that MCLR exposure resulted in cell apoptosis. To test the apoptotic pathway, the expression pattern of several apoptotic-related genes was examined for the level of enzyme activity, gene and protein expression, respectively. The overall results demonstrate that MCLR induced ROS which consequently triggered apoptosis in the heart of developing zebrafish embryos. Our results also indicate that the p53–Bax–Bcl-2 pathway and the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway play major roles in MCLR-induced apoptosis in the developing embryos.

  1. QSAR screening of 70,983 REACH substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the ChemScreen project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev;

    2015-01-01

    for information requirements. As no testing for reproductive effects should be performed in REACH on known genotoxic carcinogens or germ cell mutagens with appropriate risk management measures implemented, a QSAR pre-screen for 70,983 REACH substances was performed. Sixteen models and three decision algorithms...... were used to reach overall predictions of substances with potential effects with the following result: 6.5% genotoxic carcinogens, 16.3% mutagens, 11.5% developmental toxicants. These results are similar to findings in earlier QSAR and experimental studies of chemical inventories, and illustrate how...... QSAR predictions may be used to identify potential genotoxic carcinogens, mutagens and developmental toxicants by high-throughput virtual screening....

  2. Developmental origins of adult diseases and neurotoxicity: Epidemiological and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, D.A.; Grandjean, P.; Groot, D. de; Paule, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    To date, only a small number of commercial chemicals have been tested and documented as developmental neurotoxicants. Moreover, an increasing number of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies suggest an association between toxicant or drug exposure during the perinatal period and the deve

  3. Developmental toxicity of orally administered sildenafil citrate (Viagra) in SWR/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Tarboush, Faisal Mohamed; Abdel-Samad, Mohamed Fathy; Al-Meteri, Mokhlid Hamed

    2011-04-01

    Normal adult inbred SWR/J mice were used to investigate the teratogenic and other possible toxic effects of various dose levels of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on fetuses. Multiple dose levels of 6.5, 13.0, 19.5, 26.0, 32.5 or 40.0 mg of sildenafil citrate/kg body weight (which correspond to the multiples of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 of human 50 mg Viagra, respectively) were orally administered into pregnant mice on days 7-9, 10-12 or 13-15 of gestation. On day 17 of pregnancy, all fetuses were removed and examined for toxic phenomena (embryo-fetal toxicity) and for external, internal and skeletal malformations. A total of 285 pregnant mice were used in the present study. None of the dams treated with sildenafil citrate at any of the oral dose levels used in the present study died during the experimental period and all dams treated with the drug failed to reveal overt signs of maternal toxicity. Moreover, the results of the present study clearly demonstrate that none of the multiple oral dose levels of the drug at any time interval used has induced any external, internal or skeletal malformations in the fetuses obtained from treated females. However, the dose level of 40 mg/kg body weight of sildenafil citrate has a growth suppressing effect on alive fetuses when it was administered at all the time intervals used in the present study. Furthermore, the dose levels 26.0, 32.5 and 40 mg/kg of the drug have embryo-fetal toxicity when the drug is applied on days 13-15 of gestation. The possible mechanisms involved in the embryo-fetal toxicity and fetal growth suppressing effects of sildenafil citrate were discussed. The results of this study have important implications for the widespread use of this drug.

  4. Drosophila embryos as model to assess cellular and developmental toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT in living organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyin Liu

    Full Text Available Different toxicity tests for carbon nanotubes (CNT have been developed to assess their impact on human health and on aquatic and terrestrial animal and plant life. We present a new model, the fruit fly Drosophila embryo offering the opportunity for rapid, inexpensive and detailed analysis of CNTs toxicity during embryonic development. We show that injected DiI labelled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs become incorporated into cells in early Drosophila embryos, allowing the study of the consequences of cellular uptake of CNTs on cell communication, tissue and organ formation in living embryos. Fluorescently labelled subcellular structures showed that MWCNTs remained cytoplasmic and were excluded from the nucleus. Analysis of developing ectodermal and neural stem cells in MWCNTs injected embryos revealed normal division patterns and differentiation capacity. However, an increase in cell death of ectodermal but not of neural stem cells was observed, indicating stem cell-specific vulnerability to MWCNT exposure. The ease of CNT embryo injections, the possibility of detailed morphological and genomic analysis and the low costs make Drosophila embryos a system of choice to assess potential developmental and cellular effects of CNTs and test their use in future CNT based new therapies including drug delivery.

  5. Developmental hyperbilirubinemia and CNS toxicity in mice humanized with the UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Nguyen, Nghia; Chen, Shujuan; Tukey, Robert H

    2010-03-16

    High levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) in newborn children is associated with a reduction in hepatic UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 activity that can lead to CNS toxicity, brain damage, and even death. Little is known regarding those events that lead to UCB accumulation in brain tissue, and therefore, we sought to duplicate this condition in mice. The human UGT1 locus, encoding all 9-UGT1A genes including UGT1A1, was expressed in Ugt1(-/-) mice. Because the most common clinical condition associated with jaundice in adults is Gilbert's syndrome, which is characterized by an allelic polymorphism in the UGT1A1 promoter, hyperbilirubinemia was monitored in humanized UGT1 mice that expressed either the Gilbert's UGT1A1*28 allele [Tg(UGT1(A1*28))Ugt1(-/-) mice] or the normal UGT1A1*1 allele [Tg(UGT1(A1*1))Ugt1(-/-) mice]. Adult Tg(UGT1(A1*28))Ugt1(-/-) mice expressed elevated levels of total bilirubin (TB) compared with Tg(UGT1(A1*1))Ugt1(-/-) mice, confirming that the promoter polymorphism associated with the UGT1A1*28 allele contributes to hyperbilirubinemia in mice. However, TB accumulated to near toxic levels during neonatal development, a finding that is independent of the Gilbert's UGT1A1*28 promoter polymorphism. Whereas serum TB levels eventually returned to adult levels, TB clearance in neonatal mice was not associated with hepatic UGT1A1 expression. In approximately 10% of the humanized UGT1 mice, peak TB levels culminated in seizures followed by death. UCB deposition in brain tissue and the ensuing seizures were associated with developmental milestones and can be prevented by enhancing regulation of the UGT1A1 gene in neonatal mice.

  6. 3D Visualization of Developmental Toxicity of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Zebrafish Embryogenesis Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juneyong Eum

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination by trinitrotoluene is of global concern due to its widespread use in military ordnance and commercial explosives. Despite known long-term persistence in groundwater and soil, the toxicological profile of trinitrotoluene and other explosive wastes have not been systematically measured using in vivo biological assays. Zebrafish embryos are ideal model vertebrates for high-throughput toxicity screening and live in vivo imaging due to their small size and transparency during embryogenesis. Here, we used Single Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM/light sheet microscopy to assess the developmental toxicity of explosive-contaminated water in zebrafish embryos and report 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-associated developmental abnormalities, including defects in heart formation and circulation, in 3D. Levels of apoptotic cell death were higher in the actively developing tissues of trinitrotoluene-treated embryos than controls. Live 3D imaging of heart tube development at cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy revealed trinitrotoluene-associated cardiac toxicity, including hypoplastic heart chamber formation and cardiac looping defects, while the real time PCR (polymerase chain reaction quantitatively measured the molecular changes in the heart and blood development supporting the developmental defects at the molecular level. Identification of cellular toxicity in zebrafish using the state-of-the-art 3D imaging system could form the basis of a sensitive biosensor for environmental contaminants and be further valued by combining it with molecular analysis.

  7. Enantioselectivity in Developmental Toxicity of rac-metalaxyl and R-metalaxyl in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinjun; Zhang, Yi; Chen, An; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Quan

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselectivity of chiral pesticides in environmental safety has attracted more and more attention. In this study, we evaluated the enantioselective toxicity of rac-metalaxyl and R-metalaxyl to zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos through various malformations including pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, crooked body, and short tails. The results showed that there were significant differences in toxicity to zebrafish embryos caused by rac-metalaxyl and R-metalaxyl, and the LC50 s at 96 h are 416.41 (353.91, 499.29) mg · L(-1) and 320.650 (279.80, 363.46) mg · L(-1) , respectively. In order to explore the possible mechanism of the development defects, the genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (vtg1, vtg2, cyp17, cyp19a, cyp19b) and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis (dio1, dio2, nis, tg, tpo) were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results revealed that there were no significant differences in the expression of vtg1, vtg2, cyp17, cyp19a, and cyp19b after exposure to rac-metalaxyl. However, the expression of vtg1, cyp19a, and cyp19b decreased significantly after exposure to R-metalaxyl. And likewise, rac-metalaxyl only caused the upregulation of dio2, while R-metalaxyl suppressed the expression of dio1 and tpo and induced the expression of dio2 and nis. The change of gene expression may cause the enantioselectivity in developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryo. The data provided here will be helpful for us to comprehensively understand the potential ecological risks of the currently used chiral fungicides. Chirality 28:489-494, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Studies in developmental immunogenetics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R D

    1977-06-29

    This contract provides the research support for a group concerned with a relatively large range of problems. The integrating thread that runs through it is that of an interest in development and its genetic regulation, mainly in complex organisms and with an emphasis on the immune system as a model for developmental analysis and as a tool for following the development of other systems, especially the brain. It includes studies of biochemical genetics, primarily from a developmental viewpoint and with particular regard to defense mechanisms, and cellular aspects of the immune system. It extends into the area of cancer immunology and cell specificities as related to tumor systems and to disruptions of genetic control mechanisms in tumor development, especially as approached through the reappearance of fetal antigens associated with tumor development. During the past year, our attention has turned increasingly to genetic factors predisposing to autoimmune disease, and to factors that have been claimed to transfer specific cellular immunity from immune to nonimmune animals.

  9. Different patterns of developmental toxicity in the rat following prenatal administration of structurally diverse chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, D.L.; Valentine, D.M.; Bradshaw, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    Differences in the profiles of developmental toxicity for four structurally diverse chemical compounds have been defined following prenatal exposure in the rat. Diethylstilbestrol (DES), 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (4CB), zeranol, and cadmium were administered by gavage to Sprague-Dawley rats daily from d 6 through d 18 of gestation. Dams were sacrificed at four prenatal endpoints and the numbers of live and dead fetuses and resorbed embryos were counted. Additional dams were allowed to bring their litters to term, and their offspring were monitored until they reached adulthood. DES induced prenatal death primarily in early embryonic life, and also during parturition. 4CB increased mortality from late in gestation up to 24 h after birth, and altered the sex ratio of survivors by selectively acting against males in utero. Exposure to zeranol resulted in embryolethality only. Cadmium was not lethal to the conceptus at any dose below the dose that caused maternal mortality. Only 4CB had an obvious teratogenic effect, causing intestinal hemorrhage. All compounds produced transient perinatal decreases in the weight of the offspring. 30 references, 6 tables.

  10. Zebrafish Development: High-throughput Test Systems to Assess Developmental Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Because of its developmental concordance, ease of handling and rapid development, the small teleost, zebrafish (Danio rerio), is frequently promoted as a vertebrate model for medium-throughput developmental screens. This present chapter discusses zebrafish as an altern...

  11. Developmental toxicity in white leghorn chickens following in ovo exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden-Adams, M. M.; Stuckey, Joyce E.; Gaworecki, K.M.; Berger-Ritchie, J.; Bryant, K.; Jodice, P.G.; Scott, T.R.; Ferrario, J.B.; Guan, B.; Vigo, C.; Boone, J.S.; McGuinn, W.D.; DeWitt, J.C.; Keil, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    Studies show that perfluorinated compounds cause various toxicological effects; nevertheless, effects on immune function and developmental endpoints have not been addressed at length. This study examined the effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in white leghorn hatchlings on various developmental, immunological, and clinical health parameters. In addition, serum PFOS concentrations were determined by LC/MS/MS. Embryonic day (ED) 0 eggs were injected with either safflower oil/10% DMSO (control, 0 mg/kg egg wt) or PFOS in safflower oil/10% DMSO at 1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg egg wt, and the chicks were grown to post-hatch day (PHD) 14. Treatment with PFOS did not affect hatch rate. Following in ovo exposure chicks exhibited increases in spleen mass at all treatment levels, in liver mass at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg egg wt, and in body length (crown-rump length) at the 5 mg/kg treatment. Right wings were shorter in all treatments compared to control. Increases in the frequency of brain asymmetry were evident in all treatment groups. SRBC-specific immunoglobulin (IgM and IgY combined) titers were decreased significantly at all treatment levels, while plasma lysozyme activity was increased at all treatment levels. The PHA skin test response decreased in relation to increasing PFOS dose. Serum concentrations where significant immunological, morphological, and neurological effects were observed at the lowest dose (1 mg/kg egg wt) averaged 154 ng PFOS/g serum. These concentrations fall within environmental ranges reported in blood samples from wild caught avian species; thereby, verifying that the environmental egg concentrations used for the injections do indeed relate to serum levels in hatchlings that are also environmentally relevant. These data indicate that immune alterations and brain asymmetry can occur in birds following in ovo exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of PFOS and demonstrates the need for further research on the developmental effects of

  12. Developmental toxicity of two common corn pesticides to the endangered southern bell frog (Litoria raniformis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choung, Catherine B., E-mail: Catherine.Choung@mq.edu.au [Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Hyne, Ross V. [Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contaminants Section, Office of Environment and Heritage, PO Box 29, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Mann, Reinier M. [Centre for Environmental Sustainability, University of Technology - Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Stevens, Mark M. [EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (Industry and Investment NSW and Charles Sturt University), Yanco Agricultural Institute, Private Mail Bag, Yanco, NSW 2703 (Australia); Hose, Grant C. [Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    To examine the link between corn agriculture and the observed decline of the endangered southern bell frog (SBF), the effects of two corn crop pesticides on larval growth and development were investigated. Tadpoles were exposed to terbufos sulfone (10 {mu}g/L), a major breakdown product of the insecticide terbufos, and the herbicide atrazine (25 {mu}g/L) individually and as a mixture until the completion of metamorphosis. Atrazine did not interact synergistically with terbufos sulfone or result in significant effects on growth and development alone, although there was some indication of accelerated metamorphosis in the pilot study. Terbufos sulfone alone and as a mixture (terbufos/atrazine) significantly slowed larval development and ultimately delayed metamorphosis. The observed developmental effects from an environmentally relevant concentration of terbufos sulfone indicates a risk posed by this persistent degradation product to the endangered SBF, which breeds and develops in the rice bays adjacent to corn fields treated with pesticides. - Highlights: > The effect of terbufos sulfone and atrazine on larval growth and development was investigated. > Terbufos sulfone alone significantly slowed development and delayed metamorphosis of tadpoles. > Atrazine had no observable effects alone nor did it interact synergistically with terbufos sulfone. > The developmental effects indicates a risk to endangered southern bell frogs in the irrigation area. > The results highlight the toxicological importance of some pesticide breakdown products. - A breakdown product of the insecticide terbufos retards development and delays metamorphosis of southern bell frog tadpoles.

  13. Developmental origins of adult diseases and neurotoxicity: Epidemiological and experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Donald A; Grandjean, Philippe; de Groot, Didima

    2012-01-01

    and the development of metabolic-related diseases and neurotoxicity later in life. The four speakers at this symposium presented their research results on different neurotoxic chemicals relating to the developmental origins of health and adult disease (DOHaD). Philippe Grandjean presented epidemiological data......To date, only a small number of commercial chemicals have been tested and documented as developmental neurotoxicants. Moreover, an increasing number of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies suggest an association between toxicant or drug exposure during the perinatal period...

  14. Developmental toxicity of PCB 126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl) in nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Melancon, M.J.; Klein, P.N.; Rice, C.P.; Eisemann, J.D.; Hines, R.K.; Spann, J.W.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    Planar PCB congeners are embryotoxic and teratogenic to birds including American kestrels. The developmental toxicity of 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) was studied in the post-hatching kestrel as a model for the eagle. Nestlings were orally dosed for 10 days with 5 ul/g body weight of corn oil (controls) or the planar PCB 126 at concentrations of 50, 250, or 1000 ng/g body weight. Dosing with 50 ng/g of PCB 126 resulted in a hepatic concentration of 156 ng/g w.w., liver enlargement and mild coagulative necrosis, and over ten-fold increases in hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (BROD), and approximately a 5-fold increase in methoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (MROD). At this dose, mild to moderate lymphoid depletion of the spleen was apparent, and decreased follicle size and content of the thyroid. At 250 ng/g, concentration of PCB 126 in the liver was 380 ng/g with increasing multifocal coagulative necrosis, decreased bone growth, decreased spleen weight with lymphocyte depletion of the spleen and bursa, and degenerative lesions of the thyroid. At 1000 ng/g, the liver concentration was 1098 ng/g, accompanied by decreased bursa weight, decreased hepatic thiol concentration and increased plasma enzyme activities (ALT, AST, and LDH-L) in addition to the previous effects. Highly significant positive correlations were noted between liver concentrations of PCB 126 and the ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathone. These findings indicate that nestling kestrels are more susceptible to PCB 126 toxicity than adults, but less sensitive than embryos, and that planar PCBs are of potential hazard to nestling birds.

  15. Influence of Study Design on Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Study Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Paul M D

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory studies of developmental and reproductive toxicity (DART) studies have remained largely unchanged for decades, with exposures occurring at various phases of the reproductive cycle and toxicity evaluations at different ages/times depending on the study purpose. The National Toxicology Program has conducted studies examining the power to detect adverse effects where there is a prenatal exposure, but evaluations occur postnatally. In these studies, examination is required of only 1 male and female pup from each litter beyond weaning. This provides poor resolving power to detect rare events (e.g., reproductive tract malformations). If an adverse effect is detected, there is little confidence in the shape of the dose-response curve (and the Benchmark Dose or No Observed Adverse Effect Level [NOAEL]). We have developed a new protocol to evaluate DART, the modified one generation study, with exposure commencing with pregnant animals and retention of 4 males and females from each litter beyond weaning to improve statistical power. These animals can be allocated to specific cohorts that examine subchronic toxicity, teratology, littering, and neurobehavioral toxicity in the same study. This approach also results in a reduction in animal numbers used, compared with individual stand-alone studies, and offers increased numbers of end points evaluated compared with recent Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development proposals.

  16. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Developmental toxicity of N-methylaniline following prenatal oral administration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Sitarek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the study was to assess prenatal toxicity of N-methylaniline (NMA administered by gavage to pregnant female rats. Material and Methods: Pregnant female rats were administered N-methylaniline in corn oil by gavage at daily doses of 0.8 mg/kg of body weight (b.w., 4 mg/kg b.w., 20 mg/kg b.w. and 100 mg/kg b.w. from implantation (the 5th day post mating to the day prior to the scheduled caesarean section (the 20th day of pregnancy. General behavior, body weight, food and water consumption, hematological, biochemical analyses and pathomorphological changes of the dams were recorded. Results: All the females survived until the end of the study. The test substance was toxic to pregnant females, even at the lowest of the used doses, i.e., 0.8 mg/kg b.w./day. Lower weight gain during pregnancy and significantly higher NMA-dose-dependent absolute weight of the organs were noted in the exposed females. The females from the groups exposed at doses of 20 mg/kg b.w./day and 100 mg/kg b.w./day developed anemia and showed higher concentrations of free thyroxine (FT3 and free triiodothyronine (FT4 thyroid hormones. Total protein concentration exhibited an increase in all the exposed groups of females. In the prenatal toxicity study, administration of N-methylaniline throughout the embryonic and fetal periods produced embryotoxic effects at doses ranging 4–100 mg/kg b.w./day. Conclusions: Considering the data obtained in this study, it is reasonable to assume that N-methylaniline administered orally to pregnant rats is toxic for mothers even at a low dose of 0.8 mg/kg b.w./day. However, this dose was not associated with any significant effects to their offspring. This prenatal exposure level may be considered as no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL for the progeny and a dose of 4 mg/kg b.w./day as the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL for the progeny.

  18. Species differences in developmental toxicity of epoxiconazole and its relevance to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steffen; Hofmann, Thomas; Stinchcombe, Stefan; Moreno, Maria Cecilia Rey; Fegert, Ivana; Strauss, Volker; Gröters, Sibylle; Fabian, Eric; Thiaener, Jutta; Fussell, Karma C; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2013-06-01

    Epoxiconazole, a triazole-based fungicide, was tested in toxicokinetic, prenatal and pre-postnatal toxicity studies in guinea pigs, following oral (gavage) administration at several dose levels (high dose: 90 mg/kg body weight per day). Maternal toxicity was evidenced by slightly increased abortion rates and by histopathological changes in adrenal glands, suggesting maternal stress. No compound-related increase in the incidence of malformations or variations was observed in the prenatal study. In the pre-postnatal study, epoxiconazole did not adversely affect gestation length, parturition, or postnatal growth and development. Administration of epoxiconazole did not alter circulating estradiol levels. Histopathological examination of the placentas did not reveal compound-related effects. The results in guinea pigs are strikingly different to those observed in pregnant rats, in which maternal estrogen depletion, pathological alteration of placentas, increased gestation length, late fetal death, and dystocia were observed after administration of epoxiconazole. In the studies reported here, analysis of maternal plasma concentrations and metabolism after administration of radiolabeled epoxiconazole demonstrated that the different results in rats and guinea pigs were not due to different exposures of the animals. A comprehensive comparison of hormonal regulation of pregnancy and birth in murid rodents and primates indicates that the effects on pregnancy and parturition observed in rats are not applicable to humans. In contrast, the pregnant guinea pig shares many similarities to pregnant humans regarding hormonal regulation and is therefore considered to be a suitable species for extrapolation of related effects to humans.

  19. In vitro and field studies on the contact and fumigant toxicity of a neem-product (Mite-Stop) against the developmental stages of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, Nina; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    The acaricidal activity of the neem product MiteStop was investigated for its potential use as a botanical acaricide for the control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. This neem product is a special formulation of an extract of the seeds of the neem tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss. The efficacy was tested under laboratory conditions as well as in poultry houses. Four different methods of application were used in a filter paper bioassay to evaluate contact and vapour phase toxicity tests. The neem product proved to be already active in very small doses. In order to investigate the efficacy under field conditions, a poultry house was sprayed twice within a 7-day period using 1:33 and 1:50 diluted MiteStop. Cardboard traps were used to assess the mite population before, during and after the treatment. The mite population could be reduced by 89%. In a second poultry house, the spraying of defined areas with a 1:30, 1:33 or 1:50 dilution of the acaricide proved to be highly efficacious against all mite stages. Three other field trials proved that MiteStop is highly active against the red poultry mite. The most efficient dilution is 1:33 with tap water and spraying two or three times at intervals of 7 days.

  20. Comparison of the mouse Embryonic Stem cell Test, the rat Whole Embryo Culture and the Zebrafish Embryotoxicity Test as alternative methods for developmental toxicity testing of six 1,2,4-triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Esther; Barenys, Marta; Hermsen, Sanne A B; Verhoef, Aart; Ossendorp, Bernadette C; Bessems, Jos G M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2011-06-01

    The relatively high experimental animal use in developmental toxicity testing has stimulated the search for alternatives that are less animal intensive. Three widely studied alternative assays are the mouse Embryonic Stem cell Test (EST), the Zebrafish Embryotoxicity Test (ZET) and the rat postimplantation Whole Embryo Culture (WEC). The goal of this study was to determine their efficacy in assessing the relative developmental toxicity of six 1,2,4-triazole compounds,(1) flusilazole, hexaconazole, cyproconazole, triadimefon, myclobutanil and triticonazole. For this purpose, we analyzed effects and relative potencies of the compounds in and among the alternative assays and compared the findings to their known in vivo developmental toxicity. Triazoles are antifungal agents used in agriculture and medicine, some of which are known to induce craniofacial and limb abnormalities in rodents. The WEC showed a general pattern of teratogenic effects, typical of exposure to triazoles, mainly consisting of reduction and fusion of the first and second branchial arches, which are in accordance with the craniofacial malformations reported after in vivo exposure. In the EST all triazole compounds inhibited cardiomyocyte differentiation concentration-dependently. Overall, the ZET gave the best correlation with the relative in vivo developmental toxicities of the tested compounds, closely followed by the EST. The relative potencies observed in the WEC showed the lowest correlation with the in vivo developmental toxicity data. These differences in the efficacy between the test systems might be due to differences in compound kinetics, in developmental stages represented and in the relative complexity of the alternative assays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular and histological endpoints for developmental reproductive toxicity in Xenopus tropicalis: Levonorgestrel perturbs anti-Müllerian hormone and progesterone receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säfholm, Moa; Jansson, Erika; Fick, Jerker; Berg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing concern regarding the risks associated with developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and the consequences for reproductive capability. The present study aimed to refine the Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis test system for developmental reproductive toxicity by characterising molecular and histological features of sexual development, and to explore effects of exposure to the progestagen levonorgestrel (LNG). Larvae were exposed to LNG (0, 3, 30, 300 ng/L) over the first three weeks of development, encompassing the beginning of gonadal differentiation. mRNA levels of amh (anti-Müllerian hormone), amhr2 (amh receptor 2), ipgr (intracellular progesterone receptor), mpgr beta (membrane progesterone receptor beta), and cyp19a1 (cytochrome p450 19a1) were quantified in larvae and juveniles (4 weeks post-metamorphosis). Relative cyp19a1 and amh expression was used as a molecular marker for phenotypic sex of larvae. Gonadal and Müllerian duct development were characterised histologically in juveniles. Compared to controls, LNG exposure increased the expression of amh and ipgr in male larvae. In juveniles, mpgr beta expression was increased in both sexes and amhr2 expression was decreased in males, implying persistent effects of developmental progestagen exposure on amh and pgr expression signalling. No effects of LNG on the gonadal or Müllerian duct development were found, implying that the exposure window was not critical with regard to these endpoints. In juveniles, folliculogenesis had initiated and the Müllerian ducts were larger in females than in males. This new knowledge on sexual development in X. tropicalis is useful in the development of early life-stage endpoints for developmental reproductive toxicity.

  2. Toxicogenomics in vitro as an alternative tool for safety evaluation of petroleum substances and PAHs with regard to prenatal developmental toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsitou, Polyxeni; Heneweer, Marjoke; Boogaard, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The REACH legislation requires chemicals - including petroleum substances - that are put on the EU market in quantities greater than 1000 tonnes/year, to be tested for prenatal developmental toxicity. This will require large numbers of animals since prenatal development toxicity testing is animal

  3. Toxicity Studies on "840 Biologic Pesticide"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    [Objective] "840 Biologic Pesticide" is a very effective biologic pesticide. It consists of Abamectin and celastrus angulatus. Toxicity study was aimed to provide scientific toxicological basis. [Methods] The acute toxicity test,Ames test,micronucleus test and testicle chromosome aberration test were done. [Results] The acute toxicity of single dose of "840 Biologic Pesticide" showed that acute oral LD50 for female and male rats are 4 300 and 4 280 mg/kg,and for female and male mice are 2 330 and 5 110 mg/kg,respectively. The dermal LD50 was >2 000 mg/kg for female and male rats. The mutagenesis studies indicated that Ames test,micronucleus test and testicle chromosome aberration test were negative. [Conclusion] Tested pesticidc belongs to low toticity grade.

  4. Brain Imaging Studies of Developmental Stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Roger J.

    2001-01-01

    A review of research on brain imaging of developmental stuttering concludes that findings increasingly point to a failure of normal temporal lobe activation during speech that may either contribute to (or is the result of) a breakdown in the sequencing of processing among premotor regions implicated in phonologic planning. (Contains references.)…

  5. The power of an ontology-driven developmental toxicity database for data mining and computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling of developmental toxicology presents a significant challenge to computational toxicology due to endpoint complexity and lack of data coverage. These challenges largely account for the relatively few modeling successes using the structure–activity relationship (SAR) parad...

  6. The power of an ontology-driven developmental toxicity database for data mining and computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling of developmental toxicology presents a significant challenge to computational toxicology due to endpoint complexity and lack of data coverage. These challenges largely account for the relatively few modeling successes using the structure–activity relationship (SAR) parad...

  7. Developmental Toxicity of Louisiana Crude Oil-Spiked Sediment to Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embryonic exposures to the components of petroleum, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), cause a characteristic suite of developmental defects and cardiotoxicity in a variety of fish species. We exposed zebrafish embryos to reference sediment mixed with laboratory w...

  8. Surface charge and dosage dependent potential developmental toxicity and biodistribution of iron oxide nanoparticles in pregnant CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bona, Kristin R; Xu, Yaolin; Ramirez, Paul A; DeLaine, Javeia; Parker, Courtney; Bao, Yuping; Rasco, Jane F

    2014-12-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their potential applications, such as drug delivery, biomedical imaging, and photocatalysis. Due to their small size and the potential to cross the placental barrier, the risk to pregnant women and the developing fetus from exposure to nanoparticles is of great concern. The developmental toxicity and biodistribution of a single dose versus multiple doses of iron oxide nanoparticles with positive or negative surface charges were investigated in vivo. Multiple doses of positively-charged nanoparticles given over several days resulted in significantly increased fetal deaths and accumulation of iron in the fetal liver and placenta. These results indicate both positively and negatively charged iron oxide nanoparticles have the ability to cross the placenta and accumulate in the fetus, though greater bioaccumulation and toxicity was observed with a positively-charged surface coating.

  9. CDP-choline: acute toxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, T; Romero, A; Sacristán, A; Ortiz, J A

    1983-01-01

    The acute toxicity of a single dose of cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline, citicoline, Somazina) by different administration routes in mice and rats has been studied. LD50 values were determined according to the cumulative method by Reed-Muench for mortality rate, and Pizzi's method for calculation of standard error.

  10. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Gravitational studies in cellular and developmental biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paucity of data on the role of gravity in cellular and developmental biology has been examined, and a hypothesis has been generated that unifies potential gravity sensitivity in both plant and animal systems. This hypothesis considers the macromolecular order and functional importance of the extracellular matrix compartment, the intracellular cytoskeleton compartment, and the connecting plasma membrane-signal transduction compartment of plant and animal systems as potentially sensitive to alterations in the unit gravity environment in which they evolved.

  12. Evaluation of the developmental and reproductive toxicity of methoxychlor using an anuran (Xenopus tropicalis) chronic exposure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Douglas J; Thomas, John H; Rogers, Robert L; Noll, Andra; Spaulding, Clinton D; Guiney, Patrick D; Weeks, John A

    2004-10-01

    The chronic toxicity of methoxychlor to the South African clawed frog, Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis, was evaluated using a life cycle approach. The chronic exposure period ranged from mid-cell blastula stage [NF (Nieuwkoop and Faber, 1994) stage 8] to 90 days of exposure, during which time the organisms generally completed metamorphosis and emerged as juvenile frogs. Methoxychlor concentrations ranged from 1 to 100 micrograms/l. Methoxychlor concentrations >10 micrograms/l caused delayed development. Organisms exposed to 10 micrograms/l methoxychlor for 30 days showed enlarged thyroid glands with follicular hyperplasia. No increase in mortality or external malformation was observed at any of the test concentrations during early embryo-larval development (NF stage 8 to NF stage 46; ca. 2 days exposure). A concentration-dependent increase in external malformations and internal abnormalities of the liver and gonads were noted after 90 days of exposure, however. Skewing of the sex ratio toward the female gender decreased ovary weight and number of oocytes, and increased oocyte immaturity and necrosis were noted at methoxychlor concentrations of 100 micrograms/l. Reductions in testis weight and sperm cell count were also detected at 100 micrograms/l methoxychlor. Results from these studies suggested that methoxychlor was capable of altering the rate of larval development, but did not adversely affect early embryo-larval development (2 days of exposure) as manifested in external malformations. Internal malformations, increases in the ratio of phenotypic females, were induced by chronic methoxychlor exposure. In addition, reproductive endpoints, most notably in the female specimens, were adversely affected by methoxychlor exposure. These studies add to the standardization and validation of a useful amphibian test methods capable of evaluating both reproductive and developmental effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals over a life cycle exposure.

  13. Developmental toxicity of nicotine: A transdisciplinary synthesis and implications for emerging tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Lucinda J; Aagaard, Kjersti; Bloch, Michele; Conway, Kevin; Cosgrove, Kelly; Grana, Rachel; Gould, Thomas J; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Jensen, Frances; Kandel, Denise; Lanphear, Bruce; Leslie, Frances; Pauly, James R; Neiderhiser, Jenae; Rubinstein, Mark; Slotkin, Theodore A; Spindel, Eliot; Stroud, Laura; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    While the health risks associated with adult cigarette smoking have been well described, effects of nicotine exposure during periods of developmental vulnerability are often overlooked. Using MEDLINE and PubMed literature searches, books, reports and expert opinion, a transdisciplinary group of scientists reviewed human and animal research on the health effects of exposure to nicotine during pregnancy and adolescence. A synthesis of this research supports that nicotine contributes critically to adverse effects of gestational tobacco exposure, including reduced pulmonary function, auditory processing defects, impaired infant cardiorespiratory function, and may contribute to cognitive and behavioral deficits in later life. Nicotine exposure during adolescence is associated with deficits in working memory, attention, and auditory processing, as well as increased impulsivity and anxiety. Finally, recent animal studies suggest that nicotine has a priming effect that increases addiction liability for other drugs. The evidence that nicotine adversely affects fetal and adolescent development is sufficient to warrant public health measures to protect pregnant women, children, and adolescents from nicotine exposure. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Toxicity of cadmium to Schistosoma mansoni cercariae: effects on vitality and developmental ability in white mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliman, R.B. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg); Esham, L.P.

    1977-09-29

    Time-until-death studies were run on cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni in 8 concentrations of cadmium (from cadmium sulfate) ranging from 100 ppM to 0.0001 ppM. All concentrations used were found to be toxic, and at 10 ppM all cercariae were dead within 4 hours, which coincides with their period of maximum infectability following emergence from the snail host. At 2 ppM, all cercariae died within 8 hours, and at 1 ppM all died within 16 hours. In addition, groups of cercariae were exposed to cadmium concentrations of 10, 1, and 0.1 ppM for periods of 30, 20, and 10 minutes. Thereafter, cercariae from these groups were allowed to penetrate the tails of white mice or were injected subcutaneously into mice. After 8 weeks, these mice were autopsied and the adult worms collected by perfusion. Maturation of cercariae from both methods of invasion was seriously impaired. Statistical analysis using a 3 x 4 x 2 factoral design for analysis of variance showed both time of exposure and concentration of cadmium ion to be significant factors in determining number of worms developing at p = 0.01. A significant interaction between time of exposure and concentration was found to exist. The two methods of infection did not have a significant effect on the number of worms recovered. Therefore, it appears that those toxicant-exposed cercariae capable of maturing do not need assistance in transversing the skin barrier but can penetrate and migrate to reach the mesenteric venules for maturation.

  15. Health Risk Assessment of Women in Submarines: Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity Evaluation of Major Submarine Atmosphere Components (CO, CO2 and O2) in Rats (Rattus norvegicus) - Phase II (Neurological and Reproductive Performance Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    MO, % NE, % EO, % BA, grams hemoglobin ( HB ) per dL, % hematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscle volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) per pg, mean...examined further in Phase 3 of the study by additional analysis using immunoassays for applicable hormones (i.e. erythropoietin), cytokines (i.e...8.0 ± 0.40 (16) 8.0 ± 0.46 (15) 8.0 ± 0.43 (15) % RDW 17 ± 0.8 (16) 17 ± 0.6 (16) 17 ± 0.7 (15) 17 ± 0.9 (16) HB (8.6 – 15.7 x 106/µL

  16. Early childhood adversity, toxic stress, and the role of the pediatrician: translating developmental science into lifelong health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Andrew S; Shonkoff, Jack P

    2012-01-01

    Advances in a wide range of biological, behavioral, and social sciences are expanding our understanding of how early environmental influences (the ecology) and genetic predispositions (the biologic program) affect learning capacities, adaptive behaviors, lifelong physical and mental health, and adult productivity. A supporting technical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) presents an integrated ecobiodevelopmental framework to assist in translating these dramatic advances in developmental science into improved health across the life span. Pediatricians are now armed with new information about the adverse effects of toxic stress on brain development, as well as a deeper understanding of the early life origins of many adult diseases. As trusted authorities in child health and development, pediatric providers must now complement the early identification of developmental concerns with a greater focus on those interventions and community investments that reduce external threats to healthy brain growth. To this end, AAP endorses a developing leadership role for the entire pediatric community-one that mobilizes the scientific expertise of both basic and clinical researchers, the family-centered care of the pediatric medical home, and the public influence of AAP and its state chapters-to catalyze fundamental change in early childhood policy and services. AAP is committed to leveraging science to inform the development of innovative strategies to reduce the precipitants of toxic stress in young children and to mitigate their negative effects on the course of development and health across the life span.

  17. Albendazole causes stage-dependent developmental toxicity and is deactivated by a mammalian metabolization system in a modified zebrafish embryotoxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Anna; Ullerås, Erik; Patring, Johan; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2012-08-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test has previously been combined with an external metabolic activation system (MAS) to assess developmental toxicity of metabolites produced by maternal metabolism. Due to toxicity of MAS the exposure was limited to one early and short period. We have modified the method and included additional testing time points with extended exposure durations. Using the anthelmintic drug albendazole as a model substance, we demonstrated stage-dependent toxic effects at three windows of zebrafish embryo development, i.e. 2-3, 12-14 and 24-28h post fertilization, and showed that MAS, by metabolic deactivation, reduced the toxicity of albendazole at all time points. Chemical analysis confirmed that albendazole was efficiently metabolized by MAS to the corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone, which are non-toxic to zebrafish embryos. To conclude, the modified zebrafish embryotoxicity test with MAS can be expanded for assessment of metabolites at different developmental stages.

  18. Analysis of protein expression in developmental toxicity induced by MeHg in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, Susana; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Ruppen, Isabel; Schonthaler, Helia B; Ashman, Keith; Madrid, Yolanda; Luque-Garcia, Jose L; Cámara, Carmen

    2012-11-21

    Mercury toxicity and its implications in development are a major concern, due to the major threat to ecosystems and human health that this compound represents. Although some of the effects of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure have been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms of interaction between this compound and developing organisms are still not completely understood. To provide further insights into these mechanisms, we carried out a quantitative proteomic study (iTRAQ) using zebrafish larvae exposed to 5 μg L(-1) and 25 μg L(-1) MeHg as a model. In this study, a multidimensional approach combining isoelectric focusing (IEF) and strong cation exchange (SCX) followed by reversed phase liquid chromatography prior to MALDI TOF/TOF analysis was employed, which resulted in a substantial increase in proteome coverage. Among the proteins identified, 71 were found de-regulated by more than 1.5-fold, and implicated in embryonic development, protein synthesis, calcium homeostasis and energy production. Furthermore, morphological and histological analysis of exposed larvae was carried out, reflecting changes such as smaller swim bladder, remaining yolk, bent body axis and accumulation of blood in the heart, among others.

  19. Reproductive and developmental toxicity of the Ginkgo biloba special extract EGb 761® in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Egon; Nöldner, Michael; Leuschner, Jost

    2013-12-15

    Extracts from leaves of Ginkgo biloba are among the most widely used and best investigated phytopharmaceuticals worldwide. Almost all clinical trials and the majority of preclinical studies have been performed with a specifically defined extract (EGb 761(®)) standardized to contain confined concentrations of active ingredients and limited quantities of potentially harmful substances. Besides pharmaceutical grade extracts poorly characterized Ginkgo preparations are now increasingly appearing on the market as nutraceuticals. While the safety of EGb 761(®) has been evaluated in an extensive set of toxicology studies, adverse effects of Ginkgo extracts of non-pharmaceutical quality on reproductive functions in mice have been reported in several publications in recent years. As this species has not previously been used in reproductive toxicity studies with EGb 761(®), the present investigation was conducted to examine the influence of EGb 761(®) (100, 350 and 1225mg/kg/day) on embryo-fetal development in mice during the critical period of organogenesis. During external and internal inspection of the fetuses as well as examination of skeletal and soft tissues no embryotoxic properties were noted. In particular, the incidence of malformations, variations or retardations was not increased and the general condition of dams was not influenced. Thus, the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) was above 1225mg/kg/day for the dams and the fetuses.

  20. Analysis of a ToxCast™ HTS Toxicity Signature for putative Vascular Disruptor Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies have shown the importance of blood vessel formation during embryo development and the strong correlation to developmental toxicity. Several developmental toxicants, such as thalidomide, have been identified which specifically target the forming embryonic vasculatur...

  1. Final report on the developmental toxicity of naphthalene (CAS No. 91-20-3) in New Zealand White (trade name) rabbits. Rept. for 26 Mar-1 Aug 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, H.A.; Price, C.J.; Marr, M.C.; Myers, C.B.; Heindel, J.J.

    1992-07-13

    Naphthalene (NAP) is a polyaromatic hydrocarbon produced from petroleum and coal tar. NAP is widely used in the manufacture of dyes, synthetic tanning agents, and lubricants; it is also a common constituent of mothballs. Exposure to NAP can occur in the home and workplace, and ingestion or inhalation can cause severe toxicity in humans, especially in infants and individuals with a deficiency in the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the large population at risk, and since NAP readily crosses the placenta, it was evaluated as a developmental toxicant. Accordingly, NAP (0, 20, 80, or 120 mg/kg/day) was administered in corn oil by gavage to pregnant rabbits during the major period of organogenesis (gd 6-19). Maternal clinical signs, weight, and food consumption were monitored from gd 0 to 30. On gd 30, fetuses were removed from the does and examined for effects of NAP on growth, viability, and morphological development. The results from the study provide no definitive evidence for NAP being toxic to the fetus or doe at doses as high as 120 mg/kg/day. Higher doses were not examined in the study due to the reported incidence of 40% maternal mortality following administration of 150 mg/kg/day NAP to pregnant rabbits in a range-finding study.

  2. Environmentally relevant levels of λ-cyhalothrin, fenvalerate, and permethrin cause developmental toxicity and disrupt endocrine system in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Yi; Du, Jie; Zhao, Meirong

    2017-10-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) are one of the most widely used pesticides and frequently detected in the aquatic environment. Previous studies have shown that SPs posed high aquatic toxicity, but information on the developmental toxicity and endocrine disruption on zebrafish (Danio rerio) at environmentally relevant concentrations is limited. In this study, zebrafish embryos were employed to examine the adverse effects of λ-cyhalothrin (LCT), fenvalerate (FEN), and permethrin (PM) at 2.5, 10, 25, 125, 500 nM for 96 h. The results showed these 3 SPs caused dose-dependent mortality, malformation rate, and hatching rate. Thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) levels were significantly decreased after exposure to LCT and FEN. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was then performed on a series of nuclear receptors (NRs) genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG), hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT), hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axes, and oxidative-stress-related system. Our results showed that LCT, FEN, and PM downregulated AR expression while upregulated ER1 expression, and caused alteration to ER2a and ER2b expression. As for the expression of TRα and TRβ, they were both decreased following exposure to the 3 SPs. LCT and PM downregulated the MR expression and FEN induced MR expression. In addition, the expression of GR was increased after treating with LCT, while it was suppressed after exposure to FEN and PM. The 3 SPs also caused various alterations to the expression of genes including AhRs, PPARα, and PXR. These findings suggest that these 3 SPs may cause developmental toxicity to zebrafish larvae by disrupting endocrine signaling at environmentally relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Integrating in vitro data and physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling to assess the in vivo potential developmental toxicity of a series of phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Spenkelink, Bert; de Haan, Laura H J; Woutersen, Ruud A; Punt, Ans; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2017-05-01

    Toxicity outcomes derived in vitro do not always reflect in vivo toxicity values, which was previously observed for a series of phenols tested in the embryonic stem cell test (EST). Translation of in vitro data to the in vivo situation is therefore an important, but still limiting step for the use of in vitro toxicity outcomes in the safety assessment of chemicals. The aim of the present study was to translate in vitro embryotoxicity data for a series of phenols to in vivo developmental toxic potency values for the rat by physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling-based reverse dosimetry. To this purpose, PBK models were developed for each of the phenols. The models were parameterised with in vitro-derived values defining metabolism and transport of the compounds across the intestinal and placental barrier and with in silico predictions and data from the literature. Using PBK-based reverse dosimetry, in vitro concentration-response curves from the EST were translated into in vivo dose-response curves from which points of departure (PoDs) were derived. The predicted PoDs differed less than 3.6-fold from PoDs derived from in vivo toxicity data for the phenols available in the literature. Moreover, the in vitro PBK-based reverse dosimetry approach could overcome the large disparity that was observed previously between the in vitro and the in vivo relative potency of the series of phenols. In conclusion, this study shows another proof-of-principle that the in vitro PBK approach is a promising strategy for non-animal-based safety assessment of chemicals.

  4. The classification of motor neuron defects in the zebrafish embryo toxicity test (ZFET) as an animal alternative approach to assess developmental neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth-Köhne, Elke; Wichmann, Arne; Delov, Vera; Fenske, Martina

    2012-07-01

    Rodents are widely used to test the developmental neurotoxicity potential of chemical substances. The regulatory test procedures are elaborate and the requirement of numerous animals is ethically disputable. Therefore, non-animal alternatives are highly desirable, but appropriate test systems that meet regulatory demands are not yet available. Hence, we have developed a new developmental neurotoxicity assay based on specific whole-mount immunostainings of primary and secondary motor neurons (using the monoclonal antibodies znp1 and zn8) in zebrafish embryos. By classifying the motor neuron defects, we evaluated the severity of the neurotoxic damage to individual primary and secondary motor neurons caused by chemical exposure and determined the corresponding effect concentration values (EC₅₀). In a proof-of-principle study, we investigated the effects of three model compounds thiocyclam, cartap and disulfiram, which show some neurotoxicity-indicating effects in vertebrates, and the positive controls ethanol and nicotine and the negative controls 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and triclosan. As a quantitative measure of the neurotoxic potential of the test compounds, we calculated the ratios of the EC₅₀ values for motor neuron defects and the cumulative malformations, as determined in a zebrafish embryo toxicity test (zFET). Based on this index, disulfiram was classified as the most potent and thiocyclam as the least potent developmental neurotoxin. The index also confirmed the control compounds as positive and negative neurotoxicants. Our findings demonstrate that this index can be used to reliably distinguish between neurotoxic and non-neurotoxic chemicals and provide a sound estimate for the neurodevelopmental hazard potential of a chemical. The demonstrated method can be a feasible approach to reduce the number of animals used in developmental neurotoxicity evaluation procedures.

  5. QSAR pre-screen of 70,983 substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the EU FP7 project ChemScreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev;

    2014-01-01

    be performed in REACH on known genotoxic carcinogens or germ cell mutagens with appropriate risk management measures implemented, a QSAR pre-screen for genotoxic carcinogenicity, germ cell mutagenicity and (limited) developmental toxicity was included in the project. Predictions for estrogenic and anti...... algorithms were applied to combine the predictions from the individual models to reach overall predictions for genotoxic carcinogenicity, germ cell mutagenicity and developmental toxicity. Furthermore, the full list of REACH pre-registered substances (143,835) was searched for substances containing certain...

  6. Toxicogenomic assessment of 6-OH-BDE47 induced developmental toxicity in chicken embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydroxylated and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-/MeO-PBDEs) are analogs of PBDEs with hundreds of possible structures and many of them can activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), however, the in vivo evidence on the toxicity of OH-/MeO-PBDEs are still very limi...

  7. Screening for angiogenic inhibitors in zebrafish to evaluate a predictive model for developmental vascular toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemically-induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development may cause a wide range of adverse effects. To identify putative vascular disrupting chemicals (pVDCs), a predictive signature was constructed from U.S. EPA ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) assays that map to...

  8. Developmental immunotoxicity of methylmercury: The relative sensitivity of developmental and immune parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonk, E.C.M.; Groot, D.M.G. de; Penninks, A.H.; Waalkens - Berendsen, I.D.H.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Slob, W.; Piersma, A.H.; Loveren, H. van

    2010-01-01

    Current developmental and reproductive toxicity protocols include only a limited set of parameters for effects on the developing immune system. In this study, a wide range of immunological parameters were included in a pre- and postnatal developmental toxicity study. Dose-response data were compared

  9. Developmental origins of adult diseases and neurotoxicity: epidemiological and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Donald A; Grandjean, Philippe; de Groot, Didima; Paule, Merle G

    2012-08-01

    To date, only a small number of commercial chemicals have been tested and documented as developmental neurotoxicants. Moreover, an increasing number of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies suggest an association between toxicant or drug exposure during the perinatal period and the development of metabolic-related diseases and neurotoxicity later in life. The four speakers at this symposium presented their research results on different neurotoxic chemicals relating to the developmental origins of health and adult disease (DOHaD). Philippe Grandjean presented epidemiological data on children exposed to inorganic mercury and methylmercury, and discussed the behavioral outcome measures as they relate to age and stage of brain development. Donald A. Fox presented data that low-dose human equivalent gestational lead exposure produces late-onset obesity only in male mice that is associated with neurodegeneration. Didima de Groot presented results on prenatal exposure of rats to methylazoxymethanol and discussed the results in light of the etiology of western Pacific amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson-dementia complex. Merle G. Paule addressed the long-term changes in learning, motivation and short-term memory in aged Rhesus monkeys following acute 24 h exposure to ketamine during early development. Overall, these presentations addressed fundamental issues in the emerging areas of lifetime neurotoxicity testing, differential vulnerable periods of exposure, nonmonotonic dose-response effects and neurotoxic risk assessment. The results indicate that developmental neurotoxicity results in permanent changes, thus emphasizing the need to prevent such toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fertility, developmental toxicity and teratogenicity in albino rats treated with methanol sub-fraction of Carica papaya seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shrivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the status of fertility, developmental stages during gestation and teratological changes, if any, following oral administration of methanol sub-fraction (MSF of the benzene chromatographic fraction of the chloroform extract of the seeds of Carica papaya in rats. Materials and Methods: The MSF was administered at the doses of 50 mg contraceptive dose (CD, 100 mg (2x CD, 250 mg (5x CD and 500 mg (10x CD/kg body wt/day along with vehicle-treated control using 10 male and 20 female Wistar rats in each group. Necropsies were performed one day before the expected parturition. Status of gravid/non-gravid uterus, the number of corpora lutea in the ovary, implantation status, fetal wellbeing, fetal resorption, fetal body weight, external, visceral and skeletal malformations were recorded. Results: Pregnancies were recorded in vehicle-treated control animals and in the animals treated with 50 mg/kg body wt/day. The animals treated with 2x CD, 5x CD and 10x CD did not get pregnant. The fetuses and the status of the ovary, uterus and implantation, fetal body weight, soft tissues and skeletal structures were recorded normal. Data were comparable to those of control. Conclusion: The results suggest that the test substance had no developmental toxicity and teratogenicity which could affect pregnancy, implantation and gestation.

  11. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of tetrahydrofuran in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1988-08-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF), a four-carbon cyclic ether, is widely used as an industrial solvent. Although it has been used in large quantities for many years, few long-term toxicology studies, and no reproductive or developmental studies, have been conducted on THF. This study addresses the potential for THF to cause developmental toxicity in rodents by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 600, 1800, or 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapors, 6 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.33 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6--17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as O dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 27 refs., 6 figs., 23 tabs.

  12. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol ethers – Reproductive and developmental toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Starek-Świechowicz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Both ethylene and propylene glycol alkyl ethers (EGAEs and PGAEs, respectively are widely used, mainly as solvents, in industrial and household products. Some EGAEs demonstrate gonadotoxic, embriotoxic, fetotoxic and teratogenic effects in both humans and experimental animals. Due to the noxious impact of these ethers on reproduction and development of organisms EGAEs are replaced for considerably less toxic PGAEs. The data on the mechanisms of testicular, embriotoxic, fetotoxic and teratogenic effects of EGAEs are presented in this paper. Our particular attention was focused on the metabolism of some EGAEs and their organ-specific toxicities, apoptosis of spermatocytes associated with changes in the expression of various genes that code for oxidative stress factors, protein kinases and nuclear hormone receptors. Med Pr 2015;66(5:725–737

  13. Gestational Zearalenone Exposure Causes Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity in Pregnant Rats and Female Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZEN is an oestrogenic mycotoxin commonly found in food and feed products and can affect reproduction and development in both humans and animals. This study aimed to determine the toxic effects of ZEN on maternal SD rats and the F1 female offspring. Sixty-four pregnant rats were divided into 4 groups and exposed to feed contaminated with ZEN (0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg feed on gestational days (GDs 0–21. Compared with the controls, the groups exposed to 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN showed significantly decreased feed intake and body weight of pregnant rats and/or female offspring. Meanwhile, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly decreased the birth weight and viability of F1 newborn rats. Moreover, 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN diets increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations but decreased oestradiol in both maternal and F1 adult rats. In the F1 generation, ZEN caused no pathological changes in ovaries and uterus in weaned rats, but significant follicular atresia and a thinning uterine layer were found in F1 female adult rats in the 20 mg/kg ZEN group. These impairments concurred with the inhibited mRNA and protein levels of oestrogen receptor-alpha (Esr1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD in the adult uterus and/or ovaries. Furthermore, 10 and/or 20 mg/kg ZEN exposure significantly reduced Esr1, gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHr, and ATP binding cassette transporters b1 and c1 (ABCb1 and ABCc1 in the placenta and foetal and weaned F1 brains, and also produced a dose-dependent increase in 3β-HSD in the placenta. Additionally, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly upregulated ABCc5 expression in the placenta and ovaries of weaned rats. These results suggested that prenatal ZEN exposure in rats affected maternal and foetal development and may lead to long-term reproductive impairment in F1 adult females.

  14. Gestational Zearalenone Exposure Causes Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity in Pregnant Rats and Female Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Sun, Lvhui; Zhang, Niya; Li, Chong; Zhang, Jiacai; Xiao, Zhuohui; Qi, Desheng

    2017-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is an oestrogenic mycotoxin commonly found in food and feed products and can affect reproduction and development in both humans and animals. This study aimed to determine the toxic effects of ZEN on maternal SD rats and the F1 female offspring. Sixty-four pregnant rats were divided into 4 groups and exposed to feed contaminated with ZEN (0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg feed) on gestational days (GDs) 0–21. Compared with the controls, the groups exposed to 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN showed significantly decreased feed intake and body weight of pregnant rats and/or female offspring. Meanwhile, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly decreased the birth weight and viability of F1 newborn rats. Moreover, 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN diets increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations but decreased oestradiol in both maternal and F1 adult rats. In the F1 generation, ZEN caused no pathological changes in ovaries and uterus in weaned rats, but significant follicular atresia and a thinning uterine layer were found in F1 female adult rats in the 20 mg/kg ZEN group. These impairments concurred with the inhibited mRNA and protein levels of oestrogen receptor-alpha (Esr1) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) in the adult uterus and/or ovaries. Furthermore, 10 and/or 20 mg/kg ZEN exposure significantly reduced Esr1, gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHr), and ATP binding cassette transporters b1 and c1 (ABCb1 and ABCc1) in the placenta and foetal and weaned F1 brains, and also produced a dose-dependent increase in 3β-HSD in the placenta. Additionally, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly upregulated ABCc5 expression in the placenta and ovaries of weaned rats. These results suggested that prenatal ZEN exposure in rats affected maternal and foetal development and may lead to long-term reproductive impairment in F1 adult females. PMID:28067781

  15. Avisalmvac: evaluation studies of stability and toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Botus,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In Pasteur Institute laboratories there was developed AVISALMVAC, a vaccine against avian Salmonella, a biological product that contains S. enteritidis and S. typhimurium bacterin, with oil adjuvant. This paper presents the results of the studies regarding the stability and toxicity evaluation of this vaccine stored under conditions recommended by the manufacturer (2-80C at the end of the period of validity. The vaccine stability was assessed by serological and histopathological analysis of samples from SPF chickens vaccinated with the product at the end of the period of validity. The study of Avisalmvac toxicity was carried out by inoculation of the product or its components on Vero cell monolayer, and the effects were microscopically recorded or by MTT test, applied at 6 days post-inoculation. Antibody titers recorded at 2 and 3 weeks post vaccination demonstrated the vaccine ability (used after an year since manufacture to induce synthesis of specific antibodies and therefore, the product stability was proven. Histopathological examinations carried out on samples taken at 18 days post vaccinationfrom the vaccination site (skeletal muscle and skin and spleen, did not show any lesions associated to vaccination with Avisalmvac. The cytotoxicity analysis made by inoculating the vaccine or its components on Vero cell monolayer and the microscopic examination did not record visible cytopathic effects for any vaccine dilutions or vaccine components. The cell metabolism evaluation by MTT assay made at 6 days after vaccine/vaccine components inoculation on Vero monolayer, shown the ability of the vaccine and oil adjuvant to stimulate cell metabolism, and a certain degree of toxicity / inhibition of dehydrogenase metabolism associated to one of emulsifier but at dilutions higher than those used in the vaccine formula.

  16. Developmental genetics in emerging rodent models: case studies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallarino, Ricardo; Hoekstra, Hopi E; Manceau, Marie

    2016-08-01

    For decades, mammalian developmental genetic studies have focused almost entirely on two laboratory models: Mus and Rattus, species that breed readily in the laboratory and for which a wealth of molecular and genetic resources exist. These species alone, however, do not capture the remarkable diversity of morphological, behavioural and physiological traits seen across rodents, a group that represents >40% of all mammal species. Due to new advances in molecular tools and genomic technologies, studying the developmental events underlying natural variation in a wide range of species for a wide range of traits has become increasingly feasible. Here we review several recent studies and discuss how they not only provided technical resources for newly emerging rodent models in developmental genetics but also are instrumental in further encouraging scientists, from a wide range of research fields, to capitalize on the great diversity in development that has evolved among rodents.

  17. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats.

  18. Development of QSAR models using artificial neural network analysis for risk assessment of repeated-dose, reproductive, and developmental toxicities of cosmetic ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Aiba Née Kaneko, Maki; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    Use of laboratory animals for systemic toxicity testing is subject to strong ethical and regulatory constraints, but few alternatives are yet available. One possible approach to predict systemic toxicity of chemicals in the absence of experimental data is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. Here, we present QSAR models for prediction of maximum "no observed effect level" (NOEL) for repeated-dose, developmental and reproductive toxicities. NOEL values of 421 chemicals for repeated-dose toxicity, 315 for reproductive toxicity, and 156 for developmental toxicity were collected from Japan Existing Chemical Data Base (JECDB). Descriptors to predict toxicity were selected based on molecular orbital (MO) calculations, and QSAR models employing multiple independent descriptors as the input layer of an artificial neural network (ANN) were constructed to predict NOEL values. Robustness of the models was indicated by the root-mean-square (RMS) errors after 10-fold cross-validation (0.529 for repeated-dose, 0.508 for reproductive, and 0.558 for developmental toxicity). Evaluation of the models in terms of the percentages of predicted NOELs falling within factors of 2, 5 and 10 of the in-vivo-determined NOELs suggested that the model is applicable to both general chemicals and the subset of chemicals listed in International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI). Our results indicate that ANN models using in silico parameters have useful predictive performance, and should contribute to integrated risk assessment of systemic toxicity using a weight-of-evidence approach. Availability of predicted NOELs will allow calculation of the margin of safety, as recommended by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS).

  19. Developmental toxicity testing in the 21st century: the sword of Damocles shattered by embryonic stem cell assays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Andrea; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Pirow, Ralph; Riebeling, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Modern society faces an inherent dilemma. In our globalized society, we are spoilt for choice by an ever-increasing number of products, many of which are made of new materials and compound mixtures. At the same time, as consumers we got accustomed to the idea of a life minimized for risk, including our own exposure to chemicals from the environment or to compounds present in and released from everyday products. Chemical safety testing bridges these obviously diverging interests, and the corresponding legislation has hence been tremendously extended (e.g., introduction of the European legislation REACH in 2007). However, the underlying regulatory toxicology still relies mainly on animal testing, which is relatively slow, expensive, and ethically arguable. Meanwhile, recent years have seen a surge in efforts to develop alternative testing systems and strategies. Expectations are particularly high for the applicability of stem cells as test systems especially for developmental toxicity testing in vitro. For the first time in history, test systems can be based on differentiating cells and tissue progenitors in culture, thus bringing the 'vision of toxicity testing in the 21st century' a step closer.

  20. Introducing Environmental Toxicology in Instructional Labs: The Use of a Modified Amphibian Developmental Toxicity Assay to Support Inquiry-Based Student Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauterer, Roger; Rayburn, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Introducing students to the process of scientific inquiry is a major goal of high school and college labs. Environmental toxins are of great concern and public interest. Modifications of a vertebrate developmental toxicity assay using the frog Xenopus laevis can support student-initiated toxicology experiments that are relevant to humans. Teams of…

  1. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity: Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beker van Woudenberg, A.; Snel, C.; Rijkmans, E.; Groot, D. de; Bouma, M.; Hermsen, S.; Piersma, A.; Menke, A.; Wolterbeek, A.

    2014-01-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid

  2. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity : Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Snel, Cor; Rijkmans, Eke; De Groot, Didima; Bouma, Marga; Hermsen, Sanne; Piersma, Aldert; Menke, Aswin; Wolterbeek, André

    2014-01-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid

  3. Developmental toxicity assessment of medicinal mushroom Antrodia cinnamomea T.T. Chang et W.N. Chou (higher Basidiomycetes) submerged culture mycelium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-I; Chen, Chiao-Wen; Lin, Ting-Wei; Wang, Di-Sheng; Chen, Chin-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea is a Taiwanese medicinal mushroom with high antioxidant and polysaccharide content. The objective of this study is to investigate developmental toxicity of A. cinnamomea in pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were daily gavaged with A. cinnamomea mycelium at dosage levels of 0 (reverse osmosis water), 50, 150, and 500 mg/kg from gestation day (GD) 6 to 15. All dams were sacrificed on GD 20 and were subjected to cesarean section. Fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal abnormalities. All copulated females survived until the end of the study. No significant differences were recorded in body weight change, food consumption, and maternal gestational parameters. Only two fetal malformations were noted in 970 fetuses from the treatment groups. Some variations, such as enlarged fontanel, split sternebrae, absent sacral, absent caudal vertebral centra, absent thoracic centra, absent 13th-14th ribs, and fused ribs, were found during the skeletal examination, but no treatment-induced abnormalities occurred. No dose dependency was observed in any of the developmental variations. Overall observation of foetal malformations from rats given A. cinnamomea mycelium during pregnancy demonstrates that this material is not teratogenic at doses up to 500 mg/kg. It is concluded that A. cinnamomea BCRC 35398 mycelium has no teratogenic effects in female rats and is safe to be used as a functional food ingredient.

  4. Zebrafish on a chip: a novel platform for real-time monitoring of drug-induced developmental toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinbao Li

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical safety testing requires a cheap, fast and highly efficient platform for real-time evaluation of drug toxicity and secondary effects. In this study, we have developed a microfluidic system for phenotype-based evaluation of toxic and teratogenic effects of drugs using zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos and larvae as the model organism. The microfluidic chip is composed of two independent functional units, enabling the assessment of zebrafish embryos and larvae. Each unit consists of a fluidic concentration gradient generator and a row of seven culture chambers to accommodate zebrafish. To test the accuracy of this new chip platform, we examined the toxicity and teratogenicity of an anti-asthmatic agent-aminophylline (Apl on 210 embryos and 210 larvae (10 individuals per chamber. The effect of Apl on zebrafish embryonic development was quantitatively assessed by recording a series of physiological indicators such as heart rate, survival rate, body length and hatch rate. Most importantly, a new index called clonic convulsion rate, combined with mortality was used to evaluate the toxicities of Apl on zebrafish larvae. We found that Apl can induce deformity and cardiovascular toxicity in both zebrafish embryos and larvae. This microdevice is a multiplexed testing apparatus that allows for the examination of indexes beyond toxicity and teratogenicity at the sub-organ and cellular levels and provides a potentially cost-effective and rapid pharmaceutical safety assessment tool.

  5. Incorporating Study Strategies in Developmental Mathematics/College Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Selina Vasquez; Offer, Joey; Ward, Debra P.; Dochen, Carol W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effectiveness of incorporating study strategies in a developmental mathematics/college algebra program. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected through a quasiexperimental methodology. Results show that students reported increases on the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI)…

  6. Developmental and reproductive toxicity of PVP/PEI-coated silver nanoparticles to zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbea, Amaia; González-Soto, Nagore; Lacave, José María; Barrio, Irantzu; Cajaraville, Miren P

    2017-09-01

    Cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity of silver nanoparticles (NPs) and their toxicity to fish embryos after waterborne exposure have been widely investigated, but much less information is available regarding the effect of Ag NPs on physiological functions such as growth or reproduction. In this work, the effects of waterborne exposure of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) to PVP/PEI coated Ag NPs (~5nm) on reproduction (fecundity) were investigated. Moreover, the development of the embryos after parental exposure was compared with the development of embryos after direct waterborne exposure to the NPs. For this, two experiments were run: 1) embryos from unexposed parents were treated for 5days with Ag NPs (10μgAgL(-1)-10mgAgL(-1)) and development was monitored, and 2) selected breeding zebrafish were exposed for 3weeks to 100ngAgL(-1) (environmentally relevant concentration) or to 10μgAgL(-1) of Ag NPs, fecundity was scored and development of resulting embryos was monitored up to 5days. Waterborne exposure of embryos to Ag NPs resulted in being highly toxic (LC50 at 120h=50μgAgL(-1)), causing 100% mortality during the first 24h of exposure at 0.1mgAgL(-1). Exposure of adults, even at the environmentally relevant silver concentration, caused a significant reduction of fecundity by the second week of treatment and resulting embryos showed a higher prevalence of malformations than control embryos. Exposed adult females presented higher prevalence of vacuolization in the liver. These results show that Ag NPs at an environmentally relevant concentration are able to affect population level parameters in zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptomic studies on liver toxicity of acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toska, Endrit; Zagorsky, Robert; Figler, Bryan; Cheng, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen is widely used as a pain reliever and to reduce fever. At high doses, it can cause severe hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen overdose has become the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. The mechanisms for acetaminophen-induced liver injury are unclear. Transcriptomic studies can identify the changes in expression of thousands of genes when exposed to supratherapeutic doses of acetaminophen. These studies elucidated the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and also provide insight into future development of diagnosis and treatment options for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. The following is a brief overview of some recent transcriptomic studies and gene-expression-based prediction models on liver toxicity induced by acetaminophen.

  8. A review of toxicity studies on graphene-based nanomaterials in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2017-04-01

    We summarized the findings of toxicity studies on graphene-based nanomaterials (GNMs) in laboratory mammals. The inhalation of graphene (GP) and graphene oxide (GO) induced only minimal pulmonary toxicity. Bolus airway exposure to GP and GO caused acute and subacute pulmonary inflammation. Large-sized GO (L-GO) was more toxic than small-sized GO (S-GO). Intratracheally administered GP passed through the air-blood barrier into the blood and intravenous GO distributed mainly in the lungs, liver, and spleen. S-GO and L-GO mainly accumulated in the liver and lungs, respectively. Limited information showed the potential behavioral, reproductive, and developmental toxicity and genotoxicity of GNMs. There are indications that oxidative stress and inflammation may be involved in the toxicity of GNMs. The surface reactivity, size, and dispersion status of GNMs play an important role in the induction of toxicity and biodistribution of GNMs. Although this review paper provides initial information on the potential toxicity of GNMs, data are still very limited, especially when taking into account the many different types of GNMs and their potential modifications. To fill the data gap, further studies should be performed using laboratory mammals exposed using the route and dose anticipated for human exposure scenarios.

  9. Toxicity of road deicing salt (NaCl) and copper (Cu) to fertilization and early developmental stages of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrosh, Urma; Kleiven, Merethe; Meland, Sondre; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian

    2014-09-15

    In many countries, salting of ice or snow covered roads may affect aquatic organisms in the catchment directly or indirectly by mobilization of toxic metals. We studied the toxicity of road deicing salt and copper (Cu) on the vulnerable early life stages of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), from fertilization till hatching. Controlled episodic exposure to road salt (≥ 5,000 mg/L) during fertilization resulted in reduced swelling and less percent egg survival. Exposure to Cu both during and post fertilization caused delayed hatching. Larval deformities were, however found as an additional effect, when eggs were exposed to high salt concentration (≥ 5,000 mg/L) mixed with Cu (10 μg Cu/L) during fertilization. Thus, it appears that the sensitivity of early developmental stages of Atlantic salmon increased when exposed to these stressors, and road salt application during spawning can pose threat to Atlantic salmon in water bodies receiving road runoff. The study gives insight on assessment and management of risks on Atlantic salmon population posed by road related hazardous chemicals.

  10. Insomnia and Psychosocial Crisis: Two Studies of Erikson's Developmental Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karen Dineen; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examines the role of internal stressors in the development of sleep disturbances in two studies of 122 older adults and 66 college students. Results confirmed Erikson's (1959) developmental theory. Failure to resolve the psychosocial crises of old age and adolescence were related to insomnia. (WAS)

  11. Quantile Regression in the Study of Developmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petscher, Yaacov; Logan, Jessica A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Linear regression analysis is one of the most common techniques applied in developmental research, but only allows for an estimate of the average relations between the predictor(s) and the outcome. This study describes quantile regression, which provides estimates of the relations between the predictor(s) and outcome, but across multiple points of…

  12. An Exploratory Study of Library Anxiety in Developmental Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined Library Anxiety in a cohort of developmental English students. Levels of anxiety were measured in 191 students using Bostick's Library Anxiety Scale. Thirteen of those students were then interviewed about their use, knowledge and valuation of their campus library. The results of the interviews were compared against the measured…

  13. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment in Canada geese (Branta canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Heinz, Gary H.; Sileo, Louis; Audet, Daniel J.; Campbell, Juile K.; Obrecht, Holly H.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has recently been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The effects of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho on posthatching development of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) were examined for 6 wk. Day-old goslings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (48%) supplemented control diet, or CDARB sediment (3449 mug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12%, 24%, or 48%. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 0.68 ppm (ww), with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over fourfold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 1.61 ppm with decreased hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma protein in addition to the effects just described. The 48% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.52 ppm with 22% mortality, decreased growth, and elevated plasma lactate dehydrogenase-L (LDH-L) activity. In this group the liver lead concentration was 6.57 ppm (ww), with twofold increases in hepatic lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, TBARS) and in reduced glutathione concentration; associated effects included elevated glutathione reductase activity but lower protein-bound thiols concentration and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) activity. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 14.93 ppm with subacute renal tubular nephrosis in one of the surviving goslings. Three other geese in this treatment group exhibited calcified areas of marrow, and one of these displayed severe chronic fibrosing pancreatitis. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated less readily in gosling blood and tissues than reported in ducklings but at given concentrations was generally more toxic to goslings. Many of these effects were similar to those reported in wild geese and mallards within the Coeur d'Alene River Basin.

  14. Developmental characteristics and response to iron toxicity of root border cells in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Cheng-hua; Zhu, Mei-hong; Cai, Miao-zhen; Liu, Peng; Xu, Gen-di; Wu, Shao-hui

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the Fe2+ effects on root tips in rice plant, experiments were carried out using border cells in vitro. The border cells were pre-planted in aeroponic culture and detached from root tips. Most border cells have a long elliptical shape. The number and the viability of border cells in situ reached the maxima of 1600 and 97.5%, respectively, at 20-25 mm root length. This mortality was more pronounced at the first 1-12 h exposure to 250 mg/L Fe2+ than at the last 12-36 h. After 36 h, the cell viability exposed to 250 mg/L Fe2+ decreased to nought, whereas it was 46.5% at 0 mg/L Fe2+. Increased Fe2+ dosage stimulated the death of detached border cells from rice cultivars. After 4 h Fe2+ treatment, the cell viabilities were > or =80% at 0 and 50 mg/L Fe2+ treatment and were border cells decreased by 10% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. After 24 h Fe2+ treatment, the viabilities of border cells at all the Fe2+ levels were border cells decreased by 20% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. The decreased viabilities of border cells indicated that Fe2+ dosage and treatment time would cause deadly effect on the border cells. The increased cell death could protect the root tips from toxic harm. Therefore, it may protect root from the damage caused by harmful iron toxicity.

  15. Developmental characteristics and response to iron toxicity of root border cells in rice seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-hua XING; Mei-hong ZHU; Miao-zhen CAI; Peng LIU; Gen-di XU; Shao-hui WU

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the Fe2+ effects on root tips in rice plant, experiments were carded out using border cells in vitro. The border cells were pre-planted in aeroponic culture and detached from root tips. Most border cells have a long elliptical shape. The number and the viability of border cells in situ reached the maxima of 1600 and 97.5%, respectively, at 20~25 mm root length. This mortality was more pronounced at the first 1~12 h exposure to 250 mg/L Fe2+ than at the last 12~36 h. After 36 h, the cell viability exposed to 250 mg/L Fe2+ decreased to nought, whereas it was 46.5% at 0 mg/L Fe2+. Increased Fe2+ dosage stimulated the death of detached border cells from rice cultivars. After 4 h Fe2+ treatment, the cell viabilities were≥80% at 0 and 50 mg/L Fe2+ treatment and were <62% at 150, 250 and 350 mg/L Fe2+ treatment; The viability of border cells decreased by 10% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. After 24 h Fe2+ treatment, the viabilities of border cells at all the Fe2+ levels were <65%; The viability of border cells decreased by 20% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. The decreased viabilities of border cells indicated that Fe2+ dosage and treatment time would cause deadly effect on the border cells. The increased cell death could protect the root tips from toxic harm. Therefore, it may protect root from the damage caused by harmful iron toxicity.

  16. Genome-wide association analysis of tolerance to methylmercury toxicity in Drosophila implicates myogenic and neuromuscular developmental pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Montgomery

    Full Text Available Methylmercury (MeHg is a persistent environmental toxin present in seafood that can compromise the developing nervous system in humans. The effects of MeHg toxicity varies among individuals, despite similar levels of exposure, indicating that genetic differences contribute to MeHg susceptibility. To examine how genetic variation impacts MeHg tolerance, we assessed developmental tolerance to MeHg using the sequenced, inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP. We found significant genetic variation in the effects of MeHg on development, measured by eclosion rate, giving a broad sense heritability of 0.86. To investigate the influence of dietary factors, we measured MeHg toxicity with caffeine supplementation in the DGRP lines. We found that caffeine counteracts the deleterious effects of MeHg in the majority of lines, and there is significant genetic variance in the magnitude of this effect, with a broad sense heritability of 0.80. We performed genome-wide association (GWA analysis for both traits, and identified candidate genes that fall into several gene ontology categories, with enrichment for genes involved in muscle and neuromuscular development. Overexpression of glutamate-cysteine ligase, a MeHg protective enzyme, in a muscle-specific manner leads to a robust rescue of eclosion of flies reared on MeHg food. Conversely, mutations in kirre, a pivotal myogenic gene identified in our GWA analyses, modulate tolerance to MeHg during development in accordance with kirre expression levels. Finally, we observe disruptions of indirect flight muscle morphogenesis in MeHg-exposed pupae. Since the pathways for muscle development are evolutionarily conserved, it is likely that the effects of MeHg observed in Drosophila can be generalized across phyla, implicating muscle as an additional hitherto unrecognized target for MeHg toxicity. Furthermore, our observations that caffeine can ameliorate the toxic effects of MeHg show

  17. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity: Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Snel, Cor; Rijkmans, Eke; de Groot, Didima; Bouma, Marga; Hermsen, Sanne; Piersma, Aldert; Menke, Aswin; Wolterbeek, André

    2014-11-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETH) and levetiracetam (LEV). For VPA, histopathology was the most sensitive parameter, showing effects already at 60μM. For CBZ, morphology and MA were the most sensitive parameters, showing effects at 180μM. For ETH, all endpoints showed similar sensitivity (6.6mM), whereas MA was the most sensitive parameter for LEV (40mM). Inclusion of kinetics did not alter the absolute ranking of the compounds, but the relative potency was changed considerably. Taking all together, this demo-case study showed that inclusion of multiple-endpoints in ZET may increase the sensitivity of the assay, contribute to the elucidation of the mode of toxic action and to a better definition of the applicability domain of ZET.

  18. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity of Soybean Isoflavones to Immature SD Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI GUAN; YU HUANG; ZHEN-YU CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dose-dependent toxic effect of soybean isoflavone extracts (SIE) on reproductive development in immature rats. Methods Growing male and female rats (n=50 each, 4 weeks) were divided into five groups fed with a standard cereal-based diet and gastrogavaged daily with 0, 30, 150, 300, and 600 mg SIE / kg body weight, respectively, for 12 weeks. Body weight, organ weights, and serum level of estrogen and testosterone were measured. Results Oral administration of SIE had no effect on food intake but decreased food efficiency ratio (P<0.01). Suppression on body weight gain by SIE was dose-dependent and the effect was greater on male than on female rats (P<0.01). SIE at high doses exhibited hepatotoxicity by increasing a relative liver weight, and also caused a smaller uterus but a greater relative ovary in female rats,while leading to larger relative testis and epididymis in male rats. SIE could decrease progesterone concentrations in female rats, whereas in male rats it reduced not only total testosterone level but also sperm count compared with the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion SIE at a range of 50-1000 times of human intake level affects not only growth but also development of reproductive system in growing rats.

  19. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Badakhshan Mahdi Pour; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara(L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods: The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results: All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions:Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure.

  20. Reevaluation of the developmental toxicity of dieldrin by the use of fertilized Japanese quail eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Ryo; Shiraishi, Fujio; Takahashi, Shinji; Shimizu, Akira; Shiraishi, Hiroaki

    2010-06-01

    To reevaluate the toxicity of the organochlorine insecticide and persistent organic pollutant dieldrin and confirm its impact on development, an exposure trial using bird eggs was performed. Dieldrin at concentrations of 10-100 microg/g of egg was injected into the yolks of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) eggs. Hatchlings from the eggs were raised to sexual maturity and multiple tests to detect the harmful effects of dieldrin were conducted. Dieldrin at 100 microg/g decreased egg hatchability by 50.0% (vehicle control, 86.7%), although embryogenesis even in unhatched eggs treated with high doses of dieldrin was normal. In safely hatched chicks, dose-dependent early death with tonic seizure was observed and all birds exposed to 100 microg/g died within 3 days. Other significant alterations in hatchlings were enlargement of the whole brain, decreases in mRNA expressions of tryptophan hydroxylase in the brainstem and cholesterol side-chain cleavage in the male gonad, and increases in mRNA expressions of cytochrome P450 1A and 2C18 in the liver. For mature birds (males at 5 weeks and females at 10 weeks of age), impairment of eggshell formation such as reduced eggshell mass and eggshell thinning, increases in the body mass of males and the liver mass of females and increases in serum total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were observed. The results indicated that not only does the neurotoxicity of dieldrin bring early death, but its effects on reproductive and hepatic functions (detected as gene transcriptional changes in hatchlings) persist harmfully after maturity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of n-hexane in mice: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Decker, J.R.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Gestational exposure to n-hexane resulted in an increase in the number of resorbed fetuses for exposure groups relative to the control group; however, the increases were not directly correlated to exposure concentration. The differences were statistically significant for the 200-ppM with respect to total intrauterine death (early plus late resorptions), and with respect to late resorptions for the 5000-ppM group. A small, but statistically significant, reduction in female (but not male) fetal body weight relative to the control group was observed at the 5000-ppM exposure level. There were no exposure-related increases in any individual fetal malformation or variation, nor was there any increase in the incidence of combined malformations or variations. Gestational exposure of CD-1 mice to n-hexane vapors appeared to cause a degree of concentration-related developmental toxicity in the absence of overt maternal toxicity, but the test material was not found to be teratogenic. This developmental toxicity was manifested as an increase in the number of resorptions per litter for all exposure levels, and as a decrease in the uterine: extra-gestational weight gain ratio at the 5000-ppM exposure level. Because of the significant increase in the number of resorptions at the 200-ppM exposure level, a no observable effect level (NOEL) for developmental toxicity was not established for exposure of mice to 200, 1000 or 5000-ppM n-hexane vapors. 21 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Children's understanding of scientific concepts: A developmental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerton, Gillian Valerie

    Combining theory-oriented inquiry and research that aims to improve instruction is a major goal of neo-Piagetian theory. Within this tradition, Case's (1992) developmental model enables educational researchers to conduct a detailed analysis of the structural and conceptual changes that occur in children's representation of knowledge in different domains at various points in their development. In so doing, it is now possible for educators to first assess children's "entering competence" in a specific subject and then set developmentally realistic instructional goals. Using Case's (1992) model as a theoretical framework, a developmental study was conducted investigating children's understanding of scientific phenomena, specifically buoyancy, at the ages of 6, 8, and 10 years. The main goal was to determine whether or not children's conceptual levels of understanding change systematically with age in a progressive manner consistent with neo-Piagetian stages of development hypothesized by Case. Participants attended one elementary school in a suburban school district near Vancouver, B.C. Sixty children were individually administered a set of five buoyancy tasks that varied in level of difficulty and involved objects of different weights, shapes and sizes. Each student was asked to predict whether an object would float or sink in different liquids and to support their prediction with an explanation. Analyses using the neo-Piagetian approach of articulating the semantic and syntactic nature of children's mental structures were conducted on the students' responses. Shape, size, weight and substance were identified as the semantic components of buoyancy which are syntactically related Using Case's dimensional metric for classifying different levels of conceptual understanding of buoyancy, the results of the study confirmed that children's understanding of buoyancy did progress through the developmental sequence as hypothesized. The structural progression from

  3. Developmental toxicology: new directions workshop: refining testing strategies and study designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Kimberly C; Fenton, Suzanne E; Hansen, Deborah K; Harrouk, Wafa; Kim, James H; Shuey, Dana

    2011-10-01

    In April 2009, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee held a two-day workshop entitled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions." The third session of the workshop focused on ways to refine animal studies to improve relevance and predictivity for human risk. The session included five presentations on: (1) considerations for refining developmental toxicology testing and data interpretation; (2) comparative embryology and considerations in study design and interpretation; (3) pharmacokinetic considerations in study design; (4) utility of genetically modified models for understanding mode-of-action; and (5) special considerations in reproductive testing for biologics. The presentations were followed by discussion by the presenters and attendees. Much of the discussion focused on aspects of refining current animal testing strategies, including use of toxicokinetic data, dose selection, tiered/triggered testing strategies, species selection, and use of alternative animal models. Another major area of discussion was use of non-animal-based testing paradigms, including how to define a "signal" or adverse effect, translating in vitro exposures to whole animal and human exposures, validation strategies, the need to bridge the existing gap between classical toxicology testing and risk assessment, and development of new technologies. Although there was general agreement among participants that the current testing strategy is effective, there was also consensus that traditional methods are resource-intensive and improved effectiveness of developmental toxicity testing to assess risks to human health is possible. This article provides a summary of the session's presentations and discussion and describes some key areas that warrant further consideration. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Developmental Toxicology—New Directions Workshop: Refining Testing Strategies and Study Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Kimberly C.; Fenton, Suzanne E.; Hansen, Deborah K.; Harrouk, Wafa; Kim, James H.; Shuey, Dana

    2012-01-01

    In April 2009, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute’s (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee held a two-day workshop entitled “Developmental Toxicology—New Directions.” The third session of the workshop focused on ways to refine animal studies to improve relevance and predictivity for human risk. The session included five presentations on: (1) considerations for refining developmental toxicology testing and data interpretation; (2) comparative embryology and considerations in study design and interpretation; (3) pharmacokinetic considerations in study design; (4) utility of genetically modified models for understanding mode-of-action; and (5) special considerations in reproductive testing for biologics. The presentations were followed by discussion by the presenters and attendees. Much of the discussion focused on aspects of refining current animal testing strategies, including use of toxicokinetic data, dose selection, tiered/triggered testing strategies, species selection, and use of alternative animal models. Another major area of discussion was use of non-animal-based testing paradigms, including how to define a “signal” or adverse effect, translating in vitro exposures to whole animal and human exposures, validation strategies, the need to bridge the existing gap between classical toxicology testing and risk assessment, and development of new technologies. Although there was general agreement among participants that the current testing strategy is effective, there was also consensus that traditional methods are resource-intensive and improved effectiveness of developmental toxicity testing to assess risks to human health is possible. This article provides a summary of the session’s presentations and discussion and describes some key areas that warrant further consideration. PMID:22006510

  5. Subchronic oral toxicity studies with y-cyclodextrin in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bär, A.

    1998-01-01

    The toxicity of γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), a cyclic polymer of eight α-1,4-linked glucopyranosyl units with potential applications as a food ingredient, was examined in a 2-week pilot study followed by a 13-week oral toxicity study in Wistar rats. In the 2-week study, the test substance was administered

  6. Prediction of in vivo developmental toxicity of all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro toxicity data and in silico physiologycally based kinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Bosgra, S.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Rietjens, I.; Verwei, M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of laboratory animals for toxicity testing in chemical safety assessment meets increasing ethical, economic and legislative constraints. The development, validation and application of reliable alternatives for in vivo toxicity testing are therefore urgently needed. In order to use toxicity d

  7. Prediction of in vivo developmental toxicity of all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro toxicity data and in silico physiologically based kinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, Jochem; Bosgra, Sieto; Blaauboer, Bas J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.; Verwei, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The use of laboratory animals for toxicity testing in chemical safety assessment meets increasing ethical, economic and legislative constraints. The development, validation and application of reliable alternatives for in vivo toxicity testing are therefore urgently needed. In order to use toxicity d

  8. Prediction of in vivo developmental toxicity of all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro toxicity data and in silico physiologically based kinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Bosgra, S.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Verwei, M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of laboratory animals for toxicity testing in chemical safety assessment meets increasing ethical, economic and legislative constraints. The development, validation and application of reliable alternatives for in vivo toxicity testing are therefore urgently needed. In order to use toxicity

  9. Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, M P

    2007-08-01

    The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low NOAELs and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert

  10. Drinking water toxicity study of the environmental contaminant--Bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongmei, Liu; Zhiwei, Wang; Qi, Zhu; Fuyi, Cui; Yujuan, Shan; Xiaodong, Liu

    2015-12-01

    Bromate is a byproduct of water disinfection that is produced when waters contain bromide treated with ozone. To investigate the level of the toxicity of bromate and find the most sensitive indicators in a short time, a series of toxicological assessments were conducted including the acute toxicity, cumulative toxicity, genetic toxicity and subacute toxicity of bromate (using Potassium Bromate to represent bromate). The LD50 of orally administered Potassium Bromate was 215 mg/kg in Wistar rats and 464 mg/kg in ICR mice. The cumulative toxicity of Potassium Bromate was not obvious. The Ames test, mouse bone marrow cell micronucleus test and mouse sperm abnormality test did not indicate mutagenicity. The results of the subacute study did not exhibit significant differences in most of the parameters, except the white blood cell count, which was significantly decreased in male rats. In addition, Potassium Bromate influenced the albumin, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in male rats to various extents. A thorough analysis of the above tests clearly demonstrates that bromate has toxicity, not obvious cumulative toxicity and the white blood cell count can be used as an indicator to reflect the toxicity of bromate and investigate bromate's toxic mechanism.

  11. Combining in vitro embryotoxicity data with physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling to define in vivo dose-response curves for developmental toxicity of phenol in rat and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Spenkelink, Bert; Woutersen, Ruud A; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2013-09-01

    In vitro assays are often used for the hazard characterisation of compounds, but their application for quantitative risk assessment purposes is limited. This is because in vitro assays cannot provide a complete in vivo dose-response curve from which a point of departure (PoD) for risk assessment can be derived, like the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) or the 95 % lower confidence limit of the benchmark dose (BMDL). To overcome this constraint, the present study combined in vitro data with a physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model applying reverse dosimetry. To this end, embryotoxicity of phenol was evaluated in vitro using the embryonic stem cell test (EST), revealing a concentration-dependent inhibition of differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes. In addition, a PBK model was developed on the basis of in vitro and in silico data and data available from the literature only. After evaluating the PBK model performance, effective concentrations (ECx) obtained with the EST served as an input for in vivo plasma concentrations in the PBK model. Applying PBK-based reverse dosimetry provided in vivo external effective dose levels (EDx) from which an in vivo dose-response curve and a PoD for risk assessment were derived. The predicted PoD lies within the variation of the NOAELs obtained from in vivo developmental toxicity data from the literature. In conclusion, the present study showed that it was possible to accurately predict a PoD for the risk assessment of phenol using in vitro toxicity data combined with reverse PBK modelling.

  12. Developmental toxicity of toluene in male rats: effects on semen quality, testis morphology, and apoptotic neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, M.; Hossaini, A.; Hougaard, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    , the number of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus and cerebellum were counted after visualisation by means of the TUNEL assay. Mean body weight in pups of exposed darns was lower than in pops from control litters. This decrease was still statistically significant at PND 11, but at PND 21 and 90 the body...... in the toluene-exposed group. Thus, the granular cell layer in cerebellum is a highly relevant tissue with which to study toluene-induced apoptosis, because of the continuous migration of neurons and high frequency of neuronal apoptosis during the weaning period. In summary, it is concluded, that neither pre......- and postnatal exposure to 1200 ppm toluene nor prenatal exposure to 1800 ppm induced significant effects on the reproductive parameters investigated. However, prenatal exposure to 1800 ppm toluene did increase neuronal apoptosis in the cerebellum of weaned male rats, possibly by delaying postnatal migration...

  13. Computer Simulation of Embryonic Systems: What can a virtual embryo teach us about developmental toxicity? Microcephaly: Computational and organotypic modeling of a complex human birth defect (seminar and lecture - Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    (1) Standard practice for assessing developmental toxicity is the observation of apical endpoints (intrauterine death, fetal growth retardation, structural malformations) in pregnant rats/rabbits following exposure during organogenesis. EPA’s computational toxicology research pro...

  14. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  15. Design of a high-throughput human neural crest cell migration assay to indicate potential developmental toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Johanna; Karreman, Christiaan; Leisner, Heidrun; Kim, Yong Jun; Lee, Gabsang; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) is one of the pivotal processes of human fetal development. Malformations arise if NCC migration and differentiation are impaired genetically or by toxicants. In the currently available test systems for migration inhibition of NCC (MINC), the manual generation of a cell-free space results in extreme operator dependencies, and limits throughput. Here a new test format was established. The assay avoids scratching by plating cells around a commercially available circular stopper. Removal of the stopper barrier after cell attachment initiates migration. This microwell-based circular migration zone NCC function assay (cMINC) was further optimized for toxicological testing of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived NCCs. The challenge of obtaining data on viability and migration by automated image processing was addressed by developing a freeware. Data on cell proliferation were obtained by labelling replicating cells, and by careful assessment of cell viability for each experimental sample. The role of cell proliferation as an experimental confounder was tested experimentally by performing the cMINC in the presence of the proliferation-inhibiting drug cytosine arabinoside (AraC), and by a careful evaluation of mitotic events over time. Data from these studies led to an adaptation of the test protocol, so that toxicant exposure was limited to 24 h. Under these conditions, a prediction model was developed that allows classification of toxicants as either inactive, leading to unspecific cytotoxicity, or specifically inhibiting NC migration at non-cytotoxic concentrations.

  16. Dose- and time-related changes in aerobic metabolism, chorionic disruption, and oxidative stress in embryonic medaka (Oryzias latipes): Underlying mechanisms for silver nanoparticle developmental toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yuan, E-mail: uyuan@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Department of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing (China); Zhou Qunfang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely employed in commercial products, and are thus inevitably released into the aquatic environment. Many studies have indicated that AgNPs could induce toxicological effects on embryonic fish. To understand the mechanism of AgNP developmental toxicity, we determined the effects of AgNPs on the egg membrane, aerobic metabolism, antioxidant system, lipid peroxidation, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) generation in early-life medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). AgNP treatment at 62.5-1000 {mu}g/L caused significant increase in retarded development and abnormalities. Destruction of the surface ornamentation and egg envelope was observed at a higher AgNP concentration ({>=}125 {mu}g/L) using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A dose-dependent increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity, an indicator of anaerobic metabolism, and superoxide dismutase activity was observed in the treated embryos. In contrast, the total reduced glutathione level decreased. A high thiobarbituric acid reactive substance concentration was generated upon AgNP exposure from day 1 to day 7 postfertilisation. The biochemical parameters suggested that oxidative stress was induced by the AgNPs. Unexpectedly, a dose-dependent reduction in ROS and {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation upon high AgNP exposure ({>=}250 {mu}g/L) was observed. Although the morphological damages induced by the AgNPs were irreversible, restorable antioxidant defenses were noted in the well-developed embryos. This finding supported the idea that the stage of morphogenesis and organogenesis is a critical window to chemical exposure or environmental stress. Overall, the results suggested that hypoxia, disturbed egg chorion, and oxidative stress are mechanistically associated with AgNP toxicity in embryonic fish.

  17. Flavorings Boost Toxicity of E-Cigarettes in Lab Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_161111.html Flavorings Boost Toxicity of E-Cigarettes in Lab Study Increasing device's voltage, to get ... Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Flavorings used in e-cigarettes can increase the toxicity of the vapor that ...

  18. A Study of the Relationship Between Gesell's Developmental Age and Piaget's Concept of Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civretta, Adeline E.

    A study was conducted to determine whether a significant correlation exists between developmental age and the concept of conservation. The hypothesis was that if developmental age and the concept of conservation are related, then stages of understanding conservation will increase as developmental age increases. Ss consisted of 30 primary children…

  19. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in relation to autism and developmental delay: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessah Isaac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs are flame retardants used widely and in increasing amounts in the U.S. over the last few decades. PBDEs and their metabolites cross the placenta and studies in rodents demonstrate neurodevelopmental toxicity from prenatal exposures. PBDE exposures occur both via breastfeeding and hand-to-mouth activities in small children. Methods Participants were 100 children from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment Study, a case-control epidemiologic investigation of children with autism/autism spectrum disorder, with developmental delay and from the general population. Diagnoses of autism were confirmed by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and Autism Diagnostic Inventory-Revised, and of developmental delay using the Mullen's Scales of Early Learning and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. Typically developing controls were those with no evidence of delay, autism, or autism spectrum disorder. Eleven PBDE congeners were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from serum specimens collected after children were assessed. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between plasma PBDEs and autism. Results Children with autism/autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay were similar to typically developing controls for all PBDE congeners, but levels were high for all three groups. Conclusions Plasma samples collected post-diagnosis in this study may not represent early life exposures due to changes in diet and introduction of new household products containing PBDEs. Studies with direct measurements of prenatal or infant exposures are needed to assess the possible causal role for these compounds in autism spectrum disorders.

  20. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of n-hexane in rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    The straight chain hydrocarbon, n-hexane, is a volatile, ubiquitous solvent used in industrial, academic, and smaller commercial environments. The significant opportunity for women of child-bearing age to be exposed to this chemical prompted the undertaking of a study to assess the developmental toxicity of n-hexane in an animal model. Timed-pregnant (30 animals per group) and virgin (10 animals per group) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0 (filtered air), 200, 1000, and 5000 ppM n-hexane (99.9% purity) vapor in inhalation chambers for 20 h/day for a period of 14 consecutive days. Sperm-positive females were exposed for 6 to 19 days of gestation (dg) and virgins were exposed concurrently for 14 consecutive days. The day of sperm detection was designated as 0 dg for mated females. Adult female body weights were monitored prior to, throughout the exposure period, and at sacrifice. Uterine, placental, and fetal body weights were obtained for gravid females at sacrifice. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded as live fetus, early or late resorption, or dead. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 16 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of isoprene in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Isoprene, a reactive, branched diene, is used in large quantities in the manufacture of polyisoprene and as a copolymer in the synthesis of butyl rubber. The potential for isoprene to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in rodents, by exposing four groups each of Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 280, 1400, or 7000 ppM isoprene vapors, 6 h/day, 7 day/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.30 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 31 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. Guidelines for studying developmental prosopagnosia in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Palermo, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by severe face identity recognition problems that results from a failure to develop the mechanisms necessary for adequate face processing (Duchaine BC, Nakayama K. Developmental prosopagnosia: a window to content-specific face processing. Curr Opin Neurobiol 2006, 16:166-173.). It occurs in children and adults with normal visual acuity, and without intellectual impairments or known brain injuries. Given the importance of face recognition in daily life, and the detrimental effects of impaired face recognition, DP is an important area of study. Yet conventions for classifying individuals as DP for research purposes are poorly defined. In this focus paper, we discuss: (1) criteria for an operational definition of DP; 2) tests of face recognition and conventions for classifying individuals as DP; and 3) important considerations regarding common associations and dissociations, and cognitive heterogeneity in DP. We also highlight issues unique to studying DP in children, a relatively new endeavor that is proving to be an important complement to the work with adults. Ultimately, we hope to identify challenges researchers face when studying DP, and offer guidelines for others to consider when embarking on their own research pursuits on the topic. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Critical review of the developmental toxicity and teratogenicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin: Recent advances toward understanding the mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, L.A.; Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1990-01-01

    A specific teratogenic response is elicited in the mouse as a result of exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; dioxin). The characteristic spectrum of structural malformations induced in mice following exposure to TCDD and structurally-related congeners is highly reproducible and includes both hydronephrosis and cleft palate. In addition, prenatal exposure to TCDD has been shown to induce thymic hypoplasia. The three abnormalities occur at doses well below those producing maternal or embryo/fetal toxicity, and are among the most sensitive indicators of dioxin toxicity. In all other laboratory species tested, TCDD causes maternal and embryo/fetal toxicity, but does not induce a significant increase in the incidence of structural abnormalities even at toxic dose levels. Developmental toxicity occurs in a similar dose range across species, however, mice are particularly susceptible to development of TCDD-induced terata. Recent experiments using an organ culture were an attempt to address the issue of species and organ differences in sensitivity to TCDD. Human palatal shelves were examined in this in vitro system, and were found to approximate the rat in terms of sensitivity for induction of cleft palate.

  5. Evolution of the Vertebrate Cranium: Viewed from Hagfish Developmental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Oisi, Yasuhiro; Ota, Kinya G

    2016-06-01

    Our knowledge of vertebrate cranium evolution has relied largely on the study of gnathostomes. Recent evolutionary and developmental studies of cyclostomes have shed new light on the history of the vertebrate skull. The recent ability to obtain embryos of the hagfish, Eptatretus burgeri, has enabled new studies which have suggested an embryonic morphological pattern (the "cyclostome pattern") of craniofacial development. This pattern is shared by cyclostomes, but not by modern jawed vertebrates. Because this pattern of embryonic head development is thought to be present in some stem gnathostomes (ostracoderms), it is possible that the cyclostome pattern represents the vertebrate ancestral pattern. The study of cyclostomes may thus lead to an understanding of the most ancestral basis of craniofacial development. In this review, we summarize the development of the hagfish chondrocranium in light of the cyclostome pattern, present an updated comparison of the cyclostome chondrocranium, and discuss several aspects of the evolution and development of the vertebrate skull.

  6. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  7. Thirty-day rat toxicity study reveals reversible liver toxicity of mifepristone (RU486) and metapristone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yingying; Zhu, Yewei; Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Ho, Rodney J Y; Liu, Jian; Li, Tao; Wang, Jie; Wan, Liyuan; Yang, Xingtian; Xu, Huo; Wang, Jichuang; Tu, Xiaohuang; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Mifepristone (RU486) is an oral first-line contraceptive used by hundreds of millions of women, and recently it was tested for anticancer activity in both genders worldwide. We are developing metapristone (the N-monodemethyl RU486) as a potential metastasis chemopreventive. The present acute and 30-d subacute toxicity study aimed at examining and compared in parallel the potential toxicity of the two drugs. The single-dose acute toxicity and 30-d subacute toxicity studies were conducted in mice and rats, respectively, by gavaging metapristone or mifepristone at various doses. Blood samples and organs were collected for blood chemistry, hematology and histology analyses. Oral mifepristone (3000 mg/kg) caused 30% and 40% death in female and male mice, respectively, within 15 h post-dosing. In comparison, the same dose of metapristone produced 30% acute death in males only. Thirty-day oral administration of the two drugs to rats (12.5, 50 and 200 mg/kg/day) caused reversible hepatotoxicity that only occurred at 200 mg/kg/day group, evidenced by the elevated liver enzyme activity and liver organ weight. The present study, for the first time, reveals reversible hepatotoxicity in rats caused by the 30-d consecutive administration at the high dose, and warns the potential hepatotoxicity caused by long-term administrations of high doses of mifepristone or metapristone in clinical trials but not by the acute single abortion doses.

  8. 90-Day Inhalation Toxicity Study of FT Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    vapors of a distillate of light catalytic cracked naphtha (LCCN-D, CAS no. 64741-55-5) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Target exposure concentrations were 0...cracked naphtha distillate in rats. Int J Toxicol. (2001) 20:307-319. McDougal JN, Rogers JV. Local and systemic toxicity of JP-8 from cutaneous exposures...petroleum blending streams: inhalation subchronic toxicity/neurotoxicity study of a light catalytic reformed naphtha distillate in rats. J Toxicol

  9. Multiple bio-analytical methods to reveal possible molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos/larvae exposed to tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Zhihua [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Wang, Qiangwei [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Fu, Jie [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Chen, Hongshan [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration, School of the Environment, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Zhao, Ye [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Zhou, Bingsheng [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Gong, Zhiyuan [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Wei, Si; Li, Jun; Liu, Hongling; Zhang, Xiaowei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Liu, Chunsheng, E-mail: liuchunshengidid@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore (Singapore); College of Fisheries, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yu, Hongxia, E-mail: yuhx@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • TBEP exposure decreased the survival of zebrafish embryos/larvae. • TBEP exposure led to its bioconcentration in zebrafish lavare. • TBEP caused developmental toxicity by inhibiting the degradation and utilization of nutrients. • TBEP exposure caused developmental toxicity by inducing apoptosis. - Abstract: The flame retardant tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP) is a frequently detected contaminant in the environment, wildlife and human milk. The potentially toxic effects of TBEP and their underlying molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, zebrafish embryos were exposed to different concentrations of TBEP from 4 hours of post-fertilization (hpf) to 120 hpf, and effects on embryonic development and global protein expression patterns examined. Our results demonstrate that treatment with TBEP (0.8–100 mg/L) causes a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in embryonic survival and the hatching percentage. The median lethal concentration was 10.7 mg/L at 120 hpf. Furthermore, exposure to 150 or 800 μg/L TBEP inhibited the degradation and utilization of vitellogenins and down-regulated the expression of proteins related to cation binding, and lipid transport, uptake and metabolism, accompanied by a decrease in heart rate and body length. Exposure to TBEP (150 or 800 μg/L) also decreased the expression of proteins involved in cell proliferation and DNA repair, and led to an increased number of apoptotic cells in the tail region. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to TBEP causes toxicity in the developing zebrafish by inhibiting the degradation and utilization of nutrients from the mother and inducing apoptosis.

  10. Developmental Science and the Study of Successful Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, William M.; Li, Karen; Dirks, Melanie; Bouffard, Thérèse

    2012-01-01

    The idea of successful development is used as the conceptual platform for a proposal that three basic principles of developmental science be expanded. Specifically, we propose that (a) developmental science needs to be reframed as a guide for what successful development is and how it is manifested at different times of the life course; (b) that…

  11. Studying developmental variation with Geometric Morphometric Image Analysis (GMIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Christine; Metscher, Brian D; Müller, Gerd B; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The ways in which embryo development can vary across individuals of a population determine how genetic variation translates into adult phenotypic variation. The study of developmental variation has been hampered by the lack of quantitative methods for the joint analysis of embryo shape and the spatial distribution of cellular activity within the developing embryo geometry. By drawing from the strength of geometric morphometrics and pixel/voxel-based image analysis, we present a new approach for the biometric analysis of two-dimensional and three-dimensional embryonic images. Well-differentiated structures are described in terms of their shape, whereas structures with diffuse boundaries, such as emerging cell condensations or molecular gradients, are described as spatial patterns of intensities. We applied this approach to microscopic images of the tail fins of larval and juvenile rainbow trout. Inter-individual variation of shape and cell density was found highly spatially structured across the tail fin and temporally dynamic throughout the investigated period.

  12. Young adults with developmental coordination disorder: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal-Saban, Miri; Ornoy, Asher; Parush, Shula

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a longitudinal study to assess the continuing influence of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) on quality of life and participation. Ninety-six participants (25 in the DCD group, 30 in the borderline group, and 41 in the control group) ages 22-29 yr who had been screened for DCD 3-4 yr previously completed the Participation in Every Day Activities of Life, the Life-Satisfaction Questionnaire, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) instrument. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant between-groups difference, F(7, 95) = 2.89, p = .001, η = 0.173, and post hoc analyses revealed that participants in the DCD and borderline groups scored lower overall on participation, quality of life, and life satisfaction. Linear regression found the Psychological Health domain of the WHOQOL-BREF to be a significant predictor of life satisfaction (B = 0.533; p = .001).

  13. Boronic acids as tools to study (plant) developmental processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Michaela; Torres-Ruiz, Ramón A

    2017-05-04

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for organisms. In plants, B is known to stabilize the cell wall by crosslinking Rhamnogalacturonan II through ester bonds formed with cis-diols of sugar moieties. However, B is believed to be required for additional functions such as stability and function of (plasma membrane) proteins involved in signal transduction pathways. We have recently shown that boronic acids, competitors of B, efficiently induce perfect phenocopies of monopteros mutants. This effect is enigmatic because like B, boronic acids should find numerous cellular targets and thus disturb many biologic processes ending in a spectrum of unspecific embryo phenotypes. Based on chemical characteristics of boronic acids and their derivatives we discuss reasons that could explain this unusual specificity. The peculiarities of this class of compounds could provide new tools for studying developmental processes.

  14. A novel mode-of-action mediated by the fetal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor resulting in developmental toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulpour, Reza J; Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G; Terry, Claire; Millar, Neil S; Zablotny, Carol L; Gibb, Alasdair; Marshall, Valerie; Collins, Toby; Carney, Edward W; Billington, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Sulfoxaflor (X11422208), a novel agricultural molecule, induced fetal effects (forelimb flexure, hindlimb rotation, and bent clavicle) and neonatal death in rats at high doses (≥ 400 ppm in diet); however, no such effects occurred in rabbit dietary studies despite achieving similar maternal and fetal plasma exposure levels. Mode-of-action (MoA) studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that the effects in rats had a single MoA induced by sulfoxaflor agonism on the fetal rat muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The studies included cross-fostering and critical windows of exposure studies in rats, fetal ((α1)(2)β1γδ) and adult ((α1)(2)β1δε) rat and human muscle nAChR in vitro agonism experiments, and neonatal rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm contracture studies. The weight of evidence from these studies supported a novel MoA where sulfoxaflor is an agonist to the fetal, but not adult, rat muscle nAChR and that prolonged agonism on this receptor in fetal/neonatal rats causes sustained striated muscle contracture resulting in concomitant reduction in muscle responsiveness to physiological nerve stimulation. Fetal effects were inducible with as little as 1 day of exposure at the end of gestation, but were rapidly reversible after birth, consistent with a pharmacological MoA. With respect to human relevance, sulfoxaflor was shown to have no agonism on human fetal or adult muscle nAChRs. Taken together, the data support the hypothesis that the developmental effects of sulfoxaflor in rats are mediated via sustained agonism on the fetal muscle nAChR during late fetal development and are considered not relevant to humans.

  15. Importance of genomic studies for drug withdrawal with mental toxicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Yong Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Undesired side-effects and toxicities of drugs, especially in the area of new-drug development, are negligibleless, unpredicable and often disastrous once being encountered. The suicidal behavior caused by antidepressant treatment is a typical of clinical evidence recently being discovered. We previously hypothesized that patients’ genetic status would decide the suicidal incident rate of antidepressants - it is pharmacogenetics of antidepressants may contribute of this toxicity in patients. In this review, we discuss this problem by comparing many strings of pharmacogenomics evidence of antidepressants recently being published with many other strings of evidence such as drug withdrawal with hepatotoxicity. We argue herein that pharmacogenetics may be very useful in drug withdrawal for mental toxicity. Because this is low-incidence toxicities, which are more reliable on human’s genetic characteristics. We stress the importance of genomics studies for drug withdrawal in future.

  16. ACUTE DERMAL TOXICITY STUDIES OF TROISTM IN NEWZEALAND WHITE RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Payasi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was performed to assess the acute dermal toxicity of TroisTM in Newzealand white rabbit. Test substance was applied as such to the shaven skin of group of rabbits at the dose of 2000 mg/Kg body weight. Control group of animals were similarly treated but only with base. Following dosing up to 14 days the rabbits were observed for mortality and clinical sign of toxicity. No visible signs of toxicity after treatment were observed on the animals of both control and treated animals up to 14 days. Various haematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated and found to be in the normal limit, which indicates that no sign of toxicity in NewZealand white rabbits after 14 days treatment in respect to control group, proving safety of TroisTM in topical application.

  17. Success Rate Comparisons for DeKalb Tech Developmental Studies Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Berman E.

    A study was conducted to determine whether DeKalb Technical School's developmental studies students were as successful as other students who took more conventional routes of matriculation. The study was limited to 449 students who posted grades in developmental studies and/or in specified common content courses in Reading, English and Mathematics…

  18. 短链氯化石蜡C10(50.2%Cl)对斑马鱼胚胎的发育毒性%Study on developmental toxicity of short-chain chlorinated paraffins C10(50.2%Cl) in zebrafish embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽华; 马万里; 刘丽艳; 李一凡

    2016-01-01

    A zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) model was applied to evaluate the developmental toxicity of short⁃chain chlorinated paraffins ( SCCPs) . Death rates, hatching rates, malformation rates and body length were observed after the zebrafish embryos were exposed to different concentrations of C10(50.2% Cl) separately for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. The results indicated that C10(50.2% Cl) could exert lethal and sub⁃lethal effects on the early life stage of zebrafish. Higher concentrations of C10(50.2% Cl) ( 1 000 and 10 000 μg/L) could not only cause significant death rates increase to 100% after 96 h exposure and hating delay after 48 h exposure, but also induce a series of malformations, including spinal curvature, yolk deformity, pericardial edema, malformation of tail and uninflated swim bladder. Since the growth inhibition of juvenile zebrafish caused by C10 ( 50. 2% Cl ) on the exposure concentrations no matter high or low, SCCPs might be a risk to the aquatic ecology and fish development.%为评价短链氯化石蜡对斑马鱼胚胎的发育毒性,以斑马鱼为模式生物,观察不同质量浓度的短链氯化石蜡C10(50.2% Cl)暴露24,48,72和96 h后斑马鱼胚胎/幼鱼的死亡率、孵化率、畸形率和体长.结果表明,C10(50.2% Cl)在斑马鱼的早期发育阶段可引起一系列非致死效应和致死效应.高质量浓度(1000和10000μg/L)短链氯化石蜡可导致96 h斑马鱼胚胎死亡率显著升高(达100%),48 h抑制胚胎的孵化,并诱发一系列的发育畸形.C10(50.2% Cl)在斑马鱼幼鱼中引起的畸形表型主要包括脊柱弯曲,卵黄畸形,心包囊肿,尾部畸形和鱼鳔发育缺陷.低质量浓度组和高质量浓度组C10(50.2% Cl)均能够抑制斑马鱼幼鱼的生长速度,目前的环境质量浓度已具有一定程度的水生生态风险.

  19. The use of pig hepatocytes for biotransformation and toxicity studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    1991-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were, (1) to investigate the possibility to isolate viable hepatocytes from liver samples of pigs, (2) to study their use for biotransformation and toxicity studies, and (3) to demonstrate the value of this model, in particular in the field of residue

  20. The use of pig hepatocytes for biotransformation and toxicity studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    1991-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were, (1) to investigate the possibility to isolate viable hepatocytes from liver samples of pigs, (2) to study their use for biotransformation and toxicity studies, and (3) to demonstrate the value of this model, in particular in the field of residue toxicolo

  1. Identification and evaluation of candidate genes associated with susceptibility to PCB-126 induced developmental toxicity: a genome-wide analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) are potent teratogens that persist in the environment and pose significant risk to ecological health. Variability in risk of developmental cardiotoxicity caused by DLCs has been demonstrated within and among several vertebrate species. Beyond our know...

  2. Sub-chronic toxicity and heavy metal toxicity study on Kappaphycus alvarezii in albino rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AbiramiRG; KowsalyaS

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the toxicity of Kappaphycus alvarezii methanolic extracts in albino rats. Methods: Sub-chronic toxicity was tested with a single dose of intraperitonal administration of the extract as per the OECD guidelines in the experimental group rats and the control group rats was fed with standard diet and water ad libitum. Mortality, behaviour changes, clinical signs and symptoms, food intake, body weight and any abnormalities of the visceral organs were observed. Results: The results revealed that the algal extract resulted in neither mortality nor any abnormalities. The Most of the serum biochemical parameters and hematological values were similar in control and experimental groups, histopathological examination of the vital organs like liver, kidney, spleen, brain and heart revealed no obvious abnormality in the control group and Kappaphycus alvarezii treated group. Conclusion: It may be concluded that Kappaphycus alvarezii rich in nutrient and nutraceutial potentials and also safety food for human consumption.

  3. Two-generation reproduction toxicity study in rats with methoxychlor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Hiroaki; Hojo, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Ken L; Shimizu-Endo, Naoko; Araki, Masayuki; Takeuchi-Kashimoto, Yukiko; Saka, Machiko; Teramoto, Shoji

    2012-03-01

    A two-generation reproduction toxicity study was conducted in rats with a reference estrogenic pesticide, methoxychlor, to validate the sensitivity and competency of current guidelines recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency; Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries; and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development for predicting reproductive toxicity of the test compound based on estrogenic endocrine disrupting effects. Both sexes of SD rats were exposed to methoxychlor in the diet at concentrations of 0, 10, 500 and 1500 ppm for two successive generations. The present study has successfully detected estrogenic activities and reproductive toxicities of methoxychlor, as well as its systemic toxicity. Body weights, body weight gains and food consumption of both sexes of animals were suppressed significantly in the 500 and 1500 ppm groups. Typical reproductive toxicities observed in females of these groups included, but were not limited to, prolonged estrous cycle, reduced fertility, decreased numbers of implantation sites and newborns, decreased ovary weights and/or increased incidences of cystic ovary. Uterine weights of weanlings increased significantly in these groups, suggesting that the sensitivity of this parameter for predicting estrogenic ability of the test compound is comparable to that of the uterotrophic assay. Reproductive toxicities of methoxychlor seemed less potent in males than in females. Methoxychlor delayed preputial separation and significantly reduced sperm counts and reproductive organ weights of males of the 500 and/or 1500 ppm groups; however, most males that failed to impregnate females in the same group showed normal fertility when they were re-mated with untreated females. Neither systemic nor reproductive toxicities appeared in the 10 ppm group.

  4. A Comparative Study Between Developmental Leadership and Lean Leadership – Similarities and Differencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungblom, Mia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare Developmental leadership with Lean leadership; document the differences and similarities and examine if you can combine these theories to achieve better results in the organization. A literature review is used. The result indicates more similarities than differences between Developmental leadership and Lean leadership behavior. The major difference is that Developmental leadership focuses on making the leader conscious of their own behavior and develop (...

  5. Developmental Study on Leg-to-Body Ratio Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiniewicz, Agnieszka; Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Oleszkiewicz, Anna; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Few studies have tested developmental differences in the perception of human body attractiveness and none have investigated development of Leg-to-Body Ratio (LBR) preferences. The aim of the current study was to determine whether preferences for LBR are largely innate and present among children in their early childhood, acquired in the course of socialization, and/or triggered by biological and hormonal changes. The study included 450 Polish men and women from Lower Silesia and Opole Province, Poland, whose ages ranged from 3 to 20 years. Participants were asked to choose which figurine they found the most attractive from a set of male and female figurines of various LBRs. We found that children below 8 years of age did not prefer any particular LBR and starting from about 9 years of age, preferences towards the legs of average length emerged. Importantly an LBR higher than the population average was not perceived as the most attractive until the age of 15 years. Therefore, we have empirically confirmed that LBR preferences change during develop ment.

  6. Reading and visual search: a developmental study in normal children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Seassau

    Full Text Available Studies dealing with developmental aspects of binocular eye movement behaviour during reading are scarce. In this study we have explored binocular strategies during reading and during visual search tasks in a large population of normal young readers. Binocular eye movements were recorded using an infrared video-oculography system in sixty-nine children (aged 6 to 15 and in a group of 10 adults (aged 24 to 39. The main findings are (i in both tasks the number of progressive saccades (to the right and regressive saccades (to the left decreases with age; (ii the amplitude of progressive saccades increases with age in the reading task only; (iii in both tasks, the duration of fixations as well as the total duration of the task decreases with age; (iv in both tasks, the amplitude of disconjugacy recorded during and after the saccades decreases with age; (v children are significantly more accurate in reading than in visual search after 10 years of age. Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children's reading. The new finding is that younger children show poorer coordination than adults, both while reading and while performing a visual search task. Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age and children reach a similar level to adults after the age of 10. This finding is most likely related to the fact that learning mechanisms responsible for saccade yoking develop during childhood until adolescence.

  7. The male peripubertal phase as a developmental window for reproductive toxicology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perobelli, Juliana Elaine

    2014-01-01

    The normal development of the male reproductive system can be divided into five phases: fetal, neonatal, childhood, puberty and adulthood. Childhood/peripuberty has yet been relatively little studied. Chemical insults during the peripubertal phase may result in adverse consequences that may be already visible during puberty as well as during later adult life. This occurs because endocrine disruptors often interfere in the developmental programming. The most important is to note that children are not just little adults and should be particularly investigated. The aim of this review is to discuss the recent literature (2000-2013) on male reproductive aspects in prepubertal toxicity assays, focusing on experimental in vivo studies, establishing a comparative analysis between the design, endpoints, results and consequent conclusion. The studies discussed in the present review were selected based on the period of exposure. Only studies with post-lactational exposures were included. 33 papers were included using rats, mice, rabbits or pigs as experimental model. There is a relative scarcity of studies investigating animals in development and thus an urgent need for further studies in order to evaluate the possible persistent effects on fertility and other reproductive parameters at adulthood. Another point is the lack of studies with chemical mixtures, an imminent problem in modern society. It is vital to consider the refinement of alternative methods and the experimental designs and endpoints to improve the scientific knowledge in this area.

  8. Developmental toxicity and DNA damage from exposure to parking lot runoff retention pond samples in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Meryl D; Kwok, Kevin W H; Brandon, Jennifer A; Warren, Isaac H; Ryde, Ian T; Cooper, Ellen M; Hinton, David E; Rittschof, Daniel; Meyer, Joel N

    2014-08-01

    Parking lot runoff retention ponds (PLRRP) receive significant chemical input, but the biological effects of parking lot runoff are not well understood. We used the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model to study the toxicity of water and sediment samples from a PLRRP in Morehead City, NC. Medaka exposed in ovo to a dilution series of PLRRP water had increased odds of death before hatching, but not teratogenesis or delayed hatching. Next, we adapted a long-amplicon quantitative PCR (LA-QPCR) assay for DNA damage for use with the Japanese medaka. We employed LA-QPCR to test the hypotheses that PLRRP water and sediments would cause nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage with and without full-spectrum, natural solar radiation. Fluoranthene with and without natural sunlight was a positive control for phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced DNA damage. Fluoranthene exposure did not result in detectable DNA damage by itself, but in combination with sunlight caused significant DNA damage to both genomes. PLRRP samples caused DNA damage to both genomes, and this was not increased by sunlight exposure, suggesting the DNA damage was unlikely the result of PAH phototoxicity. We report for the first time that PLRRP-associated pollutants cause both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and that fluoranthene-mediated phototoxicity results in similar levels of damage to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. These effects may be especially significant in sensitive marine ecosystems.

  9. The Developmental Sequence of Social-Communicative Skills in Young Children with Autism: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Chin; Chiang, Chung-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    To explore the different developmental trajectories of social-communicative skills in children with autism and typically developing infants, two longitudinal studies were conducted. In Study 1, we examined the developmental sequence of social-communicative skills in 26 typically developing infants when they were 9 months old and reexamined them…

  10. Occlusal traits in developmental dyslexia: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perillo L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Letizia Perillo,1 Maria Esposito,2 Mariarosaria Contiello,1 Alessandra Lucchese,3 Annamaria Chiara Santini,2 Marco Carotenuto2 1Department of Orthodontics, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 3Department of Orthodontics, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy Aim: The objective of the study reported here was to assess the orthodontic features in children affected by developmental dyslexia (DD. Patients and methods: A total of 28 children affected by DD (22 boys, six girls; mean age: 9.78 ± 1.69 years were compared with 51 healthy children (38 boys, 13 girls; mean age 9.41 ± 1.48; range 7–10 years. Reading and writing skills were evaluated along with orthodontic features. Results: The DD and control groups were not significantly different in terms of total intelligence quotient (P = 0.441 and writing skills (P = 0.805 and P = 0.240, respectively, whereas significant differences were observed between the DD group and control group in both word reading (2.018 ± 1.714 vs 0.917 ± 0.563; P = 0.000 and non-word reading (2.537 ± 1.543 vs 0.862 ± 0.244; P = 0.000. Moreover, for many orthodontic features, there was no significant difference between the two groups; only in prevalence of diastemas (57.14%, P = 0.006, midline diastemas (46.42%, P = 0.007, overbite >4 mm (71.42%, P = 0.006 and overjet >4 mm (53.57%, P = 0.001, was there a statistically significant difference. According to univariate logistic regression analysis, the presence of diastemas (odds ratio [OR] 4.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.61–11.65, midline diastemas (OR 4.68; 95% CI 1.61–13.43, an overbite >4 mm (OR 1.75; 95% CI 0.64–4.71, or an overjet >4 mm (OR 2.76; 95% CI 1.06–7.20 seems to play a role in the relationship between occlusal abnormalities and DD in children. Conclusion: Children with DD tend to present with

  11. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  12. Perinatal toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of styrene-acrylonitrile trimer, a ground water contaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A; Malarkey, David E; Hejtmancik, Milton R; Gerken, Diane K; Chhabra, Rajendra S

    2013-12-06

    Styrene acrylonitrile (SAN) trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site's ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN Trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant.

  13. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of 1,3-butadiene in mice: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in CD-1 mice following whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200 and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female mice, which had mated with unexposed males were exposed to the chemical for 6 hours/day on 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 18 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11 and 18 dg; the mice were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. Significant concentration-related decreases were detected in a number of maternal body weight measures. There was a significant concentration-related depression of fetal body weights and placental weights. Body weights of male fetuses of all exposed groups were significantly lower than values for control fetuses; weights of female fetuses were significantly depressed in the mice exposed to 200 and 1000 ppM. In the 200- and 1000-ppM exposure groups, weights of placentas of male fetuses were significantly decreased, but placental weights of female fetuses were significantly affected only in litters exposed to the highest 1,3-butadiene concentration. This exposure regimen produced significant signs of maternal toxicity at concentrations of 200 and 1000 ppM 1,3-butadiene.

  14. Studying developmental variation with Geometric Morphometric Image Analysis (GMIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Mayer

    Full Text Available The ways in which embryo development can vary across individuals of a population determine how genetic variation translates into adult phenotypic variation. The study of developmental variation has been hampered by the lack of quantitative methods for the joint analysis of embryo shape and the spatial distribution of cellular activity within the developing embryo geometry. By drawing from the strength of geometric morphometrics and pixel/voxel-based image analysis, we present a new approach for the biometric analysis of two-dimensional and three-dimensional embryonic images. Well-differentiated structures are described in terms of their shape, whereas structures with diffuse boundaries, such as emerging cell condensations or molecular gradients, are described as spatial patterns of intensities. We applied this approach to microscopic images of the tail fins of larval and juvenile rainbow trout. Inter-individual variation of shape and cell density was found highly spatially structured across the tail fin and temporally dynamic throughout the investigated period.

  15. Developmental neurotoxic effects of two pesticides: Behavior and biomolecular studies on chlorpyrifos and carbaryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iwa; Eriksson, Per; Fredriksson, Anders; Buratovic, Sonja; Viberg, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    In recent times, an increased occurrence of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as neurodevelopmental delays and cognitive abnormalities has been recognized. Exposure to pesticides has been suspected to be a possible cause of these disorders, as these compounds target the nervous system of pests. Due to the similarities of brain development and composition, these pesticides may also be neurotoxic to humans. We studied two different pesticides, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl, which specifically inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the nervous system. The aim of the study was to investigate if the pesticides can induce neurotoxic effects, when exposure occurs during a period of rapid brain growth and maturation. The results from the present study show that both compounds can affect protein levels in the developing brain and induce persistent adult behavior and cognitive impairments, in mice neonatally exposed to a single oral dose of chlorpyrifos (0.1, 1.0 or 5mg/kg body weight) or carbaryl (0.5, 5.0 or 20.0mg/kg body weight) on postnatal day 10. The results also indicate that the developmental neurotoxic effects induced are not related to the classical mechanism of acute cholinergic hyperstimulation, as the AChE inhibition level (8-12%) remained below the threshold for causing systemic toxicity. The neurotoxic effects are more likely caused by a disturbed neurodevelopment, as similar behavioral neurotoxic effects have been reported in studies with pesticides such as organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids and POPs, when exposed during a critical window of neonatal brain development.

  16. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies.

  17. PROLIFERATION AS A KEY EVENT IN DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: "CHEMICAL SCREENING IN HUMAN NEURAL STEM CELLS USING HIGH CONTENT IMAGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    New toxicity testing approaches will rely on in vitro assays to assess chemical effects at the cellular and molecular level. Cell proliferation is imperative to normal development, and chemical disruption of this process can be detrimental to the organism. As part of an effort to...

  18. Replacing animal experiments in developmental toxicity testing of phenols by combining in vitro assays with physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strikwold, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the past decades to develop in vitro tests for a wide range of toxicological endpoints as an alternative to animal testing. The principle application of in vitro toxicity assays still lies in the hazard assessment and the prioritisation of chemicals for further

  19. Reproductive toxicity study with a novel deoxyguanosine analogue (Metacavir) in pregnant SD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qihui; Chen, Zhengli; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Fang, Jing; Peng, Xi; Tang, Li

    2015-03-01

    Our preliminary studies demonstrated that Metacavir has potential to become a new anti-HBV agent. The main targets of the toxic effects of Metacavir, in rhesus monkeys, were gastrointestinal tracts, liver, blood, and kidneys, which were not related to mitochondrial effects. In this study, the maternal toxicity, embryo-fetal developmental toxicity and teratogenicity were studied in pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats after intragastric administration of Metacavir (200, 100, 50, 0 mg/kg body weight) during the first 6-15 days of pregnancy. Slower weight gain was observed in 5 out of 21 rats subjected to a 200 mg/kg dose, as well as 2 out of 20 subjected to a 100 mg/kg dose. Compared with the solvent control group, the calibration weight gain in the 200 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg dosage groups respectively, during first 6-20 pregnant days were significantly different (P changes were observed. The present research indicated that at a dose of 200 mg/(kg·d) (i.e., 40 times the effective dose in rats), Metacavir shows some maternal toxicity to SD rats. The embryotoxicity in the 200 mg/kg group encompass decreased fetal body weight, and higher fetal mortality rates, compared with the control group. However, the litter incidence showed no statistical difference. All the treated rats displayed normal bone development, no teratogenicity and without adverse effects on fetal development, thus indicating that below a dose of 200 mg/(kg·d) there is no teratogenic side effects.

  20. Media Literacy and Developmental Tasks: A Case Study in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senta Pfaff-Rüdiger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a skill-based media literacy model which can help to explain digital inequalities. The model integrates the everyday life of children and their developmental tasks. Under this concept, users are media literate if they are able to fulfil their developmental tasks successfully by using the media and to reflect upon the consequences and risks of their media use. In 2011, 82 German boys and girls were interviewed to gain a better understanding of the connections between internet use, media literacy and digital inequalities.

  1. Developmental Norms of Children Aged 2 1/2-5 Years: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Rajalakshmi

    1969-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study, aside from collection of developmental data on 38 nursery school children aged 2 1/2 to 5 years, was (1) to develop, modify and adapt the testing equipment used in Gesell's Developmental Schedule, in the field of motor, adaptive, language, and personal-social development; (2) to develop elaborate, exhaustive,…

  2. Measuring Students' Writing Ability on a Computer-Analytic Developmental Scale: An Exploratory Validity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Hal; Swartz, Carl W.; Stenner, A. Jackson; Fitzgerald, Jill; Burdick, Don; Hanlon, Sean T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the validity of a novel computer-analytic developmental scale, the Writing Ability Developmental Scale. On the whole, collective results supported the validity of the scale. It was sensitive to writing ability differences across grades and sensitive to within-grade variability as compared to human-rated…

  3. The application of mouse and human embryonic stem cells with transcriptomics in alternative developmental toxicity tests : A bridge from model species to man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulpen, S.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    During life humans are exposed to diverse hazardous compounds, which can have toxicological effects. Reproductive and developmental toxicology are research areas dedicated to the study of the potential of a compound to affect male and female fertility, and development of the embryo and fetus during

  4. PHYTOCHEMICAL AND TOXICITY STUDY OF EMBLICA OFFICINALIS (AMLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Govind

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, phytochemistry and toxicities (acute and chronic of Emblica officinalis fruit (Amla have been determined. The hydroalcoholic extract (HAE of amla was prepared and its extractability was found to be 46.9%. Different chemical tests showed the presence of various active principles or phytoconstituents, viz., alkaloids, glycosides, reducing sugars, tannins, resins, saponins, sterols and fixed oils. For acute toxicity, including median lethal dose (LD50 of amla, its HAE was administered @ 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg body weight to female albino rats of groups 2 to 4, respectively. Rats of group 1 were given normal saline to serve as control. There was no mortality up to 48 hr, hence this drug showed the LD50 above 1000 mg/kg. For chronic toxicity of E. officinalis HAE, similar drug dosage schedule was applied in groups 1 to 4 of rats as used for acute toxicity study; however, the drug was given for 3 weeks. During this period, E. officinalis did not cause any untoward effect.

  5. Universal Developmental Screening: Preliminary Studies in Galicia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento Campos, Jose A.; Squires, Jane; Ponte, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    "A_Tempo" is a research project that is currently under development in Galicia, an autonomous community of Spain. Its main aim is to propose an effective universal screening procedure for early identification of developmental disorders in children from zero to three years of age who attend Galician pre-primary schools.…

  6. Maternal Intelligence and Institutionalized Children's Developmental Quotients: A Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Lawrence

    1976-01-01

    Product-moment correlations between Stanford-Binet IQs of 151 women and the Gesell Developmental Quotients of their illegitimate children were significant when the children were approximately 2 months old and residing in institutions. After the children were adopted, the correlations dropped at first but then increased in the final tests given at…

  7. Syntactic Complexity in Spanish Narratives: A Developmental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Clellen, Vera F.; Hofstetter, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Examination of syntactic complexity in the movie retellings of 77 elementary school-age Spanish-speaking children revealed developmental differences in the length of T-units, index of subordination, use of relative clauses, and prepositional phrases. Analysis underscores the significance of subordination as a cohesive device and as an indicator of…

  8. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  9. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-10-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu(III)(OH)(3)] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  10. A correlational study of serum alkaline phosphatase level and developmental mandibular laterognathism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiewen; Li, Hongliang; Yu, Hongbo; Si, Jiawen; Fang, Bing; Shen, Steve Guofang

    2015-03-01

    The abnormal cartilage/bone metabolism in unilateral condyle may be a direct factor that contributes to developmental mandibular laterognathism. However, although many molecules have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in the development of temporomandibular joints, the exact molecular mechanisms that lead to the disrupted condylar cartilage/bone development were greatly unknown. In this retrospective study, our findings revealed that serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level in adult patients with developmental mandibular laterognathism was lower than that in control subjects, and the serum ALP levels continue to reduce in adult patients (>20 years old). Although the exact relationship between the lower serum ALP level and developmental mandibular laterognathism is unclear, the findings further support the opinion that the condylar growth may sustain for a long time in the affected condyle in patients with developmental mandibular laterognathism and offer an alternative choice to use total serum ALP activity as a possible biomarker to assess condylar growth activity in patients with developmental mandibular laterognathism.

  11. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Influence of Surface Charge and Dose on Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bona, Kristin R; Xu, Yaolin; Gray, Marquita; Fair, Douglas; Hayles, Hunter; Milad, Luckie; Montes, Alex; Sherwood, Jennifer; Bao, Yuping; Rasco, Jane F

    2015-12-18

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are commonly utilized for biomedical, industrial, and commercial applications due to their unique properties and potential biocompatibility. However, little is known about how exposure to iron oxide NPs may affect susceptible populations such as pregnant women and developing fetuses. To examine the influence of NP surface-charge and dose on the developmental toxicity of iron oxide NPs, Crl:CD1(ICR) (CD-1) mice were exposed to a single, low (10 mg/kg) or high (100 mg/kg) dose of positively-charged polyethyleneimine-Fe₂O₃-NPs (PEI-NPs), or negatively-charged poly(acrylic acid)-Fe₂O₃-NPs (PAA-NPs) during critical windows of organogenesis (gestation day (GD) 8, 9, or 10). A low dose of NPs, regardless of charge, did not induce toxicity. However, a high exposure led to charge-dependent fetal loss as well as morphological alterations of the uteri (both charges) and testes (positive only) of surviving offspring. Positively-charged PEI-NPs given later in organogenesis resulted in a combination of short-term fetal loss (42%) and long-term alterations in reproduction, including increased fetal loss for second generation matings (mice exposed in utero). Alternatively, negatively-charged PAA-NPs induced fetal loss (22%) earlier in organogenesis to a lesser degree than PEI-NPs with only mild alterations in offspring uterine histology observed in the long-term.

  12. Metabolomics and its application to studying metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean C; Workentine, Matthew L; Weljie, Aalim M; Turner, Raymond J

    2011-11-01

    Here we explain the omics approach of metabolomics and how it can be applied to study a physiological response to toxic metal exposure. This review aims to educate the metallomics field to the tool of metabolomics. Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly used tool to compare natural and challenged states of various organisms, from disease states in humans to toxin exposure to environmental systems. This approach is key to understanding and identifying the cellular or biochemical targets of metals and the underlying physiological response. Metabolomics steps are described and overviews of its application to metal toxicity to organisms are given. As this approach is very new there are yet only a small number of total studies and therefore only a brief overview of some metal metabolomics studies is described. A frank critical evaluation of the approach is given to provide newcomers to the method a clear idea of the challenges and the rewards of applying metabolomics to their research.

  13. Application study of developmental engineering for livestock production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Hitoshi

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes several technical improvements in developmental engineering for livestock production, including their practical utility in the field. The artificial production of monozygotic twins via embryo splitting is shown to increase embryo productivity, while embryo sexing capability provides added value without compromising offspring productivity, with both techniques being adequate for practical field applications. It is also shown that: (1) the development of nuclear transfer utilizing oocytes collected from slaughtered ovaries and matured in vitro enables producing a large number of cloned embryos, (2) the intracytoplasmic injection of somatic cell improves the productivity of nuclear transplantation, and (3) the injection of sperm increases the rate of normal oocytes with male and female pronuclei allowing further preimplantation development. Finally, the removal of cytoplasmic lipid droplets from embryos following centrifugation alters an embryo's intrinsic sensitivity to low temperature allowing long-term preservation. Collectively, these techniques have clearly provided improvements in developmental engineering for livestock production.

  14. Stealth Assessment in ITS - A Study for Developmental Dyscalculia

    OpenAIRE

    Klingler, Severin; Käser, Tanja; Busetto, Alberto Giovanni; Solenthaler, Barbara; Kohn, Juliane; von Aster, Michael; Gross, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent tutoring systems are adapting the curriculum to the needs of the student. The integration of stealth assessments of student traits into tutoring systems, i.e. the automatic detection of student characteristics has the potential to re?ne this adaptation. We present a pipeline for integrating automatic assessment seamlessly into a tutoring system and apply the method to the case of developmental dyscalculia (DD). The proposed classi?er is based on user inputs only, allowing non-intr...

  15. The relation between children's pain behaviour and developmental characteristics: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Lynn M; Camfield, Carol S

    2011-02-01

    To determine whether children with developmental disabilities show responses to pain that vary according to developmental level. Factor analytical methods were used to explore whether pain behaviour is independent of developmental characteristics. As part of a longitudinal study, caregivers of 123 children (67 males, 56 females; age range 40 mo-21 y 6 mo) completed the Non-communicating Children's Pain Checklist-Revised (NCCPC-R), the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition (VABS-II), and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Deviation intelligence quotients (DIQs) were also generated. Two varimax rotated principal components analyses (PCAs) included the NCCPC-R subscales, DIQs, and age. One also included VABS-II subdomain scores and the other, PEDI scores, to allow examination of whether pain and developmental scores produced distinct components to evaluate the independence of pain behaviour from developmental factors. Children's mean age equivalents on the VABS-II were: Communication (36.4 mo, SD 34.8), Daily Living Skills (31.8 mo, SD 35.9), Socialization (43.2 mo, SD 49.9), and Motor Skills (21.6 mo, SD 20.3). Pain behaviour was distinct from developmental characteristics. The PCA including the VABS-II accounted for 78.4% of variance, with four components: Developmental Level, Pain Behaviour, Motor Development, and Chronological Age. The PCA that included the PEDI accounted for 69.4% of variance, with three corresponding components: Pain Behaviour, Developmental Level, and Chronological Age. Pain behaviour was distinct from developmental factors in two separate analyses using two functional measures. Clinicians can be confident that pain assessment with the NCCPC-R is not affected by children's developmental level. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2010.

  16. Guidance on the selection of cohorts for the extended one-generation reproduction toxicity study (OECD test guideline 443).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nigel P; Beekhuijzen, Manon; Boogaard, Peter J; Foreman, Jennifer E; North, Colin M; Palermo, Christine; Schneider, Steffen; Strauss, Volker; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Poole, Alan

    2016-10-01

    The extended one-generation reproduction toxicity study (EOGRTS; OECD test guideline 433) is a new and technically complex design to evaluate the putative effects of chemicals on fertility and development, including effects upon the developing nervous and immune systems. In addition to offering a more comprehensive assessment of developmental toxicity, the EOGRTS offers important improvements in animal welfare through reduction and refinement in a modular study design. The challenge to the practitioner is to know how the modular aspects of the study should be triggered on the basis of prior knowledge of a particular chemical, or on earlier findings in the EOGRTS itself, requirements of specific regulatory frameworks notwithstanding. The purpose of this document is to offer guidance on science-based triggers for these extended evaluations.

  17. Two-generation reproduction and developmental neurotoxicity study with sodium chlorite in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, M W; Swanson, M S; Murphy, S R; Bailey, G P

    2000-01-01

    The potential for sodium chlorite to produce reproductive toxicity, developmental neurotoxicity and alterations in hematology and thyroid hormones was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats administered sodium chlorite in the drinking water continuously for two generations. The F(0) generation animals (30 of each gender per group) and F(1) generation animals (25 of each gender per group) selected to rear the F(2) generation were allowed free access to drinking water containing 0, 35, 70 or 300 ppm sodium chlorite for a 10-week prebreed period, through mating for males and through mating, gestation and lactation for females. These drinking water concentrations corresponded to sodium chlorite doses of approximately 4, 8 and 30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for males and 5, 10 and 39 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for females, respectively. Evaluations included standard reproductive and postnatal indices, sperm morphology and motility, estrous cyclicity, a functional observational battery, motor activity, auditory startle, swim maze, hematology, serum thyroid hormone analyses and histopathology of reproductive and nervous system tissues. Sodium chlorite resulted in a decrease in water consumption in all groups and a decrease in food consumption and body weights in the 70 and 300 ppm groups. There was no evidence of reproductive toxicity. Pup body weight was decreased in the 300 ppm group and small delays were observed in the time to preputial separation and vaginal opening. Mild anemia and mild methemoglobinemia were observed for animals in the 300 ppm group. Thyroid hormone levels were not affected by treatment. Changes to the nervous system were limited to small decreases in amplitude of auditory startle response for postnatal day (PND) 25 pups in the 70 and 300 ppm groups and a small decrease in absolute brain weight for PND 11 pups in the 300 ppm group. These effects were considered to be of questionable neurotoxicological significance. Based on the results of this study, the no

  18. Subchronic toxicity study in mice fed Spirulina maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, M; Martínez, E; Madrigal, E; Ruiz, L E; Chamorro, G A

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of Spirulina maxima, a blue-green alga used as food supplement and food coloring, after 13 weeks of treatment. Groups of ten mice of each sex were given S. maxima in the diet at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, 20 or 30% (w/w) for 13 weeks. The alga ingestion had no effect on behavior, food and water intake, growth or survival. Terminal values in hematology and clinical chemistry did not reveal differences between treated and control groups. However, male and female mice showed significant changes in serum cholesterol levels at 20 and 30% algal concentrations, but a toxic effect of S. maxima was excluded. Post-mortem examination revealed no differences in gross or microscopic findings. Our results show that S. maxima up to high feeding levels did not produce adverse effects in mice after subchronic treatment.

  19. Misonidazole with dexamethasone rescue: an escalating dose toxicity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanasichuk, H.; Urtasun, R.C.; Fulton, D.S.; Raleigh, J.

    1984-09-01

    Neurotoxicity induced by misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has become the dose limiting factor in clinical work. In 1981, the authors reported a preliminary study suggestive that Dexamethasone (DEXA) does have a protective effect against peripheral neuropathies (PN) resulting from toxicity of misonidazole. The authors are presently investigating the use of DEXA, with escalating doses of MISO in an attempt to modify its neurotoxicity. To date, 16 patients have been registered to receive total doses of MISO given in 9 equally divided doses over 3 weeks. DEXA is given 3 days prior to the first dose and continues for the duration of therapy. All patients receive palliative radiation. No toxicity was seen at the total dose of 13.5 gm/M/sub 2/. One grade I PN occurred in the first four patients receiving 15.5 gm/M/sub 2/. Six additional patients were entered at this dose level and no further incidence of PN was observed.

  20. Chronic toxicity study of Hyptis suaveolens (L. Poit in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunjong Chaorai

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water extract of Hyptis suaveolens (H. suaveolens was evaluated for 6-month chronic toxicity in Wistar rats. Control group received distilled water orally 10 ml/kg/day. The extract was orally given to five treatment groups at the doses of 5, 50, 250, 500 and 500 mg/kg/day for 6 months. The last group was served as the recovery group. Changes in the body weights, actual and relative organ weights were not significantly demonstrated in all groups throughout the study. The results of hematological, biochemical parameters and histopathological lesions showed that the extract did not produce any significant doserelated changes. Therefore, it may be concluded that the extract of H. suaveolens at the given doses did not produce any significant toxic effect in rats during 6-month period of the treatment.

  1. Subacute (90 Days) Oral Toxicity Studies of Kombucha Tea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Kombucha tea (KT) is a popular health beverage and is used as an alternative therapy. KT is prepared by placing the kombucha culture in solution of tea and sugar and allowing to ferment. The inoculum is a fungus consisting of symbiotic colony of yeast and bacteria. KT is consumed in several countries and is believed to have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits in a wide variety of ailments, viz., intestinal disorders, arthritis, ageing and stimulation of immunological system. Though KT is used in several parts of the world its beneficial effects and adverse effects have not been scientifically evaluated. Since there are no animal toxicological data on KT, subacute oral toxicity study was carried out. Five groups of rats were maintained: (a) control group given tap water orally, (b) KT given 2 ml/kg orally, (c) plain tea (PT) given 2 ml/kg orally, (d) KT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v) and (e) PT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v). The rats were given this treatment daily for a period of 90 days. Weekly records of weight, feed intake, water intake and general behaviour were monitored. There was no significant difference in the growth of the animals as evidenced by the progressive body weight change. The organ to body weight ratio and histological evaluation did not show any toxic signs. The haematological and biochemical variables were within the clinical limits. The study indicates that rats fed KT for 90 days showed no toxic effects.

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin: Analytical studies and toxicity evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Tiele Caprioli, E-mail: tiele@enq.ufrgs.br [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Engenheiro Luiz Englert s/n, CEP: 90040-040 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pizzolato, Tânia Mara [Chemical Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Arenzon, Alexandre [Ecology Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Segalin, Jeferson [Biotechnology Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lansarin, Marla Azário [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Engenheiro Luiz Englert s/n, CEP: 90040-040 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin, which is a drug that has been used to reduce blood cholesterol levels, was studied in this work employing ZnO as catalyst. The experiments were carried out in a temperature-controlled batch reactor that was irradiated with UV light. Preliminary the effects of the photocatalyst loading, the initial pH and the initial rosuvastatin concentration were evaluated. The experimental results showed that rosuvastatin degradation is primarily a photocatalytic process, with pseudo-first order kinetics. The byproducts that were generated during the oxidative process were identified using nano-ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-UPLC–MS/MS) and acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna were done to evaluate the toxicity of the untreated rosuvastatin solution and the reactor effluent. - Highlights: • The photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin was studied under UV irradiation. • Commercial catalyst ZnO was used. • Initial rosuvastatin concentration, photocatalyst loading and pH were evaluated. • The byproducts generated during the oxidative process were detected and identified. • Acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna were carried out.

  3. Preliminary acute toxicity study on imidacloprid in Swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Bagri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To ascertain the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and to investigate the acute oral toxic effects of imidacloprid towards Swiss albino male mice.Materials and Methods: The MTD of imidacloprid was determined in pilot dose range finding study following the standard method. Animals were observed for toxic signs and symptoms after oral administration of MTD of imidacloprid in single dose. The body weights of animals were recorded on alternate day. Animals were sacrificed on 14th day and changes in hematological parameters (Hb, TEC, TLC and DLC and morphometric measurements (length, breadth, thickness and weight of various body organs (heart, liver, spleen, kidney, testis and epididymis were examined. The student's t-test was applied to statistically analyze the results.Results: The MTD of imidacloprid was determined to be 110 mg/kg body weight. The sign and symptoms of acute toxicity were ataxia, rigidity and fasciculation of muscles, protrusion of eye ball and tremors of head. Imidacloprid treatment resulted in decreased body weight gain as compared to the control group. The changes in hematological parameters were not significant between imidacloprid treated and control groups. Also the values of relative organ weights and morphometric measurements of various body organs did not differ significantly between the control and imidacloprid treated animals.Conclusions: MTD of imidacloprid in Swiss albino male mice through oral route was determined for the first time. Study revealed a non-toxic effect of imidacloprid on body weight, relative organs weight, hematological parameters and morphometric measurements of various body organs in mice.

  4. A Study of The diagnosis assessment On Developmental Disorders and Reactive attachment disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    吉田, ゆり; 若本, 純子

    2012-01-01

    On the other hand of attention to developmental disorders, diagnosis and evaluation of developmental disabilities easy has been a concern. In this paper, given an overview of current diagnostic criteria, diagnostic aid tool, a measure of a structured interview.A preliminary study about the tool structured interviews to clarify autism spectrum is suspected, that specializes in assessment of Psychology preliminary study was carried out for development.

  5. Clinicopathological Studies on Gentamicin Toxicity in White Leghorn Commercial Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najam Ul Islam, M. Zargham Khan1, M. Kashif Saleemi*1, Ahrar Khan1, Sheraz Ahmed Bhatti1, Muhammad Yousaf2 and Zahoor-ul-Hassan3

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gentamicin is an effective and economical drug used to control infectious diseases in poultry but is highly toxic and had slow clearance from the body. This study aimed to report three cases of gentamicin toxicity in three White Leghorn (WLH layer flocks in different poultry producing areas of Pakistan. In first case, gentamicin was injected in a 9000 WLH layer flock @ 10 mg/kg body weight (BW for seven times during 9-15 weeks for age. In second case, gentamicin was injected in a flock of 7500 WLH layers @ 25 mg/kg BW for four times during 17-18 weeks of age. In third case, gentamicin was injected in flock of 16000 WLH layers @ 22.22 mg/kg BW three times in 20-21 weeks of age. Flock wise mortality was 8.69, 82.63 and 71.86%, respectively. Birds were dehydrated, emaciated and had prominent keel bone. Clinical signs included dehydration, decreased body weight leading to emaciation, decreased feed intake, increased water intake and watery diarrhea. Necropsy revealed prominent keal bone, shrunken muscles swollen kidneys bulging out from bony sockets. Petechial and echymotic hemorrhages were present on heart and skeletal muscles. Liver was enlarged with hemorrhagic streaks on its surface. Microscopically, hemorrhages and acute tubular necrosis was recorded in kidneys. Liver had hemorrhages, cellular infiltration and vacuolar (fatty degeneration of hepatocytes. From the results, it could be concluded that overdosing and repeated administration of gentamicin was highly toxic to birds.

  6. Primitive versus derived traits in the developmental program of the vertebrate head: views from cyclostome developmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Ota, Kinya G

    2008-06-15

    Evolution can be viewed as a series of changes in the developmental program along the phylogenetic tree. To better understand the early evolution of the vertebrate skull, we can use the embryos of the cyclostome species as models. By comparing the cyclostome developmental patterns with those of gnathostomes, it becomes possible to distinguish the primitive and derived parts of the developmental program as taxon-specific traits. These traits are often recognizable as developmental constraints that define taxa by biasing the developmental trajectories within a certain limited range, resulting in morphological homologies in adults. These developmental constraints are distributed on the phylogenetic tree like the morphological character states of adult animals and are associated with specific regions of the tree. From this perspective, we emphasize the importance of considering gene expression and embryonic anatomy as the mechanistic bases that can result in homologous or nonhomologous morphological patterns at later developmental stages. Taking the acquisition of the jaw and trabecula cranii as examples, we demonstrate that a set of embryonic features can be coupled or decoupled during evolution and development. When they are coupled, they exert an ancestral developmental constraint that results in homologous morphological patterns, and when they are decoupled, the ancestral constraints tend to be abandoned, generating a new body plan. The heterotopy behind the specification of the oral domain is an example of decoupling, based on shifted tissue interactions. We also stress the importance of "developmental burden" in determining the sequential order of changes through evolution. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Developmental prosopagnosia and adaptative compensatory strategies: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anair Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Prosopagnosia is a type of visual agnosia with inability to identify faces, usually secondary to brain lesion in associative cortex areas, but there is also a congenital form known as developmental prosopagnosia. Objectives: To describe a case of developmental prosopagnosia that illustrates the specificity of the pathways for perception of faces in the visual system. Also, we will describe possible mechanisms of recognition used by this patient. Methods: R.S., a 50 year-old woman, was referred for neuropsychological assessment due to difficulties in perception of familiar faces since childhood, unexplained by any loss of visual acuity. Results: The exam showed good performance for comprehension, reasoning, concept formation, constructional abilities, criticism, judgment, mental control, memory and visual perception for other kinds of stimuli. No difficulties were seen regarding identification of ethnicity, age and types of animals. The patient was able to match celebrities' faces in different positions, but could not identify the matching pictures for unknown people. Conclusions: These findings indicate the patient had developed strategies, throughout life, to recognize familiar faces (relatives, celebrities from memorized fragments, but still had difficulties in identifying non-familiar faces holistically.

  8. Use of genomic data in risk assessment case study: I. Evaluation of the dibutyl phthalate male reproductive development toxicity data set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makris, Susan L., E-mail: makris.susan@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, (Mail code 8623P), 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, (Mail code 8623P), 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Gray, L. Earl [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, (MD-72), Highway 54, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Benson, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, (Mail code 8P-W), 1595 Wynkoop Street, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Foster, Paul M.D. [National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233 (MD K2-12), Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A case study was conducted, using dibutyl phthalate (DBP), to explore an approach to using toxicogenomic data in risk assessment. The toxicity and toxicogenomic data sets relative to DBP-related male reproductive developmental outcomes were considered conjointly to derive information about mode and mechanism of action. In this manuscript, we describe the case study evaluation of the toxicological database for DBP, focusing on identifying the full spectrum of male reproductive developmental effects. The data were assessed to 1) evaluate low dose and low incidence findings and 2) identify male reproductive toxicity endpoints without well-established modes of action (MOAs). These efforts led to the characterization of data gaps and research needs for the toxicity and toxicogenomic studies in a risk assessment context. Further, the identification of endpoints with unexplained MOAs in the toxicity data set was useful in the subsequent evaluation of the mechanistic information that the toxicogenomic data set evaluation could provide. The extensive analysis of the toxicology data set within the MOA context provided a resource of information for DBP in attempts to hypothesize MOAs (for endpoints without a well-established MOA) and to phenotypically anchor toxicogenomic and other mechanistic data both to toxicity endpoints and to available toxicogenomic data. This case study serves as an example of the steps that can be taken to develop a toxicological data source for a risk assessment, both in general and especially for risk assessments that include toxicogenomic data.

  9. Children with Cochlear Implants and Developmental Disabilities: A Language Skills Study with Developmentally Matched Hearing Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Choo, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    The number of children receiving cochlear implants (CIs) with significant disabilities in addition to their deafness has increased substantially. Unfortunately, children with additional disabilities receiving CIs have largely been excluded from studies on cochlear implant outcomes. Thus limited data exists on outcomes in this population to guide…

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY FOR SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY OF VASELINE OIL AND GLYCELAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Voronkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary therapeutic approaches offer a wide range of laxative agents, which are often used without a control, exceeding the regime recommended. Therefore, the comparative study for subchronic toxicity of both drugs from this group (Vaseline oil and Glycelax appears interesting.The aim of the study was the comparison of a toxic influence of 14-days application of the drugs under study.Methods. The drugs were studied in two doses: higher therapeutic, and toxic, which 10 times exceeds therapeutic dose. We used “Polispektr-8/B” electrocardiograph, BC 2800vet (Mindray hematologic veterinary analyzer, BS-380 (Mindray biochemical analyzer, CL-50 urine analyzer. After the animals autopsy we determined organs’ coefficient (heart, lungs, spleen, liver, stomach, kidneys, adrenals.Results. While studying the ECG of female rats, amplitude of R wave increased after they got Glycelax in both doses. Female rats who got Vaseline oil this index decreased at minimum dose and increased at maximum dose. After Glycelax application, male rats had an increased activity of alanine aminotransferase. After Vaseline oil application at maximum dose, female rats had alkaline phosphatase activity lowered. Female rats, which got a maximum dose of Vaseline oil had a total protein lowered. Glycelax at maximum dose increased the content of bilirubin and its fractions in male and female rats, while Vaseline oil application at maximum dose increased the content of bilirubin in female rats. Male rats which got Glycelax had hemoglobin and hematocrit level increased.Conclusion. At long-term application of Vaseline oil, animals of both genders had heart disorders with possible development of arrhythmia, hepatotoxic effect, lipid exchange dysfunction. After excessive use of Glycelax the above mentioned is added with possible hemoglobin and rheological blood properties level decrease.

  11. Developmental effects of decision-making on sensitivity to reward: An fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Jarcho, Johanna M.; Benson, Brenda E.; Plate, Rista C.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Detloff, Allison M.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft,Ellen; Ernst, Monique

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing neural correlates of reward processing across development yield inconsistent findings. This challenges theories characterizing adolescents as globally hypo- or hypersensitive to rewards. Developmental differences in reward sensitivity may fluctuate based on reward magnitude, and on whether rewards require decision-making. We examined whether these factors modulate developmental differences in neural response during reward anticipation and/or receipt in 26 adolescents (14.05±...

  12. Developmental relations between reading fluency and reading comprehension: A longitudinal study from grade one to two

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young-Suk; Wagner, Richard K.; Lopez, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    From a developmental framework, relations among list reading fluency, oral and silent reading fluency, listening comprehension, and reading comprehension might be expected to change as children’s reading skills develop. We examined developmental relations among these constructs in a latent-variable longitudinal study of first- and second-grade students. Results showed that list reading fluency was uniquely related to reading comprehension in grade one, but not in grade two after accounting fo...

  13. A fetal whole ovarian culture model for the evaluation of CrVI-induced developmental toxicity during germ cell nest breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jone A.; Arosh, Joe A.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Banu, Sakhila K.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol A, dioxin, pesticides, and cigarette smoke, has been linked to several ovarian diseases such as premature ovarian failure (POF) and early menopause in women. Hexavalent chromium (CrVI), one of the more toxic heavy metals, is widely used in more than 50 industries. As one of the world’s leading producers of Cr compounds, the U.S. is facing growing challenges in protecting human health against adverse effects of CrVI. Our recent findings demonstrated that in vivo CrVI exposure during gestational period caused POF in F1 offspring. Our current research focus is three-fold: (i) to identify the effect of CrVI on critical windows of great vulnerability of fetal ovarian development; (ii) to understand the molecular mechanism of CrVI-induced POF; (iii) to identify potential intervention strategies to mitigate or inhibit CrVI effects. In order to accomplish these goals we used a fetal whole ovarian culture system. Fetuses were removed from the normal pregnant rats on gestational day 13.5. Fetal ovaries were cultured in vitro for 12 days, and treated with or without 0.1 ppm potassium dichromate (CrVI) from culture day 2-8, which recapitulated embryonic day 14.5 – 20.5, in vivo. Results showed that CrVI increased germ cell/oocyte apoptosis by increasing caspase 3, BAX, p53 and PUMA; decreasing BCL2, BMP15, GDF9 and cKIT; and altering cell cycle regulatory genes and proteins. This model system may serve as a potential tool for high throughput testing of various drugs and/or EDCs in particular to assess developmental toxicity of the ovary. PMID:26348139

  14. The Impact of Surgery on the Developmental Status of Late Preterm Infants – A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Amit; Walker, Karen; Loughran-Fowlds, Alison; Halliday, Robert; J. A. Holland, Andrew; Badawi, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Despite increasing evidence in the literature regarding the impact of late prematurity on subsequent developmental impairment, the developmental outcome of late preterm infants who undergo major surgery remains unclear. The aim of this study therefore was to determine the developmental outcome for a cohort of late preterm surgical population. Methods: Late preterm infants with a gestational age from 34-36 weeks inclusive who were enrolled in the state-wide prospective Development After Infant Surgery (DAISy) study and who had undergone non-cardiac major surgery within the first ninety days of life were eligible for inclusion. Infants were assessed at one and three years of ages. Results: Forty-six infants were enrolled in the study, of which 38 infants had a complete developmental assessment at one year of age. Of these infants, late preterm infants scored significantly lower than the standardized norms of the assessment on the expressive language and gross motor subscales. At three years of age 26 infants were reassessed: late preterm infants who underwent major surgery only scored significantly lower than the standardized norms on the cognitive subscale (p less than 0.001). Conclusions: These data provide the evidence that late preterm infants who undergo major non-cardiac surgery are at risk of developmental impairment and consideration should be given to enrolling this cohort in multi-disciplinary developmental follow-up clinics. PMID:26023526

  15. The Impact of Surgery on the Developmental Status of Late Preterm Infants – A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Despite increasing evidence in the literature regarding the impact of late prematurity on subsequent developmental impairment, the developmental outcome of late preterm infants who undergo major surgery remains unclear. The aim of this study therefore was to determine the developmental outcome for a cohort of late preterm surgical population.Methods: Late preterm infants with a gestational age from 34-36 weeks inclusive who were enrolled in the state-wide prospective Development After Infant Surgery (DAISy study and who had undergone non-cardiac major surgery within the first ninety days of life were eligible for inclusion. Infants were assessed at one and three years of ages.Results: Forty-six infants were enrolled in the study, of which 38 infants had a complete developmental assessment at one year of age. Of these infants, late preterm infants scored significantly lower than the standardized norms of the assessment on the expressive language and gross motor subscales. At three years of age 26 infants were reassessed: late preterm infants who underwent major surgery only scored significantly lower than the standardized norms on the cognitive subscale (p<0.001.Conclusions: These data provide the evidence that late preterm infants who undergo major non-cardiac surgery are at risk of developmental impairment and consideration should be given to enrolling this cohort in multi-disciplinary developmental follow-up clinics.

  16. Studies on the Developmental Genetics of Tiller Number in Three-line Indica Hybrid Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Kang-jing; LIN Wen-xiong; WANG Xue-ren; CHEN Zhi-xiong; GUO Yu-chun; LIANG Yi-yuan; CHEN Fang-yu; LI Ya-juan

    2002-01-01

    Following NC Ⅱ design, the developmental genetic behavior of tiller number (TN) in three-line indica hybrid rice was studied using additive-dominance developmental genetic models and the corresponding statistical methods. The results showed that dominance effects were predominant for TN. The expression of those additive effects were affected by environment and genotype interaction, but the expression of dominance effects were not affected. Heterosis was the strongest in the middle developmental periods of TN. Additive effects and dominance effects were selectively expressed throughout in the entire tillering developmental stage.Analysis of genetic correlation between TN at different stages and the productive panicles indicated that a close correlation appeared earlier in the populations with higher heterosis than in those with less heterosis. Utilization of heterosis at the middle tillering stage might enhance the final biomass but reduce the percentage of productive panicles.

  17. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  18. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological

  19. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: reproductive and developmental effects of a distillate from light alkylate naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Q Q; Burnett, D M; Breglia, R J; Koschier, F J; Lapadula, E S; Podhasky, P I; Schreiner, C A; White, R D; Dalbey, W E; Feuston, M H

    1998-01-23

    A distillate of light alkylate naphtha (CAS number 64741-66-8; LAN distillate) was administered via inhalation, 6 h/d, 7 d/wk to 4 groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (10/sex/dose) at target concentrations of 0 (filtered air control), 5, 12.5, or 25 g/m3 with the highest dose exceeding 60% of the lower explosive limit of LAND. Exposure began 2 wk prior to mating and continued throughout gestation until postnatal d 4 for females or for 8 consecutive weeks for males. No apparent clinical signs indicative of systemic toxicity were observed in the F0 and F1 animals of either sex. Inhalation exposure to LAND up to and including the 25 g/m3 dose level had no effect on parental food consumption, body weights, absolute and relative organ weights, and reproductive indices. All groups had comparable delivery data and a fertility index > or 80%. Pups in all groups showed comparable birth weights, weight gain, a viability index (postnatal d 4) for all groups of > or = 97%, and no histopathological changes. In the dams, there were no significant differences in the mean numbers of corpora lutea, implantation sites, and resorptions recorded at necropsy. In the males, the only remarkable findings at necropsy were a small right epididymis and testis seen in one mid-dose male and an abscess on the right epididymis of a high-dose male. In both cases, the dams that had been bred to these males produced normal litters. There were no test material-related microscopic changes observed in the testes and epididymis of the F0 male rats or ovaries of the F0 female rats exposed to LAND. Under the conditions of this experiment, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for LAND via inhalation in rats is established at greater than 24.7 g/m3 (analytical concentration).

  20. Capping and in vivo toxicity studies of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Tuyen Nguyen, Thi; Fort, Emmanuel; Phuong Nguyen, Thanh; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Quy Nguyen, Thi; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2012-03-01

    Water-dispersed colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high concentration were synthesized from metal precursor HAuCl4. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) and heterobiofunctionalized thiol polyethylene glycol acid (HS-PEG-COOH) were used as biofunctionalized layers for the synthesized AuNPs. The BSA and HS-PEG-COOH bound to the AuNPs were characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by transmission electron microscope and UV-VS spectrophotometer. The fabricated BSA and HS-PEG-COOH-capped AuNPs were introduced in mouse to study its toxicity and its availability in the liver.

  1. Long-Term Association Between Developmental Assets and Health Behaviors: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleck, Jennifer; DeBate, Rita

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Based on internal and external assets, the positive youth development approach aims to increase the capacity among adolescents to overcome challenges as they transition to adulthood. Developmental assets have been found to be positively associated with academic achievement, a variety of health promoting behaviors, and improved physical and mental health. The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess the long-term association between positive youth developmental assets with health risk and promoting behaviors. Method A continuous scale of developmental assets was created using 30 items from Wave I of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, when participants were in 7th to 12th grades. Health behavior outcomes including cigarette use, substance use, fast food consumption, and physical activity were measured at both Wave III (age 18-26) and Wave IV (age 24-32). Path analysis was employed to assess the relationship between these observed measures. Results The well-fitted path model revealed associations between developmental assets with each health behavior at Wave III. Developmental assets indirectly influenced each health behavior and direct associations were observed between assets with substance use and physical activity at Wave IV. Conclusion Findings provide additional support for the developmental assets approach to adolescent health. Implications include Healthy People 2020 objectives related to tobacco and alcohol use and nutrition and physical activity.

  2. Toxicity Studies of Ethyl Maltol and Iron Complexes in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Jieli; Wu, Chonghui; Pang, Quanhai; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nan, Ruipeng; Du, Ruochen; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl maltol and iron complexes are products of ethyl maltol and the iron found in the cooking pots used to prepare the Chinese dish, hot-pot. Because their safety is undocumented, the toxicity study of ethyl maltol and iron complexes was conducted in male and female Kunming (KM) mice. The animal study was designed based on the preliminary study conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD50). The doses used in the study were 0, 1/81, 1/27, 1/9, and 1/3 of the LD50 (mg kg body weight (BW)(-1) day(-1)) dissolved in the water. The oral LD50 of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 743.88 mg kg BW(-1) in mice. The ethyl maltol and iron complexes targeted the endocrine organs including the liver and kidneys following the 90 D oral exposure. Based on the haematological data, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 1/81 LD50 (9.18 mg kg BW(-1) day(-1)) in both male and female mice. Therefore, we suggest that alternative strategies for preparing the hot-pot, including the use of non-Fe-based cookware, need to be developed and encouraged to avoid the formation of the potentially toxic complexes.

  3. Subacute(90Days) Oral Toxicity Studies of Kombucha Tea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.VIJAYARAGHAVAN; MANINDERSINGH; 等

    2000-01-01

    Kombucha tes(KT) is a popular health beverage and is used as an alternative therapy,KT is prepared by placing the kombucha culture in solution of tea and sugar and allowing to ferment,The inoculum is a fungus consisting of symbiotic colony of yeast and bacteria.KT is consumed in several coutries and is believed to have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits in a wide variety of ailments,viz.,intestinal disorders,arthritis,ageing and stiumulation of immunological system.Though KT is used in several parts of the world its eneficial effects and adverse effects have not been scientifically evaluated.Since there are no animal toxicological data on KT,subacute oral toxicity study was carried out.Five goups of rats were maintained:(a) control group given tap water orally,(b) KT given 2ml/kg orally,(c)plain tea(PT) given 2ml/kg orally,(d)KT given in drinking water,1%(v/v)and (e)PT given indrinking water,1%(v/v).The rats were given this treatment daily for a period of 90 days,Weekly records of weight,feed intake,water intake and general behaviour were monitored.There was no significant difference in the growth of the animals as evidenced by the progrssive body weight change.The organ to body weight ration and histologuical evaluation did not show any toxic signs.The haematological and biochemical variables,were within the clinical limits.The study indicates that rats fed KT for 90 day showed no toxic effects.

  4. Micro-CT imaging: Developing criteria for examining fetal skeletons in regulatory developmental toxicology studies - A workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Howard M; Makris, Susan L; Alsaid, Hasan; Bermudez, Oscar; Beyer, Bruce K; Chen, Antong; Chen, Connie L; Chen, Zhou; Chmielewski, Gary; DeLise, Anthony M; de Schaepdrijver, Luc; Dogdas, Belma; French, Julian; Harrouk, Wafa; Helfgott, Jonathan; Henkelman, R Mark; Hesterman, Jacob; Hew, Kok-Wah; Hoberman, Alan; Lo, Cecilia W; McDougal, Andrew; Minck, Daniel R; Scott, Lelia; Stewart, Jane; Sutherland, Vicki; Tatiparthi, Arun K; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Wise, L David; Wood, Sandra L; Ying, Xiaoyou

    2016-06-01

    During the past two decades the use and refinements of imaging modalities have markedly increased making it possible to image embryos and fetuses used in pivotal nonclinical studies submitted to regulatory agencies. Implementing these technologies into the Good Laboratory Practice environment requires rigorous testing, validation, and documentation to ensure the reproducibility of data. A workshop on current practices and regulatory requirements was held with the goal of defining minimal criteria for the proper implementation of these technologies and subsequent submission to regulatory agencies. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is especially well suited for high-throughput evaluations, and is gaining popularity to evaluate fetal skeletons to assess the potential developmental toxicity of test agents. This workshop was convened to help scientists in the developmental toxicology field understand and apply micro-CT technology to nonclinical toxicology studies and facilitate the regulatory acceptance of imaging data. Presentations and workshop discussions covered: (1) principles of micro-CT fetal imaging; (2) concordance of findings with conventional skeletal evaluations; and (3) regulatory requirements for validating the system. Establishing these requirements for micro-CT examination can provide a path forward for laboratories considering implementing this technology and provide regulatory agencies with a basis to consider the acceptability of data generated via this technology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity Study of n-pentane in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Kyu; Cho, Hae-Won; Han, Jeong-Hee; Lee, Sung-Bae; Chung, Yong-Hyun; Rim, Kyung-Taek; Yang, Jeong-Sun

    2012-09-01

    This study was conducted in order to obtain information concerning the health hazards that may result from a 13 week inhalation exposure of n-pentane in Sprague-Dawley rats. This study was conducted in accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines for the testing of chemicals No. 413 'Subchronic inhalation toxicity: 90-day study (as revised in 2009)'. The rats were divided into 4 groups (10 male and 10 female rats in each group), and were exposed to 0, 340, 1,530, and 6,885 ppm n-pentane in each exposure chamber for 6 hour/day, 5 days/week, for 13 weeks. All of the rats were sacrificed at the end of the treatment period. During the test period, clinical signs, mortality, body weights, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, locomotion activity, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, organ weights, and histopathology were assessed. During the period of testing, there were no treatment related effects on the clinical findings, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, relative organ weight, and histopathological findings. The no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of n-pentane is evaluated as being more than 6,885 ppm (20.3 mg/L) in both male and female rats. n-pentane was not a classified specific target organ toxicity in the globally harmonized classification system (GHS).

  6. STUDIES OF CHOSEN TOXIC ELEMENTS CONCENTRATION IN MULTIFLOWER BEE HONEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Popiela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 72 544x376 Normal 0 21 false false false  The aim of the study was to determine the bioaccumulation level of chosen toxic elements (Zn, Cu, Pb, As and Cd in multiflower honey collected from Brzeg area. Biological material (honey was mineralized using the microwave technique at an elevated pressure in the microprocessor station of pressure in the type Mars 5. Quantitative analysis of elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn was performed by plasma spectrometry method using a Varian ICP-AES apparatus. The presence of toxic elements was determined in examined biological materials. The elements fallowed the fallowing decreasing order with respect to their content of honey: Zn>Cu>Pb>As>Cd. The average concentrations of studied elements observed in multi-flower honey were as follows: 6.24 mg.kg-1 of zinc, 2.75 mg.kg-1 of copper, 0.53, 0.071, 0.042 mg.kg-1of lead, arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Lead was the most problematic in bee honey because its average content exceeded the maximum acceptable concentration. Additionally, this metal concentration was 60% higher in studied samples than allowable standard of lead content.doi:10.5219/134 

  7. E-Cigarettes May Be Less Toxic Than Tobacco, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163433.html E-Cigarettes May Be Less Toxic Than Tobacco, Study ... 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers who switch to e-cigarettes can substantially reduce their intake of toxic ...

  8. What have we learned about the processes involved in the Iowa Gambling Task from developmental studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eCassotti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Developmental studies using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT or child-friendly adaptations of the IGT converged in showing that children and adolescents exhibit a strong bias in favor of disadvantageous choices whereas adults learn to decide advantageously during the course of the task. In the present article, we reviewed developmental studies that used the IGT or child-friendly adaptations of the IGT to show how these findings provide a better understanding of the processes involved in decision-making under uncertainty. For instance, developmental studies have underlined that until late adolescence, the dominant strategy is to focus only on the frequency of punishment and to choose among options with infrequent losses. Indeed, school-aged children and adolescents’ choices in the IGT seem to be guided by the loss frequency leading them to fail in distinguishing between advantageous and disadvantageous options. In addition, recent developmental studies revealed that adults switch less often after losses than school-aged children and adolescents. These findings suggest that psychological tolerance to loss may facilitate learning the characteristics of each option, which in turn improves the ability to choose advantageously. In conclusion, developmental studies help us refine our understanding of decision-making.

  9. Role of chronic toxicology studies in revealing new toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galijatovic-Idrizbegovic, Alema; Miller, Judith E; Cornell, Wendy D; Butler, James A; Wollenberg, Gordon K; Sistare, Frank D; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    Chronic (>3 months) preclinical toxicology studies are conducted to support the safe conduct of clinical trials exceeding 3 months in duration. We have conducted a review of 32 chronic toxicology studies in non-rodents (22 studies in dogs and 10 in non-human primates) and 27 chronic toxicology studies in rats dosed with Merck compounds to determine the frequency at which additional target organ toxicities are observed in chronic toxicology studies as compared to subchronic studies of 3 months in duration. Our review shows that majority of the findings are observed in the subchronic studies since additional target organs were not observed in 24 chronic non rodent studies and in 21 chronic rodent studies. However, 6 studies in non rodents and 6 studies in rodents yielded new findings that were not seen in studies of 3-month or shorter duration. For 3 compounds the new safety findings did contribute to termination of clinical development plans. Although the incidence of compound termination associated with chronic toxicology study observations is low (∼10%), the observations made in these studies can be important for evaluating human safety risk.

  10. STUDY OF THE TOXIC EFFECTS OF CYPERMETHRIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mehmood Hasan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the toxic effects of a commercially available pesticide, cypermethrin (CM, on animals. This pesticide was administered in the form of aerosol spray through a nebulizer. The study was performed in four different groups and a constant dose of the pesticide was administered once, twice, thrice and four times a day to the respective group for a period of 30 days. The animals were then dissected to study the pesticide effects on different organs. The organs were preserved in 10% formalin. The tissues were processed by basic histopathological method and the slides were prepared for observation. The results were recorded on a performa and were quantified by a unique scoring system. It is concluded that the injurious effects to the mentioned organs were dose and frequency dependent.

  11. Morphometrics and the role of the phenotype in studies of the evolution of developmental mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    2002-04-03

    Developmental mechanisms are usually assumed to evolve by natural selection of the morphological traits they produce. Therefore, information on phenotypic traits is an important component of comparative studies of development. Morphometrics permits the rigorous quantitative analysis of variation in organismal size and shape, and is increasingly being used in developmental contexts. The new methods of morphometrics combine a geometric concept of shape with the procedures of multivariate statistics, and constitute a powerful and flexible set of tools for analyzing morphological variation. This paper briefly reviews these methods and provides examples of their application in studies of genetic variation and developmental modularity. The results of morphometric analyses can be readily interpreted in relation to the geometry and anatomical structure of the parts under study. Genetic studies of shape in the mouse mandible found two recurrent patterns in environmental and genetic variation from different origins, suggesting that the development system 'channels' the phenotypic expression of variation in similar ways. Moreover, by analyzing the correlations of left-right asymmetries of morphometric traits, it is possible to delimit the spatial extent of developmental modules. These methods complement the experimental approaches of developmental biology and genetics, and can be expected to be especially fruitful in combination with them.

  12. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... performance such as gonadal function, mating behavior, conception, development of the conceptus, and... not be limited to, changes in skin, fur, eyes, mucous membranes, occurrence of secretions and... recommended 1 . Investigations of plasma or serum must include sodium, potassium, glucose, total cholesterol...

  13. Research Models in Developmental Behavioral Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Kim N.; Pearson, Douglas T.

    Developmental models currently used by child behavioral toxicologists and teratologists are inadequate to address current issues in these fields. Both child behavioral teratology and toxicology scientifically study the impact of exposure to toxic agents on behavior development: teratology focuses on prenatal exposure and postnatal behavior…

  14. Developmental Toxic Effects of Exposure to Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents in Rats: Effects on Brain and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    stimulation of acetylcholine receptors. Common consequences of this cholinergic crisis include seizure activity, neuronal damage and behavioral deficits. The...current study, male and female rats exposed to sarin (GB) were evaluated on tests of spatial memory, locomotor activity and vestibular motor function...as well as neuropathology. Similar to our adult model, we found that juvenile rats exposed to GB exhibited deficits in vestibular motor function for

  15. Recent studies on biomethylation and demethylation of toxic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, W P; Dizikes, L; Cheh, A; Wood, J M

    1977-08-01

    Methylcobalamin (methyl-B12) has been implicated in the biomethylation of the heavy metals (mercury, tin, platinum, gold, and thallium) as well as the metalloids (arsenic, selenium, tellurium and sulfur). In addition, methylcobalamin has been shown to react with lead, but the lead-alkyl product is unstable in water. Details of the kinetics and mechanisms for biomethylation of arsenic are presented, with special emphasis on synergistic reactions between metal and metalloids in different oxidation states. This study explains why synergistic, or antagonistic, processes can occur when one toxic element reacts in the presence of another. The relative importance of biomethylation reactions involving methylcobalamin will be compared to those reactions where S-adenosylmethionine is involved.

  16. Developmental and molecular biology of annelid regeneration: a comparative review of recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özpolat, B Duygu; Bely, Alexandra E

    2016-10-01

    Studies of annelid regeneration have greatly increased in frequency in recent years, providing new insights into the developmental basis and evolution of regeneration. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to regeneration in annelids, focusing on molecular and developmental studies of epimorphic (blastema-based) regeneration, morphallactic (tissue-remodeling based) regeneration, and development and regeneration of putative stem cells of the posterior growth zone and germline. Regeneration is being investigated in a broad range of annelids spanning the phylum, and comparing findings among species reveals both widely conserved features that may be ancestral for the phylum as well as features that are variable across the group.

  17. Metabolism and toxicity studies supporting the safety of rebaudioside D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Andrey I; Rihner, Marisa O; Eapen, Alex K; Thomas, Jennifer A

    2013-07-01

    Rebaudioside D (Reb D) is one of the several glycosides found in the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni (Compositae) which has been identified as a potential sweetener. The metabolism of Reb A and Reb D was evaluated in various in vitro matrices (simulated gastrointestinal fluids, rat liver microsomes, and rat cecal contents) and through analysis of plasma collected from rats in a dietary toxicity study. Reb A and Reb D showed similar stability when exposed to simulated stomach and small intestine fluids, with susceptibility to hydrolytic degradation by enteric bacteria collected from the cecum. Incubations with rat liver microsomes indicated that neither compound is expected to be metabolized by the liver enzymes. Plasma concentrations of Reb D, Reb A, and/or the final hydrolysis product of each compound, free/conjugated steviol, were consistent between animals administered either Reb D or Reb A in the diet. A repeated exposure dietary toxicity study was conducted to compare the safety of Reb D, when administered at target exposure levels of 500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/d to Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days, to that of Reb A administered at a target exposure level of 2000 mg/kg bw/d. There were no treatment-related effects on the general condition and behavior of the animals and no toxicologically relevant, treatment-related effects on hematology, serum chemistry, or urinalysis. Macroscopic and microscopic findings revealed no treatment-related effects on any organ evaluated. Results were comparable between the group administered 2000 mg/kg/d Reb D and the group administered 2000 mg/kg/d Reb A.

  18. Open-label study of olanzapine in children with pervasive developmental disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemner, C.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Jonge, M.J.A. de; Tuynman-Qua, H.G.; Engeland, H.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The effects of olanzapine on the symptomatology of children with pervasive developmental disorder with emphasis on problems of communication and the safety of the drug were investigated in a 3-month open-label, open-dosage study. Participating in the study were 25 children age 6 to 16 years with a d

  19. The Impact of Televised Aggression on Children: A Developmental Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joel; Axsom, Danny

    Much of the television American children watch is violent in content. The evidence indicating that this programing increases children's aggressive behavior is not clear-cut, and some studies have shown a decrease in children's aggressive behavior. A study was conducted to test a more developmental perspective on the effects of violent television:…

  20. Behavioral and Developmental Characteristics of Children with Inversion of Chromosome 9 in Korea: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-won; Lee, Jun-young; Hwang, Jun-won; Hong, Kang-E Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the behavioral and developmental characteristics of children with inv(9). This case control study included 12 inv(9) subjects and 45 normal students. All of the subjects, together with their parents, underwent a psychiatric interview and parent questionnaire consisting of a Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).…

  1. Open-label study of olanzapine in children with pervasive developmental disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemner, C.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Jonge, M.J.A. de; Tuynman-Qua, H.G.; Engeland, H.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The effects of olanzapine on the symptomatology of children with pervasive developmental disorder with emphasis on problems of communication and the safety of the drug were investigated in a 3-month open-label, open-dosage study. Participating in the study were 25 children age 6 to 16 years with a

  2. Toxicity and teratogenicity studies with the hypolipidemic drug RMI 14,514 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J P; Larson, E J; Yarrington, J T; Hook, R H; Kariya, T; Blohm, T R

    1981-01-01

    The hypolipidemic drug RMI 14,514 (5-tetradecyloxy-2-furoic acid) has an oral LD50 of over 5000 mg/kg in rats. In a chronic toxicity study (6 months drug diet) doses of 30, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day produced no obvious signs of toxicity or abnormal clinical pathology parameters, other than prominent growth retardation at 300 mg/kg, which was somewhat alleviated when the dose was reduced to 200 mg/kg after 6 weeks. Hepatic change in the form of mild lipid accumulation was noted histopathologically after 6 months of treatment at 100 or 300 mg/kg/day, but was not present at 3 months or after 4 weeks off drug. The administration of RMI 14,514 in the diet to pregnant rats at 30, 100, or 150 mg/kg/day on Days 7 thru 21 of pregnancy (day 1 = day sperm detected) did not induce any teratogenic effects. When rats were exposed to the drug from implantation thru sexual maturity (126 days of age) at the same dosage, it produced no adverse developmental or behavioral effects, except for slight reduction in weight gain from birth to sexual maturity at 150 mg/kg/day. The drug caused reductions in plasma cholesterol and total fatty acids, but no distinct changes in various tissue lipids, except in the erythrocyte where fatty acids and phospholipids were reduced. These differences did not affect membrane integrity of the erythrocyte as far as osmotic or mechanical fragility tests could determine. The drug, which bears a structural resemblance to long-chain fatty acids, was incorporated into tissue lipids in detectable amounts, but tended to disappear from tissues at a rate similar to that of expected lipid turnover after treatment was stopped.

  3. [Toxicity studies of Pharmachem's tylosin tartrate for broilers and turkeys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, B; Angelov, A K; Vitanov, S

    1978-01-01

    Studied were the acute, subchronic, and chronic toxicity of the Pharmachim tylosin tartrate as well as the tolerance of chicken broilers and turkeys. The mean lethal dose of the antibiotic at subcutaneous application to 28-32 day-old broilers was 620 mg/kg; the oral dose was 1500 mg/kg. In the case of 42-45-day-old broilers these values were 740 and 5400 mg/kg. The LD50 at i/v infusion for 75-77-day-old ones was 48 mg/kg. Beside the age and route of introduction toxicity was found to depend on the initial biologic activity of tylosin tartrate. The subcutaneous injection of tylosin tartrate at the rate of 30 mg/kg for 20 days did not lead to changes in the appetite, behaviour, growth, and structure of viscera. A 42-day treatment at the same rate, however, resulted in slightly manifested and fully reversible dystrophic changes in the liver and kidneys. Higher doses (90 and 150 mg/kg) led to transient depression, stunting of growth, and a rise of the urea level and the activity of blood transaminases as well as to moderate destructive changes in the liver and kidneys. The stimulation of growth and the improvement of feed conversion (without deviations in the clinical and biochemical indices of the blood and the structure and development of the viscera in broilers) were recorded after the application of a water-soluble formula of tylosin tartrate for a period of 98 days offered via the drinking water in amounts equal to or exceeding 2 to 4 times the ED50. Turkeys' tolerance for the preparation was evaluated as very good so far as single i/m injective applications were concerned in doses exceeding 3, 5, and 10 times the average effective rates, no differences in this respect being noted with the comparative use of tylosin tartrate produced by the Elanco firm.

  4. Developmental toxicity of metaldehyde in the embryos of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) co-exposed to the synergist piperonyl butoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Katrina C; Atfield, Andrew; Comber, Sean; Hutchinson, Thomas H

    2016-02-01

    Metaldehyde is a widely used molluscicide in countries where damage to crops from slugs and snails is a major problem associated with warm and wet winters. In the UK it is estimated that over 8% of the area covered by arable crops is treated with formulated granular bait pellets containing metaldehyde as the main active ingredient. Metaldehyde is hydrophilic (log Kow=0.12), water soluble (200 mg·L(-1) at 17 °C) and has been detected in UK surface waters in the concentration range of typically 0.2-0.6 μg·L(-1) (maximum 2.7 μg·L(-1)) during 2008-2011. In the absence of chronic data on potential hazards to non-target freshwater molluscs, a laboratory study was conducted to investigate the impact of metaldehyde on embryo development in the gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis (RENILYS strain) and using zinc as a positive control. L. stagnalis embryos were exposed to metaldehyde under semi-static conditions at 20±1 °C and hatching success and growth (measured as shell height and intraocular distance) examined after 21 d. Exposure concentrations were verified using HPLC and gave 21 d (hatching)NOEC and (hatching)LOEC mean measured values of 36 and 116 mg MET·L(-1), respectively (equal to the 21 d (shell height)NOEC and (shell height)LOEC values). For basic research purposes, a second group of L. stagnalis embryos was co-exposed to metaldehyde and the pesticide synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO). Co-exposure to the PBO (measured concentrations between 0.47-0.56 mg·L(-1)) reduced hatching success from 100% to 47% and resulted in a 30% reduction in embryo growth (shell height) in snail embryos co-exposed to metaldehyde at 34-36 mg·L(-1) over 21 d. In conclusion, these data suggest mollusc embryos may have some metabolic detoxication capacity for metaldehyde and further work is warranted to explore this aspect in order to support the recent initiative to include molluscs in the OECD test guideline programme.

  5. Exploring vulnerability to suicide in the developmental history of young men: a psychological autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mette L; Haavind, Hanne; Dieserud, Gudrun; Dyregrov, Kari

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the developmental history of ten young men who completed suicide in the transition to adulthood. The young men, aged 18-30, had no previous history of suicide attempts or treatment in mental health. In-depth interviews with four to eight informants for each suicide were analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three developmental issues from early age onwards emerged: (a) unsuccessful in becoming independent; (b) weakened competence to deal with shame; and (c) trapped in anger. The capacity to regulate emotions like shame and anger could make certain men vulnerable to suicide when facing adult challenges and defeats.

  6. Comprehensive assessment of a chlorinated drinking water concentrate in a rat multigenerational reproductive toxicity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some epidemiological studies report associations between drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and adverse reproductive and developmental effects, e.g., low birth weight, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, and birth defects. To address concerns raised by these studies, w...

  7. Comprehensive Assessment of a Chlorinated Drinking Water Concentrate in a Rat Multigenerational Reproductive Toxicity Study##

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some epidemiological studies report associations between drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and adverse reproductive and developmental effects, e.g., low birth weight, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, and birth defects. To address concerns raised by these studies, w...

  8. Potential protective effect of L-cysteine against the toxicity of acrylamide and furan in exposed Xenopus laevis embryos: an interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The embryo toxicities of two food-processing-induced toxic compounds, acrylamide and furan, with and without added L-cysteine were examined individually and in mixtures using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The following measures of developmental toxicity were used (a) 96-h LC5...

  9. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies of 1,3-butadiene in the rat: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley-derived rats during and following 6 hours/day, whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200, and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female rats (Ns = 24 to 28), which had mated with unexposed males, were exposed to the chemical from 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 20 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11, 16 and 20 dg; the rats were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. There were no significant differences among treatment groups in maternal body weights or extragestational weights of rats exposed to 1,3-butadiene concentrations of 40 or 200 ppM, but, in animals exposed to 1000 ppM, significantly depressed body weight gains were observed during the first 5 days of exposure and extragestational weight gains tended to be lower than control values. These results, and the absence of clinical signs of toxicity, were considered to indicate that there was no maternal toxicity at exposure levels of 200 ppM or lower. The percentage of pregnant animals and the number of litters with live fetuses were unaffected by treatment. Under the conditions of this exposure regimen, there was no evidence for a teratogenic response to 1,3-butadiene exposure.

  10. Use of missing data methods in longitudinal studies: the persistence of bad practices in developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelicić, Helena; Phelps, Erin; Lerner, Richard M

    2009-07-01

    Developmental science rests on describing, explaining, and optimizing intraindividual changes and, hence, empirically requires longitudinal research. Problems of missing data arise in most longitudinal studies, thus creating challenges for interpreting the substance and structure of intraindividual change. Using a sample of reports of longitudinal studies obtained from three flagship developmental journals-Child Development, Developmental Psychology, and Journal of Research on Adolescence-we examined the number of longitudinal studies reporting missing data and the missing data techniques used. Of the 100 longitudinal studies sampled, 57 either reported having missing data or had discrepancies in sample sizes reported for different analyses. The majority of these studies (82%) used missing data techniques that are statistically problematic (either listwise deletion or pairwise deletion) and not among the methods recommended by statisticians (i.e., the direct maximum likelihood method and the multiple imputation method). Implications of these results for developmental theory and application, and the need for understanding the consequences of using statistically inappropriate missing data techniques with actual longitudinal data sets, are discussed.

  11. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  12. Polyethylene glycol-g-polyvinyl alcohol grafted copolymer: reproductive toxicity study in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuschmid, Franziska F; Schneider, Steffen; Schuster, Paul; Lauer, Birthe; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2013-07-01

    Polyethylene glycol-g-polyvinyl alcohol (PEG-PVA) grafted copolymer was administered by gavage to groups of 25 male and 25 female young Wistar rats at doses of 0 (vehicle control), 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg bw/day for one generation (F0). The study followed the treated F0 generation through mating, gestation, lactation, and weaning of the F1 generation. F1 animals were mated and followed to gestation day (GD) 15-17 at which time F2 implants were evaluated. There were no indications from the various clinical and gross pathological examinations that the oral administration of PEG-PVA grafted copolymer to the F0-parental rats produced any signs of general, reproductive, or developmental toxicity in the F0 or F1 animals or F2 implants. Based on the lack of any dose-related or biologically relevant effects on fertility, reproduction, development, and overall health of rats gavaged with PEG-PVA grafted copolymer and their progeny, the no-observed-adverse effect level (NOAEL) was determined to be the highest dose tested of 1000 mg/kg bw/day.

  13. Beyond Discrete Categories: Studying Multiracial, Intersex, and Transgender Children Will Strengthen Basic Developmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Olson, Kristina R.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental research on social categorization has overwhelmingly focused on perceptions about and experiences of individuals who are clear or prototypical members of discrete and usually dichotomous social categories. For example, studies of social categorization, stereotyping, prejudice, and social identity have generally explored how children…

  14. Confirmatory Factor Analytical Study of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex W. K.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Strauser, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated psychometric properties of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale (RDWPS). Results yielded a 14-item three-factor model that aligns with the original DWPS and fits the data very well. RDWPS scores were useful in predicting the resolution of Erikson's fourth stage of development, indicating construct validity.…

  15. Pragmatic Language Skills of Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Descriptive and Relational Study in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diken, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: Because communication skills, particularly pragmatic skills, are fundamental for living an independent life in society, these skills are vital to the quality of life of individuals with developmental disabilities (DD) and their families. Studies of the pragmatic skills of individuals with DD can provide important insights into…

  16. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, F.V.A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  17. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F.V.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background:  Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  18. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, F. V. A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F. C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  19. A Prospective Cohort Study Comparing Workload in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivilis, Irina; Liu, Jian; Cairney, John; Hay, John A.; Klentrou, Panagiota; Faught, Brent E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to assess how cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) of children with probable developmental coordination disorder (DCD) changes over a period of 4.7 years relative to a group of typically developing controls. A school-based sample of children in a large region of Ontario, Canada with 75 out of a possible…

  20. A Pilot Study of Core Topics in Introductory Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, George I., III; Smith, Stephanie H.; Losonczy-Marshall, Marta

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the similarities and differences in the topics and references in selected chapters of eight introductory social psychology textbooks and six developmental psychology textbooks. We wanted to determine the extent to which there were core concepts and references presented in these chapters. We found a relatively small set of core…

  1. Transformation through Health Teaching for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focht-New, Ginny

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have medical conditions similar to those among the general population but with more complex presentation, a extended life expectancy, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. These adults' health education has been inadequate. In this qualitative study, the author describes the…

  2. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, F. V. A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F. C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  3. Developmental Relations between Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension: A Latent Change Score Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, M[subscript age] = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and…

  4. Developmental changes in error monitoring : An event-related potential study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersema, Jan R.; van der Meere, Jacob J.; Roeyers, Herbert; Wiersema, R.J

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the developmental trajectory of error monitoring. For this purpose, children (age 7-8), young adolescents (age 13-14) and adults (age 23-24) performed a Go/No-Go task and were compared on overt reaction time (RT) performance and on event-related potentials (ER

  5. Use of Missing Data Methods in Longitudinal Studies: The Persistence of Bad Practices in Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelicic, Helena; Phelps, Erin; Lerner, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental science rests on describing, explaining, and optimizing intraindividual changes and, hence, empirically requires longitudinal research. Problems of missing data arise in most longitudinal studies, thus creating challenges for interpreting the substance and structure of intraindividual change. Using a sample of reports of longitudinal…

  6. Transformation through Health Teaching for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focht-New, Ginny

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have medical conditions similar to those among the general population but with more complex presentation, a extended life expectancy, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. These adults' health education has been inadequate. In this qualitative study, the author describes the…

  7. A Conservative Meta-Analysis of Linkage and Linkage-Association Studies of Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2005-01-01

    Linkage studies of complex phenotypes such as reading ability/disability (developmental dyslexia or reading disorder) and related componential processes, where the effects attributable to individual genes appear to be modest, are critically dependent on the nature and composition of the samples and the phenotypes analyzed. Thus, it might be…

  8. Use of Missing Data Methods in Longitudinal Studies: The Persistence of Bad Practices in Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelicic, Helena; Phelps, Erin; Lerner, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental science rests on describing, explaining, and optimizing intraindividual changes and, hence, empirically requires longitudinal research. Problems of missing data arise in most longitudinal studies, thus creating challenges for interpreting the substance and structure of intraindividual change. Using a sample of reports of longitudinal…

  9. Professional practices and opinions about services available to bilingual children with developmental disabilities: An international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinova-Todd, S.H.; Colozzo, P.; Mirenda, P.; Stahl, H.; Kay-Raining Bird, E.; Parkington, K.; Cain, K.; Scherba de Valenzuela, J.; Segers, P.C.J.; MacLeod, A.A.N.; Genesee, F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to gather information from school- and clinic-based professionals about their practices and opinions pertaining to the provision of bilingual supports to students with developmental disabilities. Using an online survey, data were collected in six socio-culturally and linguistically

  10. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, F.V.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background:  Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  11. The developmental course of anxiety symptoms during adolescence: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oort, F.V.A.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ormel, J.; Huizink, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the development of anxiety symptoms from late childhood to late adolescence. The present study determined developmental trajectories of symptoms of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoPh), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and

  12. A Micro-Developmental Approach to Studying Young Children's Problem Solving Behavior in Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsina, Chronoula

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study that investigated the process of change in 5-6-year-old children's successful problem-solving approaches when tackling a multiple-step task in elementary arithmetic. Micro-developmental changes in children's successful problem-solving behavior were analyzed using Karmiloff-Smith's model of representational redescription…

  13. Lying in the Name of the Collective Good: A Developmental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Genyue; Evans, Angela D.; Wang, Lingfeng; Lee, Kang

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the developmental origin of "blue lies", a pervasive form of lying in the adult world that is told purportedly to benefit a collective. Seven, 9-, and 11-year-old Chinese children were surreptitiously placed in a real-life situation where they decided whether to lie to conceal their group's cheating behavior. Children…

  14. Motor imagery training for children with developmental coordination disorder: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, I.L.J.; Steenbergen, B.; Lust, J.M.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that the predictive control of movements is impaired in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), most likely due to a deficit in the internal modeling of movements. Motor imagery paradigms have been used to test this internal modeling deficit.

  15. Project-Based Learning Communities in Developmental Education: A Case Study of Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Alison; Christofili, Monica

    2014-01-01

    This case study tracks the application of project-based learning (PBL) during four separate college terms at Portland Community College in Portland, Oregon. Each term follows a different learning community of first-term college students enrolled in a program of developmental education (DE), reading, writing, math, and college survival and success…

  16. Developmental Relations between Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension: A Latent Change Score Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, M[subscript age] = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and…

  17. Research Review: A Critical Review of Studies on the Developmental Trajectories of Antisocial Behavior in Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Nathalie; Carbonneau, Rene; Vitaro, Frank; Barker, Edward D.; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Knowledge on the onset and the development of antisocial behavior in females is limited, because most of the research in this domain is based on males. Methods: We critically reviewed 46 empirical studies that examined developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior in females, notably to help determine whether or not an…

  18. Developmental trajectories of social participation in individuals with cerebral palsy : A multicentre longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Siok Swan; Wiegerink, Diana J H G; Vos, Rimke C.; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Twisk, Jos W R; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Roebroeck, Marij E.; Dallmeijer, A. J.; Vos, R. C.; Van Eck, M.; Van Schie, P.; Voorman, J. M.; Becher, J. G.; Schuengel, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Smits, D. W.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M.; Roebroeck, M. E.; Tan, S. S.; Wiegerink, D. J H G; Van Meeteren, J.; Reinders-Messelink, H. A.; Gorter, J. W.; Verheijden, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to determine the developmental trajectories of social participation, by level of gross motor function and intellectual disability, in a Dutch population of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 1 to 24 years. Method: As part of the Pediatric Rehabilitation Research in the N

  19. Follow-Up Study of Children Referred to Developmental Evaluation Services for Children (DESC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Judith A.; Hebbeler, Kathleen M.

    Developmental Evaluation Services for Children (DESC) provides in-depth medical and educational diagnostic services for children in Montgomery County, Maryland, who are under 6 years of age and who are suspected of having handicapping conditions in two or more areas of development. This follow-up study was designed to determine the progress of…

  20. A Pilot Study of Core Topics in Introductory Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, George I., III; Smith, Stephanie H.; Losonczy-Marshall, Marta

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the similarities and differences in the topics and references in selected chapters of eight introductory social psychology textbooks and six developmental psychology textbooks. We wanted to determine the extent to which there were core concepts and references presented in these chapters. We found a relatively small set of core…

  1. Automatic Processing of Emotional Faces in High-Functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders: An Affective Priming Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamio, Yoko; Wolf, Julie; Fein, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This study examined automatic processing of emotional faces in individuals with high-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (HFPDD) using an affective priming paradigm. Sixteen participants (HFPDD and matched controls) were presented with happy faces, fearful faces or objects in both subliminal and supraliminal exposure conditions, followed…

  2. Beyond Discrete Categories: Studying Multiracial, Intersex, and Transgender Children Will Strengthen Basic Developmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Olson, Kristina R.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental research on social categorization has overwhelmingly focused on perceptions about and experiences of individuals who are clear or prototypical members of discrete and usually dichotomous social categories. For example, studies of social categorization, stereotyping, prejudice, and social identity have generally explored how children…

  3. Using Developmental Research To Study One's Teaching of an Instructional Design Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan G.

    This 5-year study of 2 instructors teaching a master's level instructional design course used developmental research to systematically examine a reflective teaching approach. The reflexive teaching model is described. Eight data sources across six deliveries of the course were analyzed in terms of design decisions (the teaching model), model…

  4. Experimental Studies of Toxicity on HNIW and Its Intermediates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; CHEN Shu-sen; JIN Shao-hua; CUI Zhao-kuan

    2006-01-01

    The polycyclic nitramine hexanitrohexaazaisowurtane(HNIW) is a compound of high energy density. HNIW can replace 1, 3, 5-trinitro-1, 3, 5-triazacyclohexane(RDX)or HMX, but its toxicity is unknown. In this paper,HNIW, hexabenzylhexaazaisowurtzitane ( HBIW ), tetraacetyldibenzulhexaazaisowurtzitane ( TADBIW ), tetraacetyldiformylhexaazaisowurtzitane(TADFIW) and tetraacetylhexaazaisowurtzitane(TAIW), which are intermediates of the synthesis of the HNIW, were selected as the tested objects in acute toxicity test, acute eye stimulation test and skin irritation test according to the standards of "chemical product testing method-401: acute oral toxicity test", "chemical product testing means-405: acute eye irritation/corrosion test" and "chemical product testing means-404: acute dermal irritation/corrosion test" of National Circumstance Protect Bureau. The results show that all of the five objects have no toxicity, no stimulation to eye and skin under the tested conditions.

  5. Facial emotion recognition in Williams syndrome and Down syndrome: A matching and developmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castilla, Pastora; Burt, Michael; Borgatti, Renato; Gagliardi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    In this study both the matching and developmental trajectories approaches were used to clarify questions that remain open in the literature on facial emotion recognition in Williams syndrome (WS) and Down syndrome (DS). The matching approach showed that individuals with WS or DS exhibit neither proficiency for the expression of happiness nor specific impairments for negative emotions. Instead, they present the same pattern of emotion recognition as typically developing (TD) individuals. Thus, the better performance on the recognition of positive compared to negative emotions usually reported in WS and DS is not specific of these populations but seems to represent a typical pattern. Prior studies based on the matching approach suggested that the development of facial emotion recognition is delayed in WS and atypical in DS. Nevertheless, and even though performance levels were lower in DS than in WS, the developmental trajectories approach used in this study evidenced that not only individuals with DS but also those with WS present atypical development in facial emotion recognition. Unlike in the TD participants, where developmental changes were observed along with age, in the WS and DS groups, the development of facial emotion recognition was static. Both individuals with WS and those with DS reached an early maximum developmental level due to cognitive constraints.

  6. [Advance in study on zearalenone's toxicity and determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang

    2005-07-01

    The article is intended to introduce the zearalenone's toxicity, determination methods and prevention. Zearalenone is one of the most widely distributed mycotoxins produces by Fusarium Species, it is harm to animals and human. And it can induce human liver cancer,carcinoma of tesis esophagus cancer. Now we use high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography, non-toxicity determinations to detect it.

  7. Contaminant mixtures and repoductive health: Developmental toxicity effects in rats after mixed exposure to environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals, with focus on effects in females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Christiansen, Sofie; Hass, Ulla

    disorders or later onset adult diseases. However, experimental evidence on the effects of developmental exposure to environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals in females has been missing attention. Since chemical exposure can affect female reproductive development it is important to investigate......Background: In toxicological testing, effects of endocrine disrupters are in most cases more thoroughly investigated in males than in females. In males the hypothesis of testicu lar dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) proposes that there is a common origin in fetal life of the increase in frequency observed...... in later years of for example incidence of boys born with hypospadias and young men with low semen quality in the human male population. Furthermore, it has been observed in animal studies that exposure during fetal life to endocrine disrupters may lead to similar adverse reproductive effects. It has been...

  8. Developmental Studies on Metallised UDMH and Kerosene Gels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. L. Varghese; S. C. Gaindhar; John David; Josekutty Jose; R. M. Muthiah; S. S. Rao; K. N. Ninan; V. N. Krishnamurthy

    1995-01-01

    ...) and kerosene containing 30 per cent 15 micron Aluminium was studied. Metallised UDMH and kerosene gels were characterised with respect to pseudoplasticity, thixotropy, consistency and yield stress using Contrave's rheometer...

  9. Developmental toxicity of cocaine exposure in mid-pregnancy mice%妊娠中期可卡因对小鼠的发育毒性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋君; 关晓伟; 任嘉谦; 何威

    2002-01-01

    目的:探讨可卡因对小鼠妊娠中期的发育毒性,尤其是对脑发育的影响.方法:建立妊娠中期给药的小鼠动物模型,体重相近的妊娠母鼠被分为三组:(1)可卡因注射自由饮食组(COC);(2)盐水注射伴有饮食对照组(SPF),饮食参考体重相近、妊娠时间相同的COC组母鼠(3)盐水注射自由饮食组(SAL).从妊娠第8天(E8)至第12天(E12)给药,记录母鼠、胎鼠和仔鼠的各项生理指标,并用HPLC分析各组胎鼠纹状体中多巴胺、5-HT含量的变化.结果:尽管COC和SPF组母鼠与SAL组母鼠相比摄食量少,体重增加量少,但E17天取材时,仅COC组胎鼠表现为脑和纹状体重量低;COC组仔鼠生后第1天(P1)双顶径(BPD)也小于其它两组仔鼠.此外,COC组胎鼠表现出脑/体重比的降低,说明宫内暴露可卡因引起的胎鼠的发育迟缓是一个不平衡过程,脑组织的受累比其它组织严重.神经递质分析和组织学分析表明COC组胎鼠脑内多巴胺和5-羟色胺的水平增高,肝脏呈现出形态学改变.结论:妊娠中期暴露可卡因可引起胎鼠宫内发育迟缓,尤其是脑发育迟缓.单纯母体营养不良在宫内暴露可卡因引起的后代发育迟缓过程中不能起决定性作用,而可能是药物直接作用的结果.%AIM: To investigate the toxic effects of mid-pregnancy cocaine exposure on embryo-fetus. METHODS: A trans-placental murine model of cocaine exposure on embryo-fetus mice was established, in which pregnant dams ofcomparable weight were assigned into three groups: cocaine with food ad lib (COC), saline and pair-fed with COC(SPF), and saline with food ad lib (SAL). From embryonic d 8 (E8) to E17, physiological variables of dams andoffspring were recorded and concentrations of dopamine and serotonin in fetal striatum were examined. RESULTS:Compared with SAL dams, COC and SPF dams showed lower weight gain. But only COC fetuses demonstratedlow brain weight and low striatum weight on E17, as well

  10. Safety profile of Hoodia gordonii extract: Mouse prenatal developmental toxicity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dent, M.P.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Russell, P.J.; Bradford, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hoodia gordonii extract (0, 5, 15 or 50. mg/kg body weight/day, n= 24 mice/group) was orally administered by gavage to female CD-1 mice from gestation days 5-17. On gestation day 18 the females were euthanized and examined. Treatment at 50. mg/kg/day caused a marked reduction in feed intake and body

  11. Safety profile of Hoodia gordonii extract: Rabbit prenatal developmental toxicity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dent, M.P.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Russell, P.J.; Bradford, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hoodia gordonii extract was orally administered by gavage to groups of 22 female New Zealand white rabbits from day 3-28 after mating at doses of 0 (control), 3, 6 or 12. mg/kg bodyweight/day. These doses were reached by a dose escalation phase between days 3 and 7 after mating. As well as a vehicle

  12. Location negative priming effects in children with developmental dyslexia: An event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yujun; Wang, Enguo; Yuan, Tian; Zhao, Guo Xiang

    2016-08-01

    As the reading process is inseparable from working memory, inhibition, and other higher cognitive processes, the deep cognitive processing defects that are associated with dyslexia may be due to defective distraction inhibition systems. In this study, we used event-related potential technology to explore the source of negative priming effects in children with developmental dyslexia and in a group of healthy children for comparison. We found that the changes in the average response times in the negative priming and control conditions were consistent across the two groups, while the negative priming effects differed significantly between the groups. The magnitude of the negative priming effect was significantly different between the two groups, with the magnitude being significantly higher in the control group than it was in the developmental dyslexia group. These results indicate that there are deficits in distraction inhibition in children with developmental dyslexia. In terms of the time course of processing, inhibition deficits in the dyslexia group appeared during early-stage cognition selection and lasted through the response selection phase. Regarding the cerebral cortex locations, early-stage cognition selection was mainly located in the parietal region, while late-stage response selection was mainly located in the frontal and central regions. The results of our study may help further our understanding of the intrinsic causes of developmental dyslexia.

  13. A Process Evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity. Interim Report II, Part A: Program Case Studies. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Lynn, Ed.

    These 8 case studies are part of a series of documents on the evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity (PDC), a Head Start demonstration program aimed at providing educational and developmental continuity between children's Head Start and primary school experiences. Each case study reviews the planning year at a PDC demonstration site in one…

  14. A Process Evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity. Interim Report II, Part A: Program Case Studies. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Lynn, Ed.

    These 7 case studies are part of a series of documents on the evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity (PDC), a Head Start demonstration program aimed at providing educational and developmental continuity between children's Head Start and primary school experiences. Each case study reviews the planning year at a PDC demonstration site in one…

  15. An Exploratory Study of the Knowledge of Personal Safety Skills among Children with Developmental Disabilities and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hannah L.; Pavlik, Kathryn M.; Kim, Min Ah; Rogers, Karen C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the knowledge of personal safety skills among children with developmental disabilities and their parents' perceptions of children's knowledge. Method: This exploratory study examined the mental health records of 37 children with developmental disabilities referred for an abuse risk reduction group in a community…

  16. The use of in vitro toxicity data and physiologically based kinetic modeling to predict dose-response curves for in vivo developmental toxicity of glycol ethers in rat and man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; de Jong, E.; van de Sandt, J.J.M.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Woutersen, R.A.; Piersma, A.H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Verwei, M.

    2010-01-01

    At present, regulatory assessment of systemic toxicity is almost solely performed using animal models. The EU REACH legislation stimulates the use of animal-free approaches to obtain information on the toxicity of chemicals. In vitro toxicity tests provide in vitro concentration-response curves for

  17. The use of in vitro toxicity data and physiologically based kinetic modeling to predict dose-response curves for in vivo developmental toxicity of glycol ethers in rat and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Jong, E. de; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Blaauboer, B.J.; Woutersen, R.A.; Piersma, A.H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Verwei, M.

    2010-01-01

    At present, regulatory assessment of systemic toxicity is almost solely carried out using animal models. The European Commission's REACH legislation stimulates the use of animal-free approaches to obtain information on the toxicity of chemicals. In vitro toxicity tests provide in vitro concentration

  18. The use of in vitro toxicity data and physiologically based kinetic modeling to predict dose-respomse curves for in vivo developmental toxicity of glycol ethers in rat and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Jong, de E.; Sandt, van de J.J.M.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Woutersen, R.A.; Piersma, A.H.; Rietjens, I.; Verwei, M.

    2010-01-01

    At present, regulatory assessment of systemic toxicity is almost solely performed using animal models. The EU REACH legislation stimulates the use of animal-free approaches to obtain information on the toxicity of chemicals. In vitro toxicity tests provide in vitro concentration-response curves for

  19. The developmental history of study on neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai FENG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In 19th century, neuromyelitis optica (NMO indicated optic neuritis and myelitis with simultaneous onset of both sides. Later studies proposed that the onset of right or left side optic neuritis could be separated by weeks, months even years. The revolutionary discovery of aquaporin 4 (AQP4 antibody in 2004 by Vanda A Lennon challenged and changed the old concept of NMO. The concept of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs was proposed in 2007. Since then, a series of different terms have been proposed, including opticospinal multiple sclerosis (OSMS, NMOSDs, spectrum of NMO, expanded spectrum of NMO, etc. Through a summary of different concepts of NMO, this paper will make a comprehensive review on the evolution history of NMO study from 19th to 21st century, and the prospective targets of study will also be proposed. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.002

  20. Epidemiological Findings of Pervasive Developmental Disorders in a Venezuelan Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Nava, Cecilia; Pena, Joaquin A.

    2008-01-01

    The study aims to determine the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) for children receiving services in Maracaibo County, Venezuela. Children aged 3-9 with diagnosis of any ASD were recruited. We ascertained area, referral process, and definitions of ASD for each patient. A total of 430 children were identified, and 76.5 percent were…

  1. A Developmental Study of Factors Influencing Discrimination Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael

    1973-01-01

    Examines the importance of (1) dimensional characteristics of stimuli present in discrimination transfer tasks, (2) having contrasting stimuli presented simultaneously, and (3) subjects age. Subjects were rural Mexican youths, ages 4 to 10. Reversal and nonreversal type discrimination transfer problems were used in the study. (DP)

  2. Review of studies of support for siblings with developmental disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the study on siblings of disabilities, and investigate siblings'experience and the trend in supports for them. As a result, two important factors are considered, 1) the role as siblings of people with disabilities were changed with the times, from role as caretaker about people with disabilities into role as siblings who have their own concern and to be supported. 2) siblings have unusual concerns and opportunities, however, siblings must care for their ...

  3. Saccades improve postural control: a developmental study in normal children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Ajrezo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dual-task performance is known to affect postural stability in children. This study focused on the effect of oculomotor tasks like saccadic eye movements on postural stability, studied in a large population of children by recording simultaneously their eye movements and posture. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-five healthy children from 5.8 to 17.6 years old were examined. All children were free of any vestibular, neurological, ophtalmologic and orthoptic abnormalities. Postural control was measured with a force platform TechnoConcept®, and eye movements with video oculography (MobilEBT®. Children performed two oculomotor tasks: fixation of a stable central target and horizontal saccades. We measured the saccade latency and the number of saccades during fixation as well as the surface, length and mean velocity of the center of pressure. RESULTS: During postural measurement, we observed a correlation between the age on the one hand and a decrease in saccade latency as well as an improvement in the quality of fixation on the other. Postural sway decreases with age and is reduced in the dual task (saccades in comparison with a simple task of fixation. DISCUSSION - CONCLUSION: These results suggest a maturation of neural circuits controlling posture and eye movements during childhood. This study also shows the presence of an interaction between the oculomotor system and the postural system. Engaging in oculomotor tasks results in a reduction of postural sway.

  4. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child).

  5. Study on frequency of dental developmental alterations in a Mexican school-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Montes, C; Garcés-Ortíz, M; Salcido-García, J-F; Hernández-Flores, F

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to know the distribution of dental developmental alterations in the population requesting stomatological attention at the Admission and Diagnosis Clinic of our institution in Mexico City. We reviewed the archives and selected those files with developmental dental alterations. Analyzed data were diagnoses, age, gender, location and number of involved teeth. Of the 3.522 patients reviewed, 179 (5.1%) harbored 394 developmental dental alterations. Of them, 45.2% were males and 54.8% were females with a mean age of 16.7 years. The most common were supernumeraries, dental agenesia and dilaceration. Adults were 30.7% of the patients with dental developmental alterations. In them, the most common lesions were agenesia and supernumeraries. Mesiodens was the most frequently found supernumerary teeth (14.7%). Our finding that 30.7% of the affected patients were adults is an undescribed and unusually high proportion of patients that have implications on planning and prognosis of their stomatological treatment.

  6. Developmental origins of physical fitness: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna K Salonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF is a major factor influencing health and disease outcomes including all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease. Importantly CRF is also modifiable and could therefore have a major public health impact. Early life exposures play a major role in chronic disease development. Our aim was to explore the potential prenatal and childhood origins of CRF in later life. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This sub-study of the HBCS (Helsinki Birth Cohort Study includes 606 men and women who underwent a thorough clinical examination and participated in the UKK 2-km walk test, which has been validated against a maximal exercise stress test as a measure of CRF in population studies. Data on body size at birth and growth during infancy and childhood were obtained from hospital, child welfare and school health records. Body size at birth was not associated with adult CRF. A 1 cm increase in height at 2 and 7 years was associated with 0.21 ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.02 to 0.40 and 0.16 ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.03 to 0.28 higher VO2max, respectively. Adjustment for adult lean body mass strengthened these findings. Weight at 2 and 7 years and height at 11 years became positively associated with CRF after adult lean body mass adjustment. However, a 1 kg/m(2 higher BMI at 11 years was associated with -0.57 ml/kg/min (95% CI -0.91 to -0.24 lower adult VO2max, and remained so after adjustment for adult lean body mass. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We did not observe any significant associations between body size at birth and CRF in later life. However, childhood growth was associated with CRF in adulthood. These findings suggest, importantly from a public point of view, that early growth may play a role in predicting adult CRF.

  7. Developmental Origins of Physical Fitness: The Helsinki Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Minna K.; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Forsén, Tom; Ylihärsilä, Hilkka; Paile-Hyvärinen, Maria; Barker, D. J. P.; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is a major factor influencing health and disease outcomes including all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease. Importantly CRF is also modifiable and could therefore have a major public health impact. Early life exposures play a major role in chronic disease development. Our aim was to explore the potential prenatal and childhood origins of CRF in later life. Methods/Principal Findings This sub-study of the HBCS (Helsinki Birth Cohort Study) includes 606 men and women who underwent a thorough clinical examination and participated in the UKK 2-km walk test, which has been validated against a maximal exercise stress test as a measure of CRF in population studies. Data on body size at birth and growth during infancy and childhood were obtained from hospital, child welfare and school health records. Body size at birth was not associated with adult CRF. A 1 cm increase in height at 2 and 7 years was associated with 0.21 ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.02 to 0.40) and 0.16 ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.03 to 0.28) higher VO2max, respectively. Adjustment for adult lean body mass strengthened these findings. Weight at 2 and 7 years and height at 11 years became positively associated with CRF after adult lean body mass adjustment. However, a 1 kg/m2 higher BMI at 11 years was associated with −0.57 ml/kg/min (95% CI −0.91 to −0.24) lower adult VO2max, and remained so after adjustment for adult lean body mass. Conclusion/Significance We did not observe any significant associations between body size at birth and CRF in later life. However, childhood growth was associated with CRF in adulthood. These findings suggest, importantly from a public point of view, that early growth may play a role in predicting adult CRF. PMID:21799817

  8. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) studies on the organophosphate insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Alper

    2014-11-04

    Organophosphate insecticides are the most commonly used pesticides in the world. In this study, quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models were derived for estimating the acute oral toxicity of organophosphate insecticides to male rats. The 20 chemicals of the training set and the seven compounds of the external testing set were described by means of using descriptors. Descriptors for lipophilicity, polarity and molecular geometry, as well as quantum chemical descriptors for energy were calculated. Model development to predict toxicity of organophosphate insecticides in different matrices was carried out using multiple linear regression. The model was validated internally and externally. In the present study, QSTR model was used for the first time to understand the inherent relationships between the organophosphate insecticide molecules and their toxicity behavior. Such studies provide mechanistic insight about structure-toxicity relationship and help in the design of less toxic insecticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Subchronic Toxicity Study on Soy Isoflavones in Rats1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN-ZHONG ZHANG; WEN-MING CUI; KIN ZHANG; WEI WANG; XU-DONG JIA; XIAO-PENG ZHANG; NING LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the subchronic toxicity of soy isoflavones (SIF) in male rats. Method Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups,10 rats per group.SIF were given to rats in different groups by gavage at dose of 0,0.2,0.5,1.5,and 4.5 g/kg bw,respectively for 13 weeks.Clinical manifestations,body weight,and food consumption were observed weekly.At the end of the study,urinalysis,hematology,clinical chemistry,total testosterone,and follicle-stimulating hormone were tested,and histopathological examinations were performed. Results No mortality,ophthalmic abnormalities or treatment-related clinical signs were identified during the study.As compared with the control group,significantly lower body weights and food consumption were observed in 1.5 and 4.5 g/kg bw groups.In clinical chemistry tests,triglyceride was significantly decreased and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly increased in all SIF-treated groups.Total testosterone levels were significantly lower in 0.50,1.50,and 4.5 g/kg bw dose groups than in the control group.Microscopic examination showed that the mammary glands exhibited hyperplasia and excreted latex in rats of the 4.5 g/kg bw group.No changes attributable to treatment of SIF in other parameters were found. Conclusion SIF at high dosages caused significant endocrine disruption in male rats.The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of SIF to male rats in this study is considered to be 0.20 g/kg bw.

  10. Fetal developmental programing: insights from human studies and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Gisele Aparecida Dionísio; Ribeiro, Vinícius Luís Bertotti; Barbisan, Luís Fernando; Marchesan Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida

    2017-03-01

    Environmental factors, particularly nutrition during pregnancy and early life can influence the risk of chronic diseases in later life. The underlying mechanism, termed "programing", postulates that an environmental stimulus during a critical window of time, early in life, has a permanent effect on subsequent structure and function of the organism. In this study we review the concept of fetal programing on chronic diseases and the proposed hypotheses for the association between early development and later disease, including epigenetic variation. We concentrate on specific aspects of maternal nutrition, particularly under-nutrition and over-nutrition, in humans and animal models. An adequate maternal nutrition during pregnancy is crucial for the health outcome of the offspring at adulthood.

  11. Content and Epistemic Relations: A Developmental Study of Recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Verbrugge

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the types of coherence relations adults and children can recall after having read a text. We discerned content and epistemic relations (Dancygier, 1998; Sweetser, 1990. Content relations express relations between events in reality. Epistemic relations typically express relations between states of thinking (premise-conclusion relations. The relations between the two parts of a content or epistemic relation is often made explicit by means of connectives. The differences between these types of sentences have been shown in different areas (e.g., reasoning, clause integration, acquisition. However, no clear results could be reached as for recall of these relations and the interaction with connectives. We aim to clarify this debate by means of an experiment involving 539 participants. The experiment revealed that the difficulty associated with epistemic relations decreases as participants get older. Interestingly, connectives play a larger role in participants' ability to recall epistemic compared to content relations.

  12. Cognitive correlates of adolescents' aspirations to leadership: a developmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M

    1990-06-01

    The study examined age and gender differences in leadership aspirations among teenage adolescents. It was hypothesized that adolescents' valence, self-efficacy and attribution perceptions about leadership would be predictive of their aspirations to leadership. Altogether 52 fourth form and 78 seventh form high school students completed a questionnaire measuring (a) overall leadership aspirations, (b) 13 valence-instrumentality expectancies for 13 leadership outcomes, (c) self-efficacy perceptions, and (d) attributions of effective leadership. The results revealed significant gender differences in valence scores and significant age differences in self-efficacy and attribution measures. Regression analyses indicated that fourth formers' leadership aspirations were significantly predicted from their "ease-of-success" self-efficacy expectation; whereas seventh formers from either valence perceptions (males) or self-efficacy and attribution scores (females). These results were discussed in the context of the valence and self-efficacy models of career decision-making processes and attribution theory.

  13. What counts as learning to teach science: A developmental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, Stephen Leo

    This study is about the development of secondary school science novice teachers during their teacher preparation program. The study incorporates three cases about novices in the same cohort within a two-year program for which admission requires completion of a first degree in science. The cases are grounded systematically in data from on-campus course work and performance in practicum settings spanning a ten-month period. The database includes videotapes of the novices' lessons, recordings of seminars and follow-up discussions about lessons, and written documents such as lesson plans, reflections, and the curriculum that governs the novices' planning. The investigator has drawn theoretical insights from research literature in two areas, teacher development and science education, to be used as "theoretical perspectives" in a conceptual framework that functions as an analytical scheme for interpreting the data. One dimension of the framework comes from the teacher development literature. There is remarkable agreement among researchers to the effect that novices progress predictably, during their student teaching experience, through three stages. These are, respectively, a focus on self-survival, on mastering the tasks of teaching, and on attending to the impact of their actions on pupils. The first dimension of the conceptual framework identifies this progression as Self Mode, Task Mode, and Impact Mode. The second dimension is drawn from literature about three specific challenges in learning to teach science. First, the novices teach from a curriculum that mandates teaching about science-technology-society (STS) in a highly structured way. Second and third, every beginning science teacher has to develop an approach to science teaching and a way to incorporate demonstrations and laboratory work. Clues from the nine components of the conceptual framework, detecting "pedagogical perspectives" about "STS/Science," "Teaching Approach," and "Demonstrations and Labs" in

  14. A developmental study of the acquisition of Russian colour terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, I R; Corbett, G G; McGurk, H; MacDermid, C

    1998-06-01

    We report a study of the acquisition of colour terms by Russian children which had two main aims: first, to test Berlin & Kay's (1969) theory of colour universals using acquisition order as a measure of basicness; and secondly, to see if the two BLUE terms of Russian are genuinely basic. Two hundred children aged from three to six-years-old were tested on three colour-tasks--colour term listing, colour term production and colour term comprehension. To a reasonable approximation, the order of colour term acquisition was in accord with Berlin & Kay's theory, but the data are also consistent with the weaker claim that primary terms tend to be learned before derived terms. On balance the data were consistent with Russian exceptionally, having an extra term for the BLUE region. But, the two BLUE terms--goluboj 'light blue' and sinij 'dark blue'--were confused more often than other pairs of terms even by the five- to six-year-old sample.

  15. A developmental study of children's stereotyping of facially deformed adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, N; Bull, R; Gahagan, D

    1986-05-01

    A frequent complaint of facially deformed people is that they are rejected by others. This study was designed to examine whether negative reactions to facially deformed people would be demonstrated by girls and boys aged 5-11 years. The children were asked to attribute positive or negative characteristics to photographs in which adults were shown before and after minor oral surgery. Despite the relatively small differences in appearance between each adult's before- and after-operation photographs, it was found that, whereas overall the younger children selected faces at around chance level (i.e. 50 per cent), the 11-year-olds on 75 per cent of occasions selected in response to questions concerning friendliness and helping (deemed 'positive') the after-operation photographs, and in response to questions concerning fear and anger (deemed 'negative') the before-operation photographs. When the children's own judgements of facial attractiveness were related to the faces they had chosen in response to positive and negative questions, while again for the five-year-olds only chance responding (50 per cent) was observed, by age seven 75 per cent, and by age 11 90 per cent, of choices suggested facial stereotyping.

  16. ACUTE ORAL TOXICITY STUDY OF CLINACANTHUS NUTANS IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Wen P'ng, Gabriel Akyirem Akowuah and Jin Han Chin*

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinacanthus nutans Lindau (Family: Acanthaceae has attracted public interest recently due to its high medicinal values for the treatment of cancer, inflammation and various skin problems. This study was aimed to determine the oral LD50 value of the methanol leaves extract of C. nutans and identify the targeted organs in mice. This acute oral toxicity study was conducted in accordance to OECD 423 guidelines by using male Swiss albino mice weighing 25-35 g. First group was served as control group which received distilled water (vehicle while second and third group were orally treated with single daily dose of 0.9 g/kg and 1.8 g/kg of methanol leaves extract of C. nutans, respectively. All the animals were closely observed for 14 days. Body weight for each mouse was recorded at day-0, day-3, day-7 and day-14. Relative organ weights for liver, kidney, spleen, lung and heart were also determined. All the results were presented as mean ± standard deviation and analyzed using Dunnett’s Test after ANOVA test. From the results obtained, no mortality was observed in both treatment groups either post 24 hours or 14 days of oral administration of C. nutans. Body weight for each mouse and relative organ weight showed insignificant difference when compared to the control group. In conclusion, acute exposure of 1.8 g/kg of C. nutans was safe in male mice without causing any adverse effects or mortality. The oral LD50 of methanol leaves extract of C. nutans was suggested to be greater than 1.8 g/kg bw in male mice.

  17. Reading comprehension and understanding idiomatic expressions: a developmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levorato, Maria Chiara; Nesi, Barbara; Cacciari, Cristina

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate idiom comprehension in school-age Italian children with different reading comprehension skills. According to our hypothesis, the level of a child's text comprehension skills should predict his/her ability to understand idiomatic meanings. Idiom comprehension in fact requires children to go beyond a simple word-by-word comprehension strategy and to integrate figurative meaning into contextual information. In a preliminary phase, we used a standardized battery of tests (Cornoldi & Colpo, 1998) to assess the ability of second graders and fourth graders to comprehend written texts. Three groups were identified at each age level: good, medium, and poor comprehenders. Children were then presented with familiar idiomatic expressions which also have a literal meaning (e.g., "break the ice"). Idioms were embedded in short stories: in Experiment 1 only the idiomatic interpretation was contextually appropriate, in Experiment 2 a literal reading of the string was also plausible in the context. A multiple-choice task was used in both experiments: children were asked to choose one answer among three corresponding to: (a) the idiomatic meaning; (b) the literal meaning; and (c) an interpretation contextually appropriate but not connected with the idiomatic or literal meaning of the idiom string. The results of both experiments showed that the ability to understand a text indeed predicted children's understanding of idioms in context. To verify whether possible improvements in children's comprehension skills might produce an increase in figurative language understanding, Experiment 3 was carried out. A group of poor comprehenders who participated in Experiments 1 and 2 was tested eight months later. The results of Experiment 3 showed that children whose general comprehension skills improved their performance on an idiom comprehension test.

  18. Claw asymmetry in lobsters: case study in developmental neuroethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, C K

    1992-12-01

    An enduring debate in the study of development is the relative contribution of genetic and epigenetic factors in the genesis of an organism, that is, the nature vs. nurture debate. The behavior of the paired claws in the lobster offers promising material for pursuing this debate because of the way they develop. The paired claws and their closer muscles are initially symmetrical; both are slender in appearance and have a mixture of fast and slow fibers in their closer muscles. During a critical period of development, they become determined into a major (crusher) and minor (cutter) claw and during subsequent development acquire their final form and behavior: The crusher becomes a stout, molar-toothed claw capable of closing only slowly because its closer muscle has 100% slow fibers while the cutter becomes a slender, incisor-toothed claw capable of closing rapidly because its closer muscle has 90% fast fibers. Our initial hypothesis was that the more active claw became the crusher and its less active counterpart the cutter. Presumably, nerve activity would influence muscle transformation, which in turn would influence the exoskeleton to which they attach and hence claw morphology. Curtailing nerve activity to the claw prevented crusher development, while reflex activation of a claw promoted its development; both results support the notion that nerve activity directly regulates claw form and function. This is not, however, the case, for when both claws were reflexly exercised neither formed a crusher, signifying rather that bilateral differences in predominantly mechanoreceptive input to the paired claws somehow lateralized the claw ganglion [central nervous system (CNS)] into a crusher and cutter side. The side experiencing the greater activity becomes the crusher side while the contralateral side becomes the cutter and is also inhibited from ever becoming a crusher. This initial lateralization in the CNS is expressed, via as yet unknown pathways, at the periphery in

  19. Developmental Relations between Reading Fluency and Reading Comprehension: A Longitudinal Study from Grade 1 to Grade 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Wagner, Richard K.; Lopez, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    From a developmental framework, relations among list reading fluency, oral and silent reading fluency, listening comprehension, and reading comprehension might be expected to change as children's reading skills develop. We examined developmental relations among these constructs in a latent-variable longitudinal study of first and second graders.…

  20. Motor imagery training for children with developmental coordination disorder: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the predictive control of movements is impaired in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), most likely due to a deficit in the internal modeling of movements. Motor imagery paradigms have been used to test this internal modeling deficit. The aim of the present study is to examine whether a training focused on the mental imagery of motor skills, can help to improve the motor abilities of children with DCD. Methods/Design A pre-post d...

  1. Galenics: studies of the toxicity and distribution of sugar substitutes on Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    RADEMACHER, Eva; Fahlberg, Anja; Raddatz, Marlene; Schneider, Saskia; Voigt, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this study was to find a substitute to sugar water in medicinal treatments of honey bee colonies with the same properties but without being ingested by bees or being toxic to them. Tylose MH, sorbitol and glycerol were tested for their attractiveness to Apis mellifera, their application ability, toxicity via individual application and distribution in small groups respectively a small colony. Neither of the substances proved attractive or toxic. All had good ...

  2. The role of chemical speciation, chemical fractionation and calcium disruption in manganese-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, R B; Nishita, M I; Espósito, B P; Scholz, S; Michalke, B

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient that can be toxic in excess concentrations, especially during early development stages. The mechanisms of Mn toxicity is still unclear, and little information is available regarding the role of Mn speciation and fractionation in toxicology. We aimed to investigate the toxic effects of several chemical forms of Mn in embryos of Danio rerio exposed during different development stages, between 2 and 122h post fertilization. We found a stage-specific increase of lethality associated with hatching and removal of the chorion. Mn(II), ([Mn(H2O)6](2+)) appeared to be the most toxic species to embryos exposed for 48h, and Mn(II) citrate was most toxic to embryos exposed for 72 and/or 120h. Manganese toxicity was associated with calcium disruption, manganese speciation and metal fractionation, including bioaccumulation in tissue, granule fractions, organelles and denaturated proteins.

  3. Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity study of erythritol in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bos-Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Til, H.P.; Bär, A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential toxicity and carcinogenicity of erythritol, a low-calorie sugar substitute, were examined in Wistar Crl:(WI) WU BR rats. Groups of 50 rats of each sex consumed diets with 0, 2, 5, or 10% erythritol, or 10% mannitol, for a period of 104-107 weeks. To each of these main groups, two

  4. Toxicity Evaluation of Engineered Nanomaterials (Phase 1 Studies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Physiol. Rev. 2007 87, 315-424. [22] Monte M.; Benetti R.; Buscemi G.; Sandy P.; Del Sal G.; and Schneider C.. The Cell Cycle- regulated Protein...Dosimetry Considerations for In Vitro Nanoparticle Toxicity Assessments. Toxicol. Sci. 2007, 95, 300–312. [34] Feng, Q.; Li, P.; Salamanca , C

  5. Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity Study of n-pentane in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Kyu Kim

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: The no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL of n-pentane is evaluated as being more than 6,885 ppm (20.3 mg/L in both male and female rats. n-pentane was not a classified specific target organ toxicity in the globally harmonized classification system (GHS.

  6. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies of kernel extract of Sclerocarya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    evaluation was done by oral feeding of the rats with the seed kernel extract daily at doses .... Significantly different from the control (P < 0.05) using one way analysis of variance. Subchronic ... acute toxicity did not produce any grossly negative behavioural changes such .... against garlic-induced oxidative stress. Journal of ...

  7. Acute toxicity studies of aqueous stem bark extract of Ximenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 7 (10), pp. ... Full Length Research Paper ... histopathological examination did not show any significant (P<0.05) damage as a result of the extract ... that the fruits contain hydrocyanic acid which is toxic. .... lesions in the organs could suggest the level of safety of.

  8. Thallium Toxicity: The Problem; An Analytical Approach; An Antidotal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-15

    Possible toxic mechanisms of T1 include ligand formation with protein sulfhydryl groups, inhibition of cellular respiration, interaction with riboflavin ...and riboflavin -based cofactors, and disruption of calcium homeostasis. The principal clinical features of thallotoxicosis are gastroenteritis...anticorrosive), optical lenses (increases refractive index), low-temperature thermometers, dye and pigments (artist paints), semiconduc- tors, superconducting

  9. Toxicity of formaldehyde and acrolein mixtures : in vitro studies using nasal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee, F.R.; Stenhuis, W.S.; Groten, J.P.; Feron, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    In vitro studies with human and rat nasal epithelial cells were carried out to investigate the combined toxicity of formaldehyde and acrolein and the role of aldehyde dehydrogenases in this process. These studies showed that the toxic effect of mixtures of aldehydes was additive. In addition, aldehy

  10. Dermal toxicity studies of technical polychlorinated biphenyls and fractions thereof in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.G.; Beems, R.B.

    1971-01-01

    A significant difference in toxicity between 3 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) preparations was found in a prior study: Clophen A 60 and Phenoclor DP6 showing the highest, Aroclor 1260 the lowest, toxicity (Vos and Koeman, 1970). A subsequent study revealed the presence of tetra- and pentachlorodiben

  11. Studies on developmental variation of isoperoxidase and protein profile of Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to produce the isoperoxidase and protein marker for the maize cultivars from India and to find the isoperoxidase and protein expression on the various developmental stages. The leaf samples of Zea mays L. were harvested on 3rd, 7th, 11th, 15th, 19th, 23rd and 27th d for electrophoretic analysis of isoperoxidase and protein. The total protein and isoperoxidase were isolated using the standard procedure described by Sadasivam and Manickam. Isozyme and protein separation was carried out using 10% non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The banding pattern suggested several similarities as well as presence of unique isoperoxidase and protein in each stage. These studies will be useful for the identification of the major proteins present at different developmental stages of Z. mays.

  12. 16 CFR 1500.135 - Summary of guidelines for determining chronic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... factors may influence the choice of study. (ii) Risk should be based on the maximum likelihood estimate... “sufficient evidence” criteria of developmental or reproductive toxicity in animals. The Food and Drug...

  13. Developmental odontogenic cysts of jaws: a clinical study of 245 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Yazdani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative frequency of developmental odontogenic cysts in an Iranian population. Materials and methods. In this study 245 cysts from both jaws, treated in the Faculty of Dentistry at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences during a 10-year period from 1998 to 2008, were analyzed in order to evaluate the incidence of such cysts. We had permission from all the patients. Case histories of 65% of male and 35% of female patients were analyzed. The age of the patients varied from 14 to 64 years, with an average of 33.21 ± 10.89. Results. In this 10-year study of odontogenic cysts, 97 cases were developmental odontogenic cysts with the following incidence: dentigerous cyst, 44%; odontogenic keratocyst, 36%; primordial cyst, 9%; Gorlin cyst, 2%; lateral periodontal cyst, 3%; eruption cyst, 3%; and gingival cyst, 3% (adults 2%, infants 1%. A total of 60% of the cysts were found in the mandible and 40% in the maxilla. Regarding the mandible, the molar region was involved in 47% of the cases, premolar region in 33% and anterior region in 20% (total = 100%. Regarding the maxilla, the canine-to-canine region was involved in 52% of the cases, premolar region in 20% and molar region in 28% (total = 100%. Conclusion. An important finding in this study was the fact that 39% of the jaw cysts were developmental odontogenic cysts and the most common developmental odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cyst and OKC (odontogenic keratocyst.

  14. Cross-sectional study of executive functioning in children with developmental coordination disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have multiple impairments in movement, in learning, and in the activities of daily living. Studies from other countries have associated these impairments with cognitive function, particularly executive functioning, but these findings have not been confirmed in China. Aim Compare the executive functioning of children with DCD with that of normal children. Methods The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was administered to 39 chi...

  15. Anthropology and the study of menopause: evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy

    2014-10-01

    This work aims to consider how the discipline of anthropology contributes to the study of menopause through evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives. This study was a review of skeletal and ethnographic evidence for menopause and postreproductive life in humans' distant past, hypotheses for the evolution of menopause and long postreproductive life, variation in age at menopause with focus on childhood environments, and the study of variation in symptom experience across populations. Longevity, rather than capacity for menopause, sets humans apart from other primates. Skeletal evidence demonstrates that some Neanderthals and archaic Homo sapiens lived to the age at menopause and that at least one third of women in traditional foraging populations live beyond menopause. The evolutionary reasons for why women experience a long postreproductive life continue to be debated. A developmental perspective suggests that early childhood may be a critical time for the environment to irreversibly influence the number of oocytes or rate of follicular atresia and, ultimately, age at menopause. A comparative perspective examines symptom experience at midlife through participant observation, qualitative interviews, and quantitative instruments to gain a holistic understanding of the meaning, experience, and sociocultural context of menopause. An evolutionary perspective suggests that menopause is not a recent phenomenon among humans. A developmental perspective focuses on the influence of early childhood on ovarian function. A comparative perspective expands clinical norms and provides knowledge about the range of human variations.

  16. Developmental origins of the adipocyte lineage: new insights from genetics and genomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billon, Nathalie; Dani, Christian

    2012-03-01

    The current epidemic of obesity and overweight has caused a surge of interest in the study of adipose tissue formation. Much progress has been made in defining the transcriptional networks controlling the terminal differentiation of adipocyte progenitors into mature adipocytes. However, the early steps of adipocyte development and the embryonic origin of this lineage have been largely disregarded until recently. In mammals, two functionally different types of adipose tissues coexist, which are both involved in energy balance but assume opposite functions. White adipose tissue (WAT) stores energy, while brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized in energy expenditure. WAT and BAT can be found as several depots located in various sites of the body. Individual fat depots exhibit different timing of appearance during development, as well as distinct functional properties, suggesting possible differences in their developmental origin. This hypothesis has recently been revisited through large-scale genomics studies and in vivo lineage tracing approaches, which are reviewed in this report. These studies have provided novel fundamental insights into adipocyte biology, pointing out distinct developmental origins for WAT and BAT, as well as for individual WAT depots. They suggest that the adipose tissue is composed of distinct mini-organs, exhibiting developmental and functional differences, as well as variable contribution to obesity-related metabolic diseases.

  17. Dropout in looking time studies: The role of infants' temperament and cognitive developmental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Radukic, Sarah; Zmyj, Norbert

    2015-11-01

    Dropout of infants in looking time studies sometimes occurs at high rates, raising concerns that the representativeness of the final sample might be reduced in comparison to the originally obtained sample. The current study investigated which infant characteristics play a role in dropout. Infants were presented with a preferential looking task at 6 and 9 months of age. At 9 months of age, an additional habituation task and a subsequent novelty preference task were conducted. In addition, temperament was assessed via the Infant Behavior Questionnaire - Revised (IBQ-R, Gartstein & Rothbart, 2003), and cognitive developmental status was assessed via the Cognitive Scale of the Bayley Scale of Infant and Toddler Development (BSID-III, Bayley, 2006). Dropout was positively related to the IBQ-R temperament scales Distress to Limitations and Approach, and negatively related to the scales Falling Reactivity and Cuddliness. The representativeness of the final sample regarding situation-specific temperament dimensions is affected by dropout. Dropout was not related to cognitive developmental status as measured via the BSID-III, habituation speed and novelty preference. Dropout at 6 months of age was associated with dropout at 9 months of age. We concluded that in looking time studies, the representativeness of the final sample regarding performance-relevant temperament dimensions or cognitive developmental status is not affected by dropout.

  18. Developmental trajectories of associative memory from childhood to adulthood: a behavioral and neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Martins, Sylvie; Deshayes, Sebastien; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Chiron, Catherine; Jambaqué, Isabelle; Landeau, Brigitte; Clochon, Patrice; Chételat, Gaël; Eustache, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Episodic memory refers to the capacity to bind multimodal memories to constitute a unique personal event. Most developmental studies on episodic memory focused on one specific component, i.e., the core factual information. The present study examines the relevance of a novel episodic paradigm to assess its developmental trajectories in a more comprehensive way according to the type of association (item-feature, item-location, and item-sequence associations) with measures of both objective and subjective recollection. We conducted a behavioral study aimed at testing the effects of age in a large sample of 160 children, adolescents, and young adults (6-23 years old). We confronted the behavioral data to the neural correlates in a subgroup of 30 children using voxel-based morphometry. Behavioral data outlined differential developmental trajectories according to the type of association, with a continuous increase of factual associative memory efficiency until 10 years, a linear increase of performance in spatial associative memory that pursues until early adulthood and an abrupt increase in temporal associative memory efficiency between 9 and 10. Regarding recollection, measures showed a more pronounced enhancement from 9 to 10 years. Hence, behavioral data highlight a peculiar period in late childhood (8-10 years old) crucial for the developmental time course of episodic memory. Regarding structural data, we found that the improvement of associative memory efficiency was related to a decrease in gray matter volume in a large cerebral network including the dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (and superior and anterior temporal regions), and the hippocampus bilaterally. These data suggest that multimodal integration would probably be related to the maturation of temporal regions and modulated by a fronto-parietal network. Besides, our findings emphasize the relevance of the present paradigm to assess episodic memory especially in the clinical setting.

  19. Developmental trajectories of associative memory from childhood to adulthood: a behavioral and neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berengere eGuillery-Girard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory refers to the capacity to bind multimodal memories to constitute a unique personal event. Most developmental studies on episodic memory focused on one specific component, i.e. the core factual information. The present study examines the relevance of a novel episodic paradigm to assess its developmental trajectories in a more comprehensive way according to the type of association (item-feature, item-location and item-sequence associations with measures of both objective and subjective recollection. We conducted a behavioral study aimed at testing the effects of age in a large sample of 160 children, adolescents and young adults (6 to 23 years old. We confronted the behavioral data to the neural correlates in a subgroup of 30 children using voxel-based morphometry. Behavioral data outlined differential developmental trajectories according to the type of association, with a continuous increase of factual associative memory efficiency until 10 years, a linear increase of performance in spatial associative memory that pursues until early adulthood and an abrupt increase in temporal associative memory efficiency between 9 and 10. Regarding recollection, measures showed a more pronounced enhancement from 9 to 10 years. Hence, behavioral data highlight a peculiar period in late childhood (8 to 10 years old crucial for the developmental time course of episodic memory. Regarding structural data, we found that the improvement of associative memory efficiency was related to a decrease in gray matter volume in a large cerebral network including the dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (and superior and anterior temporal regions and the hippocampus bilaterally. These data suggest that multimodal integration would probably be related to the maturation of temporal regions and modulated by a fronto-parietal network. Besides, our findings emphasize the relevance of the present paradigm to assess episodic memory especially in the

  20. Regression, developmental trajectory and associated problems in disorders in the autism spectrum: the SNAP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Gillian; Charman, Tony; Pickles, Andrew; Chandler, Susie; Loucas, Tom; Meldrum, David; Carcani-Rathwell, Iris; Serkana, Devanitha; Simonoff, Emily

    2008-11-01

    We report rates of regression and associated findings in a population derived group of 255 children aged 9-14 years, participating in a prevalence study of autism spectrum disorders (ASD); 53 with narrowly defined autism, 105 with broader ASD and 97 with non-ASD neurodevelopmental problems, drawn from those with special educational needs within a population of 56,946 children. Language regression was reported in 30% with narrowly defined autism, 8% with broader ASD and less than 3% with developmental problems without ASD. A smaller group of children were identified who underwent a less clear setback. Regression was associated with higher rates of autistic symptoms and a deviation in developmental trajectory. Regression was not associated with epilepsy or gastrointestinal problems.