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Sample records for development thermal barrier

  1. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  2. Development of Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced multi-component, low conductivity oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities and improved thermal stability due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  3. Overview on the Development of Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have successfully been used in gas turbine engines for increasing operation temperature and improving engine efficiency. Over the past thirty years, a variety of TBC materials and TBC deposition techniques have been developed. Recently, nanostructured TBCs emerge with the potential of commercial applications in various industries. In this paper, TBC materials and TBC deposition techniques such as air plasma spray (APS), electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (LACVD) are briefly reviewed. Nanostructured 7-8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (7-8YSZ)TBC by air plasma spraying of powder and new TBC with novel structure deposited by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) are compared. Plasma spray conditions, coating forming mechanisms, microstructures,phase compositions, thermal conductivities, and thermal cycling lives of the APS nanostructured TBC and the SPPS nanostructured TBC are discussed. Research opportunities and challenges of nanostructured TBCs deposited by air plasma spray are prospected.

  4. Development of new thermal barrier coating materials for gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X.

    2004-04-01

    New thermal barrier coating (TBC) materials for gas turbines were studied in this work. Two of the most important properties of the material for TBCs, thermal expansion coefficient and phase stability, and the powder preparation by spray-drying are investigated.

  5. MNASA as a Test for Carbon Fiber Thermal Barrier Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Paul; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A carbon fiber rope thermal barrier is being evaluated as a replacement for the conventional room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) thermal barrier that is currently used to protect o-rings in Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle joints. Performance requirements include its ability to cool any incoming, hot propellant gases that fill and pressurize the nozzle joints, filter slag and particulates, and to perform adequately in various joint assembly conditions as well as dynamic flight motion. Modified National Aeronautics and Space Administration (MNASA) motors, with their inherent and unique ability to replicate select RSRM internal environment features, were an integral step in the development path leading to full scale RSRM static test demonstration of the carbon fiber rope (CFR) joint concept. These 1/4 scale RSRM motors serve to bridge the gap between the other classes of subscale test motors (extremely small and moderate duration, or small scale and short duration) and the critical asset RSRM static test motors. A series of MNASA tests have been used to demonstrate carbon fiber rope performance and have provided rationale for implementation into a full-scale static motor and flight qualification.

  6. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  7. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  8. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  9. Thermal barrier coating materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Improved thermal barrier coatings (TBCs will enable future gas turbines to operate at higher gas temperatures. Considerable effort is being invested, therefore, in identifying new materials with even better performance than the current industry standard, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ. We review recent progress and suggest that an integrated strategy of experiment, intuitive arguments based on crystallography, and simulation may lead most rapidly to the development of new TBC materials.

  10. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  11. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  12. Low-Thermal-Conductivity Pyrochlore Oxide Materials Developed for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    When turbine engines operate at higher temperatures, they consume less fuel, have higher efficiencies, and have lower emissions. The upper-use temperatures of the base materials (superalloys, silicon-based ceramics, etc.) used for the hot-section components of turbine engines are limited by the physical, mechanical, and corrosion characteristics of these materials. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied as thin layers on the surfaces of these materials to further increase the operating temperatures. The current state-of-the-art TBC material in commercial use is partially yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is applied on engine components by plasma spraying or by electron-beam physical vapor deposition. At temperatures higher than 1000 C, YSZ layers are prone to sintering, which increases thermal conductivity and makes them less effective. The sintered and densified coatings can also reduce thermal stress and strain tolerance, which can reduce the coating s durability significantly. Alternate TBC materials with lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance are needed to further increase the operating temperature of turbine engines.

  13. Development of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Using a High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, high temperature capability thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity, which initially rises under the steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and later drops under the cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on damage accumulation and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The external radiation resistance of the coating is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser- heated intense radiation-flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature may be derived.

  14. Very Tough, Erosion-Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are receiving increased attention for advanced gas turbine engine applications. These coatings are considered to be technologically important because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus achieving higher engine efficiency, lower emissions, and increased performance goals. To take full advantage of the capabilities of these coatings, researchers need to use an aggressive design approach whenever possible--one that allows greater temperature reductions through the coating systems and less cooling air to the components. Advanced TBCs that have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability than current coatings have been developed for future ultra-efficient, low-emission engine systems. Multicomponent-doped, defect-clustered TBCs have been shown to offer the low conductivity and high stability required for future high-temperature engine applications.

  15. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  16. Hafnia-Based Materials Developed for Advanced Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, and thus help achieve engine goals of low emissions and high efficiency. Under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project, advanced T/EBCs are being developed for low-emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vaporcontaining combustion environments. The coating system is required to have increased phase stability, lower lattice and radiation thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance under high-heat-flux and thermal-cycling engine conditions. Advanced heat-flux testing approaches (refs. 1 to 4) have been established at the NASA Glenn Research Center for 1650 C coating developments. The simulated combustion water-vapor environment is also being incorporated into the heat-flux test capabilities (ref. 3).

  17. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Development for Advanced Propulsion Engine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Fox, Dennis S.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments, and extend component lifetimes. Advanced TEBCs that have significantly lower thermal conductivity, better thermal stability and higher toughness than current coatings will be beneficial for future low emission and high performance propulsion engine systems. In this paper, ceramic coating design and testing considerations will be described for turbine engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. Thermal barrier coatings for metallic turbine airfoils and thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) components for future supersonic aircraft propulsion engines will be emphasized. Further coating capability and durability improvements for the engine hot-section component applications can be expected by utilizing advanced modeling and design tools.

  18. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Co., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  19. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, M. R.; Reardon, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of partially stabilized zirconia coatings plasma sprayed over a MCrAlY bond coat. Although these systems have excellent thermal shock properties, they have shown themselves to be deficient for a number of diesel and aircraft applications. Two ternary ceramic plasma coatings are discussed with respect to their possible use in TBC systems. Zirconia-ceria-yttria (ZCY) coatings were developed with low thermal conductivities, good thermal shock resistance and improved resistance to vanadium containing environments, when compared to the baseline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings. In addition, dense zirconia-titania-yttria (ZTY) coatings were developed with particle erosion resistance exceeding conventional stabilized zirconia coatings. Both coatings were evaluated in conjunction with a NiCr-Al-Co-Y2O3 bond coat. Also, multilayer or hybrid coatings consisting of the bond coat with subsequent coatings of zirconia-ceria-yttria and zirconia-titania-yttria were evaluated. These coatings combine the enhanced performance characteristics of ZCY with the improved erosion resistance of ZTY coatings. Improvement in the erosion resistance of the TBC system should result in a more consistent delta T gradient during service. Economically, this may also translate into increased component life simply because the coating lasts longer.

  20. An overview on novel thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) offer the potential to significantly improve efficiencies of aero engines as well as stationary gas turbines for power generation. On internally cooled turbine parts, temperature gradients of the order of 100-150℃ can be achieved. TBCs, typically consisting of an yttrium stabilized zirconia top coat and a metallic bond coat deposited onto a superalloy substrate, are mainly used to extend lifetime. Further efficiency improvements require TBCs being an integral part of the component which requires reliable and predictable TBC performance. TBCs produced by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EbPVD) or plasma spray (PS) deposition are favored for high performance applications. The paper highlights critical R&D needs for advanced TBC systems with a special focus on reduced thermal conductivity and life prediction needs. To further enhance the efficiency of gas turbines, higher temperature and a longer lifetime of the coating are needed for the next generation of TBCs. This paper presents the development of new materials, new deposition technologies, and new concept for application as novel TBCs. This paper summarizes the basic properties of conventional thermal barrier coatings. Based on our own investigation, we reviewed the progress on materials and technologies of novel thermal barrier coatings. Except yttria stabilized zirconia, other materials such as lanthanum zirconate and rare earth oxides are also promising materials for thermal barrier coatings. Nanostructure thermal barrier coating is presented as a new concept. This paper also summarizes the technologies for depositing the thermal barrier coatings.

  1. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  2. Nanostructured zirconia layers as thermal barrier coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Robert PITICESCU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The coatings obtained by thermal spray are used both as antioxidant and connection materials (e.g. MCrAlY type alloys as well as thermal barrier coatings (e.g. partially stabilized zirconia oxide with yttria oxide. This paper studies the characteristics of the coatings obtained with nanostructured powders by thermal spraying and air plasma jet metallization. Testing of coatings is done against the most disturbing factor, thermal shock. Structural changes occurring after thermal shock tests are highlighted by investigations of optical and electronic microscopy. The results obtained after quick thermal shock show a good morphological and surface behavior of the developed coatings.

  3. Thermal Conductivity and Sintering Behavior of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings, having significantly reduced long-term thermal conductivities, are being developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  4. Depth-Penetrating Measurements Developed for Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Thermographic Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The insulating properties of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide highly beneficial thermal protection to turbine engine components by reducing the temperature sustained by those components. Therefore, measuring the temperature beneath the TBC is critical for determining whether the TBC is performing its insulating function. Currently, noncontact temperature measurements are performed by infrared pyrometry, which unfortunately measures the TBC surface temperature rather than the temperature of the underlying component. To remedy this problem, the NASA Glenn Research Center, under the Information Rich Test Instrumentation Project, developed a technique to measure the temperature beneath the TBC by incorporating a thin phosphor layer beneath the TBC. By performing fluorescence decay-time measurements on light emission from this phosphor layer, Glenn successfully measured temperatures from the phosphor layer up to 1100 C. This is the first successful demonstration of temperature measurements that penetrate beneath the TBC. Thermographic phosphors have a history of providing noncontact surface temperature measurements. Conventionally, a thermographic phosphor is applied to the material surface and temperature measurements are performed by exciting the phosphor with ultraviolet light and then measuring the temperature-dependent decay time of the phosphor emission at a longer wavelength. The innovative feature of the new approach is to take advantage of the relative transparency of the TBC (composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia) in order to excite and measure the phosphor emission beneath the TBC. The primary obstacle to achieving depth-penetrating temperature measurements is that the TBCs are completely opaque to the ultraviolet light usually employed to excite the phosphor. The strategy that Glenn pursued was to select a thermographic phosphor that could be excited and emit at wavelengths that could be transmitted through the TBC. The phosphor that was selected was

  5. The Effect of Core Configuration on Thermal Barrier Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Bott, Robert H.; Druesedow, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barriers and seals are integral components in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of nearly all aerospace vehicles. They are used to minimize heat transfer through interfaces and gaps and protect underlying temperature-sensitive components. The core insulation has a significant impact on both the thermal and mechanical properties of compliant thermal barriers. Proper selection of an appropriate core configuration to mitigate conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer through the thermal barrier is challenging. Additionally, optimization of the thermal barrier for thermal performance may have counteracting effects on mechanical performance. Experimental evaluations have been conducted to better understand the effect of insulation density on permeability and leakage performance, which can significantly impact the resistance to convective heat transfer. The effect of core density on mechanical performance was also previously investigated and will be reviewed. Simple thermal models were also developed to determine the impact of various core parameters on downstream temperatures. An extended understanding of these factors can improve the ability to design and implement these critical TPS components.

  6. New Generation Perovskite Thermal Barrier Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W.; Jarligo, M. O.; Mack, D. E.; Pitzer, D.; Malzbender, J.; Vaßen, R.; Stöver, D.

    2008-12-01

    Advanced ceramic materials of perovskite structure have been developed for potential application in thermal barrier coating systems, in an effort to improve the properties of the pre-existing ones like yttria-stabilized zirconia. Yb2O3 and Gd2O3 doped strontium zirconate (SrZrO3) and barium magnesium tantalate (Ba(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3) of the ABO3 and complex A(B'1/3B''2/3)O3 systems, respectively, have been synthesized using ball milling prior to solid state sintering. Thermal and mechanical investigations show desirable properties for high-temperature coating applications. On atmospheric plasma spraying, the newly developed thermal barrier coatings reveal promising thermal cycle lifetime up to 1350 °C.

  7. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  8. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W.

    1995-03-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70`s by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also to provide protection. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the thermal barrier coatings will be to reduce thermal fatigue as the engine peak cylinder pressure will nearly be doubled. As the coatings result in higher available energy in the exhaust gas, efficiency gains are achieved through use of this energy by turbochargers, turbocompounding or thermoelectric generators.

  9. Investigation of the Mechanical Performance of Compliant Thermal Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Bott, Robert J.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2011-01-01

    Compliant thermal barriers play a pivotal role in the thermal protection systems of advanced aerospace vehicles. Both the thermal properties and mechanical performance of these barriers are critical in determining their successful implementation. Due to the custom nature of many thermal barriers, designers of advanced spacecraft have little guidance as to the design, selection, and implementation of these elements. As part of an effort to develop a more fundamental understanding of the interrelationship between thermal barrier design and performance, mechanical testing of thermal barriers was conducted. Two different types of thermal barriers with several core insulation density levels ranging from 62 to 141 kg/cu m were investigated. Room-temperature compression tests were conducted on samples to determine load performance and assess thermal barrier resiliency. Results showed that the loading behavior of these thermal barriers was similar to other porous, low-density, compliant materials, such as elastomeric foams. Additionally, the insulation density level had a significant non-linear impact on the stiffness and peak loads of the thermal barriers. In contrast, neither the thermal barrier type nor the level of insulation density significantly influenced the room-temperature resiliency of the samples.

  10. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  11. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  12. Effect of Sintering on Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Barrier Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai; PENG Hui; GUO Hongbo; GONG Shengkai

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are mostly applied to hot components of advanced turbine engines to insulate the components from hot gas.The effect of sintering on thermal conductivity and thermal barrier effects of conventional plasma sprayed and nanostructured yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are investigated.Remarkable increase in thermal conductivity occurs to both typical coatings after heat treatment.The change of porosity is just the opposite.The grain size of the nanostructured zirconia coating increases more drastically with annealing time compared to that of the conventional plasma sprayed coating,which indicates that coating sintering makes more contributions to the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured coating than that of the conventional coating.Thermal barrier effect tests using temperature difference technique are performed on both coatings.The thermal barrier effects decrease with the increase of thermal conductivity after heat treatment and the decline seems more drastic in low thermal conductivity range.The decline in thermal barrier effects is about 80 ℃for nanostructured coating after 100 h heat treatment,while the conventional coating reduces by less than 60 ℃ compared to the as-sprayed coating.

  13. Thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemens, P.G.; Gell, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Inst. of Materials Science

    1998-05-01

    In thermal barrier coatings and other ceramic oxides, heat is conducted by lattice waves, and also by a radiative component which becomes significant at high temperatures. The theory of heat conduction by lattice waves is reviewed in the equipartition limit (above room temperature). The conductivity is composed of contributions from a spectrum of waves, determined by the frequency dependent attenuation length. Interaction between lattice waves (intrinsic processes), scattering by atomic scale point defects and scattering by extended imperfections such as grain boundaries, each limit the attenuation length in different parts of the spectrum. Intrinsic processes yield a spectral conductivity which is independent of frequency. Point defects reduce the contribution of the high frequency spectrum, grain boundaries and other extended defects that of the low frequencies. These reductions are usually independent of each other. Estimates will be given for zirconia containing 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and for yttrium aluminum garnet. They will be compared to measurements. The effects of grain size, cracks and porosity will be discussed both for the lattice and the radiative components. While the lattice component of the thermal conductivity is reduced substantially by decreasing the grain size to nanometers, the radiative component requires pores or other inclusions of micrometer scale. (orig.) 9 refs.

  14. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  15. Advanced Thermal-Barrier Bond Coatings for Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secura, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    New and improved bond coatings developed for use in thermal-barrier systems on Ni, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. Use of these new bond coatings, containing ytterbium instead of yttrium, significantly increased lives of resultant thermal-barrier systems. Uses include many load-bearing applications in high-temperature, hostile environments.

  16. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W.

    1995-10-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70`s by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also provide protection. Roy Kamo introduced thermal barrier coatings in his `Adiabatic Diesel Engine` in the late 70`s. Kamo`s concept was to eliminate the engine block water cooling system and reduce heat losses. Roy reported significant performance improvements in his thermally insulated engine at the SAE Congress in 1982. Kamo`s work stimulates major programs with insulated engines, particularly in Europe. Most of the major diesel engine manufacturers conducted some level of test with insulated combustion chamber components. They initially ran into increased fuel consumption. The German engine consortium had Prof. Woschni of the Technical Institute in Munich. Woschni conducted testing with pistons with air gaps to provide the insulation effects. Woschni indicated the hot walls of the insulated engine created a major increase in heat transfer he refers to as `convection vive.` Woschni`s work was a major factor in the abrupt curtailment of insulated diesel engine work in continental Europe. Ricardo in the UK suggested that combustion should be reoptimized for the hot-wall effects of the insulated combustion chamber and showed under a narrow range of conditions fuel economy could be improved. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components.

  17. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70's by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also provide protection. Roy Kamo introduced thermal barrier coatings in his 'Adiabatic Diesel Engine' in the late 70's. Kamo's concept was to eliminate the engine block water cooling system and reduce heat losses. Roy reported significant performance improvements in his thermally insulated engine at the SAE Congress in 1982. Kamo's work stimulates major programs with insulated engines, particularly in Europe. Most of the major diesel engine manufacturers conducted some level of test with insulated combustion chamber components. They initially ran into increased fuel consumption. The German engine consortium had Prof. Woschni of the Technical Institute in Munich. Woschni conducted testing with pistons with air gaps to provide the insulation effects. Woschni indicated the hot walls of the insulated engine created a major increase in heat transfer he refers to as 'convection vive.' Woschni's work was a major factor in the abrupt curtailment of insulated diesel engine work in continental Europe. Ricardo in the UK suggested that combustion should be reoptimized for the hot-wall effects of the insulated combustion chamber and showed under a narrow range of conditions fuel economy could be improved. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the

  18. CFD-Guided Development of Test Rigs for Studying Erosion and Large-Particle Damage of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Kuczmarski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Burner rigs are routinely used to qualify materials for gas turbine applications. The most useful rig tests are those that can replicate, often in an accelerated manner, the degradation that materials experience in the engine. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD can be used to accelerate the successful development and continuous improvement of combustion burner rigs for meaningful materials testing. Rig development is typically an iterative process of making incremental modifications to improve the rig performance for testing requirements. Application of CFD allows many of these iterations to be done computationally before hardware is built or modified, reducing overall testing costs and time, and it can provide an improved understanding of how these rigs operate. This paper describes the use of CFD to develop burner test rigs for studying erosion and large-particle damage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs used to protect turbine blades from high heat fluxes in combustion engines. The steps used in this study—determining the questions that need to be answered regarding the test rig performance, developing and validating the model, and using it to predict rig performance—can be applied to the efficient development of other test rigs.

  19. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  20. New generation perovskite thermal barrier coating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, W.; Jarligo, M.O.; Mack, D.E.; Pitzer, D.; Malzbender, J.; Vassen, R.; Stoever, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Advanced ceramic materials of perovskite structure have been developed for potential application in thermal barrier coating systems, in an effort to improve the properties of the pre-existing ones like yttria stabilized zirconia. Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped strontium zirconate (SrZrO{sub 3}) and barium magnesium tantalate (Ba(Mg{sub 1/3}Ta{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}) of the ABO{sub 3} and complex A(B'{sub 1/3}B''{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} systems respectively, have been synthesized using ball milling prior to solid state sintering. Thermal and mechanical investigations show desirable properties for high temperature coating applications. On atmospheric plasma spraying, the newly developed TBCs reveal promising thermal cycle lifetime above 1300 C. (orig.)

  1. Fracture mechanism of a thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilenko, V. M.; Ravilov, R. G.; Drevnyak, V. V.; Petrova, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The fracture mechanism of the thermal barrier coating of gas turbine blades is studied. The causes of the fracture of the ceramic layer are discussed and the possible ways to increase the fatigue life of the thermal barrier coating are considered.

  2. Development and evaluation of aerogel-filled BMI sandwich panels for thermal barrier applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dineshkumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study details a fabrication methodology envisaged to manufacture Glass/BMI honeycomb core aerogel-filled sandwich panels. Silica aerogel granules are used as core fillers to provide thermal insulation properties with little weight increase. Experimental heat transfer studies are conducted on these panels to study the temperature distribution between their two surfaces. Numerical studies are also carried out to validate the results. Despite exhibiting good thermal shielding capabilities, the Glass/BMI sandwich panels are found to oxidise at 180 ºC if exposed directly to heat. In order to increase the temperature bearing capacity and the operating temperature range for these panels, a way of coating them from outside with high temperature spray paint was tried. With a silicone-based coating, the temperature sustainability of these sandwich panels is found to increase to 350 ºC. This proved the effectiveness of the formed manufacturing process, selected high temperature coating, the coating method as well as the envisaged sandwich panel concept.

  3. Extending Our Understanding of Compliant Thermal Barrier Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Jeffrey J.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal barriers and seals are integral components in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of nearly all aerospace vehicles. They are used to minimize the flow of hot gases through interfaces and protect underlying temperature-sensitive components and systems. Although thermal barriers have been used extensively on many aerospace vehicles, the factors affecting their thermal and mechanical performance are not well-understood. Because of this, vehicle TPS designers are often left with little guidance on how to properly design and optimize these barriers. An ongoing effort to better understand thermal barrier performance and develop models and design tools is in progress at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Testing has been conducted to understand the degree to which insulation density influences structural performance and permeability. In addition, the development of both thermal and mechanical models is ongoing with the goal of providing an improved ability to design and implement these critical TPS components.

  4. Wood-Based Paneling as Thermal Barriers,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Forest Panelingi as Products Laboratory Research Thermal Barriers Paper ’> FPL 408 10 C-D Li-J _ LzstZibutio iOse flh SQe.it s V 82 1012 048 |stract...this paper, a small scale horizontal exposure furnace test for testing thermal barriers over a calcium silicate board was added to the Uniform Building...Results," by Robert H. White. United States Department of - a eArclueWood-Based Agriculture Forest Paneling as Products Laboratory, Par Thermal Barriers PaperFPL

  5. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  6. Measurement of residual stress in thermally grown oxide layers in thermal barrier coating systems - development of non-destructive test methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, S.R.J.; Banks, J.P.; Chen, G.; Chunnilall, C.J. [National Physical Lab., Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    It is established that the adhesion of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is dependent upon the characteristics of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) that forms between the TBC (zirconia) and the corrosion resistant bond coat. Work has been carried using laser induced fluorescence out to investigate the properties of the TGO (normally alumina) as a function of ageing treatments. The zirconia layer is transparent to the laser light used and thus the laser light can cause fluorescence in the TGO layer present on the bondcoat, so that the method is non-destructive. Fluorescence in the TGO is caused by trace impurities of Cr in the alumina layer. The position of the spectral peaks generated is stress dependent so that residual stress in the TGO can be determined; the method is also known as piezospectroscopy. Residual stress maps were generated for an electron beam physical vapour deposited (EB-PVD) TBC that showed a large variation in residual stress over the surface of a coated sample. The two peaks generally associated with {alpha} alumina (R1 and R2) frequently appear as doublets with a high and low stress component. In addition, the presence of a metastable {theta}-alumina was detected in aged samples. It is believed that these observations can be related to incipient spallation of the TBC. The development of residual stress and the metastable oxide have been studied and correlated with the spallation behaviour of the TBC. Additionally, the intensity of the spectra has been shown to yield information about the Cr content of the TGO, and this in turn could also be used as an indication of the remaining life of the TBC system. (orig.)

  7. Improved metallic and thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1981-01-01

    Low thermal conductivity two layer ceramic coatings are efficient thermal barriers between cooled matallic components and high temperature combustion gases. Potential components are combustors, blades, and vanes in aircraft engines of power-generating turbines. Presence of two layer coatings greatly reduces temperature and coolant requirements.

  8. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  9. Cold Sprayed Intermetallic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchinsky, Evgeny

    Conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of a duplex structure with a metallic bond coat and a ceramic heat-isolative topcoat. Several recent research activities are concentrated on the development of improved multilayer bond coat and TBC materials. This study represents an investigation performed for the aluminum based bond coats, especially those with reduced thermal conductivities. Using alternative TBC materials, such as metal alloys and intermetallics, their processing methods can be further optimized to achieve the best thermal physical parameters. One example is the ten-layer system in which cold sprayed aluminum based intermetallics are synthesized. These systems demonstrated improved heat insulation and thermal fatigue capabilities compared to conventional TBC. The microstructures and properties of the laminar coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD; micromechanical and durability tests were performed to define the structure and coating formation mechanisms. Application prospects for HCCI engines are discussed. Fuel energy can be utilized more efficiently with the concept of low heat rejection engines with applied TBC.

  10. Development of a CuNiCrAl Bond Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings in Rocket Combustion Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Torben; Rösler, Joachim; Bäker, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The lifetime of rocket combustion chambers can be increased by applying thermal barrier coatings. The standard coating systems usually used in gas turbines or aero engines will fail at the bond coat/substrate interface due to the chemical difference as well as the different thermal expansion between the copper liner and the applied NiCrAlY bond coat. A new bond coat alloy for rocket engine applications was designed previously with a chemical composition and coefficient of thermal expansion more similar to the copper substrate. Since a comparable material has not been applied by thermal spraying before, coating tests have to be carried out. In this work, the new Ni-30%Cu-6%Al-5%Cr bond coat alloy is applied via high velocity oxygen fuel spraying. In a first step, the influence of different coating parameters on, e.g., porosity, amount of unmolten particles, and coating roughness is investigated and a suitable parameter set for further studies is chosen. In a second step, copper substrates are coated with the chosen parameters to test the feasibility of the process. The high-temperature behavior and adhesion is tested with laser cycling experiments. The new coatings showed good adhesion even at temperatures beyond the maximum test temperatures of the NiCrAlY bond coat in previous studies.

  11. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  12. Thermal barrier coatings for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive NASA-Lewis program of coating development for aircraft gas turbine blades and vanes is presented. Improved ceramic layer compositions are investigated, along the MCrAlY bond films and the methods of uniform deposition of the coatings; the thermomechanical and fuel impurity tolerance limits of the coatings are being studied. Materials include the ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY system; the effects of the bond coat and zirconia composition on coating life and Mach 1 burner rig test results are discussed. It is concluded that Diesel engines can also utilize thermal barrier coatings; they have been used successfully on piston crowns and exhaust valves of shipboard engines to combat lower grade fuel combustion corrosion.

  13. Development of a thermal fatigue test method for thermal barrier coatings by laser excitation using a laser thermal shock facility; Entwicklung eines Pruefverfahrens zur laserinduzierten thermischen Ermuedung thermischer Schutzschichten mittels einer Laser-Thermoschockpruefeinrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nies, Daniel

    2012-07-13

    The finite nature of fossil fuel supply and the growing environmental awareness become increasingly stronger motivations for the development of efficient gas turbines and jet engines for power generation or as engines for land-, sea- and water-based vehicles. One concept developed for this purpose are thermal barrier coatings, where the thermal load of components is reduced by applying a ceramic coating onto the components. In this work the possibility to use a laser thermal shock facility for thermo-cyclic testing of thermal barrier coatings is examined. A focused laser beam is used for heating the sample and a homogeneous temperature distribution on the sample surface is achieved by the used trajectory and radial adjusted laser power. The required improvements of the existing testing facility are explained, including the development of a new sample holder and of the testing and evaluation routines for the experiments. For the assessment of the initiation and evolution of damages, acoustic emission and thermographic methods are used. The possibilities and limits of these methods are assessed during the experiments. The work also includes an extensive temperature dependent characterisation of the ceramic material used for the thermal barrier coating. In this part, the measurement of the Young's modulus by a dynamic method is to be highlighted, as this is a rarely used technique. The characterisations show the expected values, except for a lower porosity as expected by the manufacturer and no significant phase changes during isothermal heat treatments. To reach sample surface temperatures above 1000 C, it is necessary to increase the absorption by an additional coating of magnetite. The temperature distribution on the surface is measured by an infrared camera, which is calibrated for this purpose. With the incorporated active air cooling of the sample backside, the temperature gradient can be controlled, but still leaves room for improvements. Already without

  14. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Delamination-Indicating Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of premature failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), typically composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), compromises the reliability of TBCs used to provide thermal protection for turbine engine components. Unfortunately, TBC delamination proceeds well beneath the TBC surface and cannot be monitored by visible inspection. Nondestructive diagnostic tools that could reliably probe the subsurface damage state of TBCs would alleviate the risk of TBC premature failure by indicating when the TBC needs to be replaced before the level of TBC damage threatens engine performance or safety. To meet this need, a new coating design for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that are self-indicating for delamination has been successfully implemented by incorporating a europium-doped luminescent sublayer at the base of a TBC composed of YSZ. The luminescent sublayer has the same YSZ composition as the rest of the TBC except for the addition of low-level europium doping and therefore does not alter TBC performance.

  16. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  17. Atlas V Launch Incorporated NASA Glenn Thermal Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    In the Spring of 2002, Aerojet experienced a major failure during a qualification test of the solid rocket motor that they were developing for the Atlas V Enhanced Expendable Launch Vehicle. In that test, hot combustion gas reached the O-rings in the nozzle-to-case joint and caused a structural failure that resulted in loss of the nozzle and aft dome sections of the motor. To improve the design of this joint, Aerojet decided to incorporate three braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The thermal barriers were used to block the searing-hot 5500 F pressurized gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-rings that seal the joint. Glenn originally developed the thermal barriers for the nozzle joints of the space shuttle solid rocket motors, and Aerojet decided to use them on the basis of the results of several successful ground tests of the thermal barriers in the shuttle rockets. Aerojet undertook an aggressive schedule to redesign the rocket nozzle-to-case joint with the thermal barriers and to qualify it in time for a launch planned for the middle of 2003. They performed two successful qualification tests (Oct. and Dec. 2002) in which the Glenn thermal barriers effectively protected the O-rings. These qualification tests saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in development costs and put the Lockheed-Martin/Aerojet team back on schedule. On July 17, 2003, the first flight of an Atlas V boosted with solid rocket motors successfully launched a commercial satellite into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Aero-jet's two 67-ft solid rocket boosters performed flawlessly, with each providing thrust in excess of 250,000 lbf. Both motors incorporated three Glenn-developed thermal barriers in their nozzle-to-case joints. The Cablevision satellite launched on this mission will be used to provide direct-to-home satellite television programming for the U.S. market starting in late 2003. The Atlas V is a product of the

  18. Behavior of nanoporous thermal barrier coatings under cyclic thermal loading. Computer-aided simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseenko, D. D., E-mail: mdd@ispms.tsc.ru; Maksimov, P. V., E-mail: mdd@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Sciences SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Panin, S. V., E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru; Panin, V. E., E-mail: paninve@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Sciences SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Berto, F., E-mail: berto@gest.unipd.it [University of Padua, Vicenza, 36100 Italy (Italy)

    2015-10-27

    The work presents the development of new algorithms for calculating the fraction of thermal energy dissipated during the irradiation on the inner surface of pores. On the basis of these algorithms, the simulation of heat transfer in three-layered systems was carried out taking into account the dissipation of thermal energy in specimens having different porosity. We have performed quantitative estimates of the portion of dissipating thermal energy and its influence on the distribution of thermal stresses in thermal barrier coating systems. It was demonstrated that the presence of pores with a large internal surface area in the intermediate layer material enables two-fold decrease of the internal thermal stresses.

  19. Vibration Analysis of Commercial Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    different thermal barrier coatings, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria stabilized zirconia; the confirmation that sweep rate does not cause data...coatings which have been extensively researched are discussed in this study: magnesium aluminate spinel (Blackwell, 2004; Ivancic, 2003; Reed, 2007...Reed, 2007). Objective In this study, the elastic modulus and loss factor will be evaluated for magnesium aluminate spinel with a NiCrAlY bond

  20. Multicomponent, Rare-Earth-Doped Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2005-01-01

    Multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type thermal-barrier coating materials have been developed in an effort to obtain lower thermal conductivity, greater phase stability, and greater high-temperature capability, relative to those of the prior thermal-barrier coating material of choice, which is yttria-partially stabilized zirconia. As used here, "thermal-barrier coatings" (TBCs) denotes thin ceramic layers used to insulate air-cooled metallic components of heat engines (e.g., gas turbines) from hot gases. These layers are generally fabricated by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition of the TBC materials onto the metal components. A TBC as deposited has some porosity, which is desirable in that it reduces the thermal conductivity below the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the fully dense form of the material. Undesirably, the thermal conductivity gradually increases because the porosity gradually decreases as a consequence of sintering during high-temperature service. Because of these and other considerations such as phase transformations, the maximum allowable service temperature for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia TBCs lies in the range of about 1,200 to 1,300 C. In contrast, the present multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type TBCs can withstand higher temperatures.

  1. Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings. ... entailing improved lifetime of the coating, but with a higher thermal conductivity. ... elasticity and its evolution with the temperature as well as thermal expansion, aiming at ...

  2. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the apparent thermal conductivity of the coating to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature and the scattering and absorption properties of the coating material. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can also be derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. The model prediction is found to have good agreement with experimental observations.

  3. Computational design and experimental validation of new thermal barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The focus of this project is on the development of a reliable and efficient ab initio based computational high temperature material design method which can be used to assist the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) bond-coat and top-coat design. Experimental evaluations on the new TBCs are conducted to confirm the new TBCs’ properties. Southern University is the subcontractor on this project with a focus on the computational simulation method development. We have performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics simulation on screening the top coats and bond coats for gas turbine thermal barrier coating design and validation applications. For experimental validations, our focus is on the hot corrosion performance of different TBC systems. For example, for one of the top coatings studied, we examined the thermal stability of TaZr2.75O8 and confirmed it’s hot corrosion performance.

  4. Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates for Rocket Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Jana; Fedorova, Tatiana; Bäker, Martin; Rösler, Joachim

    Currently a new generation of relaunchable space transportation system using liquid hydrogen/ liquid oxygen rocket engines is under development. The inner combustion chamber is exposed to extreme thermal loads and environmental attack during starts. To prevent failure of the cooling channels, a thermal barrier coating to provide thermal and oxidation protection could be applied. Thermal barrier coatings are state of the art for gas turbines and this concept should be transferred to copper substrates in rocket engine applications. The thermomechanical loading conditions are quite different from the gas turbine applications as heat fluxes and temperature gradients are much higher while overall service time is much shorter. As a start for optimization of a suitable coating, a material system known for gas turbines is employed. In this work a thermal barrier coating system is applied by atmospheric plasma spraying to the copper-based high strength alloy Cu-1%Cr-0.3%Zr. The bond coat consists of a NiCrAlY alloy, while partially stabilized zirconia is used as a top coat. Spraying parameter optimization for the new substrate is described. The reached coating system is tested in thermal cycling experiments, where no failure of the coating could be detected. In oxidation experiments good environmental protection of the coating is shown.

  5. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  6. Analytical investigation of thermal barrier coatings on advanced power generation gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical investigation of present and advanced gas turbine power generation cycles incorporating thermal barrier turbine component coatings was performed. Approximately 50 parametric points considering simple, recuperated, and combined cycles (including gasification) with gas turbine inlet temperatures from current levels through 1644K (2500 F) were evaluated. The results indicated that thermal barriers would be an attractive means to improve performance and reduce cost of electricity for these cycles. A recommended thermal barrier development program has been defined.

  7. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-11-09

    In the second year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings, our research has focused three topics: (1) Eu{sup 3+} doping for temperature sensing, (2) the effect of long-term, high-temperature aging on the characteristics of the luminescence from the Eu{sup 3+} ions of 8YSZ materials, (3) construction of a fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. It has been demonstrated that the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature is identical for electron-beam evaporated Eu-doped YSZ coatings as for bulk ceramics of the same composition. Experiments indicate that the luminescence lifetime method of measuring temperatures is sensitive up to 1150 C for both Eu-doped YSZ coatings and Eu-doped Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, the technique is sensitive up to 1250 C for the composition Eu{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The luminescence spectra Eu-doped YSZ are insensitive to long-term aging at high-temperatures, even to 195 hours at 1425 C, except for a small frequency shift that is probably too small in measure except with instruments of the highest spectral resolution. The temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, experiments are on-going to explore longer term exposures. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  8. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  9. Improving thermal barrier coatings by laser remelting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnez, C J; Gómez-García, J; Sevillano, F; Poza, P; Utrilla, M V

    2011-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are extensively used to protect metallic components in applications where the operating conditions include aggressive environment at high temperatures. These coatings are usually processed by thermal spraying techniques and the resulting microstructure includes thin and large splats, associated with the deposition of individual droplets, with porosity between splats. This porosity reduces the oxidation and corrosion resistance favouring the entrance of aggressive species during service. To overcome this limitation, the top coat could be modified by laser glazing reducing surface roughness and sealing open porosity. ZrO2(Y2O3) top coat and NiCrAlY bond coating were air plasma sprayed onto an Inconel 600 Ni base alloy. The top coat was laser remelted and a densified ceramic layer was induced in the top surface of the ceramic coating. This layer inhibited the ingress of aggressive species and delayed bond coat oxidation.

  10. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Propulsion Engine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments, and extend component lifetimes. For future high performance engines, the development of advanced ceramic barrier coating systems will allow these coatings to be used to simultaneously increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling requirements, thereby leading to significant improvements in engine power density and efficiency. In order to meet future engine performance and reliability requirements, the coating systems must be designed with increased high temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved thermal stress and erosion resistance. In this paper, ceramic coating design and testing considerations will be described for high temperature and high-heat-flux engine applications in hot corrosion and oxidation, erosion, and combustion water vapor environments. Further coating performance and life improvements will be expected by utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, and improved processing techniques, in conjunction with modeling and design tools.

  11. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  12. Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Glassy Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Julie Marie

    Engineering of alloys has for years allowed aircraft turbine engines to become more efficient and operate at higher temperatures. As advancements in these alloy systems have become more difficult, ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), often yttria (7 wt %) stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), have been utilized for thermal protection. TBCs have allowed for higher engine operating temperatures and better fuel efficiency but have also created new engineering problems. Specifically, silica based particles such as sand and volcanic ash that enter the engine during operation form glassy deposits on the TBCs. These deposits can cause the current industrial 7YSZ thermal barrier coatings to fail since the glass formed penetrates and chemically interacts with the TBC. When this occurs, coating failure may occur due to a loss of strain tolerance, which can lead to fracture, and phase changes of the TBC material. There have been several approaches used to stop calcium-magnesium aluminio-silcate (CMAS) glasses (molten sand) from destroying the entire TBC, but overall there is still limited knowledge. In this thesis, 7YSZ and new TBC materials will be examined for thermochemical and thermomechanical performance in the presence of molten CMAS and volcanic ash. Two air plasma sprayed TBCs will be shown to be resistant to volcanic ash and CMAS. The first type of coating is a modified 7YSZ coating with 20 mol% Al2O3 and 5 mol% TiO2 in solid solution (YSZ+20Al+5Ti). The second TBC is made of gadolinium zirconate. These novel TBCs impede CMAS and ash penetration by interacting with the molten CMAS or ash and drastically changing the chemistry. The chemically modified CMAS or ash will crystallize into an apatite or anorthite phase, blocking the CMAS or ash from further destroying the coating. A presented mechanism study will show these coatings are effective due to the large amount of solute (Gd, Al) in the zirconia structure, which is the key to creating the crystalline apatite or

  13. Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coating includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX, and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer, or a diameter of less than 5 microns. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate, and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of die invention, a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  14. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  15. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2014-04-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

  16. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2012-10-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DEFOA- 0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed Durability Test Rig.

  17. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2014-04-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

  18. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  19. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  20. Comparative study on effect of blending, thermal barrier coating (LHR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But proper deployment of blending the biodiesel with diesel and adopting thermal ... almost comparable engine performance with acceptable emission norms. ... Keywords: Uppage oil, biodiesel, thermal barrier coating, low heat rejection ...

  1. Next Generation Thermal Barrier Coatings for the Gas Turbine Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Nicholas; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Li, Xin-Hai; Tricoire, Aurélien; Dorfman, Mitch

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop the next generation of production ready air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating with a low conductivity and long lifetime. A number of coating architectures were produced using commercially available plasma spray guns. Modifications were made to powder chemistry, including high purity powders, dysprosia stabilized zirconia powders, and powders containing porosity formers. Agglomerated & sintered and homogenized oven spheroidized powder morphologies were used to attain beneficial microstructures. Dual layer coatings were produced using the two powders. Laser flash technique was used to evaluate the thermal conductivity of the coating systems from room temperature to 1200 °C. Tests were performed on as-sprayed samples and samples were heat treated for 100 h at 1150 °C. Thermal conductivity results were correlated to the coating microstructure using image analysis of porosity and cracks. The results show the influence of beneficial porosity on reducing the thermal conductivity of the produced coatings.

  2. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, T.A.; Johnsen, B.P.; Nagy, A.

    1995-10-01

    The paper reports on several years of mechanical testing of thermal barrier coatings. The test results were generated to support the development of durability models for the coatings in heat engine applications. The test data that are reviewed include modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data. The test methods and results are discussed, along with the significant difficulties inherent in mechanical testing of thermal barrier coating materials. The materials include 7 percent wt. and 8 percent wt. yttria, partially stabilized zirconia as well as a cermet material. Both low pressure plasma spray and electron-beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  3. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Johnsen, B. P.; Nagy, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on several years of mechanical testing of thermal barrier coatings. The test results were generated to support the development of durability models for the coatings in heat engine applications. The test data that are reviewed include modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data. The test methods and results are discussed, along with the significant difficulties inherent in mechanical testing of thermal barrier coating materials. The materials include 7 percent wt. and 8 percent wt. yttria, partially stabilized zirconia as well as a cermet material. Both low pressure plasma spray and electron-beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  4. Thermomechanical behavior of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J. P.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of coating porosity and thickness on the resistance to damage of yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings in an oxidizing environment by thermal cycling was evaluated. Hardness and elastic modulus of an as-processed porous coating were lower than those of a dense coating and the porous coating failed after fewer thermal cycles. Similarly, specimen with a thicker coating failed after fewer thermal cycles than specimen with a thinner coating. The earlier failure of the porous coating is due to lower fracture toughness and enhanced oxidation of the coating/substrate interface, whereas, the earlier failure of the thick coating is due to higher thermal transient stresses that developed in the coating during thermal cycling. Generally, an increase in coating density led to initial increase in both hardness and elastic modulus with increasing thermal cycles. However, hardness and density gradually decreased as the number of thermal cycles increase because of microcracks formation and growth. Microscopic observations indicated that the formation of multiple microcracks and their subsequent growth and coalescence led to final coating failure.

  5. TECHNOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A technology for formation of thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide has been developed in the paper. The paper investigates structures of phase composition and thermal stability of such developed coatings. Investigation results pertaining to formation of an oxide system ZrO2 – Y2O3, while using plasma spraying and subsequent high-energy processing, which allows to increase resistance of a thermal barrier coating to thermal cycling heat resistance of the coating at temperature of 1100 °C. This leads to longer protection of bottom layer against high-temperature exposure. The methodology is based on complex metallographic, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy investigations of structural elements in composite plasma coatings of the ZrO2 – Y2O system. Resistance of plasma coatings (Мe – Cr – Al – Y/ZrO2 – Y2O3-type, used as TBC to protect gas turbine engine blades under conditions of frequent thermal cyclings is limited by cleavage of an outer ceramic layer. Structural and electron microprobe investigations have shown that as a result of thermal cycling an outer atmosphere due to porous structure of the ceramic coating layer, migrates to the surface of lower metal coating, causing its oxidation. As a result, the metal-ceramic Al2O3 layer is formed at a metal-ceramic interface and it changes a stress state of the coating that causes a reduction of protective properties. Thus, a high heat resistance of thermal barrier coatings depends on processes occurring at the interface between metal and ceramic coating layers. A laser impact on samples with TBC leads to changes in the structure of the oxide layer of ZrO2 – Y2O3. In this case its initial surface characterized by considerable relief is significantly flattened due to processing and the coating is fractured and it is separated in fragments. As the oxide coating has low thermal conductivity, and the time of laser exposure is about 10–3 sec, a heat flux

  6. Healing particles in self-healing thermal barrier coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derelioglu, Z.; Anusuya Ponnusami, S.; Turteltaub, S.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Sloof, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Crack healing in ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) may be realized by embedding Mo-Si based particles in the thermal barrier coating. Upon cracking, these particles are exposed to oxygen that permeates through the top layer and the crack gap is filled with SiO2 which is produced from oxidation

  7. Enhancing thermal barrier coatings performance through reinforcement of ceramic topcoat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, V. I.; Giorbelidze, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies structure of thermal barrier coatings applied to hot gas path components in gas turbine engines and produced in a number of ways, and its impact on performance. Methods of structural reinforcement for ceramic topcoat in thermal barrier coatings are considered.

  8. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMAL SHOCK BEHAVIOR OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDERSON.A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available High temperature thermal cycling fatigue causes the breakdown of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBCsystems. This paper presents the development of thick TBCs, focusing attention on the microstructure of the Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ coating and Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ, in relation to its resistance to thermal cycling fatigue. Thick TBCs, were produced by means of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and Yttria Partially Stabilised Zirconia top coat or Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ, both sprayed by AtmosphericPlasma Spray process. The thermal fatigue resistance of new TBC systems and the evolution of the coatings before and after thermal cycling were evaluated. The limit of thermal fatigue resistance increases in the Zirconia ceria powder (Ce+YPSZ top coat.

  9. Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier coatings under thermal shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs under different cycles of thermal shock loading of 1100°C was investigated by the microscopic digital image correlation (DIC and micro-Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained results showed that, as the cycle number of the thermal shock loading increases, the evolution of the residual stress undergoes three distinct stages: a sharp increase, a gradual change, and a reduction. The extension stress near the TBC surface is fast transformed to compressive one through just one thermal cycle. After different thermal shock cycles with peak temperature of 1100°C, phase transformation in TBC does not happen, whereas the generation, development, evolution of the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer and micro-cracks are the main reasons causing the evolution regularity of the residual stress.

  10. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  11. The deformation and fracture of thick thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Husheng

    Plasma-sprayed thick thermal barrier coatings (TTBCs) are being developed for thermal protection of diesel engine components in high temperature service. Comparing to thin thermal barrier coatings used in gas turbine industry, increased thickness causes some TTBCs failure to occur within the bulk of the coating materials and away from the interface. This necessitated the study of mechanical properties of the coating materials independent of the substrate. In order to enhance the performance and to predict the life of TTBCs, we have to understand the materials response under multiaxial stress states, the deformation mechanisms, failure criteria, and the constitutive relations. In this study, the deformation behavior, the deformation mechanisms, and the failure criteria were investigated. The results shows that under combined axial and shear loading, thin walled tubular specimens of ceramic coatings failed in one of two modes, a tensile failure perpendicular to the maximum principal stress when s1≥sTf or a shear failure through the thickness when s3≤sCf . Two apparatuses for in situ SEM torsion and compression testing were developed for deformation mechanisms investigation. The deformation mechanisms were identified as tensile microcracking, crack closing, and crack sliding. A model has been developed for the constitution relation of functionally graded TTBCs. It is shown that with a few simple experiments, this model can be used to predict the cyclic deformation behavior of the functionally graded TTBCs.

  12. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  13. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  14. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  15. Effect of an Opaque Reflecting Layer on the Thermal Behavior of a Thermal Barrier Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric study using a two-flux approximation of the radiative transfer equation was performed to examine the effects of an opaque reflective layer on the thermal behavior of a typical semitransparent thermal barrier coating on an opaque substrate. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges where thermal radiation is important. Even with an opaque layer on each side of the semitransparent thermal barrier coating, scattering and absorption can have an effect on the heat transfer. In this work, a thermal barrier coating that is semitransparent up to a wavelength of 5 micrometers is considered. Above 5 micrometers wavelength, the thermal barrier coating is opaque. The absorption and scattering coefficient of the thermal barrier was varied. The thermal behavior of the thermal barrier coating with an opaque reflective layer is compared to a thermal barrier coating without the reflective layer. For a thicker thermal barrier coating with lower convective loading, which would be typical of a combustor liner, a reflective layer can significantly decrease the temperature in the thermal barrier coating and substrate if the scattering is weak or moderate and for strong scattering if the absorption is large. The layer without the reflective coating can be about as effective as the layer with the reflective coating if the absorption is small and the scattering strong. For low absorption, some temperatures in the thermal barrier coating system can be slightly higher with the reflective layer. For a thin thermal barrier coating with high convective loading, which would be typical of a blade or vane that sees the hot sections of the combustor, the reflective layer is not as effective. The reflective layer reduces the surface temperature of the reflective layer for all conditions considered. For weak and moderate scattering, the temperature of the TBC-substrate interface is reduced but for strong scattering, the temperature of the substrate is increased

  16. TBCs for better engine efficiency. [thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, William J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    State-of-the-art thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) developed for aircraft engines can achieve both hot-section component operating temperature reductions and superior oxidation resistance. Such TBCs typically consist of two layers: a metallic, often NiCrAlY 'bond' inner layer in contact with the superalloy structural component, and an outer, insulating ceramic layer. A ceramic frequently used in this role due to its high durability is plasma-sprayed ZrO2, partially stabilized with 6-8 wt pct Y2O3. TBCs can also be useful in nonaircraft gas turbines, which frequently use highly contaminated fuels.

  17. Wavelet analysis of acoustic emission signals from thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; ZHOU Yi-chun

    2006-01-01

    The wavelet transform is applied to the analysis of acoustic emission signals collected during tensile test of the ZrO2-8% Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The acoustic emission signals are de-noised using the Daubechies discrete wavelets,and then decomposed into different wavelet levels using the programs developed by the authors. Each level is examined for its specific frequency range. The ratio of energy in different levels to the total energy gives information on the failure modes (coating micro-failures and substrate micro-failures) associated with TBCs system.

  18. Processing, characterization, and properties of some novel thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Amol D.

    The efficacy of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used to protect and to insulate metal components in engines increases with the thickness of the TBCs. However, the durabilities of thick TBCs deposited using conventional ceramic-coating deposition methods have not been adequate. Here the feasibility of depositing highly durable thick TBCs (1.5 to 4 mm thickness) of ZrO 2-7 wt.% Y2O3 (7YSZ) on bond-coated superalloy substrates using the solution-precursor plasma spray (SPPS) method has been demonstrated. Thermal cyclic durabilities of the thick SPPS TBCs have been shown to be much superior compared to TBCs deposited using the conventional air-plasma-spray (APS) process. To evaluate the performance of thick APS and SPPS TBCs, mechanical properties of free-standing coatings and coating/substrate interfaces have been determined experimentally. Additional evaluation of TBC performance has been obtained from studies of damage and development of thermally grown oxide (TGO) at the interface as a result of thermal cycling. The later results are used to suggest mechanisms of chemical failure of TGO in thick plasma-sprayed TBCs. Based on the experimental results and numerical analysis of the TBC residual stresses, the dramatic improvement in the thermal cycling life in the SPPS TBCs is attributed to superior mechanical properties of SPPS coatings. The presence of the strain tolerant vertical cracks in SPPS TBCs reduces the driving force for TBC spallation under mode-II loading. Additionally, high in-plane fracture toughness in the SPPS TBCs under mode-I loading delays the TBC spallation significantly. Finally, thermal conductivity of the SPPS TBCs has been reduced by microstructural tailoring. Analytical and object-oriented finite element (OOF) models have been used to analyze the experimental thermal conductivity data, and to predict thermal conductivities of engineered TBCs.

  19. Microstructural Evolution and Residual Stresses of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyoun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Cho, Hyun; Yi, Dong-Kee; Paik, Ungyu

    Microstructural evolution and fracture behavior of zirconia (ZrO2)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated under thermal exposure. New ZrO2 granule with 8 wt.% yttria (Y2O3) with a deformed hollow morphology was developed through a spray drying process and employed to prepare TBCs. The thermal exposure tests were conducted at 1210°C with a dwell time of 100 h till 800 h. The residual stress at the interface between top coat and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was measured using a nanoindentation technique before and after thermal exposure. Vertical cracks on the top coat were newly formed and interlamellar cracks at the interface were enhanced after the thermal exposure of 800 h. Especially, partial delamination was observed at the interface after the thermal exposure of 800 h in TBC samples tested. The microstructural evolution in the top coat could be defined through load-displacement curves, showing a higher load or a less displacement after the thermal exposure of 800 h. The stress state was strongly dependent on the TGO geometry, resulting in the compressive stresses at the "valleys" or the "troughs," and the tensile stresses at the "crests" or peak areas, in the ranges of -500 to -75 MPa and of +168 to + 24 MPa, respectively. These stress terms incorporated with resintering during thermal exposure affected the mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the top coat.

  20. Thermal barrier coating on high temperature industrial gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N.; Stoner, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal barrier coating used was a yttria stabilized zirconia material with a NiCrAlY undercoat, and the base engine used to establish improvements was the P&WA FT50A-4 industrial gas turbine engine. The design benefits of thermal barrier coatings include simplified cooling schemes and the use of conventional alloys in the engine hot section. Cooling flow reductions and improved heating rates achieved with thermal barrier coating result in improved performance. Economic benefits include reduced power production costs and reduced fuel consumption. Over the 30,000 hour life of the thermal barrier coated parts, fuel savings equivalent to $5 million are projected and specific power (megawatts/mass of engine airflow) improvements on the order of 13% are estimated.

  1. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  2. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TRANSPARENT BARRIER MODIFIED WITH ORGANIC PCMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał MUSIAŁ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources are increasingly often applied in civil engineering as a mean to reduce buildings energy demand for heating. One of the ways to reduce HVAC energy demand is to limit heat transfer and excessive solar gain through building's glazed barriers. Preliminary results of the research conducted on organic PCM-modified transparent barrier are presented in this paper. Multiple publications concerning PCMs application in structural materials have recently appeared. Most of them are focused on modification of structure of non-transparent sections of buildings' envelope. Augmenting a glazed barrier with PCMs increases its heat capacity and thermal resistance. The most important feature of the assembly is the thermal buffer, a product of PCM's considerable value of specific latent heat. Research were conducted on a triple-pane transparent rectangular barrier, that constituted one of the faces of cubic chamber. Internal volume of the chamber was 1m3. The applied PCM was a mixture of saturated and non-saturated hydrocarbons. The described assembly was subjected to temperature and radiation that occur in Poland during winter. Glazing temperature, melted/total PCM ratio were measured, as well as energy demand for keeping internal temperature at constant level. Measurements were made in steady states, for various PCM layer thickness. The influence of the modification on energy demand was determined, along with the most effective and rational thickness of PCM layer to be applied. Conducted research enabled to develop a basis for further investigation of PCMs application in civil engineering.

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Thermal Stresses in Ceramic/Metal Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING Pingshun; XIAO Jinsheng; LIU Jie; ZHOU Xiaoqin

    2005-01-01

    This paper studied the thermal stresses of ceramic/metal gradient thermal barrier coating which combines the conceptions of ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and functionally gradient material (FGM). Thermal stresses and residual thermal stresses were calculated by an ANSYS finite element analysis software. Negative thermal expansion coefficient method was proposed and element birth and death method was applied to analyze the residual thermal stresses which have non-uniform initial temperature field. The numerical results show a good agreement with the analytical results and the experimental results.

  5. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2011-12-31

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

  6. Thermal Conductivity Analysis and Lifetime Testing of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Curry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Suspension plasma spraying (SPS has become an interesting method for the production of thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine components. The development of the SPS process has led to structures with segmented vertical cracks or column-like structures that can imitate strain-tolerant air plasma spraying (APS or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD coatings. Additionally, SPS coatings can have lower thermal conductivity than EB-PVD coatings, while also being easier to produce. The combination of similar or improved properties with a potential for lower production costs makes SPS of great interest to the gas turbine industry. This study compares a number of SPS thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with vertical cracks or column-like structures with the reference of segmented APS coatings. The primary focus has been on lifetime testing of these new coating systems. Samples were tested in thermo-cyclic fatigue at temperatures of 1100 °C for 1 h cycles. Additional testing was performed to assess thermal shock performance and erosion resistance. Thermal conductivity was also assessed for samples in their as-sprayed state, and the microstructures were investigated using SEM.

  7. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  8. Optical Diagnostics for High-Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments, such as in jet turbine engines. Taking advantage of the translucent nature of TBCs, optical diagnostics have been developed that can provide an informed assessment of TBC health that will allow mitigating action to be taken before TBC degradation threatens performance or safety. In particular, rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers have been integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence that monitors TBC erosion, delamination, and temperature gradients. Erosion monitoring of TBC-coated specimens is demonstrated by utilizing visible luminescence that is excited from a sublayer that is exposed by erosion. TBC delamination monitoring is achieved in TBCs with a base rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer by the reflectance-enhanced increase in luminescence produced in regions containing buried delamination cracks. TBC temperature monitoring is demonstrated using the temperature-dependent decay time for luminescence originating from the specific coating depth associated with a rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers is discussed, including co-doping strategies to produce more penetrating near-infrared luminescence. It is demonstrated that integration of the rare-earth-doped sublayers is achieved with no reduction in TBC life. In addition, results for multilayer TBCs designed to also perform as radiation barriers are also presented.

  9. Microlaminate composites: An alternate approach to thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunshah, R. F.; Deshpandey, C. V.; Obrien, B. P.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings suffer from a major drawback, i.e., brittle behavior. An alternate approach is microlaminate composite coatings consisting of alternate layers of metal and oxide. As the thickness of the individual laminae decrease while keeping the total thickness of the coating constant, the thermal conductivity drops markedly. Data on the Fe-Cu system will be presented. A model is proposed for an MCrAlY-Al2O3 microlaminate coating for thermal barriers. The methods of fabrication will also be discussed.

  10. Noncontacting Laser Inspection System for Dimensional Profiling of Space Application Thermal Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shawn C.

    2011-01-01

    A noncontacting, two-dimensional (2-D) laser inspection system has been designed and implemented to dimensionally profile thermal barriers being developed for space vehicle applications. In a vehicle as-installed state, thermal barriers are commonly compressed between load sensitive thermal protection system (TPS) panels to prevent hot gas ingestion through the panel interface during flight. Loads required to compress the thermal barriers are functions of their construction, as well as their dimensional characteristics relative to the gaps in which they are installed. Excessive loads during a mission could damage surrounding TPS panels and have catastrophic consequences. As such, accurate dimensional profiling of thermal barriers prior to use is important. Due to the compliant nature of the thermal barriers, traditional contact measurement techniques (e.g., calipers and micrometers) are subjective and introduce significant error and variability into collected dimensional data. Implementation of a laser inspection system significantly enhanced the method by which thermal barriers are dimensionally profiled, and improved the accuracy and repeatability of collected data. A statistical design of experiments study comparing laser inspection and manual caliper measurement techniques verified these findings.

  11. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivathsa B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  12. Influence of creep and cyclic oxidation in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Philipp; Baeker, Martin; Roesler, Joachim [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe

    2012-01-15

    The lifetime of thermal barrier coating systems is limited by cracks close to the interfaces, causing delamination. To study the failure mechanisms, a simplified model system is analysed which consists of a bond-coat bulk material, a thermally grown oxide, and an yttria-stabilised zirconia topcoat. The stresses in the model system are calculated using a finite element model which covers the simulation of full thermal cycles, creep in all layers, and the anisotropic oxidation during dwelling. Creep in the oxide and the thermal barrier coating is varied with the use of different creep parameter sets. The influence of creep in the bondcoat is analysed by using two different bond-coat materials: fast creeping Fecralloy and slow creeping oxide dispersion strengthened MA956. It is shown that creep in the bondcoat influences the lifetime of the coatings. Furthermore, a fast creeping thermally grown oxide benefits the lifetime of the coating system. (orig.)

  13. Application of Rare Earths in Thermal Barrier Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqiang CAO

    2007-01-01

    Rare earths are a series of minerals with special properties that make them essential for applications including miniaturized electronics, computer hard disks, display panels, missile guidance, pollution controlling catalysts,H2-storage and other advanced materials. The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has the potential to extend the working temperature and the life of a gas turbine by providing a layer of thermal insulation between the metallic substrate and the hot gas. Yttria (Y2O3), as one of the most important rare earth oxides, has already been used in the typical TBC material YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia). In the development of the TBC materials, especially in the latest ten years, rare earths have been found to be more and more important. All the new candidates of TBC materials contain a large quantity of rare earths, such as R2Zr2O7 (R=La, Ce, Nd,Gd), CeO2-YSZ, RMeAI11O19 (R=La, Nd; Me=Mg, Ca, Sr) and LaPO4. The concept of double-ceramiclayer coatings based on the rare earth materials and YSZ is effective for the improvement of the thermal shock life of TBCs at high temperature.

  14. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  15. Monitoring Local Strain in a Thermal Barrier Coating System Under Thermal Mechanical Gas Turbine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manero, Albert; Sofronsky, Stephen; Knipe, Kevin; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Raghavan, Seetha; Bartsch, Marion

    2015-07-01

    Advances in aircraft and land-based turbine engines have been increasing the extreme loading conditions on traditional engine components and have incited the need for improved performance with the use of protective coatings. These protective coatings shield the load-bearing super alloy blades from the high-temperature combustion gases by creating a thermal gradient over their thickness. This addition extends the life and performance of blades. A more complete understanding of the behavior, failure mechanics, and life expectancy for turbine blades and their coatings is needed to enhance and validate simulation models. As new thermal-barrier-coated materials and deposition methods are developed, strides to effectively test, evaluate, and prepare the technology for industry deployment are of paramount interest. Coupling the experience and expertise of researchers at the University of Central Florida, The German Aerospace Center, and Cleveland State University with the world-class synchrotron x-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory, the synergistic collaboration has yielded previously unseen measurements to look inside the coating layer system for in situ strain measurements during representative service loading. These findings quantify the in situ strain response on multilayer thermal barrier coatings and shed light on the elastic and nonelastic properties of the layers and the role of mechanical load and internal cooling variations on the response. The article discusses the experimental configuration and development of equipment to perform in situ strain measurements on multilayer thin coatings and provides an overview of the achievements thus far.

  16. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Infiltration and Cyclic Degradations of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Smialek, Jim; Miller, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop higher temperature capable turbine thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) resistance of the advanced coating systems needs to be evaluated and improved. This paper highlights some of NASA past high heat flux testing approaches for turbine thermal and environmental barrier coatings assessments in CMAS environments. One of our current emphases has been focused on the thermal barrier - environmental barrier coating composition and testing developments. The effort has included the CMAS infiltrations in high temperature and high heat flux turbine engine like conditions using advanced laser high heat flux rigs, and subsequently degradation studies in laser heat flux thermal gradient cyclic and isothermal furnace cyclic testing conditions. These heat flux CMAS infiltration and related coating durability testing are essential where appropriate CMAS melting, infiltration and coating-substrate temperature exposure temperature controls can be achieved, thus helping quantify the CMAS-coating interaction and degradation mechanisms. The CMAS work is also playing a critical role in advanced coating developments, by developing laboratory coating durability assessment methodologies in simulated turbine engine conditions and helping establish CMAS test standards in laboratory environments.

  17. Evaluation of hot corrosion behavior of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, P. E.; Miller, R. A.; Gedwill, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Calcium silicate and yttria stabilized zirconia/MCrAlY thermal barrier coating systems on air-cooled specimens were exposed to sodium plus vanadium doped Mach 0.3 combustion gases. Thermal barrier coating endurance was determined to be a strong inverse function of ceramic coating thickness. Coating system durability was increased through the use of higher Cr + Al NiCrAl and CoCrAlY bond coatings. Chemical and electron microprobe analyses supported the predictions of condensate compositions and the determination of their roles in causing spalling of the ceramic coatings.

  18. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  19. Effect of Plasma Pretreatment on Thermal Durability of Thermal Barrier Coatings in Cyclic Thermal Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Won Myoung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma pretreatment on the top and bond coats was performed and its influence on the thermal durability of thermal barrier coating (TBC system was investigated through cyclic thermal exposure. Two types of bond coat were prepared by different methods, namely, air plasma spray (APS and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF, and two kinds of feedstock powder were employed for preparing the top coat in APS process. The better thermal durability was achieved in the vertically cracked TBC with the surface modified bond coat or with the bond coat prepared by APS process. The hardness and fracture toughness values of TBCs increased because of densification of the top coat during cyclic thermal exposure, and the bond coat prepared by HVOF process showed higher values than that by APS process. The TBCs with the surface modified bond coat were more efficient in improving adhesive strength than those without plasma pretreatment on the bond coat. The relationship between microstructure evolution and thermomechanical characteristics of TBCs with plasma pretreatment was discussed in cyclic thermal exposure.

  20. Microstructural aspects of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, T. E.; Suhr, D. S.; Keller, R. J.; Lanteri, V.; Heuer, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Various combination of plasma-sprayed bond coatings and zirconia ceramic coatings on a nickel-based superalloy substrate were tested by static thermal exposure at 1200 C and cyclic thermal exposure to 1000 C. The bond coats were based on Ni-Cr-Al alloys with additions of rare earth elements and Si. The ceramic coats were various ZrO2-Y2O3 compositions, of which the optimum was found to be ZrO2-8.9 wt percent Y2O3. Microstructural analysis showed that resistance to cracking during thermal exposure is strongly related to deleterious phase changes. Zones depleted of Al formed at the bond coat/ceramic coat interface due to oxidation and at the bond coat/substrate interface due to interdiffusion, leading eventually to breakdown of the bond coat. The 8.9 percent Y2O3 coating performed best because the as-sprayed metastable tetragonal phase converted slowly into the low-Y2O3 tetragonal plus high-Y2O3 cubic-phase mixture, so that the deleterious monoclinic phase was inhibited from forming. Failure appeared to start with the formation of circumferential cracks in the zirconia, probably due to compressive stresses during cooling, followed by the formation of radial cracks due to tensile stresses during heating. Cracks appeared to initiate at the Al2O3 scale/bond coat interface and propagate through the zirconia coating. Comparisons were made with the behavior of bulk ZrO2-Y2O3 and the relationship between the microstructure of the tetragonal phase and the phase diagram. A separate investigation was also made of the ZrO2-Al2O3 interface.

  1. Hypersonic propulsion - Breaking the thermal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The challenges of hypersonic propulsion impose unique features on the hypersonic vehicle - from large volume requirements to contain cryogenic fuel to airframe-integrated propulsion required to process sufficient quantities of air. Additional challenges exist in the design of the propulsion module that must be capable of efficiently processing air at very high enthalpies, adding and mixing fuel at supersonic speeds and expanding the exhaust products to generate thrust greater than drag. The paper explores the unique challenges of the integrated hypersonic propulsion system, addresses propulsion cycle selection to cope with the severe thermal environment and reviews the direction of propulsion research at hypervelocity speeds.

  2. Ceramic Thermal Barriers For Dirty-Fuel Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Report discusses performances of ceramic thermal-barrier coating materials for use in electric-utility gas-turbine engines. Variations of standard coating evaluated in search for coating resistant to dirty fuel. Variations included alterations of level of yttria, replacement of yttria by other stabilizers, controlling surface density (by plasma spray processing, infiltration, laser glazing, or sputtering), and interface treatments.

  3. Evaluation of the Lifetime and Thermal Conductivity of Dysprosia-Stabilized Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Nicholas; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Östergren, Lars; Li, Xin-Hai; Dorfman, Mitch

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was the further development of dysprosia-stabilized zirconia coatings for gas turbine applications. The target for these coatings was a longer lifetime and higher insulating performance compared to today's industrial standard thermal barrier coating. Two morphologies of ceramic top coat were studied: one using a dual-layer system and the second using a polymer to generate porosity. Evaluations were carried out using a laser flash technique to measure thermal properties. Lifetime testing was conducted using thermo-cyclic fatigue testing. Microstructure was assessed with SEM and Image analysis was used to characterize porosity content. The results show that coatings with an engineered microstructure give performance twice that of the present reference coating.

  4. Environmental/Thermal Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites: Thermal Tradeoff Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. M.; Brewer, David; Shah, Ashwin R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent interest in environmental/thermal barrier coatings (EBC/TBCs) has prompted research to develop life-prediction methodologies for the coating systems of advanced high-temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Heat-transfer analysis of EBC/TBCs for CMCs is an essential part of the effort. It helps establish the resulting thermal profile through the thickness of the CMC that is protected by the EBC/TBC system. This report documents the results of a one-dimensional analysis of an advanced high-temperature CMC system protected with an EBC/TBC system. The one-dimensional analysis was used for tradeoff studies involving parametric variation of the conductivity; the thickness of the EBC/TBCs, bond coat, and CMC substrate; and the cooling requirements. The insight gained from the results will be used to configure a viable EBC/TBC system for CMC liners that meet the desired hot surface, cold surface, and substrate temperature requirements.

  5. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Simonen, E.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kalinen, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany). International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Team; Terlain, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Service de la Corrosion, d`Electrochimie et Chimie des Fluides

    1994-06-01

    A review of hydrogen permeation barriers that can be applied to structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Li17-Pb blanket designs, although barriers also appear necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers that provide greater than a 1000 fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors, PRFS, from 1000 to over 100,000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison to laboratory experiments, i.e., <150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the REID enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower permeation reduction factors during in-reactor experiments.

  6. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  7. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  8. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  9. Thermal Shock Property of Al/Ni-ZrO2 Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANJin-juan; WANGQuan-sheng; ZHANGWei-fang

    2004-01-01

    Al/Ni-ZrO2 gradient thermal barrier coatings are made on aluminum substrate using plasma spraying method and one direction thermal shock properties of the coatings are studied in this paper. The results show that pores in coatings link to form cracks vertical to coating surface. They go through the whole ZrO2 coating once vertical cracks form. When thermal shock cycles increase, horizontal cracks that result in coatings failure forms in the coatings and interface. And vertical cracks delay appearance of horizontal cracks and enhance thermal shock property of coatings. Failure mechanisms of coating thermal shock are discussed using experiments and finite element method.

  10. Thermal Shock Property of Al/Ni-ZrO2 Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jin-juan; WANG Quan-sheng; ZHANG Wei-fang

    2004-01-01

    Al/Ni-ZrO2 gradient thermal barrier coatings are made on aluminum substrate using plasma spraying method and one direction thermal shock properties of the coatings are studied in this paper. The results show that pores in coatings link to form cracks vertical to coating surface. They go through the whole ZrO2 coating once vertical cracks form. When thermal shock cycles increase, horizontal cracks that result in coatings failure forms in the coatings and interface. And vertical cracks delay appearance of horizontal cracks and enhance thermal shock property of coatings. Failure mechanisms of coating thermal shock are discussed using experiments and finite element method.

  11. Laser drilling of thermal barrier coated jet-engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, H. K.

    Aero engine hot end components are often covered with ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). Laser drilling in the TBC coated components can be a source of service life TBC degradation and spallation. The present study aims to understand the mechanisms of TBC delamination and develop techniques to drill holes without damaging the TBC, Nimonic 263 workpieces coated with TBC are used in the experiments. Microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) is employed to monitor the integrity of the coating /substrate interfaces of the post-laser drilled materials. A numerical modelling technique is used to investigate the role of melt ejection on TBC delamination. The model accounts for the vapour and the assist gas flow effects in the process. Broadly, melt ejection induced mechanical stresses for the TBC coating / bond coating and thermal effects for the bond coating / substrate interfaces are found the key delamination mechanisms. Experiments are carried out to validate the findings from the model. Various techniques that enable laser drilling without damaging the TBC are demonstrated. Twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling is one successful technique that has been analysed using the melt ejection simulation. Optimisation of the twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling process parameters is carried out using Design of Experiments (DoE) and statistical modelling approaches. Finally, an industrial case study to develop a high speed, high quality laser drilling system for combustor cans is described. Holes are drilled by percussion and trepan drilling in TBC coated and uncoated Haynes 230 workpieces. The production rate of percussion drilling is significantly higher than the trepan drilling, however metallurgical hole quality and reproducibility is poor. A number of process parameters are investigated to improve these characteristics. Gas type and gas pressure effects on various characteristics of the inclined laser drilled holes are investigated through theoretical

  12. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  13. Aspects of fatigue life in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, H.

    2001-08-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are applied on hot components in airborne and land based gas turbines when higher turbine inlet temperature, meaning better thermal efficiency, is desired. The TBC is mainly applied to protect underlying material from high temperatures, but also serves as a protection from the aggressive corrosive environment. Plasma sprayed coatings are often duplex TBC's with an outer ceramic top coat (TC) made from partially stabilised zirconia - ZrO{sub 2} + 6-8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Below the top coat there is a metallic bond coat (BC). The BC is normally a MCrAlX coating (M=Ni, Co, Fe... and X=Y, Hf, Si ... ). In gas turbine components exposed to elevated temperatures nickel-based superalloys are commonly adopted as load carrying components. In the investigations performed here a commercial wrought Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 has been used as substrate for the TBC. As BC a NiCoCrAlY serves as a reference material and in all cases 7% Yttria PS zirconia has been used. Phase development and failure mechanisms in APS TBC during service-like conditions, have been evaluated in the present study. This is done by combinations of thermal cycling and low cycle fatigue tests. The aim is to achieve better knowledge regarding how, when and why thermal barrier coatings fail. As a final outcome of the project a model capable of predicting fatigue life of a given component will help engineers and designers of land based gas turbines for power generation to better optimise TBC's. In the investigations it is seen that TBC life is strongly influenced by oxidation of the BC and interdiffusion between BC and the substrate. The bond coat is known to oxidise with time at high temperature. The initial oxide found during testing is alumina. With increased time at high temperature Al is depleted from the bond coat due to inter-diffusion and oxidation. Oxides others than alumina start to form when the Al content is reduced below a critical limit. It is here believed

  14. Thermal barrier coatings for diesel engine exhaust applications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The strive to increase the engine efficiency in terms of fuel consumption and lower emissions have lead to higher demands on materials. In this thesis five different thermal barrier coatings applied using air plasma spraying to three materials commonly used for exhaust application are evaluated. This thesis work was done at Scania CV in Södertälje with main focus on evaluation during thermal cycling. The goal of this thesis is to evaluate the coatings and correlate their behaviour to their ch...

  15. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  16. Elastic behaviour of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbrech, R.W.; Frahm, J.; Herzog, R.; Schubert, F. [Inst. for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The elastic behaviour of air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of 8 wt.% yttria stabilised zirconia was studied using various mechanical tests with global and local resolution. Results are presented, which reveal the complex relationship between lamellar APS-microstructure and stiffness and illustrate scaling aspects. Also the influence of residual stresses is addressed. The obtained stiffness values for as-sprayed TBCs show a systematic variation between 10 and 100 GPa. Typically results from bending tests of free-standing TBCs are at the low end, whereas results from depth sensitive indentation tests with TBCs bonded to a substrate are found at the high end. When heat treated above 950 C the TBCs exhibit a rapid increase in stiffness which can be attributed to defect healing within the spraying lamellae. Discussion of the results focuses on the implications of a non-uniform stiffness modulus for the mechanical characterisation of thermal barrier systems. (orig.)

  17. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

  18. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  19. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  20. Deterioration of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades by Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Swar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single-stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests were performed to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity, and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two-stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDFs were developed to represent experimentally based correlations for particle surface interaction models and TBC erosion rates models. UDFs were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics and TBC erosion rates on the blade surfaces. Computational results are presented in a commercial turbine and a NASA-designed automotive turbine. The similarities between the erosion patterns in the two turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5% of the stator blade span to represent the flow cooling of the combustor liner.

  1. Sand effects on thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael; Barnett, Blake; Ghoshal, Anindya; Murugan, Muthuvel; Swab, Jeffrey; Pepi, Marc; Hopkins, David; Gazonas, George; Kerner, Kevin

    Accumulation and infiltration of molten/ semi-molten sand and subsequent formation of calcia-magnesia-alumina-silicate (CMAS) deposits in gas turbine engines continues to be a significant problem for aviation assets. This complex problem is compounded by the large variations in the composition, size, and topology of natural sands, gas generator turbine temperatures, thermal barrier coating properties, and the incoming particulate's momentum. In order to simplify the materials testing process, significant time and resources have been spent in the development of synthetic sand mixtures. However, there is debate whether these mixtures accurately mimic the damage observed in field-returned engines. With this study, we provide a direct comparison of CMAS deposits from both natural and synthetic sands. Using spray deposition techniques, 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings are deposited onto bond-coated, Ni-superalloy discs. Each sample is coated with a sand slurry, either natural or synthetic, and exposed to a high temperature flame for 1 hour. Test samples are characterized before and after flame exposure. In addition, the test samples will be compared to field-returned equipment. This research was sponsored by the US Army Research Laboratory, and was accomplished under Cooperative Agreement # W911NF-12-2-0019.

  2. Optimization of the NiCrAl-Y/ZrO-Y2O3 thermal barrier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of bond and thermal barrier coating compositions, thicknesses, and densities on air plasma spray deposited Ni-Cr-Al-Y/ZrO2-Y2O3 life were evaluated in cyclic furnace oxidation tests at temperatures from 1110 to 1220 C. An empirical relation was developed to give life as a function of the above parameters. The thermal barrier system tested which had the longest life consisted of Ni-35.0 wt% Cr-5.9 wt% Al-0.95 wt% Y bond coating and ZrO2-6.1 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating.

  3. Evaluation of properties and thermal stress field for thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 齐红宇; 杨晓光; 李旭

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal stress field of the hot section with thermal barrier coating (TBCs), the thermal conductivity and elastic modulus of top-coat are the physical key properties. The porosity of top-coat was tested and evaluated under different high temperatures. The relationship between the microstructure (porosity of top-coat) and properties of TBCs were analyzed to predict the thermal properties of ceramic top-coat, such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The temperature and stress field of the vane with TBCs were simulated using two sets of thermal conductivity data and elastic modulus, which are from literatures and this work, respectively. The results show that the temperature and stress distributions change with thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The differences of maximum temperatures and stress are 6.5% and 8.0%, respectively.

  4. Curvature behaviour of multilayer specimens of thermal barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandin, G.; Bruenings, S.E.; Steinbrech, R.W.; Singheiser, L. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe und Verfahren der Energietechnik

    2000-07-01

    The impact of residual stresses on the elastic and plastic deformation behavior of plasma sprayed and physical vapor deposited thermal barrier systems was studied. In particular, multilayer specimen strips composed of plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia, oxidation resistant NiCoCrAlY bond-coat and Ni-based superalloy substrate were tested. The experiments focused on the in-situ observation of specimen curvature during thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 C. The mechanical response of specimens with different layer thickness was analyzed with a thermoelastic model to derive elastic modulus and thermal expansion of the ceramic top coat, both parameters as a function of temperature. With the thermoelastic data of all three layers, the residual stress distribution could be calculated analytically. The results of the two coating variants are compared. The deviation from thermoelastic behavior at higher temperature is discussed in terms of stress relaxation in the bond coat due to plastic deformation. (orig.)

  5. Advanced Oxide Material Systems for 1650 C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are being developed for low-emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor and vane applications to extend the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vapor-containing combustion environments. The advanced 1650 C TEBC system is required to have a better high-temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and more resistance to sintering and thermal stress than current coating systems under engine high-heat-flux and severe thermal cycling conditions. In this report, the thermal conductivity and water vapor stability of selected candidate hafnia-, pyrochlore- and magnetoplumbite-based TEBC materials are evaluated. The effects of dopants on the materials properties are also discussed. The test results have been used to downselect the TEBC materials and help demonstrate the feasibility of advanced 1650 C coatings with long-term thermal cycling durability.

  6. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  7. Minimized thermal conductivity in highly stable thermal barrier W/ZrO2 multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Florian; Major, Anna; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Nanoscale thin-film multilayer materials are of great research interest since their large number of interfaces can strongly hinder phonon propagation and lead to a minimized thermal conductivity. When such materials provide a sufficiently small thermal conductivity and feature in addition also a high thermal stability, they would be possible candidates for high-temperature applications such as thermal barrier coatings. For this article, we have used pulsed laser deposition in order to fabricate thin multilayers out of the thermal barrier material ZrO2 in combination with W, which has both a high melting point and high density. Layer thicknesses were designed such that bulk thermal conductivity is governed by the low value of ZrO2, while ultrathin W blocking layers provide a high number of interfaces. By this phonon scattering, reflection and shortening of mean free path lead to a significant reduction in overall thermal conductivity even below the already low value of ZrO2. In addition to this, X-ray reflectivity measurements were taken showing strong Bragg peaks even after annealing such multilayers at 1300 K. Those results identify W/ZrO2 multilayers as desired thermally stable, low-conductivity materials.

  8. Minimized thermal conductivity in highly stable thermal barrier W/ZrO{sub 2} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, Florian; Major, Anna; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [University of Goettingen, Institut fuer Materialphysik, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Nanoscale thin-film multilayer materials are of great research interest since their large number of interfaces can strongly hinder phonon propagation and lead to a minimized thermal conductivity. When such materials provide a sufficiently small thermal conductivity and feature in addition also a high thermal stability, they would be possible candidates for high-temperature applications such as thermal barrier coatings. For this article, we have used pulsed laser deposition in order to fabricate thin multilayers out of the thermal barrier material ZrO{sub 2} in combination with W, which has both a high melting point and high density. Layer thicknesses were designed such that bulk thermal conductivity is governed by the low value of ZrO{sub 2}, while ultrathin W blocking layers provide a high number of interfaces. By this phonon scattering, reflection and shortening of mean free path lead to a significant reduction in overall thermal conductivity even below the already low value of ZrO{sub 2}. In addition to this, X-ray reflectivity measurements were taken showing strong Bragg peaks even after annealing such multilayers at 1300 K. Those results identify W/ZrO{sub 2} multilayers as desired thermally stable, low-conductivity materials. (orig.)

  9. Permanent isolation surface barrier development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wing, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The exhumation and treatment of wastes may not always be the preferred alternative in the remediation of a waste site. In-place disposal alternatives, under certain circumstances, may be the most desirable alternatives to use in the protection of human health and the environment. The implementation of an in-place disposal alternative will likely require some type of protective covering that will provide long-term isolation of the wastes from the accessible environment. Even if the wastes are exhumed and treated, a long-term barrier may still be needed to adequately dispose of the treated wastes or any remaining waste residuals. Currently, no {open_quotes}proven{close_quotes} long-term barrier is available. The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site. The permanent isolation barrier technology also could be used at other sites. Permanent isolation barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with redundant protective features. Drawings of conceptual permanent isolation surface barriers are shown. The natural construction materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity. The objective of current designs is to use natural materials to develop a maintenance-free permanent isolation surface barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1,000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling the exhalation of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion-related problems.

  10. Precise control of thermal conductivity at the nanoscale through individual phonon-scattering barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, G.; Stoffel, M.; Savic, I.; Pezzoli, F.; Chen, P.; Savelli, G.; Jacquot, A.; Schumann, J.; Denker, U.; Mönch, I.; Deneke, Ch.; Schmidt, O. G.; Rampnoux, J. M.; Wang, S.; Plissonnier, M.; Rastelli, A.; Dilhaire, S.; Mingo, N.

    2010-06-01

    The ability to precisely control the thermal conductivity (κ) of a material is fundamental in the development of on-chip heat management or energy conversion applications. Nanostructuring permits a marked reduction of κ of single-crystalline materials, as recently demonstrated for silicon nanowires. However, silicon-based nanostructured materials with extremely low κ are not limited to nanowires. By engineering a set of individual phonon-scattering nanodot barriers we have accurately tailored the thermal conductivity of a single-crystalline SiGe material in spatially defined regions as short as ~15nm. Single-barrier thermal resistances between 2 and 4×10-9m2KW-1 were attained, resulting in a room-temperature κ down to about 0.9Wm-1K-1, in multilayered structures with as little as five barriers. Such low thermal conductivity is compatible with a totally diffuse mismatch model for the barriers, and it is well below the amorphous limit. The results are in agreement with atomistic Green's function simulations.

  11. Monoclinic zirconia distributions in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, M. J.; Haynes, J. A.; Ferber, M. K.; Cannon, W. R.

    2000-03-01

    Phase composition in an air plasma-sprayed Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) top coating of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system was characterized. Both the bulk phase content and localized pockets of monoclinic zirconia were measured with Raman spectroscopy. The starting powder consisted of ˜15 vol.% monoclinic zirconia, which decreased to ˜2 vol.% in the as-sprayed coating. Monoclinic zirconia was concentrated in porous pockets that were evenly distributed throughout the TBC. The pockets resulted from the presence of unmelted granules in the starting powder. The potential effect of the distributed monoclinic pockets on TBC performance is discussed.

  12. Laser Remelting of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang ZHANG; Yong LIANG; Yingna WU; Zhongchao FENG; Bingchun ZHANG; Fangjun LIU

    2001-01-01

    A CO2 continuous wave laser with defocused beam was used for remelting the surface of plasma sprayed ZrO2-8 wt pct Y2O3 (8YSZ)/Ni22Cr10AlY thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on GH536 superalloy substrate. Two main laser processing parameters, power and travel speed, were adopted to produce a completely remelted layer, and their effects on remelted appearance,remelting depth, density and diameter of depression, space of segment crack and remelted microstructure were evaluated. With energy of 4.0 to 8.0 J.mm-2, an appropriate laser processing for applicable remelted layer was suggested.

  13. Preparation of thermal barrier coatings by ultrasonic plasma spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Xiong-wei; LI Lu-ming; ZHANG Hua-tang; HAO Hong-wei; LU Zhi-qing

    2004-01-01

    Modulated plasma arc not only can heat the powder, but also can excite ultrasonic of different frequencies and different powers. The principles and characters of the plasma arc-excited ultrasonic were described, and the ultrasonic plasma spraying was compared with normal plasma spraying. Zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were fabricated with two kinds of method. The TBCs were studied by the optical microscope observation, SEM observation and bonding strength experiment. The results show that suitable ultrasonic changes the performance and microstructure of TBCs in evidence. And the mechanism of ultrasonic influencing the TBCs was also discussed.

  14. Measurements of the interfacial fracture energy of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, L.L.; Barber, B; Jordan, E.H.; Gell, M.

    1998-10-13

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines for improved durability and performance for more than 15 years. In this study, chevron-notched sandwich specimens proposed recently by Shaw are chosen for the study of the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of several metal/oxide and metal/silicide interfaces. The main advantages of this test specimen are: (1) it provides a rigorous fracture mechanics quantification for the bimaterial interface; (2) the fracture energy obtained arises mainly from the chemical bonding at the interface; (3) the test specimen is easy to fabricate (either diffusion or adhesive bonding), and the test is easy to implement (e.g., neither fatigue precracking nor crack length monitoring is needed); (4) no special compliance calibration of specimens is necessary because previously developed compliance calibrations for homogeneous materials can be utilized directly; (5) the test specimen is suitable for the fracture energy measurement of a single interface as well as for interfacial regions composed of several discrete interfaces, which is often the case for TBCs; and (6) the test method allows the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs to be found independent of the poorly characterized TBCs' elastic modulus as to which there is great uncertainty (e.g., the modulus in tension may be different then in compression). As will be shown in this study, all the aforementioned advantages are maintained for TBCs. Furthermore, the failure location using the chevron notched sandwich specimen duplicates the service failure mode. Thus, the data obtained can be utilized directly for lifetime prediction modeling.

  15. Reliability assessment on interfacial failure of thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Wei Guo; Li Yang; Yi-Chun Zhou; Li-Min He; Wang Zhu; Can-Ying Cai; Chun-Sheng Lu

    2016-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) usually exhibit an uncertain lifetime owing to their scattering mechanical properties and severe service conditions. To consider these uncertainties, a reliability assessment method is proposed based on failure probability analysis. First, a limit state equa-tion is established to demarcate the boundary between failure and safe regions, and then the failure probability is calculated by the integration of a probability density function in the failure area according to the first-or second-order moment. It is shown that the parameters related to interfacial failure follow a Weibull distribution in two types of TBC. The inter-facial failure of TBCs is significantly affected by the thermal mismatch of material properties and the temperature drop in service.

  16. Thermal barrier coatings for gas-turbine engine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padture, Nitin P; Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H

    2002-04-12

    Hundreds of different types of coatings are used to protect a variety of structural engineering materials from corrosion, wear, and erosion, and to provide lubrication and thermal insulation. Of all these, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have the most complex structure and must operate in the most demanding high-temperature environment of aircraft and industrial gas-turbine engines. TBCs, which comprise metal and ceramic multilayers, insulate turbine and combustor engine components from the hot gas stream, and improve the durability and energy efficiency of these engines. Improvements in TBCs will require a better understanding of the complex changes in their structure and properties that occur under operating conditions that lead to their failure. The structure, properties, and failure mechanisms of TBCs are herein reviewed, together with a discussion of current limitations and future opportunities.

  17. Reliability assessment on interfacial failure of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-Wei; Yang, Li; Zhou, Yi-Chun; He, Li-Min; Zhu, Wang; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) usually exhibit an uncertain lifetime owing to their scattering mechanical properties and severe service conditions. To consider these uncertainties, a reliability assessment method is proposed based on failure probability analysis. First, a limit state equation is established to demarcate the boundary between failure and safe regions, and then the failure probability is calculated by the integration of a probability density function in the failure area according to the first- or second-order moment. It is shown that the parameters related to interfacial failure follow a Weibull distribution in two types of TBC. The interfacial failure of TBCs is significantly affected by the thermal mismatch of material properties and the temperature drop in service.

  18. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  19. Barrier Mechanisms in the Developing Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, Norman R.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.

    2012-01-01

    The adult brain functions within a well-controlled stable environment, the properties of which are determined by cellular exchange mechanisms superimposed on the diffusion restraint provided by tight junctions at interfaces between blood, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These interfaces are referred to as “the” blood–brain barrier. It is widely believed that in embryos and newborns, this barrier is immature or “leaky,” rendering the developing brain more vulnerable to drugs or toxins ent...

  20. High Temperature Thermal Properties of Columnar Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coating Performed by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, B.; Schick, V.; Remy, B.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Performance enhancement of gas turbines is a main issue for the aircraft industry. Over many years, a large part of the effort has been focused on the development of more insulating Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). In this study, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) columnar structures are processed by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS). These structures have already demonstrated abilities to get improved thermal lifetime, similarly to standard YSZ TBCs performed by EB-PVD. Thermal diffusivity measurements coupled with differential scanning calorimetry analysis are performed from room temperature up to 1100 °C, first, on HastelloyX substrates and then, on bilayers including a SPS YSZ coating. Results show an effective thermal conductivity for YSZ performed by SPS lower than 1 W.m-1K-1 whereas EB- PVD YSZ coatings exhibit a value of 1.5 W.m-1K-1.

  1. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  2. Thermal Conductivity in Suspension Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Kumara, Chamara; Gupta, Mohit; Nylen, Per

    2016-12-01

    Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS) can generate microstructures with higher porosity and pores in the size range from submicron to nanometer. ASPS thermal barrier coatings (TBC) have already shown a great potential to produce low thermal conductivity coatings for gas turbine applications. It is important to understand the fundamental relationships between microstructural defects in ASPS coatings such as crystallite boundaries, porosity etc. and thermal conductivity. Object-oriented finite element (OOF) analysis has been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermal conductivity of conventional TBCs as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent microstructure in the model. The objective of this work was to analyze the thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs using experimental techniques and also to evaluate a procedure where OOF can be used to predict and analyze the thermal conductivity for these coatings. Verification of the model was done by comparing modeling results with the experimental thermal conductivity. The results showed that the varied scaled porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Smaller crystallites and higher overall porosity content resulted in lower thermal conductivity. It was shown that OOF could be a powerful tool to predict and rank thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs.

  3. Thermal Conductivity in Suspension Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Kumara, Chamara; Gupta, Mohit; Nylen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS) can generate microstructures with higher porosity and pores in the size range from submicron to nanometer. ASPS thermal barrier coatings (TBC) have already shown a great potential to produce low thermal conductivity coatings for gas turbine applications. It is important to understand the fundamental relationships between microstructural defects in ASPS coatings such as crystallite boundaries, porosity etc. and thermal conductivity. Object-oriented finite element (OOF) analysis has been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermal conductivity of conventional TBCs as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent microstructure in the model. The objective of this work was to analyze the thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs using experimental techniques and also to evaluate a procedure where OOF can be used to predict and analyze the thermal conductivity for these coatings. Verification of the model was done by comparing modeling results with the experimental thermal conductivity. The results showed that the varied scaled porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Smaller crystallites and higher overall porosity content resulted in lower thermal conductivity. It was shown that OOF could be a powerful tool to predict and rank thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs.

  4. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  5. X-ray residual stress analysis of a ceramic thermal barrier coating undergoing thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D.W. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Faber, K.T. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States))

    1993-11-25

    The residual stress of a ZrO[sub 2]-8%Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] thermal barrier coating was determined as a function of thermal cycling. Samples were thermally cycled from 400 C to 1000 C in air. After a few cycles the samples exhibited a value of compressive residual stress consistent with that determined by considering the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate. Stress relief occurs in the ZrO[sub 2]-Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] coating, increasing in both frequency and magnitude with increasing number of thermal cycles. This behavior is explained in terms of a model of failure of coatings in compression. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of the Hot-Corrosion Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    coat the components with an insulating material. Ceramic thermal barriers intended for this application must be resistant to thermal shock, spalling...corrosive environment found in a gas turbine. 4428 APPROACH The purpose of using thermal barriers is to allow t-he utilization of high gas

  7. Overcoming barriers to Clean Development Mechanism projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J. [OECD, Paris (France); Kamel, S. [UNEP Risoe Centre on Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development URC, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    The market for Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects is continuing to grow rapidly, with the current portfolio expecting to deliver 2 billion tons of CO2-eq greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions by 2012, equivalent to 17% of Annex I Parties' base year GHG emissions. In total, governments and companies have earmarked over USD11 billion for CDM funding to 2012. This study analyses the various barriers to CDM market expansion in developing countries, and makes recommendations on how some of them can be removed or reduced. It also examines the distribution of CDM projects amongst regions and sectors. Different types of barriers can impede the development of CDM projects. These include: National-level barriers not related specifically to the CDM such as the policy or legislative framework within which a CDM project operates, e.g. electricity-related regulations that constrain generation by independent power producers; National-level CDM-related barriers such as institutional capability/effectiveness or lack of awareness about CDM potential. For example, delays in host country approval of CDM projects can dampen interest in CDM project development; Project-related issues including availability (or not) of underlying project finance, or other country or project-related risks that render the performance of the project uncertain; International-level barriers such as constraints on project eligibility (e.g. on land use and forestry projects), available guidance and decisions (e.g. with respect to the inclusion of carbon capture and storage projects), etc. Thus, barriers to CDM development can arise at different parts of the CDM project cycle. The relative importance of particular barriers varies between countries as well as over time. A combination of factors is needed to drive growth in a country's CDM activity. This includes the presence of attractive CDM opportunities, a positive investment climate, and an enabling policy and legislative framework (in

  8. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  9. Monitoring thermally grown oxides under thermal barrier coatings using photoluminescence piezospectroscopy (PLPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Corno, A.; De Maria, L.; Rinaldi, C. [ERSE, Milan (Italy); Nalin, L.; Simms, N.J. [Cranfield Univ., Bedford (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Centre

    2010-07-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on cooled components in industrial gas turbine has enabled higher inlet gas temperatures to be used and hence higher efficiencies to be achieved, without increasing component metal temperatures. However TBCs have a complex coating structure that during high temperature exposure and thermal cycling modifies until TBC spalling which can result in dangerous over-heating of components. This paper reports the results of a TBC exposure programme planned to monitor TGOs development in an example TBC system in terms of both stress evolution within the TGOs and TGO growth. The COST538 reference TBC system was used: an yttria stabilised zirconia TBC applied to an Amdry 995 bond coat on an CMSX-4 substrate. Samples were in the form of 10 mm diameter bars, with the TBC applied to their curved surface. Coated samples were exposed in simulated combustion gases at temperatures 850, 900 and 950 C for periods of up to 10,000 hours. Every 1000 hours samples were cooled and weighed to monitor the progression of the oxidation: selected samples NDT inspected using PLPS and/or destructive examination. Cross-sections were prepared and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at multiple locations to determine TGO thickness distributions. PLPS spectra were measured and elaborated with a system self developed in ERSE, able to calculate and map the TGO residual stress values under columnar TBCs. So the positions could be evidenced where the damage of the TBC /TGO/BC interface is higher on the exposed bars. The data of TGO thickness distributions and PLPS stress measurement distributions were compared to the exposures carried out on samples to identify and quantify trends in their development. Metallography confirmed that the PLPs technique can reliably detect interface cracking before visible EB-PVD TBC spalling. (orig.)

  10. Barriers towards integrated product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anita Friis; Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra; Steger-Jensen, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    to traditional methods, when it is a matter of complex problem solving where product development is a disruptive and non-linear process. Even though integrated product development has been the focus of a large number of research studies, most focus on identifying success criteria and improving performance while...... requirements for implementation of integrated product development remains under-researched. This study takes on a holistic project management perspective and identifies challenges and requirements through an in-depth case study. It is found that implementation requires both awareness and skills of integrated...

  11. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nagaraj, B.A. [General Electric Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Aircraft Engine Group

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  12. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  13. Analytical investigation of thermal barrier coatings for advanced power generation combustion turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical evaluation was conducted to determine quantitatively the improvement potential in cycle efficiency and cost of electricity made possible by the introduction of thermal barrier coatings to power generation combustion turbine systems. The thermal barrier system, a metallic bond coat and yttria stabilized zirconia outer layer applied by plasma spray techniques, acts as a heat insulator to provide substantial metal temperature reductions below that of the exposed thermal barrier surface. The study results show the thermal barrier to be a potentially attractive means for improving performance and reducing cost of electricity for the simple, recuperated, and combined cycles evaluated.

  14. X-Ray Elastic Constants and Residual Stress Distributions of Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coating

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 賢治; 町屋, 修太郎; 田中, 啓介; 坂井田, 喜久; SUZUKI, Kenji; Machiya, Syutaro; Tanaka, Keisuke; Sakaida, Yoshihisa

    2001-01-01

    Accurate values of X-ray elastic constants are required for a reliable stress measurement of thermal barrier coating films (TBC films). In this paper, atmosphere and pressureless plasma sprayed TBC films were removed from substrates, then X-ray elastic constants of both TBC films were determained by using newly developed tensile jig. For the atmosphere plasma sprayed film, the value of the mechanical elastic constant was much smaller than the X-ray elastic constant owing to cracks or pores ex...

  15. Thermal/residual stress in an electron beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.; Jordan, E.H.; Barber, B.; Gell, M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1998-10-09

    Elastic-plastic finite element models are used to define the thermal/residual stress state responsible for the observed failure behavior of an electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating on a Pt-Al bond coat. The failures were observed to start at grain boundary ridges, some of which evolved into oxide filled cavities. Finite element models are made of the actual interface geometries through the use of metallographic sectioning and imaging processing. There is a one to one correspondence of calculated tension in the oxide layer and the observed localized damage. Purely elastic analysis failed to show some important tensile regions associated with the observed failure.

  16. FEM ANALYSIS OF THERMAL STRESSES IN GRADIENT THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS PRODUCED BY EB-PVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.B. Guo; H.B. Xu; S.K. Gong

    2001-01-01

    Gradient thermal barrier coatings (GTBCs) produced by co-deposition of mixtures ofAl-Al2 O3-YSZ onto metallic bond coat exhibited longer lifetimes than the two-layeredTBCs. The finite element method (FEM) numerical models were used to investigatestress and strain states in the GTBCs and traditional two-layered TBCs as they cooledto 750℃ from a stress-free state at 850℃.

  17. History of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Engines: Emphasizing NASA's Role from 1942 to 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has played a central role in the development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for gas turbine applications. This report discusses the history of TBCs emphasizing the role NASA has played beginning with (1) frit coatings in the 1940s and 1950s; (2) thermally sprayed coatings for rocket application in the 1960s and early 1970s; (3) the beginnings of the modern era of turbine section coatings in the mid 1970s; and (4) failure mechanism and life prediction studies in the 1980s and 1990s. More recent efforts are also briefly discussed.

  18. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, R. J.; Lau, S. K.; Andersson, C. A.; Lee, S. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The results of studies concerning the high temperature corrosion resistance of ZrO2-Y2O3, ZrO2-MgO, and Ca2SiO4 plasma-sprayed coatings, which may be used as gas turbine engine thermal barriers, are reported. The coatings were evaluated in atmospheric burner rig and pressurized passage tests, using GT No. 2 fuel in pure form and with sodium, sulfur and vanadium corrosive impurities doping. It is found that, while the coatings performed well in both pressurized passage and burner rig tests with pure fuel chemical reactions between the ceramic coatings and combustion gases/condensates resulted in coating degradation with impure fuels. Chemical reactions between the ceramic coatings and vanadium compounds played a critical role in coating degradation.

  19. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Plasma spray for forming nanostructured thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; Feng; JIANG; Xian-liang; YU; Yue-guang; ZENG; Ke-li; REN; Xian-jing

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline powders of yttrium partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) are reprocessed into agglomerated feedstocks for plasma spraying thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), using the methods of ball milling, slurry dispersion, spray drying, and heat treatment. Atmospheric plasma is used to spray the agglomerated nanocrystalline particle feedstocks and coatings were deposited on the substrate of Ni-based superalloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to examine the morphology and cross-section of the agglomerated feedstocks and the free-section and cross-section of the nanostructured TBCs. Experimental results show that the agglomerated nanocrystalline particles are spherical and dense. Unlike conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, the micron/nano/micron sandwich structure can be found in the nanostructured YPSZ coatings deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying.

  1. Waste Package Outer Barrier Stress Due to Thermal Expansion with Various Barrier Gap Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. M. Lewis

    2001-11-27

    The objective of this activity is to determine the tangential stresses of the outer shell, due to uneven thermal expansion of the inner and outer shells of the current waste package (WP) designs. Based on the results of the calculation ''Waste Package Barrier Stresses Due to Thermal Expansion'', CAL-EBS-ME-000008 (ref. 10), only tangential stresses are considered for this calculation. The tangential stresses are significantly larger than the radial stresses associated with thermal expansion, and at the WP outer surface the radial stresses are equal to zero. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the tangential stresses the waste package outer shell is subject to due to the interference fit, produced by having two different shell coefficients of thermal expansions. The inner shell has a greater coefficient of thermal expansion than the outer shell, producing a pressure between the two shells. This calculation is associated with Waste Package Project. The calculations are performed for the 21-PWR (pressurized water reactor), 44-BWR (boiling water reactor), 24-BWR, 12-PWR Long, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF - Short (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel), 2-MCO/2-DHLW (multi-canister overpack), and Naval SNF Long WP designs. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the types of WPs considered in this calculation. This calculation is performed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for SR (Ref.7). The calculation is documented, reviewed, and approved in accordance with AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref.1).

  2. Mechanisms and Mitigation of CMAS Attack on Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Elisa Marie

    As gas turbine engines are driven to operate at higher temperatures to maximize efficiency, components become susceptible to attack by deposits of calcium magnesium alumino-silicate (CMAS) ingested with the intake air. Of particular interest to this work is the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by CMAS. Molten CMAS is known to interact with TBCs both thermochemically, by dissolving the ceramic and reprecipitating it as a new or modified phase, and thermomechanically, by infiltrating the porosity and degrading the strain tolerance. The thermochemical degradation of TBCs was investigated using primarily differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) by comparing the endotherms and exotherms recorded for pure, model silicates to those observed for silicates mixed with various TBC materials including YSZ and GZO. The five ternary silicates studied (CaO-AlO1.5-SiO2) began melting over a relatively narrow range (˜1125-1145°C). Introducing magnesium to the ternary results in higher melting temperatures and only minor changes to the crystallization behavior. Iron decreases the melting temperature, and markedly improves the crystallization kinetics of pure silicate systems, especially absent magnesium. Modification of the crystallization behavior of pure silicates has been proposed in the literature as a mitigation strategy for CMAS. This work utilizes DSC to look for characteristic changes as described above to probe potentially effective TBCs. The addition of YSZ to a quaternary CMAS results in little change to the melting or crystallization in the DSC, despite the dissolution of YSZ into the silicate. In stark contrast, GZO with CMAS generates a significant crystallization exotherm that appears in the DSC immediately after the silicate melts. As the fraction of GZO is increased, the melting endotherm begins to shrink due to the thermal overlap of the melting and crystallization processes. This signifies a rapid reaction, and a potentially useful TBC material for

  3. Effects of supersonic fine particle bombarding on thermal cyclic failure lifetime of thermal barrier coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ya-jun; LIN Xiao-ping; WANG Zhi-ping; WANG Li-jun; JI Zhao-hui; DONG Yun

    2010-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating(TBC)consisting of a NiCoCrAlY bond coat(BC)and a ZrO2-8 wt.%Y2O3 topcoat(TC)was fabricated on the nickel-base supcralloy by air plasma spray(APS).The BC was trea-ted by supersonic fine particle bombarding(SFPB).Thermal cyclic failure and residual stress in thermally grown oxide(TGO)scale were studied by SEM with EDS and ruby fluorescence spectroscopy(RFS).As shown in the results,after treated by SFPB,thickening of TGO was relatively slow,which reduced the level of growth stress.The TBC with SFPB treatment was still remained well undergoing 350 times of thermal cycle.However,after thermal cycle with the same times,the separation of TC was observed in TBC without SFPB treatment.The residual stress analysis by RFS showed that the residual stress of SFPB-treated TBC increased with the increasing number of thermal cycle.The residual stress of conventional TBC reached a value of 650MPa at 350 times of cycle and that of SFPB-treated TBC only reached 532 MPa at 400 times of cycle.The BC with SFPB treatment after 400 times of cycle was analyzed by RFS,the high stress value was not observed in local thickened region of TGO.Thermal cycling resistance of TBC can be improved by the SFPB technology.

  4. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  5. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  6. MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.K. Mathur

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

  7. Sintering Characteristics of Multilayered Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Gradient and Isothermal High Temperature Annealing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amarendra K.; Schmitt, Michael P.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides have most of the relevant attributes for use as next generation thermal barrier coatings such as phase stability, low sintering kinetics and low thermal conductivity. One of the issues with the pyrochlore oxides is their lower toughness and therefore higher erosion rate compared to the current state-of-the-art TBC material, yttria (6 to 8 wt%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In this work, sintering characteristics were investigated for novel multilayered coating consisted of alternating layers of pyrochlore oxide viz Gd2Zr2O7 and t' low k (rare earth oxide doped YSZ). Thermal gradient and isothermal high temperature (1316 C) annealing conditions were used to investigate sintering and cracking in these coatings. The results are then compared with that of relevant monolayered coatings and a baseline YSZ coating.

  8. Effects of Thermal Exposure on Structures of DD6 Single Crystal Superalloy with Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Jianmin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of water grit-blasting and high temperature thermal exposure on the microstructures of DD6 alloy with TBCs, DD6 single crystal superalloy specimens were water grit-blasted with 0.3 MPa pressure, then the specimens were coated with thermal barrier coatings by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. Specimens with TBCs were exposed at 1100℃ for 50 and 100 hours in the air respectively, and then these specimens were subjected to stress-rupture tests under the condition of 1100℃/130 MPa. The results show that grit-blasting doesn't lead into the recrystallization, thermal exposure can induce element interdiffusion between the bond coat and alloy substrate, the residual stress and element diffusion lead into the changes of γ' phase coarsing direction. After stress rupture tests, the secondary reaction zone emerges into a local area.

  9. Failure Mechanisms and Life Prediction of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zju, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) will play an increasingly important role in gas turbine engines because of their ability to further raise engine temperatures. However, the issue of coating durability is of major concern under high-heat-flux conditions. In particular, the accelerated coating delamination crack growth under the engine high heat-flux conditions is not well understood. In this paper, a laser heat flux technique is used to investigate the coating delamination crack propagation under realistic temperature-stress gradients and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating delamination mechanisms are investigated under various thermal loading conditions, and are correlated with coating dynamic fatigue, sintering and interfacial adhesion test results. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation driving forces for coating failure under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  10. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings on tube superalloy substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yu; ZHANG Chun-xia; ZHOU Chun-gen; GONG Sheng-kai; XU Hui-bin

    2006-01-01

    Two-layer structure thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) (NiCoCrAlY (bond coat)+(6%-8%, mass fraction) Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2(YSZ top coat)) were deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) on tube superalloy substrates. The samples were investigated by isothermal oxidation and thermal shock tests. It is found that the mass gains of the substrate with and without TBCs are 0.165 and 7.34 mg/cm2, respectively. So the TBCs system is a suitable protection for the substrate. In thermal shock tests the vertical cracks initiate at the top coat and grow into the bond coat, causing the oxidation of the bond coat along the cracks. Failure of the TBCs system occurs by the spallation of the YSZ from the bond coat, and some micro-cracks are found at the location where the fragment of the YSZ top coat spalled from.

  11. Thermal conductivity and thermal stability of zirconia and hafnia based thermal barrier coatings by EB-PVD for high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.; Wolfe, D.E.; Miller, R.; Eldridge, J.; Zhu Dong-Ming [Applied Research Lab., Penn State Univ., Univ. Park, PA and NASA-GRC, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Zirconia and hafnia based thermal barrier coating materials were produced by industrial prototype electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). Columnar microstructure of the thermal barrier coatings were modified with controlled microporosity and diffuse sub-interfaces resulting in lower thermal conductivity (20-30% depending up on microporosity volume fraction), higher thermal reflectance (15-20%) and more strain tolerance as compared with standard thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The novel processed coating systems were examined by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, and thermal conductivity by laser technique, hemispherical reflectance and thermal cyclic tests. The test results showed the tailored-microstructural TBC offered superior performance over the conventional thermal barrier coatings (ZrO{sub 2} -8 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}). (orig.)

  12. Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit; Kumara, Chamara; Nylén, Per

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  13. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  14. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, T.A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  15. Revisiting the Birth of 7YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings: Steve Stecura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in all turbine engines, typically using a 7 wt% Y2O3-ZrO2 formulation. Extensive research and development over many decades have refined the processing and structure of these coatings for increased durability and reliability. New compositions demonstrate some unique advantages and are gaining in application. However, the "7YSZ" formulation predominates and is still in widespread use. This special composition has been universally found to produce nanoscale precipitates of metastable t' tetragonal phase, giving rise to a unique toughening mechanism via ferro-elastic switching under stress. This note recalls the original study that identified superior properties of 6 to 8 wt% YSZ plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings, published in 1978. The impact of this discovery, arguably, continues in some form to this day. At one point, 7YSZ thermal barrier coatings were used in every new aircraft and ground power turbine engine produced worldwide. It is a tribute to its inventor, Dr. Stephan J. Stecura, NASA retiree.

  16. Improving oxidation resistance and thermal insulation of thermal barrier coatings by intense pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei Xianxiu, E-mail: xxmei@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Xiaofei; Wang Cunxia; Wang Younian; Dong Chuang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulsed electron beam was used for sealing ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier coating prepared by electron beam-physical vapor deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At irradiation energy densities above 8 J/cm{sup 2}, ZrO{sub 2} ceramic coating surface was fully re-melted and became smooth, dense and shiny. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal diffusion rate of the irradiated coating was decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal insulation properties and high temperature oxidation resistance were improved. - Abstract: In this paper, intense pulsed electron beam was used for the irradiation treatment of 6-8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stablized ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier coating prepared by electron beam-physical vapor deposition to achieve the 'sealing' of columnar crystals, thus improving their thermal insulation properties and high temperature oxidation resistance. The electron beam parameters used were: pulse duration 200 {mu}s, electron voltage 15 kV, energy density 3, 5, 8, 15, 20 J/cm{sup 2}, and pulsed numbers 30. 1050 Degree-Sign C cyclic oxidation and static oxidation experiments were used for the research on oxidation resistance of the coatings. When the energy density of the electron beam was larger than 8 J/cm{sup 2}, ZrO{sub 2} ceramic coating surface was fully re-melted and became smooth, dense and shiny. The coating changed into a smooth polycrystalline structure, thus achieving the 'sealing' effect of the columnar crystals. After irradiations with the energy density of 8-15 J/cm{sup 2}, the thermally grown oxide coating thickness decreased significantly in comparison with non-irradiated coatings, showing that the re-melted coating improved the oxidation resistance of the coatings. The results of thermal diffusivity test by laser flash method showed that the thermal diffusion rate of the irradiated coating was lower than that of the coating without irradiation treatment, and the thermal

  17. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  18. Method of Producing Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coatings includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer or a diameter of less than 5 micron. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate. and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of the invention a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  19. Thermal shock behavior of toughened gadolinium zirconate/YSZ double-ceramic-layered thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Xinghua, E-mail: xhzhong@mail.sic.ac.cn; Zhao, Huayu; Zhou, Xiaming; Liu, Chenguang; Wang, Liang; Shao, Fang; Yang, Kai; Tao, Shunyan; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/YSZ DCL thermal barrier coating was designed and fabricated. • The Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3YSZ. • Remarkable improvement in thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was achieved. - Abstract: Double-ceramic-layered (DCL) thermal barrier coating system comprising of toughened Gadolinium zirconate (Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, GZ) as the top ceramic layer and 4.5 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} partially-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (4.5YSZ) as the bottom ceramic layer was fabricated by plasma spraying and thermal shock behavior of the DCL coating was investigated. The GZ top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} partially-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (3YSZ) to improve fracture toughness of the matrix. The thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was enhanced significantly compared to that of single-ceramic-layered (SCL) GZ-3YSZ composite coating, which is believed to be primarily attributed to the two factors: (i) the increase in fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer by incorporating nanostructured YSZ particles and (ii) the improvement in strain tolerance through the utilization of 4.5YSZ as the bottom ceramic layer. In addition, the failure mechanisms are mainly attributed to the still low fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer and oxidation of the bond-coat.

  20. Thermal Cycling Assessment of Steel-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings for Al Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Dominique; Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong interest from the transportation industry to achieve vehicle weight reduction through the replacement of steel components by aluminum parts. For some applications, aluminum requires protective coatings due to its limited wear and lower temperature resistance compared to steel. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of amorphous-type plasma-sprayed steel coatings and conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings as thermal barrier coatings, mainly through the evaluation of their spalling resistance under thermal cycling. The microstructures of the different coatings were first compared via SEM. The amorphicity of the coatings produced via plasma spraying of specialized alloyed steel and the crystalline phases of the conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings were confirmed through x-ray diffraction. The thermal diffusivity of all coatings produced was measured to be about a third of that of bulk stainless steel. Conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings typically offered better spalling resistance under thermal cycling than steel-based amorphous coatings due probably to their higher initial bond strength. However, the presence of vertical cracks in the steel-based amorphous coatings was found to have a beneficial effect on their thermal cycling resistance. The amorphous plasma-sprayed steel coatings presented indications of recrystallization after their exposure to high temperature.

  1. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F.; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Raghavan, Seetha [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Bartsch, Marion [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Materials Research, 51147 Cologne (Germany); Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Karlsson, Anette M. [Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  3. Residual Stress Analysis of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coating Based on Thermal Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki; Wada, Eiji; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    Residual stress is generated in ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which were sprayed by a plasma spray technology, due to the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion between the coating and the substrate. Previous experimental results obtained by the X-ray diffraction method indicated that the residual stress at the ceramic coating surface is tensile and could lead to TBC failure such as cracking and spalling of the ceramic coating. In this study, a numerical model that can predict the residual stress exactly is proposed by taking into account a thermal spray process. This numerical model is a layer-buildup model based on a shear-lag theory, and the residual stress contribution comes from two kinds of the following stress components: (1) quenching stress, which was generated in molten spray particles impinged onto the substrate, and (2) thermal stress, which was generated due to differences in thermal expansion between the deposited particle and the underlying substrate. It is shown herein that residual stress predicted by the proposed numerical model coincided with the experimental one obtained by the strain gage technique, with a good level of accuracy.

  4. Novel Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings in Coal-Fired Power Plant Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing [Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This project presents a detailed investigation of a novel functionally graded coating material, pyrochlore oxide, for thermal barrier coating (TBC) in gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Thermal barrier coatings are refractory materials deposited on gas turbine components, which provide thermal protection for metallic components at operating conditions. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a manufacturing process to produce the novel low thermal conductivity and high thermal stability pyrochlore oxide based coatings with improved high-temperature durability. The current standard TBC, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), has service temperatures limited to <1200°C, due to sintering and phase transition at higher temperatures. In contrast, pyrochlore oxide, e.g., lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7, LZ), has demonstrated lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability, which are crucial to high temperature applications, such as gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) has collaborated with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST), and Changwon National University in South Korea to perform the proposed research. The research findings are critical to the extension of current TBCs to a broader range of high-temperature materials and applications. Several tasks were originally proposed and accomplished, with additional new opportunities identified during the course of the project. In this report, a description of the project tasks, the main findings and conclusions are given. A list of publications and presentations resulted from this research is listed in the Appendix at the end of the report.

  5. Nanocomposite Lanthanum Zirconate Thermal Barrier Coating Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaohui; Wang, You; Wang, Liang; Hao, Guangzhao; Sun, Xiaoguang; Shan, Fan; Zou, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    This work seeks to develop an innovative nanocomposite thermal barrier coating (TBC) exhibiting low thermal conductivity and high durability compared with that of current TBCs. To achieve this objective, nanosized lanthanum zirconate particles were selected for the topcoat of the TBC system, and a new process—suspension plasma spray—was employed to produce desirable microstructural features: the nanocomposite lanthanum zirconate TBC contains ultrafine splats and high volume porosity, for lower thermal conductivity, and better durability. The parameters of plasma spray experiment included two main variables: (i) spray distance varying from 40 to 80 mm and (ii) the concentration of suspension 20, 25, and 30 wt.%, respectively. The microstructure of obtained coatings was characterized with scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. The porosity of coatings is in the range of 6-10%, and the single phase in the as-sprayed coatings was pyrochlore lanthanum zirconate.

  6. Failure mechanism of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings on NiAl substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia(YSZ) was deposited on the line cut β-NiAl substrate by electron-beam physical vapour deposition(EB-PVD), and the cyclic oxidation behaviors of thermal barrier coatings on β-NiAl substrate were investigated in 1 h thermal cycles at 1 200 ℃ in air. The results show that the samples fail after 80-100 cycles. Sub-interface cavitations in the substrate develop due to depletion of Al in forming thermally grown oxides(TGOs). The collapse and closing up of cavities result in the ragged YSZ/TGO/substrate interface. Since the specific crack trajectories are quite sensitive to local geometry, cracks along the YSZ/TGO/substrate interfaces ultimately lead to YSZ spallation.

  7. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  8. Residual Stress in TGO and Interfacial Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating after Thermal Exposure and Cyclic Indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shijie; Fukuda, Kunihisa; Osaki, Toru

    The local stress distributions in thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer of thermal barrier coating before and after thermal exposure were measured by photo-stimulated luminescence spectrum. The effect of isothermal oxidation on the residual stress in the TGO was investigated. It was found that the compressive stress in the TGO increased with an increase in thermal exposure time up to 100 hours and then decreased. The residual stresses in the TGO were also influenced by interfacial damage introduced by cyclic indentation.

  9. Numerical evaluation of the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Miranville, Frédéric; Boyer, Harry; Lucas, Franck; Johan, Seriacaroupin

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers. Using dynamic simulations of a mathematical model of a whole test cell including a radiant barrier installed between the roof top and the ceiling, the thermal performance of the roof is calculated. The mean method is more particularly used to assess the thermal resistance of the building component and lead to a value which is compared to the one obtained for a mass insulation product such ...

  10. PLASMA THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WITH HIGH THERMAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devoino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization of  processes for obtaining maximum content of tetragonal phase in the initial material and thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide and hafnium oxide.  Results of the investigations on phase composition of oxide HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3  system have been given in the paper. The system represents  a microstructure which is similar to  zirconia dioxide and  transformed for its application at 1300 °C. The paper explains a mechanism of hafnium oxide influence on formation of the given microstructure. The research methodology has been based on complex metallography, X – ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of  structural elements of the composite plasma coating HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O system.In order to stabilize zirconium dioxide  dopant oxide should not only have an appropriate size of  metal ion, but also form a solid solution with the zirconia. This condition severely limits the number of possible stabilizers. In fact, such stabilization is possible only with the help of rare earth oxides (Y2O3, Yb2O3, CeO2, HfO2. Chemical purity of the applied materials plays a significant role for obtaining high-quality thermal barrier coatings. Hafnium oxide has been selected as powder for thermal barrier coatings instead of zirconium dioxide due to their similarities in structural modification, grating, chemical and physical properties and its high temperature structural transformations. It has been established that plasma thermal barrier HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3 coatings consist of  one tetragonal phase. This phase is equivalent to a non-equilibrium tetragonal t' phase in the “zirconium dioxide stabilized with yttrium oxide” system. Affinity of  Hf+4 and Zr+4 cations leads to the formation of identical metastable phases during rapid quenching.

  11. Coupled Effects of Temperature Gradient and Oxidation on the Thermal Barrier Coating Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.C.Zhou; T.Hashida

    2000-01-01

    The present article reviews the investigation about the coupled effects of temperature gradient and oxidation on the failure of thermal barrier ceramic coatings in the past ten years in our laboratory. The investigations include the experimental and theoretical study. On the experimental investigation, the heating method, non-destructive evaluation and interface properties are mainly reviewed. An attempt is done for developing four different heating methods, which are furnace heating, burner heating, plasma heating and laser beam heating. The non-destructive evaluation such as temperature test, acoustic emission (AE) signals detected and impedance spectroscopy (IS) method are successfully used in the study of TBCs system degradation. The interface properties such as oxidation and fracture toughness are studied by test and observation. On the theoretical investigation, the temperature fields and the related thermal stresses fields are analytical solved where the coupling effect of temperature gradient, oxidation, thermal fatigue, creep, morphology of the TBC system as well as the cooling rate are considered. The delamination cracking in thermal barrier coating system with ceramic coating deposited on a substrate is analytical studied. Due to the complication of TBCs degradation, a real physical map of TBCs system failure is not obtained up to now. The investigation on the further is proposed.

  12. The oxidation behavior of classical thermal barrier coatings exposed to extreme temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina DRAGOMIRESCU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC are designed to protect metal surfaces from extreme temperatures and improve their resistance to oxidation during service. Currently, the most commonly used systems are those that have the TBC structure bond coat (BC / top coat (TC layers. The top coat layer is a ceramic layer. Oxidation tests are designed to identify the dynamics of the thermally oxide layer (TGO growth at the interface of bond coat / top coat layers, delamination mechanism and the TBC structural changes induced by thermal conditions. This paper is a short study on the evolution of aluminum oxide protective layer along with prolonged exposure to the testing temperature. There have been tested rectangular specimens of metal super alloy with four surfaces coated with a duplex thermal barrier coating system. The specimens were microscopically and EDAX analyzed before and after the tests. In order to determine the oxide type, the samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation are encouraging for future studies. The results show a direct relationship between the development of the oxide layer and long exposure to the test temperature. Future research will focus on changing the testing temperature to compare the results.

  13. Performance Testing of Suspension Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Produced with Varied Suspension Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Curry

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Suspension plasma spraying has become an emerging technology for the production of thermal barrier coatings for the gas turbine industry. Presently, though commercial systems for coating production are available, coatings remain in the development stage. Suitable suspension parameters for coating production remain an outstanding question and the influence of suspension properties on the final coatings is not well known. For this study, a number of suspensions were produced with varied solid loadings, powder size distributions and solvents. Suspensions were sprayed onto superalloy substrates coated with high velocity air fuel (HVAF -sprayed bond coats. Plasma spray parameters were selected to generate columnar structures based on previous experiments and were maintained at constant to discover the influence of the suspension behavior on coating microstructures. Testing of the produced thermal barrier coating (TBC systems has included thermal cyclic fatigue testing and thermal conductivity analysis. Pore size distribution has been characterized by mercury infiltration porosimetry. Results show a strong influence of suspension viscosity and surface tension on the microstructure of the produced coatings.

  14. A Guide to Finite Element Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäker, Martin; Seiler, Philipp

    2017-08-01

    To understand the stress evolution and failure mechanisms of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), finite element simulations are an invaluable tool. Simulations are especially useful to unwrap complex interactions of different phenomena at high temperature, including creep, sintering, diffusion, and oxidation. However, the correct setup and evaluation of a finite element model for this problem are difficult. This article reviews critical issues in modelling TBC systems. Some of the most important aspects are as follows: (a) stresses in 3D simulations may differ considerably from 2D models; (b) the interface shape strongly affects the stresses and using an idealized geometry may underestimate stresses; (c) crack propagation requires simulating sufficiently large regions to correctly capture stress redistribution; (d) a correct description of the material behaviour (visco-plasticity, TGO growth, sintering) is crucial in determining the stress state. The article discusses these and other issues in detail and provides guidelines on the choice of model parameters, boundary conditions, etc. The paper also points out open questions in modelling TBC systems and discusses aspects of verification and validation.

  15. Evaluation of interface reactions in thermal barrier ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, E.; Avci, E.; Yilmaz, F. [Sakarya Univ. (Turkey). Eng. Fac.

    1997-12-01

    In this study, the interface reactions in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs) on AISI 304L stainless steel substrates were investigated. The plasma-spray technique was employed to deposit metallic and ceramic powders such as MgZrO{sub 3}, NiAl+MgZrO{sub 3} and NiCrAl+MgZrO{sub 3} on the substrate. The porosity of these coatings, measured by an optical method, was found to be between 6 and 9%. Oxidation tests were carried out to evaluate the interface reactions in TBCs at temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 C. The microstructures of the powders, coatings and oxidized coatings were examined by means of an optical microscope and X-ray diffractometry. The results show that the oxidation kinetics depend strongly on oxide layer thickness, temperature, duration of oxidation and composition of the bond coat. It was also observed that the oxidation rate changed with temperature was initially linear and then exponential. (orig.) 14 refs.

  16. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barriers for RSRM Nozzle Joint Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Solid rockets, including the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, are generally manufactured in large segments which are then shipped to their final destination where they are assembled. These large segments are sealed with a system of primary and secondary 0-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket which are at pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. The seals are protected from hot combustion gases by thick layers of phenolic insulation and by joint-filling compounds between these layers. Recently, though, routine inspections of nozzle-to-case joints in the Shuttle solid rocket motors during disassembly revealed erosion of the primary O-rings. Jets of hot gas leaked through gaps in the joint-filling compound between the layers of insulation and impinged on the O-rings. This is not supposed to take place, so NASA and Thiokol, the manufacturer of the rockets, initiated an investigation and found that design improvements could be made in this joint. One such improvement would involve using NASA Lewis braided thermal barriers as another level of protection for the O-ring seals against the hot combustion gases.

  17. Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, E. H.; Xie, L.; Gell, M.; Padture, N. P.; Cetegen, B.; Ozturk, A.; Ma, X.; Roth, J.; Xiao, T. D.; Bryant, P. E. C.

    2004-03-01

    A novel process, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS), is presented for depositing thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), in which aqueous chemical precursors are injected into a standard direct current plasma spray system. The resulting coatings microstructure has three unique features: (1) ultra fine splats (1 µm), (2) nanometer and micron-sized interconnected porosity, and (3) closely spaced, through-thickness cracks. Coatings over 3 mm thick can be readily deposited using the SPPS process. Coating durability is excellent, with SPPS coatings showing, in furnace cycling tests, 2.5 times the spallation life of air plasma coatings (APS) and 1.5 times the life of electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coatings. The conductivity of SPPS coatings is lower than EB-PVD coatings and higher than the best APS coatings. Manufacturing cost is expected to be similar to APS coatings and much lower than EB-PVD coatings. The SPPS deposition process includes droplet break-up and material arriving at the deposition surface in various physical states ranging from aqueous solution, gel phase, to fully-molten ceramic. The relation between the arrival state of the material and the microstructure is described.

  18. Scandia-and-Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia for Thermal Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, Derek

    2003-01-01

    yttria in suitable proportions has shown promise of being a superior thermal- barrier coating (TBC) material, relative to zirconia stabilized with yttria only. More specifically, a range of compositions in the zirconia/scandia/yttria material system has been found to afford increased resistance to deleterious phase transformations at temperatures high enough to cause deterioration of yttria-stabilized zirconia. Yttria-stabilized zirconia TBCs have been applied to metallic substrates in gas turbine and jet engines to protect the substrates against high operating temperatures. These coatings have porous and microcracked structures, which can accommodate strains induced by thermal-expansion mismatch and thermal shock. The longevity of such a coating depends upon yttria as a stabilizing additive that helps to maintain the zirconia in an yttria-rich, socalled non-transformable tetragonal crystallographic phase, thus preventing transformation to the monoclinic phase with an associated deleterious volume change. However, at a temperature greater than about 1,200 C, there is sufficient atomic mobility that the equilibrium, transformable zirconia phase is formed. Upon subsequent cooling, this phase transforms to the monoclinic phase, with an associated volume change that adversely affects the integrity of the coating. Recently, scandia was identified as a stabilizer that could be used instead of, or in addition to, yttria. Of particular interest are scandia-and-yttria-stabilized zirconia (SYSZ) compositions of about 6 mole percent scandia and 1 mole percent yttria, which have been found to exhibit remarkable phase stability at a temperature of 1,400 C in simple aging tests. Unfortunately, scandia is expensive, so that the problem becomes one of determining whether there are compositions with smaller proportions of scandia that afford the required high-temperature stability. In an attempt to solve this problem, experiments were performed on specimens made with reduced

  19. Ultrasonic characterization of thermally grown oxide in thermal barrier coating by reflection coefficient amplitude spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Yang; Luo, Zhongbing; Lin, Li

    2014-04-01

    The thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface of ceramic coating/bond coating in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated by ultrasonic reflection coefficient amplitude spectrum (URCAS). A theoretical analysis was performed about the influence of acoustic impedance match relationship between the ceramic coating and its adjacent media on URCAS. The immersion ultrasonic narrow pulse echo method was carried out on the TBC specimen before and after oxidation under 1050°C×1h for 15cycles. The resonant peaks of URCAS obtained before and after oxidation showed that TGO which generated between the ceramic coating and bond coating due to the oxidation, changed the acoustic impedance match between the ceramic coating and its adjacent media. This method is able to nondestructively characterize the generation of TGO in TBCs, and is important to practical engineering application.

  20. Life Prediction Issues in Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Brewer, David N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2001-01-01

    Issues and design requirements for the environmental barrier coating (EBC)/thermal barrier coating (TBC) life that are general and those specific to the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) development program have been described. The current state and trend of the research, methods in vogue related to the failure analysis, and long-term behavior and life prediction of EBCITBC systems are reported. Also, the perceived failure mechanisms, variables, and related uncertainties governing the EBCITBC system life are summarized. A combined heat transfer and structural analysis approach based on the oxidation kinetics using the Arrhenius theory is proposed to develop a life prediction model for the EBC/TBC systems. Stochastic process-based reliability approach that includes the physical variables such as gas pressure, temperature, velocity, moisture content, crack density, oxygen content, etc., is suggested. Benefits of the reliability-based approach are also discussed in the report.

  1. Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-05-01

    The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

  2. Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating with Bond Coat Species in Cyclic Thermal Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungyu Paik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the bond coat species on the delamination or fracture behavior in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs was investigated using the yclic thermal fatigue and thermal-shock tests. The interface microstructures of each TBC showed a good condition without cracking or delamination after flame thermal fatigue (FTF for 1429 cycles. The TBC with the bond coat prepared by the air-plasma spray (APS method showed a good condition at the interface between the top and bond coats after cyclic furnace thermal fatigue (CFTF for 1429 cycles, whereas the TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF and low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS methods showed a partial cracking (and/or delamination and a delamination after 780 cycles, respectively. The TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the APS, HVOF and LPPS methods were fully delaminated (>50% after 159, 36, and 46 cycles, respectively, during the thermal-shock tests. The TGO thickness in the TBCs was strongly dependent on the both exposure time and temperature difference tested. The hardness values were found to be increased only after the CFTF, and the TBC with the bond coat prepared by the APS showed the highest adhesive strength before and after the FTF.

  3. Comparison of thermal shock behaviors between plasma-sprayed nanostructured and conventional zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-bo; ZHANG Zhi-min; JIANG Xian-liang; LIU Min; ZHU Zhao-hui

    2009-01-01

    NiCoCrAlTaY bond coat was deposited on pure nickel substrate by low pressure plasma spraying(LPPS), and ZrO2-8%Y2O3 (mass fraction) nanostructured and ZrO2-7%Y2O3 (mass fraction) conventional thermal barrier coatings(TBCs) were deposited by air plasma spraying(APS). The thermal shock behaviors of the nanostructured and conventional TBCs were investigated by quenching the coating samples in cold water from 1 150, 1 200 and 1 250 ℃, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) was used to examine the microstructures of the samples after thermal shock testing. Energy dispersive analysis of X-ray(EDAX) was used to analyze the interface diffusion behavior of the bond coat elements. X-ray diffractometry(XRD) was used to analyze the constituent phases of the samples. Experimental results indicate that the nanostructured TBC is superior to the conventional TBC in thermal shock performance. Both the nanostructured and conventional TBCs fail along the bond coat/substrate interface. The constituent phase of the as-sprayed conventional TBC is diffusionless-transformed tetragonal(t′). However, the constituent phase of the as-sprayed nanostructured TBC is cubic(c). There is a difference in the crystal size at the spalled surfaces of the nanostructured and conventional TBCs. The constituent phases of the spalled surfaces are mainly composed of Ni2.88Cr1.12 and oxides of bond coat elements.

  4. Small-scale experimental tests of tandem mirror machines with thermal barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.P.

    1979-09-01

    A summary is given of current physical understanding of tandem mirrors with thermal barriers. Physicists who understand tandem mirrors can use this document as a preliminary guide to the physical issues and experimental problems involved. This report will focus upon the issues that can be tested experimentally, and on the areas needing experimental and theoretical inventions. The next section discusses the plasma potentials and plasma confinement which correspond to a tandem mirror with thermal barriers, assuming the barriers exist in steady-state. The creation of a barrier is discussed, i.e., the natural tendency of the barrier cell to fill with plasma must be countered by pumping ions out of the barrier. The design of a barrier-pumping experiment for TMX is described.

  5. Optimization Design Model of Functional Gradient Thermal Barrier Coating Material by Using Parallel Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important for huge ship to find the ceramic/metal functional gradient thermal barrier coating materials. A parallel computation model is built for optimization design of three-dimensional ceramic/metal functionally gradient thermal barrier coating material. According to the control equation and initial-boundary conditions, the heat transfer problem is considered, and numerical algorithms of optimization design is constructed by adapting difference method. The numerical results shows that gradient thermal barrier coating material can improve the function of material.

  6. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  7. Barriers to the Development of the Kepler Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, William J.; Batalha, N. M.; Dunham, E. W.; Jenkins, J. M.; Kepler Science Team

    2014-01-01

    No one had ever proposed nor flown a spacecraft mission that could do automated photometry of many thousands of stars simultaneously with the 10 ppm photometric precision necessary to detect the transits of Earth-size planets. Consequently, several barriers needed to be overcome before the Kepler Mission concept was accepted by the Discovery Program review panel. To overcome these barriers it was necessary to; 1) demonstrate that an appropriate combination of detectors and data analysis techniques was available that had the precision necessary to detect transits of Earth-size planets, 2) prove that the variability of solar-like stars was likely to be sufficiently low that SNR of transits from Earth-size planets could be detected with high reliability, 3) demonstrate the automated observations of thousands of stars simultaneously and the automated analysis of the observations, 4) develop a lab test facility to demonstrate the 10ppm photometric precision necessary to find Earth-sized planets orbiting solar-like stars and do it in the presence of the noise expected from on-orbit operation including thermal variations, the presence of nearby stars, and the impact of energetic particles, 5) form a team of experienced, technically qualified people who agreed that the technique would work and that they would support the mission development, operation, and the analysis of the results. The approaches used to overcome these barriers will be presented.

  8. Vibration damping of superalloys and thermal barrier coatings at high-temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, Giuliano [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93160-5050 (United States)], E-mail: g.gregori@fkf.mpg.de; Li Li [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93160-5050 (United States); Nychka, John A. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0046 (United States); Clarke, David R. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93160-5050 (United States)

    2007-09-25

    A high-temperature mechanical spectroscopy system, based on non-contact laser vibrometry, has been developed to investigate the temperature dependence of the flexural damping properties of materials and coatings up to 900 deg. C. Results for the damping coefficient and Young's modulus have been obtained for several high temperature alloys (FeCrAlY and a single crystal, Ni-based superalloy PWA 1484), ceramics (polycrystalline alumina and yttria-stabilized zirconia) and an electron-beam deposited thermal barrier coating. The results indicate that the thermally grown oxide, formed by high-temperature oxidation does not confer significant damping, whereas, coatings of the yttria-stabilized zirconia produce measurable damping over the entire temperature range with a peak centered at {approx}200 deg. C. The damping peak appears to be an intrinsic property of the YSZ material whether in the form of a bulk material or a metastable coating. Data on the temperature dependent in-plane Young's modulus of the 7 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating between room temperature (22 GPa) and 900 deg. C (18 GPa) is also reported for the first time.

  9. Thermal Shock Damage and Microstructure Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Mar-M247 Superalloy in a Combustion Gas Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hui

    2012-06-01

    The effect of preoxidation on the thermal shock of air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was completely investigated in a combustion gas environment by burning jet fuel with high speed air. Results show that with increasing cycles, the as-oxidized TBCs lost more weight and enlarged larger spallation area than the as-sprayed ones. Thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth and thermal mismatch stress were proven to play critical roles on the as-oxidized TBC failure. Two types of significant cracks were identified: the type I crack was vertical to the TGO interface and the type II crack was parallel to the TGO interface. The former accelerated the TGO growth to develop the latter as long as the oxidizing gas continuously diffused inward and then oxidized the more bond coat (BC). The preoxidation treatment directly increased the TGO thickness, formed the parallel cracks earlier in the TGO during the thermal shocks, and eventually resulted in the worse thermal shock resistance.

  10. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research supporting Thermal Bypass Air Barrier requirements. Since these were adopted in the 2009 IECC, close to one million homes have been mandated to include this vitally important energy efficiency measure.

  11. Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

    2012-10-09

    This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

  12. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Carter, M.R.; Failor, B.H.; Foote, J.H.; Hornady, R.S.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Perkins, D.E.

    1986-08-29

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented.

  13. Thermoelastic Characteristics in Thermal Barrier Coatings with a Graded Layer between the Top and Bond Coats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokchan Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A graded layer was introduced at the interface between the top and bond coats to reduce the risk of failure in a thermal barrier coating (TBC system, and the thermoelastic behavior was investigated through mathematical approaches. Two types of TBC model with and without the graded layer, subject to a symmetric temperature distribution in the longitudinal direction, were taken into consideration to evaluate thermoelastic behaviors such as temperature distribution, displacement, and thermal stress. Thermoelastic theory was applied to derive two governing partial differential equations, and a finite volume method was developed to obtain approximations because of the complexity. The TBC with the graded layer shows improved durability in thermoelastic characteristics through mathematical approaches, in agreement with the experimental results. The results will be useful in discovering technologies for enhancing the thermomechanical properties of TBCs.

  14. Thermoelastic characteristics of thermal barrier coatings with layer thickness and edge conditions through mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Jaegwi; Myoung, Sang-Won; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Seokchan; Paik, Ungyu

    2014-10-01

    The thermoelastic behaviors of such as temperature distribution, displacements, and stresses in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are seriously influenced by top coat thickness and edge conditions, which were investigated based on the thermal and mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed TBCs. A couple of governing partial differential equations were derived based on the thermoelastic theory. Since the governing equations are too involved to solve analytically, a finite volume method was developed to obtain approximations. The thermoelastic characteristics of TBCs with the various thicknesses and microstructures were estimated through mathematical approaches with different edge conditions. The results demonstrated that the top coat thickness and the edge condition in theoretical analysis are crucial factors to be considered in controlling the thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed TBCs.

  15. Development of dual-band barrier detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plis, Elena; Myers, Stephen A.; Ramirez, David A.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of dual-band InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattices (T2SL) detectors with barrier designs at SK Infrared. Over the past five years, we demonstrated mid-wave/long-wave (MW/LWIR, cut-off wavelengths are 5 μm and 10.0 μm), and LW/LWIR (cut-off wavelengths are 9 μm and 11.0 μm) detectors with nBn and pBp designs. Recent results include a high performance bias-selectable long/long-wavelength infrared photodetector based on T2SL with a pBp barrier architecture. The two channels 50% cut-off wavelengths were ~ 9.2 μm and ~ 12 μm at 77 K. The "blue" and "red" LWIR absorbers demonstrated saturated QE values of 34 % and 28 %, respectively, measured in a backside illuminated configuration with a ~ 35 μm thick layer of residual GaSb substrate. Bulk-limited dark current levels were ~ 2.6 x 10-7 A/cm2 at + 100 mV and ~ 8.3 x 10-4 A/cm2 at - 200 mV for the "blue" and "red" channels, respectively.

  16. Investigation of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Iron-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-02-01

    Because of their favorable thermophysical properties, good machinability and low material costs, iron-based coatings which exhibit a highly amorphous/nanocrystalline microstructure are currently in the focus of research. Considering the crystallization temperature of the material, iron-based coatings might be the next generation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for low-temperature systems, reducing thermal losses. The objective of this research project is the development of highly amorphous, iron-based coatings. For this purpose, amorphous feedstock materials with different chromium contents have been developed and characterized regarding their microstructures, phase compositions, crystallization temperatures and amorphous content. The results show that the amorphous content is reduced with increasing particle size and chromium content. The coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying (APS) and high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF). It is shown that all coatings exhibit amorphous structures. HVOF coatings show a smaller amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock materials, indicating crystallization occurring in not fully melted particles or insufficient rapid cooling. The APS process can increase the amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock material, as shown for x Cr = 15%. All coatings proof good thermal shock behavior. Lowest thermal diffusivity values were determined for APS coatings, which confirms the potential of iron-based TBCs.

  17. Investigation of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Iron-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-01-01

    Because of their favorable thermophysical properties, good machinability and low material costs, iron-based coatings which exhibit a highly amorphous/nanocrystalline microstructure are currently in the focus of research. Considering the crystallization temperature of the material, iron-based coatings might be the next generation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for low-temperature systems, reducing thermal losses. The objective of this research project is the development of highly amorphous, iron-based coatings. For this purpose, amorphous feedstock materials with different chromium contents have been developed and characterized regarding their microstructures, phase compositions, crystallization temperatures and amorphous content. The results show that the amorphous content is reduced with increasing particle size and chromium content. The coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying (APS) and high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF). It is shown that all coatings exhibit amorphous structures. HVOF coatings show a smaller amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock materials, indicating crystallization occurring in not fully melted particles or insufficient rapid cooling. The APS process can increase the amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock material, as shown for x Cr = 15%. All coatings proof good thermal shock behavior. Lowest thermal diffusivity values were determined for APS coatings, which confirms the potential of iron-based TBCs.

  18. Bond strength, bond stress and spallation mechanisms of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Krishnakumar, V.; McCarron, K.; Barber, B.; Sohn, Y.-H. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metall. and Mater. Eng.; Eric, J. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Tolpygo, V.K.

    1999-11-01

    Five production thermal barrier coatings were thermally cycled between room temperature and 1121 C (2050 F) to determine relative spallation life. Bond strength measurements were made using a modified ASTM direct pull-test. Bond stress measurements were made in the thermally grown oxide using a laser photoluminescence technique. Bond strength and bond stress measurements were conducted on two electron beam physical vapor deposition coatings as a function of thermal cycling. Each coating showed characteristic values of as-coated strength and stress and changes in strength and stress with thermal cycling. These variations in strength and stress with thermal cycling are related to oxidation and micro-debonding effects. (orig.)

  19. Silicon based substrate with environmental/thermal barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  20. Silicon based substrate with environmental/ thermal barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Nanottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  1. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  2. Inelastic constitutive equation of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masayuki ARAI

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are a very important technology for protecting the hot parts of gas turbines (GTs) from a high-temperature environment. The coating stress generated in the operation of GTs brings cracking and peeling damage to the TBCs. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate precisely such coating stress in a TBC system. We have obtained a stress-strain curve for a freestanding ceramic coat specimen peeled from a TBC coated substrate by conducting the bending test. The test results have revealed that the ceramic coating deforms nonlinearly with the applied loading. In this study, an inelastic constitutive equation for the ceramic thermal barrier coatings deposited by APS is developed. The obtained results are as follows: (1) the micromechanics-based constitutive equation was formulated with micro crack density formed at splat boundary, and (2) it was shown that the numerical results for a nonlinearly deformed beam simulated by the developed constitutive equation agreed with the experimental results obtained by cantilever bending tests.

  3. Breaking the Barriers in Chinese Female Career Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Career development is an important part of modern human resource management. Women are an important and integral part in human resources. Paying at ention to women's career development can’t be ignored both for women own career development and the economic development of society. But compared to men, the Chinese women encounter more barriers in the process of career development, the purpose of this paper is to analyze these barriers and put forward corresponding countermeasures to break the barriers.

  4. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Eric [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Gell, Maurice [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm⁻¹K⁻¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al₂O₃ and TiO₂, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium

  5. COMPARISON OF THERMAL SHOCK BEHAVIOR OF 7YSZ, 15YSZ AND SYSZ THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS PRODUCED BY APS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jamali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured scandia, yttria doped zirconia (SYSZ, 7wt. % yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ and 15YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs were produced by plasma spraying on nickel-based superalloy substrates with NiCrAlY as the bond coat. The thermal shock behavior of the three as-sprayed TBCs at 1000 °C was investigated. The results indicated that the thermal cycling lifetime of SYSZ and 7YSZ TBCs was longer than the 15YSZ TBCs due to the lower thermal mismatch stress between the ceramic layer and the metallic layer at high temperature and higher amount of tetragonal phase.

  6. An investigation of enhanced capability thermal barrier coating systems for diesel engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, R. L.; Layne, J. L.; Schechter, B.

    1984-01-01

    Material systems and processes for the development of effective and durable thermal barriers for heavy duty diesel engines were investigated. Seven coating systems were evaluated for thermal conductivity, erosion resistance, corrosion/oxidation resistance, and thermal shock resistance. An advanced coating system based on plasma sprayed particle yttria stabilized zirconia (PS/HYSZ) was judged superior in these tests. The measured thermal conductivity of the selected coating was 0.893 W/m C at 371 C. The PS/HYSZ coating system was applied to the piston crown, fire deck and valves of a single cylinder low heat rejection diesel engine. The coated engine components were tested for 24 hr at power levels from 0.83 MPa to 1.17 MPa brake mean effective pressure. The component coatings survived the engine tests with a minimum of distress. The measured fire deck temperatures decreased 86 C (155 F) on the intake side and 42 C (75 F) on the exhaust side with the coating applied.

  7. Numerical evaluation of the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Miranville, Frédéric; Lucas, Franck; Johan, Seriacaroupin

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers. Using dynamic simulations of a mathematical model of a whole test cell including a radiant barrier installed between the roof top and the ceiling, the thermal performance of the roof is calculated. The mean method is more particularly used to assess the thermal resistance of the building component and lead to a value which is compared to the one obtained for a mass insulation product such as polyurethane foam. On a further stage, the thermal mathematical model is replaced by a thermo-aeraulic model which is used to evaluate the thermal resistance of the roof as a function of the airflow rate. The results shows a better performance of the roof in this new configuration, which is widely used in practice. Finally, the mathematical relation between the thermal resistance and the airflow rate is proposed.

  8. Barriers in green lean six sigma product development process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Luthra, Sunil; Govindan, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    are identified as driver barriers, nine as dependent, five barriers as linkage and no barrier as autonomous. An analysis of interdependence and interactions among these barriers may help supply chain managers reach a better understanding of barriers. Thus, managers may be helped in prioritising and managing......In today’s competitive globalised business environment, production cost cutting is a primary issue before operation managers. As a research area, green lean six sigma (GLS) is proposed to have strategic importance in product development towards cutting costs, contributing to optimisation......, which shows ‘Competition and Uncertainty’ as the topmost output of the model and ‘Lack of Total Top Management Commitment’ as the bottom-level input to other barriers of the model. Further, MICMAC analysis has been also done to classify these barriers for better understanding; seven barriers...

  9. Factors Influencing Residual Stresses in Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrann, Roy T. R.; Rybicki, Edmund F.; Shadley, John R.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    To improve gas turbine and diesel engine performance using thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) requires an understanding of the factors that influence the in-service behavior of thermal barrier coatings. One of the many factors related to coating performance is the state of stress in the coating. The total stress state is composed of the stresses due to the in-service loading history and the residual stresses. Residual stresses have been shown to affect TBC life, the bond strength of thermal spray coatings, and the fatigue life of tungsten carbide coatings. Residual stresses are first introduced in TBC's by the spraying process due to elevated temperatures during processing and the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion of the top coat, bond coat, and substrate. Later, the residual stresses can be changed by the in-service temperature history due to a number of time and temperature dependent mechanisms, such as oxidation, creep, and sintering. Silica content has also been shown to affect sintering and the cyclic life of thermal barrier coatings. Thus, it is important to understand how the spraying process, the in-service thermal cycles, and the silica content can create and alter residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings.

  10. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, William P.; Hoffman, Eugene E.; Lee, Woo Y.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS machines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. In fact, the goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBC's, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first stage vanes and blades for times considerably in excess of those experienced in current applications. Issues that assume increased importance are the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and of the metallic bond coat; the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer; and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBC's, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology. A significant TBC development effort is planned in the ATS program which will address these key issues.

  11. Microstructural evolution and growth kinetics of thermally grown oxides in plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoju Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO during high temperature is a key factor to the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs applied on hot section components. In the present study both the CoNiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ ceramic coat of TBCs were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS. The composition and microstructure of TGO in TBCs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The growth rate of TGO for TBC and pure BC were gained after isothermal oxidation at 1100 °C for various times. The results showed that as-sprayed bond coat consisted of β and γ/γ′phases, β phase reducesd as the oxidation time increased. The TGO comprised α-Al2O3 formed in the first 2 h. CoO, NiO, Cr2O3 and spinel oxides appeared after 20 h of oxidation. Contents of CoO and NiO reduced while that of Cr2O3 and spinel oxides increased in the later oxidation stage. The TGO eventually consisted of a sub-Al2O3 layer with columnar microstructure and the upper porous CS clusters. The TGO growth kinetics for two kinds of samples followed parabolic laws, with oxidation rate constant of 0.344 μm/h0.5 for TBCs and 0.354 μm/h0.5 for pure BCs.

  12. Microstructural evolution and growth kinetics of thermally grown oxides in plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoju Liu; Teng Wang; Caicai Li; Zhenhuan Zheng; Qiang Li

    2016-01-01

    The formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) during high temperature is a key factor to the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied on hot section components. In the present study both the CoNiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ) ceramic coat of TBCs were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS). The composition and microstructure of TGO in TBCs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The growth rate of TGO for TBC and pure BC were gained after isothermal oxidation at 1100 °C for various times. The results showed that as-sprayed bond coat consisted of β and γ/γ'phases,β phase reducesd as the oxidation time increased. The TGO comprised α-Al2O3 formed in the first 2 h. CoO, NiO, Cr2O3 and spinel oxides appeared after 20 h of oxidation. Contents of CoO and NiO reduced while that of Cr2O3 and spinel oxides increased in the later oxidation stage. The TGO eventually consisted of a sub-Al2O3 layer with columnar microstructure and the upper porous CS clusters. The TGO growth kinetics for two kinds of samples followed parabolic laws, with oxidation rate constant of 0.344 μm/h0.5 for TBCs and 0.354 μm/h0.5 for pure BCs.

  13. Iron serves as diffusion barrier in thermally regenerative galvanic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouthamel, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Pure iron or iron-coated diaphragm provides a hydrogen diffusion electrode for a thermally regenerative galvanic cell. It allows the gas to diffuse through its interatomic spaces and resists the corrosive action of the cell environment.

  14. Preparation of cross-sectional specimens of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, O; Heuer, A H; Mitchell, T E

    1990-04-01

    During the microstructural examination of ceramic thermal barrier coatings by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), initial efforts for the preparation of cross-sectional thin foils from interface regions by conventional means were mostly failures. Delamination of the Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 ceramic coating from the nickel-base alloy substrate sometimes occurred during fine polishing at around 80 microns thickness but mostly occurred during dimpling. Because of this sensitivity, special techniques for mechanical handling were developed so that ion milling could give thin enough regions of the metal-ceramic interface. TEM showed convincingly that the highly fragile nature of the coatings is in fact due to the extensive porosity at the interface developed as a result of heat treatment.

  15. Analysis on partial thermal resistances of packaged SiC schottky barrier diodes at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehwa; Funaki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the temperature dependence of partial thermal resistances of a packaged SiC schottky barrier diode (SBD) for high temperature applications. Transient thermal resistances of the packaged SiC SBD were measured and characterized in temperature range from 27 to 275 °C. The partial thermal resistances were extracted and analyzed using the cumulative and differential thermal structure functions. The extracted partial thermal resistances were compared to the results from the finite difference thermal model, and both results were in good agreement. The temperature dependence of the partial thermal resistance of the SiC device and the Si3N4 substrate contributes to the overall thermal characteristics variation of the packaged SiC SBD.

  16. SELECTION OF OXIDES FOR STABILIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WHILE OBTAINING THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes selection of oxides and describes in details a majority of oxide systems which are applicable for stabilization of zirconium dioxide while obtaining thermal barrier coatings with maximum amount of tetragonal phase. Methodology of investigation is based on a review of analytical information on the current state of thermal barrier coatings on the basis of zirconium dioxide stabilized by oxides of rare-earth metals. The method used for application of  zirconium dioxide thermal barrier coatings is plasma spraying. Positive results have been also obtained while applying e-beam sputtering, ion-plasma deposition and magnetron sputtering. Nevertheless preferred plasma spraying application for thermal barrier coatings still continues due to its high productivity and versatility that permits to deposit metallic and ceramic materials of the ordered chemical and phase composition.Ytterbium and cerium oxides have been selected as oxides for stabilization of zirconium dioxide in order to obtain thermal barrier coatings. The paper also considers аn oxide system of zirconium dioxide: “hafnium oxide – yttrium oxide”, representing in itself the structure which is similar to zirconium dioxide.

  17. Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of Single Phase Lanthanum Zirconate Thermal Barrier Coatings with Optimized Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Mauer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The shortcomings at elevated operation temperatures of the standard material yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs have initiated many research activities seeking alternatives. One candidate is the pyrochlore lanthanum zirconate La2Zr2O7 (LZ, which is phase-stable to its melting point. At the same time, it shows a lower thermal conductivity and a lower sintering tendency when compared to YSZ. Because of its low thermal expansion coefficient and poor toughness, it is applied in combination with YSZ in double layer TBC systems. It is the current state of knowledge that LZ is prone to lanthanum depletion if processed by plasma spraying. The process conditions have to be selected carefully to avoid this. Furthermore, the amount and morphology of the coating porosity is essential for a good thermo-mechanical performance. In this work, the development and testing of LZ/YSZ double layer TBC systems is described. Initially, suitable basic parameters (torch, plasma gas composition, and power were tested with respect to coating stoichiometry. Then, microstructures were optimized by adjusting feed rate, spray distance, and by selecting a more appropriate feedstock. Powder particles and coatings were characterized by digital image analysis.

  18. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  19. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on Ni, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1985-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on NI-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  20. Effect of Layer-Graded Bond Coats on Edge Stress Concentration and Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability is closely related to design, processing and microstructure of the coating Z, tn systems. Two important issues that must be considered during the design of a thermal barrier coating are thermal expansion and modulus mismatch between the substrate and the ceramic layer, and substrate oxidation. In many cases, both of these issues may be best addressed through the selection of an appropriate bond coat system. In this study, a low thermal expansion and layer-graded bond coat system, that consists of plasma-sprayed FeCoNiCrAl and FeCrAlY coatings, and a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed FeCrAlY coating, is developed to minimize the thermal stresses and provide oxidation resistance. The thermal expansion and oxidation behavior of the coating system are also characterized, and the strain isolation effect of the bond coat system is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Experiments and finite element results show that the layer-graded bond coat system possesses lower interfacial stresses. better strain isolation and excellent oxidation resistance. thus significantly improving the coating performance and durability.

  1. Inelastic deformation behavior of thermal barrier coatings exposed at a high-temperature environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are usually deposited onto the surface of the high-temperature component such as gas turbine, in order to protect it from a hightemperature environment. Coating stress generated by such a high-temperature brings serious damages in TBCs in service. For predicting numerically it, it is necessary to develop the constitutive equation suite to plasam-sprayed TBCs. Previous studies have made clear that the freestanding ceramic coat peeled from TBC coated substrate deforms nonlinearly with a mechanical loading, however the results there have been restricted to the test done using as-sprayed sample. In this study, effect of deposition parameter and high-temperature exposure condition on stress-strain curve of the freestanding ceramic coating sample was examined. The associated deformation process was discussed with the microstructure changes observed after performing a bending test for the exposed sample.

  2. High Temperature Damping Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    A high temperature damping test apparatus has been developed using a high heat flux CO 2 laser rig in conjunction with a TIRA S540 25 kHz Shaker and Polytec OFV 5000 Vibrometer system. The test rig has been successfully used to determine the damping performance of metallic and ceramic protective coating systems at high temperature for turbine engine applications. The initial work has been primarily focused on the microstructure and processing effects on the coating temperature-dependence damping behavior. Advanced ceramic coatings, including multicomponent tetragonal and cubic phase thermal barrier coatings, along with composite bond coats, have also been investigated. The coating high temperature damping mechanisms will also be discussed.

  3. Failure of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chen; ZHANG Chun-xia; GUO Hong-bo; GONG Sheng-kai; ZHANG Yue

    2006-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were developed to protect metallic blades and vanes working in turbo-engines. The two-layered structure TBCs, consisting of NiCoCrAlY bond coat and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), were deposited on a cylinder of superalloy substrate by the electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The failure mechanism of the TBCs was investigated with a thermo-mechanical fatigue testing system under the service condition similar to that for turbine blades. Non-destructive evaluation of the coated specimens was conducted through the impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the crack initiation mainly takes place on the top coat at the edge of the heated zones.

  4. Residual stress inspection by Eu3+ photoluminescence piezo-spectroscopy: An application in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Ma, Chunli; Huang, Fengxian; Wang, Chunjie; Zhao, Sumei; Cui, Qiliang; Cao, Xueqiang; Li, Fangfei

    2013-08-01

    A non-destructive inspection technique was developed to measure the residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by using Eu3+ photoluminescence piezo-spectroscopy. The new approach is based on the relationship between stress and the position of the main peak of 5D0→7F2 transition, which is built by the high-pressure techniques. The Eu3+ luminescent sublayer was applied in the current method to ensure that the detected position in TBCs can be well controlled. The laser used to detect Eu3+ luminescence gives a proper penetration depth and spatial resolution, which make this method suitable to detect the stresses concentrated near the interfaces between different layers. This method was successfully applied in detecting residual stress in plasma sprayed TBCs with a 8YSZ:Eu (1 mol. %) sublayer.

  5. Low Thermal Conductivity Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Using the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Eric H.; Jiang, Chen; Roth, Jeffrey; Gell, Maurice

    2014-06-01

    The primary function of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is to insulate the underlying metal from high temperature gases in gas turbine engines. As a consequence, low thermal conductivity and high durability are the primary properties of interest. In this work, the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process was used to create layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries, in yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBCs. IPBs have been shown to be effective in reducing thermal conductivity. Optimization of the IPB microstructure by the SPPS process produced YSZ TBCs with a thermal conductivity of 0.6 W/mK, an approximately 50% reduction compared to standard air plasma sprayed (APS) coatings. In preliminary tests, SPPS YSZ with IPBs exhibited equal or greater furnace thermal cycles and erosion resistance compared to regular SPPS and commercially made APS YSZ TBCs.

  6. Magnetic tunneling junctions with permalloy electrodes: a study of barrier, thermal annealing, and interlayer coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoyong E-mail: xiaoyong_liu@brown.edu; Ren Cong; Ritchie, Lance; Schrag, B.D.; Xiao Gang; Li Laifeng

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic properties of Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} tunneling junctions are studied for different Al thicknesses and plasma oxidation times. A maximal magnetoresistance of 34% is obtained with Al thickness of 20 A. Magnetometry reveals large exchange bias fields ({approx}400 Oe) over a wide range of barrier thicknesses, indicating junctions of high quality. Transport measurements conducted on junctions before and after thermal annealing show a dramatic improvement in barrier quality after annealing. Interlayer coupling fields have been measured as a function of barrier thickness for different oxidation times.

  7. Mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverio, Hudson Alves; Flauzino Neto, Wilson Pires; Silva, Ingrid Souza Vieira da; Rosa, Joyce Rover; Pasquini, Daniel, E-mail: pasquini@iqufu.ufu.br, E-mail: danielpasquini2005@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Assuncao, Rosana Maria Nascimento de [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), Ituiutaba, MG (brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Integradas do Pontal; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney Jose Lima [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-11-15

    In this work, the effects of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from soy hulls (WSH{sub 30}) on the mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose (MC) nanocomposites were evaluated. MC/WSH{sub 30} nanocomposite films with different filler levels (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10%) were prepared by casting. Compared to neat MC film, improvements in the mechanical and barrier properties were observed, while thermal stability was retained. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared may be attributed to mechanical percolation of WSH{sub 30}, formation of a continuous network of WSH{sub 30} linked by hydrogen interactions and a close association between filler and matrix. (author)

  8. Potential benefits of a ceramic thermal barrier coating on large power generation gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating design option offers benefit in terms of reduced electricity costs when used in utility gas turbines. Options considered include: increased firing temperature, increased component life, reduced cooling air requirements, and increased corrosion resistance (resulting in increased tolerance for dirty fuels). Performance and cost data were obtained. Simple, recuperated and combined cycle applications were considered, and distillate and residual fuels were assumed. The results indicate that thermal barrier coatings could produce large electricity cost savings if these coatings permit turbine operation with residual fuels at distillate-rated firing temperatures. The results also show that increased turbine inlet temperature can result in substantial savings in fuel and capital costs.

  9. Thermal barrier coatings: Coating methods, performance, and heat engine applications. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning conference proceedings on coating methods, performance evaluations, and applications of thermal barrier coatings as protective coatings for heat engine components against high temperature corrosions and chemical erosions. The developments of thermal barrier coating techniques for high performance and reliable gas turbines, diesel engines, jet engines, and internal combustion engines are presented. Topics include plasma sprayed coating methods, yttria stabilized zirconia coatings, coating life models, coating failure and durability, thermal shock and cycling, and acoustic emission analysis of coatings. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Pulsed-terahertz reflectometry for health monitoring of ceramic thermal barrier coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chu; Lee, Dong-Joon; Pollock, Tresa; Whitaker, John F

    2010-02-15

    Terahertz time-domain reflectometry was used to monitor the progress of a thermally grown oxide layer and stress-induced, air-filled voids at the interface of an Yttria-stabilized-zirconia ceramic thermal-barrier coating and a metal surface. The thicknesses of these internal layers, observed in scanning-electron-microscope images to increase with thermal-exposure time, have been resolved - even when changing on the order of only a few micrometers - by distinguishing not only increased delays in the arrival times of terahertz pulses reflected from this multilayer structure, but also changes in the width and shape of the pulses. These unique features can be used to predict the lifetime of thermal-barrier coatings and to indicate or warn of spallation conditions. The trends of the experimental results are also confirmed through Fresnel-reflection time-domain simulations.

  11. Barriers to the Diffusion of Solar Thermal Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Despite its considerable potential in household, domestic and industry sectors, the possible contribution of solar heat is often neglected in many academic and institutional energy projections and scenarios. This is best explained by the frequent failure to distinguish heat and work as two different forms of energy transfers. As a result, policy makers in many countries or States have tended to pay lesser attention to solar thermal technologies than to other renewable energy technologies.

  12. Ultrathin, transferred layers of thermally grown silicon dioxide as biofluid barriers for biointegrated flexible electronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hui; Zhao, Jianing; Yu, Ki Jun; Song, Enming; Barati Farimani, Amir; Chiang, Chia-Han; Jin, Xin; Xue, Yeguang; Xu, Dong; Du, Wenbo; Seo, Kyung Jin; Zhong, Yiding; Yang, Zijian; Won, Sang Min; Fang, Guanhua; Choi, Seo Woo; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Huang, Yonggang; Ashraful Alam, Muhammad; Viventi, Jonathan; Aluru, N. R.; Rogers, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Materials that can serve as long-lived barriers to biofluids are essential to the development of any type of chronic electronic implant. Devices such as cardiac pacemakers and cochlear implants use bulk metal or ceramic packages as hermetic enclosures for the electronics. Emerging classes of flexible, biointegrated electronic systems demand similar levels of isolation from biofluids but with thin, compliant films that can simultaneously serve as biointerfaces for sensing and/or actuation while in contact with the soft, curved, and moving surfaces of target organs. This paper introduces a solution to this materials challenge that combines (i) ultrathin, pristine layers of silicon dioxide (SiO2) thermally grown on device-grade silicon wafers, and (ii) processing schemes that allow integration of these materials onto flexible electronic platforms. Accelerated lifetime tests suggest robust barrier characteristics on timescales that approach 70 y, in layers that are sufficiently thin (less than 1 μm) to avoid significant compromises in mechanical flexibility or in electrical interface fidelity. Detailed studies of temperature- and thickness-dependent electrical and physical properties reveal the key characteristics. Molecular simulations highlight essential aspects of the chemistry that governs interactions between the SiO2 and surrounding water. Examples of use with passive and active components in high-performance flexible electronic devices suggest broad utility in advanced chronic implants.

  13. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  14. SMEs and Barriers to Skill Development: A Scottish Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Thomas; Ottens, Melanie; Taylor, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of Scottish small and medium-sized enterprises reveals that small business culture is a significant barrier to skill development. Other barriers include awareness, finance, and access to training. A welter of recent policy initiatives has added to a state of confusion about the role of training. (SK)

  15. Loadings in thermal barrier coatings of jet engine turbine blades an experimental research and numerical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses complex loadings of turbine blades and protective layer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC), under real working airplane jet conditions. They obey both multi-axial mechanical loading and sudden temperature variation during starting and landing of the airplanes. In particular, two types of blades are analyzed: stationary and rotating, which are widely applied in turbine engines produced by airplane factories.

  16. Thermally induced decomposition of B4C barrier layers in Mo/Si multilayer structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, S.; van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; Yakshin, A. E.; Zoethout, E.; F. Bijkerk,

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the Mo crystalline state (quasi-amorphous or crystalline) on the thermal stability of Mo/Si thin film multilayers with B4C diffusion barrier layers at either of the two interfaces. We find that multilayers containing amorphous Mo layers are more stable than those cont

  17. Self-healing thermal barrier coatings; with application to gas turbine engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponnusami, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) systems have been applied in turbine engines for aerospace and power plants since the beginning of the 1980s to increase the energy efficiency of the engine, by allowing for higher operation temperatures. TBC systems on average need to be replaced about four times durin

  18. Micromechanical Simulation of Thermal Cyclic Behavior of ZrO2/Ti Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Tsukamoto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study numerically investigates cyclic thermal shock behavior of ZrO2/Ti functionally graded thermal barrier coatings (FG TBCs based on a nonlinear mean-field micromechanical approach, which takes into account the time-independent and dependent inelastic deformation, such as plasticity of metals, creep of metals and ceramics, and diffusional mass flow at the ceramic/metal interface. The fabrication processes for the FG TBCs have been also considered in the simulation. The effect of creep and compositional gradation patterns on micro-stress states in the FG TBCs during thermal cycling has been examined in terms of the amplitudes, ratios, maximum and mean values of thermal stresses. The compositional gradation patterns highly affect thermal stress states in case of high creep rates of ZrO2. In comparison with experimental data, maximum thermal stresses, amplitudes and ratios of thermal stresses can be effective parameters for design of such FG TBCs subject to cyclic thermal shock loadings.

  19. Effect of intergranular interactions on thermal energy barrier distribution in perpendicular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Bertram, H. Neal; Schabes, Manfred E.

    2002-05-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been performed to simulate dynamic hysteresis loops in perpendicular media. Thermal energy barrier distributions have been calculated. For a fixed percentage of magnetization switched, a linear variation between the scaled applied field Ha(t)/HK and ln(f0t)1/2 is found. Without including intergranular magnetostatic interactions, intergranular exchange coupling reduces the thermal energy barrier distribution width, compared to the physical volume distribution width. However, the magnetostatic interactions increase the energy barrier width substantially. The increase is significantly reduced at smaller magnetostatic interactions. For the effective volume of 50% magnetization switched (V50), the results show V50=√ almost independent of intergranular magnetostatic and exchange interactions.

  20. Formation and behavior of thermal barrier coatings on nickel-base superalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高阳; 解仑; 曾飞

    2004-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been used to extend the life of combustors. Electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) ceramic coating has been developed for more demanding rotating as well as stationary turbine components. Here 3 kW RF magnetron sputtering equipment was used to gain zirconia ceramic coatings on hollow turbine blades and vanes, which had been deposited NiCrAlY by cathodic arc deposition.NiCrAlY coating surface was treated by shot peening; the effects of shot peening on the residual stress are presented. The results show that RF sputtered TBCs are columnar ceramics, strongly bonded to metal substrates. NiCrAlY bond coat is made of β, γ′ and Cr phases, ZrO2 ceramic layer consists of t' and c phases. No degradation occursto RF ceramic coatings after 100 h high temperature oxidation at 1 150 ℃ and 500 thermal cycles at 1 150 ℃ for 2 min,air-cooling.

  1. Liquid Feedstock Plasma Spraying: An Emerging Process for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markocsan, Nicolaie; Gupta, Mohit; Joshi, Shrikant; Nylén, Per; Li, Xin-Hai; Wigren, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid feedstock plasma spraying (LFPS) involves deposition of ultrafine droplets of suspensions or solution precursors (typically ranging from nano- to submicron size) and permits production of coatings with unique microstructures that are promising for advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. This paper reviews the recent progress arising from efforts devoted to development of high-performance TBCs using the LFPS approach. Advancements in both suspension plasma spraying and solution precursor plasma spraying, which constitute the two main variants of LFPS, are presented. Results illustrating the different types of the microstructures that can be realized in LFPS through appropriate process parameter control, model-assisted assessment of influence of coating defects on thermo-mechanical properties and the complex interplay between pore coarsening, sintering and crystallite growth in governing thermal conductivity are summarized. The enhancement in functional performances/lifetime possible in LFPS TBCs with multilayered architectures and by incorporating new pyrochlore chemistries such as gadolinium zirconate, besides the conventional single 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia insulating ceramic layer, is specifically highlighted.

  2. Residual Stress Analysis of Laser-Drilled Thermal Barrier Coatings Involving Various Bond Coats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinard, C.; Montay, G.; Guipont, V.; Jeandin, M.; Girardot, J.; Schneider, M.

    2015-01-01

    The gas turbine combustion chamber of aero-engines requires a thermal barrier coating (TBC) by thermal spraying. Further heat protection is achieved by laser drilling of cooling holes. The residual stresses play an important role in the mechanical behaviour of TBC. It could also affect the TBC response to delamination during laser drilling. In this work, studies of the cracking behaviour after laser drilling and residual stress distribution have been achieved for different bond coats by plasma spray or cold spray. From interface crack length measured pulse-by-pulse after laser percussion drilling at 20° angle, the role of the various bond coats on crack initiation and propagation are investigated. It is shown that the bond coat drastically influences the cracking behaviour. The residual stresses profiles were also determined by the incremental hole-drilling method involving speckle interferometry. An original method was also developed to measure the residual stress profiles around a pre-drilled zone with a laser beam at 90°. The results are discussed to highlight the influence of TBCs interfaces on the resulting residual stresses distribution before laser drilling, and also to investigate the modification around the hole after laser drilling. It is shown that laser drilling could affect the residual stress state.

  3. Thermal behavior of bovine serum albumin after exposure to barrier discharge helium plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijie, R.; Pohoata, V.; Topala, I.

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal plasma jets at atmospheric pressure are useful tools nowadays in plasma medicine. Various applications are tested such as cauterization, coagulation, wound healing, natural and artificial surfaces decontamination, and sterilization. In order to know more about the effects of gas plasma on biological supramolecules, we exposed protein powders to a barrier discharge helium plasma jet. Then, spectroscopic investigations were carried out in order to obtain information on protein secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. We obtained a reduction of the protein alpha-helix content after the plasma exposure and a different behavior, for both thermal denaturation/renaturation kinetics and thermal aggregation process.

  4. New Technique for Successful Thermal Barrier Coating Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickey; Lee

    2000-05-01

    Reliability of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) hinges on the adhesion of a thermally grown oxide scale to an insulative ceramic topcoat and an underlying metallic bondcoat. The width of the scale and its interfaces makes transmission electron microscopy (TEM) an appropriate tool for its analysis. However, specimen preparation has proven to be a challenging obstacle leading to a dearth of TEM research on TBCs. A new approach to cross-section TBC TEM specimen preparation is described. The principal advantages of this technique are reproducibility, reduced specimen damage, and time savings resulting from decreased ion milling. This technique has been successfully applied to numerous TBC specimens with various thermal histories.

  5. Thermal stability of nanocrystalline W-Ti diffusion barrier thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Nanocrystalline W-Ti diffusion barrier thin films with different phase structures and Cu/barrier/Si multilayer structures were deposited on p-type Si(100) substrates by DC magnetron sputtering.These films were annealed at different temperatures for 1 h.The diffusion barrier properties and thermal stability were studied using four-probe tester(FPP),XRD,AFM,XPS,FESEM,and HRTEM.The experimental results showed that the films were stable up to 700℃.When the annealing temperature was increased,the Cu and Ti atoms began to react and CuTi3 was formed.In addition,the high resistance Cu3Si was formed due to inter-diffusion between the Si and Cu atoms which made the surface rougher and caused the sheet resistance to increase abruptly.At the same time,failure mechanism of the nanocrystalline W-Ti diffusion barrier thin films during annealing process was also discussed.

  6. Physics parameter calculations for a Tandem Mirror Reactor with thermal barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian, B.M.; Lappa, D.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1979-11-06

    Thermal barriers are localized reductions in potential between the plugs and the central cell, which effectively insulate trapped plug electrons from the central cell electrons. By then applying electron heating in the plug, it is possible to obtain trapped electron temperatures that are much greater than those of the central cell electrons. This, in turn, effects an increase in the plug potential and central cell confinement with a concomitant decrease in plug density and injection power. Ions trapped in the barrier by collisions are removed by the injection of neutral beams directed inside the barrier cell loss cone; these beam neutrals convert trapped barrier ions to neutrals by charge exchange permitting their escape. We describe a zero-dimensional physics model for this type of reactor, and present some preliminary results for Q.

  7. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on nickel-, cobalt- and iron-base alloy substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1986-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems have significantly longer lives than MCrAlY bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  8. Ionoluminscence of partially-stabilized zirconia for thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo, N.R. [Departamento de Fisica Experimental, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)]. E-mail: nrebollof@yahoo.com; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L. [Departamento de Fisica Experimental, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Miranda, J. [Departamento de Fisica Experimental, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2007-08-15

    Ionoluminescence is explored as an alternative technique to study the high temperature phase stability of zirconia-based oxides. The evolution of an initially metastable single tetragonal phase towards de-stabilization is investigated for three single-doped zirconia compositions with Y, Yb and Gd. The differences in de-stabilization paths are identified using X-ray diffraction and ionoluminescence; elemental analysis is also performed using particle-induced X-ray emission. X-ray diffraction studies reveal a different scenario for each of the compositions selected; the differences are strongly influenced by the thermodynamic driving forces associated to the fluorite-to-tetragonal displacive transformation. Ionoluminescence studies indicate a significant increment on the signal intensity for de-stabilized samples, relative to previous annealing stages. There are also more subtle differences in the luminescent response from the samples at intermediate annealing stages also related to phase changes. This study provides a basis to characterize phase evolution in single-doped zirconia compositions for thermal insulation applications using luminescence.

  9. Microstructure and properties of sputtered thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao; Lun Xie; Feng Pan; Mengcheng Chen

    2004-01-01

    A 3 kW radio frequency (RF) magnetron-sputtering unit was used to produce zirconia ceramic coatings on hollow turbine blades and vanes, which had been deposited a NiCrAlY bond coat layer by cathodic arc deposition. The NiCrAlY coating surface was shot-peened, and the residual stress in the bond coat layer and the effects of heat treatment on the residual stress are presented.After shot peening porosities and microgaps disappear in the NiCrAlY bond coat, the whole depth profile is residual compressive stress. Coarseness tests show that the roughness value (Rz) decreases from 16.4 to 3.3 μm. The microstructure and phase composition of the coatings were investigated using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the NiCrAlY bond coat is composed of γ' and Cr phases, and the Al2O3 scales are formed near the interface between the ZrO2 ceramic layer and the NiCrAlY bond coat. No degradation occurred to RF sputtered ceramic coatings after oxidating at 1150℃ for 100 h,heating at 1150℃ for 5 min and then air-cooling for 500 thermal cycles.

  10. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  11. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Development Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tony

    2015-01-01

    There are clear advantages of development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) for a crewed mission to Mars. NTP for in-space propulsion enables more ambitious space missions by providing high thrust at high specific impulse ((is) approximately 900 sec) that is 2 times the best theoretical performance possible for chemical rockets. Missions can be optimized for maximum payload capability to take more payload with reduced total mass to orbit; saving cost on reduction of the number of launch vehicles needed. Or missions can be optimized to minimize trip time significantly to reduce the deep space radiation exposure to the crew. NTR propulsion technology is a game changer for space exploration to Mars and beyond. However, 'NUCLEAR' is a word that is feared and vilified by some groups and the hostility towards development of any nuclear systems can meet great opposition by the public as well as from national leaders and people in authority. The public often associates the 'nuclear' word with weapons of mass destruction. The development NTP is at risk due to unwarranted public fears and clear honest communication of nuclear safety will be critical to the success of the development of the NTP technology. Reducing cost to NTP development is critical to its acceptance and funding. In the past, highly inflated cost estimates of a full-scale development nuclear engine due to Category I nuclear security requirements and costly regulatory requirements have put the NTP technology as a low priority. Innovative approaches utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU). Even though NTP can be a small source of radiation to the crew, NTP can facilitate significant reduction of crew exposure to solar and cosmic radiation by reducing trip times by 3-4 months. Current Human Mars Mission (HMM) trajectories with conventional propulsion systems and fuel-efficient transfer orbits exceed astronaut radiation exposure limits. Utilizing extra propellant from one additional SLS launch and available

  12. THE EFFECT OF V2O5 MELT INFILTRATION ON THE FAILURE OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABBA ABDULHAMID ABUBAKAR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of low quality fuel in land based driven turbine in Saudi Arabia usually results in hot corrosion attack (Type 1 due to the penetration of V2O5 into the existing micro pores and cracks on the top coat of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs. As a result of dissolution-precipitation reaction, 4-5% volumetric expansion of the coating occurs due to the tetragonal-to-monoclinic (destabilization transformation of Zirconia. In the current work, a Phase Field Model that estimates the kinetics of micro-structural evolution during the diffusional tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in the Melt Infiltrated Reaction Zone of the top coat at 900ºC is developed. The model is sequentiallycoupled with constitutive model in order to determine the resulting stress field developed in the top coat. The results show that localized stresses are developed due to the Zirconia-destabilization transformation, and the stresses are found to be higher at the corners and curvatures formed by inter-lamella connection of the micro-pores and micro-cracks.

  13. Thermal hydraulics development for CASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowrie, Robert B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-07

    This talk will describe the technical direction of the Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) Project within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Department of Energy Innovation Hub. CASL is focused on developing a 'virtual reactor', that will simulate the physical processes that occur within a light-water reactor. These simulations will address several challenge problems, defined by laboratory, university, and industrial partners that make up CASL. CASL's T-H efforts are encompassed in two sub-projects: (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (2) Interface Treatment Methods (ITM). The CFD subproject will develop non-proprietary, scalable, verified and validated macroscale CFD simulation tools. These tools typically require closures for their turbulence and boiling models, which will be provided by the ITM sub-project, via experiments and microscale (such as DNS) simulation results. The near-term milestones and longer term plans of these two sub-projects will be discussed.

  14. Relationship Between Lamellar Structure and Elastic Modulus of Thermally Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Intra-splat Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Rong; Lv, Bo-Wen; Yang, Guan-Jun; Zhang, Wei-Xu; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-12-01

    The elastic modulus of plasma-sprayed top coating plays an important role in thermal cyclic lifetime of thermally sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), since the thermal stress is determined by the substrate/coating thermal mismatch and the elastic modulus of top coating. Consequently, much attention had been paid to understanding the relationship between elastic modulus and lamellar structure of top coating. However, neglecting the intra-splat cracks connected with inter-splat pores often leads to poor prediction in in-plane modulus. In this study, a modified model taking account of intra-splat cracks and other main structural characteristics of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was proposed. Based on establishing the relationship between elastic modulus and structural parameters of basic unit, effects of structural parameters on the elastic modulus of coatings were discussed. The predicted results are well consistent with experimental data on coating elastic modulus in both out-plane direction and in-plane direction. This study would benefit the further comprehensive understanding of failure mechanism of TBCs in thermal cyclic condition.

  15. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  16. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  17. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2004-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land -based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems; a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization.

  18. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-07-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  19. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  20. Synthesis of thermal and chemical resistant oxygen barrier starch with reinforcement of nano silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Satyabrata; Swain, Sarat K

    2013-09-12

    Starch/silicon carbide (starch/SiC) bionanocomposites were synthesized by solution method using different wt% of silicon carbide with starch matrix. The interaction between starch and silicon carbide was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The structure of the bionanocomposites was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Thermal property of starch/SiC bionanocomposites was measured and a significant enhancement of thermal resistance was noticed. The oxygen barrier property of the composites was studied and a substantial reduction in permeability was observed as compared to the virgin starch. The reduction of oxygen permeability with enhancement of thermal stability of prepared bionanocomposites may enable the materials suitable for thermal resistant packaging and adhesive applications.

  1. Substrate Effects on the High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limin He; Zhenhua Xu; Jianping Li; Rende Mu; Shimei He; Guanghong Huang

    2009-01-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behaviors of the NiCrAIYSi/P-YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) pro-duced by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) on directionally solidified (DS) and single crys-talline (SC) Ni-based superalloy substrates were investigated. The cross-sectional microstructure investigation, isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests were conducted for the comparison of oxidation behaviors of TBCs on different substrates. Although TBC on DS substrate has a relatively higher oxidation rate, it has a longer thermal cycling lifetime than that on SC substrate. The primary factor for TBC spallation is the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of the bond coat and substrate. The morphological feature of thermally grown oxide (TGO) has a strong influence on the TBC performance. By optimizing the elemental interdiffusion between bond coat and substrate, a high quality TGO layer is formed on the DS substrate, and therefore the TBC oxidation behavior is improved.

  2. Influence of Annealing on the Grain Growth and Thermal Diffusivity of Nanostructured YSZ Thermal Barrier Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na WANG; Chungen ZHOU; Shengkai GONG; Huibin XU

    2006-01-01

    The nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited by atmospherically plasma spraying. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the microstructure of the zirconia coatings. Thermal diffusivity values at normal temperatures have been evaluated by laser flash technique. Effect of annealing on the microstructure evolution of the zirconia coating has been performed. The grains and thermal diffusivity are increased with increasing annealing time and temperature.The grain growth is according to the GRIGC (the grain rotation induced grain coalescence) mechanism. The increase in thermal diffusivity is attributed to the grain growth and the decrease in porosity of nanostructured zirconia coatings.

  3. Enhancement of thermal spin transfer torque by double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a nonmagnetic metal spacer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H.; Tseng, P.; Yang, Y. Y.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of thermal spin transfer torque in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal spacer is proposed in this study. The results indicate that, given the same temperature difference, thermal spin transfer torque and charge current density for the proposed double barrier magnetic tunnel junction configuration can be approximately twice as much as that of the traditional single-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. This enhancement can be attributed to the resonant tunneling mechanism in the double-barrier structure.

  4. Sol–gel processing and characterization of (RE-Y)-zirconia powders for thermal barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Fenech, Justine; Dalbin, Michel; Barnabé, Antoine; Bonino, Jean-Pierre; Ansart, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The effect of doping on the structural, morphological and thermal properties of ZrO2–XO1.5 (X=Y, La, Sm, Er) solid solutions for thermal barrier (TBC) applications was investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions from 9.7 to 40 mol% XO1.5 (X=Y, La, Sm, Er) were synthesised by the sol–gel route. The structural analysis of the powders was performed using X-ray diffraction analysis coupled with Rietveld refinements and the measurement of their specific surface area with the BET method. Fo...

  5. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  6. Improving anti-corrosion property of thermal barrier coatings by intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S., E-mail: syan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shang, Y.J., E-mail: shangyijun@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, X.F., E-mail: reandy123@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yi, X., E-mail: xyle@buaa.edu.com [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Le, X.Y., E-mail: xyle@buaa.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-02-01

    Anticorrosion behavior is an important factor for the reliability and durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Intense pulsed ion beam (ion species: 70% H{sup +} + 30% C{sup +}; current density: 150 A/cm{sup 2} and 250 A/cm{sup 2}; accelerate voltage: 300 kV; pulse duration: 65 ns) irradiation were used to improve the anticorrosion behavior of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) /NiCoCrAlY thermal barrier coating. The anticorrosion property of the TBCs was evaluated with polarization curves method. A quite good result was obtained. Further analysis show that IPIB irradiation can seal the pores in YSZ layer, and block the penetration channels of corrosive fluid, therefore, improves the anticorrosion behavior.

  7. Effect of equilibrium moisture content on barrier, mechanical and thermal properties of chitosan films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Loredo, Rocío Yaneli; Rodríguez-Hernández, Adriana Inés; Morales-Sánchez, Eduardo; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos Alberto; Velazquez, Gonzalo

    2016-04-01

    Water molecules modify the properties of biodegradable films obtained from hydrophilic materials. Most studies dealing with thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of hydrophilic films are carried out under one relative humidity (RH) condition. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the moisture content on the thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of chitosan films under several RH conditions. Microclimates, obtained with saturated salt solutions were used for conditioning samples and the properties of the films were evaluated under each RH condition. Chitosan films absorbed up to 40% of moisture at the higher RH studied. The percentage of elongation and the water vapour permeability increased while tensile strength, Young's modulus and glass transition temperature decreased, when the moisture content increased. The results suggest that the water molecules plasticized the polymer matrix, changing the properties when the films were in contact with high RH environments.

  8. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Ceramic/Metal Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jin-sheng; JIANG Bing; LIU Jie; HUANG Shi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The ceramic/metal gradient thermal barrier coatings (CMGTBCs) which combined the conceptions of thermal barrier coatings ( TBG ) and functional gradient materials ( FGMs ) are investigated. The structure model studied in this paper is a general model which includes four different layers: pure ceramic layer , ceramic/metal gradient layer, pure metal layer, and substrate layer. The microstructures of gradient layer have different ceramics and metal volume fraction profile along with the direction of thickness. The profile function used to describe the gradient microstructures can be expressed in power-law or polynomial expression. The mechanical properties of CMGTBCs are obtained by means of microscopic mechanics. As special cases, the interactive solutions are given by Mori- Tanaka method, and the non- interactive solutions by dilute solution. The Young's modulus calculated by these methods are compared with those by other methods , e g, the rule of mixtures.

  9. An Experimental Characterization of Damping Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    magnets (McMaster-Car: Ultra-High-Temp ALNICO 8 Disc Magnet 1/4" Diameter x 1/2” high, 1.06lb pull Cat# 57295K74 and ALNICO 8 Disc Magnet 1/4" Diameter...Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH, 2001. Gregori, G., Lì, L., Nychka, J., and Clarke, D. “Vibration Damping of Superalloys and Thermal Barrier

  10. Z-dependent barriers in multifragmentation from poissonian reducibility and thermal scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, L; Moretto, L G; Wozniak, G J

    1998-01-01

    We explore the natural limit of binomial reducibility in nuclear multifragmentation by constructing excitation functions for intermediate mass fragments (IMF) of a given element Z. The resulting multiplicity distributions for each window of transverse energy are Poissonian. Thermal scaling is observed in the linear Arrhenius plots made from the average multiplicity of each element. ``Emission barriers'' are extracted from the slopes of the Arrhenius plots and their possible origin is discussed.

  11. Influence of Water Vapor on the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chungen ZHOU; Jingsheng YU; Shengkai GONG; Huibin XU

    2004-01-01

    The oxidation of specimens with thermal barrier coating (TBC) consisted of nickel-base superalloy, low-pressure plasma sprayed Ni-28Cr-6Al-0.4Y (wt pct) bond coating and electron beam physical vapor deposited 7.5 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coating was studied at 1050℃ respectively in flows of O2, and mixture of O2 and 5%H2O under atmospheric pressure. The thermal barrier coating has relatively low oxidation rate at 1050℃ in pure O2. Oxidation rate of thermal barrier coating in the atmosphere of O2 and 5%H2O is increased The oxidation kinetics obeys almost linear law after long exposure time in the presence of 5% water vapor. Oxide formed along the interface between bond coat and top coat after oxidation at 1050℃ in pure O2 consisted of Al2O3, whereas interfacial scales formed after oxidation at 1050℃ in a mixture of O2 and 5%H2O were mainly composed of Ni(Al,Cr)2O4,NiO and Al2O3. It is suggested that the effect of water vapor on the oxidation of the NiCrAlY coating may be attributed to the increase in Ni and Cr ions transport in the oxides.

  12. Mathematical analysis of thermoelastic characteristics in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Jaegwi; Jungo, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Seokchan; Ali, Md Afsar; Paik, Ungyu

    2012-02-01

    The thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been analyzed using mathematical modeling. Two types of TBC model, cylinder and circular disk which are commercial plasma-sprayed TBCs, subjecting to symmetric temperature distribution to the radial and longitudinal directions, respectively, were taken into consideration. Based on the thermoelastic theories, a second order ordinary differential equation was derived for the cylinder model and a pair of partial differential equations were set up for the circular disk model. The analytic solution was obtained from the ordinary differential equation, while a finite volume method was developed for numerical solutions to the pair of partial differential equations due to the complexity of governing equations. The thermoelastic characteristics of TBC models, such as temperature distributions, displacements, and stresses, were displayed according to the obtained solutions. The rate of heat conduction in the section of the top coat is relatively slow in comparison with the substrate, and no profound difference appears in the temperature distribution between two TBC models. The highest longitudinal tensile stress is expressed at the bond coat of both models, and the substrate is under the compressive stresses to the circumferential direction. While the cylinder expands to the positive longitudinal direction only, the expansion in the circular disk occurs to both the positive and negative longitudinal directions. Relatively large displacement and stresses exhibit in the cylinder as compared with the circular disk. In the circular disk, the stresses to the radial direction undulate at each section, and the displacement profile displays that the width of the circular disk is slightly narrowed. The results demonstrate that the mechanical and thermal properties of the top and bond coats are the crucial factors to be considered in controlling the thermoelastic characteristics of plasma

  13. Thermal barrier coating toughness: Measurement and identification of a bridging mechanism enabled by segmented microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, Erin M., E-mail: erin_donohue@engineering.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Philips, Noah R. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Begley, Matthew R.; Levi, Carlos G. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Mechanical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Failure mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) often involve the propagation of delamination cracks within the top coating. The work presented in this paper makes two principal contributions: first, the development of a straightforward testing geometry and analysis approach enables the accurate determination of the mode I fracture toughness of these coatings and second, the application of the approach to technologically relevant coatings produces new insights into the impact of the dense vertically cracked (DVC) microstructure on the toughness. Mode I toughness of air plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia DVC TBCs is measured by sandwiching the freestanding coatings in a modified double cantilever beam configuration. Digital image correlation measurements and finite element analysis provide a pathway to quickly and accurately extract toughness values from displacement data alone. Results show R-curve behavior and unexpectedly high steady-state toughness values of G{sub ss}≈300–400J/m{sup 2}. The observation of this elevated toughness can be rationalized by a crack bridging model that is consistent with the TBC's starting microstructure and features of the fracture surfaces.

  14. High-Heat-Flux Cyclic Durability of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. For the supersonic vehicles currently envisioned in the NASA fundamental aeronautics program, advanced gas turbine engines will be used to provide high power density thrust during the extended supersonic flight of the aircraft, while meeting stringent low emission requirements. Advanced ceramic coating systems are critical to the performance, life and durability of the hot-section components of the engine systems. In this work, the laser and burner rig based high-heat-flux testing approaches were developed to investigate the coating cyclic response and failure mechanisms under simulated supersonic long-duration cruise mission. The accelerated coating cracking and delamination mechanism under the engine high-heat-flux, and extended supersonic cruise time conditions will be addressed. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation in conjunction with environmental degradation under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  15. Furnace Cyclic Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia-Yttria and Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Nesbitt, James A.; McCue, Terry R.; Barrett, Charles A.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to enable further increases in engine temperatures. However, the coating performance and durability become a major concern under the increasingly harsh thermal cycling conditions. Advanced zirconia- and hafnia-based cluster oxide thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity and improved thermal stability are being developed using a high-heat-flux laser-rig based test approach. Although the new composition coatings were not yet optimized for cyclic durability, an initial durability screening of numerous candidate coating materials was carried out using conventional furnace cyclic tests. In this paper, furnace thermal cyclic behavior of the advanced plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings that were co-doped with multi-component rare earth oxides was investigated at 1163 C using 45 min hot cycles. The ceramic coating failure mechanisms were studied by using scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray diffraction phase analysis after the furnace tests. The coating cyclic lifetime will be discussed in relation to coating phase structures, total dopant concentrations, and other properties.

  16. Breaking barriers to novel analgesic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekkirala, Ajay S; Roberson, David P; Bean, Bruce P; Woolf, Clifford J

    2017-08-01

    Acute and chronic pain complaints, although common, are generally poorly served by existing therapies. This unmet clinical need reflects a failure to develop novel classes of analgesics with superior efficacy, diminished adverse effects and a lower abuse liability than those currently available. Reasons for this include the heterogeneity of clinical pain conditions, the complexity and diversity of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, and the unreliability of some preclinical pain models. However, recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of pain are beginning to offer opportunities for developing novel therapeutic strategies and revisiting existing targets, including modulating ion channels, enzymes and G-protein-coupled receptors.

  17. Barriers and Challenges of Educational Development in China: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amy Stambach

    The barriers of education development in China are gradually being uprooted ... development and over-all success of the Chinese education in the near future. ... This situation had a major impact on the educational system and curriculum. ... led to the acceptance of local nongovernmental organization to finance schools.

  18. Degradation Of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBC) Due To Chemical and Thermal Expansion Incompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; King, Deboran (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Current environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) consist of multiple layers, with each layer having unique properties to meet the various requirements for successful EBCs. As a result, chemical and thermal expansion compatibility between layers becomes an important issue to maintaining durability. Key constituents in current EBCs are mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2), BSAS (BaO(1-x)-SrO(x)-Al2O3-2SiO2), and YSZ (ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3). The mullite-BSAS combination appears benign although significant diffusion occurs. Mullite-YSZ and BSAS-YSZ combinations do not react up to 1500 C. Thermally grown SiO2- BSAS and mullite-BSAS-YSZ combinations are most detrimental, forming low melting glasses. Thermal expansion mismatch between YSZ and mullite or BSAS causes severe cracking and delamination.

  19. Finite Element Model Characterization Of Nano-Composite Thermal And Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshiki; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Thermal and environmental barrier coatings have been applied for protecting Si based ceramic matrix composite components from high temperature environment in advanced gas turbine engines. It has been found that the delamination and lifetime of T/EBC systems generally depend on the initiation and propagation of surface cracks induced by the axial mechanical load in addition to severe thermal loads. In order to prevent T/EBC systems from surface cracking and subsequent delamination due to mechanical and thermal stresses, T/EBC systems reinforced with nano-composite architectures have showed promise to improve mechanical properties and provide a potential crack shielding mechanism such as crack bridging. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) was established to understand the potential beneficial effects of nano-composites systems such as SiC nanotube-reinforced oxide T/EBC systems.

  20. Designing a highly sensitive Eddy current sensor for evaluating damage on thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Seong; Lee, Yeong Ze [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seul Gi [LG Electronics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been widely applied to machine components working under high temperature as a thermal insulator owing to its critical financial and safety benefits to the industry. However, the nondestructive evaluation of TBC damage is not easy since sensing of the microscopic change that occurs on the TBC is required during an evaluation. We designed an eddy current probe for evaluating damage on a TBC based on the finite element method (FEM) and validated its performance through an experiment. An FEM analysis predicted the sensitivity of the probe, showing that impedance change increases as the TBC thermally degrades. In addition, the effect of the magnetic shield concentrating magnetic flux density was also observed. Finally, experimental validation showed good agreement with the simulation result.

  1. Life Prediction of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Temperature-Dependent Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Chen, Kuiying; Baddour, N.; Patnaik, P. C.

    2017-06-01

    The failure analysis and life prediction of atmospheric plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (APS-TBCs) were carried out for a thermal cyclic process. A residual stress model for the top coat of APS-TBC was proposed and then applied to life prediction. This residual stress model shows an inversion characteristic versus thickness of thermally grown oxide. The capability of the life model was demonstrated using temperature-dependent model parameters. Using existing life data, a comparison of fitting approaches of life model parameters was performed. A larger discrepancy was found for the life predicted using linearized fitting parameters versus temperature compared to those using non-linear fitting parameters. A method for integrating the residual stress was proposed by using the critical time of stress inversion. The role of the residual stresses distributed at each individual coating layer was explored and their interplay on the coating's delamination was analyzed.

  2. Analysis of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings With Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Bond Coats Under Spatially Uniform Cyclic Thermal Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a numerical investigation into the spallation mechanism in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings observed under spatially-uniform cyclic thermal loading. The analysis focuses on the evolution of local stress and inelastic strain fields in the vicinity of the rough top/bond coat interface during thermal cycling, and how these fields are influenced by the presence of an oxide film and spatially uniform and graded distributions of alumina particles in the metallic bond coat aimed at reducing the top/bond coat thermal expansion mismatch. The impact of these factors on the potential growth of a local horizontal delamination at the rough interface's crest is included. The analysis is conducted using the Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials with creep/relaxation constituent modeling capabilities. For two-phase bond coat microstructures, both the actual and homogenized properties are employed in the analysis. The results reveal the important contributions of both the normal and shear stress components to the delamination growth potential in the presence of an oxide film, and suggest mixed-mode crack propagation. The use of bond coats with uniform or graded microstructures is shown to increase the potential for delamination growth by increasing the magnitude of the crack-tip shear stress component.

  3. Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2006-03-02

    The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings

  4. Thermal barrier ZrO2 - Y2O3 obtained by plasma spraying method and laser melting

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to determine the influence of laser melting upon the selected physical properties of ZrO2 - Y2O3 ceramic coatings deposited by APS (Air Plasma Spraying) method on super-alloys which function as TBC (Thermal Barriers Coatings).Design/methodology/approach: Laser melting which helps eliminate pores and other structural defects of coatings deposited by plasma spraying method should contribute to the improvement of their density and durability as thermal barriers. ...

  5. Addressing the Barriers to Agile Development in DoD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    pmodigliani@mitre.org May 2015 Addressing the Barriers to Agile Development in DoD MITRE Defense Agile Acquisition Guide Naval Postgraduate School’s...COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Addressing the Barriers to Agile Development in DoD 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS

  6. Advanced neutron and X-ray techniques for insights into the microstructure of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Anand [State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Goland, Allen [State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Herman, Herbert [State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)]. E-mail: hherman@ms.cc.sunysb.edu; Allen, Andrew J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Dobbins, Tabbetha [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); DeCarlo, Francesco [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ilavsky, Jan [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Long, Gabrielle G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fang, Stacy [Chromalloy Gas Turbine Corporation, Orangeburg, NY 10962 (United States); Lawton, Paul [Chromalloy Gas Turbine Corporation, Orangeburg, NY 10962 (United States)

    2006-06-25

    The ongoing quest to increase gas turbine efficiency and performance (increased thrust) provides a driving force for materials development. While improved engine design and usage of novel materials provide solutions for increased engine operating temperatures, and hence fuel efficiency, reliability issues remain. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), deposited onto turbine components using the electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process, exhibit unique pore architectures capable of bridging the technological gap between insulation/life extension and prime reliance. This article explores the potential of advanced X-ray and neutron techniques for comprehension of an EB-PVD TBC coating microstructure. While conventional microscopy reveals a hierarchy of voids, complementary advanced techniques allow quantification of these voids in terms of component porosities, anisotropy, size and gradient through the coating thickness. In addition, the derived microstructural parameters obtained both further knowledge of the nature and architecture of the porosity, and help establish its influence on the resultant thermal and mechanical properties.

  7. Effect of Residual Stresses and Prediction of Possible Failure Mechanisms on Thermal Barrier Coating System by Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar-Far, M.; Absi, J.; Mariaux, G.; Shahidi, S.

    2010-09-01

    This work is focused on the effect of the residual stresses resulting from the coating process and thermal cycling on the failure mechanisms within the thermal barrier coating (TBC) system. To reach this objective, we studied the effect of the substrate preheating and cooling rate on the coating process conditions. A new thermomechanical finite element model (FEM) considering a nonhomogeneous temperature distribution has been developed. In the results, we observed a critical stress corresponding to a low substrate temperature and high cooling rate during spraying of the top-coat material. Moreover, the analysis of the stress distribution after service shows that more critical stresses are obtained in the case where residual stresses are taken into account.

  8. Driving forces and barriers for environmental technology development; Drivkrefter og barrierer for utvikling av miljoeteknologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Driving forces and barriers behind development and usage of environmental technology is discussed, and also whether there are certain characteristics related to environmental innovations compared to other innovations in general. The development of environmental technology is in principle dominated by the same drivers and barriers as any other technology, but the order and strength of the various factors may be different. This examination as well as other empirical studies shows that regulations play a greater part for environmental technology than 'pure market forces'. To many participants it is important to be one step ahead of the regulations, i.e. the expected regulations are equally important as the factual ones in driving the technology development. Players in the business community express that it is important that the authorities cooperate with them when introducing new regulations. This will increase acceptance for the regulations and facilitate the necessary adjustments. The most important barrier in the development and use of the technologies studied is probably the lack of demand.

  9. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for Si-Based Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, R. Sung; Robinson, Raymond C.; Lee, Kang N.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating concepts based on multi-component HfO2 (ZrO2) and modified mullite systems are developed for monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) applications. Comprehensive testing approaches were established using the water vapor cyclic furnace, high pressure burner rig and laser heat flux steam rig to evaluate the coating water vapor stability, cyclic durability, radiation and erosion resistance under simulated engine environments. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the environmental barrier coating systems for 2700 to 3000 F monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC CMC component applications. The high-temperature-capable environmental barrier coating systems are being further developed and optimized in collaboration with engine companies for advanced turbine engine applications.

  10. Perceived need and barriers to continuing professional development among doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenwilo, Divine; Skåtun, Diane

    2014-08-01

    There is growing need for continuing professional development (CPD) among doctors, especially following the recent introduction of compulsory revalidation for all doctors in the United Kingdom (UK). We use unique datasets from two national surveys of non-training grade doctors working in the National Health Service in Scotland to evaluate doctors' perceptions of need and barriers to CPD. We test for differences over time and also examine differences between doctor grades and for other characteristics such as gender, age, contract type and specialty. Doctors expressed the greatest need for CPD in clinical training, management, and information technology. In terms of perceived barriers to CPD, lack of time was expressed as a barrier by the largest proportion of doctors, as was insufficient clinical cover, lack of funding, and remoteness from main education centres. The strength of perceived need for particular CPD activities and the perceived barriers to CPD varied significantly by doctors' job and personal characteristics. An understanding of the perceived needs and barriers to CPD among doctors is an important precursor to developing effective educational and training programmes that cover their professional practice and also in supporting doctors towards successful revalidation.

  11. Reverse logistics in the Czech Republic: Barriers to development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Škapa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents empirical survey results concerning two objectives. The first objective was to describe barriers of reverse logistics (RL development in Czech companies. The other one was to research whether there are different views of these barriers between company experts and top managers. The analyses are based on data obtained through a questionnaire survey of 102 representatives of companies operating in the Czech Republic. The study applied basic statistical methods used in quantitative research.Based on answer frequencies of respondents, the main internal barrier of RL development is its little importance in comparison with other activities, followed by the lack of systematic management, and unskilled workforce. On the other hand, customers are regarded as the most significant external barrier due to their careless handling with products and packaging as well as their pressure on the sale price. The obtained data also speak volumes about the differences in the view of the RL importance (in the second part of the article. Employees whose work is directly connected with reverse flows report the insignificance of RL as a barrier less frequently than top managers, who quoted this opinion in 50% cases.

  12. Analysis of the energetic/environmental performances of gas turbine plant: Effect of thermal barrier coatings and mass of cooling air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ion V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 is the most common material to be applied in thermal barrier coatings owing to its excellent properties: low thermal conductivity, high toughness and thermal expansion coefficient as ceramic material. Calculation has been made to evaluate the gains of thermal barrier coatings applied on gas turbine blades. The study considers a top ceramic coating Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 on a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and Inconel 738LC as substrate. For different thickness and different cooling air flow rates, a thermodynamic analysis has been performed and pollutants emissions (CO, NOx have been estimated to analyze the effect of rising the gas inlet temperature. The effect of thickness and thermal conductivity of top coating and the mass flow rate of cooling air have been analyzed. The model for heat transfer analysis gives the temperature reduction through the wall blade for the considered conditions and the results presented in this contribution are restricted to a two considered limits: (1 maximum allowable temperature for top layer (1200ºC and (2 for blade material (1000ºC. The model can be used to analyze other materials that support higher temperatures helping in the development of new materials for thermal barrier coatings.

  13. Preparation of SrZrO3 Thermal Barrier Coating by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhui; Ma, Wen; Wen, Jing; Bai, Yu; Sun, Li; Chen, Baodong; Dong, Hongying; Shuang, Yingchai

    2017-02-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process is capable of depositing highly durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In this study, an aqueous chemical precursor feedstock was injected into the plasma jet to deposit SrZrO3 thermal barrier coating on metal substrate. Taguchi design of experiments was employed to optimize the SPPS process. The thermal characteristics and phase evolution of the SrZrO3 precursor, as well as the influence of various spray parameters on the coating deposition rate, microhardness, microstructure, and phase stability, were investigated. The experimental results showed that, at given spray distance, feedstock flow rate, and atomization pressure, the optimized spray parameters were arc current of 600 A, argon flow rate of 40 L/min, and hydrogen flow rate of 10 L/min. The SrZrO3 coating prepared using the optimized spray parameters had single-pass thickness of 6.0 μm, porosity of 18%, and microhardness of 6.8 ± 0.1 GPa. Phase stability studies indicated that the as-sprayed SrZrO3 coating had good phase stability in the temperature range from room temperature to 1400 °C, gradually exhibiting a phase transition from t'-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 in the SrZrO3 coating at 1450 °C with increasing time, while the SrZrO3 phase did not change.

  14. Evaluation of the degradation of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings using nano-indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Jin; Cho, Sung-Keun; Choi, Jung-Hun; Koo, Jae-Mean; Seok, Chang-Sung; Kim, Moon-Young

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the disk type of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system for a gas turbine blade was isothermally aged at 1100 degrees C for various times up to 400 hours. For each aging condition, the thickness of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) was measured by optical microscope and mechanical properties such as the elastic modulus and hardness were measured by micro-indentation and nano-indentation on the cross-section of a coating specimen. In the case of micro-indentation, the mechanical properties of a Ni-base superalloy substrate and MCrAlY bond coat material did not significantly change with an increase in exposure time. In the case of nano-indentation, the gamma-Ni phase and beta-NiAl phase in the bond coat and top coat material show no significant change in their properties. However, the elastic modulus and the hardness of TGO show a remarkable decrease from 100 h to 200 h then remain nearly constant after 200 h due to the internal delamination of TBC. It has been confirmed that the nano-indentation technique is a very effective way to evaluate the degradation of a thermal barrier coating system.

  15. Modeling of Thermal Distributions around a Barrier at the Interface of Coating and Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sahin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to constant heat flux, the thermal distribution around an insulated barrier at the interface of substrate and functionally graded material (FGM which are essentially two-phase particulate composites is examined in such a way that the volume fractions of the constituents vary continuously in the thickness direction. Using integral transform method, two-dimensional steady-state diffusion equation with variable conductivity is turned into constant coefficient differential equation. Reducing that equation to a singular integral equation with Cauchy type, the temperature distribution around the barrier is obtained by defining an unknown function, which is called density function, as a series expansion of orthogonal polynomials. Results are shown for different thickness and nonhomogeneity parameters of FGM.

  16. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  17. Progress in Long Life Thermal Barrier Coatings Technologies%长寿命热障涂层技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世兴; 刘新基; 汪瑞军

    2012-01-01

    随着高性能航空发动机对长寿命热障涂层需求的增加,提高热障涂层寿命已成为研究重点。本文从粘结层成分及结构设计和陶瓷层制备技术方面介绍了长寿命热障涂层研究进展,最后展望了未来低成本、长寿命热障涂层制备技术的研究方向及研究重点。%With high performance gas turbine engine increased demand for long life thermal barrier coatings, the research interest was focused on improvement thermal barrier coatings life. In this paper, the development and research statues of bond coat composition,structure design and top coat deposition technology for long life thermal barrier coatings was introduced. The research direction and focus of long life thermal barrier coatings deposited by low cost technologies was also anticipated.

  18. Graded tunnelling barrier and oxygen concentration in thermally grown ultrathin SiO{sub x} gate oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitlin, Daniel [Device Physics Laboratory, Xilinx, Inc., 2100 Logic Drive, San Jose, CA 95124-3400 (United States); Karp, James [Device Physics Laboratory, Xilinx, Inc., 2100 Logic Drive, San Jose, CA 95124-3400 (United States); Moyzhes, Boris [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, McCullough Building, Stanford University, CA 94305-4045 (United States)

    2007-04-07

    Barrier parameters of a thermally grown SiO{sub x} gate oxide are derived by relating the SIMS oxygen concentration profile to the barrier height. Even in the simple analytical form such a graded barrier model agrees with the tunnelling current and its voltage dependence in both directions. Asymmetrical tunnelling I-Vs in the symmetrical n{sup +}Si-SiO{sub x}-n{sup +}Si structure are due to both graded barrier and penetration of carriers into the gate oxide at the SiO{sub x}-Si substrate interface.

  19. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  20. Microstructure Analysis of Laser Remelting for Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Surface of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the preparation and organization performance of thermal barrier coatings (TCBs on the surface of titanium were studied experimentally. Nanostructured 8 wt% yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying. The microstructure of nanostructured and the conventional coating was studied after laser remelting. It has shown that formed a network of micro-cracks and pits after laser remelting on nanostructured coatings. With the decrease of the laser scanning speed, mesh distribution of micro cracks was gradually thinning on nanostructured coatings. Compared with conventional ceramic layers, the mesh cracks of nanostructured coating is dense and the crack width is small.

  1. THE EFFECT OF LASER GLAZING PROCESS ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF PLASMA SPRAYED THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyid Fehmi DİLTEMİZ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are widely used by aero and land based gas turbines to protect hot section parts from oxidation and reducing component temperature thereby increase life. TBCs aregenerally a combination of multiple layers of coating (usually two with each layer having a specific function [Aktaa et al., 2005]. In this study air plasma sprayed TBCs were deposited on 304 stainlesssteel substrates then ceramic surfaces were glazed using Nd-YAG laser. Both glazed and as-coated samples were subjected to metallographic examination to investigate microstructural changes inglazed ceramic layer. Laser glazing provides a remelting and subsequent solidification of the surface, resulting on new top layer microstructure.

  2. Mixed Mode Fracture of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Effects of Anisotropy and Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis L.

    2008-01-01

    The combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of anisotropic ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the microsplat coating material was modeled using Finite Element approach to account for anisotropy and micro cracked structures, and predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  3. Combined Experimental and Numerical Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Awate; Tabakoff, Widen; Swar, Rohan; Shin, Dongyun; Woggon, Nthanial; Miller, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC) blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests of particle surface interactions were performed in specially designed tunnels to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDF) were developed to represent experimentally-based correlations for particle surface interaction models which were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics after each surface impact. The experimentally based erosion UDF model was used to predict the TBC erosion rates on the turbine blade surfaces based on the computed statistical data of the particles impact locations, velocities and angles relative to the blade surface. Computational results are presented for the predicted TBC blade erosion in a single stage commercial APU turbine, for a NASA designed automotive turbine, and for the NASA turbine scaled for modern rotorcraft operating conditions. The erosion patterns in the turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5 percent of the stator blade span representing the flow cooling the combustor liner.

  4. Elastically Cooperative Activated Barrier Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Fluids. II. Thermal Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirigian, Stephen [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Schweizer, Kenneth [University of Illinois

    2014-01-01

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in Paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singularities above zero Kelvin, and relaxation in the equilibrium low temperature limit is predicted to be of a roughly Arrhenius form. The two-barrier (local cage and long range collective elastic) description results in a rich dynamic behavior including apparent Arrhenius, narrow crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes, and multiple characteristic or crossover times and temperatures of clear physical meaning. Application of the theory to nonpolar molecules, alcohols, rare gases, and liquids metals is carried out. Overall, the agreement with experiment is quite good for the temperature dependence of the alpha time, plateau shear modulus, and Boson-like peak frequency for van der Waals liquids, though less so for hydrogen-bonding molecules. The theory predicts multiple growing length scales upon cooling, which reflect distinct aspects of the coupled local hopping and cooperative elastic physics. Calculations of the growth with cooling of an activation volume, which is strongly correlated with a measure of dynamic cooperativity, agree quantitatively with experiment. Comparisons with elastic, entropy crisis, dynamic facilitation, and other approaches are performed, and a fundamental basis for empirically extracted crossover temperatures is established. The present work sets the stage for addressing distinctive glassy phenomena in polymer melts, and diverse liquids under strong confinement.

  5. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. II. Thermal liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-05-01

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in Paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singularities above zero Kelvin, and relaxation in the equilibrium low temperature limit is predicted to be of a roughly Arrhenius form. The two-barrier (local cage and long range collective elastic) description results in a rich dynamic behavior including apparent Arrhenius, narrow crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes, and multiple characteristic or crossover times and temperatures of clear physical meaning. Application of the theory to nonpolar molecules, alcohols, rare gases, and liquids metals is carried out. Overall, the agreement with experiment is quite good for the temperature dependence of the alpha time, plateau shear modulus, and Boson-like peak frequency for van der Waals liquids, though less so for hydrogen-bonding molecules. The theory predicts multiple growing length scales upon cooling, which reflect distinct aspects of the coupled local hopping and cooperative elastic physics. Calculations of the growth with cooling of an activation volume, which is strongly correlated with a measure of dynamic cooperativity, agree quantitatively with experiment. Comparisons with elastic, entropy crisis, dynamic facilitation, and other approaches are performed, and a fundamental basis for empirically extracted crossover temperatures is established. The present work sets the stage for addressing distinctive glassy phenomena in polymer melts, and diverse liquids under strong confinement.

  6. Thermal desalination in GCC and possible development

    KAUST Repository

    Darwish, Mohamed Ali

    2013-06-28

    The Water Desalination and Reuse Center in King Abdulla University of Science and Technology, in Saudi Arabia, held a workshop on thermal desalination on the 11th and 12th of March, 2013. This paper was presented as part of a lecture at the workshop. It presents the status and possible developments of the two main thermal desalination systems processing large quantities of seawater in the Gulf Cooperation Council, multi-stage flash, and thermal vapor compression systems. Developments of these systems were presented to show how these systems are competing with the more energy-efficient seawater reverse osmosis desalting. © 2013 © 2013 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  7. Some recent trends in research and technology of advanced thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, U.; Leyens, Ch.; Fritscher, K.; Peters, M.; Saruhan-Brings, B. [Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR, Institute of Mateirals Research, Koln (Germany); Lavigne, O.; Dorvaux, J.M.; Poulain, M.; Mevrel, R.; Caliez, M. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Dept. of Metallic Materials and Processing, 92 - Chatillon (France)

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) offer the potential to significantly improve efficiencies of aero engines as well as stationary gas turbines for power generation. On internally cooled turbine parts temperature gradients of the order of 100 to 150 deg. C can be achieved. Today, state-of-the-art TBCs, typically consisting of an yttria-stabilised zirconia top coat and a metallic bond coat deposited onto a superalloy substrate, are mainly used to extend lifetime. Further efficiency improvements require TBCs being an integral part of the component which, in turn, requires reliable and predictable TBC performance. Presently, TBCs produced by electron beam physical vapour deposition are favoured for high performance applications. The paper highlights critical R and D needs for advanced TBC systems with a special focus on reduced thermal conductivity and life prediction needs. (authors)

  8. The degradation of oxadiazon by non-thermal plasma with a dielectric barrier configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, ZHAO; Risheng, YAO; Yuedong, MENG; Jiaxing, LI; Yiman, JIANG; Longwei, CHEN

    2017-03-01

    To explore the feasibility of a degradation approach by non-thermal plasma and the corresponding degradation pathways, studies on the oxadiazon removal in synthetic wastewater by a dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor were investigated. The loss of the nitro group, dechlorination and ring cleavage is mainly involved in the non-thermal plasma degradation pathways of oxadiazon in a solution based on the OES and LC-MS analysis. Detection of EC25 and the production of the chlorine ion and nitrate ion further demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the approach. The conditions with a proper applied voltage, solution flow rate, oxygen flow rate, and solution pH contribute to the plasma degradation processes with a degradation ratio of over 94%.

  9. Luminescence-Based Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coating Health and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments in both air- and land-based turbine engines. For advanced turbine engines designed for higher temperature operation, a diagnostic capability for the health and performance of TBCs will be essential to indicate when a mitigating action needs to be taken before premature TBC failure threatens engine performance or safety. In particular, it is shown that rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers can be integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence emission that can be monitored to assess TBC erosion and delamination progression, and to map surface and subsurface temperatures as a measure of TBC performance. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers are presented.

  10. Oxidation and Hot Corrosion of Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings Prepared by EB-PVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The performances of gradient thermal barrier coatings (GTBCs) produced by EB-PVD were evaluated by isothermaloxidation and cyclic hot corrosion (HTHC) tests. Compared with conventional two-layered TBCs, the GTBCs exhibitebetter resistance to not only oxidation but also hot-corrosion. A dense Al2O3 layer in the GTBCs effectively prohibitesinward diffusion of O and S and outward diffusion of Al and Cr during the tests. On the other hand, an "inlaid"interface, resulting from oxidation of the Al along the columnar grains of the bond coat, enhances the adherence ofAl2O3 layer. Failure of the GTBC finally occurred by cracking at the interface between the bond coat and Al2O3layer, due to the combined effect of sulfidation of the bond coat and thermal cycling.

  11. Impedance Analysis of 7YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings During High-Temperature Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Long; Liu, Min; Zhang, Ji-Fu

    2016-12-01

    ZrO2-7 wt.%Y2O3 (7YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying. High-temperature oxidation of 7YSZ TBCs was accomplished at 950 °C and characterized by impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry. The results indicated that the thermally grown oxide (TGO) mainly contained alumina. The increase of the thickness of the TGO layer appeared to follow a parabolic law. Impedance analysis demonstrated that the resistance of the TGO increased with increasing oxidation time, also following a parabolic law, and that characterization of the TGO thickness based on fitting an equivalent circuit to its measured resistance is feasible. The YSZ grain-boundary resistance increased due to increasing cracks within the coating for oxidation time less than 50 h. However, beyond 150 h, the YSZ grain-boundary resistance slightly decreased, mainly due to sintering of the coating during the oxidation process.

  12. Crack prediction in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings based on the simulation of residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. W.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Ma, J.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings systems (TBCs) are widely used in the field of aerospace. The durability and insulating ability of TBCs are highly dependent on the residual stresses of top coatings, thus the investigation of the residual stresses is helpful to understand the failure mechanisms of TBCs. The simulation of residual stresses evolution in electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs is described in this work. The interface morphology of TBCs subjected to cyclic heating and cooling is observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). An interface model of TBCs is established based on thermal elastic-plastic finite method. Residual stress distributions in TBCs are obtained to reflect the influence of interfacial roughness. Both experimental and simulation results show that it is feasible to predict the crack location by stress analysis, which is crucial to failure prediction.

  13. Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Approaches to Turbine Blade Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Reliance on Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) to reduce the amount of air used for turbine vane cooling is beneficial both from the standpoint of reduced NOx production, and as a means of improving cycle efficiency through improved component efficiency. It is shown that reducing vane cooling from 10 to 5 percent of mainstream air can lead to NOx reductions of nearly 25 percent while maintaining the same rotor inlet temperature. An analysis is given which shows that, when a TBC is relied upon in the vane thermal design process, significantly less coolant is required using internal cooling alone compared to film cooling. This is especially true for small turbines where internal cooling without film cooling permits the surface boundary layer to remain laminar over a significant fraction of the vane surface.

  14. Optimizing Compliance and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings via Controlled Powders and Processing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Srinivasan, Vasudevan; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay; Bertrand, Pierre; Bertrand, Ghislaine

    2012-09-01

    The properties and performance of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are strongly dependent on the microstructural defects, which are affected by starting powder morphology and processing conditions. Of particular interest is the use of hollow powders which not only allow for efficient melting of zirconia ceramics but also produce lower conductivity and more compliant coatings. Typical industrial hollow spray powders have an assortment of densities resulting in masking potential advantages of the hollow morphology. In this study, we have conducted process mapping strategies using a novel uniform shell thickness hollow powder to control the defect microstructure and properties. Correlations among coating properties, microstructure, and processing reveal feasibility to produce highly compliant and low conductivity TBC through a combination of optimized feedstock and processing conditions. The results are presented through the framework of process maps establishing correlations among process, microstructure, and properties and providing opportunities for optimization of TBCs.

  15. Drivers and barriers for development of alternative broadband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadayoni, Reza; Sigurdsson, Halldór Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Alternative broadband infrastructures are emerging and developing very fast. Different technologies and organization/business models have been used to establish these networks. The aim of the paper is to understand and identify the technological, economic and political/regulatory drivers...... and barriers of this development, including the role of government in this process. The paper has a pure empirical approach and is mainly based on detailed case studies....

  16. Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1990 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to design and test an earthen cover system(s) that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. The joint PNL/WHC program was initiated in FY 1986. To date, research findings support the initial concepts of barrier designs for the Hanford Site. A fine-soil surface is planned to partition surface water into runoff and temporary storage. Transpiration by vegetation that grows in the fine-soil layer will return stored water to the atmosphere as will surface evaporation. A capillary break created by the interface of the fine-soil layer and coarser textured materials below will further limit the downward migration of surface water, making it available over a longer period of time for cycling to the atmosphere. Should water pass the interface, it will drain laterally through a coarse textured sand/gravel layer. Tested barrier designs appear to work adequately to prevent drainage under current and postulated wetter-climate (added precipitation) conditions. Wind and water erosion tasks are developing data to predict the extent of erosion on barrier surfaces. Data collected during the last year confirm the effectiveness of small burrowing animals in removing surface water. Water infiltrating through burrows of larger mammals was subsequently lost by natural processes. Natural analog and climate change studies are under way to provide credibility for modeling the performance of barrier designs over a long period of time and under shifts in climate. 10 refs., 30 figs.

  17. Damage characterization of thermal barrier coatings by acoustic emission and thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nies, Daniel; Rehmer, Birgit; Skrotzki, Birgit [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Vassen, Robert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Thermal barrier coatings allow increasing the operating temperature and efficiency of land-, sea-, or air-based turbines. As failure of the coating may result in serious damage of the turbine, reliable estimation of its lifetime is essential. To assess the lifetime, cyclic tests are conceived to combine thermal loading by heating the surface of the coating with laser irradiation and nondestructive methods for damage determination. Using laser irradiation allows a high reproducibility of the thermal load. The temperature of the sample surface during thermal loading is determined by an infrared-camera which also enables the possibility to detect damage in the coating via thermography. Additionally, four acoustic sensors, attached to the experimental setup, are used to detect damage in the sample and determine the source of acoustic events. Results of acoustic emission correlate well with thermographic images that visualize the formation and evolution of damage through delaminations in the samples. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helminiak, M.A.; Yanar, N.M.; Pettit, F.S.; Meier, G.H. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, 636 Benedum Hall, 3700 O& #x27; Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Taylor, T.A. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., 1400 Polco Street, Indianapolis, IN 46224 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  20. Characterization of functionally graded ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings sprayed by supersonic plasma spray with dual powder feed ports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Zhi-hai; WANG Hai-jun; ZHOU Shi-kui; XU Bing-shi

    2005-01-01

    The functionally graded thermal barrier coatings (FG-TBCs) with 80 % ZrO2-13 % CeO2-7 % Y2 Os ( CYSZ)/NiCoCrAlY were prepared using a recently developed supersonic plasma spraying(S-PS) with dual powder feed ports system. The thermal shock experiment of FG-TBCs specimens was carried out by means of the automatic thermal cycle device, in which the samples were heated to 1 200 ℃ by oxygen-acetylene flame jet then waterquenched to ambient temperature. The temperature-time curves of specimens and photographs can be watched online and recorded by a computer during the test. The results show that the totally 1 mm-thick FG-TBCs have excellent thermal shock resistance due to the fact that the coatings have no any peeling-off after 200 thermal cycles. The microstructures and morphologies of FG-TBCs were characterized and analyzed by SEM.

  1. Barriers of clinical practice guidelines development and implementation in developing countries: A case study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Baradaran Seyed

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The lack of an evidence-based healthcare system and a political macro support are mentioned as the key barriers in Iran as a developing country. The establishment of a system of development and implementation of CPGs as the evidence-based practice tools will not be possible, unless the barriers are removed.

  2. Some effects of metallic substrate composition on degradation of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Alexander, K.B.; Pruessner, K.

    1997-12-31

    Comparisons have been made in laboratory isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests of the degradation of oxide scales grown on single crystal superalloy substrates and bond coating alloys intended for use in thermal barrier coatings systems. The influence of desulfurization of the superalloy and bond coating, of reactive element addition to the bond coating alloy, and of oxidation temperature on the spallation behavior of the alumina scales formed was assessed from oxidation kinetics and from SEM observations of the microstructure and composition of the oxide scales. Desulfurization of nickel-base superalloy (in the absence of a Y addition) resulted in an increase in the lifetime of a state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating applied to it compared to a Y-free, non-desulfurized version of the alloy. The lifetime of the same ceramic coating applied without a bond coating to a non-desulfurized model alloy that formed an ideal alumina scale was also found to be at least four times longer than on the Y-doped superalloy plus state-of-the-art bond coating combination. Some explanations are offered of the factors controlling the degradation of such coatings.

  3. Indentations on Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Prepared by Different Starting Granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Suk Heo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of starting granules on the indentation properties of air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs is investigated in this paper. Various kinds of spray-dried granules are prepared from different processing conditions, especially varying solvent and dispersant, showing a deformed hollow-typed and a filled spherical-typed granule. The similar coating thicknesses are prepared by adjusting process parameters during air plasma spray. All XRD peaks in phase analysis are tetragonal and cubic phases without any monoclinic phase after the starting granules were heat-treated. A relatively porous microstructure of the coating layer could be obtained from the monodisperse granules, while a relatively dense microstructure resulted from the hollow-typed granules. The morphology and distribution of the granules crucially affect the microstructure of thermal barrier coatings and thus have influences on indentation properties such as indentation stress-strain curves, contact damage, and hardness. The implication concerning microstructure design of TBCs for gas turbine applications is considered.

  4. Thermal stability of amorphous tungsten/tungsten nitride synthesis using HFCVD as a diffusion barrier for copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgary, Somayeh; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood [Islamic Azad University, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Boochani, Arash [Islamic Azad University, Department of Physics, Kermanshah Branch, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The amorphous W/WN bi-layer with excellent thermal stability was successfully prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition method on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. It was found that the W/WN bi-layer is technological importance because of its low resistivity and good diffusion barrier properties between Cu and Si up to 700 C for 30 min. The thermal stability was evaluated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The XRD results show that the Cu{sub 3}Si phase was formed by Cu diffusion through W/WN barrier for the 800 C annealed sample. The formation of the Cu-Si compounds denotes the failure of the W/WN diffusion barrier with rapid increase in sheet resistance of the film. The microstructure of the interface between W/WN and Cu reflects the stability and breakdown of the barriers. The failure of this amorphous barrier occurs with heat treatment when the deposited amorphous barrier material crystallizes. The major part of Cu diffusion in polycrystalline structure with disordered grain boundaries is controlled by grain boundaries. AFM results indicated a rapid increase in surface roughness at the diffusion barrier failure temperature. It was found that the grain size plays an important factor to control the thermally stability of the W/WN bi-layer. (orig.)

  5. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  6. Thermal failure of nanostructured thermal barrier coatings with cold sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY bond coat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Zhang, S.L.; Wang, X.R.; Yang, G.J.; Li, C.X.; Li, C.J. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2008-07-01

    Nanostructured YSZ is expected to exhibit a high strain tolerability due to its low Young's modulus and consequently high durability. In this study, a porous YSZ as the thermal barrier coating was deposited by plasma spraying using an agglomerated nanostructured YSZ powder on a Ni-based superalloy Inconel 738 substrate with a cold-sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY as the bond coat. The heat treatment in Ar atmosphere was applied to the cold-sprayed bond coat before deposition of YSZ. The isothermal oxidation and thermal cycling tests were applied to examine failure modes of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ. The results showed that YSZ coating was deposited by partially melted YSZ particles. The nonmelted fraction of spray particles retains the porous nanostructure of the starting powder into the deposit. YSZ coating exhibits a bimodal microstructure consisting of nanosized particles retained from the powder and micro-columnar grains formed through the solidification of the melted fraction in spray particles. The oxidation of the bond coat occurs during the heat treatment in Ar atmosphere. The uniform oxide at the interface between the bond coat and YSZ can be formed during isothermal test. The cracks were observed at the interface between TGO/BC or TGO/YSZ after thermal cyclic test. However, the failure of TBCs mainly occurred through spalling of YSZ within YSZ coating. The failure characteristics of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ are discussed based on the coating microstructure and formation of TGO on the bond coat surface. (orig.)

  7. Thermal shock behavior of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxuciac@163.com [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); Dai, Jianwei [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); Niu, Jing [Shenyang Liming Aero-engine (Group) Corporation Ltd., Institute of Metallurgical Technology, Technical Center, Shengyang 110043 (China); Li, Na; Huang, Guanghong; He, Limin [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • TBCs of (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and YSZ ceramic coating. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. • Ridges removed, cavities formation appeared and the damage initiation deteriorated. • Damage initiation and progression at interface lead to a buckling failure. - Abstract: Thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, thermal shock behaviors and residual stresses of the coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges still remain on the surface of bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating, which are shown to be the major sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. When these ridges are mostly removed, they appear some of cavities formation and then the damage initiation mode is deteriorated. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface during cooling. The suppressed cavities formation, the removed ridges at the grain boundaries, the relative high TGO to bond coat interface toughness, the uniform growth behavior of TGO thickening and the lower of the residual stress are the primary factors for prolonging the lifetime of TBCs.

  8. Developing effective rockfall protection barriers for low energy impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentani, Alessio; Giacomini, Anna; Buzzi, Olivier; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Fityus, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Recently, important progresses have been made towards the development of high capacity rockfall barriers (100 kJ - 8000 kJ). The interest of researchers and practitioners is now turning to the development of fences of minor capacity, whose use becomes essential in areas where rockfall events generally have low intensity and the use of high capacity barriers would be accompanied by excessive costs and high environmental impact. Low energy barriers can also provide a cost-effective solution even in areas where high energies events are expected. Results of full-scale tests are vital to any investigation on the behaviour of these structures. An experimental set-up has been developed at The University of Newcastle (AUS), to investigate the response of low energy rockfall barrier prototypes to low energy impacts. The Australian territory, and in particular New South Wales, is in fact characterised by rockfall events of low-to-medium intensity (50 kJ - 500 kJ) and the need of protection structures working within such energy range, is particularly felt [1]. The experiments involved the impact of a test block onto three spans, low energy barrier prototypes, made of steel structural posts, fully fixed at the base, side cables and a steel meshwork constituted by a double twist hexagonal wire net [2]. Test data enabled the development, calibration and assessment of FE models [3], on which non-linear and dynamic analyses have been performed addressing the effect of the block size. Results have shown that the response of the structure is strongly governed by the net. Data from tests conducted on the sole net and on the entire barrier showed in fact a similar trend, different to what typically observed for high capacity barriers, whose behaviour is also led by the presence of uphill cables and brakes. In particular, the numerical analyses have demonstrated a dependence of the net performance on the block size. In particular, a loss of capacity in the order of 50% occurred as the

  9. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  10. Thermal barrier coatings of new rare-earth composite oxide by EB-PVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.H., E-mail: zhxubiam@sina.com; Zhou, X.; Wang, K.; Dai, J.W.; He, L.M.

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • 3Y-LZ7C3 coating has a cyclic lifetime longer than that of LZ7C3 coating. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} helps to moderate the excessive vapor pressure condition during deposition. • 3Y-LZ7C3 coating is a mixture of pyrochlore and fluorite structures. • 3Y-LZ7C3 coating has a low sintering ability as compared with LZ7C3 coating. -- Abstract: Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of La{sub 2}(Zr{sub 0.7}Ce{sub 0.3}){sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZ7C3) with the addition of 3 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (3Y-LZ7C3) were deposited by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, thermal cycling behaviors of these coatings were studied in detail. The thermal cycling test at 1373 K in an air furnace indicates that the 3Y-LZ7C3 coating has a lifetime of 1134 cycles which is about 18% longer than that of LZ7C3 coating. The improvement of chemical homogeneity of the coating, the superior growth behavior of columns and the favorable mechanical properties are all very helpful to the prolongation of thermal cycling life of 3Y-LZ7C3 coating. The failure of 3Y-LZ7C3 coating is probably a result of the reduction–oxidation of cerium oxide (Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2}), the solid solution reactions between La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (or ZrO{sub 2}), the visible cracks initiation, propagation and extension, the abnormal oxidation of bond coat and the thermal expansion mismatch between ceramic coating and bond coat.

  11. Preparation and characterization of ceria magnesium aluminate nano powder for thermal barrier application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankara Subaramainian, N.; Ramalingam, R.; Vijayaraghavan, M.

    2015-02-01

    The present work deals with the preparation of CeMgAl11O19 nano powder by sol gel citric acid route and to investigate its structural, surface and thermo-mechanical properties, to access its suitability for thermal barrier application. The XRD profile of the CeMgAl11O19 powder heat treated at different temperatures confirms polycrystalline structure. From the XRD data, mean grain size, lattice strain energy, dislocation density and other structural parameters have been investigated and reported. Thermal properties of the as synthesized CeMgAl11O19 powder have been studied from the TG-DTA and DSC measurement and the results are presented. Thermal conductivity of the CeMgAl11O19 specimen heat treated at different temperatures has been evaluated using the physical property measurement system and the results have been discussed. Hardness of the pelletized CeMgAl11O19 specimen heat treated at different temperatures has been measured in the Vickers scale and the results have been discussed. The influence of annealing temperature on the tensile strength and wear resistance of the CeMgAl11O19 specimen have been investigated and reported. The 2D and 3D AFM image of the CeMgAl11O19 specimen heat treated at 750°C shows the uniform surface pattern without any dark pits and pinholes. The surface roughness and grain size evaluated from the AFM data have been analyzed and presented.

  12. Residual stress analysis of the thermal barrier coating system by considering the plasma spraying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Jae; Lee, Byung Chai [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jang Gyun; Kim, Moon Ki [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The residual stress is the key factor causing the reliability problem of thermal barrier coating (TBC). The failure of plasma spray coatings due to residual stresses is a serious and recurring problem of TBC. The difference of thermal expansion coefficient between the substrate and each coating combined with temperature evolution and temperature gradients during deposition process determine the residual stress for the whole TBC system. The magnitudes and distributions of the residual stresses are affected by deposition process and deposition characteristics. Most of FEA (finite element analysis) has been performed under the assumption that the multilayer coating system is stacked at once without considering the deposition process during plasma spraying. In this research, FEA for a coupled heat transfer and elastic-plastic thermal stress was performed to obtain the more detailed and reliable result of residual stress of the TBC system using the element activation/deactivation technique. The residual stress variation from the start of plasma spraying to cooling stage with room temperature was obtained systematically considering the deposition process. It can be used as reference data to improve the performance of TBC. In addition, the relationship between residual stress and coating conditions such as cooling rate and time is also examined thoroughly.

  13. Thermal Barrier Coatings Made by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H.; Teicholz, Matthew; Cetegen, Baki M.; Padture, Nitin P.; Xie, Liangde; Chen, Dianying; Ma, Xinqing; Roth, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process is a relatively new and flexible thermal spray process that can produce a wide variety of novel materials, including some with superior properties. The SPPS process involves injecting atomized droplets of a precursor solution into the plasma. The properties of resultant deposits depend on the time-temperature history of the droplets in the plasma, ranging from ultra-fine splats to unmelted crystalline particles to unpyrolized particles. By controlling the volume fraction of these three different constituents, a variety of coatings can be produced, all with a nanograin size. In this article, we will be reviewing research related to thermal barrier coatings, emphasizing the processing conditions necessary to obtain a range of microstructures and associated properties. The SPPS process produces a unique strain-tolerant, low-thermal conductivity microstructure consisting of (i) three-dimensional micrometer and nanometer pores, (ii) through-coating thickness (vertical) cracks, (iii) ultra-fine splats, and (iv) inter-pass boundaries. Both thin (0.12 mm) and thick (4 mm) coatings have been fabricated. The volume fraction of porosity can be varied from 10% to 40% while retaining the characteristic microstructure of vertical cracks and ultra-fine splats. The mechanism of vertical crack formation will be described.

  14. Investigation on plasma-sprayed ZrO2 thermal barrier coating on nickel alloy substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢安贤; 常鹰; 蔡小梅

    2002-01-01

    The thermal barrier coatings with NiCrAlY alloy bonding layer, NiCrAlY-Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 transition layer and Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 ceramic layer are prepared on nickel alloy substrates using the plasma spray technique. The relationship among the composition, structure and property of the coatings are investiga-ted by means of optical microscope, scanning electronic microscope and the experiments of thermal shock resistance cycling and high temperature oxidation resistance. The results show that the structure design of introdu-cing a transition layer between Ni alloy substrate and ZrO2 ceramic coating guarantees the high quality and properties of the coatings; ZrO2 coatings doped with a little SiO2 possesses better thermal shock resistance and more excellent hot corrosion resistance as compared with ZrO2 coating materials without SiO2 ;the improvement in performance of ZrO2 coating doped with SiO2 is due to forming more dense coating structure by self- closing effects of the flaws and pores in the ZrO2 coatings.

  15. Interface delamination of the thermal barrier coating subjected to local heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the possible failure modes of the thermal barrier coating (TBC) used to protect the scramjet combustion chamber, the local heating via laser beam irradiation was utilized to simulate the service condition of high thermal flux and high temperature gradient. Firstly, the experimental method and process were described and the typical fracture morphology of the TBC under test were provided. Then, the theoretical and finite element modeling were carried out to study the temperature, deformation and stresses of the specimen when the top ceramic coat was subjected to local heating, and to demonstrate the mechanism on the failure of the TBC. It is revealed that the interface delamination shall appear and ultimately lead to the failure of the TBC under such thermal loading of local quick heating. According to the outcome of this study, the driving force of the interface delamination is influenced greatly by the key structural parameters and performance matching. Moreover, by utilizing the rules of the effects of these parameters on the fracture driving force, there is some possibility for the designer to optimize the performances of the TBC.

  16. Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-01-31

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are critical technologies for future gas turbine engines of advanced coal based power generation systems. TBCs protect engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. In this work, nanostructured HfO{sub 2}-based coatings, namely Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (YSH), Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (GSH) and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} (YSZH) were investigated for potential TBC applications in hydrogen turbines. Experimental efforts are aimed at creating a fundamental understanding of these TBC materials. Nanostructured ceramic coatings of YSH, GSH and YSZH were grown by physical vapor deposition methods. The effects of processing parameters and ceramic composition on the microstructural evolution of YSH, GSH and YSZH nanostructured coatings was studied using combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron microscopy analyses. Efforts were directed to derive a detailed understanding of crystal-structure, morphology, and stability of the coatings. In addition, thermal conductivity as a function of composition in YSH, YSZH and GSH coatings was determined. Laboratory experiments using accelerated test environments were used to investigate the relative importance of various thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical failure modes of TBCs. Effects of thermal cycling, oxidation and their complex interactions were evaluated using a syngas combustor rig.

  17. An experimental study on the effects of the thermal barrier plating over engine fuel consumption exhaust temperature and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Gürbüz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study, the combustion chamber elements of a one-cylinder diesel engine which is air-cooled, single-cylinder, direct injection, 4-stroke and starter motor were plated with thermal barrier plating and tested with diesel fuel between the speeds of 1600 1/min to 3200 1/min and determined the effects of the thermal barrier plating on the engine exhaust gas temperature, emissions and fuel consumption. Increase in the temperature of the exhaust gas, decrease in HC and CO emissions that are harmful to the environment and living things and improvement in fuel consumption were observed.

  18. Effects of yttrium, aluminum and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted on thermal barrier systems to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium and aluminum in nickel-base alloy bond coatings and the effect of bond coating thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating life. Without yttrium in the bond coatings, the zirconia coatings failed very rapidly. Increasing chromium and aluminum in the Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings increased total coating life. This effect was not as great as that due to yttrium. Increased bond coat thickness was also found to increase life.

  19. Environmental degradation of oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings for fuel-flexible gas turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Prabhakar

    The development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been undoubtedly the most critical advancement in materials technology for modern gas turbine engines. TBCs are widely used in gas turbine engines for both power-generation and propulsion applications. Metallic oxidation-resistant coatings (ORCs) are also widely employed as a stand-alone protective coating or bond coat for TBCs in many high-temperature applications. Among the widely studied durability issues in these high-temperature protective coatings, one critical challenge that received greater attention in recent years is their resistance to high-temperature degradation due to corrosive deposits arising from fuel impurities and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate) sand deposits from air ingestion. The presence of vanadium, sulfur, phosphorus, sodium and calcium impurities in alternative fuels warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature materials degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbine engines. Degradation due to CMAS is a critical problem for gas turbine components operating in a dust-laden environment. In this study, high-temperature degradation due to aggressive deposits such as V2O5, P2O 5, Na2SO4, NaVO3, CaSO4 and a laboratory-synthesized CMAS sand for free-standing air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the topcoat of the TBC system, and APS CoNiCrAlY, the bond coat of the TBC system or a stand-alone ORC, is examined. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. This study demonstrated that the V2O5 melt degrades the APS YSZ through the formation of ZrV2O7 and YVO 4 at temperatures below 747°C and above 747°C, respectively. Formation of YVO4 leads to the depletion of the Y2O 3 stabilizer and the deleterious transformation of the YSZ to the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. The investigation on the YSZ degradation by Na 2SO4 and a Na2SO4 + V2

  20. Anisotropic TGO rumpling in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings under in-phase thermomechanical loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balint, D.S., E-mail: d.balint@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kim, S.-S.; Liu Yufu; Kitazawa, R.; Kagawa, Y. [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8409 (Japan); Evans, A.G. [College of Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier system has been tested under in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions with thermal gradient in the through-thickness direction. Undulations in the thermally grown oxide (TGO) were observed to have clear anisotropic behavior with respect to the directions parallel and perpendicular to the loading axis. It was found that undulation wavelengths were nearly the same in both directions but the amplitude in the perpendicular direction was much larger than in the parallel direction. A recent model of TGO rumpling was adapted and used to analyze and explain the origins of the observed rumpling behavior under TMF conditions. Methods for deducing variation in the coefficient of thermal expansion with temperature and in the creep properties of the substrate from the experimental strain data are also presented in the course of the derivations. Model results show that tensile stress applied in the loading direction can overcome the compression occurring from lateral expansion during oxide formation, causing undulations to flatten; undulations perpendicular to the loading axis are unaffected. However, ratcheting in the strain cycle experienced by the substrate, which occurs naturally by substrate creep, is necessary for anisotropic rumpling under cyclic stress conditions. Model predictions for constant applied stress are also presented, demonstrating a reversal in the direction of undulation alignment under compression. A threshold stress is identified, in both tension and compression, sufficient to produce appreciable anisotropic rumpling. The model predictions provide a clear mechanism for the anisotropy and further evidence that the lateral expansion strain in the oxide is the driving force for oxide rumpling.

  1. Influence of the Thermal Barrier Coatings Design on the Oxidation Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Saeedi; A.Sabour; A.Ebadi; A.M.Khoddami

    2009-01-01

    The properties of two different types of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were compared to improve the surface characteristics on high temperature components. These TBCs consisted of a duplex TBC and a five-layered functionally graded TBC. NiCrAlY bond coats were deposited on a number of Inconel-738LC specimens using high velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF) technique. For duplex coating, a group of these specimens were coated with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) using plasma spray technique. Functionally graded NiCrAlY/YSZ coatings were fabricated by plasma spray using co-injection of the two different powders in a single plasma torch. The amount of zirconia in functionally graded coatings were gradually increased from 30 to 100 vol. pct. Microstructural changes, thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer growth and damage initiation of the coatings were investigated as a function of isothermal oxidation test at 970℃. As a complementary test, the performance of the fabricated coatings by the optimum processing conditions was evaluated as a function of intense thermal cycling test at 1100℃. Also the strength of the adhesive coatings of the substrate was also measured. Microstructural characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy whereas phase analysis and chemical composition changes of the coatings and oxides formed during the tests were studied by XRD (X-ray diffraction) and EDS (energy dispersive spectrometer). The results showed that microstructure and compositions gradually varied in the functionally graded coatings. By comparison of duplex and functionally graded TBCs oxidation behavior (duplex failure after 1700 h and funcitionally graded TECs failure after 2000 h), thermal shock test and adhesion strength of the coatings, the functionally graded TBC had better performance and more durability.

  2. Use of indentation technique to measure elastic modulus of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.P.; Sutaria, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Ferber, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Elastic modulus of an yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) was evaluated with a Knoop indentation technique. The measured elastic modulus values for the coating ranged from 68.4 {+-} 22.6 GPa at an indentation load of 50 g to 35.7 {+-} 9.8 at an indentation load of 300 g. At higher loads, the elastic modulus values did not change significantly. This steady-state value of 35.7 GPa for ZrO{sub 2} TBC agreed well with literature values obtained by the Hertzian indentation method. Furthermore, the measured elastic modulus for the TBC is lower than that reported for bulk ZrO{sub 2} ({approx} 190 GPa). This difference is believed to be due to the presence of a significant amount of porosity and microcracks in the TBCs. Hardness was also measured.

  3. Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings: numerical study on damage localization and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Slámečka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are advanced material systems used to enhance performance and in-service life of components operated at high temperatures in gas turbines and other power-generation devices. Because of complexity, numerical methods became important tools both for design of these coatings and for in-service life estimations and optimization. In this contribution, two main features that affect the TBCs’ performance, namely the roughness of the bond coat and the microstructure of the ceramic top coat, are discussed based on Finite Element Method (FEM and Finite Element Microstructure MEshfree (FEMME simulations that were used to calculate stresses and assess damage within the coating. Roughness data obtained from plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY + YSZ coated samples are supplemented to discuss assumptions and results of employed numerical models.

  4. Mechanisms governing the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system with double ceramic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Fan, Xueling; Wang, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study of factors affecting the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) with double ceramic layers (DCL) is presented. Crack driving forces for delaminations at two weak interfaces are examined. The results show that a thicker outermost ceramic layer can induce dramatic increase in crack driving force and make the interface between two ceramic coatings become more prone to delamination. The behavior is shown to be more prominent in TBCs with stiffer outmost coating. The thickness ratio of two ceramic layers is an important parameter for controlling the failure mechanisms and determining the lifetime of DCL TBCs under inservice condition. By accounting for the influences of thickness ratio of two ceramic layers and interfacial fracture toughnesses of two involved interfaces, the fracture mechanism map of DCL TBCs has been constructed, in which different failure mechanisms are identified. The results quanlitatively agree with the aviliable experimental data.

  5. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  6. Investigation on surface figuration and microstructure of laser glazed nanostructure zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Binghua; WANG Hongying; HAO Yunfei; TANG Weijie

    2009-01-01

    CO2 continuous wave laser beam had been applied to the laser glazing of plasma sprayed nanostructure zirconia thermal barrier coatings. The effects of luser glazing processing parameters on the surface figuration and microstructure change had been carried out, the microstructure and phase composition of the coatings had been evaluated by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM observation indicates that the microstructure of the as-glazed coating could be altered from single columnar structure to a combination of the columnar grain and fine equiaxed grain with the different laser glazing conditions. XRD analysis illustrates that the predominance phase of the as-glazed coating is the metastable tetragonal phase, and the glazed coating with the single columnar structure has shown the clear orientation in (220) and (400) peaks while the other coatings do not show that.

  7. Morphology, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties of graphene oxide/poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Woo; Choi, Hyun Muk [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To improve the physical and gas barrier properties of biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) film, two graphene nanosheets of highly functionalized graphene oxide (0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%) and low-functionalized graphene oxide (0.5 wt%) were incorporated into PLA resin via solution blending method. Subsequently, we investigated the effects of material parameters such as loading level and degree of functionalization for the graphene nanosheets on the morphology and properties of the resultant nanocomposites. The highly functionalized graphene oxide (GO) caused more exfoliation and homogeneous dispersion in PLA matrix as well as more sustainable suspensions in THF, compared to low-functionalized graphene oxide (LFGO). When loaded with GO from 0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%, the glass transition temperature, degree of crystallinity, tensile strength and modulus increased steadily. The GO gave rise to more pronounced effect in the thermal and mechanical reinforcement, relative to LFGO. In addition, the preparation of fairly transparent PLA-based nanocomposite film with noticeably improved barrier performance achieved only when incorporated with GO up to 0.7wt%. As a result, GO may be more compatible with hydrophilic PLA resin, compared to LFGO, resulting in more prominent enhancement of nanocomposites properties.

  8. The porosity assessment of thermal barrier coatings obtained by APS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Moskal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The article presents the outline of methods and range of microstructural assessment of ceramiccoatings, using the example of thermal barrier coatings. The major structural parameters describing the qualityof the barrier layers have been characterised as well as the problems related to the correct metallographicspecimen preparation and the methodology of their assessment.Design/methodology/approach: A procedure of porosity assessment, employing quantative metallographicprinciples and automatic image analysis has been propounded, together with types of quantitative parametersand methods of their application.Findings: It was found that the application of the quantitative metallographic methods combined with automaticimage analysis can form an effective tool of both quantitative and qualitative assessment such parameters ofstructural ceramic layers as porosity.Research limitations/implications: This type of assessment enables obtaining more than just the absolute valueof the porosity of the given area: it provides the means for determining a number of other quantitative parameters,e.g. the surface area of the pores, their elongation and shape together with the whole statistical analysis.Practical implications: The application of scanning microscopy, especially observation techniques such as BSE,BSETOPO or BSE3D enables a precise differentiation of the areas constituting pores from other artefacts.Originality/value: Description of procedure of porosity assessments in APS TBC system by use of thequantitative metallographic methods combined with automatic image analysis, and possibility of applicationsspecial techniques of scanning microscopy.

  9. 燃气轮机应用的热障涂层%The Application of Thermal Barrier C oatings for Gas Turbine Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文文; 赵迎炬

    2001-01-01

    A concise account is given of the recent progress in the use of thermal barrier coating technology for gas turbine flow path components. The newly developed EB - PVD (electronic beam - physical vapor deposition) method represents a major bre a kthrough in thermal barrier coating technology. The present paper briefly explai ns the EB PVD method and its related equipment%简要叙述了燃气轮机热燃气通流部件上热障涂层镀敷工艺的 进展情况。最新开发的EB-PVD方法是TBC技术的重大突破,简介了EB-PVD方法及其设备。

  10. ICTs for rural development: potential applications and barriers involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Stratigea

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rural policy nowadays is at the heart of the policy discussion in many countries all over the world, in the effort to address and effectively support the specific needs and opportunities of rural places and their population in the new era. Along these lines, the focus of the present paper is twofold: on the one hand it attempts to shed light on the role of ICTs and their applications as enabling tools empowering rural development; while on the other hand it explores the barriers appearing towards the adoption and use of ICTs in rural regions. In such a context, it firstly places emphasis on the evolving new rural development paradigm. Then, the range and potential of ICTs applications is explored, that can serve the implementation of the new policy paradigm in rural regions. It follows a discussion on the steps that are needed in order to develop value-added ICTs applications in rural regions and the barriers appearing in the adoption and use of ICTs in these regions. Finally, are presented some issues of policy concern in respect to the adoption and use of ICTs in a rural development perspective.

  11. A Robot Trajectory Optimization Approach for Thermal Barrier Coatings Used for Free-Form Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Qi, Beichun; Tao, Chongyuan; Luo, Jie; Chen, Yuepeng; Xie, Changjun

    2017-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a robot trajectory optimization approach for thermal barrier coatings. As the requirements of high reproducibility of complex workpieces increase, an optimal thermal spraying trajectory should not only guarantee an accurate control of spray parameters defined by users (e.g., scanning speed, spray distance, scanning step, etc.) to achieve coating thickness homogeneity but also help to homogenize the heat transfer distribution on the coating surface. A mesh-based trajectory generation approach is introduced in this work to generate path curves on a free-form component. Then, two types of meander trajectories are generated by performing a different connection method. Additionally, this paper presents a research approach for introducing the heat transfer analysis into the trajectory planning process. Combining heat transfer analysis with trajectory planning overcomes the defects of traditional trajectory planning methods (e.g., local over-heating), which helps form the uniform temperature field by optimizing the time sequence of path curves. The influence of two different robot trajectories on the process of heat transfer is estimated by coupled FEM models which demonstrates the effectiveness of the presented optimization approach.

  12. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of Supersonic Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Ding, Chunhua; Li, Hongqiang; Han, Zhihai; Ding, Bingjun; Wang, Tiejun; Yu, Lie

    2013-10-01

    In this work, Y2O3 stabilized zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were deposited by conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high efficiency supersonic atmospheric plasma spraying (SAPS), respectively. The effect of Al2O3 layer stability on the isothermal growth behavior of thermally grown oxides (TGOs) was studied. The results revealed that the Al2O3 layer experienced a three-stage change process, i.e., (1) instantaneous growth stage, (2) steady-state growth stage, and (3) depletion stage. The thickness of Al2O3 scale was proved to be an important factor for the growth rate of TGOs. The SAPS-TBCs exhibited a higher Al2O3 stability and better oxidation resistance as compared with the APS-TBCs. Additionally, it was found that inner oxides, especially nucleated on the top of the crest, continually grew and swallowed the previously formed Al2O3 layer, leading to the granulation and disappearance of continuous Al2O3 scale, which was finally replaced by the mixed oxides and spinel.

  13. Evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coatings Exposed to Hot Corrosion Environment by Impedance Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chao; HUANG Hui; NI Liyong; ZHOU Chungen

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation,impedance spectroscopy(IS) is used,as a non-destructive tool,to examine the hot corrosion behavior of thermal barrier coatings(TBCs) exposed to a mixture of 25wt% NaC1 and 75wt% Na2SO4.The results show that the thermally grown oxide(TGO) formed along the top coat/bond coat interface is a mixed oxide layer,i.e.Cr2O3,(Ni,Co)(Cr,Al)2O4 spinel and NiO.The growth of TGO layer appears to follow the parabolic law.The resistance of TGO increases due to the increase of thickness when the number of cycles is less than 110.While for more than 110 cycles,the resistance of TGO decreases with the increase of porosity of TGO layer,even though the thickness of TGO layer increases.The nucleation and propagation of cracks within top coat increase the electrical resistance of top coat.The parameters in equivalent circuit could be used to characterize the degradation of TBCs.

  14. Load rate dependence of the mechanical properties of thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotov, Nikolay; Eggeler, Gunther [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Bartsch, Marion [Institut fuer Werkstoff-Forschung, DLR Koeln, 51147 Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC), composed of yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic top coat (TC) and intermetallic NiCoCrAlY bond coat (BC) are commonly used as protective coatings of Ni-based high temperature gas engine components. Nanoindentation techniques are increasingly applied for determining the TBC mechanical properties on a nanometre scale. However, little is known about the load-rate dependence of the mechanical properties, which is important for better understanding of cyclic thermal fatigue experiments. Nanoindentations with different load rates omega were performed on polished cross-sections of TBC, deposited by EB-PVD on IN625 substrates (S), using a XP Nanoindenter (MTS) equipped with Berkovich diamond tip. The Young's modulus (E) of the TC is independent of omega, while E for the BC and the S decreases with omega. The hardness (H) of the TC and the BC increases, while H for the S decreases with omega. From the dependence of H on omega, creep power-law exponents c = 0.24(11) and c = 0.023(6) for the TC and the BC were determined. For all TBC components, a decrease with omega of the power-law exponents n and m, describing the loading and unloading nanoindentation curves, is observed.

  15. A Robot Trajectory Optimization Approach for Thermal Barrier Coatings Used for Free-Form Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Qi, Beichun; Tao, Chongyuan; Luo, Jie; Chen, Yuepeng; Xie, Changjun

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with a robot trajectory optimization approach for thermal barrier coatings. As the requirements of high reproducibility of complex workpieces increase, an optimal thermal spraying trajectory should not only guarantee an accurate control of spray parameters defined by users (e.g., scanning speed, spray distance, scanning step, etc.) to achieve coating thickness homogeneity but also help to homogenize the heat transfer distribution on the coating surface. A mesh-based trajectory generation approach is introduced in this work to generate path curves on a free-form component. Then, two types of meander trajectories are generated by performing a different connection method. Additionally, this paper presents a research approach for introducing the heat transfer analysis into the trajectory planning process. Combining heat transfer analysis with trajectory planning overcomes the defects of traditional trajectory planning methods (e.g., local over-heating), which helps form the uniform temperature field by optimizing the time sequence of path curves. The influence of two different robot trajectories on the process of heat transfer is estimated by coupled FEM models which demonstrates the effectiveness of the presented optimization approach.

  16. Dead Zones as Thermal Barriers to Rapid Planetary Migration in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Planetary migration in standard models of gaseous protoplanetary disks is known to be very rapid ($\\sim 10^5$ years) jeopardizing the existence of planetary systems. We present a new mechanism for significantly slowing rapid planetary migration, discovered by means of radiative transfer calculations of the thermal structure of protoplanetary disks irradiated by their central stars. Rapid dust settling in a disk's dead zone - a region with very little turbulence - leaves a dusty wall at its outer edge. We show that the back-heating of the dead zone by this irradiated wall produces a positive gradient of the disk temperature which acts as a thermal barrier to planetary migration which persists for the disk lifetime. Although we analyze in detail the migration of a Super-Earth in a low mass disk around an M star, our findings can apply to wide variety of young planetary systems. We compare our findings with other potentially important stopping mechanisms and show that there are large parameter spaces for which d...

  17. Mechanism of spallation in platinum aluminide/electron beam physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Barber, B.; Cheng, J.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1999-02-01

    The spallation failure of a commercial thermal barrier coating (TBC), consisting of a single-crystal RENE N5 superalloy, a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) bond coat, and an electron beam-deposited 7 wt pct yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic layer (7YSZ), was studied following cyclic furnace testing. In the uncycled state and prior to deposition of the ceramic, the Pt-Al bond-coat surface contains a cellular network of ridges corresponding to the underlying bond-coat grain-boundary structure. With thermal cycling, the ridges and associated grain boundaries are the sites of preferential oxidation and cracking, which results in the formation of cavities that are partially filled with oxide. Using a fluorescent penetrant dye in conjunction with a direct-pull test, it is shown that, when specimens are cycled to about 80 pct of life, these grain-boundary regions show extensive debonding. The roles of oxidation and cyclic stress in localized grain boundary region spallation are discussed. The additional factors leading to large-scale TBC spallation are described.

  18. Effect of laser remelting on the tribological performance of thermal barrier coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, A; Sevillano, F; Múnez, C J; López, M D; Utrilla, V; Rodríguez, J; Poza, P

    2012-06-01

    Gas turbine's efficiency improves as operating temperature is increased. For this reason, metallic components used in turbine engines, for propulsion and power generation, are protected by thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Laser glazing has been used to enhance the oxidation and corrosion resistance of thermally sprayed TBC, but there is no information about the effect of this treatment on the tribological performance. ZrO2(CaO) top coat and NiAIMo bond coating were flame sprayed onto an AlSI 1045 carbon steel. The top coat was laser remelted and a densified ceramic layer was induced in the top surface of the ceramic coating. Both, the as sprayed and the laser remelted top coatings, were formed by cubic ZrO2 with some tetragonal precipitates. The grain size was reduced by the laser treatment. The mechanical properties and the local wear rate were evaluated by depth sensing indentation and scratch tests respectively. The nanoscale wear behaviour was always improved by the laser treatment.

  19. Simulation of residual stresses and their effects on thermal barrier coating systems using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, JianGuo; Chen, Wei; Xie, HuiMin

    2015-03-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are widely used in industrial gas-turbine engines. However, premature failures have impaired the use of TBCs and cut down their lifetime, which requires a better understanding of their failure mechanisms. In the present study, experimental studies of isothermal cycling are firstly carried out with the observation and estimation of microstructures. According to the experimental results, a finite element model is established for the analysis of stress perpendicular to the TBC/BC interface. Detailed residual stress distributions in TBC are obtained to reflect the influence of mechanical properties, oxidation, and interfacial roughness. The calculated results show that the maximum tensile stress concentration appears at the peak of TBC and continues to increase with thermal cycles. Because of the microstructural characteristics of plasma-sprayed TBCs, cracks initialize in tensile stress concentration (TSC) regions at the peaks of TBC and propagate along the TBC/BC interface resulting in the spallation of TBC. Also, the inclusion of creep is crucial to failure prediction and is more important than the inclusion of sintering in the simulation.

  20. Ceramic Top Coats of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Materials, Processes, and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Emine; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The ceramic top coat has a major influence on the performance of the thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs). Yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the top coat material frequently used, and the major deposition processes of the YSZ top coat are atmospheric plasma spraying and electron beam physical vapor deposition. Recently, also new thermal spray processes such as suspension plasma spraying or plasma spray-physical vapor deposition have been intensively investigated for TBC top coat deposition. These new processes and particularly the different coating microstructures that can be deposited with them will be reviewed in this article. Furthermore, the properties and the intrinsic-extrinsic degradation mechanisms of the YSZ will be discussed. Following the TBC deposition processes and standard YSZ material, alternative ceramic materials such as perovskites and hexaaluminates will be summarized, while properties of pyrochlores with regard to their crystal structure will be discussed more in detail. The merits of the pyrochlores such as good CMAS resistance as well as their weaknesses, e.g., low fracture toughness, processability issues, will be outlined.

  1. Barriers to Alzheimer disease drug discovery and development in academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eldik, Linda J; Koppal, Tanuja; Watterson, D Martin

    2002-01-01

    The drug discovery and the drug development processes represent a continuum of recursive activities that range from initial drug target identification to final Food and Drug Administration approval and marketing of a new therapeutic. Drug discovery, as its name implies, is more exploratory and less focused in many cases, whereas drug development has a clinically defined endpoint and a specific disease goal. Academia has historically made major contributions to this process at the early discovery phases. However, current trends in the organization of the pharmaceutical industry suggest an expanded role for academia in the near future. Megamergers among major pharmaceutical corporations indicate their movement toward a focus on end-stage clinical trials, manufacturing, and marketing. There has been a parallel increase in outsourcing of intermediate steps to specialty small pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and contract service companies. The new paradigm suggests that academia will play an increasingly important role at the proof-of-principle stage of basic and clinical drug discovery research, in training the future skilled work force, and in close partnerships with small pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. However, academic drug discovery research faces a set of barriers to progress, the relative importance of which varies with the home institution and the details of the research area. These barriers fall into four general categories: (1) the historical administrative structure and environment of academia; (2) the structure and emphasis of peer review panels that control research funding by government and private agencies; (3) the organization and operation of the academic infrastructure; and (4) the structure and availability of specialized resources and information management. Selected examples of barriers to drug discovery and drug development research and training in academia are presented, as are some specific recommendations designed to minimize or

  2. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  3. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  4. WHAT ARE THE BARRIERS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF ORGANIC FARMING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afagh VEISI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate the main barriers to development of organic farming system in Kermanshah Province, Iran. Statistical population in this study consisted of all farmers in Kermanshah province, Iran. Applying stratified random sampling method, 137 farmers were selected as a sample. The main instrument in this study was questionnaire which its validity was confirmed by the panel of experts and its reliability was established by Cronbach's Alpha coefficient. Data was analyzed by SPSSWin16 software. Principal component analysis was used as main statistical technique to analyze the data. The results of factor analysis revealed that 4 factors including “Infrastructural”, “technical-managerial”, “economic-financial” and “educational” explained 42.36 percent of the variance. Results of this study have applications for agriculture development policy- makers for development of organic farming in Iran.

  5. Thermal Barrier Coatings Chemically and Mechanically Resistant to High Temperature Attack by Molten Ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Andrew

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are ceramic coatings used on component in the hottest sections of gas turbine engines, used for power generation and aviation. These coatings insulate the underlying metal components and allow for much higher engine operating temperatures, improving the engine efficiency. These increase temperatures engender a new set of materials problems for TBCs. Operating temperatures in engines are now high enough for silicate impurities, either present in the fuel or ingested into the engines, to melt and adhere to the surface of the TBCs. The effects of four such impurities, two coal fly ashes, a petroleum coke-fly ash blend, and volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajokull volcano were tested with conventional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, and found to penetrate through the entire thickness of the coating. This penetration reduces the strain tolerance of the coatings, and can result in premature failure. Testing on a newly built thermal gradient burner rig with simultaneous injection of ash impurities has shown a reduction of life up to 99.6% in these coatings when ash is present. Coatings of an alternative ceramic, gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr 2O7), were found to form a dense reaction layer with each of these impurities, preventing further penetration of the molten ash. This dense layer also reduces the strain tolerance, but these coatings were found to have a significantly higher life than the YSZ coatings. Testing with a small amount of ash baked onto the samples showed thirteen times the life of YSZ coatings. When the ash is continuously sprayed onto the hot sample, the life of the Gd2Zr2O7 coatings was nearly twice that of the YSZ. Finally, a delamination model was employed to explain the degradation of both types of coatings. This elastic model that takes into account the degree of penetration, differential cooling in thermal gradient testing, and thermal expansion mismatch with the underlying substrate, predicted the failure of

  6. Microstructural characterization of thermal barrier coating on Inconel 617 after high temperature oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Daroonparvar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A turbine blade was protected against high temperature corrosion and oxidation by thermal barrier coatings (TBCsusing atmospheric plasma spraying technique (APS on a Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 617. The coatings (NiCr6AlY/ YSZ and NiCr10AlY/YSZ consist of laminar structure with substantial interconnected porosity transferred oxygen from Yittria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ layer toward the bond coat (NiCrAlY. Hence, a thermally grown oxide layer (TGO was formed on the metallic bond coat and internal oxidation of the bond coat occurred during oxidation. The TBC systems were oxidized in a normal electrically heated furnace at 1150 °C for 18, 22, 26, 32 and 40h.Microstructural characterization of coatings demonstrated that the growth of the TGO layer on the nickel alloy with 6wt. % Al is more rapid than TGO with 10wt. % Al. In addition, many micro-cracks were observed at the interface of NiCr6AlY/YSZ. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD showed the existence of detrimental oxides such as NiCr2O4, NiCrO3 and NiCrO4 in the bond coat containing 6wt. % Al, accompanied by rapid volume expansion causing the destruction of TBC. In contrast, in the bond coat with 10wt. % Al, NiO, Al2O3and Cr2O3 oxides were formed while very low volume expansion occurred. The oxygen could not penetrate into the TGO layer of bond coat with 10 wt. % Al during high temperature oxidation and the detrimental oxides were not extensively formed within the bond coat as more oxygen was needed. The YSZ with higher Al content showed higher oxidation resistance.

  7. Development of Thermal Shock Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, B.; Varewijck, G.; Dufour, J.-F.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal shock testing is performed to qualify materials and processes for use in space in accordance to ECSS- Q-70-04A. The Fast Thermal Vacuum facility (FTV) has been specially designed to allow testing from -100oC up to 550oC. This large temperature test range is achieved by having two separate temperature controlled compartments. The specimen is placed on a trolley, which moves from one compartment to the other. The challenge in development of the facility was the relatively large size of the compartments (600 mm x 600 mm x 400 mm) and the required vacuum level of p~1E-05 mbar. The FTV was successfully commissioned in September 2010. The presentation summarises the results of the commissioning, facility performance, test data and lessons learned.

  8. Disposal systems evaluations and tool development : Engineered Barrier System (EBS) evaluation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny (LBNL); Liu, Hui-Hai (LBNL); Steefel, Carl I. (LBNL); Serrano de Caro, M. A. (LLNL); Caporuscio, Florie Andre (LANL); Birkholzer, Jens T. (LBNL); Blink, James A. (LLNL); Sutton, Mark A. (LLNL); Xu, Hongwu (LANL); Buscheck, Thomas A. (LLNL); Levy, Schon S. (LANL); Tsang, Chin-Fu (LBNL); Sonnenthal, Eric (LBNL); Halsey, William G. (LLNL); Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wolery, Thomas J. (LLNL)

    2011-01-01

    Key components of the nuclear fuel cycle are short-term storage and long-term disposal of nuclear waste. The latter encompasses the immobilization of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and radioactive waste streams generated by various phases of the nuclear fuel cycle, and the safe and permanent disposition of these waste forms in geological repository environments. The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a very important role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. EBS concepts and their interactions with the natural barrier are inherently important to the long-term performance assessment of the safety case where nuclear waste disposition needs to be evaluated for time periods of up to one million years. Making the safety case needed in the decision-making process for the recommendation and the eventual embracement of a disposal system concept requires a multi-faceted integration of knowledge and evidence-gathering to demonstrate the required confidence level in a deep geological disposal site and to evaluate long-term repository performance. The focus of this report is the following: (1) Evaluation of EBS in long-term disposal systems in deep geologic environments with emphasis on the multi-barrier concept; (2) Evaluation of key parameters in the characterization of EBS performance; (3) Identification of key knowledge gaps and uncertainties; and (4) Evaluation of tools and modeling approaches for EBS processes and performance. The above topics will be evaluated through the analysis of the following: (1) Overview of EBS concepts for various NW disposal systems; (2) Natural and man-made analogs, room chemistry, hydrochemistry of deep subsurface environments, and EBS material stability in near-field environments; (3) Reactive Transport and Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes in EBS; and (4) Thermal analysis toolkit, metallic barrier degradation mode survey, and development of a Disposal Systems

  9. Functional Food Market Development in Serbia: Motivations and Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žaklina Stojanović

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present main findings obtained from the empirical analysis of the functional food market in Serbia. The analysis is based on the in-depth interviews with relevant processors and retailers present on the market. The following set of topics are considered: (1 motivations (driving forces and barriers to offer products with nutrition and health (N&H claim and (2 perception of consumer demand toward N&H claimed products. Differences between Serbia and other Western Balkan Countries (WBC are explored by using nonparametric techniques based on the independent samples. Results support overall conclusion that this market segment in Serbia is underdeveloped and rather producer than consumer driven compared to more developed WBC markets.

  10. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal barrier coatings under bending

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Ray; N Roy; K M Godiwalla

    2001-04-01

    Ceramic based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are currently considered as a candidate material for advanced stationary gas turbine components. Crack propagation studies under bending are described that were performed on plasma sprayed ZrO2, bonded by MCrAlY layer to Ni base superalloy. The crack propagation behaviour of the coatings at room temperature in as received and oxidized conditions revealed a linear growth of the cracks on the coating till the yield point of the super alloy was reached. High threshold load at the interface between the ceramic layer and the bond coat was required to propagate the crack further into the bond coat. Once the threshold load was surpassed the crack propagated into the brittle bond coat without an appreciable increase in the load. At temperatures of 800°C the crack propagated only in the TBC (ceramic layer), as the ductile bond coat offered an attractive sink for the stress relaxation. Effects of bond coat oxidation on crack propagation in the interface region have been examined and are discussed.

  11. A Numerical Procedure to Obtain the Creep Parameters of the Thermal Barrier Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-point bending creep test was used to understand the creep behavior of typical thin film/substrate systems—thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. Firstly, a simplified model, which does not consider the local effect, has been set up to get an analytical relationship. The important result is that creep stress exponent of materials is equal to the creep load exponent of the steady-state deflection rate of BC specimens. Secondly, in order to consider the local effect of bending, the finite element method (FEM has been carried out. FEM calculation shows that there is a steady stage of the creep deflection under a constant applied load. And the exponent of the steady-state creep deflection rate to the applied load is found to be equal to the creep stress exponent of materials. The creep constant of the materials can be obtained by a set of trials with assumed creep constants of materials and can be finally determined by the best fit method. Finally, the finite element results show that the influences of the friction, the thickness of TBCs, and the modulus ratio of TBC to the substrate on stress distribution are important.

  12. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  13. Methane Conversion Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge: Comparison with Thermal Process and Catalyst Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonius Indarto; Jae-Wook Choi; Hwaung Lee; Hyung Keun Song

    2006-01-01

    The direct conversion of methane using a dielectric barrier discharge has been experimentally studied. Experiments with different values of flow rates and discharge voltages have been performed to investigate the effects on the conversion and reaction products both qualitatively and quantitatively.Experimental results indicate that the maximum conversion of methane has been 80% at an input flow rate of 5 ml/min and a discharge voltage of 4 kV. Experimental results also show that the optimum condition has occurred at a high discharge voltage and higher input flow rate. In terms of product distribution, a higher flow rate or shorter residence time can increase the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons. No hydrocarbon product was detected using the thermal method, except hydrogen and carbon. Increasing selectivity for ethane was found when Pt and Ru catalysts presented in the plasma reaction. Hydrogenation of acetylene in the catalyst surface could have been the reason for this phenomenon as the selectivity for acetylene in the products was decreasing.

  14. Failure Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Cylindrical Superalloy Tube Under Thermomechanical Fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhubing CHEN; Zhongguang WANG; Shijie ZHU

    2013-01-01

    Failure behavior of thermal barrier coatings on cylindrical superalloy tube was investigated under thermomechanical fatigue (TMF).Two types of TMF tests,i.e.in phase (IP) and out of phase (OP),were performed in the temperature range of 450-850 ℃.All tests were carried out under mechanical strain control at a given period of 300 s.The bond coat NiCrA1Y was produced by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF),and the top coat 7%Y2O3-ZrO2 was deposited by air plasma spraying (APS).The testing results showed that the OP TMF life was longer than the IP TMF one under the same mechanical strain amplitude.Observations of the fractured specimens revealed that the interface damage and cracking behavior in the two phasing conditions were different.In OP loading,the top coat was cracked and detached from the bond coat while no spallation was found in the IP loading.

  15. Interface conjunction factors of thermal barrier coatings and the relationship between factors and composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhilin; (李志林); XU; Huibin; (徐惠彬); GONG; Shengkai; (宫声凯)

    2003-01-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC), ceramics is covered on the metal matrix as coatings in order to raise its temperature endurance. Today most of the TBCs are of the double-layer-struc- ture of Ni base heat-resistant alloy matrix + the bonding layer of MCrAlY alloy (M = Ni, Co, Ni + Co) + ZrO2. In this paper, the concept of interface conjunction factor (ICF) in the biphase interface of alloys is expanded to coatings. The ICFs of the interface between the ceramics and the bonding layers with various compositions, such as the electron density ρ, the electron density difference △ρ, and the number of atom state group which keeps the electron density continuous σ are calculated. From the calculation results, the following estimations can be deduced. When Al content is less than 6 wt% it improves the mechanical properties of the coatings; when the content is 6 wt%-12 wt% it will not worsen the properties; when the content is greater than 12 wt% it will have disadvantageous effect. The estimations accord well with the experiment results of the properties and the service time of the coatings. Therefore the concept of ICF has the same important meaning in coatings, and the valence electron structure of the interface can be a possible theoretical guide for the content optimization of TBCs.

  16. Highly Segmented Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray: Effects of Spray Process on Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Araki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Effects of the ceramic powder size used for suspension as well as several processing parameters in suspension plasma spraying of YSZ were investigated experimentally, aiming to fabricate highly segmented microstructures for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to observe the atomization process and the velocity distribution of atomized droplets and ceramic particles travelling toward the substrates. The tested parameters included the secondary plasma gas (He versus H2), suspension injection flow rate, and substrate surface roughness. Results indicated that a plasma jet with a relatively higher content of He or H2 as the secondary plasma gas was critical to produce highly segmented YSZ TBCs with a crack density up to 12 cracks/mm. The optimized suspension flow rate played an important role to realize coatings with a reduced porosity level and improved adhesion. An increased powder size and higher operation power level were beneficial for the formation of highly segmented coatings onto substrates with a wider range of surface roughness.

  17. Multilayer stacks obtained by ion assisted EB PVD aimed at thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E.; Maile, K.; Lyutovich, A. [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA)

    2010-07-01

    Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) using Electron Beam Physical Vapour Deposition (EB PVD) is widely implemented, especially for aero-engine turbine blades. Generally, multilayer stacks are used for these aims. For the additional improvement of intermediate layers with graded transitions to the initial Ni-based alloy, the use of accelerated ions in the EBPVD-process is advantageous. The effect of the substrate bias potential, ion current density and deposition temperature on the structure and properties of Ti and Zr intermediate layers are investigated. The morphology of the films is studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is found that the surface morphology becomes smoother with rising bias potential and decreasing ion current density. Measurements of Vicker's micro-hardness performed on these coatings have shown its increase with higher values of the bias and its reduction with the growing temperature. This effect is caused by the observed decrease in grain size and higher porosity of the films. A multilayer coating system Ni (based substrate)-Si-Si{sub x}Al{sub y}-Al with graded transitions between the layers is obtained using ion assisted EBPVD. Architecture of a multilayer stack for TBC with graded transitions is proposed. (orig.)

  18. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Residual Stress in Thermal Barrier Coatings During APS Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lifu; Zhu, Jianguo; Xie, Huimin

    2014-04-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is widely used in modern gas turbines to protect the internals and enable them to service in higher temperature environment. Residual stress in the TBC system can be induced during its production procedure, such as air plasma spraying (APS) process, and affect its performance to a large extent. The temperature history and the evolution of residual stress in the TBC system during APS process were studied in this paper by finite element simulation and hole-drilling experiment. A five-layered TBC specimen model was established, and a thermo-mechanical-coupled analysis was conducted in the simulation. The "modified element birth-death technique" was used to represent the formation of TBC. In addition, experimental validation of the simulation result was carried out on a TBC specimen using hole-drilling technique combined with moiré interferometry. The experimental data agreed well with the simulation results and the study of this paper could provide a reference for the production of the TBC system.

  19. Surface laser-glazing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, C. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Portinha, A. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ribeiro, R.M. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)]. E-mail: ricardo@fisica.uminho.pt; Teixeira, V. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Costa, M.F. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Oliveira, C.R. [Instituto de Desenvolvimentoe Inovacao Tecnologica (IDIT), 4520-102 Santa Maria da Feira (Portugal); University Lusiada, 4760-108 Vila Nova de Famalicao (Portugal)

    2005-07-15

    Atmospheric plasma-sprayed (APS) ZrO{sub 2}-8%WtY{sub 2}O{sub 3} thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were subjected to a CO{sub 2} continuous wave laser-glazing process in order to generate an external dense layer produced by different processing parameters. For that purpose, different beam scanning speeds and track overlapping were chosen. Surface roughness has been reduced significantly after laser-glazing. Despite the surface crack network, all laser-glazed specimens presented a fully dense and porous free external layer with a columnar microstructure. Surface cracks along the densified layer were found to have tendency to be oriented in two perpendicular directions, one in the direction of the laser beam travel, the other perpendicular to it. Moreover, the cracks parallel to the beam moving direction are found to be on the overlapping zone, coinciding with the edge of the subsequent track. The cracks along the densified layer are vertical and tend to branch and deviate from the vertical direction within the porous PS coating. The largest overlapping allied to the smallest amount of irradiated energy generated the most uniform layer with the shortest crack branches within the PS coating. For the as-sprayed coating, the XRD results revealed mainly t' non-transformable tetragonal zirconia with a small percentage of residual monoclinic zirconia. All glazed coatings presented only t' non-transformable tetragonal zirconia with some variations on preferable crystal orientation.

  20. Elastically Cooperative Activated Barrier Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Fluids. II. Thermal Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in the preceding paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singulariti...

  1. Conjugate heat transfer investigation on the cooling performance of air cooled turbine blade with thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yongbin; Ma, Chao; Ge, Bing; Zang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    A hot wind tunnel of annular cascade test rig is established for measuring temperature distribution on a real gas turbine blade surface with infrared camera. Besides, conjugate heat transfer numerical simulation is performed to obtain cooling efficiency distribution on both blade substrate surface and coating surface for comparison. The effect of thermal barrier coating on the overall cooling performance for blades is compared under varied mass flow rate of coolant, and spatial difference is also discussed. Results indicate that the cooling efficiency in the leading edge and trailing edge areas of the blade is the lowest. The cooling performance is not only influenced by the internal cooling structures layout inside the blade but also by the flow condition of the mainstream in the external cascade path. Thermal barrier effects of the coating vary at different regions of the blade surface, where higher internal cooling performance exists, more effective the thermal barrier will be, which means the thermal protection effect of coatings is remarkable in these regions. At the designed mass flow ratio condition, the cooling efficiency on the pressure side varies by 0.13 for the coating surface and substrate surface, while this value is 0.09 on the suction side.

  2. Research Progress of A2 Zr2 O7-type Rare-earth Zirconate Thermal Barrier Coatings%A2 Zr2 O7型稀土锆酸盐热障涂层研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红松; 杨树森; 温倩

    2014-01-01

    Searching for new ceramic materials is the most feasible method in order to resolve the defects of current thermal barrier coatings. The A2 Zr2 O7-type rare earth zirconates are regarded as the most potential candidate ceramic materials for thermal barrier coatings because of their low thermal conductivities, high thermal expansion coefficients and excellent phase stability at high temperatures. Rare-earth zirconate coatings are one of the key-research directions in thermal barrier coating field. In the current paper, the research progress at home and abroad, such as coating preparing technology, coating structure, coating properties inclu-ding thermophysical properties, mechanics and thermal erosion, were systemically summarized. The development deficiencies of rare-earth zirconate thermal barrier coatings were investigated. In the future, the preparing and post-treatment technology of rare-earth zirconate coatings should be improved. The bonding strength, working lifetime, corrosion and sintering resistance of new ther-mal barrier coatings should also be enhanced. In order to study coating properties of nano-structure thermal barrier coatings, new preparing technology must be developed. The thermal insulation, working temperature and lifetime of new thermal barrier coatings should also be improved.%综述了国内外稀土锆酸盐热障涂层在制备技术,纳米涂层,涂层结构及涂层的热物理性能、力学性能及热腐蚀性能等方面的研究成果,讨论了稀土锆酸盐热障涂层在每个方面研究存在的不足。指出未来应该进一步改善稀土锆酸盐涂层的制备工艺及后处理工艺,提高涂层的结合强度,延长涂层的服役寿命,改善涂层耐腐蚀、抗烧结等性能;开发新的涂层制备工艺,重点研究各类纳米稀土锆酸盐涂层的性能;进一步提高涂层的隔热效果、服役温度及工作寿命。

  3. Motivations and Barriers for Policymakers to Developing State Adaptation Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.; Sylak-Glassman, E.

    2016-12-01

    Current approaches for developing high-quality adaptation plan require significant resources. In recent years, communities have grown to embrace adaptive plans across multiple forms, including adaptive capacity assessments, resilience strategies, and vulnerability assessments. Across the United States, as of this writing, 14 states have established adaptation plans, with another 8 states having begun the process. Given the high resources requirements and increasing interest in the development of adaptation plans, we aim to examine patterns behind the establishment of resilience plans at the state level. We examine demographic, financial, political, and physical characteristics associated with different states in an effort to explore the reasoning behind investing in the development of adaptation plans. This analysis considers quantitative and qualitative factors, including recent elections for political parties, politicians' climate-related statements and campaign promises, demographics, budgets, and regional climate threats. The analysis aims to identify motivations for state leadership taking action to develop adaptation plans. Results from the analysis seek to identify the primary drivers and barriers associated with state-wide resilience planning. These results could inform the design of scientific communication tools or approaches to aid future adaptation responses to climate change.

  4. 大气等离子喷涂氧化锆热障涂层研究进展%Research Progress of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐鹏; 宋仁国; 王超

    2011-01-01

    简要概述了大气等离子喷涂技术、等离子喷涂热障涂层选用氧化锆材料的原因及其具有的优异性能,同时也介绍了等离子喷涂制备热障涂层的国内外研究现状并指出了未来的发展方向.%The atmospheric plasma spraying and the reason of the choosing zirconia in the process of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings as well as its excellent performance were briefly overviewed. Meanwhile, the domestic and overseas research status of the plasma sprayed yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings was also reviewed. Finally, the future development of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings was pointed out.

  5. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  6. Autonomous Aerobraking: Thermal Analysis and Response Surface Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Thornblom, Mark N.

    2011-01-01

    A high-fidelity thermal model of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was developed for use in an autonomous aerobraking simulation study. Response surface equations were derived from the high-fidelity thermal model and integrated into the autonomous aerobraking simulation software. The high-fidelity thermal model was developed using the Thermal Desktop software and used in all phases of the analysis. The use of Thermal Desktop exclusively, represented a change from previously developed aerobraking thermal analysis methodologies. Comparisons were made between the Thermal Desktop solutions and those developed for the previous aerobraking thermal analyses performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during aerobraking operations. A variable sensitivity screening study was performed to reduce the number of variables carried in the response surface equations. Thermal analysis and response surface equation development were performed for autonomous aerobraking missions at Mars and Venus.

  7. Effect of thermal barrier coating with various blends of pumpkin seed oil methyl ester in DI diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthickeyan, V.; Balamurugan, P.

    2017-05-01

    The rise in oil prices, dependency on fossil fuels, degradation of non-renewable energy resources and global warming strives to find a low-carbon content alternative fuel to the conventional fuel. In the present work, Partially Stabilized Zirconia (PSZ) was used as a thermal barrier coating in piston head, cylinder head and intake and exhaust valves using plasma spray technique, which provided a rise in combustion chamber temperature. With the present study, the effects of thermal barrier coating on the blends of Pumpkin Seed Oil Methyl Ester (PSOME) were observed in both the coated and uncoated engine. Performance and emission characteristics of the PSOME in coated and uncoated engines were observed and compared. Increased thermal efficiency and reduced fuel consumption were observed for B25 and diesel in coated and uncoated engine. On comparing with the other biodiesel samples, B25 exhibited lower HC, NOx and smoke emissions in thermally coated engine than uncoated engine. After 100 h of operation, no anamolies were found in the thermally coated components except minor cracks were identified in the edges of the piston head.

  8. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with MCrAlY Bond Coat Irradiated by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Lv, Peng; Guan, Qingfeng; Xu, Xiaojing; Lu, Jinzhong; Wang, Zhiping; Han, Zhiyong

    2016-11-30

    Microstructural modifications of a thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat subjected to high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) and their relationships with thermal cycling behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated. Microstructural observations revealed that the rough surface of air plasma spraying (APS) samples was significantly remelted and replaced by many interconnected bulged nodules after HCPEB irradiation. Meanwhile, the parallel columnar grains with growth direction perpendicular to the coating surface were observed inside these bulged nodules. Substantial Y-rich Al2O3 bubbles and varieties of nanocrystallines were distributed evenly on the top of the modified layer. A physical model was proposed to describe the evaporation-condensation mechanism taking place at the irradiated surface for generating such surface morphologies. The results of thermal cycling test showed that HCPEB-TBCs presented higher thermal cycling resistance, the spalling area of which after 200 cycles accounted for only 1% of its total area, while it was about 34% for APS-TBCs. The resulting failure mode, i.e., in particular, a mixed delamination crack path, was shown and discussed. The irradiated effects including compact remelted surface, abundant nanoparticles, refined columnar grains, Y-rich alumina bubbles, and deformation structures contributed to the formation of a stable, continuous, slow-growing, and uniform thermally grown oxide with strong adherent ability. It appeared to be responsible for releasing stress and changing the cracking paths, and ultimately greatly improving the thermal cycling behavior of HCPEB-TBCs.

  9. AN ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF ENGINEERED BARRIERS IN A HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KWON

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Adequate design of engineered barriers, including canister, buffer and backfill, is important for the safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Three-dimensional computer simulations were carried out under different condition to examine the thermal and mechanical behavior of engineered barriers and rock mass. The research looked at five areas of importance, the effect of the swelling pressure, water content of buffer, density of compacted bentonite, emplacement type and the selection of failure criteria. The results highlighted the need to consider tensile stress in the outer shell of a canister due to thermal expansion of the canister and the swelling pressure from the buffer for a more reliable design of an underground repository system. In addition, an adequate failure criterion should be used for the buffer and backfill.

  10. Influence of thermal barrier effect of grain boundaries on bulk cascades in alpha-zirconium revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yanan; Lai, Wensheng, E-mail: wslai@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2016-03-15

    The effect of grain boundaries (GBs) on bulk cascades in nano-structured alpha-zirconium has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It turns out that the existence of GBs increases the defect productivity in grains, suggesting that the GBs may act as a thermal barrier and postpone the annihilation of defects within grains. Moreover, it is found that the thermal barrier effect of GBs facilitates the shift of symmetric tilt GBs to the grain with higher temperature, and the smaller the tilt angle is, the easier the boundary shift will be. Thus, the influence of GBs on radiation damage in the nano-structured materials comes from the competition between damage increase in grains and defect annihilation at GBs.

  11. DETERMINATION OF CREEP PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATING(TBC) SYSTEMS FROM THE INDENTATION CREEP TESTING WITH ROUND FLAT INDENTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. Zhao; B.X. Xu; J. Liu; Z.F. Yue

    2004-01-01

    Indentation creep behavior with cylindrical flat indenters on the thermal barrier coating (TBC) was studied by finite element method (FEM). On the constant applied indentation creep stress, there is a steady creep rate for each case studied for different creep properties of the TBC system. The steady creep depth rate depends on the applied indentation creep stress and size of the indenters as well as the creep properties of the bond coat of the TBC and the substrate. The possibilities to determine the creep properties of a thermal barrier system from indention creep testing were discussed. As an example, with two different size indenters, the creep properties of bond coat of the TBC system can be derived by an inverse FEM method. This study not only provides a numerical method to obtain the creep properties of the TBC system, but also extends the application of indentation creep method with cylindrical flat indenters.

  12. A computer program for full-coverage film-cooled blading analysis including the effects of a thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The program input, coolant flow and heat transfer model, and the program output are discussed. As an example, sections of the suction and pressure sides of a high temperature, high pressure turbine vane are analyzed to show the effects of a thermal barrier coating. Compared to the uncoated design, the coating halves the required coolant flow, while simultaneously reducing metal outer temperatures by over 111 K.

  13. Biomimetic thermal barrier coating in jet engine to resist volcanic ash deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Schulz, Uwe; Muth, Tobias; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The threat of volcanic ash to aviation safety is attracting extensive attention when several commercial jet aircraft were damaged after flying through volcanic ash clouds from the May 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helen in Washington, U.S. and especially after the air traffic disruption in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. A major hazard presented by volcanic ash to aircraft is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Due to the fact ash has a lower melting point, around 1100 °C, than the gas temperature in the hot section (between 1400 to 2000 °C), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components (e.g., combustor and turbine blades), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components of the engine creating, substantial damage or even engine failure after ingestion. Here, inspiring form the natural surface of lotus leaf (exhibiting extreme water repellency, known as 'lotus effect'), we firstly create the multifunctional surface thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by producing a hierarchical structure with femtosecond laser pulses. In detail, we investigate the effect of one of primary femtosecond laser irradiation process parameter (scanning speed) on the hydrophobicity of water droplets onto the two kinds of TBCs fabricated by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spray (APS), respectively as well as their corresponding to morphology. It is found that, comparison with the original surface (without femtosecond laser ablation), all of the irradiated samples demonstrate more significant hydrophobic properties due to nanostructuring. On the basis of these preliminary room-temperature results, the wettability of volcanic ash droplets will be analysed at the high temperature to constrain the potential impact of volcanic ash on the jet engines.

  14. Monitoring Delamination of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings by Reflectance-Enhanced Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Highly scattering plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) present a challenge for optical diagnostic methods to monitor TBC delamination because scattering attenuates light transmitted through the TBC and usually degrades contrast between attached and delaminated regions of the TBC. This paper presents a new approach where reflectance-enhanced luminescence from a luminescent sublayer incorporated along the bottom of the TBC is used to identify regions of TBC delamination. Because of the higher survival rate of luminescence reflecting off the back surface of a delaminated TBC, the strong scattering exhibited by plasma-sprayed TBCs actually accentuates contrast between attached and delaminated regions by making it more likely that multiple reflections of luminescence off the back surface occur before exiting the top surface of the TBC. A freestanding coating containing sections designed to model an attached or delaminated TBC was prepared by depositing a luminescent Eu-doped or Er-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent layer below a plasma-sprayed undoped YSZ layer and utilizing a NiCr backing layer to represent an attached substrate. For specimens with a Eu-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer, luminescence intensity maps showed excellent contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections even at a plasma-sprayed overlayer thickness of 300 m. Discernable contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections was not observed for specimens with a Er-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer because luminescence from Er impurities in the undoped YSZ layer overwhelmed luminescence originating form the Er-doped YSZ sublayer.

  15. Thermo-mechanical Experiments of Y-PSZ Thermal Barrier Ceramic Coating with Bond Coat of Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kamal Raj; Kumar, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, aluminum alloy (AlSi) substrates coated by Yttria stabilized zirconia used as thermal barrier have been investigated. The ceramic coating on the substrate is applied by plasma-spraying technique. Alumina (Al2O3) is used as a bond coat material. Four types of ceramic coating thickness (150, 250, 350 and 450 µm) were applied to AlSi materials which were cut out of diesel engine pistons with 100 µm thickness of bonding coat of Al2O3. The thermal torch and the thermal shock tests were conducted to coated samples which were made according to the international standards. Constant shock intensities were tested for 70 cycles on different thicknesses of the ceramic material and special attention was paid to the influence of thickness of the coating on the crazing phenomenon. Thermal resistance of thermal torch tested samples has been checked by drilling a hole in the middle of the samples and deformation time has been noted. Thermal shock tested samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction machine and scanning electron microscopy machine. The diffractograms and micrographs have been obtained respectively for the samples. The diffractograms and micrographs of as sprayed samples and shock tested samples for different thickness have been compared, even the effect of thermal shock experiment on the different coating thickness of the ceramic have been analyzed. At the end of the tests, the most suitable ceramic coating thickness was determined.

  16. Nano-MgO reinforced chitosan nanocomposites for high performance packaging applications with improved mechanical, thermal and barrier properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, R T; Mantilaka, M M M G P G; Ratnayake, S P; Amaratunga, G A J; de Silva, K M Nalin

    2017-02-10

    Chitosan nanocomposite thin films were fabricated by incorporating MgO nanoparticles to significantly improve its physical properties for potential packaging applications. A novel in-situ method was developed to synthesise spherical shaped MgO nanoparticles by heat-treating magnesium carbonate/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composite precursor. Optimum mechanical properties of chitosan composites were yielded at 5 (w/w%) of MgO concentration, where tensile stress and elastic modulus significantly improved by 86% and 38%, respectively, compared to those of pure chitosan films. These improvements are due to the interaction of hydroxyl and amine groups of chitosan with MgO as confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Fracture surface morphology indicated the interplay between MgO dispersion and aggregation on the mechanical properties at different MgO concentrations. Furthermore, the chitosan/MgO nanocomposites displayed remarkable thermal stability, flame retardant properties (satisfied V0 rating according to the UL-94 standards), UV shielding and moisture barrier properties, which could certainly add value to the packaging material.

  17. Accuracy of Young's Modulus of Thermal Barrier Coating Layer Determined by Bending Resonance of a Multilayered Specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Hiroyuki; Takizawa, Kensuke; Kato, Masahiko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    The Young's modulus of individual layer in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is an important mechanical property because it allows determining the parameters of materials mechanics in the TBC system. In this study, we investigated the accuracy of the evaluation method for the Young's modulus of a TBC layer according to the first bending resonance of a multilayered specimen comprising a substrate, bond coating, and TBC. First, we derived a closed-form solution for the Young's modulus of the TBC layer using the equation of motion for the bending vibration of a composite beam. The solution for the three-layered model provided the Young's modulus of the TBC layer according to the measured resonance frequency and the known values for the dimensions, mass, and Young's moduli of all the other layers. Next, we analyzed the sensitivity of these input errors to the evaluated Young's modulus and revealed the important inputs for accurate evaluation. Finally, we experimentally confirmed that the Young's modulus of the TBC layer was obtained accurately by the developed method.

  18. Yttria-stabilized zirkonia / gadolinium zirconate double-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakan, Emine

    2015-07-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) research and development is driven by the desirability of further increasing the maximum inlet temperature in a gas turbine engine. A number of new top coat ceramic materials have been proposed during the last decades due to limited temperature capability (1200 C) of the state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (7 wt. % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}, YSZ) at long term operation. Zirconate pyrochlores of the large lanthanides((Gd → La){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) have been particularly attractive due to their higher temperature phase stability than that of the YSZ. Nonetheless, the issues related with the implementation of pyrochlores such as low fracture toughness and formation of deleterious interphases with thermally grown oxide (TGO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were reported. The implication was the requirement of an interlayer between the pyrochlores and TGO, which introduced double-layer systems to the TBC literature. Furthermore, processability issues of pyrochlores associated with the different evaporation rates of lanthanide oxides and zirconia resulting in unfavorable composition variations in the coatings were addressed in different studies. After all, although the material properties are available, there is a paucity of data in the literature concerning the properties of the coatings made of pyrochlores. From the processability point of view the most reported pyrochlore is La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Hence, the goal of this research was to investigate plasma-sprayed Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (GZO) coatings and YSZ/GZO double-layer TBC systems. Three main topics were examined based on processing, performance and properties: (i) the plasma spray processing of the GZO and its impact on the microstructural and compositional properties of the GZO coatings; (ii) the cycling lifetime of the YSZ/GZO double-layer systems under thermal gradient at a surface temperature of 1400 C; (iii) the properties of the GZO and YSZ coatings such as

  19. Development and Remodeling of the Vertebrate Blood-Gas Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Makanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During vertebrate development, the lung inaugurates as an endodermal bud from the primitive foregut. Dichotomous subdivision of the bud results in arborizing airways that form the prospective gas exchanging chambers, where a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB is established. In the mammalian lung, this proceeds through conversion of type II cells to type I cells, thinning, and elongation of the cells as well as extrusion of the lamellar bodies. Subsequent diminution of interstitial tissue and apposition of capillaries to the alveolar epithelium establish a thin BGB. In the noncompliant avian lung, attenuation proceeds through cell-cutting processes that result in remarkable thinning of the epithelial layer. A host of morphoregulatory molecules, including transcription factors such as Nkx2.1, GATA, HNF-3, and WNT5a; signaling molecules including FGF, BMP-4, Shh, and TFG-β and extracellular proteins and their receptors have been implicated. During normal physiological function, the BGB may be remodeled in response to alterations in transmural pressures in both blood capillaries and airspaces. Such changes are mitigated through rapid expression of the relevant genes for extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors. While an appreciable amount of information regarding molecular control has been documented in the mammalian lung, very little is available on the avian lung.

  20. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    An important component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier is the use of a two-layer composite asphalt system, which provides backup water diversion capabilities if the primary capillary barrier fails to meet infiltration goals. Because of asphalt`s potential to perform to specification over the 1000-year design life criterion, a composite asphalt barrier (HMAC/fluid-applied polymer-modified asphalt) is being considered as an alternative to the bentonite clay/high density poly(ethylene) barriers for the low-permeability component of the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier. The feasibility of using asphalt as a long-term barrier is currently being studied. Information that must be known is the ability of asphalt to retain desirable physical properties over a period of 1000 years. This paper presents the approach for performing accelerated aging tests and evaluating the performance of samples under accelerated conditions. The results of these tests will be compared with asphalt artifact analogs and the results of modeling the degradation of the selected asphalt composite to make life-cycle predictions.

  1. Residual Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings for a Cu-8Cr-4Nb Substrate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Raj, Sai V.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical calculations were conducted to determine the thermal stresses developed in a coated copper-based alloy, Cu-8%(at.%)Cr-4%Nb (designated as GRCop-84), after plasma spraying and during heat-up in a simulated rocket engine environment. Finite element analyses were conducted for two coating systems consisting of a metallic top coat, a pure copper bond coat and the GRCop-84. The through thickness temperature variations were determined as a function of coating thickness for two metallic coatings, a Ni-17%(wt%)Cr-6%Al-0.5%Y alloy and a Ni-50%(at.%)Al alloy. The residual stresses after low-pressure plasma spraying of the NiCrAlY and NiAl coatings on GRCop-84 substrate were also evaluated. These analyses took into consideration a 50.8 mm copper bond coat and the effects of an interface coating roughness. The through the thickness thermal stresses developed in coated liners were also calculated after 15 minutes of exposure in a rocket environment with and without an interfacial roughness.

  2. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  3. Stability of coral-endosymbiont associations during and after a thermal stress event in the southern Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stat, M.; Loh, W. K. W.; Lajeunesse, T. C.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Carter, D. A.

    2009-09-01

    Shifts in the community of symbiotic dinoflagellates to those that are better suited to the prevailing environmental condition may provide reef-building corals with a rapid mechanism by which to adapt to changes in the environment. In this study, the dominant Symbiodinium in 10 coral species in the southern Great Barrier Reef was monitored over a 1-year period in 2002 that coincided with a thermal stress event. Molecular genetic profiling of Symbiodinium communities using single strand conformational polymorphism of the large subunit rDNA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region did not detect any changes in the communities during and after this thermal-stress event. Coral colonies of seven species bleached but recovered with their original symbionts. This study suggests that the shuffling or switching of symbionts in response to thermal stress may be restricted to certain coral species and is probably not a universal feature of the coral-symbiont relationship.

  4. Porous-Al2O3 thermal barrier coatings with dispersed Pt particles prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Porousa-Al2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) containing dispersed Pt particles were prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition (CPED). The influence of the Pt particles on the microstructure of the coatings and the CPED process were studied. The prepared coatings were mainly composed ofα-Al2O3. The average thickness of the coatings was approximately 100μm. Such single-layer TBCs ex-hibited not only excellent high-temperature cyclic oxidation and spallation resistance, but also good thermal insulation properties. Porousa-Al2O3 TBCs inhibit further oxidation of alloy substrates because of their extremely low oxygen diffusion rate, provide good thermal insu-lation because of their porous structure, and exhibit excellent mechanical properties because of the toughening effect of the Pt particles and because of stress relaxation induced by deformation of the porous structure.

  5. Numerical Parametric Analysis of Bond Coat Thickness Effect on Residual Stresses in Zirconia-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Musharaf; Hasham, Hasan Junaid; Baig, Yasir

    2016-02-01

    Numerical-based finite element investigation has been conducted to explain the effect of bond coat thickness on stress distribution in traditional and nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Stress components have been determined to quantitatively analyze the mechanical response of both kinds of coatings under the thermal shock effect. It has been found that maximum radial tensile and compressive stresses that exist at thermally grown oxide (TGO)/bond coat interface and within TGO respectively decrease with an increase in bond coat thickness. Effect of bond coat thickness on axial tensile stresses is not significant. However, axial compressive stresses that exist at the edge of the specimen near bond coat/substrate interface decrease appreciably with the increase in bond coat thickness. Residual stress profile as a function of bond coat thickness is further explained for comparative analysis of both coatings to draw some useful conclusions helpful in failure studies of TBCs.

  6. Effect of Young's modulus evolution on residual stress measurement of thermal barrier coatings by X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Mao, W. G.; Zhou, Y. C.; Lu, C.

    2010-09-01

    Subjected to thermal cycling, the apparent Young's modulus of air plasma-sprayed (APS) 8 wt.% Y 2O 3-stabilized ZrO 2 (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was measured by nanoindentation. Owing to the effects of sintering and porous microstructure, the apparent Young's modulus follows a Weibull distribution and changes from 50 to 93 GPa with an increase of thermal cycling. The evolution of residual stresses in the top coating of an 8YSZ TBC system was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The residual stresses derived from the XRD data are well consistent with that obtained by the Vickers indention. It is shown that the evolution of Young's modulus plays an important role in improving the measurement precision of residual stresses in TBCs by XRD.

  7. Development of the Barriers to Error Disclosure Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Darlene; Zephyr, Dominique; Pfeifle, Andrea L; Carr, Douglas E; Fink, Joseph L; Jones, Mandy

    2017-06-30

    An interprofessional group of health colleges' faculty created and piloted the Barriers to Error Disclosure Assessment tool as an instrument to measure barriers to medical error disclosure among health care providers. A review of the literature guided the creation of items describing influences on the decision to disclose a medical error. Local and national experts in error disclosure used a modified Delphi process to gain consensus on the items included in the pilot. After receiving university institutional review board approval, researchers distributed the tool to a convenience sample of physicians (n = 19), pharmacists (n = 20), and nurses (n = 20) from an academic medical center. Means and SDs were used to describe the sample. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to examine test-retest correspondence between the continuous items on the scale. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to determine factor loadings and examine internal consistency reliability. Cronbach α coefficients were calculated during initial and subsequent administrations to assess test-retest reliability. After omitting 2 items with intraclass correlation coefficient of less than 0.40, intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.43 to 0.70, indicating fair to good test-retest correspondence between the continuous items on the final draft. Factor analysis revealed the following factors during the initial administration: confidence and knowledge barriers, institutional barriers, psychological barriers, and financial concern barriers to medical error disclosure. α Coefficients of 0.85 to 0.93 at time 1 and 0.82 to 0.95 at time 2 supported test-retest reliability. The final version of the 31-item tool can be used to measure perceptions about abilities for disclosing, impressions regarding institutional policies and climate, and specific barriers that inhibit disclosure by health care providers. Preliminary evidence supports the tool's validity and reliability for measuring

  8. Thermal barrier ZrO2 - Y2O3 obtained by plasma spraying method and laser melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kobylańska–Szkaradek

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose: The aim of the paper is to determine the influence of laser melting upon the selected physical properties of ZrO2 - Y2O3 ceramic coatings deposited by APS (Air Plasma Spraying method on super-alloys which function as TBC (Thermal Barriers Coatings.Design/methodology/approach: Laser melting which helps eliminate pores and other structural defects of coatings should contribute to the improvement of their density and durability as thermal barriers. In order to prove the assumptions made in the paper, coatings featuring varied porosity and deposited upon the nickel base super-alloys surface with the initially sprayed NiCrAlY bond coat have been subjected to laser melting and then their structure, thermal conductivity and thermal life prediction in the conditions of cyclic temperature changes from 20 to 1200ºC have been examined.Findings: It has been revealed that the coatings featuring low porosity laser melted on part of their thickness and heated up to about 700ºC demonstrate the highest thermal life prediction under the conditions mentioned and at slightly lower thermal conductivity.Research limitations/implications: Low wettability of metal by ceramic which results from various surface tensions of these materials is the cause of their lower adhesion to the substrate during laser melting all through their thickness. It is so because delaminations occur between phases the boundary and cracks.Practical implications: The worked out conditions of laser melting might be used in the process of creation of TBC which feature high working durability upon super-alloy elements.Originality/value: It has been found that homogenization of chemical composition of coatings occurs during laser melting leading to the reduction of ZrO2 - Y2O3 phase with monoclinic lattice participation as well as to the reduction of structural stresses which accompany this phase transformation during heating and cooling process.

  9. Evolution of photo-stimulated luminescence of EB-PVD/(Ni, Pt)Al thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Mei [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Jordan, Eric H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)]. E-mail: jordan@engr.uconn.edu; Gell, Maurice [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2005-05-25

    Experiments are described which were designed to assess the suitability of photo-stimulated luminescence piezo-spectroscopy (PLPS) measurements as a basis for non-destructive inspection (NDI) and determination of life remaining of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Thermal cyclic tests were conducted on 7 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD)/(Ni, Pt)Al/CMSX-4 TBCs at two temperatures 1151 and 1121 deg. C. The evolution of PLPS spectral characteristics (peak frequency shift, peak width and area ratio of peaks) was studied as a function of thermal cycles. It was observed that the average thermally grown oxide (TGO) stress and its standard deviation, and the area ratio of peaks show systematic change with thermal cycling, indicating that these characteristics can be used for NDI and determination of life remaining. The average TGO stress increases initially and then decreases monotonically with thermal cycling. The rate of change in the stress can be related to specimen life: the shallower the slope, the higher the life. The peak area ratio also decreases monotonically with cycling. The average TGO stress changes in a systematic manner versus remaining life fraction independent of temperature. Remaining life predictions were made based on average stress versus life fraction, which resulted in life assessments within {+-}13% of actual values excluding one specimen with abnormal behavior.

  10. Initial phase hot corrosion mechanism of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yugeswaran, S. [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kobayashi, A., E-mail: kobayasi@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V. [L and PT Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-04-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Free standing TBC specimens were prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying with thickness of around 300-400 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 50%8YSZ + 50%La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composite coating shows superior hot corrosion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosive crystals structure and phase transformation was well controlled in this coating. - Abstract: The hot corrosion resistance of the top layer in TBC is one of the main constructive factors which determines the lifetime of the coatings under critical operating environments. In the present study, 8 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ), lanthanum zirconate (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and equal weight percentage of its composite (50%8YSZ + 50% La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) coatings were prepared by using gas tunnel type plasma spray torch at optimum spraying conditions. The hot corrosion performances of the above thermal barrier coatings were examined against 40 wt%V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-60 wt%Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} corrosive ash at 1173 K for 5 h in open air atmosphere. After hot-corrosion testing, the coating surface was studied using a scanning electron microscope to observe the microstructure and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to identify the phase compositions. The results showed that LaVO{sub 4} and YVO{sub 4} are the main hot corrosion products along with the ZrO{sub 2} phase transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic phases in La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} and 8YSZ coatings respectively. The microstructure and phase formation mechanism of the hot corrosion products varied with each coating and among these, composition of 50%8YSZ + 50%La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} coating exhibited least degradation against V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} corrosive environment compared to the other coatings.

  11. Controlling both ground- and excited-state thermal barriers to Bergman cyclization with alkyne termini substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Mahendra; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M

    2005-01-19

    The cross-coupling reaction of 2,3-dibromo-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin with corresponding organostannanes in the presence of a Pd0 catalyst in THF at reflux temperature yields free base 2,3-dialkynylporphyrins 1a,c-e. The subsequent deprotection of trimethylsilyl group of 1a with TBAF in THF under aqueous conditions produces the 2,3-diethynyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrins 1b in 87% yield. Compounds 1a-d undergo zinc insertion upon treatment with Zn(OAc)2.2H2O in CHCl3/MeOH to give zinc(II) 2,3-dialkynyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrins (2a-d) in 70-92% yields. Thermal Bergman cyclization of 1a-e and 2a-d was studied in chlorobenzene and approximately 35-fold 1,4-cyclohexadiene at 120-210 degrees C. Compounds 1b and 2b with R = H react at lower temperature (120 degrees C) and produce cyclized products 3b and 4b in higher yields (65-70%) than their propyl, isopropyl, and phenyl analogues, with R = Ph being the most stable. Continuing in this trend, the -TMS derivatives 1a and 2a exhibit no reactivity even after heating at 190 degrees C in chlorobenzene/CHD for 24 h. Photolysis (at lambda >/= 395 nm) of 1b and 2b at 10 degrees C leads the formation of isolable picenoporphyrin products in 15 and 35% yields, respectively, in 72 h, whereas these compounds are stable in solution under same reaction conditions at 25 degrees C in the dark. Unlike thermolysis at 125 degrees C, which did not yield Bergman cyclized product for R = Ph, photolysis generated very small amounts of picenoporphyrin products (3c: 5%; 4c: 8% based on 1H NMR) as well as a mixture of reduced porphyrin products that were not separable. Thus, trends in the barrier to Bergman cyclization in the excited state exhibit the same trend as those observed in the ground state as a function of R-group. Finally, photolysis of 2b at 10 degrees C with lambda >/= 515 or 590 nm in benzene/iPrOH (4:1, 72 h) produces 4b in 15 and 6% isolated yields, indicating that conjugation of the enediyne unit into the

  12. Improving the Thermal Shock Resistance of Thermal Barrier Coatings Through Formation of an In Situ YSZ/Al2O3 Composite via Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanipour, Zohre; Baghshahi, Saeid; Shoja-razavi, Reza

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, laser cladding of alumina on the top surface of YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBC) was conducted via Nd:YAG pulsed laser. The thermal shock behavior of the TBC before and after laser cladding was modified by heating at 1000 °C for 15 min and quenching in cold water. Phase analysis, microstructural evaluation and elemental analysis were performed using x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The results of thermal shock tests indicated that the failure in the conventional YSZ (not laser clad) and the laser clad coatings happened after 200 and 270 cycles, respectively. The SEM images of the samples showed that delamination and spallation occurred in both coatings as the main mechanism of failure. Formation of TGO was also observed in the fractured cross section of the samples, which is also a main reason for degradation. Thermal shock resistance in the laser clad coatings improved about 35% after cladding. The improvement is due to the presence of continuous network cracks perpendicular to the surface in the clad layer and also the thermal stability and high melting point of alumina in Al2O3/ZrO2 composite.

  13. Development and Production of Array Barrier Detectors at SCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Dobromislin, R.; Fraenkel, R.; Gershon, G.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Karni, Y.; Klin, O.; Kodriano, Y.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nevo, I.; Nitzani, M.; Pivnik, I.; Rappaport, N.; Rosenberg, O.; Shtrichman, I.; Shkedy, L.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tessler, R.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2017-09-01

    XB n or XB p barrier detectors exhibit diffusion-limited dark currents comparable with mercury cadmium telluride Rule-07 and high quantum efficiencies. In 2011, SemiConductor Devices (SCD) introduced "HOT Pelican D", a 640 × 512/15- μm pitch InAsSb/AlSbAs XB n mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector with a 4.2- μm cut-off and an operating temperature of ˜150 K. Its low power (˜3 W), high pixel operability (>99.5%) and long mean time to failure make HOT Pelican D a highly reliable integrated detector-cooler product with a low size, weight and power. More recently, "HOT Hercules" was launched with a 1280 × 1024/15- μm format and similar advantages. A 3-megapixel, 10- μm pitch version ("HOT Blackbird") is currently completing development. For long-wave infrared applications, SCD's 640 × 512/15- μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" XB p type II superlattice (T2SL) detector has a ˜9.3- μm cut-off wavelength. The detector contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, and is fabricated into focal plane array (FPA) detectors using standard production processes including hybridization to a digital silicon read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), glue underfill and substrate thinning. The ROIC has been designed so that the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector family. The Pelican-D LW FPA has a quantum efficiency of ˜50%, and operates at 77 K with a pixel operability of >99% and noise equivalent temperature difference of 13 mK at 30 Hz and F/2.7.

  14. Thermally assisted interlayer magnetic coupling through Ba0.05Sr0.95TiO3 barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Santiago J.; Avilés Félix, Luis; Sirena, Martín; Alejandro, Gabriela; Steren, Laura B.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the interlayer exchange coupling across insulating barriers observed on Ni80Fe20/Ba0.05Sr0.95TiO3/La0.66Sr0.33MnO3 (Py/BST0.05/LSMO) trilayers. The coupling mechanism has been analyzed in terms of the barrier thickness, samples' substrate, and temperature. We examined the effect of MgO (MGO) and SrTiO3 (STO) (001) single-crystalline substrates on the magnetic coupling and also on the magnetic anisotropies of the samples in order to get a deeper understanding of the magnetism of the structures. We measured a weak coupling mediated by spin-dependent tunneling phenomena whose sign and strength depend on barrier thickness and substrate. An antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange prevails for most of the samples and smoothly increases with the barrier thicknesses as a consequence of the screening effects of the BST0.05. The coupling monotonically increases with temperature in all the samples and this behavior is attributed to thermally assisted mechanisms. The magnetic anisotropy of both magnetic components has a cubic symmetry that in the case of permalloy is added to a small uniaxial component.

  15. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate environmental/thermal barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  16. Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1992 and 1993 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W. [eds.

    1993-09-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Westinghouse Hanford Company to design and test an earthen cover system that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company provided engineering design support for the program. Work on barrier design has been under way at Hanford for nearly 10 years. The comprehensive development of a long-term barrier, formerly the Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program, was initiated in FY 1986, and a general field-tested design is expected to be completed by FY 1998. Highlights of efforts in FY 1992 and FY 1993 included the resumption of field testing, the completion of the prototype barrier design, and the convening of an external peer review panel, which met twice with the barrier development team. The review panel provided helpful guidance on current and future barrier development activities, while commending the program for its significant technical contributions to innovative barrier technology development.

  17. Thermal noise can facilitate energy transformation in the presence of entropic barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, Bao-quan; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Liu, Liang-gang

    2007-01-01

    Efficiency of a Brownian particle moving along the axis of a three-dimensional asymmetric periodic channel is investigated in the presence of a symmetric unbiased force and a load. Reduction of the spatial dimensionality from two or three physical dimensions to an effective one-dimensional system entails the appearance of entropic barriers and an effective diffusion coefficient. The energetics in the presence of entropic barriers exhibits peculiar behavior which is different from that occurri...

  18. High-temperature stability of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating on niobium alloy—C-103

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Panwar; T Umasankar Patro; K Balasubramanian; B Venkataraman

    2016-02-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) of different thicknesses with an intermediate bond coat were deposited on C-103 Nb alloy using the air plasma spraying technique. The coatings were subjected to rapid infra-red (IR) heating ($\\sim$25°C s$^{−1}$) up to $\\sim$1250°C and exposed up to 100 s at this temperature with heat flux varying from 55 to 61 Wcm$^{−2}$. The TBCs were found to be stable and intact after the heat treatment. In contrast, at the same conditions, the uncoated C-103 alloy specimen showed extensive oxidation followed by weight loss due to spallation. A maximum temperature drop of $\\sim$200°C was observed on the opposite side of the coated alloy with 600 $\\mu$m YSZ coat; as against negligible temperature drop in case of bare alloy specimen. The temperature drop was found to increase with the coating thickness of YSZ. The coatings before and after IR heating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, microhardness and residual stress measurements in order to understand the effect of thermal shock on the properties of the TBC. On account of these high-temperature properties, YSZ coating along with the bond coat is expected to find potential thermal barrier coating system on niobium alloys for supersonic vehicles.

  19. Research on ZrO2 Thermal Barrier Coatings Modified by High-Intensity Pulsed Ion Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WV Di; LIU Chen; ZHU Xiao-Peng; LEI Ming-Kai

    2008-01-01

    @@ We report a modification method for ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation. Based on the temporal and spatial distribution models of the ion beam density detected by Faraday cup in the chamber and the ions accelerating voltage, the energy deposition of the beam ions in ZrO2 is calculated by Monte Carlo method. Taking this time-dependent nonlinear deposited energy as the source term of two-dimensional thermal conduction equation, we obtain the temporal and spatial ablation process of ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings during a pulse time. The top-layer TBC material in thickness of about 0.2μm is ablated by vaporization and the coating in thickness of 1 μm is melted after one shot at the ion current density of 200 A/cm2. This calculation is in reasonable agreement with those measured by HIPIB irradiation experiments.The melted top coat becoming a dense modification layer due to HIPIB irradiation seals the gaps among ZrO2crystal clusters, and hence barrels the direct tunnel of oxygen.

  20. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karthikeya Sharma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE. This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied.

  1. Development Status and Performance Comparisons of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft turbine engine systems, because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper presents current NASA EBC-CMC development emphases including: the coating composition and processing improvements, laser high heat flux-thermal gradient thermo-mechanical fatigue - environmental testing methodology development, and property evaluations for next generation EBC-CMC systems. EBCs processed with various deposition techniques including Plasma Spray, Electron Beam - Physical Vapor Deposition, and Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) will be particularly discussed. The testing results and demonstrations of advanced EBCs-CMCs in complex simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic fatigue, oxidizing-steam and CMAS environments will help provide insights into the coating development strategies to meet long-term engine component durability goals.

  2. Barriers of clinical practice guidelines development and implementation in developing countries: a case study in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradaran-Seyed, Zahra; Nedjat, Sima; Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge products such as clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are vitally required for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Although the EBM, to some extent, has been attended during recent years, no result has achieved thus far. The current qualitative study is to identify the barriers to establishing development system and implementation of CPGs in Iran. Twelve semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of health policy and decision makers, the experts of development and or adaptation of CPGs, and the experts of EBM education and development. In addition, 11 policy-makers, decision-makers, and managers of the health system participated in a focus group discussion. The analysis of the study data was undertaken by thematic framework approach. Six themes emerged in order of their frequency include practice environment, evidence-based health care system, individual professional, politician and political context, innovation (CPG) and patients. Most of the indications in the treatment environment focused on such sub-themes as regulations and rules, economical factors, organizational context, and social context. While the barriers related to the conditions of treatment environment, service provider and the features of innovation and patients had been identified before in other studies, very little attention has been paid to the evidence-based health care system and politician and political context. The lack of an evidence-based healthcare system and a political macro support are mentioned as the key barriers in Iran as a developing country. The establishment of a system of development and implementation of CPGs as the evidence-based practice tools will not be possible, unless the barriers are removed.

  3. Asteroid thermal modeling: recent developments and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of thermal models are used for the derivation of asteroid physical parameters from thermal-infrared observations Simple models based on spherical geometry are often adequate for obtaining sizes and albedos when very little information about an object is available However sophisticated ther

  4. Asteroid thermal modeling: recent developments and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of thermal models are used for the derivation of asteroid physical parameters from thermal-infrared observations Simple models based on spherical geometry are often adequate for obtaining sizes and albedos when very little information about an object is available However sophisticated

  5. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer.

  6. The Development of 2700-3000 F Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in future turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is a key to enable the applications of the envisioned 2700-3000F EBC - CMC systems to help achieve next generation engine performance and durability goals. This paper will primarily address the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The emphasis is placed on current NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiCSiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, cyclic durability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term system performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be discussed.

  7. Mechanisms of spallation of electron beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings with and without platinum aluminide bond coat ridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, K.; Gell, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy; Jordan, E. [Dept. Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, CT-06269, Storrs (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Grain boundary ridges, that form on the surface of platinum aluminide [(Ni,Pt)Al] bond coats prior to the deposition of the yttria stabilized zirconia ceramic layer by the electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process, were shown to be the sites for spallation damage initiation in (Ni,Pt)Al/EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings. When these ridges are removed prior to deposition of the ceramic layer, a 3 x life improvement is achieved. This study compares the spallation mechanisms in specimens with and without bond coat ridges, in order to explain the improvement in spallation life. (orig.)

  8. Analysis on Residual Stress in Electron Beam-Physical Vapor Deposited Thermal Barrier Coating using Hard Synchrotron X-Rays

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 賢治; 松本, 一秀; 久保, 貴博; 町屋, 修太郎; 田中, 啓介; 秋庭, 義明; SUZUKI, Kenji; MATSUMOTO, Kazuhide; Kubo, Takahiro; Machiya, Syutaro; Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of the residual stress in the thermal barrier coating, which was made by an electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) method, was determined using X-ray stress measurements. As the bond coating, NiCoCrAlY was low-pressure plasma sprayed on the substrate of austenitic stainless steel. The 8 mass% Y_2O_3-ZrO_2 was coated on the bond coating using the EB-PVD method as the top coating. The top coating had the preferred orientation with the axis direction perpendicular to ...

  9. HyTES: Thermal Imaging Spectrometer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Realmuto, Vincent; Lamborn, Andy; Paine, Chris; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES). It is an airborne pushbroom imaging spectrometer based on the Dyson optical configuration. First low altitude test flights are scheduled for later this year. HyTES uses a compact 7.5-12 micrometer m hyperspectral grating spectrometer in combination with a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) and grating based spectrometer. The Dyson design allows for a very compact and optically fast system (F/1.6). Cooling requirements are minimized due to the single monolithic prism-like grating design. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal science-grade imaging spectroscopy solution for high altitude, lighter-than-air (HAA, LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The QWIP sensor allows for optimum spatial and spectral uniformity and provides adequate responsivity which allows for near 100mK noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) operation across the LWIR passband. The QWIP's repeatability and uniformity will be helpful for data integrity since currently an onboard calibrator is not planned. A calibration will be done before and after eight hour flights to gage any inconsistencies. This has been demonstrated with lab testing. Further test results show adequate NEDT, linearity as well as applicable earth science emissivity target results (Silicates, water) measured in direct sunlight.

  10. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  11. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  12. 热循环下梯度热障涂层热氧化物生长的应力分析%Numerical Analysis of Thermal Stress for Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings Experienced Thermal Oxidation Growth Under Thermal Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄孝庆; 黄护林

    2012-01-01

    A multi-layer numerical model was proposed in order to predict the thermal stress of multi-layer gradient thermal barrier coating system (TBCs). Based on the finite element method, the effects of compositional exponent and the thermal oxidation which grew in thermal cycling process on the thermal stress and the distribution of TBCs were investigated. The results show that it is feasible to mitigate thermal stress and to improve the stress distribution by controlling compositional exponent n of the coatings. When n=l, the thermal stress is low and gentle changes, and the coatings performance is excellent. Compared with non-gradient duplex coatings, functionally gradient coatings are able to alleviate the thermal stress and suppress stress concentration of TBCs significantly. In addition, under the thermal cycling process, the thermal growth oxidation locates in the interface of gradient coatings and the substrates dramatically enhance the interface thermal stress. Complex and concentrated thermal stress have a tremendous damage to the gradient coating system. So a method is proposed to prevent the growth of thermal oxide. The results demonstrate that the method could be contributed to optimize the thermal stress and improve the quality of the coatings.%建立了一种预测多层复合梯度热障涂层热应力的理论模型,并通过有限元方法分析了梯度涂层分布指数n、热循环过程中热氧化物的生长对涂层热应力大小及分布的影响.结果表明,通过控制梯度涂层的成分分布指数可以显著降低热应力和改善应力分布.当n=1时,涂层热应力较小且变化平缓,结合性能优异.与双层非梯度涂层的热应力对比可知,功能梯度涂层能显著地缓和涂层系统的热应力和消除应力集中.另外,热循环过程中梯度热障涂层与基体界面附近生长的热氧化物急剧地提升了界面附近的热应力,复杂而又集中的热应力对梯度涂层有很大的破坏.同时采

  13. Strain response of thermal barrier coatings captured under extreme engine environments through synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Siddiqui, Sanna F.; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings in operation holds the key to understanding durability of jet engine turbine blades. Here we report the results from experiments that monitor strains in the layers of a coating subjected to thermal gradients and mechanical loads representing extreme engine environments. Hollow cylindrical specimens, with electron beam physical vapour deposited coatings, were tested with internal cooling and external heating under various controlled conditions. High-energy synchrotron X-ray measurements captured the in situ strain response through the depth of each layer, revealing the link between these conditions and the evolution of local strains. Results of this study demonstrate that variations in these conditions create corresponding trends in depth-resolved strains with the largest effects displayed at or near the interface with the bond coat. With larger temperature drops across the coating, significant strain gradients are seen, which can contribute to failure modes occurring within the layer adjacent to the interface.

  14. Acetylated rice starches films with different levels of amylose: Mechanical, water vapor barrier, thermal, and biodegradability properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Rosana; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Biduski, Bárbara; Prietto, Luciana; Castilhos, Danilo Dufech; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra

    2017-04-15

    Biodegradable films from native or acetylated starches with different amylose levels were prepared. The films were characterized according to the mechanical, water vapor barrier, thermal, and biodegradability properties. The films from acetylated high amylose starches had higher moisture content and water solubility than the native high amylose starch film. However, the acetylation did not affect acid solubility of the films, regardless of the amylose content. Films made from high and medium amylose rice starches were obtained; however low amylose rice starches, whether native or acetylated, did not form films with desirable characteristics. The acetylation decreased the tensile strength and increased the elongation of the films. The acetylated starch-based films had a lower decomposition temperature and higher thermal stability than native starch films. Acetylated starches films exhibited more rapid degradation as compared with the native starches films. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Strain response of thermal barrier coatings captured under extreme engine environments through synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Siddiqui, Sanna F; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-07-31

    The mechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings in operation holds the key to understanding durability of jet engine turbine blades. Here we report the results from experiments that monitor strains in the layers of a coating subjected to thermal gradients and mechanical loads representing extreme engine environments. Hollow cylindrical specimens, with electron beam physical vapour deposited coatings, were tested with internal cooling and external heating under various controlled conditions. High-energy synchrotron X-ray measurements captured the in situ strain response through the depth of each layer, revealing the link between these conditions and the evolution of local strains. Results of this study demonstrate that variations in these conditions create corresponding trends in depth-resolved strains with the largest effects displayed at or near the interface with the bond coat. With larger temperature drops across the coating, significant strain gradients are seen, which can contribute to failure modes occurring within the layer adjacent to the interface.

  16. Effects of interface morphology and TGO thickness on residual stress of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei; Zhao, Yang; Ma, Jian

    2015-04-01

    The residual stress of electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) is complex and difficult to be obtained. In this paper, the interface morphology of TBCs subjected to cyclic heating and cooling was observed by SEM. Based on the thermal elastic-plastic finite method, corresponding interface model of TBCs was established. The residual stress of EB-PVD TBCs with different interface morphologies and TGO thicknesses was calculated using the FE method without regard to the presence of cracks and defects. The result shows that the distribution of residual stress is significantly affected by the interface morphology, and the growth of TGO also has influence on the residual stress of TC and TGO.

  17. Development and psychometric testing of a barriers to HIV testing scale among individuals with HIV infection in Sweden; The Barriers to HIV testing scale-Karolinska version

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Wiklander et al. Background: Barriers to HIV testing experienced by individuals at risk for HIV can result in treatment delay and further transmission of the disease. Instruments to systematically measure barriers are scarce, but could contribute to improved strategies for HIV testing. Aims of this study were to develop and test a barriers to HIV testing scale in a Swedish context. Methods: An 18-item scale was developed, based on an existing scale with addition of six new it...

  18. Development of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRB) Using Edible Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Remediation Technology Roundtable GC gas chromatograph GMO Glycerol Monooleate GRAS Generally Recognized As Safe H2O2 Hydrogen Peroxide HLB...Emulsions prepared from food -grade edible oils have been used in a variety of locations to stimulate anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents... food -grade edible oils and then injected into the contaminated aquifer in a barrier configuration using either conventional wells or Geoprobe

  19. Development of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Nolan, Sarah E. M.; Grandoit, Delphia J.; Gonzales, Lucia; Smith, Mary B.; Desmond, Frederic F.

    2011-01-01

    The Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI) was developed for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart behaviors") that should occur daily to help promote health and overcome illnesses/diseases: eating a healthy…

  20. Development of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Nolan, Sarah E. M.; Grandoit, Delphia J.; Gonzales, Lucia; Smith, Mary B.; Desmond, Frederic F.

    2011-01-01

    The Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI) was developed for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart behaviors") that should occur daily to help promote health and overcome illnesses/diseases: eating a healthy…

  1. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  2. Experimental Study on the Machining of Inclined Holes for Thermal Barrier-Coated Nickel Superalloys by EDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guowei; Guo, Yongfeng; Wang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to thermally insulate superalloy components from the hot gas streams in gas turbine engines. In this work, electrical discharge machining (EDM) was used to machine different inclined holes in TBC-coated nickel superalloys by integrating the inner-jet-liquid rotating electrode method and the assisting electrode method. The influences of the inclination angle (i.e., from 0° to 60°) and EDM parameters (i.e., peak current, pulse duration, duty factor and flushing pressure) on the machining time and electrode wear were investigated. The surface morphologies and elemental distribution were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive spectroscope. The results of the analysis showed that the 8YSZ ceramic coating is more prone to brittle fracture and cracking than the IN718 substrate and NiCoAlY bond coating, and pits and cracks become more pronounced as the inclination angle increases. The damage on the trailing edge is primarily caused by the thermal stress fracture, and the damage on the leading edge is mainly caused by thermal erosion. Using high-energy parameters, a delamination with dimensions of 28 μm (W) × 200 μm (L) occurs on the trailing edges of the coating/substrate interface.

  3. Double-Layer Gadolinium Zirconate/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.; Harris, Alan B.; Gell, Maurice; Roth, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with lower thermal conductivity, increased resistance to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS), and improved high-temperature capability, compared to traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBCs, are essential to higher efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. Double-layer rare-earth zirconate/YSZ TBCs are a promising solution. From a processing perspective, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process with its unique and beneficial microstructural features can be an effective approach to obtaining the double-layer microstructure. Previously durable low-thermal-conductivity YSZ TBCs with optimized layered porosity, called the inter-pass boundaries (IPBs) were produced using the SPPS process. In this study, an SPPS gadolinium zirconate (GZO) protective surface layer was successfully added. These SPPS double-layer TBCs not only retained good cyclic durability and low thermal conductivity, but also demonstrated favorable phase stability and increased surface temperature capabilities. The CMAS resistance was evaluated with both accumulative and single applications of simulated CMAS in isothermal furnaces. The double-layer YSZ/GZO exhibited dramatic improvement in the single application, but not in the continuous one. In addition, to explore their potential application in integrated gasification combined cycle environments, double-layer TBCs were tested under high-temperature humidity and encouraging performance was recorded.

  4. A Linear Relationship between the Mechanical, Thermal and Gas Barrier Properties of MAPE Modified Rubber Toughened Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Ayuni jamal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Composites based on high density polyethylene (HDPE, ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM and organophilic montmorillonite (OMMT clays were prepared by melt compounding followed by compression molding. The addition of clay as well as compatibilizer agent (maleic anhydride polyethylene (MAPE considerably improved the tensile properties of nanocomposites systems. The largest improvement in mechanical and thermal properties occurred at clay loading levels of 4% (2-8 wt % with MAPE system. Interestingly, the increased in tensile properties also resulted in improve in thermal and barrier properties. Differential scanning calorimeter analysis (DSC revealed that the barrier property of nanocomposite was influenced by the crystalline percentage of nanocomposite. Along with crystalline percentage, the crystallization temperature, Tc and melting temperature, Tm were also improved with OMMT and MAPE agent. The d-spacings of the clay in nanocomposites were monitored using x-ray diffraction (XRD and the extent of delamination was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM. The wide angle of XRD patterns showed the increased interplanar spacing, d of clay layers, indicating enhanced compatibility between polymer matrix and OMMT with the aid of MAPE agent. TEM photomicrographs illustrated the mixed intercalated and partial exfoliated structures of the nanocomposites with OMMT and MAPE agent.

  5. Investigation about thermal conductivities of La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} doped with calcium or magnesium for thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hongsong, E-mail: zhs761128@163.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Henan Institute of Engineering, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Yuan Wei [Department of Materials and Chemistry, Henan Institute of Engineering, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Li Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Henan Institute of Engineering, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Chen Xiaoge [Department of Construction Engineering, Henan Institute of Engineering, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Wang Xinli [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Henan Institute of Engineering, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These ceramic materials with fluorite structure were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen vacancies lead to their lower thermal conductivities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These ceramics can be explored as novel candidate ceramic materials for TBCs. - Abstract: The La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders doped with Ca and Mg were synthesized by sol-gel method in this paper and their dense bulk samples were also prepared by pressure-less sintering at 1600 Degree-Sign C for 10 h. Their phase compositions, microstructures and thermal conductivities were investigated, respectively. XRD results reveal that single-phase (La{sub 0.95}Ca{sub 0.05}){sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 6.95} and (La{sub 0.95}Mg{sub 0.05}){sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 6.95} ceramics with fluorite structure are successfully synthesized. SEM and EDS results show that their microstructures are very dense and no other unreacted oxides or interphases exist in the interfaces between grains. Their thermal conductivities are lower than that of YSZ, which can be attributed to the phonon scattering caused by vacancies in their crystal lattices. The larger differences in atomic weight and ionic radius between Mg and La lead to the lower thermal conductivity of (La{sub 0.95}Mg{sub 0.05}){sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 6.95} than that of (La{sub 0.95}Ca{sub 0.05}){sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 6.95}. The synthesized rare earth cerium oxides have potentials to be used as novel candidate materials for thermal barrier coatings in the future.

  6. Hemorheological alterations of red blood cells induced by non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Kim, Jae Hyung; Chang, Boksoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been introduced in various applications such as wound healing, sterilization of infected tissues, blood coagulation, delicate surgeries, and so on. The non-thermal plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), including ozone. Various groups have reported that the produced ROS influence proliferation and differentiation of cells, as well as apoptosis and growth arrest of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of non-thermal plasma on rheological characteristics of red blood cells (RBC). We experimentally measured the extent of hemolysis, deformability, and aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) with respect to exposure times of non-thermal plasma. RBC morphology was also examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The absorbance of hemoglobin released from the RBCs increased with increasing exposure time of the non-thermal plasma. Values of the elongation index and aggregation index were shown to decrease significantly with increasing plasma exposure times. Therefore, hemorheological properties of RBCs could be utilized to assess the performance of various non-thermal plasmas.

  7. Review on Thermal Power Automation Development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zilian

    2005-01-01

    Areview on thermal power plant automation development in China over 50 years is presented.The level of thermal power automation is introduced, especially for 200 MW and above units which are clarified into three categories by grade. The conditions, existing problems, relevant solutions and policies are summarized chronologically in aspects of centralized control, automatic regulation and controllability of main and auxiliary units, turbine control system, furnace security protection, and computer application in thermal power plants. This paper also points out the development tendency of thermal power plant automation and concepts of some vocabularies.

  8. Development of the GPM Observatory Thermal Vacuum Test Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kan; Peabody, Hume

    2012-01-01

    A software-based thermal modeling process was documented for generating the thermal panel settings necessary to simulate worst-case on-orbit flight environments in an observatory-level thermal vacuum test setup. The method for creating such a thermal model involved four major steps: (1) determining the major thermal zones for test as indicated by the major dissipating components on the spacecraft, then mapping the major heat flows between these components; (2) finding the flight equivalent sink temperatures for these test thermal zones; (3) determining the thermal test ground support equipment (GSE) design and initial thermal panel settings based on the equivalent sink temperatures; and (4) adjusting the panel settings in the test model to match heat flows and temperatures with the flight model. The observatory test thermal model developed from this process allows quick predictions of the performance of the thermal vacuum test design. In this work, the method described above was applied to the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory spacecraft, a joint project between NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) which is currently being integrated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for launch in Early 2014. From preliminary results, the thermal test model generated from this process shows that the heat flows and temperatures match fairly well with the flight thermal model, indicating that the test model can simulate fairly accurately the conditions on-orbit. However, further analysis is needed to determine the best test configuration possible to validate the GPM thermal design before the start of environmental testing later this year. Also, while this analysis method has been applied solely to GPM, it should be emphasized that the same process can be applied to any mission to develop an effective test setup and panel settings which accurately simulate on-orbit thermal environments.

  9. Strategies for Overcoming Key Barriers to Development of a National Security Workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-06-30

    This report documents the strategies for overcoming identified key barriers to development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. Many barriers currently exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of properly trained national security personnel. The identified strategies to address the barriers will focus on both short-term and long-term efforts, as well as strategies to capture legacy knowledge of retiring national security workforce personnel.

  10. Thermal stability of tungsten-titanium diffusion barriers for silver metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, S.K. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona (United States); Theodore, N.D. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona (United States); Wireless and Packaging Systems Laboratory, Freescale Semiconductor Inc., Tempe, Arizona (United States); Alford, T.L. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona (United States)], E-mail: alford@asu.edu

    2008-09-01

    Tungsten-titanium thin films have been extensively applied as barrier layers for aluminum and copper metallization. The present work investigated the feasibility of tungsten-titanium barrier layers for silver metallization. Reactive sputtered W-Ti was deposited on a Si wafer followed by an Ag thin film on top. The resulting samples were annealed in vacuum at temperatures up to 700 deg. C. These were then characterized using X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and four point probe analysis. The analyses showed that the samples were stable up to 600 deg. C. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed that above 600 deg. C, agglomeration of silver film started. Si started moving into the tungsten-titanium film above 600 deg. C. Movement of Si resulted in local Si voiding as indicated by transmission electron microscopy. At Si/W-Ti interface, silicide formation occurred. Silver agglomerated completely at 700 deg. C. These results showed that W-Ti was an effective barrier layer for silver metallization for process temperatures below 600 deg. C.

  11. Experimental investigation of thermal barrier (8YSZ-TiO2-Al2O3 coated piston used in direct injection compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthusamy Jayaram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings are becoming increasingly important in providing protection from high temperature degradation for heat engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. The main objective of this research work is to experimentally investigate the air plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia with addition of titanium oxide and aluminum oxide thermal barrier coating on Al-13% Si piston material. The mechanical properties of the coated and uncoated samples were comparatively analyzed. The test revealed that hardness values of coated samples are ten times higher than the hardness values of uncoated samples. The microstructure and surface morphology of the coating were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The delamination behaviour of thermal barrier coating was evaluated by thermal cycle test. Finally, the performance test of the coated and uncoated engine was evaluated with the same engine operating conditions. The brake thermal efficiency is increased by 5.99%. The brake specific fuel consumption was decreased by 0.06 kg/kWh, in TBC engine with 8YSZ + Al2O3 + TiO2. The CO and HC was greatly decreased in thermal barrier coating engine. There was the greater reduction of NOx is observed due to coating because of nitrogen has absorbed by zirconia.

  12. Thermally developing forced convection and the corresponding thermal stresses in a porous plate channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao; LIU Xuemei

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Darcy fluid model, by considering the effects of viscous dissipation due to the interaction between solid skeleton and pore fluid flow and thermal conduction in the direction of the fluid flow, the thermally developing forced convection of the local thermal equili- brium and the corresponding thermal stresses in a semi- infmite saturated porous plate channel are investigated in this paper. The expressions of temperature, local Nusselt number and corresponding thermal stresses are obtained by means of the Fourier series, and the distributions of the same are also shown. Furthermore, influences of the Péclet number (Pe) and Brinkman number (Br) on temperature, Nusselt number (Nu) and thermal stress are revealed numerically.

  13. Mechanical properties of EB-PVD ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier coatings; Mechanische Eigenschaften von EB-PVD ZrO{sub 2} Waermedaemmschichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Carolin

    2014-08-29

    In this work, the elastic properties of thermal barrier coatings which were produced by electron-beam enhanced physical vapour deposition were investigated, as well as the dependency of the properties on the sample microstructure, the thermal treatment and the test method. For this purpose, not only commercial coatings were characterized, but also special sample material was used which consists of a 1 mm thick layer of EB-PVD TBC. This material was isothermally heat treated for different times at 950 C, 1100 C and 1200 C and then tested in a specially developed miniaturized bend test and by dynamic mechanical analysis. The sample material was tested by nanoindentation in order to measure the Young's modulus on a local scale, and the porosity of the samples was determined by microstructure analysis and porosimetry. The decrease of porosity could be connected with sintering and subsequent stiffening of the material. The test results are dependent on the tested volume. A small test volume leads to larger measured Young's moduli, while a large test volume yields lower values. The test volume also has an influence on the increase of stiffness during thermal exposure. With a small tested volume, a quicker increase of the Young's modulus was registered, which could be associated to the sintering of local structures.

  14. Oxidation resistance of Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite compared to conventional CSZ and YSZ thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, A.; Bahamirian, M.

    2016-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in combustion sections of turbine engines, however, their main disadvantage is the spallation from the bond coat, occurring due to oxidation and formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO). In this paper, the oxidation resistance of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), ceria stabilized zirconia (CSZ), and Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite coatings have been studied and compared with each other. Samples were heated in air at 1100 °C using an electrical furnace. Three types of the top coats were applied by thermal spray technique on IN738LC base metal. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure of the coatings before and after the oxidation. The experimental results showed that Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite coating exhibits considerably better oxidation resistance compared to conventional YSZ and CSZ coatings. The microstructural analysis indicated a smaller growth of TGO in the Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite coating, improving the oxidation resistance of the coating.

  15. Hot Corrosion Behavior of Double-ceramic-layer LaTi2Al9O19/YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xiaoyun; GUO Hongbo; GONG Shengkai; XU Huibin

    2012-01-01

    LaTi2Al9O19 (LTA) exhibits promising potential as a new kind of thermal barrier coating (TBC) material,due to its excellent high-temperature capability and low thermal conductivity.In this paper,LTA/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBCs are produccd by atmospheric plasma spraying.Hot corrosion behavior and the related failure mechanism of the coating are investigated.Decomposition of LTA does not occur even after 1 458 hot corrosion cycles at 1 373 K,revealing good chemical stability in molten salt of Na2SO4 and NaCl.However,the molten salt infiltrates to the bond coat,causing dissolving of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) in the molten salt and hot corrosion of the bond coat.As a result,cracking of the TBC occurs within the oxide layer.In conclusion,the ceranic materials LTA and YSZ reveal good chemical stability in molten salts of Na2SO4 and NaCl,and the bond coat plays a significant role in providing protection for the component against hot corrosion in the LTA/YSZ TBCs.LTA exhibits very promising potential as a novel TBC material.

  16. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  17. Design of a Nickel-Based Bond-Coat Alloy for Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Fiedler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To increase the lifetime of rocket combustion chambers, thermal barrier coatings (TBC may be applied on the copper chamber wall. Since standard TBC systems used in gas turbines are not suitable for rocket-engine application and fail at the interface between the substrate and bond coat, a new bond-coat material has to be designed. This bond-coat material has to be chemically compatible to the copper substrate to improve the adhesion and needs a coefficient of thermal expansion close to that of copper to reduce thermal stresses. One approach to achieve this is to modify the standard NiCrAlY alloy used in gas turbines by adding copper. In this work, the influence of copper on the microstructure of NiCrAlY-alloys is investigated with thermodynamical calculations, optical microscopy, SEM, EDX and calorimetry. Adding copper leads to the formation of a significant amount of \\(\\beta\\ and \\(\\alpha\\ Reducing the aluminum and chromium content leads furthermore to a two-phase fcc microstructure.

  18. Surface geometry and strain energy effects in the failure of a (Ni, Pt)Al/EB-PVD thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, Krishnakumar; Jordan, Eric H.; Gell, Maurice

    2004-03-08

    Thermal cycling tests were conducted on a commercial yttria-stabilized zirconia electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coating (TBC) on a platinum aluminide ({beta}-(Ni, Pt)Al) bond coat. Surprisingly, the longest life sample lasted 10 times longer than the shortest life sample. Two distinct mechanisms have been found responsible for the observed damage initiation and progression at the thermally grown oxide (TGO)/bond coat interface. The first mechanism leads to localized debonding at the TGO/bond coat interface due to increasing out-of-plane tensile stresses at ridges that form along bond coat grain boundaries. The second mechanism is driven by cyclic plasticity of the bond coat that leads to cavity formation at the TGO/bond coat interface. The primary finding of this work is that the first mechanism, involving tensile stress at ridge tops, is life limiting. Based on this mechanism, it is demonstrated that the variation in bond coat ridge aspect ratio can explain the unusual 10x variation in observed sample life. It is proposed that ridge top spallation leads to debonds of sufficient size to result in unstable fracture driven by the strain energy stored in the TGO. The criticality of the flaw created by local debonding is supported by experimental determination of the strain energy available in the TGO through measurement of TGO stress and thickness combined with published fracture mechanics solutions of the relevant flaw geometry.

  19. Microstructural features and properties of plasma sprayed YPSZ/NiCrAlY thermal barrier coating (TBC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大谦; 王文权; 宣兆志; 宫文彪

    2004-01-01

    The plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) consists of NiCrAlY bond coating and yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) top coating. NiCrAlY coating mainly contains Ni solid solution with face centered cubic lattice, Al2O3 oxides and pores. The most obvious feature of YPSZ coating with tetragonal zirconia is a lot of vertical microcracks in this coating. The thermal insulation capability of the TBC increased with an increase in YPSZ coating thickness, the temperature drop across the TBC increasing from 60℃ to 92℃ with increasing YPSZ coating thickness with increasing YPSZ coating thickness and cracks initiated mainly in original vertical microcrack tips of the YPSZ coating and propagated not only along YPSZ coating / NiCrAlY coating interface but also through into two stages: transient oxidation stage with rapid oxidation rate and steady oxidation stage with slow oxidation. Their transition time was favorable to increase YPSZ coating toughness and to decrease the pores and oxides of the TBC system for improving thermal shock resistance and oxidation resistance of the TBC.

  20. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Analysis Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael; Lavelle, Thomas; Saimento, Charles; Juhasz, Albert; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars and beyond. One concept of operations for these missions utilizes the nuclear reactor to generate electrical power during coast phases, known as bimodal operation. This presentation focuses on the systems modeling and analysis efforts for a NERVA derived concept. The NERVA bimodal operation derives the thermal energy from the core tie tube elements. Recent analysis has shown potential temperature distributions in the tie tube elements that may limit the thermodynamic efficiency of the closed Brayton cycle used to generate electricity with the current design. The results of this analysis are discussed as well as the potential implications to a bimodal NERVA type reactor.