WorldWideScience

Sample records for development monthly progress

  1. Monthly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    This monthly report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the principal results concerning the surveillance of radioactivity in the environment: atmospheric dusts (air at ground level, high altitude air), rainwater, surface water, underground water, irrigation water, drinking water, food chain (milk plants, cattle, fish), seawater around nuclear plant sites and other sites. The activities of various radioisotopes are presented in tables ( 7 Be, 95 Zr and 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 106 Rh, 226 Ra, 54 Mn U and T). A monthly bibliographic selection is also presented [fr

  2. Monthly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    This monthly report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the principal results concerning the surveillance of radioactivity in the environment: atmospheric dusts (air at ground level, high altitude air), rainwater, surface water, underground water, irrigation water, drinking water, food chain (milk, plants, cattle, fish), sea water around nuclear plant sites and other sites. The activities of various radioisotopes are presented in tables ( 7 Be, 95 Zr and 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 106 Rh, 226 Ra, 54 Mn, U and T). A monthly bibliographic selection is also presented [fr

  3. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  4. Periodic progress report, 6 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    This is the first progress report of the BriteEuram project named "High Power Laser Cutting for Heavy Industry" ("Powercut"). The report contains a summary of the objectives of the first period, an overview of the technical progress, a comparison between the planed and the accomplished work......, a description of the planned activities for the next period, and last comments on management and coordination....

  5. Periodic progress report, 12 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the first 12 months of the project started with the establishment of the cutting theory for the cutting of heavy sections (phase 1). Phase 2 comprises the design of the first laboratory version cutting head with optics, nozzle systems and interfaces for the various...

  6. Hydrogen from renewable resources. Monthly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    This monthly report of project entitled Hydrogen from Renewable Resources describes progress in five tasks, namely (1) Thermochemical Production of Hydrogen from Wet Biomass, (2) Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production, (3) Photobiological Production and (4) Hydrogen Storage (via reversible catalytic degradation of cycloalkanes by polyhydride complexes), and (5) Thermodynamic Characterization and Engineering.

  7. Monthly progress report: Heat source technology program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.G. [comp.

    1993-05-01

    This monthly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

  8. LOFT Monthly Progress Report for November 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. C. Kaufman

    1980-12-01

    During November major work efforts were directed towards preparation for Test L3-6/L8-1. These tests, to be run in sequence, will evalute the system effects of primary coolant pump operation during a small break LOCA (L3-6), and are to obtain a partial core uncovery to aid in the planning and conduct of future core uncovery experiments (L8-1). Plant modifications in preparation for the December test included installation of a new PC-3 gamma densitometer to measure the density of fluid coming from the steam generator and the installation of the EPRI Liquid Level Detector system to measure levels of fluid during the core uncovery experiment. Other key efforts concerned planning for test conduct and safety analysis. On November 6 and 7 the LOFT Review Group met in Idaho Falls to evaluate the activities on LOFT since its last meeting in February. Future test plans, budgets, the man-machine (AOC) program, and various other topics presented by LOFT personnel and consultants were discussed. Several suggestions were presented by those in attendance. These comments were directed to the areas of test scheduling and the kinds of tests to be run as well as how LOFT could better communicate with utilities and vendors to transmit information to the general nuclear power industry. Overall costs are in good agreement with current budgets and authorized funding levels. In the areas of fuel design and analysis, a temporary overrun will be shown for the first few months of the fiscal year. This overrun is due to an Exxon billing received ahead of schedule. A recovery plan has been implemented and actuals are expected to be in agreement with budget by January 1981.

  9. Monthly oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratzer, Rikke; Iversen, Pernille; Börnsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a large unmet need for treatments for patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Phase 2 studies with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker outcomes may be well suited for the initial evaluation of efficacious treatments. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of monthly oral...... methylprednisolone pulse treatment on intrathecal inflammation in progressive MS. METHODS: In this open-label phase 2A study, 15 primary progressive and 15 secondary progressive MS patients received oral methylprednisolone pulse treatment for 60 weeks. Primary outcome was changes in CSF concentrations of osteopontin....... Secondary outcomes were other CSF biomarkers of inflammation, axonal damage and demyelination; clinical scores; magnetic resonance imaging measures of disease activity, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI); motor evoked potentials; and bone density scans. RESULTS: We found...

  10. Heat source technology programs. Monthly progress report, March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    This monthly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of 238 PuO 2 in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses

  11. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    This report is a collection of monthly status reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company, who is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

  12. Your Child's Development: 2 Years (24 Months)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Child’s Development: 2 Years (24 Months) KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child’s Development: 2 Years (24 Months) Print en español El ...

  13. 15-18 Months: Your Child's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources & Services Parenting Resource 15–18 Months: Your Child’s Development Download Files Feb 10, 2016 Your toddler is ... Stages Back to top Explore more from Your Child's Development: Age-Based Tips From Birth to 36 Months ...

  14. 18-24 Months: Your Child's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources & Services Parenting Resource 18–24 Months: Your Child’s Development Download Files Feb 10, 2016 This is a ... home language in the same sentence. Downloads Your Child's Development: 18–24 Months PDF 464 KB Read more ...

  15. Developing the First Highly Specialized Neurosurgical Center of Excellence in Trujillo, Peru: Work in Progress-Results of the First Four Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choque-Velasquez, Joham; Colasanti, Roberto; Baffigo-Torre, Virginia; Sacieta-Carbajo, Luisa Estela; Olivari-Heredia, Jacqueline; Falcon-Lizaraso, Yolanda; Mallma-Torres, Juan Huber; Elera-Florez, Humberto; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2017-06-01

    Economic, cultural, and geographical reasons usually limit the access to specialized health centers in developing countries, especially in rural areas. Peruvian health system indicators still highlight significant unmet clinical need for neurosurgical patients. Our project is to develop the first highly specialized neurosurgical center in the EsSalud hospital of Trujillo, with the goal to improve the treatment of neurosurgical diseases in that region, thus optimizing their outcomes while decreasing expensive and risky patients transfer to the neurosurgical departments in the capital district. After an initial center evaluation, 2 neurosurgeons and 2 nurses from the Helsinki University Central Hospital provided the microneurosurgical training for the local team. Moreover, our team worked closely with the local staff to develop standardized protocols for surgical procedures and postoperative management. From February to May 2016, 59 surgeries were performed in the new Neurosurgical Center, including cerebrovascular and skull-base cases that were never performed before in Trujillo. Moreover, the first "Cerebral Bypass and Vascular Microsurgery Live Course" was held in Trujillo in May 2016. After we left, the local team continued to work following the same protocols we introduced, and built up together. An effective and adequate operative skill transfer to the local staff may be accomplished in a reasonable amount of time, thus guaranteeing a long-lasting improvement of neurosurgical care, while minimizing expenditures on personnel and capital. We believe that this is possible following a general microsurgical philosophy that can be simplified as follows: "simple, clean, fast, and preserving normal anatomy." Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Your Child's Development: 2 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pose) fists remain unclenched half of the time Social and Emotional Development comforts himself or herself, maybe by putting a fist in the mouth makes an effort to look at parents when they're nearby smiles when happy Cognitive Skills (Thinking and Learning) gets bored and lets you know it by ...

  17. 12-15 Months: Your Child's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources & Services Parenting Resource 12–15 Months: Your Child’s Development Download Files Feb 9, 2016 This is a ... who she is. Downloads 12–15 Months: Your Child’s Development PDF 418 KB Read more about: Ages and ...

  18. 30-36 Months: Your Child's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources & Services Parenting Resource 30–36 Months: Your Child’s Development Download Files Feb 10, 2016 Older toddlers are ... go?” Then you two can switch. Downloads Your Child's Development: 30–36 Months PDF 373 KB Read more ...

  19. RDBE Development and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, A.; Bark, M.; Beaudoin, C.; Brisken, W.; Frej, H. Ben; Doeleman, S.; Durand, S.; Guerra, M.; Hinton, A.; Luce, M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    A digital backend based on the ROACH board has been developed jointly by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and MIT Haystack Observatory. The RDBE will have both Polyphase Filterbank and Digital Downconverter personalities. The initial configuration outputs sixteen 32-MHz channels, comprised of half the channels from the PFB processing of the two IF inputs, for use in the VLBI2010 geodetic system and in the VLBA sensitivity upgrade project. The output rate is 2x109 bits/second (1x10(exp 9) bits/sec = 1 Gbps) over a 10 GigE connection to the Mark 5C with the data written in Mark 5B format on disk.

  20. RDBE Development and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, A.; Bark, M.; Beaudoin, C.; Brisken, W.; Ben Frej, H.; Doeleman, S.; Durand, S.; Guerra, Ml; Hinton, A.; Luce, M.; McWhirter, R.; Morris, K.; Peck, G.; Revnell, M.; Rogers, A.; Romney, J.; Ruszczyk, C; Taveniku, M.; Walker, R.; Whitney, A.

    2010-12-01

    A digital backend based on the ROACH board has been developed jointly by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and MIT Haystack Observatory. The RDBE will have both Polyphase Filterbank and Digital Downconverter personalities. The initial configuration outputs sixteen 32-MHz channels, comprised of half the channels from the PFB processing of the two IF inputs, for use in the VLBI2010 geodetic system and in the VLBA sensitivity upgrade project. The output rate is 2x10^9 bits/second (1x10^9 bits/sec = 1 Gbps) over a 10 GigE connection to the Mark 5C with the data written in Mark 5B format on disk.

  1. Progress in Brucella vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANG, Xinghong; SKYBERG, Jerod A.; CAO, Ling; CLAPP, Beata; THORNBURG, Theresa; PASCUAL, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp. are zoonotic, facultative intracellular pathogens, which cause animal and human disease. Animal disease results in abortion of fetuses; in humans, it manifests flu-like symptoms with an undulant fever, with osteoarthritis as a common complication of infection. Antibiotic regimens for human brucellosis patients may last several months and are not always completely effective. While there are no vaccines for humans, several licensed live Brucella vaccines are available for use in livestock. The performance of these animal vaccines is dependent upon the host species, dose, and route of immunization. Newly engineered live vaccines, lacking well-defined virulence factors, retain low residual virulence, are highly protective, and may someday replace currently used animal vaccines. These also have possible human applications. Moreover, due to their enhanced safety and efficacy in animal models, subunit vaccines for brucellosis show great promise for their application in livestock and humans. This review summarizes the progress of brucellosis vaccine development and presents an overview of candidate vaccines. PMID:23730309

  2. Six months into Myanmar's minimum wage: Reflecting on progress ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... Six months ago, the Government of Myanmar established a national minimum wage, expecting that it would stimulate investment in the garment industry. The new wage, 3600 Kyat (3 US$) a day, is as much as 4.5 times more than unskilled entry-level workers were earning.

  3. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  4. LIFE: Recent Developments and Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anklam, T M

    2011-04-08

    Test results from the NIF show excellent progress toward achieving ignition. Experiments designed to verify coupling of the laser energy to the fusion target have shown that the efficiency meets that needed for ignition. Several tests with the cryogenic targets needed for ignition have been performed, and world-record neutron output produced. The National Ignition Campaign is on schedule to meet its 2012 ignition milestone, with the next phase in the campaign due to start later this month. It has been a busy and very productive year. The NIF is in full 24/7 operations and has progressed markedly in the path toward ignition. The long-standing goal of the National Ignition Campaign to demonstrate ignition by the end of FY 2012 is on track. The LIFE plant design has matured considerably, and a delivery plan established based on close interactions with vendors. National-level reviews of fusion are underway, and are due to present initial findings later this year. A value proposition has been drafted for review. The LIFE project is ready to move into the delivery phase.

  5. Solar central receiver hybrid power system. Monthly technical progress report for the month of December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-17

    Levelized busbar energy costs for the sodium-cooled hybrid central receiver concept using both oil and coal as a fuel were developed as a function of the plant capacity factor and as a function of the solar multiple. The fuel escalation question was reviewed in detail on the basis of past historical data, and it was concluded that the lower escalation numbers that are provided in the requirements definition document appear to be more likely to represent the real situation. Subsystem-level trade studies were continued during this reporting period. A detailed investigation of the series/parallel arrangement of the sodium heater and solar receiver was conducted. The various performance, lifetime, and cost factors were determined for each arrangement for the receiver and nonsolar subsystems, respectively. Collector subsystem studies were continued. Revised cost algorithms that include levelized O and M costs for the heliostats were generated in order that they can be used in the field optimization. On the basis of the subsystem studies and the economic assessment work, a reference configuration was tentatively derived. This configuration does not require storage and uses a parallel arrangement of the receiver and the heater. At this time, a coal-fired heater seems to have a potential economic advantage under realistic assumptions for the escalation of coal relative to oil over the next decade or so.

  6. FATHER-CHILD INTERACTIONS AT 3 MONTHS AND 24 MONTHS: CONTRIBUTIONS TO CHILDREN'S COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT AT 24 MONTHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Vaheshta; Perry, Emily; Domoney, Jill; Iles, Jane; Psychogiou, Lamprini; Rowbotham, Natasha E L; Stein, Alan; Murray, Lynne; Ramchandani, Paul G

    2017-05-01

    The quality of father-child interactions has become a focus of increasing research in the field of child development. We examined the potential contribution of father-child interactions at both 3 months and 24 months to children's cognitive development at 24 months. Observational measures of father-child interactions at 3 and 24 months were used to assess the quality of fathers' parenting (n = 192). At 24 months, the Mental Developmental Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition (N. Bayley, ) measured cognitive functioning. The association between interactions and cognitive development was examined using multiple linear regression analyses, adjusting for paternal age, education and depression, infant age, and maternal sensitivity. Children whose fathers displayed more withdrawn and depressive behaviors in father-infant interactions at 3 months scored lower on the MDI at 24 months. At 24 months, children whose fathers were more engaged and sensitive as well as those whose fathers were less controlling in their interactions scored higher on the MDI. These findings were independent of the effects of maternal sensitivity. Results indicate that father-child interactions, even from a very young age (i.e., 3 months) may influence children's cognitive development. They highlight the potential significance of interventions to promote positive parenting by fathers and policies that encourage fathers to spend more time with their young children. © 2017 The Authors. Infant Mental Health Journal published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  7. Individual moral development and moral progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Anders; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    At first glance, one of the most obvious places to look for moral progress is in individuals, in particular in moral development from childhood to adulthood. In fact, that moral progress is possible is a foundational assumption of moral education. Beyond the general agreement that moral progress is

  8. Individual Moral Development and Moral Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Anders; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2017-01-01

    At first glance, one of the most obvious places to look for moral progress is in individuals, in particular in moral development from childhood to adulthood. In fact, that moral progress is possible is a foundational assumption of moral education. Beyond the general agreement that moral progress is

  9. Cassini RTG Program. Monthly technical progress report, 27 November--31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This monthly technical progress report provided information on the following tasks: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety analysis; qualified unicouple fabrication; ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment (GSE); RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, and reliability, and contractor acquired government owned (CAGO) property acquisition

  10. Infant Development: Birth to 3 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the foundation of his or her healthy development. Trust your ability to meet your baby's needs. You ... infant-and-toddler-health/in-depth/infant-development/art-20048012 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  11. Association of weight change with progression of meniscal intrasubstance degeneration over 48 months: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Julio Brandao; Nevitt, Michael C; McCulloch, Charles E; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Gersing, Alexandra S; Facchetti, Luca; Bucknor, Matthew D; Chanchek, Nattagan; Liu, Felix; Joseph, Gabby B; Link, Thomas M

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the association of weight change over 48 months with progression of meniscal intrasubstance degeneration (MID). We studied 487 subjects with MID at baseline and after 48 months using 3-T MRI with the same protocol (FSE sequences with and without fat suppression). These participants lost weight (≥3%, n = 141), had moderate weight gain (3-10%, n = 77), substantial weight gain (>10%, n = 15) or maintained stable weight (n = 254). Progression of MID to a meniscal tear was assessed using the WORMS grading system and compared among weight change groups using logistic regression. ANOVA and chi-square tests were used to study the differences in subjects' characteristics. Progression of MID increased from weight loss to substantial weight gain (p meniscal intrasubstance degeneration will progress with the risk increasing with greater weight gain. • Subjects who gained weight were more likely to develop meniscal tears. • Greater amount of weight gain was associated with an increasing likelihood of progression. • Prevention of weight gain has health benefits for the meniscus.

  12. Business progress towards sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stigson, Bjorn

    1998-01-01

    The executive director of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development described the organisation, its membership and its objectives. The organisation believes nuclear energy is needed in support of the goal of eradicating poverty, but it must also make all-round financial sense. If the risks are perceived to be high then investors expect a high financial return. The argument is supported by discussions on: (i) industry and sustainable development; (ii) the driving process;(iii) the way ahead; (iv) the environment and shareholder value; (v) conclusions for business in general and (vi) conclusions for the nuclear industry.(UK)

  13. Development studies: work in progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the establishment of Development Studies at several European universities at the end of the 1960s, these institutes evolved from an amalgam of left-inclined students and professors towards representatives of an established academic discipline. The author critically reflects upon the

  14. Development Studies: Work in Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the establishment of Development Studies at several European universities at the end of the 1960s, these institutes evolved from an amalgam of left-inclined students and professors towards representatives of an established academic discipline. The author critically reflects upon the

  15. Nurturing Your Child's Development from 24 to 36 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Member Home Resources & Services Parenting Resource Nurturing Your Child's Development from 24 to 36 Months Download Files En ... important aspects of overall healthy development. Charting Your Child's Healthy Development The following chart describes many of the things ...

  16. Your Child's Development: 2.5 Years (30 Months)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Child’s Development: 2.5 Years (30 Months) KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child’s Development: 2.5 Years (30 Months) Print en español ...

  17. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT SEPTEMBER 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astely, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-10-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during September 1969.

  18. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FEBRUARY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.

    1969-03-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT (45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during February 1969.

  19. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT MAY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-06-06

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during May 1969 .

  20. Emotional and Social Development: 4 to 7 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ages & Stages Listen Text Size Email Print Share Emotional and Social Development: 4 to 7 Months Page Content Article Body Between four and seven months, your baby may undergo a dramatic change in personality. At the beginning of this period, she may ...

  1. Progress in MELCOR development and assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, R.M.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Elsbernd, A.E.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Modeling and Analysis Dept.

    1995-04-01

    MELCOR models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. Recent efforts in MELCOR development to incorporate CORCON-Mod3 models for core-concrete interactions, new models for advanced reactors, and improvements to several other existing models have resulted in release of MELCOR 1.8.3. In addition, continuing efforts to expand the code assessment database have filled in many of the gaps in phenomenological coverage. Efforts are now under way to develop models for chemical interactions of fission products with structural surfaces and for reactions of iodine in the presence of water, and work is also in progress to improve models for the scrubbing of fission products by water pools, the chemical reactions of boron carbide with steam, and the coupling of flow blockages with the hydrodynamics. Several code assessment analyses are in progress, and more are planned.

  2. Progress in MELCOR development and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R.M.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Elsbernd, A.E.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    MELCOR models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. Recent efforts in MELCOR development to incorporate CORCON-Mod3 models for core-concrete interactions, new models for advanced reactors, and improvements to several other existing models have resulted in release of MELCOR 1.8.3. In addition, continuing efforts to expand the code assessment database have filled in many of the gaps in phenomenological coverage. Efforts are now under way to develop models for chemical interactions of fission products with structural surfaces and for reactions of iodine in the presence of water, and work is also in progress to improve models for the scrubbing of fission products by water pools, the chemical reactions of boron carbide with steam, and the coupling of flow blockages with the hydrodynamics. Several code assessment analyses are in progress, and more are planned

  3. Progress and challenges in TB vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Gerald; Casimiro, Danilo; Neyrolles, Olivier; Williams, Ann; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; McShane, Helen; Hatherill, Mark; Fletcher, Helen A

    2018-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccine can provide decades of protection against tuberculosis (TB) disease, and although imperfect, BCG is proof that vaccine mediated protection against TB is a possibility. A new TB vaccine is, therefore, an inevitability; the question is how long will it take us to get there? We have made substantial progress in the development of vaccine platforms, in the identification of antigens and of immune correlates of risk of TB disease. We have also standardized animal models to enable head-to-head comparison and selection of candidate TB vaccines for further development.  To extend our understanding of the safety and immunogenicity of TB vaccines we have performed experimental medicine studies to explore route of administration and have begun to develop controlled human infection models. Driven by a desire to reduce the length and cost of human efficacy trials we have applied novel approaches to later stage clinical development, exploring alternative clinical endpoints to prevention of disease outcomes. Here, global leaders in TB vaccine development discuss the progress made and the challenges that remain. What emerges is that, despite scientific progress, few vaccine candidates have entered clinical trials in the last 5 years and few vaccines in clinical trials have progressed to efficacy trials. Crucially, we have undervalued the knowledge gained from our "failed" trials and fostered a culture of risk aversion that has limited new funding for clinical TB vaccine development. The unintended consequence of this abundance of caution is lack of diversity of new TB vaccine candidates and stagnation of the clinical pipeline. We have a variety of new vaccine platform technologies, mycobacterial antigens and animal and human models.  However, we will not encourage progression of vaccine candidates into clinical trials unless we evaluate and embrace risk in pursuit of vaccine development.

  4. Emotional and Social Development: 8 to 12 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Emotional and Social Development: 8 to 12 Months Ages & Stages Listen Español ...

  5. Progressive numbness of distal limbs for two years, unsteady gait for two months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun MA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old female was admitted to our department, complaining of progressive numbness of distal limbs for two years and unsteady gait for two months. “Peripheral neuropathy” was the presumed diagnosis. She has suffered dry mouth for months. Neurological examination revealed proximal upper muscle strength was normal and distal was 5-/5 while muscle strength in lower limbs was normal. Tendon reflexes in all limbs were reduced, and superficial sensation as well as deep sensation in all limbs was also diminished. Deep sensation below T8-10 was diminished. Romberg’s test was positive with negative pathological reflex. Several sensory nerves action potentials (SNAPs were diminished or absent with normal compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs. Cervical MRI showed hyperintensities in the dorsal column. Serum anti-Ro/SSA antibody was positive. Tear break-up time was abnormal in either eye (5s, normal range>10s; the rate of saliva production declined 0.02 ml/min (> 1.50 ml/15 min; parotid gland contrast sialography was abnormal; lip biopsy was positive with focal lymphocytic sialadenitis with focus score ≥1. The patient was diagnosed as primary Sjogren's syndrome and sensory neuronopathy. She received oral prednisone in dose of 1mg/(kg·d for four weeks, then reduce the dosage with 5mg/w to 0.50mg/ (kg·d. Later she reduced the dosage with 2.5mg/per week. At the same time, she got cyclophosphamide (100mg every other day and hydroxychloroquine (0.20g twice a day. Numbness of limbs and unsteady gait were improved when the patient was discharged. Two month later, during the follow-up, the patient’ gait was slightly improved, but the numbness still existed. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.11.016

  6. Progress in FMIT test assembly development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.; Shen, E.J.; Trego, A.L.

    1983-08-01

    Research and development supporting the completed design of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is continuing at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) in Richland, Washington. The FMIT, a deuteron accelerator based (d + Li) neutron source, will produce an intense flux of high energy neutrons for use in radiation damage studies of fusion reactor materials. The most intense flux magnitude of greater than 10 15 n/cm 2 -s is located close to the neutron producing lithium target and is distributed within a volume about the size of an American football. The conceptual design and development of FMIT experiments called Test Assemblies has progressed over the past five years in parallel with the design of the FMIT. The paper will describe the recent accomplishments made in developing test assemblies appropriate for use in the limited volume close to the FMIT target where high neutron flux and heating rates and the associated spacial gradients significantly impact design considerations

  7. Progress and controversies in developing cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speiser Daniel E

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapy has become a standard approach for cancer management, through the use of cytokines (eg: interleukin-2 and monoclonal antibodies. Cancer vaccines hold promise as another form of immunotherapy, and there has been substantial progress in identifying shared antigens recognized by T cells, in developing vaccine approaches that induce antigen-specific T cell responses in cancer patients, and in developing new technology for monitoring immune responses in various human tissue compartments. Dramatic clinical regressions of human solid tumors have occurred with some cancer vaccines, but the rate of those responses remains low. This article is part of a 2-part point:counterpoint series on peptide vaccines and adoptive therapy approaches for cancer. The current status of cancer vaccination, and associated challenges, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need to increase our knowledge of cancer immunobiology, as well as to improve monitoring of cellular immune function after vaccination. Progress in both areas will facilitate development of effective cancer vaccines, as well as of adoptive therapy. Effective cancer vaccines promise to be useful for treatment and prevention of cancer at low cost and with low morbidity.

  8. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] monthly progress report, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Accomplishments for the month of July are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuel Research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplement Government Program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; development of methods for mapping distribution of clays in petroleum reservoirs; summary of geological and production characteristics of class 1. unstructured, deltaic reservoirs; third international reservoir characterization technical conference; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; analysis of the US oil resource base and estimate of future recoverable oil; DOE education initiative project; and technology transfer to independent producers.

  9. (National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research) monthly progress report, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Accomplishments for the month of July are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuel Research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplement Government Program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; development of methods for mapping distribution of clays in petroleum reservoirs; summary of geological and production characteristics of class 1. unstructured, deltaic reservoirs; third international reservoir characterization technical conference; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; analysis of the US oil resource base and estimate of future recoverable oil; DOE education initiative project; and technology transfer to independent producers.

  10. Wills Plasma Physics Department thirty seventh 6-monthly progress report, January 1 to June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following areas: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, magnetohydrodynamics, laser diagnostics and far infrared interferometry

  11. Savannah River Plant Works Technical Department monthly progress report for May 1958: Deleted Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This progress report by the Atomic Energy Division of the Savannah River Plant covers: Reactor Technology; Separation Technology; Engineering Assistance; Health Physics; and General Laboratory Work. (JT)

  12. Wills plasma physics department thirty fifth 6-monthly progress report, Jan 1 to Jun 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following areas: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, rotating plasmas, magnetohydrodyamics, laser diagnostics, and far infrared interferometry

  13. NASA's SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM: Development and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, John; Lyles, Garry

    2016-01-01

    NASA is embarked on a new era of space exploration that will lead to new capabilities, new destinations, and new discoveries by both human and robotic explorers. Today, the International Space Station (ISS) and robotic probes are yielding knowledge that will help make this exploration possible. NASA is developing both the Orion crew vehicle and the Space Launch System (SLS) (Figure 1), that will carry out a series of increasingly challenging missions leading to human exploration of Mars. This paper will discuss the development and progress on the SLS. The SLS architecture was designed to be safe, affordable, and sustainable. The current configuration is the result of literally thousands of trade studies involving cost, performance, mission requirements, and other metrics. The initial configuration of SLS, designated Block 1, will launch a minimum of 70 metric tons (mT) (154,324 pounds) into low Earth orbit - significantly greater capability than any current launch vehicle. It is designed to evolve to a capability of 130 mT (286,601 pounds) through the use of upgraded main engines, advanced boosters, and a new upper stage. With more payload mass and volume capability than any existing rocket, SLS offers mission planners larger payloads, faster trip times, simpler design, shorter design cycles, and greater opportunity for mission success. Since the program was officially created in fall 2011, it has made significant progress toward launch readiness in 2018. Every major element of SLS continued to make significant progress in 2015. Engineers fired Qualification Motor 1 (QM-1) in March 2015 to test the 5-segment motor, including new insulation, joint, and propellant grain designs. More than 70 major components of test article and flight hardware for the Core Stage have been manufactured. Seven test firings have been completed with an RS-25 engine under SLS operating conditions. The test article for the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) has also been completed

  14. Recent Progress in the Sinoprobe Datacenter Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y.; Dong, S.; Zhang, G.; Liu, D.; Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    Sinoprobe datacenter development is to build new IT infrastructures needed to store, visualize and manage all the data acquired by SinoProbe program. The hardware and network infrastructures of the datacenter have been built including computer servers and storage facilities. The software system is developed using service-oriented architecture (SOA) principles and realizes major service functionalities such as including the security infrastructure services (user authentication and authorization), metadata services, data warehouse stores, data services, GIS services, and web portal through integrating various advanced technologies. These service functionalities serve three types of users, data managers, data consumers, and data providers. User management and access control, application administration, system support functionalities are mainly used by data managers. Extract, transform, and load (ETL) services are provided for data providers to upload their data into the data warehouse. Data consumers can search and download data through data search and download services. A virtual web-based globe is developed to facilitate data search and visualization. Strong support of GIS functionalities is provided including layered Geological and tectonic maps on topographic data. This poster displays the latest progress of the SinoProbe data center development and overall system functionalities.

  15. Progress in quantitative GPR development at CNDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, F. J.; Chiou, C.-P.; Roberts, Ron; Wendt, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) uses electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses to locate and map embedded objects. Commercial GPR instruments are generally geared toward producing images showing the location and extent of buried objects, and often do not make full use of available absolute amplitude information. At the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE) at Iowa State University efforts are underway to develop a more quantitative approach to GPR inspections in which absolute amplitudes and spectra of measured signals play a key role. Guided by analogous work in ultrasonic inspection, there are three main thrusts to the effort. These focus, respectively, on the development of tools for: (1) analyzing raw GPR data; (2) measuring the EM properties of soils and other embedding media; and (3) simulating GPR inspections. This paper reviews progress in each category. The ultimate goal of the work is to develop model-based simulation tools that can be used assess the usefulness of GPR for a given inspection scenario, to optimize inspection choices, and to determine inspection reliability

  16. Savannah River Plant, Works Technical Department monthly progress report for March 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1956-01-01

    This document details activities of the Works Technical Department during the month of March 1956. It covers reactor technology, separations technology, engineering assistance and heavy water technology

  17. Savannah River Plant, Works Technical Department monthly progress report for March 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1956-04-18

    This document details activities of the Works Technical Department during the month of March 1956. It covers reactor technology, separations technology, engineering assistance and heavy water technology.

  18. Technical progress report on the metabolic studies of plutonium for month of August 1945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.G.

    1945-12-31

    This monthly report briefly describes ongoing studies including urinary and fecal excretion of Plutonium 238 by human subjects and by rats, exploring way to facilitate the removal of Plutonium 238 from rat bone, the absorption of Plutonium 238 by barley plants, and use of inert iodine to block absorption of Iodine-131 in the rat.

  19. Motor development of kindergarten in 13 months interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Teresa Bucken Gobbi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Motor development is a changing process of individual functioning level where a better capacity to control movements is acquiring with time. Then, the purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in children motor behavior in 13 months interval. Thirty-five children ranging from 3 to 7 years of age participated and were distributed in 4 age groups. The motor performance of each participant were evaluated and reevaluated after 13 months by means of the Motor Development Scale, which is a test battery with specific tasks according to the age for each component: fine skill, global skill, balance, body schema/fastness, and spatial organization. Motor performance was compared inter and intra groups for each component. The results showed that the motor performance in the balance tasks improved after the 13 months for all age groups; for fine skill, global skill, and body schema children of 3, 4, and 5 years of age improved their performances between the evaluations; for spatial organization only children of 3 and 5 years of age improved their performances when reevaluated. These results suggest that the development in this age range occurs in a no homogeneous way, i.e., it presents different rhythms for the motor components. Environmental, individual and task factors can explain the developmental changes in a 13 months period. We conclude that the developmental process of each motor component is dynamic and it presents no linearity aspects. RESUMO O desenvolvimento motor é um processo de mudanças no nível de funcionamento de um indivíduo, onde uma maior capacidade de controlar movimentos é adquirida ao longo do tempo. Assim, o objetivo principal deste estudo foi analisar as mudanças no comportamento motor de crianças no intervalo de 13 meses. Participaram deste estudo 35 crianças entre 3 e 7 anos de idade distribuídas por faixa etária em 4 grupos. O desempenho motor de cada participante foi avaliado e re-avaliado após 13 meses por meio

  20. Progress in Development of the Axel Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesnas, Issa A.; Helmick, Daniel M.; Volpe, Richard A.; Abad-Manterola, Pablo; Edlund, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of a family of robotic land vehicles having modular and minimalist design features chosen to impart a combination of robustness, reliability, and versatility. These vehicles at earlier stages of development were described in two previous NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Reconfigurable Exploratory Robotic Vehicles" (NPO-20944), Vol. 25, No. 7 (July 2001), page 56; and "More About Reconfigurable Exploratory Robotic Vehicles" (NPO-30890), Vol. 33, No. 8 (August 2009), page 40. Conceived for use in exploration of the surfaces of Mars and other remote planets, these vehicles could also be adapted to terrestrial applications, including exploration of volcanic craters or other hostile terrain, military reconnaissance, inspection of hazardous sites, and searching for victims of earthquakes, landslides, avalanches, or mining accidents. In addition, simplified versions of these vehicles might be marketable as toys. The most basic module in this family of reconfigurable robots is the Axel rover, which has a cylindrical body with two main wheels and a trailing link. Inside its body are three motors and associated mechanisms for driving the two wheels and for rotating the link 360 around its symmetrical body. The actuated link serves several purposes: It is used as a lever arm to react to the wheels thrust to move Axel in multiple directions. It is used to rotate the Axel housing in order to tilt, to the desired angle, any sensors and instruments mounted on or in the Axel housing. It provides an alternative mobility mode, which is primarily used in its tethered configuration. Turn ing the link into the ground in lieu of driving the wheels causes the Axel housing and wheels to roll as a unit and thereby leads to a tumbling motion along the ground. With a tether mounted around Axel s cylindrical body, the link serves as a winch mechanism to reel and unreel the tether raising and lowering Axel over steep and vertical surfaces (Figure 1

  1. Development of indigenous irradiator - current progress and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar A Rahman; Mohd Arif Hamzah; Muhd Nor Atan; Aznor Hassan; Fadil Ismail; Julia A Karim; Rosli Darmawan

    2009-01-01

    The development of indigenous irradiator is one of Prototype Development Center main project to support Nuclear Malaysia services. Three (3) projects have been identified and currently the status is in final stage of design. There are some issues and challenges encountered, which delayed the project progress. The paper will discuss the current progress of development and challenges faced in designing the irradiator. (Author)

  2. Infant Development: Milestones from 4 to 6 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up or bear weight on their legs. Around age 6 months, many babies begin sitting alone after being positioned upright. Improving hand-eye coordination. Your baby will probably grasp your finger, a ...

  3. The progression of heartworm associated respiratory disease (HARD) in SPF cats 18 months after Dirofilaria immitis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, A Ray; Blagburn, Bryon L; Tillson, Michael; Brawner, William; Welles, Betsy; Johnson, Calvin; Cattley, Russell; Rynders, Pat; Barney, Sharron

    2017-11-09

    Heartworm-associated respiratory disease (HARD) in cats is induced by the arrival and death of immature adult Dirofilaria immitis in the pulmonary system and is indistinguishable from mature adult heartworm infection. A controlled, blind research study investigated the long-term (18 months post infection, PI) consequences of the inflammatory response associated with the death of immature adult heartworms in cats. Three groups of cats, 10 per group, were infected with 100 third-stage (L3) larvae by subcutaneous injection. Group A cats were treated with selamectin (Revolution®; Zoetis) per label directions at 28 days PI and once monthly for 17 months. Group B cats were treated orally with ivermectin (Ivomec®; Merial) at 150 μg/kg) at 70 days PI, then every 2 weeks for 15 months. Group C cats were untreated PI. At baseline (Day 0) and on Days 70, 110, 168, 240, 309, 380, and 505 PI, peripheral blood, serum, bronchial lavage, and thoracic radiographic images were collected. The selamectin-treated cats (Group A) and ivermectin-treated cats (Group B) were free of heartworms or heartworm fragments at necropsy. All cats became heartworm antibody positive at some time point in the study except for one cat in Group A. Only cats in Group C (all with adult heartworms) were heartworm antigen positive. The heartworm antibody titer for Group B was highest on Days 110 to 168 and then decreased over time and 50% were serologically antibody negative on Day 240. Eosinophilic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology and peripheral eosinophilia were most pronounced on Day 110 in all cats. Randomly distributed myofibrocytes in the lungs of some Group A cats suggest that precardiac larval stages were affecting the lungs. Radiographs in Group B cats demonstrated partial resolution of the initial HARD reaction but chronic myofibrocyte proliferation was histologically evident 18 months after infection. HARD was induced by immature adult worm infection with progressive improvement

  4. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] monthly progress report for June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Accomplishments for this period are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluid in porous media. Fuels research includes; development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplemental Government Program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; development of methods for mapping distribution of clays in petroleum reservoirs; summary of geological and production characteristics of class 1, unstructured, deltaic reservoirs; third international reservoir characterization technical conference; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; and analysis of the U. S. oil resource base and estimate of future recoverable oil.

  5. (National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research) monthly progress report for June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Accomplishments for this period are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluid in porous media. Fuels research includes; development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplemental Government Program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; development of methods for mapping distribution of clays in petroleum reservoirs; summary of geological and production characteristics of class 1, unstructured, deltaic reservoirs; third international reservoir characterization technical conference; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; and analysis of the U. S. oil resource base and estimate of future recoverable oil.

  6. Progress report for the first twenty-one months of the contract period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    During the period of July 1, 1978, through March 31, 1980 in-depth research of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in all of the nineteen northeastern states was performed. Research into economic issues associated with the development of small scale hydroelectric power was undertaken by the project economist. Special research activities have been undertaken with respect to the federal dam safety programs, the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System requirements of the Federal Clean Water Act and the implications of those requirements to small scale hydroelectric power, riparian law on lake and reservoir fluctuation in the State of Maine, and the implications of Title II and IV of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 to the development of small scale hydroelectric power. The results of these studies are reported. (LCL)

  7. National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research monthly progress report for December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-22

    Research programs from the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) are briefly described. Topics include enhanced recovery, studies on reservoir rock, microbial EOR, development of analytical techniques for petroleum analysis, and imaging techniques applied to fluids study in porous media. (CBS)

  8. Chemical development Separations Technology Unit. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodfield, F.W.

    1952-07-31

    The Redox Plant operated at a 76.7% time efficiency (IAF basis) and averaged 3.16 tons of uranium per operating day during the month. During the period from July 4 through July 13, 38,000 gallons of 72% ANN from Tygon-lined storage tank SS-112 were used in aqueous salt solution make-ups with some emulsion difficulty and fission-product carry-over resulting. New ANN, from stainless-steel tanks, was used for the balance of the month. An extensive (thermally) hot 60% HNO{sub 3} cleanout was given to the IA, IB, 2D, 3D, 2A, and 3A columns and associated salt solution head tanks to prepare the solvent-extraction battery for operation using 90-day `cooled` uranium. Continuous cross-over oxidation to improve 2A Column waste losses, and employment of KOH (vice NaOH) in 2DS, ICU, and 2EU butt additions to minimize Na in 3EU, were begun concurrently on July 20. Aged (90-day) uranium in head-end treated feed batches, was started to the IA Column on July 21, with early data indicating adequate two-cycle decontamination for both uranium and plutonium.

  9. Physics Computer Development Project (PCDP), Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Alfred M.

    This report discusses the development and implementation of computer-related teaching materials for undergraduate physics courses. A list of the computer dialogs developed, with a short description of each, is included. The types of dialog are: (1) development of an interactive proof, (2) assistance in problem solving, (3) diagnosing and filling…

  10. Studies in development immunogenetics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R D

    1975-03-26

    This contract provides the research support for a group concerned with a relatively large range of problems. The integrating thread that runs through it is that of an interest in development and its genetic regulation, mainly in complex organisms and with an emphasis on the immune system as a model for developmental analysis and as a tool for following the development of other systems, especially the brain. It includes studies of biochemical genetics, primarily from a developmental viewpoint and with particular regard to defense mechanisms, and cellular aspects of the immune system. It extends into the area of cancer immunology and cell specificities as related to tumor systems, primarily from an immunogenetic viewpoint and with particular reference to leukemias in the mouse, and to disruptions of genetic control mechanisms in tumor development, especially as approached through the reappearance of fetal antigens associated with tumor development.

  11. Development and progress: advancing towards environmental crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez G, Luis Jair

    2011-01-01

    Physical, biological and social evolution is doubtless. One of its first manifestations is the arrival of technique when hominids emerge from pre-hominids. Those first technical developments implied a new relation man/environment that was expressed in three components that appeared successively and pushed each other in time and space like this: dominion over nature, population concentration (urbanism), and population growth. Techniques are to generate three notorious effects on the relation man/nature: 1. Deep intervention on the physical environment: mining and industrial transformation processes; 2. Deep intervention on the biological environment: development of agriculture with a decrease in biodiversity; and 3. Deep intervention on the social environment: going from a pre-modern communitarian world, to the individualism of modernity; and from the agrarian field to the big city. All these technical developments boosted dominion of the technosphere over the ecosphere, which led to the appearance of the Environmental Crisis, whose most notable manifestation is Climatic Change.

  12. Progression of emphysema in a 12-month hyperpolarized 3He-MRI study: lacunarity analysis provided a more sensitive measure than standard ADC analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz, Sandra; Casselbrant, Ingrid; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Inhaled hyperpolarized (3)He magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been used to measure alveolar size in patients with emphysema. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that (3)He MR images could be used to develop a biomarker of emphysema progression. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: Twelve healthy controls and 18 patients with emphysema (eight current smokers, 10 ex-smokers) were imaged at baseline and 6 and 12 months. An additional nine subjects with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (four with emphysema, six without symptoms) were also imaged at baseline and at 6 months. Each...... subject was imaged at two lung volumes: functional residual capacity (FRC) and FRC plus 15% of total lung capacity. Means and standard deviations of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated from coronal images of the entire lung and correlated with pulmonary function test results...

  13. Sustainable development in Cameroon's forestry sector: Progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines initiatives formulated by the government of Cameroon to promote sustainable development within its forestry sector, and proffers a series of policy recommendations for advancing sustainable forest management in Cameroon. Since the enactment of Cameroon's comprehensive forestry law (Law N0.

  14. Sustainable development in Cameroon's forestry sector: Progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    development within its forestry sector, and proffers a series of policy recommendations for advancing sustainable forest management in .... Netherlands, Belgium, Malaysia, China, Hong-Kong, and. Lebanon (Karsenty, 2007; Alemagi and ... in the 2002-2003 fiscal year (Tieguhong and Betti, 2008). With respect to community ...

  15. Recent development and progress of IBA cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleeven, W., E-mail: Willem.Kleeven@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Abs, M., E-mail: Michel.Abs@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Delvaux, J.L., E-mail: Jean-Luc.Delvaux@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Forton, E., E-mail: Eric.Forton@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Jongen, Y., E-mail: Yves.Jongen@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Medeiros Romao, L., E-mail: Luis.MedeirosRomao@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nactergal, B., E-mail: Benoit.Nactergal@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nuttens, V., E-mail: Vincent.Nuttens@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Servais, T., E-mail: Thomas.Servais@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Vanderlinden, T., E-mail: Thierry.Vanderlinden@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Zaremba, S., E-mail: Simon.Zaremba@iba-group.com [Ion Beam Applications s.a. Chemin du Cyclotron 3, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-12-15

    Several cyclotron development projects were recently realized by Ion Beam Applications S.A. (IBA). This contribution presents three of them: (i) the intensity enhancement of the Cyclone 30 cyclotron, a machine mainly used for the production of SPECT isotopes. This project is related with the increased demand for {sup 201}Tl because of the shortage of Mo/Tc generators from nuclear reactors, (ii) development of a new versatile multiple-particle K = 30 isotope-production cyclotron (the Cyclone 30XP) being able to accelerate H{sup -}, D{sup -} and also {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-beam of this cyclotron will allow the production of new therapeutic isotopes (e.g. {sup 211}At) and (iii) commissioning of the Cyclone 70 cyclotron installed for Arronax in France. This machine is similar to the C30XP but provides higher energy (K = 70) and allows research on new types of medical isotopes.

  16. Progress in CPI Microwave Tube Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.; Bohlen, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    CPI continues its role as a leading supplier of state-of-the-art, high-power microwave tubes; from linear beam, velocity- and density-modulated devices, to high frequency gyro-devices. Klystrons are the device-of-choice for many high-power microwave applications, and can provide multi-megawatts to multi-kilowatts of power from UHF to W-band, respectively. A number of recent and on-going developments will be described. At UHF frequencies, the inductive output tube (IOT) has replaced the klystron for terrestrial NTSC and HDTV broadcast, due to its high efficiency and linearity, and is beginning to see use in scientific applications requiring 300 kW or less. Recent advances have enabled use well into L-band. CPI has developed a number of multiple-beam amplifiers. The VKL-8301 multiple-beam klystron (MBK) was built for the TESLA V/UV and x-ray FEL projects, and is a candidate RF source for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We have also contributed to the development of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) high-power fundamental-mode S-band MBK. The VHP-8330B multiple-beam, high-order mode (HOM) IOT shows great promise as a compact, CW UHF source for high power applications. These topics will be discussed, along with CPI's development capabilities for new and novel applications. Most important is our availability to provide design and fabrication services to organizations requiring CPI's manufacturing and process control infrastructure to build and test state-of-the-art devices.

  17. Recent Progress in Perennial Buckwheat Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Fu Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Grains in the genus Fagopyrum have benefits to human health and are an excellent gluten-free raw material. Of all cereal foods, this genus has the highest total content of amino-acid nutrients necessary for humans; nutrients that are resistant to digestion (protein and starch resulting in their sustained release; higher dietary fiber content than key cereals, and is rich in a special healthy ingredient (flavonoids. Fagopyrum includes 24 species of which five are perennial. Among them, golden buckwheat (F.cymosum complex is the most important perennial buckwheat, which is not only used in Chinese medicine, but also has great potential in healthy food crop. In order to provide some clues for perennial crop studies and their industry development, this paper presents the state of perennial buckwheat research in terms of taxonomy; natural chemical products and pharmacological and health functions; genetics and evolution; breeding; and product development and utilization. The great advances such as successful interspecific crossing and its subsequent new perennial buckwheat varieties will speed up the development of the perennial buckwheat industry.

  18. Predictors of Haitian-American Infant Development at Twelve Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmayer, Susan M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Families in urban and rural settings were studied in an investigation of environmental influences on the development of Haitian-American infants. Birthweight and scores on the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment predicted mental development. Psychomotor development was related to birthweight and household crowding. (PCB)

  19. Status of progress in IFR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1994-01-01

    The author touches on a number of the issues being addressed in work on the IFR reactor concept development at this time. This technology offers the opportunity to achieve a much more efficient utilization of uranium resources in the process of energy generation. Liquid metal coolant is likely to be a design feature of this type reactor, in part due to the passive safety of this design. Fuel reprocessing, and waste management issues are discussed. This reactor design has the advantage of being much better positioned to minimize concerns about nuclear proliferation issues

  20. MRI findings associated with development of incident knee pain over 48 months: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Gabby B.; Hou, Stephanie W.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Heilmeier, Ursula; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this nested case-control study was to identify baseline, incident, and progressive MRI findings visible on standard MRI clinical sequences that were associated with development of incident knee pain in subjects at risk for OA over a period of 48 months. We analyzed 60 case knees developing incident pain (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} ≥ 5 at 48 months) and 60 control knees (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at 48 months) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. 3 T knee MRIs were analyzed using a modified WORMS score (cartilage, meniscus, bone marrow) at baseline and after 48 months. Baseline and longitudinal findings were grouped into logistic regression models and compared using likelihood-ratio tests. For each model that was significant, a stepwise elimination was used to isolate significant MRI findings. One baseline MRI finding and three findings that changed from baseline to 48 months were associated with the development of pain: at baseline, the severity of a cartilage lesion in the medial tibia was associated with incident pain - (odds ratio (OR) for incident pain = 3.05; P = 0.030). Longitudinally, an incident effusion (OR = 9.78; P = 0.005), a progressive cartilage lesion of the patella (OR = 4.59; P = 0.009), and an incident medial meniscus tear (OR = 4.91; P = 0.028) were associated with the development of pain. Our results demonstrate that baseline abnormalities of the medial tibia cartilage as well as an incident joint effusion, progressive patella cartilage defects, and an incident medial meniscus tear over 48 months may be associated with incident knee pain. Clinically, this study helps identify MRI findings that are associated with the development of knee pain. (orig.)

  1. Intensive lipid lowering may reduce progression of carotid atherosclerosis within 12 months of treatment: the METEOR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, M L; Palmer, M K; Dogan, S; Plantinga, Y; Raichlen, J S; Evans, G W; O'Leary, D H; Grobbee, D E; Crouse, J R

    2009-06-01

    In several statin trials, vascular event rates for treatment groups begin to separate 1 year after commencement of treatment. For atherosclerosis progression, the temporal sequence of the effect has not been defined. We used data from the Measuring Effects on intima media Thickness: an Evaluation Of Rosuvastatin (METEOR) trial to determine the earliest time point at which significant differences in atherosclerosis progression rates could be detected after initiation of statin therapy. The METEOR trial was a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial that studied the effect of LDL-C lowering with 40 mg rosuvastatin on the rate of change of carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) measured by B-mode ultrasound amongst 984 low risk subjects. Ultrasound assessments were made at baseline and every 6 months up to 2 years. Rosuvastatin treatment was associated with a 49% reduction in LDL-C-C, a 34% reduction in total cholesterol, an 8.0% increase in HDL-C and a 16% reduction in triglycerides (all P METEOR.

  2. Progress on Fast Reactor Development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohira, Hiroaki; Uto, Nariaki

    2012-01-01

    Situation of National Policy Making and FaCT Project: On July 19, 2011, JAEC decided to continue the FR cycle technology development program in the limited range of activities to contribute to international standardization (ex. safety criteria) and to maintain the technology base level until the determination of new nuclear energy policy. On Sept. 27, 2011, JAEC restarted the deliberation process for new Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy. - The process was suspended after the Fukushima NPS accidents. - Major issues: Safety, Cost, Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Options, Waste Management, International Perspectives, R&D planning, etc. - The process has been carried out to determine the new Framework with the relationship to new governmental energy/environmental policy making. On Dec. 21, 2011, Energy and Environment Council complied Basic guideline toward Presentation of Alternatives regarding the Strategy for Energy and the Environment. In the FaCT project, focus has been on further improvement on safety of next generation SFRs based on lessons learned from the Fukushima NPS accidents

  3. Progress in CIS-based module development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrant, D.E.; Bauer, J.; Dearmore, R.; Dietrich, M.E.; Fernandez, G.T.; Frausto, O.D.; Fredric, C.V.; Jensen, C.L.; Ramos, A.R.; Schmitzberger, J.A.; Wieting, R.D.; Willett, D.; Gay, R.R. [Siemens Solar Industries, 4650 Adohr Lane, Camarillo, California 93012 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Alloys of copper indium diselenide are the most promising candidates for reducing the cost of photovoltaics below the cost of crystalline silicon. Small area, fully integrated modules exceed 13{percent} in efficiency and long-term outdoor stability has been demonstrated. The availability of natural resources and environmental impacts appear acceptable. Challenges remain to scale the process to larger area and to pass accelerated environmental testing. Process scale-up is systematically proceeding from the foundation of a reproducible small area module process with low variation; however, large-area circuit performance has not yet achieved the same level as the baseline process. Differences in performance between the baseline and large area processes have been isolated to differences in the equipment used to form absorbers and is the subject of current development. The impact of larger part size has been tested for each process step using the demonstrated baseline process. Results indicate that larger-area parts will achieve the performance level of the baseline process. This paper will outline the status and prospects for CIS-based photovoltaics and discuss efforts at Siemens Solar Industries to scale up to larger circuit area and to pass accelerated environmental tests. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Emotional and Social Development: Birth to 3 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eventually with the rest of this great big world around him, not only will his brain development advance, but the more he’ll be distracted from internal sensations (hunger, gas, fatigue) that once strongly influenced much of ...

  5. Fear of progression in patients 6 months after cancer rehabilitation-a- validation study of the fear of progression questionnaire FoP-Q-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Andreas; Mehnert, Anja; Ernst, Jochen; Herschbach, Peter; Schulte, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Many cancer patients experience fear of progression (FoP). The purpose of this study was to test psychometric properties of the questionnaire FoP-Q-12, to examine age and gender differences of FoP, and to explore prognostic factors of FoP. A sample of 2059 patients with a cancer diagnosis who had participated in a cancer rehabilitation program was examined 6 months after discharge from the rehabilitation clinic. Participants filled in the Fear of Progression questionnaire FoP-Q-12, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (anxiety subscale), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire GAD-2 and answered a list of questions concerning their cancer disease. Reliability of the FoP-Q-12 (Cronbach's alpha = 0.90) was good. While exploratory factorial analysis supported the one-dimensional structure of the FoP-Q-12, confirmatory factorial analysis only partially supported the one-dimensional model. A proportion of 16.7 % of the sample scored above the FoP-Q-12 cutoff score. Females showed higher FoP scores than males (effect size d = 0.52), and older patients had slightly lower levels of FoP than younger patients (d = 0.17). There were substantial and significant correlations between FoP-Q-12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) anxiety (r = 0.71) as well as GAD-2 anxiety (r = 0.57). The highest FoP mean scores were found for the following cancer locations: ovary (M = 29.5), thyroid gland (M = 28.8), and breast (M = 27.9), while the lowest scores were found for Hodgkin lymphoma (M = 23.6), testis (M = 21.8), and prostate (M = 21.7). The FoP-Q-12 proved to be a valid instrument for measuring fear of progression in cancer patients.

  6. Chemistry research and development. Progress report, December 1978-May 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miner, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Progress and activities are reported on component development, pilot plant development, and instrumentation and statistical systems. Specific items studied include processing of pond sludge, transport of radioactive materials and wastes, corrosion, decontamination and cleaning, fluidized-bed incineration, Pu contamination of soils, chemical analysis, radiometric analysis, security

  7. The Progressive Development of Environmental Education in Sweden and Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiting, Soren; Wickenberg, Per

    2010-01-01

    Our paper traces the history and progressive development of environmental education and education for sustainable development (ESD) in Sweden and Denmark. Our main focus is on work in primary and lower secondary schools as part of a search for trends of international interest related to the conceptualisation and practice of environmental education…

  8. Motor development from 4 to 8 months corrected age in infants born at or less than 29 weeks' gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Tamis W; Darrer, Tanya; Eldridge, Bev; Galea, Mary P

    2009-09-01

    Clinically, preterm infants show motor delay and atypical postures compared with their peers born at term. A longitudinal cohort study was designed to describe the motor development of very preterm infants from 4 to 18 months corrected age (CA). The study was also designed to investigate how the atypical postures observed in early infancy in the preterm infants might be related to their later motor development. Here we report the findings in early motor skills from 4 to 8 months CA. Early motor skills were assessed in 62 preterm infants (32 males, 30 females, mean gestation 26.94wks, SD 1.11) and 53 term infants (32 males, 21 females, mean gestation 39.55wks, SD 1.17) using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS). The preterm infants demonstrated different motor behaviours from their term peers, with an uneven progression of motor skills in different positions from 4 to 8 months CA. At 8 months CA, 90%of the term infants were able to sit without arm support, but only 56%of the preterm infants could maintain sitting very briefly without arm support. This uneven progression may have been due to an imbalance between the active flexor and extensor strength and hence inadequate postural control in these positions. The AIMS has also been shown to be a valid assessment tool to demonstrate unique characteristics in movement quality in the preterm population.

  9. Progress in the development of the surface effect catamaran (SECAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, J. M.; Paraskevas, N. M.

    1986-09-01

    Twin-cushion surface effect ship technology development includes analytical and experimental investigations in the areas of hydrodynamics, seakeeping, and structures. This paper reviews the progress achieved in hydrodynamic drag prediction and correlation, and craft motions, and identification of passive motion reducing devices. A 33-foot demonstrator has been constructed to further extend the technology data base.

  10. Risk factors for development and progression of nonproliferative retinopathy in normoalbuminuric patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulum, Tomislav; Blaslov, Kristina; Duvnjak, Lea

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for development and progression of nonproliferative retinopathy (NPR) in normoalbuminuric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A total of 223 T1DM with normal renal function and normoalbuminuria were included in this study and followed for 48 months. Photodocumented retinopathy status was made according to the EURODIAB protocol. Urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE) was measured from at least two 24-h urine samples. Possible risk factors for development or progression of NPR were examined in backward stepwise Cox's multiple regression analysis. The majority of patients (70%) had no retinopathy while 67 (30%) had NPR at baseline. Patients with NPR were older, had longer duration of diabetes, higher systolic blood pressure, BMI, resting heart rate, UAE and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (p ≤ 0.04 for all). After 48 months 24 patients (10.7%) developed NPR or progressed to proliferative retinopathy. Systolic blood pressure (HR 1.03, CI 1.01-1.05, p=0.02), UAE (HR 1.14, CI 1.07-1.21, pretinopathy is present and may progress in T1DM even when coexisting renal disease is excluded. Normoalbuminuric T1DM requires close monitoring for the early detection of retinopathy, especially if they have a higher UAE, systolic blood pressure and resting heart rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Fourteenth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E

    1976-04-30

    Progress is reported for a Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program sponsored by the Heat Engine Systems Branch, Division of Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). Structurally, this program is made up of three parts: (1) documentation of the existing automotive gas turbine state-of-the-art; (2) conduction of an extensive component improvement program; and (3) utilization of the improvements in the design, and building of an Upgraded Engine capable of demonstrating program goals.

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wang, I-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68-5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15-11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68-3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10-1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02-1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72-2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16-4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87-2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11-1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation.

  13. Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5: Past and future progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Michelle F; Das, Jai K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-10-01

    We review global and regional progress towards Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 with respect to their indicators, drawing on the latest data available from the relevant United Nations inter-agency groups responsible for maternal and child mortality estimation, as well as recent reports from individual UN agencies and external monitoring groups reporting on MDG progress. We also draw on recent, comprehensive evidence syntheses to present an overview of a selection of existing effective interventions that, if collectively implemented at scale, would reduce maternal and child deaths well beyond the MDG target levels. We conclude with a summary of why and how a focus on maternal and child health in the post-2015 era should be maintained, as the global development agenda transitions from the MDGs to the Sustainable Development Goals. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Design and development of progressive tool for manufacturing washer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Ulhas K.; Raghavendra Ravi Kiran, K.; Deepthi, Y. P.

    2017-07-01

    In a progressive tool the raw material is worked at different station to finally fabricate the component. A progressive tool is a lucrative tool for mass production of components. A lot of automobile and other transport industries develop progressive tool for the production of components. The design of tool involves lot of planning and the same amount of skill of process planning is required in the fabrication of the tool. The design also involves use of thumb rules and standard elements as per experience gained in practice. Manufacturing the press tool is a laborious task as special jigs and fixtures have to be designed for the purpose. Assembly of all the press tool elements is another task where use of accurate measuring instruments for alignment of various tool elements is important. In the present study, design and fabrication of progressive press tool for production of washer has been developed and the press tool has been tried out on a mechanical type of press. The components produced are to dimensions.

  15. Progressive development of renal cysts in glycogen storage disease type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorgjieva, Monika; Raffin, Margaux; Duchampt, Adeline; Perry, Ariane; Stefanutti, Anne; Brevet, Marie; Tortereau, Antonin; Dubourg, Laurence; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Mabille, Mylène; Pelissou, Coralie; Lassalle, Louis; Labrune, Philippe; Mithieux, Gilles; Rajas, Fabienne

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is a rare metabolic disease due to glucose-6 phosphatase deficiency, characterized by fasting hypoglycemia. Patients also develop chronic kidney disease whose mechanisms are poorly understood. To decipher the process, we generated mice with a kidney-specific knockout of glucose-6 phosphatase (K.G6pc -/- mice) that exhibited the first signs of GSDI nephropathy after 6 months of G6pc deletion. We studied the natural course of renal deterioration in K.G6pc -/- mice for 18 months and observed the progressive deterioration of renal functions characterized by early tubular dysfunction and a later destruction of the glomerular filtration barrier. After 15 months, K.G6pc -/- mice developed tubular-glomerular fibrosis and podocyte injury, leading to the development of cysts and renal failure. On the basis of these findings, we were able to detect the development of cysts in 7 out of 32 GSDI patients, who developed advanced renal impairment. Of these 7 patients, 3 developed renal failure. In addition, no renal cysts were detected in six patients who showed early renal impairment. In conclusion, renal pathology in GSDI is characterized by progressive tubular dysfunction and the development of polycystic kidneys that probably leads to the development of irreversible renal failure in the late stages. Systematic observations of cyst development by kidney imaging should improve the evaluation of the disease's progression, independently of biochemical markers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Progress towards sustainable development : 1997 sustainable development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The ways in which Shell Canada has been able to incorporate sustainable development concepts into the Company's business strategies were highlighted. The report describes Shell Canada's plans for protecting the air, water, wilderness, wildlife, soil and groundwater. Land reclamation of abandoned well sites, building a solid capability in emergency preparedness and a strong program to ensure health and safety, are also high on Shell Canada's priorities list. Achievements in 1997, led by the completion of environmental and socio-economic impact assessment of the Sable Offshore Energy Project and the announcement of plans for the construction of a mine and extraction plant north of Fort McMurray (Musked River Mine) Alberta, were reviewed. An ambitious list of objectives and targets for 1998 were also outlined. While in 1997 improvements in safety and sustainable development performance were impressive, financial results were also gratifying, with the Company reporting its best financial results ever. tabs., figs

  17. Bionic balance organs: progress in the development of vestibular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2017-09-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that is critically important in humans for gaze and image stability as well as postural control. Patients with complete bilateral vestibular loss are severely disabled and experience a poor quality of life. There are very few effective treatment options for patients with no vestibular function. Over the last 10 years, rapid progress has been made in developing artificial 'vestibular implants' or 'prostheses', based on cochlear implant technology. As of 2017, 13 patients worldwide have received vestibular implants and the results are encouraging. Vestibular implants are now becoming part of an increasing effort to develop artificial, bionic sensory systems, and this paper provides a review of the progress in this area.

  18. Topical KINOSTAT™ ameliorates the clinical development and progression of cataracts in dogs with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kador, Peter F; Webb, Terah R; Bras, Dineli; Ketring, Kerry; Wyman, Milton

    2010-11-01

    To determine whether topical administration of the aldose reductase inhibitor Kinostat™ can ameliorate the onset or progression of cataracts in dogs with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus (DM). A randomized, prospective, double-masked placebo control pilot study was conducted with 40 dogs newly diagnosed with DM with no or minimal lens changes. Twenty-eight dogs received Kinostat™ and 12 dogs received placebo. Owners administered the agent into both eyes three times daily for 1 year and compliance was monitored with log sheets. Complete ophthalmic examinations were performed on dilated eyes at the time of enrollment and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months into treatment. Cataract severity was assessed on a scale of 0-3. At 12 months, full bloodwork, including HbA1C and blood Kinostat™ levels were performed. After 12 months of treatment, the cataract score in the placebo group significantly increased with seven dogs (14 eyes) developing mature cataracts, two dogs (4 eyes) developing cortical opacities, and one dog (2 eyes) developing equatorial vacuoles with mild punctate cortical opacities. In contrast, the cataract score in the Kinostat™ treated dogs was significantly less with seven developing anterior equatorial vacuoles, two developing incipient anterior cortical cataracts, and four developing mature cataracts. In fact, the cataract scores of the Kinostat™ group at 12 months did not significantly increase from the score at the time of enrollment. The HbA1C values between the two groups after 12 months of treatment were similar, and no blood levels of Kinostat™ were found in any enrolled dog. The onset and/or progression of cataracts in dogs with DM can be significantly delayed by topical administration of Kinostat™. © 2010 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Exploring the Climate Literacy Development Utilizing a Learning Progressions Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, A.; Breslyn, W.; McGinnis, J. R.; Hestness, E.; Mouza, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change encompasses a broad and complex set of concepts that is often challenging for students and educators. Using a learning progressions framework, in this exploratory study we report our efforts to identify, describe, and organize the development of learners' understanding of climate change in an empirically supported learning progression (LP). The learning progression framework is a well suited analytical tool for investigating how student thinking develops over time (Duschl et al., 2007). Our primary research question is "How do learners progress over time from an initial to a more sophisticated understanding of climate change?"We followed a development process that involved drafting a hypothetical learning progression based on the science education research literature, consensus documents such as the Next Generation Science Standards and the Atlas of Science Literacy. Additionally, we conducted expert reviews with both climate scientists and educational researchers on the content and pedagogical expectations. Data are then collected from learners, which are used to modify the hypothetical learning progression based on how well it describes actual student learning. In this current analysis, we present findings from written assessments (N=294) and in-depth interviews (n=27) with middle school students in which we examine their understanding of the role of human activity, the greenhouse effect as the mechanism of climate change, local and global impacts, and strategies for the adaptation and mitigation of climate change. The culmination of our research is a proposed, empirically supported LP for climate change. Our LP is framed by consideration of four primary constructs: Human Activity, Mechanism, Impacts, and Mitigation and Adaptation. The conditional LP provides a solid foundation for continued research as well as providing urgently needed guidance to the education community on climate change education (for curriculum, instruction, and assessment

  20. Incidence, degree, and development of graft hypertrophy 24 months after matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation: association with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Butler, Rodney; Nairn, Robert; Breidahl, William; Wood, David J

    2015-09-01

    Graft hypertrophy is a common occurrence after periosteal, collagen-covered and matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, development, and degree of graft hypertrophy at 24 months after MACI. The hypothesis was that graft hypertrophy would not be associated with clinical outcome at 24 months. Case series, Level of evidence, 4. This study was undertaken in 180 consecutive patients (113 male, 67 female) after MACI in the knee. All patients were assessed clinically using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The incidence of hypertrophy relevant to anatomic graft site was investigated, as was the progressive change in hypertrophic studies postoperatively. The degree of tissue overgrowth in hypertrophic cases was investigated, as was its association with patient clinical outcome at 24 months after surgery. Of the 180 patients, 50 demonstrated a hypertrophic graft at 1 or more postoperative time points. This included 9 grafts (5.0%) at 3 months and 32 grafts (18.7%) at 12 months. At 24 months, 47 grafts (26.1%)-43 (32.1%) tibiofemoral and 4 (8.7%) patellofemoral-were hypertrophic. Patients with hypertrophic grafts at 24 months (n = 47) were younger (P = .051), they had a lower body mass index (BMI; P = .069), and significantly fewer of them had patellofemoral grafts (P = .007) compared with patients who had grafts with full (100%) tissue infill (n = 61). There were no significant differences in any of the KOOS subscales between patients with graft hypertrophy or full (100%) tissue infill at 24 months after surgery, while the severity of graft hypertrophy was not associated with KOOS subscales at 24 months. Hypertrophic grafts after MACI were common and continued to develop through to 24 months after surgery. Hypertrophic growth was associated with being younger and having a lower BMI, was

  1. Wills Plasma Physics department thirty first 6-monthly progress report 1st January-30th June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following topics: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, rotating plasmas, magnetohydrodynamics, laser diagnostics and far infrared interferometry. (R.L.)

  2. Maternal Psychopathology and Infant Development at 18 Months: The Impact of Maternal Personality Disorder and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Susan; Pariante, Carmine M.; Marks, Maureen N.; Davies, Helen A.; Farrelly, Simone; Schacht, Robin; Moran, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: No previous longitudinal study has examined the impact of comorbid maternal personality disorder (PD) and depression on child development. We set out to examine whether maternal PD and depression assessed at 2 months post partum would be independently associated with adverse developmental outcomes at 18 months of age. Method: Women were…

  3. Preterm infants fed nutrient-enriched formula until 6 months show improved growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ga Won; Jung, Yu Jin; Koh, Sun Young; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Kyung Ah; Shin, Son Moon; Kim, Sung Shin; Shim, Jae Won; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of feeding nutrient-enriched preterm formula to preterm infants until 6 months' corrected age (CA) on growth and development in the first 18 months of life. Very low-birthweight preterm infants were fed preterm formula until term (40 weeks CA). Infants were then assigned to one of three groups and were fed term formula until 6 months' CA (group 1, n= 29); preterm formula to 3 months' CA and then term formula to 6 months' CA (group 2, n= 30); or preterm formula until 6 months' CA (group 3, n= 31). Anthropometry was performed at term, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and at s18 months' CA. Mental and psychomotor development were assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II at 18 months' CA. Although body weight, length, head circumference and z score for CA at term in group 3 were significantly lower than those of groups 1 and 2, growth rates of these parameters were significantly higher in group 3 up to 18 months CA', as compared to groups 1 and 2. The mental developmental index and psychomotor developmental index of the Bayley test were not significantly different between the three groups. Very low-birthweight preterm infants fed nutrient-enriched preterm formula until 6 months' CA demonstrated significantly improved growth rates for bodyweight, length and head circumference, and comparable mental and psychomotor development throughout the first 18 months of life. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Advanced waste forms research and development. Comprehensive progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: cesium fixation in aluminosilicates and supercalcine development; low sodium wastes and high sodium wastes. Phase relations in the appropriate (for supercalcine) portion of the Cs 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 system are being investigated. Several compatibility lines (tie lines) have been established on the phase diagram. Methods of preparing pure single phases of CsAlSiO 4 and CsAlSi 2 O 6 (pollucite) are being developed. Compatibility studies continue to be the basis of supercalcine crystalline phase formation modeling

  5. Progress in Development of Kharkov X-Ray Generator Nestor

    CERN Document Server

    Androsov, V; Botman, J I M; Bulyak, V; Dovbnya, A; Drebot, I; Gladkikh, P; Grevtsev, V; Grigorev, Yu; Gvozd, A; Ivashchenko, V; Karnaukhov, I; Kovalyova, N; Kozin, V; Lapshin, V; Lebedev, A; Lyashchenko, V; Markov, V; Mocheshnikov, N; Molodkin, V; Mytsykov, A; Neklyudov, I; Peev, F; Rezaev, A; Shcherbakov, A; Shpak, A; Skirda, V; Skomorovsky, V I; Tatchyn, R; Telegin, Yu P; Trotsenko, V; Zelinsky, A; Zvonarova, O

    2005-01-01

    The sources of the X-rays based on Compton scattering of intense Nd:YAG laser beam on electron beam circulating in a storage ring with beam energy 43 - 225 MeV is under construction in NSC KIPT. In the paper the progress in development and construction of Kharkov X-ray generator NESTOR is presented. The current status of the main facility system design and development are described. New scheme and main parameters of injection system are presented. The facility is going to be in operation in the middle of 2007 and generated X-rays flux is expected to be of about 10(13) phot/s.

  6. Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program ninth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, C.E.

    1975-01-31

    Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. NASA completed the first phase of their baseline engine heat balance tests, and an upgraded engine compressor is being scaled for test. EPA completed their report on vehicle tests including emissions and vehicle performance, and a new endurance engine is on test. Significant development progress was made on both fixed and variable geometry combustors. After 45 hours of engine operation with Vendor A ceramic regenerator, no significant deterioration of the matrix, seals, or elastomeric mount was encountered. Ceramic regenerator stress analysis has commenced. Additional developments in non-nickel oxide regenerator rubbing seals are encouraging. The first preprototype integrated control system is in vehicle operation. Control adaptation for variable inlet guide vanes and water injection is progressing. AiRefrac turbine wheels were verified dimensionally and are being processed for engine testing. Water injection tests with a four nozzle system were run, and additional performance documentation of variable inlet guide vanes was obtained. Linerless insulation is on test in the free rotor engine, the new endurance engine, and a performance engine. The free rotor engine completed test cell checkout and was installed in a vehicle. Vehicle checkout, including a preprototype integrated control, is underway. Detailed specifications of the upgraded engine were written.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  8. The Effects of 6 Months of Progressive High Effort Resistance Training Methods upon Strength, Body Composition, Function, and Wellbeing of Elderly Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raubold, Kristin; Gentil, Paulo; Giessing, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The present study examined the progressive implementation of a high effort resistance training (RT) approach in older adults over 6 months and through a 6-month follow-up on strength, body composition, function, and wellbeing of older adults. Methods Twenty-three older adults (aged 61 to 80 years) completed a 6-month supervised RT intervention applying progressive introduction of higher effort set end points. After completion of the intervention participants could choose to continue performing RT unsupervised until 6-month follow-up. Results Strength, body composition, function, and wellbeing all significantly improved over the intervention. Over the follow-up, body composition changes reverted to baseline values, strength was reduced though it remained significantly higher than baseline, and wellbeing outcomes were mostly maintained. Comparisons over the follow-up between those who did and those who did not continue with RT revealed no significant differences for changes in any outcome measure. Conclusions Supervised RT employing progressive application of high effort set end points is well tolerated and effective in improving strength, body composition, function, and wellbeing in older adults. However, whether participants continued, or did not, with RT unsupervised at follow-up had no effect on outcomes perhaps due to reduced effort employed during unsupervised RT. PMID:28676855

  9. Multiple sclerosis in South America: month of birth in different latitudes does not seem to interfere with the prevalence or progression of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess whether the month of birth in different latitudes of South America might influence the presence or severity of multiple sclerosis (MS later in life. Methods Neurologists in four South American countries working at MS units collected data on their patients' month of birth, gender, age, and disease progression. Results Analysis of data from 1207 MS patients and 1207 control subjects did not show any significant variation in the month of birth regarding the prevalence of MS in four latitude bands (0–10; 11–20; 21–30; and 31–40 degrees. There was no relationship between the month of birth and the severity of disease in each latitude band. Conclusion The results from this study show that MS patients born to mothers who were pregnant at different Southern latitudes do not follow the seasonal pattern observed at high Northern latitudes.

  10. Progress on development of nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Since three Laws on the nuclear power were published 45 years has passed. Now, development on nuclear power in Japan is at an emergent state. In Japan, 51 units of commercial nuclear reactors with 44.917 GW are in operation, occupy about 37% of total electric power generation, and is positioned at an essential basic energy source supporting economical society in Japan. However, an accident occurred at Tokai Works of the JCO Co., Ltd., one of the uranium reconversion company, on September 30, 1999, was the first critical accident in Japan, and became the worst case in history on development of nuclear power in Japan, because of forming three heavy radiation disabled persons (One of them was dead) in its operators. This was a big crisis with relation to existence on development of nuclear power in Japan, by which anxiety and distrust of the Japanese against the nuclear power were amplified rapidly. On the other side, for Japan short in energy sources and of a big energy consumption, in order to intend for a long term to carry out energy security, global environmental conservation, and sustainable maintenance of essential growth, it remains to be one of important optional methods to further promote nuclear power generation and to establish nuclear fuel cycle. Here were described on progress on peaceful applications of nuclear power in Japan, progress on the field of nuclear power in Japan (from 1955 to 1999), progress on Tokai nuclear power station, introduction of nuclear power generation and effort on its domestic production. (G.K.)

  11. Cryobiotechnology of apple (Malus spp.): development, progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Rui; Chen, Long; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Volk, Gayle M; Wang, Qiao-Chun

    2018-05-01

    Cryopreservation provides valuable genes for further breeding of elite cultivars, and cryotherapy improves the production of virus-free plants in Malus spp., thus assisting the sustainable development of the apple industry. Apple (Malus spp.) is one of the most economically important temperate fruit crops. Wild Malus genetic resources and existing cultivars provide valuable genes for breeding new elite cultivars and rootstocks through traditional and biotechnological breeding programs. These valuable genes include those resistant to abiotic factors such as drought and salinity, and to biotic factors such as fungi, bacteria and aphids. Over the last three decades, great progress has been made in apple cryobiology, making Malus one of the most extensively studied plant genera with respect to cryopreservation. Explants such as pollen, seeds, in vivo dormant buds, and in vitro shoot tips have all been successfully cryopreserved, and large Malus cryobanks have been established. Cryotherapy has been used for virus eradication, to obtain virus-free apple plants. Cryopreservation provided valuable genes for further breeding of elite cultivars, and cryotherapy improved the production of virus-free plants in Malus spp., thus assisting the sustainable development of the apple industry. This review provides updated and comprehensive information on the development and progress of apple cryopreservation and cryotherapy. Future research will reveal new applications and uses for apple cryopreservation and cryotherapy.

  12. Baseline gas turbine development program. Eighteenth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E [comps.

    1977-04-30

    Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental upgraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Initial running of the upgraded engine took place on July 13, 1976. The engine proved to be mechanically sound, but was also 43% deficient in power. A continuing corrective development effort has to date reduced the power deficiency to 32%. Compressor efficiency was increased 2 points by changing to a 28-channel diffuser and tandem deswirl vanes; improved processing of seals has reduced regenerator leakage from about 5 to 2.5% of engine flow; a new compressor turbine nozzle has increased compressor turbine stage efficiency by about 1 point; and adjustments to burner mixing ports has reduced pressure drop from 2.8 to 2.1% of engine pressure. Key compressor turbine component improvements are scheduled for test during the next quarterly period. During the quarter, progress was also made on development of the Upgraded Vehicle control system; and instrumentation of the fourth program engine was completed by NASA. The engine will be used for development efforts at NASA LeRC.

  13. Assessing progress in the development of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Ghita, S.; Biro, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is focussed on the organizational culture and learning processes required for the implementation of all aspects of safety culture. There is no prescriptive formula for improving safety culture. However, some common characteristics and practices are emerging that can be adopted by organizations in order to make progress. The paper refers to some approaches that have been successful in a number of countries. The experience of the international nuclear industry in the development and improvement of safety culture could be extended and found useful in other nuclear activities, irrespective of scale. The examples given of specific practice cover a wide range of activities including analysis of events, the regulatory approach on safety culture, employee participation and safety performance measures. Many of these practices may be relevant to smaller organizations and could contribute to improving safety culture, whatever the size of the organization. The most effective approach is to pursue a range of practices that can be mutually supportive in the development of a progressive safety culture, supported by professional standards, organizational and management commitment. Some guidance is also given on the assessment of safety culture and on the detection of a weakening safety culture. Few suggestions for accelerating the safety culture development and improvement process are also provided. (author)

  14. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  16. Public health workforce development: progress, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtveld, Maureen Y; Cioffi, Joan P

    2003-01-01

    The public health workforce is key to strengthening public health infrastructure. National partners have articulated a vision of a sustainable and competent workforce prepared to deliver essential public health services. Six strategic elements provide a framework for action: monitoring workforce composition; identifying competencies and developing related curriculum; designing an integrated life-long learning delivery system; providing individual and organizational incentives to ensure competency development; conducting evaluation and research and assuring financial support. Partners convened in January 2003 to review progress and to re-evaluate strategies in light of the recently released Institute of Medicine reports on infrastructure and workforce issues. Although significant challenges remain, there is convergence on priorities for competency development, research questions to be addressed and next steps in the national dialogue on certification and credentialing in public health.

  17. Motor development curve from 0 to 12 months in infants born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayenne Martins Roberto Formiga, Cibelle; Linhares, Maria Beatriz Martins

    2011-03-01

    To trace a reference curve for motor development from birth up to 12 months of corrected chronological age in infants born preterm and low birth weight. This is a cross-sectional study with a sample of 308 preterm infants (53% boys) weighing Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) was used for motor development assessment. Comparing the motor performance of preterm infants with infants from a standardized sample on the AIMS, it was found that, except for the age group of the newborn, preterm infants showed lower motor development scores in comparison with the AIMS normative sample in all age groups between 1 and 12 months. The curve of motor development showed a continuous increase in the number of motor skills of preterm infants during their first 12 months of age. However, the average of motor acquisitions of preterm infants showed a nonlinear pattern with a standard indicator of stabilization between 8 and 10 months of age. Preterm infants, 1-12 months of age, showed motor development AIMS scores lower than the standards established in the normative sample. The findings may contribute as norm-reference for assessing the motor development of preterm infants in follow-up programmes in developing countries. © 2010 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2010 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  18. Development of GENOA Progressive Failure Parallel Processing Software Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Frank; Minnetyan, Levon

    1999-01-01

    A capability consisting of software development and experimental techniques has been developed and is described. The capability is integrated into GENOA-PFA to model polymer matrix composite (PMC) structures. The capability considers the physics and mechanics of composite materials and structure by integration of a hierarchical multilevel macro-scale (lamina, laminate, and structure) and micro scale (fiber, matrix, and interface) simulation analyses. The modeling involves (1) ply layering methodology utilizing FEM elements with through-the-thickness representation, (2) simulation of effects of material defects and conditions (e.g., voids, fiber waviness, and residual stress) on global static and cyclic fatigue strengths, (3) including material nonlinearities (by updating properties periodically) and geometrical nonlinearities (by Lagrangian updating), (4) simulating crack initiation. and growth to failure under static, cyclic, creep, and impact loads. (5) progressive fracture analysis to determine durability and damage tolerance. (6) identifying the percent contribution of various possible composite failure modes involved in critical damage events. and (7) determining sensitivities of failure modes to design parameters (e.g., fiber volume fraction, ply thickness, fiber orientation. and adhesive-bond thickness). GENOA-PFA progressive failure analysis is now ready for use to investigate the effects on structural responses to PMC material degradation from damage induced by static, cyclic (fatigue). creep, and impact loading in 2D/3D PMC structures subjected to hygrothermal environments. Its use will significantly facilitate targeting design parameter changes that will be most effective in reducing the probability of a given failure mode occurring.

  19. Maternal responsive-didactic caregiving in play interactions with 10-month-olds and cognitive development at 18 months

    OpenAIRE

    Mermelshtine, Roni; Barnes, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Maternal responsive-didactic caregiving (RDC) and infant advanced object play were investigated in a sample of 400 mothers and their 10-month-old infants during video-recorded semi-structured play interactions. Three maternal behaviours: contingent response, cognitively stimulating language and autonomy promoting speech were coded and infant object play. Factor analysis confirmed the three maternal behaviours loaded onto one underlying factor, labelled RDC. Based on ecological and transaction...

  20. Progress in Development of Kharkov X-Ray Generator Nestor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Androsov, V.; Bulyak, V.; Dovbnya, A.; Drebot, I.; Gladkikh, P.; Grevtsev, V.; Grigorev, Yu.; Gvozd, A.; Ivashchenko, V.; Karnaukhov, I.; Kovalyova, N.; Kozin, V.; Lapshin, V.; Lyashchenko, V.; Markov, V.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Neklyudov, I.; Peev, F.; Rezaev, A.; Shcherbakov, A.; /Kharkov, KIPT /SLAC, SSRL /Eindhoven, Tech. U.

    2005-09-14

    The sources of the X-rays based on Compton scattering of intense Nd:YAG laser beam on electron beam circulating in a storage ring with beam energy 43-225 MeV is under construction in NSC KIPT. In the paper the progress in development and construction of Kharkov X-ray generator NESTOR is presented. The current status of the main facility system design and development are described. New scheme and main parameters of injection system are presented. The status of power supply system and control system is described. The facility is going to be in operation in the middle of 2007 and generated X-rays flux is expected to be of about 10{sup 13} phot/s.

  1. Recent progress at NASA in LISA formulation and technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, R T [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 663, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)], E-mail: Robin.T.Stebbins@nasa.gov

    2008-06-07

    Over the last year, the NASA half of the joint LISA project has focused its efforts on responding to a major review, and advancing the formulation and technology development of the mission. The NAS/NRC Beyond Einstein program assessment review will be described, including the outcome. The basis of the LISA science requirements has changed from detection determined by integrated signal-to-noise ratio to observation determined by uncertainty in the estimation of astrophysical source parameters. The NASA team has further defined the spacecraft bus design, participated in many design trade studies and advanced the requirements flow down and the associated current best estimates of performance. Recent progress in technology development is also summarized.

  2. Progress in Development of I2S-LWR Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The paper will present the progress in developing the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (12S-LWR) concept. This new concept aims to combine the competitive economics of a large nuclear power plant, with enhanced safety achieved by the integral primary circuit configuration (previously considered only for PWRs with power levels not exceeding several hundred MWc), and with enhanced accident tolerance (to address concerns after the Fukushima Dai-lchi accidents). Several new technologies are being developed to enable this concept, including novel silicide fuel and micro-channel primary heat exchangers. This project is performed by a multi-disciplinary multi-organization team led by Georgia Tech, including academia, a national laboratory, nuclear industry, and a power utility, wit expected participation of the University of Zagreb. (author)

  3. Individual Differences in Language Development: Relationship with Motor Skill at 21 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Katherine J.; Krawczyk, Kirsty

    2010-01-01

    Language development has long been associated with motor development, particularly manual gesture. We examined a variety of motor abilities--manual gesture including symbolic, meaningless and sequential memory, oral motor control, gross and fine motor control--in 129 children aged 21 months. Language abilities were assessed and cognitive and…

  4. Achieving motor development milestones at the age of three months may determine, but does not guarantee, proper further development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, Ewa; Sobieska, Magdalena; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Steinborn, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Proper motor performance at 3rd month is necessary for further motor development. The paper aims to demonstrate the reliability, sensitivity, and predictive value of an original motor performance assessment tool in comparison with the neurological assessment at 3, 6, and 9 months. Children (n = 123), born at term without pre- or perinatal complications, born at term with pre- or perinatal complications, or born preterm, were assessed at the age of 3, 6, and 9 months, by a neurologist and a physiotherapist. The physiotherapist evaluated 15 qualitative features typical for the age of 3 months in the prone and supine positions. The final neurological assessment determined the degree of developmental disorder. Neurological and global physiotherapeutic assessments showed a statistically significant correlation. Qualitative assessment results were very good in healthy children and decreased with worsening neurological diagnoses. Children diagnosed with cerebral palsy did not show proper qualitative features of 3 months when analyzed at 3, 6, and 9 months. Children with delayed motor development revealed minor qualitative performance impairments as early as 3 months but improved with age. Qualitative assessment at 3 months not only facilitates diagnosis of major developmental disorders but is also a good predictor of delayed motor development in children.

  5. Progress in High Power Free-Piston Stirling Convertor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.; Walter, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration Policy has established a vision for human exploration of the moon and Mars. One option for power for future outposts on the lunar and Martian surfaces is a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. A 25 kW convertor was developed in the 1990s under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in such a possible lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Foster-Miller, Inc. is developing the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  6. Assessing progress in the development of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ioan; Ghita, Sorin

    1999-01-01

    visible prescriptive formula for developing a strong safety culture. However, a prerequisite is genuine and consistent commitment by the top management of an organization to improving safety . Providing this commitment exists, the best recommendation is to due something tangible and visible to improve safety, preferably involving employees from the outset. The choice of practices for developing an improved safety culture should take account of the existing national and organizational culture in order to ensure effective implementation. The importance of the learning process has been emphasized. A mechanism is necessary to ensure that international experience of practices to develop a strong safety culture is shared on a regular and frequent basis. The maintenance and improvement of a safety culture is a process of continuous evolution. Indicators are available to assess positive progress in this evolution and to detect a weakening safety culture. (authors)

  7. Line-focus solar central power systems, Phase I. Monthly technical progress report, 31 January 1979-28 February 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slemmons, A J

    1979-03-01

    The work performed during the fifth month of the Phase I study of the High Temperature Line-Focus Solar Central Power System is summarized. During the reporting period, the optical and receiver computer analysis programs and parametricized data have been combined in a computer program to give the projected annualized Bus Bar Energy Costs for a specified design. Although some of the data are incomplete or need further refinement, the program has been used to examine the sensitivity of some parameters, and to make preliminary optimizations.

  8. Progress in development of MOSART concept with Th support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V.; Feynberg, O.; Merzlyakov, A.; Surenkov, A.; Zagnitko, A. [National Research Center, Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Afonichkin, V.; Bovet, A.; Khokhlov, V. [Inst. of High Temperature Electrochemisty, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Subbotin, V.; Fazilov, R.; Gordeev, M.; Panov, A.; Toropov, A. [Inst. of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    A study is under progress to examine the feasibility of Molten Salt Actinide Recycler and Transmuter system with U-Th support (MOSART+Th) fuelled with different compositions of actinide tri-fluorides (AnF{sub 3}) from used LWR fuel. New fast-spectrum design options with homogeneous core and fuel salt with high enough solubility for AnF{sub 3} are being examined because of new goals. Experimental data base created was used for further development of MOSART+Th technology as applied to consumption of AnF{sub 3} while extracting their energy. The flexibility of single fluid MOSART+Th concept fuel cycle is underlined, particularly, possibility of its operation in self-sustainable mode (CR=1) using different loadings and make up. The paper summarizes the current status of the design data for the MOSART+Th concept received within ISTC 3749 Task. (authors)

  9. Current progress in orchid flowering/flower development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin-Mei; Tong, Chii-Gong; Jang, Seonghoe

    2017-05-04

    Genetic pathways relevant to flowering of Arabidopsis are under the control of environmental cues such as day length and temperatures, and endogenous signals including phytohormones and developmental aging. However, genes and even regulatory pathways for flowering identified in crops show divergence from those of Arabidopsis and often do not have functional equivalents to Arabidopsis and/or existing species- or genus-specific regulators and show modified or novel pathways. Orchids are the largest, most highly evolved flowering plants, and form an extremely peculiar group of plants. Here, we briefly summarize the flowering pathways of Arabidopsis, rice and wheat and present them alongside recent discoveries/progress in orchid flowering and flower developmental processes including our transgenic Phalaenopsis orchids for LEAFY overexpression. Potential biotechnological applications in flowering/flower development of orchids with potential target genes are also discussed from an interactional and/or comparative viewpoint.

  10. Regional odontodysplasia: A case of progressive tooth development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ganguly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional odontodysplasia (RO is considered a relatively rare dental anomaly despite increasing numbers of case reports in recent years. It usually presents as a localized anomaly in tooth development affecting a few adjacent teeth in a single maxillary or mandibular quadrant. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncommon case of regional odotodysplasia involving noncontiguous mandibular teeth, crossing the midline in a male patient, and showing progressive normalization of tooth anatomy over a period of 6 years. Typically, teeth affected with RO become pulpally involved early on and are either extracted or endodontically treated. Such reports of automatic normalization over time in RO is supportive of a more conservative treatment approach.

  11. Chemistry research and development progress report, May-October, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miner, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    Work in progress includes: calorimetry and thermodynamics of nuclear materials; americium recovery and purification; optimization of the cation exchange process for recovering americium and plutonium from molten salt extraction residues, photochemical separations of actinides; advanced ion exchange materials and techniques; secondary actinide recovery; removal of plutonium from lathe coolant oil; evaluation of tributyl phosphate-impregnated sorbent for plutonium-uranium separations; plutonium recovery in advance size reduction facility; plutonium peroxide precipitation; decontamination of Rocky Flats soil; soil decontamination at other Department of Energy sites; recovery of actinides from combustible wastes; induction-heated, tilt-pour furnace; vacuum melting; determination of plutonium and americium in salts and alloys by calorimetry; plutonium peroxide precipitation process; silica removal study; a comparative study of annular and Raschig ring-filled tanks; recovery of plutonium and americium from a salt cleanup alloy; and process development for recovery of americium from vacuum melt furnace crucibles

  12. The Progressive Development of Early Embodied Algebraic Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Luis

    2014-06-01

    In this article I present some results from a 5-year longitudinal investigation with young students about the genesis of embodied, non-symbolic algebraic thinking and its progressive transition to culturally evolved forms of symbolic thinking. The investigation draws on a cultural-historical theory of teaching and learning—the theory of objectification. Within this theory, thinking is conceived of as a form of reflection and action that is simultaneously material and ideal: It includes inner and outer speech, sensuous forms of imagination and visualisation, gestures, rhythm, and their intertwinement with material culture (symbols, artifacts, etc.). The theory articulates a cultural view of development as an unfolding dialectic process between culturally and historically constituted forms of mathematical knowing and semiotically mediated classroom activity. Looking at the experimental data through these theoretical lenses reveals a developmental path where embodied forms of thinking are sublated or subsumed into more sophisticated ones through the mediation of properly designed classroom activity.

  13. Technology development, evaluation, and application (TDEA) FY 1997 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, L.G.

    1998-05-01

    The public expects that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will operate in a manner that prevents negative impacts to the environment and protects the safety and health of its employees and the public. To achieve this goal within budget, the Department of Energy (DOE) and LANL must develop new and improved environment, safety, and health (ES and H) technologies and implement innovative, more cost-effective ES and H approaches to operations. In FY95, the Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division initiated a Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) program. The purpose of this unique program is to test and develop technologies that solve LANL ES and H problems and improve the safety of LANL operations. This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded in FY97 by the TDEA Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY97 included implementation of radiation worker dosimetric monitoring systems (two); evaluation and validation of cost-effective animal-tracking systems for environmental studies (two); evaluation of personal protective equipment (two); and development of a method for optimal placement of continuous air monitors in the workplace.

  14. Technology development, evaluation, and application (TDEA) FY 1997 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, L.G.

    1998-05-01

    The public expects that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will operate in a manner that prevents negative impacts to the environment and protects the safety and health of its employees and the public. To achieve this goal within budget, the Department of Energy (DOE) and LANL must develop new and improved environment, safety, and health (ES and H) technologies and implement innovative, more cost-effective ES and H approaches to operations. In FY95, the Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division initiated a Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) program. The purpose of this unique program is to test and develop technologies that solve LANL ES and H problems and improve the safety of LANL operations. This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded in FY97 by the TDEA Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY97 included implementation of radiation worker dosimetric monitoring systems (two); evaluation and validation of cost-effective animal-tracking systems for environmental studies (two); evaluation of personal protective equipment (two); and development of a method for optimal placement of continuous air monitors in the workplace

  15. Three Months of Progressive High-Load Versus Traditional Low-Load Strength Training Among Patients With Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Jensen, Steen Lund; Sørensen, Lilli

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive high-load exercise (PHLE) has led to positive clinical results in patients with patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, its effects on rotator cuff tendinopathy still need to be investigated. PURPOSE: To assess the clinical effects of PHLE versus low-load exercise (LLE...... outcome measure was change from baseline to 12 weeks in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. RESULTS: A total of 100 patients were randomized to PHLE (n = 49) or LLE (n = 51). Mean changes in the DASH questionnaire were 7...... of motion, and strength. However, a significant interaction effect was found between the 2 groups and concomitant corticosteroid use (P = .028), with the largest positive change in DASH in favor of PHLE for the group receiving concomitant corticosteroid. CONCLUSION: The study results showed no superior...

  16. Recent Progress in Development of SWOT River Discharge Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelsky, Tamlin M.; Andreadis, Konstantinos; Biancamaria, Sylvian; Durand, Michael; Moller, Dewlyn; Rodriguez, Enersto; Smith, Laurence C.

    2013-09-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is a satellite mission under joint development by NASA and CNES. The mission will use interferometric synthetic aperture radar technology to continuously map, for the first time, water surface elevations and water surface extents in rivers, lakes, and oceans at high spatial resolutions. Among the primary goals of SWOT is the accurate retrieval of river discharge directly from SWOT measurements. Although it is central to the SWOT mission, discharge retrieval represents a substantial challenge due to uncertainties in SWOT measurements and because traditional discharge algorithms are not optimized for SWOT-like measurements. However, recent work suggests that SWOT may also have unique strengths that can be exploited to yield accurate estimates of discharge. A NASA-sponsored workshop convened June 18-20, 2012 at the University of North Carolina focused on progress and challenges in developing SWOT-specific discharge algorithms. Workshop participants agreed that the only viable approach to discharge estimation will be based on a slope-area scaling method such as Manning's equation, but modified slightly to reflect the fact that SWOT will estimate reach-averaged rather than cross- sectional discharge. While SWOT will provide direct measurements of some key parameters such as width and slope, others such as baseflow depth and channel roughness must be estimated. Fortunately, recent progress has suggested several algorithms that may allow the simultaneous estimation of these quantities from SWOT observations by using multitemporal observations over several adjacent reaches. However, these algorithms will require validation, which will require the collection of new field measurements, airborne imagery from AirSWOT (a SWOT analogue), and compilation of global datasets of channel roughness, river width, and other relevant variables.

  17. The progression of 102 Brazilian patients with bipolar disorder: outcome of first 12 months of prospective follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Novis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Prospective studies have shown that the course of bipolar disorder (BD is characterized by the persistence of symptoms, predominantly depression, along most of the time. However, to our knowledge, no studies in Latin America have investigated it. OBJECTIVES: To replicate international studies using a Brazilian sample to prospectively analyze treatment outcomes in the first year and to determine potential chronicity factors. METHODS: We followed up 102 patients with BD for 12 months and evaluated the number of months with affective episodes and the intensity of manic and depressive symptoms using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS and the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17. Sociodemographic and retrospective clinical data were examined to determine possible predictors of outcome. RESULTS: Almost 50% of the patients had symptoms about half of the time, and there was a predominance of depressive episodes. Disease duration and number of depressive episodes were predictors of chronicity. Depressive polarity of the first episode and a higher number of depressive episodes predicted the occurrence of new depressive episodes. CONCLUSION: In general, BD outcome seems to be poor in the first year of monitoring, despite adequate treatment. There is a predominance of depressive symptoms, and previous depressive episodes are a predictor of new depressive episodes and worse outcome.

  18. Quarterly Progress Report Metallurgy Development Operation: January - March 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, O. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Metallurgy Development Operation; Last, G. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Metallurgy Development Operation. Fuels Design; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Metallurgy Development Operation. Metal Fabrication Development; Nelson, T. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Metallurgy Development Operation. Plutonium Product Development; Stewart, R. W. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Metallurgy Development Operation. Plutonium Metallurgy Development

    1964-05-20

    This progress report focuses on two topics: Metallic Fuels Technology and Metallic Fuel Development. Within Metallic Fuels Technology, the following subtopics are covered: new fuels design, fabrication development, and fuel evaluation. The addition of recently obtained swelling data on tubular fuel elements to the previously accumulated information has prompted a refinement to the swelling model. Analysis of data for the N-outer tube, the N-inner tube and the K-single tube geometries has led to separate empirical expressions for each of the three shapes in place of the single expression formerly used for all geometries. Within Metallic Fuel Development, the irradiation of thorium fuel continued. Three tubular elements containing 2.35 wt% U235 and 1 wt% Zr have reached an exposure of 5200 Mwd/ton in the ETR P-7 facility. Weight measurements indicate that the elements have undergone 0.8% volume increase. This figure is very close to the theoretical minimum volume expansion expected from fission product production.

  19. Progress report on fast breeder reactor development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    As for the experimental fast reactor ''Joyo'', the power increase test has been carried out since April, and the power output was raised stepwise up to 40 MW. The power output, core behavior, plant characteristics as well as shielding integrity were measured at each power level. The examination for licensing the power increase to 75 and 100 MW is still continued by the Committee No. 130. The preparation of various codes required for the core characteristic analysis is in progress. As for the development of the prototype fast reactor ''Monju'', the Construction Preliminary Design (1) was evaluated, and the studies on the specifications of the Construction Preliminary Design (2) are carried out. In respect to the analysis for the Safety Licensing, the analysis of decay heat, the development of an analytical code regarding the rupture propagation in heat transfer tubes for steam generators and others are under way. Technological investigation is carried out to obtain the overseas informations on the safety standards for FBRs and LMFBR technologies. The technical specifications for the preliminary design of the demonstration fast reactor are being prepared. The researches and developments of reactor physics, the structural components of ''Joyo'' and ''monju'', instrumentation and control, sodium technology, fuel materials, structural materials, safety and steam generators are reported, respectively. (Kako, I.)

  20. Progress in integrated energy-economy-environment model system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasukawa, Shigeru; Mankin, Shuichi; Sato, Osamu; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Yasuyuki; Nagano, Takao

    1987-11-01

    The Integrated Energy-Economy-Environment Model System has been developed for providing analytical tools for the system analysis and technology assessments in the field of nuclear research and development. This model system consists of the following four model groups. The first model block installs 5 models and can serve to analyze and generate long-term scenarios on economy-energy-environment evolution. The second model block installs 2 models and can serve to analyze the structural transition phenomena in energy-economy-environment interactions. The third model block installs 2 models and can handle power reactor installation strategy problem and long-term fuel cycle analysis. The fourth model block installs 5 models and codes and can treats cost-benefit-risk analysis and assessments. This report describes mainly the progress and the outlines of application of the model system in these years after the first report on the research and development of the model system (JAERI-M 84 - 139). (author)

  1. Description of the motor development of 3-12 month od infants with Down Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tudella, E.; Pereira, K.; Pedronongo Basso, R.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the rate of motor development in infants with Down syndrome in the age range of 3-12 months and identify the difficulties both in performance and acquiring motor skills in prone, supine, sitting and standing positions. Nineteen infants with Down

  2. Screening of Infants at Eight Months for Atypical Development in Primary Health Care in Southern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivberg, Bengt; Lundqvist, Pia; Johanson, Ingmarie; Nordström, Berit; Persson, Bengt A.

    2016-01-01

    Screening studies of a population in primary health care are sparsely reported. The aim was to describe observed atypical behaviours that may be associated with autism spectrum conditions, in a population (n?=?4,329) of infants at eight months. Observations were performed by paediatric nurses. An observational instrument, named SEEK developed for…

  3. Gender Differences in Language Development in French Canadian Children between 8 and 30 Months of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Caroline; Trudeau, Natacha; Sutton, Ann; Boudreault, Marie-Claude; Deneault, Joane

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the language of girls and boys between 8 and 30 months of age, using the Quebec French version of The MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories. The findings from this parental report measure confirm those of earlier research, which showed the linguistic superiority of girls over boys at a young age.…

  4. Communication development in children who receive a cochlear implant by 12 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Jaime; Dettman, Shani; Dowell, Richard; Briggs, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Describe the long-term benefits of early cochlear implantation. Provide a comprehensive description of outcomes, including: language, speech production, and speech perception. Compare the communication outcomes for the early implanted children to those of normally hearing children and children who received a cochlear implant at a comparatively older age. Retrospective review of the communication development of 35 children implanted between 6 and 12 months of age and 85 children implanted between 13 and 24 months of age. Audiologic assessments included unaided and aided audiograms, auditory brainstem response (ABR), auditory steady state response (ASSR), and otoacoustic emissons (OAEs). Formal language, speech production, and speech perception measures were administered, preimplant and at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years postimplant. The children who received their cochlear implant by 12 months of age demonstrated language growth rates equivalent to their normally hearing peers and achieved age appropriate receptive language scores 3 years postimplant. The children who received their cochlear implant between 13 and 24 months demonstrated a significant language delay at 3 years postimplant. Speech production development followed a similar pattern to that of normal-hearing children, although was delayed, for both groups of children. Mean open-set speech perception scores were comparable with previous reports for children and adults who use cochlear implants. Children implanted by 12 months of age demonstrate better language development compared with children who receive their cochlear implant between 13 and 24 months. This supports the provision of a cochlear implant within the first year of life to enhance the likelihood that a child with severe-to-profound hearing impairment will commence elementary school with age-appropriate language skills.

  5. Rapid recognition at 10 months as a predictor of language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, Caroline; Kooijman, Valesca; Hagoort, Peter; Cutler, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Infants' ability to recognize words in continuous speech is vital for building a vocabulary. We here examined the amount and type of exposure needed for 10-month-olds to recognize words. Infants first heard a word, either embedded within an utterance or in isolation, then recognition was assessed by comparing event-related potentials to this word versus a word that they had not heard directly before. Although all 10-month-olds showed recognition responses to words first heard in isolation, not all infants showed such responses to words they had first heard within an utterance. Those that did succeed in the latter, harder, task, however, understood more words and utterances when re-tested at 12 months, and understood more words and produced more words at 24 months, compared with those who had shown no such recognition response at 10 months. The ability to rapidly recognize the words in continuous utterances is clearly linked to future language development. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Diabetic nephropathy: Time to withhold development and progression - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama A.A. Sharaf El Din

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent discoveries in the fields of pathogenesis and management of diabetic nephropathy have revolutionized the knowledge about this disease. Little was added to the management of diabetic nephropathy after the introduction of renin angiotensin system blockers. The ineffective role of the renin- angiotensin system blockers in primary prevention of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus necessitated the search for other early therapeutic interventions that target alternative pathogenic mechanisms. Among the different classes of oral hypoglycemic agents, recent studies highlighted the distinguished mechanisms of sodium glucose transporter 2 blockers and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors that settle their renoprotective actions beyond the hypoglycemic effects. The introduction of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents to this field had also added wealth of knowledge. However, many of these agents are still waiting well-designed clinical studies in order to prove their beneficial therapeutic role. The aim of this review of literature is to highlight the recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, the established and the potential renoprotective therapeutic agents that would prevent the development or the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Quantitative Reasoning Learning Progressions for Environmental Science: Developing a Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Mayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reasoning is a complex concept with many definitions and a diverse account in the literature. The purpose of this article is to establish a working definition of quantitative reasoning within the context of science, construct a quantitative reasoning framework, and summarize research on key components in that framework. Context underlies all quantitative reasoning; for this review, environmental science serves as the context.In the framework, we identify four components of quantitative reasoning: the quantification act, quantitative literacy, quantitative interpretation of a model, and quantitative modeling. Within each of these components, the framework provides elements that comprise the four components. The quantification act includes the elements of variable identification, communication, context, and variation. Quantitative literacy includes the elements of numeracy, measurement, proportional reasoning, and basic probability/statistics. Quantitative interpretation includes the elements of representations, science diagrams, statistics and probability, and logarithmic scales. Quantitative modeling includes the elements of logic, problem solving, modeling, and inference. A brief comparison of the quantitative reasoning framework with the AAC&U Quantitative Literacy VALUE rubric is presented, demonstrating a mapping of the components and illustrating differences in structure. The framework serves as a precursor for a quantitative reasoning learning progression which is currently under development.

  8. Progress report on fast breeder reactor development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor ''Joyo'' will be tested at 75 MW output, starting in April, 1980. In connection with the accident in the Three Mile Island plant, the reexamination of the plant safety and the rechecking-up of the maintenance control system were carried out, and the special inspection by the Science and Technology Agency was executed from May 21 to 23, 1979. Thereafter, the preparation for raising the power output was completed. The periodical inspection after the completion of 50 MW operation is being carried out. The state of progress of various equipments and the codes for core characteristic analysis is reported. The construction preliminary design (2) of the prototype reactor ''Monju'' is examined, and the same design (3) is prepared. The analysis of the decay heat in the prototype reactor is carried on for the safety licensing. The technological investigation of LMFBRs in foreign countries is under way. The preliminary design (4) of the demonstration reactor is under examination, and the technical specifications of the conceptual design (1) are prepared. The researches and developments of reactor physics, structural components, instrumentation and control, sodium technology, fuel materials, structures and materials, safety and steam generators are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Tenth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F.W.; Wagner, C.E.

    1975-04-30

    Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. A fuel control system is being developed to allow program evaluation of a very promising low emissions, single stage, fixed geometry proprietary burner. Ceramic regenerators are under test in the free-rotor vehicle, and some have completed 30 hours of performance evaluation. Three-dimensional ceramic regenerator transient thermal and structural analysis programs are operational. Initial friction and wear test fixture results show that zirconium oxide fully stabilized by yttrium oxide is an effective substitute for nickel oxide in a plasma sprayed seal. A preprototype control system was adapted for variable inlet guide vane control in a vehicle installation. An evaluation of the free-rotor accessory drive concept in a vehicle showed no serious mechanical integrity problems. Simplifications are being made to the water injection system; significant metallurgical analysis of observed erosion/corrosion problems was accomplished. Variable inlet guide vane aerodynamic loss characteristics were determined. Generally satisfactory results with linerless insulation are resulting in extended use and application. Pattern work for the upgraded engine housing and the power turbine wheel castings are in process. A computer design analysis of the regenerator drive gears was made, and an analysis was completed of a three peripheral roller regenerator support and drive proposal for the upgraded engine.

  10. Progress toward Development of a Vaccine against Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permar, Sallie R.; Plotkin, Stanley A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A vaccine against congenital human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major public health priority. Congenital CMV causes substantial long-term morbidity, particularly sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), in newborns, and the public health impact of this infection on maternal and child health is underrecognized. Although progress toward development of a vaccine has been limited by an incomplete understanding of the correlates of protective immunity for the fetus, knowledge about some of the key components of the maternal immune response necessary for preventing transplacental transmission is accumulating. Moreover, although there have been concerns raised about observations indicating that maternal seropositivity does not fully prevent recurrent maternal CMV infections during pregnancy, it is becoming increasing clear that preconception immunity does confer some measure of protection against both CMV transmission and CMV disease (if transmission occurs) in the newborn infant. Although the immunity to CMV conferred by both infection and vaccination is imperfect, there are encouraging data emerging from clinical trials demonstrating the immunogenicity and potential efficacy of candidate CMV vaccines. In the face of the knowledge that between 20,000 and 30,000 infants are born with congenital CMV in the United States every year, there is an urgent and compelling need to accelerate the pace of vaccine trials. In this minireview, we summarize the status of CMV vaccines in clinical trials and provide a perspective on what would be required for a CMV immunization program to become incorporated into clinical practice. PMID:29046308

  11. Notch3 drives development and progression of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Rachel V; Boulter, Luke; Dwyer, Benjamin J; Kendall, Timothy J; Man, Tak-Yung; Minnis-Lyons, Sarah E; Lu, Wei-Yu; Robson, Andrew J; Gonzalez, Sofia Ferreira; Raven, Alexander; Wojtacha, Davina; Morton, Jennifer P; Komuta, Mina; Roskams, Tania; Wigmore, Stephen J; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2016-10-25

    The prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is dismal. Notch has been identified as a potential driver; forced exogenous overexpression of Notch1 in hepatocytes results in the formation of biliary tumors. In human disease, however, it is unknown which components of the endogenously signaling pathway are required for tumorigenesis, how these orchestrate cancer, and how they can be targeted for therapy. Here we characterize Notch in human-resected CC, a toxin-driven model in rats, and a transgenic mouse model in which p53 deletion is targeted to biliary epithelia and CC induced using the hepatocarcinogen thioacetamide. We find that across species, the atypical receptor NOTCH3 is differentially overexpressed; it is progressively up-regulated with disease development and promotes tumor cell survival via activation of PI3k-Akt. We use genetic KO studies to show that tumor growth significantly attenuates after Notch3 deletion and demonstrate signaling occurs via a noncanonical pathway independent of the mediator of classical Notch, Recombinant Signal Binding Protein for Immunoglobulin Kappa J Region (RBPJ). These data present an opportunity in this aggressive cancer to selectively target Notch, bypassing toxicities known to be RBPJ dependent.

  12. Proposed Special Issue: Progress of cancer research in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Jong

    2016-10-01

    % growth in the same period, with two consecutive years of decline between 2012 and 2014. This steady upward trend of publication output from developing countries shows that researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the values of evidence-based research, without which would limit funding opportunities and restrict international collaborations, as well as partnerships.Advances in Modern Oncology Research is an Open Access journal aimed at increasing the accessibility of peer-reviewed information among researchers worldwide. The journal emphasizes on equal opportunity in scientific publishing, and is committed towards bridging the existing knowledge gap in cancer research between developed and developing countries. AMOR is keen to highlight the current challenges and opportunities of cancer research in developing countries, and the creation of a special issue dedicated to this subject is especially relevant and urgent to the broad community of cancer researchers because:(i It provides a much-needed platform to clinicians and researchers from developing countries to share important region-specific data, statistics, observations, and findings with the international community. This will not only improve the visibility of researchers from developing countries, but also enrich existing medical literature with updated information on the progress of cancer research in the developing world.(ii It gives clinicians, researchers, and policy makers from developed nations the opportunity to assess the existing and projected capability of developing countries in coping with the disease burden of cancer. Moreover, it is expected to equip stakeholders with key data and information to better manage vital resources, i.e. the allocation of funding and creation of knowledge transfer programs, moving forward.It takes collective efforts to address the escalating threat of cancer mortality and morbidity in the developing world. In order to introduce effective long-term solutions, it is

  13. Progressive MS Alliance Industry Forum: Maximizing Collective Impact To Enable Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaratin, P; Comi, G; Coetzee, T; Ramsey, K; Smith, K; Thompson, A; Panzara, M

    2016-10-01

    The Progressive MS Alliance Industry Forum describes a new approach to address barriers to developing treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). This innovative model promises to facilitate robust collaboration between industry, academia, and patient organizations and accelerate research towards the overarching goal of developing safe and effective treatments for progressive MS. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J

    2009-09-04

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and do-decane which are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For the cycloalkanes, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multidimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel

  15. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Mueller, C J

    2009-12-09

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and n-dodecane that are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For two-ring compounds, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multi-dimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real

  16. Orphan drugs in development for Huntington's disease: challenges and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgunder JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Marc Burgunder1–4 1Swiss Huntington’s Disease Centre, Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 3Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 4Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a monogenic disorder encompassing a variable phenotype with progressive cognitive, psychiatric, and movement disorders. Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in this disorder has made substantial advances since the discovery of the gene mutation. The dynamic mutation is the expansion of a CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene, which is transcribed into an abnormal protein with an elongated polyglutamine tract. Polyglutamine HTT accumulates and is changed in its function in multifaceted ways related to the numerous roles of the normal protein. The protein is expressed in numerous areas of the brain and also in other organs. The major brain region involved in the disease process is the striatum, but it is clear that other systems are involved as well. This accumulated knowledge has now led to the development of treatment strategies based on specific molecular pathways for symptomatic and disease course-modifying treatment. The most proximal way to handle the disturbed protein is to hinder the gene transcription, translation, and/or to increase protein clearance. Other mechanisms now being approached include modulation of energy and intracellular signaling, induction of factors potentially leading to neuroprotection, as well as modulation of glial function. Several clinical trials based on these approaches are now under way, and it is becoming clear that a future disease-modifying therapy will be a combination of several approaches harmonized with symptomatic treatments. In this review, some of the most promising and

  17. A single-blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of 6 months of progressive aerobic exercise training in patients with uraemic restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Christoforos D; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Karatzaferi, Christina; Maridaki, Maria D; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Founta, Paraskevi; Tsianas, Nikolaos; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K

    2013-11-01

    Uraemic restless legs syndrome (RLS) affects a significant proportion of patients receiving haemodialysis (HD) therapy. Exercise training has been shown to improve RLS symptoms in uraemic RLS patients; however, the mechanism of exercise-induced changes in RLS severity is still unknown. The aim of the current randomized controlled exercise trial was to investigate whether the reduction of RLS severity, often seen after training, is due to expected systemic exercise adaptations or it is mainly due to the relief that leg movements confer during exercise training on a cycle ergometer. This is the first randomized controlled exercise study in uraemic RLS patients. Twenty-four RLS HD patients were randomly assigned to two groups: the progressive exercise training group (n = 12) and the control exercise with no resistance group (n = 12). The exercise session in both groups included intradialytic cycling for 45 min at 50 rpm. However, only in the progressive exercise training group was resistance applied, at 60-65% of maximum exercise capacity, which was reassessed every 4 weeks to account for the patients' improvement. The severity of RLS symptoms was evaluated using the IRLSSG severity scale, functional capacity by a battery of tests, while sleep quality, depression levels and daily sleepiness status were assessed via validated questionnaires, before and after the intervention period. All patients completed the exercise programme with no adverse effects. RLS symptom severity declined by 58% (P = 0.003) in the progressive exercise training group, while a no statistically significant decline was observed in the control group (17% change, P = 0.124). Exercise training was also effective in terms of improving functional capacity (P = 0.04), sleep quality (P = 0.038) and depression score (P = 0.000) in HD patients, while no significant changes were observed in the control group. After 6 months of the intervention, RLS severity (P = 0.017), depression score (P = 0.002) and

  18. Implications of newborn amygdala connectivity for fear and cognitive development at 6-months-of-age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Alice M.; Buss, Claudia; Rasmussen, Jerod M.; Rudolph, Marc D.; Demeter, Damion V.; Gilmore, John H.; Styner, Martin; Entringer, Sonja; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Fair, Damien A.

    2015-01-01

    The first year of life is an important period for emergence of fear in humans. While animal models have revealed developmental changes in amygdala circuitry accompanying emerging fear, human neural systems involved in early fear development remain poorly understood. To increase understanding of the neural foundations of human fear, it is important to consider parallel cognitive development, which may modulate associations between typical development of early fear and subsequent risk for fear-related psychopathology. We, therefore, examined amygdala functional connectivity with rs-fcMRI in 48 neonates (M=3.65 weeks, SD=1.72), and measured fear and cognitive development at 6-months-of-age. Stronger, positive neonatal amygdala connectivity to several regions, including bilateral anterior insula and ventral striatum, was prospectively associated with higher fear at 6-months. Stronger amygdala connectivity to ventral anterior cingulate/anterior medial prefrontal cortex predicted a specific phenotype of higher fear combined with more advanced cognitive development. Overall, findings demonstrate unique profiles of neonatal amygdala functional connectivity related to emerging fear and cognitive development, which may have implications for normative and pathological fear in later years. Consideration of infant fear in the context of cognitive development will likely contribute to a more nuanced understanding of fear, its neural bases, and its implications for future mental health. PMID:26499255

  19. Amount and Timing of Group-Based Childcare from Birth and Cognitive Development at 51 Months: A UK Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jacqueline; Melhuish, Edward C.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether the amount and timing of group-based childcare between birth and 51 months were predictive of cognitive development at 51 months, taking into account other non-parental childcare, demographic characteristics, cognitive development at 18 months, sensitive parenting and a stimulating home environment. Children's…

  20. Prenatal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation and Offspring Development at 18 Months: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Stinger, Amanda; DiGirolamo, Ann M.; Martorell, Reynaldo; Neufeld, Lynnette M.; Rivera, Juan A.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Stein, Aryeh D.; Wang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the effects of prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on offspring development at 18 months of age. Design Randomized placebo double-blind controlled trial. Settings Cuernavaca, Mexico. Participants and Methods We followed up offspring (n = 730; 75% of the birth cohort) of women in Mexico who participated in a trial of DHA supplementation during the latter half of pregnancy. We assessed the effect of the intervention on child development and the potential modifying effects of gravidity, gender, SES, and quality of the home environment. Interventions or Main Exposures 400 mg/day of algal DHA. Outcome Measures Child development at 18 months of age measured using the Spanish version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II. We calculated standardized psychomotor and mental development indices, and behavior rating scale scores. Results Intent-to-treat differences (DHA-control) were: Psychomotor Developmental Index -0.90 (95% CI: -2.35, 0.56), Mental Developmental Index -0.26 (95% CI: -1.63, 1.10) and Behavior Rating Scale -0.01 (95% CI: -0.95, 0.94). Prenatal DHA intake attenuated the positive association between home environment and psychomotor development index observed in the control group (p for interaction = 0.03) suggesting potential benefits for children living in home environments characterized by reduced caregiver interactions and opportunities for early childhood stimulation. Conclusions Prenatal DHA supplementation in a population with low intakes of DHA had no effects on offspring development at 18 months of age although there may be some benefit for infants from poor quality home environments. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00646360 PMID:26262896

  1. Prenatal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation and Offspring Development at 18 Months: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Stinger, Amanda; DiGirolamo, Ann M; Martorell, Reynaldo; Neufeld, Lynnette M; Rivera, Juan A; Schnaas, Lourdes; Stein, Aryeh D; Wang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on offspring development at 18 months of age. Randomized placebo double-blind controlled trial. Cuernavaca, Mexico. We followed up offspring (n = 730; 75% of the birth cohort) of women in Mexico who participated in a trial of DHA supplementation during the latter half of pregnancy. We assessed the effect of the intervention on child development and the potential modifying effects of gravidity, gender, SES, and quality of the home environment. 400 mg/day of algal DHA. Child development at 18 months of age measured using the Spanish version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II. We calculated standardized psychomotor and mental development indices, and behavior rating scale scores. Intent-to-treat differences (DHA-control) were: Psychomotor Developmental Index -0.90 (95% CI: -2.35, 0.56), Mental Developmental Index -0.26 (95% CI: -1.63, 1.10) and Behavior Rating Scale -0.01 (95% CI: -0.95, 0.94). Prenatal DHA intake attenuated the positive association between home environment and psychomotor development index observed in the control group (p for interaction = 0.03) suggesting potential benefits for children living in home environments characterized by reduced caregiver interactions and opportunities for early childhood stimulation. Prenatal DHA supplementation in a population with low intakes of DHA had no effects on offspring development at 18 months of age although there may be some benefit for infants from poor quality home environments. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00646360.

  2. Prenatal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation and Offspring Development at 18 Months: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA supplementation on offspring development at 18 months of age.Randomized placebo double-blind controlled trial.Cuernavaca, Mexico.We followed up offspring (n = 730; 75% of the birth cohort of women in Mexico who participated in a trial of DHA supplementation during the latter half of pregnancy. We assessed the effect of the intervention on child development and the potential modifying effects of gravidity, gender, SES, and quality of the home environment.400 mg/day of algal DHA.Child development at 18 months of age measured using the Spanish version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II. We calculated standardized psychomotor and mental development indices, and behavior rating scale scores.Intent-to-treat differences (DHA-control were: Psychomotor Developmental Index -0.90 (95% CI: -2.35, 0.56, Mental Developmental Index -0.26 (95% CI: -1.63, 1.10 and Behavior Rating Scale -0.01 (95% CI: -0.95, 0.94. Prenatal DHA intake attenuated the positive association between home environment and psychomotor development index observed in the control group (p for interaction = 0.03 suggesting potential benefits for children living in home environments characterized by reduced caregiver interactions and opportunities for early childhood stimulation.Prenatal DHA supplementation in a population with low intakes of DHA had no effects on offspring development at 18 months of age although there may be some benefit for infants from poor quality home environments.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00646360.

  3. Progress in second-generation HTS wire development and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Chen, Y.; Xiong, X.; Xie, Y.; Zhang, X.; Rar, A.; Martchevskii, M.; Schmidt, R.; Lenseth, K.; Herrin, J.

    2008-01-01

    2007 has marked yet another year of continued rapid progress in developing and manufacturing high-performance, long-length second-generation (2G) HTS wires at high speeds. Using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) MgO and associated buffer sputtering processes, SuperPower has now exceeded piece lengths of 1000 m of fully buffered tape reproducibly with excellent in-plane texture of 6-7 degrees and uniformity of about 2%. These kilometer lengths are produced at high speeds of about 350 m/h of 4 mm wide tape. In combination with metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), 2G wires up to single piece lengths to 790 m with a minimum critical current value of 190 A/cm corresponding to a Critical current x Length performance of 150,100 Am have been achieved. Tape speeds up to 180 m/h have been reached MOCVD while maintaining critical currents above 200 A/cm in 100+ m lengths. Thick film MOCVD technology has been transitioned to Pilot manufacturing system where a minimum critical current of 320 A/cm has been demonstrated over a length of 155 m processed at a speed of 70 m/h in 4 mm width. Finally, nearly 10,000 m of 2G wire has been produced, exhaustively tested, and delivered to the Albany Cable project. The average minimum critical current of the wire delivered in 225 segments of 43-44 m is 70 A in 4 mm widths. A 30 m cable has been fabricated with this wire by Sumitomo Electric and has been installed in the power grid of National Grid in downtown Albany and is the world's first 2G device installed in the grid

  4. Progress in second-generation HTS wire development and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower, Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)], E-mail: vselva@superpower-inc.com; Chen, Y.; Xiong, X.; Xie, Y.; Zhang, X.; Rar, A.; Martchevskii, M.; Schmidt, R.; Lenseth, K.; Herrin, J. [SuperPower, Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    2007 has marked yet another year of continued rapid progress in developing and manufacturing high-performance, long-length second-generation (2G) HTS wires at high speeds. Using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) MgO and associated buffer sputtering processes, SuperPower has now exceeded piece lengths of 1000 m of fully buffered tape reproducibly with excellent in-plane texture of 6-7 degrees and uniformity of about 2%. These kilometer lengths are produced at high speeds of about 350 m/h of 4 mm wide tape. In combination with metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), 2G wires up to single piece lengths to 790 m with a minimum critical current value of 190 A/cm corresponding to a Critical current x Length performance of 150,100 Am have been achieved. Tape speeds up to 180 m/h have been reached MOCVD while maintaining critical currents above 200 A/cm in 100+ m lengths. Thick film MOCVD technology has been transitioned to Pilot manufacturing system where a minimum critical current of 320 A/cm has been demonstrated over a length of 155 m processed at a speed of 70 m/h in 4 mm width. Finally, nearly 10,000 m of 2G wire has been produced, exhaustively tested, and delivered to the Albany Cable project. The average minimum critical current of the wire delivered in 225 segments of 43-44 m is 70 A in 4 mm widths. A 30 m cable has been fabricated with this wire by Sumitomo Electric and has been installed in the power grid of National Grid in downtown Albany and is the world's first 2G device installed in the grid.

  5. Timing, duration, and severity of iron deficiency in early development and motor outcomes at 9 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Denise C C; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa M; Li, Ming; Bian, Yang; Sturza, Julie; Richards, Blair; Lozoff, Betsy

    2018-03-01

    Poorer motor development is reported in infants with iron deficiency (ID). The role of timing, duration and severity is unclear. We assessed relations between ID timing, duration, and severity and gross motor scores, neurological integrity, and motor behavior quality at 9 months. Iron status was determined at birth and 9 months in otherwise healthy term Chinese infants. The 9-month motor evaluation included the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale (PDMS-2), Infant Neurological International Battery (INFANIB), and motor quality factor. Motor outcomes were analyzed by ID timing (fetal-neonatal, infancy), duration, and severity. For severity, we also considered maternal iron status. The data were available for 1194 infants. Iron status was classified as fetal-neonatal and infancy ID (n = 253), fetal-neonatal ID (n = 256), infancy ID (n = 288), and not ID (n = 397). Compared with not ID, infants with fetal-neonatal or infancy ID had lower locomotion scores (effect size ds = 0.19, 0.18) and those with ID in both periods (longer duration) had lower locomotion and overall PDMS-2 gross motor scores (ds = 0.20, 0.18); ID groups did not differ. More severe ID in late pregnancy was associated with lower INFANIB Vestibular function (p = 0.01), and total score (p = 0.03). More severe ID in infancy was associated with lower scores for locomotion (p = 0.03), overall gross motor (p = 0.05). Fetal-neonatal and/or infancy ID was associated with lower overall gross motor development and locomotion test scores at 9 months. Associations with ID severity varied by ID timing: more severe ID in late pregnancy, poorer neurological integrity; more severe ID in infancy, poorer gross motor development.

  6. Development of allocentric spatial memory abilities in children from 18 months to 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribordy, Farfalla; Jabès, Adeline; Banta Lavenex, Pamela; Lavenex, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Episodic memories for autobiographical events that happen in unique spatiotemporal contexts are central to defining who we are. Yet, before 2 years of age, children are unable to form or store episodic memories for recall later in life, a phenomenon known as infantile amnesia. Here, we studied the development of allocentric spatial memory, a fundamental component of episodic memory, in two versions of a real-world memory task requiring 18 month- to 5-year-old children to search for rewards hidden beneath cups distributed in an open-field arena. Whereas children 25-42-months-old were not capable of discriminating three reward locations among 18 possible locations in absence of local cues marking these locations, children older than 43 months found the reward locations reliably. These results support previous findings suggesting that allocentric spatial memory, if present, is only rudimentary in children under 3.5 years of age. However, when tested with only one reward location among four possible locations, children 25-39-months-old found the reward reliably in absence of local cues, whereas 18-23-month-olds did not. Our findings thus show that the ability to form a basic allocentric representation of the environment is present by 2 years of age, and its emergence coincides temporally with the offset of infantile amnesia. However, the ability of children to distinguish and remember closely related spatial locations improves from 2 to 3.5 years of age, a developmental period marked by persistent deficits in long-term episodic memory known as childhood amnesia. These findings support the hypothesis that the differential maturation of distinct hippocampal circuits contributes to the emergence of specific memory processes during early childhood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early Development Standards for Children Aged 2 to 12 Months in a Low-Income Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhi U. W. P. Lokuketagoda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a screening tool to screen children for development problems in a low-income setting. Childhood development problems are a major health issue faced by low-income countries. A validated screening tool is needed for early identification of developmental delays. This article contains the first phase of a study that established a relatively simple tool to screen children for developmental problems. The aim of the first phase was to define a set of development indicators for the period of 2 to 12 months of life. The study methodology consisted of an extensive literature review, to develop a set of indicators to measure child development in infancy. The indicators were placed within a framework developed and used by experts in other countries. It consists of major domains, subdomains, specific aspects, and standards of development. This was followed by content validation of the indicators. Following review of literature, 171 indicators were compiled under the framework. At the end of content validation, 125 indicators were retained in the framework. These were pretested, and another 26 were removed following pretesting. The study developed a framework of indicators that could be used as a development tool following a reference-based validation. The second phase of the study that included the assessment of psychometric characteristics and reference-based validation would be published in a separate article.

  8. Healing with Incomplete Root Development After Forty Months Following: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Erkmen Almaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the concept of revascularization has been developed that employs the use of a mixture of antibacterial drugs for disinfection of infected root canals. The clinical and radiographic examinations showed deep coronal caries, immature root, and periapical radiolucency in mandibular second premolar (#35 of a 13-year-old girl. The exam findings suggested revascularization treatment. Revascularization with triantibiotic mix was administered for 2 weeks. Then, a blood clot was created in the canal, over which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. Coronal sealing was performed with composite resin. After 40 months follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic with a positive response to the pulp test and periapical radiolucency was healed. However, no evidence of root development was observed. In spite of numerous reports of revascularization treatment, no incomplete root development was reported after long-term follow-up. Despite incomplete root development, positive response to the pulp test is controversial.

  9. Research and development at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe - progress report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe progress report is the 1991 issue of the scientific reports the institution is bound to submitt each year according to para. 13.4 of its articles of partnership. The points of main effort which are discussed reflect the institution's R and D scheme. The summaries submitted by the different institutes and departments are compiled by the topics and fields they deal with. The report gives an account of the progress under each of the KfK R and D projects. This correlation facilitates comparisons between the targets and actual achievements and elucidates the general relation between the individual tasks which often are in the care of several institutes at a time. The departments and institutes and their respective tasks are introduced, and a comprehensive appendix is attached which lists the 1991 publications. (orig./UA) [de

  10. Effect of palmitoylethanolamide on visual field damage progression in normal tension glaucoma patients: results of an open-label six-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, Ciro; Romano, Mario R; dell'Omo, Roberto; Russo, Andrea; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Semeraro, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) oral administration on intraocular pressure (IOP) and visual field damage progression in normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients. Thirty-two consecutive patients affected by NTG were enrolled and randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive PEA treatment (group A) or no treatment (group B). Group A patients took ultramicronized 300 mg PEA tablets two times per day for six months. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), IOP, and visual field test were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the six-month follow-up. No significant differences in clinical parameters between the two groups were observed at baseline. At six months, group A patients showed significant IOP reduction (from 14.4±3.2 mm Hg to 11.1±4.3 mm Hg, p<0.01). No statistically significant changes were seen in BCVA in either group. Visual field parameters significantly diminished in patients receiving PEA compared to baseline values (-7.65±6.55 dB vs. -4.55±5.31 dB, p<0.001; 5.21±4.08 dB vs. 3.81±3.02 dB, p<0.02; mean deviation [MD] and pattern standard deviation [PSD] respectively), while no significant changes were seen in group B. A generalized linear model demonstrated that the final IOP, MD, and PSD was affected only by the systemic PEA treatment (p<0.01 each) and not affected by demographic or clinical characteristic between the groups. Hence, systemic administration of PEA reduces IOP and improves visual field indices in individuals affected by NTG. Neither ocular nor systemic side effects were recorded during the study period.

  11. Motor Development in 9-Month-Old Infants in Relation to Cultural Differences and Iron Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, Lauren; Liang, Weilang; Rodrigues, Onike; Shafir, Tal; Kaciroti, Niko; Jacobson, Sandra W.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    Motor development, which allows infants to explore their environment, promoting cognitive, social, and perceptual development, can be influenced by cultural practices and nutritional factors, such as iron deficiency. This study compared fine and gross motor development in 209 9-month-old infants from urban areas of China, Ghana, and USA (African-Americans) and considered effects of iron status. Iron deficiency anemia was most common in the Ghana sample (55%) followed by USA and China samples. Controlling for iron status, Ghanaian infants displayed precocity in gross motor development and most fine-motor reach-and-grasp tasks. US African-Americans performed the poorest in all tasks except bimanual coordination and the large ball. Controlling for cultural site, iron status showed linear trends for gross motor milestones and fine motor skills with small objects. Our findings add to the sparse literature on infant fine motor development across cultures. The results also indicate the need to consider nutritional factors when examining cultural differences in infant development. PMID:21298634

  12. Annual and monthly range fidelity of female boreal woodland caribou in respons to petroleum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyan V. Tracz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum-sector development in northern Alberta, Canada has been implicated as one factor influencing the decline of boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou. Previous research showed that caribou are farther from petroleum-sector disturbances within their home range than expected. As petroleum development increases, the distance caribou can selectively place themselves relative to industrial disturbance must decrease, because distances between disturbances decrease. Conceptually, the number of local disturbances becomes so large that caribou either abandon their local avoidance behaviour or leave their traditional home range. We evaluated whether an intense petroleum- development event in northern Alberta was sufficient to result in home range abandonment by female woodland caribou. Using well locations as an index of petroleum development, we found that caribou studied from 1992 to 2000 did not change their annual or monthly range fidelity as a function of development intensity. Caribou remained in peatland complexes containing a large number of petroleum-sector disturbances rather than move to new areas, presumably because the risks of dispersing across upland habitat to reach other suitable habitat are high. Such range fidelity may have fitness consequences for woodland caribou if they suffer greater predation in areas where petroleum development is occurring.

  13. Development of a monthly to seasonal forecast framework tailored to inland waterway transport in central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Meißner

    2017-12-01

    predictive limitations on longer lead times in central Europe, this study reveals the existence of a valuable predictability of streamflow on monthly up to seasonal timescales along the Rhine, upper Danube and Elbe waterways, and the Elbe achieves the highest skill and economic value. (3 The more physically based and the statistical approach are able to improve the predictive skills and economic value compared to climatology and the ESP approach. The specific forecast skill highly depends on the forecast location, the lead time and the season. (4 Currently, the statistical approach seems to be most skilful for the three waterways investigated. The lagged relationship between the monthly and/or seasonal streamflow and the climatic and/or oceanic variables vary between 1 month (e.g. local precipitation, temperature and soil moisture up to 6 months (e.g. sea surface temperature. Besides focusing on improving the forecast methodology, especially by combining the individual approaches, the focus is on developing useful forecast products on monthly to seasonal timescales for waterway transport and to operationalize the related forecasting service.

  14. Development of a monthly to seasonal forecast framework tailored to inland waterway transport in central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Dennis; Klein, Bastian; Ionita, Monica

    2017-12-01

    limitations on longer lead times in central Europe, this study reveals the existence of a valuable predictability of streamflow on monthly up to seasonal timescales along the Rhine, upper Danube and Elbe waterways, and the Elbe achieves the highest skill and economic value. (3) The more physically based and the statistical approach are able to improve the predictive skills and economic value compared to climatology and the ESP approach. The specific forecast skill highly depends on the forecast location, the lead time and the season. (4) Currently, the statistical approach seems to be most skilful for the three waterways investigated. The lagged relationship between the monthly and/or seasonal streamflow and the climatic and/or oceanic variables vary between 1 month (e.g. local precipitation, temperature and soil moisture) up to 6 months (e.g. sea surface temperature). Besides focusing on improving the forecast methodology, especially by combining the individual approaches, the focus is on developing useful forecast products on monthly to seasonal timescales for waterway transport and to operationalize the related forecasting service.

  15. Research Progress and Development of Sapphire Fiber Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guochang ZHAO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sapphire fiber thermometers have become a new potential option in the field of high-temperature measurements. Recent research progress of sapphire fiber sensors is summarized; operational principles, advantages, disadvantages, and applications of sapphire fiber sensors are introduced. Research has shown that sapphire fiber sensors can be used to accurately measure very high temperatures in harsh environments and has been widely applied in fields such as aviation, metallurgy, the chemical industry, energy, and other high temperature measurement areas. Sapphire optical fiber temperature measurement technology will move toward miniaturization, intelligence following the advances in materials, micro-fabrication and communication technologies.

  16. Prenatal head growth and child neuropsychological development at age 14 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álamo-Junquera, Dolores; Sunyer, Jordi; Iñiguez, Carmen; Ballester, Ferran; Garcia-Esteban, Raquel; Forns, Joan; Turner, Michelle C; Lertxundi, Aitana; Lertxundi, Nerea; Fernandez-Somoano, Ana; Rodriguez-Dehli, Cristina; Julvez, Jordi

    2015-05-01

    We sought to assess the association between prenatal head growth and child neuropsychological development in the general population. We evaluated 2104 children at the age of 14 months from a population-based birth cohort in Spain. Head circumference (HC) was measured by ultrasound examinations at weeks 12, 20, and 34 of gestation and by a nurse at birth. Head growth was assessed using conditional SD scores between weeks 12-20 and 20-34. Trained psychologists assessed neuropsychological functioning using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Head size measurements at birth were transformed into a 3-category variable: microcephalic (psychomotor scores. In particular, no associations were found between HC at birth and mental scores (coefficient, 0.04; 95% confidence interval, -0.02 to 0.09) and between interval head growth (20-34 weeks) and mental scores (0.31; 95% confidence interval, -0.36 to 0.99). Upon stratification by microcephalic, normocephalic, or macrocephalic head size, results were imprecise, although there were some significant associations in the microcephalic and macrocephalic groups. Adjustment by various child and maternal cofactors did not affect results. The minimum sample size required for present study was 883 patients (β=2, α=0.05, power=0.80). Overall prenatal and perinatal HC was not associated with 14-month-old neuropsychological development. Findings suggest HC growth during uterine life among healthy infants may not be an important marker of early-life neurodevelopment but may be marginally useful with specific populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a Coal Quality Expert. Technical progress report No. 6, [July 1--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-20

    This is the sixth Technical Progress Report, describing work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-FC22-90PC89663, ``Development of a Coal Quality Expert.`` The contract is a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy, CQ Inc., and Combustion Engineering, Inc. This report covers the period from July 1 through September 30, 1991. Four companies and seven host utilities have teamed with CQ Inc. and C-E to perform the work on this project. The work falls under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program category of ``Advanced Coal Cleaning.`` The 45-month project will provide the utility industry with a PC expert system to confidently and inexpensively evaluate the potential for coal cleaning, blending, and switching options to reduce emissions while producing lowest cost electricity. Specifically, this project will: Enhance the existing Coal Quality Information System (CQIS) database and Coal Quality Impact Model (CQIM) to allow confident assessment of the effects of cleaning on specific boiler cost and performance; and develop and validate a methodology, Coal Quality Expert (CQE) which allows accurate and detailed predictions of coal quality impacts on total power plant capital cost, operating cost, and performance based upon inputs from inexpensive bench-scale tests. The project consists of the following seven tasks: Project management; coal cleanability characterization; pilot-scale combustion testing; utility boiler field testing; CQIM completion and development of CQE specification; develop CQE and CQE workstation testing and Validation.

  18. Structural growth trajectories and rates of change in the first 3 months of infant brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Dominic; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Curran, Megan; Buchthal, Steven D; Alicata, Daniel; Skranes, Jon; Johansen, Heather; Hernandez, Antonette; Yamakawa, Robyn; Kuperman, Joshua M; Dale, Anders M

    2014-10-01

    The very early postnatal period witnesses extraordinary rates of growth, but structural brain development in this period has largely not been explored longitudinally. Such assessment may be key in detecting and treating the earliest signs of neurodevelopmental disorders. To assess structural growth trajectories and rates of change in the whole brain and regions of interest in infants during the first 3 months after birth. Serial structural T1-weighted and/or T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were obtained for 211 time points from 87 healthy term-born or term-equivalent preterm-born infants, aged 2 to 90 days, between October 5, 2007, and June 12, 2013. We segmented whole-brain and multiple subcortical regions of interest using a novel application of Bayesian-based methods. We modeled growth and rate of growth trajectories nonparametrically and assessed left-right asymmetries and sexual dimorphisms. Whole-brain volume at birth was approximately one-third of healthy elderly brain volume, and did not differ significantly between male and female infants (347 388 mm3 and 335 509 mm3, respectively, P = .12). The growth rate was approximately 1%/d, slowing to 0.4%/d by the end of the first 3 months, when the brain reached just more than half of elderly adult brain volume. Overall growth in the first 90 days was 64%. There was a significant age-by-sex effect leading to widening separation in brain sizes with age between male and female infants (with male infants growing faster than females by 200.4 mm3/d, SE = 67.2, P = .003). Longer gestation was associated with larger brain size (2215 mm3/d, SE = 284, P = 4×10-13). The expected brain size of an infant born one week earlier than average was 5% smaller than average; at 90 days it will not have caught up, being 2% smaller than average. The cerebellum grew at the highest rate, more than doubling in 90 days, and the hippocampus grew at the slowest rate, increasing by 47% in 90 days. There was left

  19. [Effect of family integrate care on the development of preterm infants at 18 months of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Gao, X Y; Xiang, X Y; Dai, H M; Yang, L; Shoo K, M Y; Hei, Mingyan

    2016-12-02

    Objective: To study the effect of family integrated care (FIC) in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the development of preterm infants at 18 months of age. Method: This is a prospective parallel case-control study. Infants in FIC group were preterm infants enrolled in previous FIC study with gestational age (GA) 28-35 weeks. Study period was from July 2015 to July 2016. Subjects were all enrolled from Department of Child Healthcare in the Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University. Infants in control group were gender, birth weight (BW), BW percentile and days of life (DOL) at follow-up matched (1∶1 ratio) preterm infants who did not enter FIC in NICU. The age at follow-up was 18 months. Study parameters were maternal education year, socioeconomic status (SES) by Graffar method, home observation for measurement of the environment (HOME), mental development index (MDI) and psychomotor development index (PDI) by mental and psychomotor Bayley scales of infant development (BSID). SPSS 20.0 of χ 2 test, t test, Pearson coefficient test and Spearman coefficient test were used for the statistical analysis. Result: Totally 67 infants were enrolled in each of FIC group and control group, with percentage of male gender 52% (35 infants) and 51% (34 infants), representatively. GA of FIC group and control group was (32.4±1.7) and (32.2±1.6) weeks, BW was (1 690±415) and (1 719±412) g. Weight at 18 months follow-up was (10±1) and (10±1) kg, maternal education year was (15±2) and (15±2) years, SES was (42±6) and (41±6) score, HOME was (31±5) and (32±5) score, representatively. There was no significant difference between FIC group and control group in the above parameters, making these 2 groups comparable. The MDI and PDI of FIC group were significantly higher than those of control group ((95±9) vs . (86±9), (87±9) vs . (80±8) score, t =5.506, 4.502, both P =0.000). The MDI and PDI of all groups were positively correlated to GA ( r =0.398 and 0

  20. Fuels Development Operation. Quarterly progress report, July, August, September, 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-10-15

    The present quarterly report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development Operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations.

  1. Regional infant brain development: an MRI-based morphometric analysis in 3 to 13 month olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Myong-Sun; Ortiz-Mantilla, Silvia; Makris, Nikos; Gregas, Matt; Bacic, Janine; Haehn, Daniel; Kennedy, David; Pienaar, Rudolph; Caviness, Verne S; Benasich, April A; Grant, P Ellen

    2013-09-01

    Elucidation of infant brain development is a critically important goal given the enduring impact of these early processes on various domains including later cognition and language. Although infants' whole-brain growth rates have long been available, regional growth rates have not been reported systematically. Accordingly, relatively less is known about the dynamics and organization of typically developing infant brains. Here we report global and regional volumetric growth of cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem with gender dimorphism, in 33 cross-sectional scans, over 3 to 13 months, using T1-weighted 3-dimensional spoiled gradient echo images and detailed semi-automated brain segmentation. Except for the midbrain and lateral ventricles, all absolute volumes of brain regions showed significant growth, with 6 different patterns of volumetric change. When normalized to the whole brain, the regional increase was characterized by 5 differential patterns. The putamen, cerebellar hemispheres, and total cerebellum were the only regions that showed positive growth in the normalized brain. Our results show region-specific patterns of volumetric change and contribute to the systematic understanding of infant brain development. This study greatly expands our knowledge of normal development and in future may provide a basis for identifying early deviation above and beyond normative variation that might signal higher risk for neurological disorders.

  2. Developing drugs for treatment of atopic dermatitis in children (≥3 months to industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, Elaine C; Jaworski, Jennifer C; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Paller, Amy; Hebert, Adelaide A; Simpson, Eric L; Altman, Emily; Arena, Charles; Blauvelt, Andrew; Block, Julie; Boguniewicz, Mark; Chen, Suephy; Cordoro, Kelly; Hanna, Diane; Horii, Kimberly; Hultsch, Thomas; Lee, James; Leung, Donald Y; Lio, Peter; Milner, Joshua; Omachi, Theodore; Schneider, Christine; Schneider, Lynda; Sidbury, Robert; Smith, Timothy; Sugarman, Jeffrey; Taha, Sharif; Tofte, Susan; Tollefson, Megha; Tom, Wynnis L; West, Dennis P; Whitney, Lucinda; Zane, Lee

    2018-03-30

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic skin disease, and it primarily affects children. Although atopic dermatitis (AD) has the highest effect on burden of skin disease, no high-level studies have defined optimal therapy for severe disease. Corticosteroids have been used to treat AD since the 1950s and remain the only systemic medication with Food and Drug Administration approval for this indication in children, despite published guidelines of care that recommend against this option. Several clinical trials with level 1 evidence have supported the use of topical treatments for mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in adults and children, but these trials have had little consistency in protocol design. Consensus recommendations will help standardize clinical development and trial design for children. The Food and Drug Administration issues guidance documents for industry as a source for "the Agency's current thinking on a particular subject." Although they are nonbinding, industry considers these documents to be the standard for clinical development and trial design. Our consensus group is the first to specifically address clinical trial design in this population. We developed a draft guidance document for industry, Developing Drugs for Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in Children (≥3 months to <18 years of age). This draft guidance has been submitted to the Food and Drug Administration based on a provision in the Federal Register (Good Guidance Practices). © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of progressive high-impact exercise on femoral neck structural strength in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis: a 12-month RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multanen, J; Rantalainen, T; Kautiainen, H; Ahola, R; Jämsä, T; Nieminen, M T; Lammentausta, E; Häkkinen, A; Kiviranta, I; Heinonen, A

    2017-04-01

    It is uncertain whether subjects with mild knee osteoarthritis, and who may be at risk of osteoporosis, can exercise safely with the aim of improving hip bone strength. This RCT showed that participating in a high-impact exercise program improved femoral neck strength without any detrimental effects on knee cartilage composition. No previous studies have examined whether high-impact exercise can improve bone strength and articular cartilage quality in subjects with mild knee osteoarthritis. In this 12-month RCT, we assessed the effects of progressive high-impact exercise on femoral neck structural strength and biochemical composition of knee cartilage in postmenopausal women. Eighty postmenopausal women with mild knee radiographic osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into the exercise (n = 40) or control (n = 40) group. Femoral neck structural strength was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The knee cartilage region exposed to exercise loading was measured by the quantitative MRI techniques of T2 mapping and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC). Also, an accelerometer-based body movement monitor was used to evaluate the total physical activity loading on the changes of femoral neck strength in all participants. Training effects on the outcome variables were estimated by the bootstrap analysis of covariance. A significant between-group difference in femoral neck bending strength in favor of the trainees was observed after the 12-month intervention (4.4%, p strength remained significant after adjusting for baseline value, age, height, and body mass (4.0%, p = 0.020). In all participants, the change in bending strength was associated with the total physical activity loading (r = 0.29, p = 0.012). The exercise participation had no effect on knee cartilage composition. The high-impact training increased femoral neck strength without having any harmful effect on knee cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis. These

  4. Development of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors from 15 to 77 Months: Stability of Two Distinct Subtypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uljarevic, Mirko; Arnott, Bronia; Carrington, Sarah J.; Meins, Elizabeth; Fernyhough, Charles; McConachie, Helen; Le Couteur, Ann; Leekam, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    A community sample of 192 parents reported on their children's restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) at mean ages 15 months (N = 138), 26 months (N = 191), and 77 months (N = 125) using the Repetitive Behavior Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2). Consistent with previous factor analytic research, 2 factors were found at each age: 1 comprising repetitive…

  5. Feeding behaviors and other motor development in healthy children (2-24 months).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Betty Ruth; Skinner, Jean D

    2002-04-01

    To monitor infant's gross, fine and oral motor development patterns related to feeding. An incomplete block design was used with 57 to 60 (sample = 98) mothers interviewed when their children were 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 and 24 months (within +/- 5 days of birth date). Each mother had 5 to 6 interviews. Selected developmental feeding behaviors were monitored using in-home interviews conducted by trained interviewers (n = 2). At each interview, mothers reported the child's age when behaviors first occurred, and anthropometric measurements were performed. Subjects were healthy white children who lived mostly in homes with educated two-parent families of upper socioeconomic status. Mean behavioral ages were within normal ranges reported in the literature, whereas individuals exhibited a wide diversity in reported ages. Examples of gross motor skills (age in months, +/- SD) included sitting without help (5.50+/-2.08) and crawling (8.00+/-1.55). Mean ages for self-feeding fine motor skills showed children reaching for a spoon when hungry (5.47+/-1.44), using fingers to rake food toward self (8.87+/-2.58) and using fingers to self-feed soft foods (13.52+/-2.83). Oral behaviors included children opening their mouth when food approached (4.46+/-1.37), eating food with tiny lumps (8.70+/-2.03) and chewing and swallowing firmer foods without choking (12.17+/-2.28). Mean ages for feeding behaviors occurred within expected age ranges associated with normal development. However, mothers reported that individual children exhibited a wide age range for achieving these behaviors. Our results should be considered in counseling mothers about infant feeding practices.

  6. Seasonal variations of neuromotor development by 14 months of age: Hamamatsu Birth Cohort for mothers and children (HBC Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji J Tsuchiya

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at investigating whether neuromotor development, from birth to 14 months of age, shows seasonal, cyclic patterns in association with months of birth. Study participants were 742 infants enrolled in the Hamamatsu Birth Cohort (HBC Study and followed-up from birth to the 14th month of age. Gross motor skills were assessed at the ages of 6, 10, and 14 months, using Mullen Scales of Early Learning. The score at each assessment was regressed onto a trigonometric function of months of birth, with an adjustment for potential confounders. Gross motor scores at the 6th and 10th months showed significant 1-year-cycle variations, peaking among March- and April-born infants, and among February-born infants, respectively. Changes in gross motor scores between the 10th and 14th months also showed a cyclic variation, peaking among July- and August-born infants. Due to this complementary effect, gross motor scores at the 14th month did not show seasonality. Neuromotor development showed cyclic seasonality during the first year of life. The effects brought about by month of birth disappeared around 1 year of age, and warmer months seemed to accelerate the neuromotor development.

  7. Progress made by the South African light metals development network

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Damm, O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Through focused investment by the CSIR, the South African Innovation Fund, the Automotive Industry Development Centre and the Department of Science and Technology over the past eight years, the national Light Metals Development Network has been...

  8. Chemistry research and development. Progress report, July 1977--May 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, F.J.

    1979-03-30

    Studies were continued to determine the compatibility of non-nuclear weapons metals with various production processing materials. The corrosion resistance of 304L stainless steel in mixed acid environment was tested. Intergranular corrosion tests were performed on welded 21-6-9 and 304L stainless steels. A laboratory scale fast fluidized bed incineration system was installed and operating techniques developed. A new uranium chip burning process is being developed. Component development, pilot plant development, and instrumentation and statistical systems development are briefly discussed.

  9. Chemistry research and development. Progress report, July 1977--May 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miner, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were continued to determine the compatibility of non-nuclear weapons metals with various production processing materials. The corrosion resistance of 304L stainless steel in mixed acid environment was tested. Intergranular corrosion tests were performed on welded 21-6-9 and 304L stainless steels. A laboratory scale fast fluidized bed incineration system was installed and operating techniques developed. A new uranium chip burning process is being developed. Component development, pilot plant development, and instrumentation and statistical systems development are briefly discussed

  10. A radiographic study of the development of the sheep carpus from birth to 18 months of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, A.S.; Bolbol, A.E.; Schenk-Saber, B.

    1989-01-01

    Osseous development of the carpus of six clinically normal lambs was studied radiographically from birth to 18 months of age with the aim of forming a standard radiographic evaluation and reference for the sheep carpus. Radiographic data consisted of 200 radiographs. Dorsopalmar and lateromedial projections were made daily during the first week, then weekly until the sixth month, and finally monthly until 18 month of age. Ten radiographs were selected to illustrate normal development of the carpus. The distal ulnar epiphysis reached the ulnar carpal bone at the third week, but remained separate from the ulnar diaphysis until six months of age. The ulnar epiphysis was radiographically fused with the ulnar diaphysis at thirteen months of age

  11. Technological progress and sustainable development. What about the rebound effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binswanger, M.

    2001-01-01

    Sustainability concepts that rest on the idea of resource- or energy-efficiency improvements due to technological progress tend to overestimate the potential saving effects because they frequently ignore the behavioral responses evoked by technological improvements. Efficiency improvements also affect the demand for resources and energy, and often an increase in efficiency by 1% will cause a reduction in resource use that is far below 1% or, sometimes, it can even cause an increase in resource use. This phenomenon is commonly labeled the rebound effect, which is well-known among energy economists, but never attracted much attention in ecological economics. The paper starts with the traditional neoclassical analysis of the rebound effect in a partial equilibrium framework that concentrates on the demand of one particular energy service such as mobility or room temperature. It also provides an overview of some of the main empirical studies based on this model that mostly confirm the existence of the rebound effect, but are controversial about its actual importance. However, we have to go beyond the neoclassical single-service model in order to take care of the variety of possible feedback affecting energy use. The paper presents two important expansions of the single-service model in order to show the potential relevance of the rebound effect to ecological economics. First, it is shown that in a multi-services model it proves to be difficult to make general statements about the relevance of the rebound effect. In this case, the overall effect of an increase in energy efficiency on total energy use depends on the on the assumptions about the substitutability between the services considered and the direction of the income effect. Second, the paper also tries to take care of the fact that changes in resource use or energy use are frequently just 'side-effects' of other forms of technological progress. Especially technological change of a time-saving nature can have a

  12. Progress report on nuclear technology developments in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear industry study in Canada has resulted in recognition of the need for strong support of the research and development programme and has established the basis for a restructuring that will enhance the industries effectiveness. The increased funding for research and development activities in support of advanced CANDU projects provides a base for both long-term development and the necessary underlying research. 13 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  13. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: October - December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1960-01-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  14. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: July - September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Wallace, W. P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1957-10-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  15. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: January - March 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1958-04-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  16. Individual Differences in Lexical Processing at 18 Months Predict Vocabulary Growth in Typically-Developing and Late-Talking Toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    Fernald, Anne; Marchman, Virginia A.

    2011-01-01

    Using online measures of familiar word recognition in the looking-while-listening procedure, this prospective longitudinal study revealed robust links between processing efficiency and vocabulary growth from 18 to 30 months in children classified as typically-developing (n = 46) and as “late talkers” (n = 36) at 18 months. Those late-talkers who were more efficient in word recognition at 18 months were also more likely to “bloom”, showing more accelerated vocabulary growth over the following ...

  17. Development of sarcoidosis 6-month post discontinuation of etanercept: coincidence or real association?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    There have been numerous reports of granulomatous diseases developing in patients receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Herein, we report a patient who developed sarcoidosis 6 months after discontinuation of etanercept. To date, all reported cases have occurred in patients undergoing ongoing treatment with TNF blockers with resolution on its discontinuation. A 47-year-old man was diagnosed with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2003. He was initially treated with methotrexate and corticosteroids. In 2005, adalimumab was added due to ongoing disease activity. However, he had persistent low-grade synovitis of bilateral wrist joints and remained oral glucocorticoids dependent. In October 2008, adalimumab was switched to etanercept with marginal benefit; however, etanercept was continued until March 2009. Rituximab was discontinued due to an immediate allergic reaction. In September 2009, he developed bilateral ankle synovitis with erythema nodosum. Further investigations (chest X-ray and CT scan of thorax) revealed new development of bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy and interstitial nodular changes typical of sarcoidosis. His baseline therapy of methotrexate was continued. His recent repeat chest X-ray and CT scan of thorax (March 2010) has shown significant spontaneous resolution of his mediastinal lymphadenopathy and pulmonary nodules. Apart from the initial brief course of NSAIDs, his sarcoidosis resolved spontaneously without requiring any further therapy. For his rheumatoid arthritis, he has been recently commenced on abatacept and his baseline therapy of methotrexate has been continued. It remains speculative as to whether the concurrence of RA and sarcoidosis is purely serendipitous, or is related to an immunodysregulatory state attributable to TNF blockade.

  18. Making Progress: A Case Study of Academic Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Naoko

    2013-01-01

    The processes by which unprepared freshmen are able to develop their academic literacy are overlooked by those in the academy. The author will describe a case study of the development of a student's academic literacy in the 1st 3 semesters of college. The information for this project was obtained through interviews with the student and her…

  19. Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry and Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess, Stella, Ed.; Thomas, Alexander, Ed.

    Selected studies of infant development concern biological rhythms, pattern preferences, sucking, and Negro-white comparisons. Sex, age, state, eye to eye contact, and human symbiosis are considered in mother-infant interaction. Included in pediatrics are child development and the relationship between pediatrics and psychiatry. Environmental…

  20. The Use of a Formative Assessment in Progressive Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ira H.; Goulet, Laurel; Martin, JennyMae K.; Owens, Jake

    2015-01-01

    As institutions continue to place value on developing leaders, it becomes increasingly important to effectively assess students' leadership skills. The development and subsequent use of a formative competency based leader assessment was used with (N = 124) sophomore students at a small military college in the Northeast United States with a mission…

  1. Fine Motor Development of Low Birth Weight Infants Corrected Aged 8 to 12 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Nazi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the fine motor development between Low Birth Weight (LBW infants and Normal Birth Weight infants (NBW at the age of 8-12 months by using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale-2 (PDMS-2 . Methods: This was a non experimental and cross sectional study which was conducted on the 18 LBW infants and 14 normal infants. By referring to the profile of infants in NICU of Aliasghar Hospital, those with defined inclusion criteria was recognized (case group. The normal weight infants, randomly selected from Health Center of that hospital, matched with case group for date of birth. After completing the questionnaire about demographic variables, their gross motor development was assessed with PDMS-2. Finally the scores of the motor quotient were analyzed by independent t-test statistical method. Results: There was a significant difference between Fine motor quotient of groups (P=0.007. Discussion: This study showed that LBW infants are significantly lower than normal weight infants in attaining Fine motor skills. It means that the LBW infants are more prone to developmental difficulties.

  2. Mapping mean annual and monthly river discharges: geostatistical developments for incorporating river network dependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauquet, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Regional hydrology is one topic that shows real improvement in partly due to new statistical development and computation facilities. Nevertheless theoretical difficulties for mapping river regime characteristics or recover these features at un gauged location remain because of the nature of the variable under study: river flows are related to a specific area that is defined by the drainage basin, are spatially organised by the river network with upstream-downstream dependencies. Estimations of hydrological descriptors are required for studying links with ecological processes at different spatial scale, from local site where biological or/and water quality data are available to large scale for sustainable development purposes. This presentation aims at describing a method for runoff pattern along the main river network. The approach dedicated to mean annual runoff is based on geostatistical interpolation procedures to which a constraint of water budget has been added. Expansion in Empirical Orthogonal Function has been considered in combination with kriging for interpolating mean monthly discharges. The methodologies are implemented within a Geographical Information System and illustrated by two study cases (two large basins in France). River flow regime descriptors are estimated for basins of more than 50km 2 . Opportunities of collaboration with a partition of France into hydro-eco regions derived from geology and climate considerations is discussed. (Author)

  3. Developing team leadership to facilitate guideline utilization: planning and evaluating a 3-month intervention strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Wendy; Davies, Barbara; Tourangeau, Ann; Lefebre, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Research describes leadership as important to guideline use. Yet interventions to develop current and future leaders for this purpose are not well understood. To describe the planning and evaluation of a leadership intervention to facilitate nurses' use of guideline recommendations for diabetic foot ulcers in home health care. Planning the intervention involved a synthesis of theory and research (qualitative interviews and chart audits). One workshop and three follow-up teleconferences were delivered at two sites to nurse managers and clinical leaders (n=15) responsible for 180 staff nurses. Evaluation involved workshop surveys and interviews. Highest rated intervention components (four-point scale) were: identification of target indicators (mean 3.7), and development of a team leadership action plan (mean 3.5). Pre-workshop barriers assessment rated lowest (mean 2.9). Three months later participants indicated their leadership performance had changed as a result of the intervention, being more engaged with staff and clear about implementation goals. Creating a team leadership action plan to operationalize leadership behaviours can help in delivery of evidence-informed care. Access to clinical data and understanding team leadership knowledge and skills prior to formal training will assist nursing management in tailoring intervention strategies to identify needs and gaps. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Accelerating Progress: A New Era of Research on Character Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Sarah; Bollinger, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Adolescent character development is a high priority for educators, policymakers, and front-line youth workers. To meet this growing demand, and as exemplified in the five articles in this special section, character development scholars are drawing from a range of academic disciplines to push beyond the traditional boundaries of the science of character development. These articles highlight important trends in character research, including the co-development of a subset of character strengths, the articulation of developmental trajectories of character, the use of advanced methodological approaches, and the implications for education. Studies such as these are critically important for establishing the research base that will be used to design the character development programs of tomorrow.

  5. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies (“differentiating competencies”) must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make comprehensive leadership development widely accessible to a greater number of potential health care leaders. This paper addresses the skills that health care leaders should develop, the optimal leadership

  6. Sexual development in a 21 month-old boy caused by testosterone contamination of a topical hydrocortisone cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoren, Britta M; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I

    2005-05-01

    Sexual development, including enlargement of the penis, growth acceleration, and growth of pubic hair without an increase in the size of his testes, occurred in a 21 month-old boy over a period of several months. The sexual development was caused by dermal exposure to a hydrocortisone cream, prescribed for eczema, which was contaminated by testosterone. After use of the cream was discontinued, sexual development ceased.

  7. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  8. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects' principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences

  9. Progress in development of the advanced Thomson scattering diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatae, T; Naito, O; Howard, J; Ebizuka, N; Yoshida, H; Nakatsuka, M; Fujita, H; Kajita, S; Narihara, K; Yamada, I; Funaba, H; Hirano, Y; Koguchi, H

    2010-01-01

    We have been studied the advanced Thomson scattering diagnostics from viewpoints of new concepts, laser technology and spectrum analysis. This paper summarizes results of development on technologies for advanced Thomson scattering diagnostics.

  10. Scintillating fiber detector development for the SSC: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchti, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    During the past year, considerable effort has been applied to the development of scintillating fiber detectors in several areas: new scintillation liquids and studies of their fluorescence properties; new fluorescent dyes based on non-intramolecular proton transfer; new dyes based on intramolecular proton transfer; incorporation of these new dyes in plastic (polystyrene) and liquid scintillation solutions; development of small cross section glass capillaries for the containment of liquid scintillators; studies of waveguide characteristics; studies of image intensifier phosphor screen characteristics; initial steps to form a collaboration to study and develop appropriate new properties of the Solid State Photomultiplier; construction of a new laboratory at Notre Dame to enhance our capabilities for further measurements and studies; and organization of and execution of a Workshop on Scintillating Fiber Detector Development for the SSC, held at Fermilab, November 14--16, 1988

  11. Progress on developing expert systems in waste management and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A.L.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of artificial intelligence (AI) represents a challenging opportunity in expanding the potential benefits from computer technology in waste management and disposal. The potential of this concept lies in facilitating the development of intelligent computer systems to help analysts, decision makers, and operators in waste and technology problem solving similar to the way that machines support the laborer. Because the knowledge of multiple human experts is an essential input in the many aspects of waste management and disposal, there are numerous opportunities for the development of expert systems using software products from AI. This paper presents systems analysis as an attractive framework for the development of intelligent computer systems of significance to waste management and disposal, and it provides an overview of limited prototype systems and the commercially available software used during prototype development activities

  12. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  13. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Progress report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  14. The Development of Siblings of Children with Autism at 4 and 14 Months: Social Engagement, Communication, and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yirmiya, Nurit; Gamliel, Ifat; Pilowsky, Tammy; Feldman, Ruth; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Sigman, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To compare siblings of children with autism (SIBS-A) and siblings of children with typical development (SIBS-TD) at 4 and 14 months of age. Methods: At 4 months, mother-infant interactional synchrony during free play, infant gaze and affect during the still-face paradigm, and infant responsiveness to a name-calling paradigm were examined (n…

  15. Development of a Coal Quality Expert. Final technical progress report No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-08

    This is the ninth Technical Progress Report, describing work performed under DOE Contract No. (DE-FC2290PC896631) ``Development of a Coal Quality Expert.`` The contract is a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy, CQ Inc., and ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. This report covers the period from April 1, through June 30, 1992. Four companies and seven host utilities have teamed with CQ Inc. and ABB/CE to perform the work on this project. The work falls under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program category of ``Advanced Coal Cleaning.`` The 45-month project will provide the utility industry with a PC expert system to confidently and inexpensively evaluate the potential for coal cleaning blending, and switching options to reduce emissions while producing lowest cost electricity. Specifically, this project will: (1) Enhance the existing Coal Quality Information System (CQIS) database and. Coal Quality Impact Model (CQIM) to allow confident assessment of the effects of cleaning on specific boiler cost and performance. (2) Develop and validate a methodology, Coal Quality Expert (CQE) which allows accurate and detailed predictions of coal quality impacts on total power plant capital cost, operating cost, and performance based upon inputs from inexpensive bench-scale tests.

  16. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  17. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  18. Development of an estimated food record for 9-36-month-old toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, A; Drossard, C; Kersting, M; Alexy, U

    2014-08-01

    Adequacy of dietary intake in the sensitive period of toddler development is a key determinant of health in a short- and long-term perspective. Therefore, studies focussing the nutrition of toddlers are of importance. For this purpose, tailored dietary record methods are an important prerequisite. The objective of this work is to develop a toddler-specific estimated food record (EFR) in a booklet providing photographs of age-specific foods and portion sizes that should be accurate and simple. For a toddler study in Germany, a 7-day consecutive EFR was developed. Data were obtained from a sample of toddlers in Germany. The basis is an evaluation of 3-day weighing food records on food choice and portion size of the DONALD (Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed) study for 227 toddlers (118 boys) aged 9-36 months from January 2004 to March 2008. In the analysed food records, a total of 15.147 eating occasions with 24.820 dishes were reported and grouped in 17 food groups. To estimate the portion size, the median consumption amounts of the 194 most frequently consumed dishes were calculated and photographed. Formula and commercial complementary food are collected separately. EFR was structured into seven eating occasions of the day: before breakfast, breakfast, mid-morning, lunch, mid-afternoon, dinner, and before bed. The EFR booklet provides a simple, feasible and validated instrument that can be used to update information on dietary habits during the transition from infant to childhood diet for families in different social classes.

  19. RotaTeq: Progress toward developing world access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goveia, Michelle G; Nelson, Christopher B; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-09-01

    Phase III studies of an oral, live, pentavalent, human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq; Merck) in developed countries have demonstrated that it is well tolerated with regard to intussusception and other adverse events and is efficacious in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis and associated healthcare encounters. However, it cannot be assumed that rotavirus vaccines will be equally efficacious in infants and young children in the developing world. Differences in host populations, associated health conditions, and the epidemiology of rotavirus disease could affect vaccine performance. Concern about the potential for differences in efficacy stems from studies of previous candidate rotavirus vaccines, including bovine and rhesus rotaviruses, which showed no or variable efficacy in developing regions. Given this history, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended that the efficacy of "new" rotavirus vaccines should be demonstrated in diverse geographic areas, including developing countries, before widespread implementation. Successful implementation of any rotavirus vaccine in the developing world requires additional clinical research and sharing of early introduction experiences. We discuss efforts to bring RotaTeq vaccine to the developing world. Critical steps to achieve this goal include the clinical evaluation of vaccine safety and efficacy in a multisite trial in Asia and Africa, evaluation of concomitant use with other pediatric vaccines routinely used, and vaccine assessment in special populations (premature, human immunodeficiency virus-infected, and malnourished infants). Completion of WHO prequalification of RotaTeq and affordability are also key requirements to routine vaccine introduction. The RotaTeq Partnership with the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health provides an example of the successful introduction of this vaccine into a developing world country.

  20. Biofuels feedstock development program. Annual progress report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Martin, S.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) leads the nation in the research, development, and demonstration of environmentally acceptable and commercially viable dedicated feedstock supply systems (DFSS). The purpose of this report is to highlight the status and accomplishments of the research that is currently being funded by the BFDP. Highlights summarized here and additional accomplishments are described in more detail in the sections associated with each major program task. A few key accomplishments include (1) development of a methodology for doing a cost-supply analysis for energy crops and the application of that methodology to looking at possible land use changes around a specific energy facility in East Tennessee; (2) preliminary documentation of the relationship between woody crop plantation locations and bird diversity at sites in the Midwest, Canada, and the pacific Northwest supplied indications that woody crop plantations could be beneficial to biodiversity; (3) the initiation of integrated switchgrass variety trials, breeding research, and biotechnology research for the south/southeast region; (4) development of a data base management system for documenting the results of herbaceous energy crop field trials; (5) publication of three issues of Energy Crops Forum and development of a readership of over 2,300 individuals or organizations as determined by positive responses on questionnaires.

  1. Progressive Development of Creative Design Skills from Kindergarden Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Yalcin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article offers an alternative view of design education, emphasising on its introduction in kindergarten and proposing a curriculum that covers design issues for introduction in kinder­gar­ten. This approach is suited to developing creative thinking skills. In an environ­ment where children imagine, create, practice, modify, recognise, manipulate and share knowl­edge, experiences and objects are crucial in design education. Early childhood education should be advanced based on basic design issues—such as design principles, conceptuali­zation, 2D/3D spatial allocation and composition—more comprehensively, which will enable children to construct perceptual, critical and analytic view points at an early age and develop these perspectives in the future. Based on this argument, the study model for design education in kindergarten, which will instil in children strong design knowledge, as well as stimulate their cognitive development

  2. Progress in the research and development of photonic structure devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Pham, Van Dai; Cham Tran, Thi; Trang Hoang, Thu; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we review the results of the research and development of photonic structure devices performed in the Institute of Materials Science in the period from 2010-2015. We have developed a configuration of 1D photonic crystal (PC) microcavities based on porous silicon (PS) layers and applied them to optical sensing devices that can be used for the determination of organic content with a very low concentration in different liquid environments. Various important scientific and technological applications of photonic devices such as the ultralow power operation of microcavity lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emissions and the manipulation of light amplification by combining the surface plasmonic effect and the microcavity are expected. We developed new kinds of photonic structures for optical filters based on guided-mode resonances in coupled slab waveguide gratings, which have great potential for application in fiber-optic communication and optical sensors.

  3. [Health and development in Brazil: progress and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira

    2012-12-01

    The structural sustainability of the Brazilian health system refers to the country's pattern of development according to how this pattern is expressed and reproduced in the Brazilian population. This derives not only from its social dimension, but also from the economic one, as it accounts for a significant part of the gross domestic product and of job creation, and produces a great impact on the generation of innovation and national competitiveness. The federal government has institutionalized the role of health in the national development agenda due to its strategic aspect. Despite this, the fragility of its productive base continues to be a major vulnerability for the National Health System and for Brazil's competitiveness in a global environment. This signals that the virtuous establishment of the relation between health and development involves the rupture of cognitive and political paradigms that separate, in an impermeable way, the economic from the social order.

  4. Superconducting magnet development program progress report, July 1974--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.; Harvey, A.R.; Nelson, R.L.; Taylor, C.E.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    During FY 1975, the superconducting magnet development program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory was primarily directed toward the development of multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn conductor for large CTR machines. It was secondarily concerned with preliminary work for the MX experiment and with the acquisition of additional testing facilities. Among the significant achievements was the construction and operation of a 27-cm-bore coil to its short-sample limit of 7-T at the windings. The coil was wound with a 100-m length of 67,507-filament Nb 3 Sn conductor

  5. Biofuels Feedstock Development Program annual progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1992-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the ongoing research funded in 1991 by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP). The BFDP is managed by the Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and encompasses the work formerly funded by the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. The combined program includes crop development research on both woody and herbaceous energy crop species, cross-cutting energy and environmental analysis and integration, and information management activities. Brief summaries of 26 different program activities are included in the report.

  6. Biofuels Feedstock Development Program annual progress report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1992-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the ongoing research funded in 1991 by the Department of Energy's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP). The BFDP is managed by the Environmental Sciences Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and encompasses the work formerly funded by the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. The combined program includes crop development research on both woody and herbaceous energy crop species, cross-cutting energy and environmental analysis and integration, and information management activities. Brief summaries of 26 different program activities are included in the report.

  7. Sonaravni razvoj (napredek in geografija = Sustainable development (progress and geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Plut

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent and intensity of different forms of degradation of geographical environment andits constituents prove the need for such economic development which will take account ofenvironmental features. In order to increase the environmental component of human welfare,only passively devised protection of geographical environment is not sufficient. Geographyof sustainable development both as an area of research and as a subject in the curriculum,lays emphasis on the significance of landscape features and on the processes of sustainablepattern of settling, economy, infrastructure and landscape use, as well adjusted as possible.

  8. Technical Progress and Development Directions of Oceanic Spatial Information Datum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAO Jingyang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly analyzes the basic development and technical situation of oceanic spatial information datum, reviews the main processes of oceanic vertical datum and correlative oceanic tidal study, such as improvement and perfect methods of determining tidal station vertical datum, realizing form of vertical datum controlled by tidal station, effect on maintaining vertical datum by long-term tidal station, oceanic tidal model establishing, and also construction and transformation of tidal datum, and then forecasts the key development directions of oceanic spatial information datum on high-accuracy marine position service, vertical datum and the transferring model refinement and spatial datum application.

  9. [New drug developments of snake venom polypeptides and progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sihai; Feng, Mei; Xiong, Yan

    2017-11-28

    The value of snake venom polypeptides in clinical application has drawn extensive attention, and the development of snake polypeptides into new drugs with anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, analgesic or antihypertensive properties has become the recent research hotspot. With the rapid development of molecular biology and biotechnology, the mechanisms of snake venom polypeptides are also gradually clarified. Numerous studies have demonstrated that snake venom polypeptides exert their pharmacological effects by regulating ion channels, cell proliferation, apoptosis, intracellular signaling pathway, and expression of cytokine as well as binding to relevant active sites or receptors.

  10. Tools for tracking progress. Indicators for sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Rogner, H.H.; Aslanian, G.

    2000-01-01

    A project on 'Indicators for Sustainable Energy Development (ISED)' was introduced by the IAEA as a part of its work programme on Comparative Assessment of Energy Sources for the biennium 1999-2000. It is being pursued by the Planning and Economic Studies Section of the Department of Nuclear Energy. The envisaged tasks are to: (1) identify the main components of sustainable energy development and derive a consistent set of appropriate indicators, keeping in view the indicators for Agenda 21, (2) establish relationship of ISED with those of the Agenda 21, and (3) review the Agency's databases and tools to determine the modifications required to apply the ISED. The first two tasks are being pursued with the help of experts from various international organizations and Member States. In this connection two expert group meetings were held, one in May 1999 and the other in November 1999. The following nine topics were identified as the key issues: social development; economic development; environmental congeniality and waste management; resource depletion; adequate provision of energy and disparities; energy efficiency; energy security; energy supply options; and energy pricing. A new conceptual framework model specifically tuned to the energy sector was developed, drawing upon work by other organizations in the environmental area. Within the framework of this conceptual model, two provisional lists of ISED - a full list and a core list - have been prepared. They cover indicators for the following energy related themes and sub-themes under the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable energy development: Economic dimension: Economic activity levels; End-use energy intensities of selected sectors and different manufacturing industries; energy supply efficiency; energy security; and energy pricing. Social dimension: Energy accessibility and disparities. Environmental dimension: Air pollution (urban air quality; global climate change concern); water

  11. Progress report on research and development in 1991, Institute of Reactor Development, KfK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Progress report on research and development in 1991 Institute of Reactor Development. The papers on nuclear fusion concentrate on the design and material selection for highly stressed components as well as on safety matters. Experiments with the thermomechanical behaviour of different material samples continued, with selected materials being put to a load of up to 10 000 cycles. Carbon fiber reinforced composite materials proved to be very stable as regards their form, and unproblematic from a thermomechanical viewpoint, even at high cycle numbers. The papers on handling techniques refer to specific requirements of nuclear fusion with applications at JET and NET, to the development of system solutions to be used in the classical industrial area, and to standardization accompanying the developments. The system for physical simulation of working scenes was refined and extended by models for the prototype of a testing device to be handled in the torus of a fusion machine. Control of the articulated boom has been further improved. Under the nuclear safety research project, studies have been made of the dynamic behaviour of fast reactors under incident conditions, of the possible propagation of local cooling incidents in the reactor core as well as of core monitoring. The further development of physical models and computer programs on the dynamic behaviour of fast sodium-cooled reactors has been supported by experimental results. (orig./DG) [de

  12. Progress in developing technologies to domesticate the cultivation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was also observed that shea tree populations on farms developed from natural regeneration had tree densities of 1,200 trees per hectare and begin to bear fruit within seven years of establishment. Keywords: Vitellaria paradoxa, shea trees, technologies, pollination. Agricultural and Food Science Journal of Ghana Vol.

  13. Language development: Progress and challenges in a multilingual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some such challenges discussed include issues like language selection for development, absence of clear language policy and the important issue of attitudes of respective language communities towards language research programmes. The article also looks at how the project and the institute have managed to make ...

  14. Development of mental health law in Iran: work in progress

    OpenAIRE

    Esfahani, Mehdi Nasr; Mirsepassi, Gholamreza; Atef-Vahid, Mohammad-Kazem

    2015-01-01

    A brief account of the three stages of development of a new mental health law in Iran is given. At each stage, the expert opinions of mental health professionals and lawyers interested in the rights of psychiatric patients were obtained. The final draft of the law consists of six sections and 50 articles. It has been submitted for ratification by Parliament.

  15. Development of mental health law in Iran: work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Mehdi Nasr; Mirsepassi, Gholamreza; Atef-Vahid, Mohammad-Kazem

    2015-08-01

    A brief account of the three stages of development of a new mental health law in Iran is given. At each stage, the expert opinions of mental health professionals and lawyers interested in the rights of psychiatric patients were obtained. The final draft of the law consists of six sections and 50 articles. It has been submitted for ratification by Parliament.

  16. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  17. Information the Invisible Hand of Development and Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Cornelia PETRACHE

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The economic, social, cultural evolution of the economic society it is based on the human´s being faculty of inventing and understanding different concepts and notions, on his spiritual activity, often materialized in goods. Beetwen the development of any kind of society and the creative activity of its members, the relation is direct proportional, being considered a real truth to say that nowadays the developed countries are considered to be that countries where the creativ and spiritual activity is appreciated, encouraged and protected in an efficient way. Economic development is acomplex phenomenon..... Within society, people are perceptive to a system of general rules that provides incentives and constraints for human behavior. Institutions’ and human action’s mutuality, and also its economic and political implications, explain the essential importance of institutions in economic science and the institutional approach viability. In this articol I proposed to make an analise of the importance of information and the higher dependens of the technological sistems of the developed countries. The role of this paper is to observ the neccesity of informations in every sector of economy, the modalities of spreading the informationes.

  18. Progress in nutrition related millennium development goals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Promulgation of Millennium Development Goals (MDG) in year 2000 gave hope to the world that common interests and challenges such as poverty and hunger, education, gender equality and women empowerment, child mortality and maternal health, diseases such as, HIV/AIDS, malaria, environmental sustainability, ...

  19. Evaluating the development of life and progress of heavy vehicles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of automotive products considering product lifecycle is considered as one of the automotive strategic key issues. In this article, Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is used to evaluate the lifetime of heavy vehicles. To do this research, subsystems of weighted Titan heavy vehicle and the position of desired ...

  20. Progress and perspectives on HIV-1 microbicide development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of HIV-1 infections occur via sexual intercourse. Women are the most affected by the epidemic, particularly in developing countries, due to their socio-economic dependence on men and the fact that they are often victims of gender based...

  1. Progress report on research and development activities 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    A review is given about the work performed at the named institute. This work concerns the development of the separation nozzle method and the particle injection at fusion experiments and in fusion reactors, as well as experiments with molecular beams. (HSI)

  2. Heterogeneous Contributing Factors in MPM Disease Development and Progression: Biological Advances and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolani, Bhairavi; Acevedo, Luis A.; Hoang, Ngoc T.; He, Biao

    2018-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors are remarkably aggressive and most patients only survive for 5–12 months; irrespective of stage; after primary symptoms appear. Compounding matters is that MPM remains unresponsive to conventional standards of care; including radiation and chemotherapy. Currently; instead of relying on molecular signatures and histological typing; MPM treatment options are guided by clinical stage and patient characteristics because the mechanism of carcinogenesis has not been fully elucidated; although about 80% of cases can be linked to asbestos exposure. Several molecular pathways have been implicated in the MPM tumor microenvironment; such as angiogenesis; apoptosis; cell-cycle regulation and several growth factor-related pathways predicted to be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Furthermore, the availability of genomic data has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of MPM. The MPM genomic landscape is dominated by inactivating mutations in several tumor suppressor genes; such as CDKN2A; BAP1 and NF2. Given the complex heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment in MPM; a better understanding of the interplay between stromal; endothelial and immune cells at the molecular level is required; to chaperone the development of improved personalized therapeutics. Many recent advances at the molecular level have been reported and several exciting new treatment options are under investigation. Here; we review the challenges and the most up-to-date biological advances in MPM pertaining to the molecular pathways implicated; progress at the genomic level; immunological progression of this fatal disease; and its link with developmental cell pathways; with an emphasis on prognostic and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:29342862

  3. With progress for some. Women and development in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, V

    1984-07-01

    The Committee on the Status of Women in India recognized early in its investigation that the anti-discrimination approach, reflected in laws and dependence on education, legal equality, and the franchise as major instruments for women's development, had failed to bring about a meaningful improvement in women's status. Significant processes of decline in women's status which had begun much earlier had continued unchecked after independence in 1947 and were actually accelerated by development planning. Demographic statistics which show a decline in the proportion of women in the Indian population, a declining female economic participation rate since the early 20th century, and a high rate of female migration caused by economic distress and declining employment opportunities, and rising number and proportion of women illiterates, provide evidence of the decline in women's status in India. A search for the reasons why earlier policy had failed led to realization that development aggravated the inequalities persisting within traditional roles. Women in the working sectorsof the population had traditionally played major roles in agriculture, industry, and services, but the official 5-Year Plans of the Indian government had totally ignored their contribution. Statutory laws which tried to ensure women's equality were modelled very often of the laws in industrialized societies and tended to ignore the uncoded customary laws that were closer to the realities of poor women's lives. The right of divorce, of remarriage after widowhood, and of a share of property, which were traditionally denied to elite women, were generally prevalent among the lower cases and tribes by custom, but the influence of elite culture has been eroding them for a long time. Statutory laws brought some relief to women of the elite, but not to the poor. Various working groups have identified strategies to reverse the economic marginalization of women, but acceptance of their recommendations has been

  4. Progress in developing ultrathin solar cell blanket technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.; Mesch, H. G.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1984-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop technologies for welding interconnects to three types of 50-micron-thick, 2 by 2-cm solar cells. Parallel-gap resistance welding was used for interconnect attachment. Weld schedules were independently developed for each of the three cell types and were coincidentally identical. Six 48-cell modules were assembled with 50-micron (nominal) thick cells, frosted fused-silica covers, silver-plated Invar interconnectors, and four different substrate designs. Three modules (one for each cell type) have single-layer Kapton (50-micron-thick) substrates. The other three modules each have a different substrate (Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton, Kapton-graphite-Kapton, and Kapton-graphite-aluminum honeycomb-graphite). All six modules were subjected to 4112 thermal cycles from -175 to 65 C (corresponding to over 40 years of simulated geosynchronous orbit thermal cycling) and experienced only negligible electrical degradation (1.1 percent average of six 48-cell modules).

  5. Optimizing spacecraft design - optimization engine development : progress and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Dunphy, Julia R; Salcedo, Jose; Menzies, Tim

    2003-01-01

    At JPL and NASA, a process has been developed to perform life cycle risk management. This process requires users to identify: goals and objectives to be achieved (and their relative priorities), the various risks to achieving those goals and objectives, and options for risk mitigation (prevention, detection ahead of time, and alleviation). Risks are broadly defined to include the risk of failing to design a system with adequate performance, compatibility and robustness in addition to more traditional implementation and operational risks. The options for mitigating these different kinds of risks can include architectural and design choices, technology plans and technology back-up options, test-bed and simulation options, engineering models and hardware/software development techniques and other more traditional risk reduction techniques.

  6. Recent progress on cathode development from Nagoya and KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, T.; Aoyagi, H.; Nakamura, S.; Okumi, S.; Suzuki, C.; Takahashi, C.; Tanimoto, Y.; Tawada, M.; Togawa, K.; Tsubata, M. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464 (Japan); Kurihara, Y.; Omori, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yoshioka, M. [KEK, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba 305 (Japan); Kato, T.; Saka, T. [New Research Laboratory, Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya 457 (Japan); Baba, T.; Mizuta, M. [Fundamental Research Laboratory, NEC Corp., Tsukuba 305 (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Recently the high electron spin polarization (ESP) photocathodes which have also high quantum efficiencies (QE) have been developed in Japan. These improvements were achieved using new techniques of a resonant absorption and a modulated doping, which are applied to a strained GaAs grown on GaAsP and an AlGaAs-GaAs superlattice, respectively. The former photocathode provides the QE of 1.0{percent} with the ESP of 85{percent} at the laser wavelength of 866 nm. The latter one does the QE of 0.5{percent} with the ESP of 71{percent} at 757 nm. Using a new type of strained-layer superlattice cathode, the ESP of 83{percent} which is higher than that of our previous superlattices was observed. The development of photocathodes not only with a high ESP but also with a high QE are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Triso coating development progress for uranium nitride kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolly, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lindemer, Terrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    In support of fully ceramic matrix (FCM) fuel development [1-2], coating development work is ongoing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to produce tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles with UN kernels [3]. The nitride kernels are used to increase fissile density in these SiC-matrix fuel pellets with details described elsewhere [4]. The advanced gas reactor (AGR) program at ORNL used fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) techniques for TRISO coating of UCO (two phase mixture of UO2 and UCx) kernels [5]. Similar techniques were employed for coating of the UN kernels, however significant changes in processing conditions were required to maintain acceptable coating properties due to physical property and dimensional differences between the UCO and UN kernels (Table 1).

  8. Progress and challenges towards the development of malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Kevin K A; Polley, Spencer D

    2007-01-01

    The promise afforded by attenuated sporozoite vaccines in the 1970s led many researchers to believe that an efficacious malaria vaccine was an attainable medium-term goal. Over 30 years later, no licensed vaccine is currently available for public health intervention. This is despite global expenditure on research and development for malaria vaccines that is estimated to have increased from $US42 million in 1999 to $US84 million in 2004. Serious questions must therefore be asked: is this a good investment of research and public health funds, and are we really any nearer to producing a viable product for global use?Proponents of a malaria vaccine promote this technology as a viable way to combat both the current economic and humanitarian burden of malaria and the decreasing efficacy of many front-line antimalaria drug therapies. The recent successful phase IIb trial of the RTS,S/AS02A vaccine showed that the production of a subunit vaccine with significant efficacy is technically possible. The combined efforts and financial commitment of researchers, pharmaceutical companies, and not-for-profit organizations, including the Malaria Vaccines Initiative, have resulted in a significant scaling up in the number of products suitable for testing in humans. In addition, new technologies, such as genetically attenuated vaccines and the exploitation of malaria genomes, offer exciting possibilities for vaccine development. There is now a real possibility of producing a malaria vaccine licensed for public health. However, this positive outlook must be tempered with the challenges facing vaccine development and distribution. The efficacy levels seen with RTS,S/AS02A are well below those of all vaccines currently in use for public health. Furthermore, poor preclinical and clinical predictors of efficacy, allele-specific immunity, and an imperfect understanding of natural and induced immunity to malaria may yet delay (or even prevent) the development of a vaccine suitable for

  9. Progress toward the development of universal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoft, Daniel F; Belshe, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Influenza remains a major problem causing significant morbidity and mortality annually and periodic pandemics with the potential for 10-100 fold increased mortality. Conventional vaccines can be highly effective if generated each year to match currently circulating viruses. Ongoing research focuses on producing cross-protective vaccines that induce T cell and/ or antibody responses specific for highly conserved viral epitopes. The Saint Louis University Center for Vaccine Development (SLUCVD) is highly engaged in multiple efforts to generate universally relevant influenza vaccines.

  10. Cascade Distillation Subsystem Development: Progress Toward a Distillation Comparison Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, M. R.; Lubman, A.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2009-01-01

    Recovery of potable water from wastewater is essential for the success of long-duration manned missions to the Moon and Mars. Honeywell International and a team from NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing a wastewater processing subsystem that is based on centrifugal vacuum distillation. The wastewater processor, referred to as the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS), utilizes an innovative and efficient multistage thermodynamic process to produce purified water. The rotary centrifugal design of the system also provides gas/liquid phase separation and liquid transport under microgravity conditions. A five-stage subsystem unit has been designed, built, delivered and integrated into the NASA JSC Advanced Water Recovery Systems Development Facility for performance testing. A major test objective of the project is to demonstrate the advancement of the CDS technology from the breadboard level to a subsystem level unit. An initial round of CDS performance testing was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2008. Based on FY08 testing, the system is now in development to support an Exploration Life Support (ELS) Project distillation comparison test expected to begin in early 2009. As part of the project objectives planned for FY09, the system will be reconfigured to support the ELS comparison test. The CDS will then be challenged with a series of human-gene-rated waste streams representative of those anticipated for a lunar outpost. This paper provides a description of the CDS technology, a status of the current project activities, and data on the system s performance to date.

  11. A process for developing and revising a learning progression on sea level rise using learners' explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert Christopher

    The purpose of this study was to explore the process of developing a learning progression (LP) on constructing explanations about sea level rise. I used a learning progressions theoretical framework informed by the situated cognition learning theory. During this exploration, I explicitly described my decision-making process as I developed and revised a hypothetical learning progression. Correspondingly, my research question was: What is a process by which a hypothetical learning progression on sea level rise is developed into an empirical learning progression using learners' explanations? To answer this question, I used a qualitative descriptive single case study with multiple embedded cases (Yin, 2014) that employed analytic induction (Denzin, 1970) to analyze data collected on middle school learners (grades 6-8). Data sources included written artifacts, classroom observations, and semi-structured interviews. Additionally, I kept a researcher journal to track my thinking about the learning progression throughout the research study. Using analytic induction to analyze collected data, I developed eight analytic concepts: participant explanation structures varied widely, global warming and ice melt cause sea level rise, participants held alternative conceptions about sea level rise, participants learned about thermal expansion as a fundamental aspect of sea level rise, participants learned to incorporate authentic scientific data, participants' mental models of the ocean varied widely, sea ice melt contributes to sea level rise, and participants held vague and alternative conceptions about how pollution impacts the ocean. I started with a hypothetical learning progression, gathered empirical data via various sources (especially semi-structured interviews), revised the hypothetical learning progression in response to those data, and ended with an empirical learning progression comprising six levels of learner thinking. As a result of developing an empirically based LP

  12. Progress toward sustainable development : 1998 sustainable development report of Shell Canada Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    The efforts made by Shell Canada Ltd. to continuously improve the overall environmental performance of their operations and products were reflected in this report. According to the report, in 1998 the company reached or bettered most of their targets, especially for energy conservation and emissions. They also made progress in implementing a health, safety and development management system. The report provides a detailed summary of how the company is managing for sustainability through: (1) regulatory compliance, (2) protecting air and water, (3) conserving energy, (4) protecting soil and groundwater, (5) managing waste, (6) emergency preparedness, (7) ensuring health and safety, (8) social responsibility, and (9) land use and habitat protection. The company's 1999 objectives and targets are also included. 22 figs

  13. Impact of month of birth on the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in the United Kingdom and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Alexander; Newby, Paul R; Carr-Smith, Jacqueline D

    2014-01-01

    /winter experience increased viral/bacterial exposure after birth, impacting upon immune system development and predisposing to AITD later in life. OBJECTIVE: Month of birth effects were investigated in three independent European Caucasian AITD datasets. DESIGN: Variation in GD and HT onset was compared across......: Our results suggest in UK/Northern European Caucasian GD subjects, month of birth does not impact on AITD development. Although some month of birth effects for HT females in one collection cannot be excluded, only further work in larger European Caucasian AITD collections can confirm these effects....

  14. Progress towards developing an international repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeme, M.

    2001-01-01

    Pangea Resources was established to develop and promote the concept of international repositories. The concept was based on repositories located in geologically stable, flat, arid environments meeting the 'high isolation' criteria developed by Pangea Resources. The high isolation concept of Pangea Resources can be applied in various regions of the world, and these have been made public. The pilot project chosen for exploring feasibility was for an international repository in Australia. This study was in preparation for public release, when the existence of the proposal was prematurely revealed to the media. The general media and public reaction to the concept was understandably negative. However, there were also some opinion pieces reported suggesting that the concept of an international repository should be thought about seriously, before it is accepted or rejected. In addition, thoughtful reactions were received from the business and scientific communities. In particular a group of very eminent scientists, the Scientific Review Group, undertook to review independently the quality of the work done. Nevertheless, the reaction from the state and federal governments, was also negative. The Australian Government stated its policy not to permit importation or disposal of foreign nuclear waste. During the last two years Pangea Resources has been developing the technical aspects of the concept and has produced and published several scientific reports on transport, storage and disposal of radioactive materials. All the scientific studies of Pangea Resources have been reviewed by the Scientific Review Group. The work has also been presented in scientific conferences, to the media (including a dedicated television documentary) and to the public. The technical work is generic or is based on diverse potential siting areas around the world and the disposal and storage technologies studied are being broadened beyond the specific high-isolation concept. Most importantly, it has

  15. CCD Development Progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Kolbe, W.F.; Holland, S.E.; Bebek, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    P-channel CCD imagers, 200-300um thick, fully depleted, and back-illuminat ed are being developed for scientific applications including ground- and space-based astronomy and x-ray detection. These thick devices have extended IR response, good point-spread function (PSF) and excellent radiation tolerance. Initially, these CCDs were made in-house at LBNL using 100 mm diameter wafers. Fabrication on high-resistivity 150 mm wafers is now proceeding according to a model in which the wafers are fir...

  16. Laser development for laser fusion applications research. Progress report, October 1977--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    Research progress is reported on three laser programs being developed for the commercialization of laser-fusion energy. The lasers include iodine, hydrogen fluoride and Group VI atoms (e.g., O, S, Se, Te). (TFD)

  17. Laser development for laser fusion applications research. Progress report, October 1977--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    Research progress is reported on three laser programs being developed for the commercialization of laser-fusion energy. The lasers include iodine, hydrogen fluoride and Group VI atoms (e.g., O, S, Se, Te)

  18. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  19. Progress report on fast breeder reactor development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The performance test on the reactor power increase to 75 MW was started on July 3, and the target of 75 MW was reached on July 16, in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. The tests on the heat transport characteristics, power coefficient, the response to the change of outlet temperature, the loss of external power supply and so on were carried out, and the performance test was finished on August 23, except the test of 75 MW continuous operation. The annual inspection of the systems is being carried out in parallel with the regular inspection. The design to prepare for the manufacture of the prototype fast reactor Monju is being prepared. The analysis of decay heat removal is being carried out, and various calculation codes were developed. The technological survey on overseas LMFBRs is being made. The conceptual design of the demonstration reactor is being prepared. The research and development of reactor physics, structural components for Joyo and Monju, instrumentation and control, sodium technology, fuel materials, structural materials, safety problems and steam generators are reported. The tests on the transient boiling of sodium, fuel failure propagation, heat transfer between molten materials, post-accident decay heat removal and so on have been carried out. (Kako, I.)

  20. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system testing and development progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, Melissa Van; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Kapernick, Rick; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems requires an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series, whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system, has demonstrated that realistic testing can be performed using non-nuclear methods. This test series, carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities, successfully completed a testing program with a 30 kWt core. Stirling engine, and ion engine configuration. Additionally, a 100 kWt core is in fabrication and appropriate test facilities are being reconfigured. This paper describes the current SAFE non-nuclear tests, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans

  1. INTERNAL COMMUNICATION, THE PROGRESS OF TECHNOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA ANDREI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development involves the broad public participation including the national, regional and local authorities, business and industry, civil society, all major groups – women, children and youth, all workers, trade unions and families. Not only organizations but also employees have a role to play in applying sustainable development in their jobs because their decisions taken every day have an environmental impact. Communication within organization is used as a means to coordinate information exchange and to establish effective coordination of activities between the members of organization. Internet, e-mail, mobile phones, satellite and wireless have had an effect on the way in which information is exchanged and on how people communicate not only in their day-to-day life but also within in the organizations they belong to. New communication technologies have increased the possibilities for a better access to information for employees and made possible to have their voices heard from their colleagues to superior levels, offering the possibility of a two-way communication and creating the potential for greater understanding and dialogue between them. Besides increasing profits, saving time and costs, the use of e-communication within organizations, offer the convenience of combating environmental damage through cutting back on paper and ink usage

  2. Progress towards developing neutron tolerant magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard; Rempe, Joy; Daw, Joshua; Kohse, Gordon; Carpenter, David; Ames, Michael; Ostrovsky, Yakov; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hualte; Wernsman, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Current generation light water reactors (LWRs), sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), small modular reactors (SMRs), and next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs) produce harsh environments in and near the reactor core that can severely tax material performance and limit component operational life. To address this issue, several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) research programs are evaluating the long duration irradiation performance of fuel and structural materials used in existing and new reactors. In order to maximize the amount of information obtained from Material Testing Reactor (MTR) irradiations, DOE is also funding development of enhanced instrumentation that will be able to obtain in-situ, real-time data on key material characteristics and properties, with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Such data are required to validate new multi-scale, multi-physics modeling tools under development as part of a science-based, engineering driven approach to reactor development. It is not feasible to obtain high resolution/microscale data with the current state of instrumentation technology. However, ultrasound-based sensors offer the ability to obtain such data if it is demonstrated that these sensors and their associated transducers are resistant to high neutron flux, high gamma radiation, and high temperature. To address this need, the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) is funding an irradiation, led by PSU, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor to test the survivability of ultrasound transducers. As part of this effort, PSU and collaborators have designed, fabricated, and provided piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are optimized to perform in harsh, high flux, environments. Four piezoelectric transducers were fabricated with either aluminum nitride, zinc oxide, or bismuth titanate as the active element that were coupled to either Kovar or aluminum waveguides and two

  3. Stuck and Frustrated or In Flow and Happy: Sensing Developers' Emotions and Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Sebastian; Fritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Software developers working on change tasks commonly experience a broad range of emotions, ranging from happiness all the way to frustration and anger. Research, primarily in psychology, has shown that for certain kinds of tasks, emotions correlate with progress and that biometric measures, such as electro-dermal activity and electroencephalography data, might be used to distinguish between emotions. In our research, we are building on this work and investigate developers' emotions, progress ...

  4. Role of autophagy in development and progression of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Shuli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is considered an autodigestive disorder in which inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells leads to the development of pancreatitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily preserved degradation process of cytoplasmic cellular constituents, and it is one of the early pathological processes in acute pancreatitis. Autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis, which mediates the key pathologic responses of this disease. Impaired autophagy, dysfunction of lysosomes, and dysregulation of autophagy suggest a disorder of the endolysosomal pathway in acute pancreatitis. The role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis is discussed from the aspects of autophagic process, autophagy and activation of trypsinogen, impaired autophagy and acute pancreatitis, and defective autophagy promoting inflammation.

  5. Progress in development of high capacity magnetic HTS bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummeth, P.; Nick, W.; Neumueller, H.-W.

    2005-01-01

    HTS magnetic bearings are inherently stable without an active feedback system. They provide low frictional losses, no wear and allow operation at high rotational speed without lubrication. So they are very promising for use in motors, generators and turbines. We designed and constructed an HTS radial bearing for use with a 400 kW HTS motor. It consists of alternating axially magnetized permanent magnet rings on the rotor and a segmented YBCO stator. Stator cooling is performed by liquid nitrogen, the temperature of the stator can be adjusted by varying the pressure in the cryogenic vessel. At 68 K maximum radial forces of more than 3.7 kN were found. These results range within the highest radial bearing capacities reported worldwide. The encouraging results lead us to develop a large heavy load HTS radial bearing. Currently a high magnetic gradient HTS bearing for a 4 MVA synchronous HTS generator is under construction

  6. Progress in Developing Virus-like Particle Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recombinant vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) or nanoparticles have been successful in their safety and efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. The technology of expressing enveloped VLP vaccines has combined with molecular engineering of proteins in membrane-anchor and immunogenic forms mimicking the native conformation of surface proteins on the enveloped viruses. This review summarizes recent developments in influenza VLP vaccines against seasonal, pandemic, and avian influenza viruses from the perspective of use in humans. The immunogenicity and efficacies of influenza VLP vaccine in the homologous and cross-protection were reviewed. Discussions include limitations of current influenza vaccination strategies and future directions to confer broadly cross protective new influenza vaccines as well as vaccination. PMID:27058302

  7. Progress in the Development of the TOP Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Picardi, L

    2004-01-01

    The TOP Linac (Oncological Therapy with Protons), under development by ENEA and ISS is a sequence of three pulsed (5 msec, 300 Hz) linear accelerators: a 7 MeV, 425 MHz RFQ+DTL (AccSys Model PL-7), a 7–65 MeV, 2998 MHz Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) and a 65–200 MeV, variable energy 2998 MHz Side Coupled Linac (SCL). The first SCDTL module is composed by 11 DTL tanks coupled by 10 side cavities. The tanks has modified to overcome vacuum leakage that occurred during brazing, and now the module has been completed, and is ready to be tested with protons. The 7 MeV injector has been recently installed in the ENEA Frascati laboratories for preliminary test, before being transferred to the main Oncologycal Hospital in Rome, Istituto Regina Elena.

  8. Progress and recent developments in sodium, metal chloride batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnakumar, B.V.; Attia, A.I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    A new class of rechargeable sodium batteries emerged in the last decade mainly due to the efforts in South Africa and the United Kingdom. These systems include solid transition metal chlorides in sodium tetrachloroaluminates as cathodes. Significant developments have been made on two systems, i.e., Na/NiCl 2 and Na/FeCl 2 ; high energy densities of the order of 130 Wh/Kg have been demonstrated at the cell level both with FeCl 2 and NiCl 2 cathodes. Long cycle life of over 2000 cycles was demonstrated with NiCl 2 , especially with a sulfur additive to the electrolyte to retain the sintered structure of the NiCl 2 electrode. Various environmental and safety tests have been successfully performed on the cells. Scale up efforts resulted in cells of 40 - 100 Ah, which were evaluated in an electric vehicle application. Additionally, it appears from a recent evaluation study carried out by European Space Agency on Na/NiCl 2 for GEO and LEO applications that energy densities of the order of 120 Wh/Kg and 100 Wh/Kg respectively at the cell level are feasible and long cycle lives (beyond 2800 cycles are possible). Several fundamental and developmental studies have been carried out at other laboratories aimed at understanding the reaction mechanisms, determining the kinetics and identifying various rate governing processes, and screening various other metal chlorides. Finally, the specific energies and especially the power densities projected for Na/FeCl 2 and Na/NiCl 2 systems based on alternate designs for beta alumina solid electrolyte, i.e., multiple tubes and flat plates are very attractive for electric vehicle and space applications. In this paper, the authors propose to present a detailed account of the developments made hither to as well as the key research issues being addressed in the sodium - metal chloride battery technology

  9. Progress in the active development of large optics for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, David Jon

    An international consortium consisting of the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Brazil, Chile and Argentina are planning to revolutionize the field of astronomy by building the two GEMINI 8m astronomical telescopes. These are designed to provide unprecedented image quality, which should significantly increase our knowledge and understanding of the structure and dynamics of the universe. To provide such superb image quality, the specifications of almost every aspect of the telescope are tighter than for any other ever built. The work described in this thesis is part of the ongoing research currently being undertaken in the Optical Science Laboratory into the production of large, highly aspheric optical surfaces. Meeting the design specifications for the GEMINI secondary mirrors is believed to be impossible using conventional craft techniques, but it is expected to be a tractable problem when utilizing the Active Lap technique described herein. The goal of the project is to demonstrate this technique by producing a 1/3 scale model of these mirrors. Broadly speaking, the Active Lap uses closed loop control of a system comprising of arrays of load cells and force actuators to control the ablation of the mirror in real time. This is a significant step forward in the field, and aims to propel conventional craft techniques which date back to the time of Sir Isaac Newton into the 21st century! A major contribution of the author to the Active Lap research project was the data acquisition and control software, which was designed to be ergonomic and make efficient use of cpu time. Other significant contributions involved calibration methods, system testing, and development of the closed loop control algorithms. In particular the novel idea of utilizing artificial neural networks to replace these algorithms is discussed. Finally, the performance of the Active Lap is evaluated, and suggestions are made for both the strategy for its future use, and the investigations

  10. Progress in hardware development for the SAFE heatpipe reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, P. J.; Sayre, E. D.; van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Advanced Methods & Materials Company (AMM) previously fabricated the stainless steel modules for the SAFE 30 system. These earlier modules consisting of five fuel pins surrounding a heat pipe, were brazed together using a tricusp insert in the gaps between tubes to ensure maximum braze coverage. It was decided that if possible the next generations of modules, both stainless steel and refractory alloy, would be diffusion bonded together using a Hot Issostatic Pressing (HIP) process. This process was very successfully used in producing the bonded rhenium Nb-lZr fuel cladding and the heat exchanger for the SP-100 Nuclear Space System Ref. 1 & 2. In addition AMM have since refined the technology enabling them to produce very high temperature rocket thrust chambers. Despite this background the complex geometry required for the SAFE module was quite challenging. It was necessary to develop a method which could be applied for both stainless steel and refractory alloy systems. In addition the interstices between tubes had to be completely filled with the tricusp insert to avoid causing distortion of the tube shape during HIPing and provide thermal conductivity from the fuel tubes to the heat pipes. Nevertheless it was considered worth the effort since Hot Isostatic Pressing, if successful, will produce an assembly with the heat pipe completely embedded within the module such that the diffusion bonded assembly has the thermal conduction and strength equivalent to a solid structure. .

  11. Herbaceous energy crop development: recent progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Emily A; Flavell, Richard B; Mascia, Peter N; Thomas, Steven R; Dohleman, Frank G; Long, Stephen P

    2008-06-01

    Oil prices and government mandates have catalyzed rapid growth of nonfossil transportation fuels in recent years, with a large focus on ethanol from energy crops, but the food crops used as first-generation energy crops today are not optimized for this purpose. We show that the theoretical efficiency of conversion of whole spectrum solar energy into biomass is 4.6-6%, depending on plant type, and the best year-long efficiencies realized are about 3%. The average leaf is as effective as the best PV solar cells in transducing solar energy to charge separation (ca. 37%). In photosynthesis, most of the energy that is lost is dissipated as heat during synthesis of biomass. Unlike photovoltaic (PV) cells this energetic cost supports the construction, maintenance, and replacement of the system, which is achieved autonomously as the plant grows and re-grows. Advances in plant genomics are being applied to plant breeding, thereby enabling rapid development of next-generation energy crops that capitalize on theoretical efficiencies while maintaining environmental and economic integrity.

  12. PROGRESS ON GENERIC PHASE-FIELD METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biner, Bullent; Tonks, Michael; Millett, Paul C.; Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Martinez, E.; Anderson, D.

    2012-09-26

    In this report, we summarize our current collobarative efforts, involving three national laboratories: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Los Alamos National Laboatory (LANL), to develop a computational framework for homogenous and heterogenous nucleation mechanisms into the generic phase-field model. During the studies, the Fe-Cr system was chosen as a model system due to its simplicity and availability of reliable thermodynamic and kinetic data, as well as the range of applications of low-chromium ferritic steels in nuclear reactors. For homogenous nucleation, the relavant parameters determined from atomistic studies were used directly to determine the energy functional and parameters in the phase-field model. Interfacial energy, critical nucleus size, nucleation rate, and coarsening kinetics were systematically examined in two- and three- dimensional models. For the heteregoneous nucleation mechanism, we studied the nucleation and growth behavior of chromium precipitates due to the presence of dislocations. The results demonstrate that both nucleation schemes can be introduced to a phase-field modeling algorithm with the desired accuracy and computational efficiency.

  13. Development of the international trade in wood fuels. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loenner, Goeran

    2000-04-01

    The imports of different biofuels have increased drastically over the last years on the expanding Swedish market. Apart from peat and refuse, imports cover wood fibre from clearcuts and forest industry and recycled wood from the rapidly expanding recycling industry in Central European countries. The objectives of this research project has been to analyse how the Swedish market for wood fuels has developed and interacted with the international market. The integration aspects have been difficult to cover due to the limited means of the project; a general data gathering and contact making have been prioritised. Knowledge has also been gathered to be used for an application for support for a new project within the EU fifth framework program. In 1997 some 6-8 TWh (21-29 PJ) of biofuels were imported, out of which 50-60% were wood fuels. There is a strong need for a continued analysis of how national policy instruments influence and interact with different markets. This becomes all the more important when facing an emerging European energy policy and the EU white paper on renewable energy

  14. Progress and promise for the MDMA drug development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduccia, Allison A; Holland, Julie; Mithoefer, Michael C

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacotherapy is often used to target symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but does not provide definitive treatment, and side effects of daily medication are often problematic. Trauma-focused psychotherapies are more likely than drug treatment to achieve PTSD remission, but have high dropout rates and ineffective for a large percentage of patients. Therefore, research into drugs that might increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy is a logical avenue of investigation. The most promising drug studied as a catalyst to psychotherapy for PTSD thus far is 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), commonly known as the recreational drug "Ecstasy." MDMA stimulates the release of hormones and neurochemicals that affect key brain areas for emotion and memory processing. A series of recently completed phase 2 clinical trials of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment of PTSD show favorable safety outcomes and large effect sizes that warrant expansion into multi-site phase 3 trials, set to commence in 2018. The nonprofit sponsor of the MDMA drug development program, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), is supporting these trials to explore whether MDMA, administered on only a few occasions, can increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Brain imaging techniques and animal models of fear extinction are elucidating neural mechanisms underlying the robust effects of MDMA on psychological processing; however, much remains to be learned about the complexities of MDMA effects as well as the complexities of PTSD itself.

  15. Progress towards Millennium Development Goals with women empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Chaturvedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women empowerment is a powerful determinant of their own, children’s and their families’ health. Perhaps, due to this fact, promotion of gender equality and empowering women was kept as one of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs.Objective: The present analysis was undertaken to study the effect of women empowerment on health of women, family planning and various health indicators of children.Methods: Available data from National Surveys in India, various research studies and evidences from published global studies were gathered and further analyzed.Results: Census 2011 (India have shown that states having higher women literacy, like Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra (75%, have better positive indicators of health than states like Rajasthan with 53 % literacy. NFHS -3 (India showed that empowered women had better access to maternal services (76 %, more use of contraception (66.6% and resultantly, had lower neonatal mortality (36%. As against this, for less empowered women, access to maternal services (72 % is low, lesser use of contraception (44% and relatively higher neonatal mortality (43%. A systematic analysis of 175 countries (Lancet, 2010 has established that increase in women education decreases under five child mortality.Conclusions: Investments in women’s employment, health and education, are correlated with a range of positive outcomes, including greater economic growth and children’s health and survival.

  16. Recent Progress in the Development of Diagnostic Tests for Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis D. Krampa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of malaria on global health has continually prompted the need to develop effective diagnostic strategies. In malaria endemic regions, routine diagnosis is hampered by technical and infrastructural challenges to laboratories. These laboratories lack standard facilities, expertise or diagnostic supplies; thus, therapy is administered based on clinical or self-diagnosis. There is the need for accurate diagnosis of malaria due to the continuous increase in the cost of medication, and the emergence and spread of drug resistant strains. However, the widely utilized Giemsa-stained microscopy and immunochromatographic tests for malaria are liable to several drawbacks, including inadequate sensitivity and false-positive outcomes. Alternative methods that offer improvements in performance are either expensive, have longer turnaround time or require a level of expertise that makes them unsuitable for point-of-care (POC applications. These gaps necessitate exploration of more efficient detection techniques with the potential of POC applications, especially in resource-limited settings. This minireview discusses some of the recent trends and new approaches that are seeking to improve the clinical diagnosis of malaria.

  17. Progress In Developing Laser Based Post Irradiation Examination Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James A.; Scott, Clark L.; Benefiel, Brad C.

    2016-09-01

    To be able to understand the performance of reactor fuels and materials, irradiated materials must be characterized effectively and efficiently in a high rad environment. The characterization work must be performed remotely and in an environment hostile to instrumentation. Laser based characterization techniques provide the ability to be remote and robust in a hot-cell environment. Laser based instrumentation also can provide high spatial resolution suitable for scanning and imaging large areas. The INL is currently developing three laser based Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) stations for the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at the INL. These laser based systems will characterize irradiated materials and fuels. The characterization systems are the following: Laser Shock Laser based ultrasonic C-scan system Gas Assay, Sample, and Recharge system (GASR, up-grade to an existing system). The laser shock technique will characterize material properties and failure loads/mechanisms in various materials such as LWR fuel, plate fuel, and next generation fuel forms, for PIE in high radiation areas. The laser shock-technique induces large amplitude shock waves to mechanically characterize interfaces such as the fuel-clad bond. The shock wave travels as a compression wave through the material to the free (unconfined) back surface and reflects back through the material under test as a rarefaction (tensile) wave. This rarefaction wave is the physical mechanism that produces internal de-lamination failure. As part of the laser shock system, a laser-based ultrasonic C-scan system will be used to detect and characterize debonding caused by the laser shock technique. The laser ultrasonic system will be fully capable of performing classical non-destructive evaluation testing and imaging functions such as microstructure characterization, flaw detection and dimensional metrology in complex components. The purpose of the GASR is to measure the pressure/volume of the plenum of an

  18. Progress in Development of Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay L.; White, Victor E.; Maurer, Joshua A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2008-01-01

    Further improvements have recently been made in the development of the devices described in Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors (NPO-30710), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 30. As discussed in more detail in that article, these sensors offer advantages of greater stability, greater lifetime, and individual electrical addressability, relative to prior ion-channel biosensors. In order to give meaning to a brief description of the recent improvements, it is necessary to recapitulate a substantial portion of the text of the cited previous article. The figure depicts one sensor that incorporates the recent improvements, and can be helpful in understanding the recapitulated text, which follows: These sensors are microfabricated from silicon and other materials compatible with silicon. Typically, the sensors are fabricated in arrays in silicon wafers on glass plates. Each sensor in the array can be individually electrically addressed, without interference with its neighbors. Each sensor includes a well covered by a thin layer of silicon nitride, in which is made a pinhole for the formation of a lipid bilayer membrane. In one stage of fabrication, the lower half of the well is filled with agarose, which is allowed to harden. Then the upper half of the well is filled with a liquid electrolyte (which thereafter remains liquid) and a lipid bilayer is painted over the pinhole. The liquid contains a protein that forms an ion channel on top of the hardened agarose. The combination of enclosure in the well and support by the hardened agarose provides the stability needed to keep the membrane functional for times as long as days or even weeks. An electrode above the well, another electrode below the well, and all the materials between the electrodes together constitute a capacitor. What is measured is the capacitive transient current in response to an applied voltage pulse. One notable feature of this sensor, in comparison with prior such sensors, is a

  19. Incidence of infection in 39-month-old ewes with TMEM154 diplotypes "1 1," "1 3," and "3 3" after natural exposure to ovine progressive pneumonia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production and well-being of sheep and goats in many countries are harmfully impacted by small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) that cause incurable, progressive diseases. Susceptibility to ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV), the North American form of SRLV, is influenced by variants of the ovine...

  20. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-06-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

  1. Developing reservoir monthly inflow forecasts using artificial intelligence and climate phenomenon information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiantian; Asanjan, Ata Akbari; Welles, Edwin; Gao, Xiaogang; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Liu, Xiaomang

    2017-04-01

    Reservoirs are fundamental human-built infrastructures that collect, store, and deliver fresh surface water in a timely manner for many purposes. Efficient reservoir operation requires policy makers and operators to understand how reservoir inflows are changing under different hydrological and climatic conditions to enable forecast-informed operations. Over the last decade, the uses of Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining [AI & DM] techniques in assisting reservoir streamflow subseasonal to seasonal forecasts have been increasing. In this study, Random Forest [RF), Artificial Neural Network (ANN), and Support Vector Regression (SVR) are employed and compared with respect to their capabilities for predicting 1 month-ahead reservoir inflows for two headwater reservoirs in USA and China. Both current and lagged hydrological information and 17 known climate phenomenon indices, i.e., PDO and ENSO, etc., are selected as predictors for simulating reservoir inflows. Results show (1) three methods are capable of providing monthly reservoir inflows with satisfactory statistics; (2) the results obtained by Random Forest have the best statistical performances compared with the other two methods; (3) another advantage of Random Forest algorithm is its capability of interpreting raw model inputs; (4) climate phenomenon indices are useful in assisting monthly or seasonal forecasts of reservoir inflow; and (5) different climate conditions are autocorrelated with up to several months, and the climatic information and their lags are cross correlated with local hydrological conditions in our case studies.

  2. Behaviour and development in 24-month-old moderately preterm toddlers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marjanneke; Verhoeven, Marjolein; Lasham, Carole A.; Meijssen, Clemens B.; van Baar, Anneloes L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Moderately preterm children (gestational age 32-36+6 weeks) are at risk of cognitive and behaviour problems at school age. The aim of this study was to investigate if these problems are already present at the age of 2 years. STUDY DESIGN: Developmental outcome was assessed at 24-months

  3. Mediating Pathways in the Socio-Economic Gradient of Child Development: Evidence from Children 6-42 Months in Bogota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Grantham-McGregor, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Research has previously shown a gap of near 0.5 of a standard deviation (SD) in cognition and language development between the top and bottom household wealth quartile in children aged 6-42 months in a large representative sample of low- and middle-income families in Bogota, using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development. The gaps in…

  4. Trials at Sea: Successful Implementation of a Unique Two-Month Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, L. W.; Orcutt, B. N.; Fisher, A. T.; Tsuji, T.; Petronotis, K. E.; Iodp Expedition 327 Participants

    2010-12-01

    During the summer of 2010, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 327 conducted coring and observatory installations on the Juan de Fuca Plate to characterize the hydrogeology of ridge-flank ocean crust. Due to the nature of the expedition, a smaller science party than usual was needed. IODP took this opportunity to expand education, outreach, and communication (EOC) activities with a previously untested model. Up to now, the IODP U.S. Implementing Organization had sailed either individual teachers on regular (2-month long) expeditions or groups of teachers and informal educators during short (2-week long) transits (School of Rock workshops). After two shipboard (Expeditions 312 and 321T) and two shore-based (Gulf Coast Repository) programs, we have recognized that sailing a group of educators is a beneficial model for IODP and the participants. What has been unavoidable is that these workshops took place outside typical expedition activities. Expedition 327 provided a unique opportunity to sail a diverse group of outreach officers on a regular expedition with a full range of scientific activities. The group included individuals with a wide variety of skills and backgrounds. US participants included a late-career high school physics teacher, a visualization graduate student, an undergraduate engineering student from an historically black university, and an artist. French participants included two middle and high school earth and life science teachers. This diversity made the group more dynamic but it also posed a challenge. Numerous scientific and technical staff also participated in EOC activity design and leadership, including development of dedicated web sites and blogs. After a seminar on constructivist and inquiry-based methods, we spent the first few weeks investigating earth science concepts so EOC participants could gain a basic understanding of the regional geology and the scientific objectives of the expedition. Close to the beginning of the

  5. Development of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0016 TITLE: Development of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic...of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0016 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...risk taking behavior. Taken with the behavior of the 2x and 1x injured mice, the 4x group may be displaying depressive like behavior rather than a

  6. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-04-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  7. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  8. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  9. Developing ''SMART'' Equipment and Systems through Collaborative NERI Research and Development: A First Year of Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, Daryl L.; Golay, Michael W.; Chapman, Leon D.; Maynard, Kennet P.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) created the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) in 1999 to conduct research and development with the objectives of: (1) overcoming the principal technical obstacles to expanded nuclear energy use, (2) advancing the state of nuclear technology to maintain its competitive position in domestic and world markets, and (3) improving the performance, efficiency, reliability, and economics of nuclear energy. The NERI program is now beginning its second year with increased funding and an emphasis on international participation. Among the programs selected for funding was the ''Smart Equipment and Systems to Improve Reliability and Safety in Future Nuclear Power Plant Operations''. This program is a 36 month collaborative effort bringing together the technical capabilities of Westinghouse Nuclear Automation, Sandia National Laboratories, Duke Engineering and Services (DE and S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The goal of the program is to design, develop, and evaluate an integrated set of tools and methodologies that can improve the reliability and safety of advanced nuclear power plants through the introduction of smart equipment and predictive maintenance technology. The results have implications for reduced construction costs. This paper discusses: (1) the goals and significance of the program, (2) the significant achievements of the program's first year and the current direction for its continuing efforts and (3) potential cooperation with the domestic nuclear and component manufacturing industries, and with international organizations

  10. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum. Part II. Outcomes for New Graduate Nurses 12 Months Post-Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Navarro, Justine; Jancar, Sonya; Canizares, Genevieve

    2015-11-28

    New graduate nurses' (NGNs) transition into the nursing workforce is characterized as stressful and challenging. Consequently, a high percentage of them leave their first place of employment or the profession entirely within one year of graduation. Nursing literature describes this complicated shift from student to registered nurse, however, limited attention has focused on strategies that could be implemented during students' academic programs to prepare them for this difficult transition period. Therefore, a longitudinal intervention study was conducted to examine the influence of a career planning and development (CPD) program on the development of career resilience in baccalaureate nursing students and at 12 months post-graduation (NGN). The findings support including structured and progressive curriculum-based CPD opportunities in academic programs, not only for the positive outcomes that accrue to students, but also because of the benefits they extend to NGNs as they make the transition to their first professional nursing role.

  11. Brominated flame retardants in breast milk and behavioural and cognitive development at 36 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgent, Margaret A; Hoffman, Kate; Goldman, Barbara Davis; Sjödin, Andreas; Daniels, Julie L

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent flame retardants found in the environment, in household dust, and in humans. Breast feeding is a prominent route of exposure in infancy. PBDEs adversely affect neurodevelopment in animals. Here, we estimate associations between PBDEs in breast milk and behaviour and cognitive skills in children at 36 months of age. We prospectively studied 304 mothers and their children. We measured PBDEs in breast milk collected at 3 months postpartum. At 36 months, we measured child behaviour with the parent-rated Behavioral Assessment System for Children 2 (n = 192), and cognitive skills with the Mullen Scales of Early Learning (n = 184). We analysed data with robust regression. We detected BDE-28, -47, -99, -100, and -153 in >70% of milk samples. For each congener, the highest quartile of breast milk PBDE concentration, vs. the lowest, was associated with more anxious behaviour, after confounder adjustment. Select congeners were associated with increased withdrawal (BDE-28) and improved activity of daily living skills (BDE-153). Cognitive skills tended to be positively associated with PBDEs, especially language and fine motor skills. However, most estimates were imprecise. Here, lactational PBDE exposure was modestly and imprecisely associated with anxiety and withdrawal, but was also associated with improved adaptive and cognitive skills. Positive factors associated with breast feeding may have mitigated some of the hypothesised adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with PBDEs. Further research is needed to inform our understanding of PBDE neurotoxicity and how sources of exposure might confound neurodevelopmental studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. From early stress to 12-month development in very preterm infants: Preliminary findings on epigenetic mechanisms and brain growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Monica; Provenzi, Livio; De Carli, Pietro; Dessimone, Francesca; Sirgiovanni, Ida; Giorda, Roberto; Cinnante, Claudia; Squarcina, Letizia; Pozzoli, Uberto; Triulzi, Fabio; Brambilla, Paolo; Borgatti, Renato; Mosca, Fabio; Montirosso, Rosario

    2018-01-01

    Very preterm (VPT) infants admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are at risk for altered brain growth and less-than-optimal socio-emotional development. Recent research suggests that early NICU-related stress contributes to socio-emotional impairments in VPT infants at 3 months through epigenetic regulation (i.e., DNA methylation) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4). In the present longitudinal study we assessed: (a) the effects of NICU-related stress and SLC6A4 methylation variations from birth to discharge on brain development at term equivalent age (TEA); (b) the association between brain volume at TEA and socio-emotional development (i.e., Personal-Social scale of Griffith Mental Development Scales, GMDS) at 12 months corrected age (CA). Twenty-four infants had complete data at 12-month-age. SLC6A4 methylation was measured at a specific CpG previously associated with NICU-related stress and socio-emotional stress. Findings confirmed that higher NICU-related stress associated with greater increase of SLC6A4 methylation at NICU discharge. Moreover, higher SLC6A4 discharge methylation was associated with reduced anterior temporal lobe (ATL) volume at TEA, which in turn was significantly associated with less-than-optimal GMDS Personal-Social scale score at 12 months CA. The reduced ATL volume at TEA mediated the pathway linking stress-related increase in SLC6A4 methylation at NICU discharge and socio-emotional development at 12 months CA. These findings suggest that early adversity-related epigenetic changes might contribute to the long-lasting programming of socio-emotional development in VPT infants through epigenetic regulation and structural modifications of the developing brain.

  13. Dietary iron intake in the first 4 months of infancy and the development of type 1 diabetes: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ambika P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To investigate the impact of iron intake on the development of type 1 diabetes (T1DM. Methods Case-control study with self-administered questionnaire among families of children with T1DM who were less than 10 years old at the time of the survey and developed diabetes between age 1 and 6 years. Data on the types of infant feeding in the first 4 months of life was collected from parents of children with T1DM (n = 128 and controls (n = 67 Results The median (min, max total iron intake in the first 4 months of life was 1159 (50, 2399 mg in T1DM cases and 466 (50, 1224 mg among controls (P Conclusion In this pilot study, high iron intake in the first 4 months of infancy is associated with T1DM. Whether iron intake is causal or a marker of another risk factor warrants further investigation.

  14. Role of hepatitis B virus X protein in development and progression of primary liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIAO Kai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV X protein (HBx is a multifunctional protein encoded by HBV X gene. It plays a regulatory role in gene transcription, cell signal transduction, cell proliferation and transformation, cell cycle, and cell apoptosis. Currently, HBx is considered to play an important role in the development and progression of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The relationship of HBx with oncogene, antioncogene, cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, invasion and metastasis of liver cancer, and liver cancer stem cells is presented, and the role of HBx in the development and progression of HCC is reviewed.

  15. Pragmatic Language Development in 18- to 47-Month-Old Italian Children: A Study with the Language Use Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, Emiddia; Lonigro, Antonia; Laghi, Fiorenzo; O'Neill, Daniela K.

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate pragmatic development and the ability to make comments/questions on social and non-social topics in Italian-speaking children aged 18-47 months. Parents of 190 children completed an adaptation of the Language Use Inventory into Italian. Overall, the children's performance on the subscales of the LUI-Italian…

  16. Predicting the 6-month risk of severe hypoglycemia among adults with diabetes: Development and external validation of a prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Emily B; Xu, Stan; Goodrich, Glenn K; Nichols, Gregory A; O'Connor, Patrick J; Steiner, John F

    2017-07-01

    To develop and externally validate a prediction model for the 6-month risk of a severe hypoglycemic event among individuals with pharmacologically treated diabetes. The development cohort consisted of 31,674 Kaiser Permanente Colorado members with pharmacologically treated diabetes (2007-2015). The validation cohorts consisted of 38,764 Kaiser Permanente Northwest members and 12,035 HealthPartners members. Variables were chosen that would be available in electronic health records. We developed 16-variable and 6-variable models, using a Cox counting model process that allows for the inclusion of multiple 6-month observation periods per person. Across the three cohorts, there were 850,992 6-month observation periods, and 10,448 periods with at least one severe hypoglycemic event. The six-variable model contained age, diabetes type, HgbA1c, eGFR, history of a hypoglycemic event in the prior year, and insulin use. Both prediction models performed well, with good calibration and c-statistics of 0.84 and 0.81 for the 16-variable and 6-variable models, respectively. In the external validation cohorts, the c-statistics were 0.80-0.84. We developed and validated two prediction models for predicting the 6-month risk of hypoglycemia. The 16-variable model had slightly better performance than the 6-variable model, but in some practice settings, use of the simpler model may be preferred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Maternal Stress and Young Children's Behavioural Development: A Prospective Pilot Study from 8 to 36 Months in a Finnish Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapsamo, Helena; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel A.; Kuusikko-Gauffin, Sanna; Ebeling, Hanna; Larinen, Katja; Soini, Hannu; Moilanen, Irma

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between maternal parenting stress and infant/toddler behavioural development was examined in a longitudinal pilot study. Fifty mothers reported parenting stress via the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form when their infants were eight months old. Parents subsequently rated their children's emotional and behavioural problems with the…

  18. Psychosocial intervention for family caregivers of people with dementia reduces caregiver's burden: development and effect after 6 and 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signe, Andrén; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2008-03-01

    A number of different intervention programmes have been described in the literature for caregivers of people with dementia, but the nature of intervention has varied widely. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of psychosocial intervention on family caregiver's level of burden and satisfaction, and possible influence of the caregiver's relationship and health and the patient's severity of the disease on the effects of intervention. All persons, 70 years and older, from two districts of a municipality (2721 individuals) who were in receipt of any form of social services were invited to participate in a screening of cognitive decline, and 1656 home visits were made. Those with symptoms of cognitive decline, and having a family caregiver, were invited for a further medical examination. Data were analysed from 308 family caregivers: 153 caregivers who underwent intervention and 155 control caregivers who did not. Repeated measures were carried out 6 and 12 months later. Outcomes were measured using instruments that had been tested for reliability and validity, and all patients were diagnosed according to DSM-IV dementia criteria. Caregivers who underwent the psychosocial intervention (5-week programme and 3-month conversation group) reported significantly lower strain and disappointment after 6 months, and this trend remained after 12 months. Satisfaction, measured in terms of purpose, increased in the intervention group and decreased in the control group. The best effect on caregivers in the intervention group was found early in the progression of dementia and in caregivers with impaired health. These findings emphasize the importance of identifying family caregivers early in the caring process to optimize well-being. This study demonstrates that psychosocial intervention with a clearly defined aim that includes giving information and having a conversation group have significant, positive effects on burden and satisfaction for caregivers of people

  19. Maternal HIV-1 disease progression 18-24 months postdelivery according to antiretroviral prophylaxis regimen (triple-antiretroviral prophylaxis during pregnancy and breastfeeding vs zidovudine/single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis): The Kesho Bora randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis effectively reduces mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). However, it is unclear whether stopping ARVs after breastfeeding cessation affects maternal HIV disease progression. We assessed 18-24-month postpartum disease progression risk among women in a randomized trial assessing efficacy and safety of prophylactic maternal ARVs. From 2005 to 2008, HIV-infected pregnant women with CD4(+) counts of 200-500/mm(3) were randomized to receive either triple ARV (zidovudine, lamivudine, and lopinavir/ritonavir during pregnancy and breastfeeding) or AZT/sdNVP (zidovudine until delivery with single-dose nevirapine without postpartum prophylaxis). Maternal disease progression was defined as the combined endpoint of death, World Health Organization clinical stage 4 disease, or CD4(+) counts of prolonged triple ARV prophylaxis had no effect on HIV progression following cessation (compared with AZT/sdNVP). However, women on triple ARV prophylaxis had lower progression risk during the time on triple ARV. Given the high rate of progression among women with CD4(+) cells of <350/mm(3), ARVs should not be discontinued in this group. ISRCTN71468410.

  20. The development of Business Ethics in front of the progress of organizational neuroscience and neuroethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa González Esteban

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Organizational neuroscience and neuroethics are proving to have already made a number of advances in the discovery of both cognition and human behaviour. Those progresses invite us to rethink some of the classical assumptions on which have been developed applied ethics. This article focuses on the analysis about how the progresses of the neurosciences affect our understanding of business ethics and its future development, specially in its organizational level. In order to achieve this objective, the paper is structured in two steps. On the one hand, it considers whether such developments undermine or erode normative foundations of business ethics. On the other hand, it tries to discover the implications of such developments have for business ethics in its practical development.

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF TWO FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRES TO ASSESS GLUTEN INTAKE IN CHILDREN UP TO 36 MONTHS OF AGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo Escobar, Paula; Calvo Lerma, Joaquim; Hervas Marin, David; Donat Aliaga, Ester; Masip Simó, Etna; Polo Miquel, Begoña; Ribes Koninckx, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    precise information on gluten consumption is crucial for specifically studying the impact of gluten introduction and gluten intake in celiac disease development. Our aim was to develop and validate tools (food frequency questionnaires, FFQs) for the assessment of gluten consumption in Spanish children aged 7-36 months. a total of 342 children, who attended primary healthcare centers for routine health surveys or La Fe Hospital for minor health problems as well as healthy children (recruited in nurseries and primary schools) participated in this survey. We have developed two different FFQs (one for 7-12 months and other for 13-36 months). For validation, results from two FFQs were compared with results of 2-day food records and also with the gold standard 7-day records. The mean gluten intake obtained by the 2DR vs. FFQ and the 7DR vs. FFQ, were compared using the Bland Altman plot method and also Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. we found a good agreement between our FFQs and the 2DR and 7DR according to the results of both the Bland-Altman plots and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. our two new FFQs are therefore the only validated questionnaires available to determine gluten consumption in Spanish children. They are user-friendly and offer excellent instruments to assess gluten intake in children up to 36 months of age. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Individual Differences in Lexical Processing at 18 Months Predict Vocabulary Growth in Typically-Developing and Late-Talking Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Anne; Marchman, Virginia A.

    2011-01-01

    Using online measures of familiar word recognition in the looking-while-listening procedure, this prospective longitudinal study revealed robust links between processing efficiency and vocabulary growth from 18 to 30 months in children classified as typically-developing (n = 46) and as “late talkers” (n = 36) at 18 months. Those late-talkers who were more efficient in word recognition at 18 months were also more likely to “bloom”, showing more accelerated vocabulary growth over the following year, compared to late-talkers less efficient in early speech processing. Such findings support the emerging view that early differences in processing efficiency evident in infancy have cascading consequences for later learning and may be continuous with individual differences in language proficiency observed in older children and adults. PMID:22172209

  3. Factors that Determine the Development and Progression of Gastroesophageal Varices in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Robert J.; Sanyal, Arun J.; Ghany, Marc G.; Lee, William M.; Reid, Andrea E.; Naishadham, Deepa; Everson, Gregory T.; Kahn, Jeffrey A.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Szabo, Gyongyi; Morgan, Timothy R.; Everhart, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims We aimed to identify the incidence and predictors of de novo gastroesophageal variceal formation and progression in a large cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and advanced fibrosis. Methods All participants in the HALT-C Trial were offered an endoscopy before treatment and again after 4 years. Patients with varices at baseline also had a endoscopy at 2 years. Baseline laboratory and clinical parameters were analyzed as predictors of de novo variceal formation and variceal progression. Results De novo varices developed in 157 of the 598 (26.2%) patients. Most of the new varices were small (76.4%) and only 1% of patients developed variceal hemorrhage. The likelihood of developing varices was associated with subject race (Hispanic > Caucasian > African American, p= 0.0005), lower baseline levels of albumin (P=0.051), and higher levels of hyaluronic acid (P< 0.001) with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve=0.70. Among 210 patients with existing gastroesophageal varices, 74 (35.2%) had variceal progression or bleeding during follow-up. Patients with a higher baseline ratios of serum aspartate /alanine aminotransferase (P=0.028) and lower platelet counts (P=0.0002) were at greatest risk of variceal progression (AUROC = 0.72). Prolonged, low-dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers did not influence the risk of developing new or enlarging varices. Conclusion Development of varices in patients with CHC is associated with patient race/ethnicity and laboratory markers of disease severity. Prolonged low dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers do not reduce the risk of variceal development nor progression. PMID:20211180

  4. Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffhauser, A.C.

    1977-06-01

    Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat source containment materials; (3) /sup 144/Cm fuel development; (4) terrestrial radioisotope applications; (5) selenide isotope generator system support; (6) isotope Brayton system materials support; and (7) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

  5. Movement : A Global Civil Society Report on Progress and Impact for Migrants' Rights and Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGregor, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    The civil society Migration and Development (MADE) network commissioned this first edition of a "Movement" report as an independent assessment of what progress has been made on achieving each of the eight goals in that 5-year 8-point Plan of Action in the two years since 2013. Based on interviews,

  6. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1991-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions. 10 refs

  7. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions

  8. Development of a definition for Rapid Progression (RP) of renal function in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamara, David A; Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Ross, Michael

    2014-01-01

    No consensus exists on how to define abnormally rapid deterioration in renal function (Rapid Progression, RP). We developed an operational definition of RP in HIV-positive persons with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >90ml/min/1.73m2 (using Cockcroft Gault) in the Data...

  9. Developing a Learning Progression for Sea Level Rise, a Major Impact of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslyn, Wayne; McGinnis, J. Randy; McDonald, R. Christopher; Hestness, Emily

    2016-01-01

    We present research from an investigation on developing a learning progression (LP) for sea level rise (SLR), a major effect of global climate change. We began our research by drafting a hypothetical LP for sea level rise, informed by extant knowledge of the topic in the scientific community, in science education literature, and in science…

  10. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions.

  11. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1991-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions. (author)

  12. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1991-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions. 10 refs.

  13. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1993-03-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions.

  14. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The purpose was to develop and improve appropriate experimental techniques to the point where they could be applied to specific classes of biological problems. Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) area detectors; (2) x-ray diffraction studies of membranes; (3) electron transfer in loosely coupled systems; (4) bioluminescence and fluorescence; and (5) sonoluminescence

  15. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram supporting the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  16. Development of Specific Aspects of Spirituality during a 6-Month Intensive Yoga Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt Büssing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of research on yoga focuses on its psychophysiological and therapeutic benefits, while the spiritual aspects are rarely addressed. Changes of specific aspects of spirituality were thus investigated among 160 individuals (91% women, mean age 40.9±8.3 years; 57% Christians starting a 2-year yoga teacher training. We used standardized questionnaires to measure aspects of spirituality (ASP, mindfulness (FMI—Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory, life satisfaction (BMLSS—Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, and positive mood (lightheartedness/relief. At the start of the course, scores of the respective ASP subscales for search for insight/wisdom, transcendence conviction, and conscious interactions/compassion were high, while those for religious orientation were low. Within the 6 month observation period, both conscious interactions/compassion (effect size, Cohen’s =.33, Religious orientation (=.21, Lightheartedness/Relief (=.75 and mindfulness (=.53 increased significantly. Particularly non-religious/non-spiritual individuals showed moderate effects for an increase of conscious interactions/compassion. The results from this study suggest that an intensive yoga practice (1 may significantly increase specific aspects of practitioners’ spirituality, mindfulness, and mood, (2 that these changes are dependent in part on their original spiritual/religious self-perception, and (3 that there are strong correlations amongst these constructs (i.e., conscious interactions/compassion, and mindfulness.

  17. From arteritis to mycotic aneurysm: visualization of the progression of mycotic aneurysm development following femoral arterial line insertion in an infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck-Razi, Nira [Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Medical Imaging, The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa (Israel); Rambam Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Haifa (Israel); Bar-Joseph, Gad [Israel Institute of Technology, Pediatric Critical Care Unit, The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa (Israel); Ofer, Amos; Gaitini, Diana [Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Medical Imaging, The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa (Israel); Hoffman, Aharon [Israel Institute of Technology, Department of Vascular Surgery, Rambam Health Care Center, The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa (Israel)

    2010-12-15

    Although uncommon, mycotic aneurysms in infants can be lethal because of the high risk of rapid expansion and rupture. Most catheter-associated mycotic aneurysms reported in the first year of life develop following umbilical artery catheterizations. We describe the sonographic detection of an early stage mycotic aneurysm in a 4-month-old following femoral artery catheterization complicated by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) septicemia. We also describe the sonographic and radiographic progression of this mycotic aneurysm before surgery. (orig.)

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report March 1966 On AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Fawcett

    1966-04-01

    This report has the following sections: Summary of Activities; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; Advanced Systems; and Nuclear Safety.

  19. Next generation of procedural skills curriculum development: Proficiency-based progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Satava

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The FRS use a new process (full life-cycle curriculum development with proficiency-based progression which can be used in order to develop any quantitative procedural curriculum, through generic templates that have been developed. Such an approach will dramatically decrease the cost, time and effort to develop a new specific curriculum, while producing uniformity in approach, inter-operability among different curricula and consistency in objective assessment. This process is currently online, open source and freely available, to encourage the adoption of a scholarly and rigorous approach to curriculum development which is flexible enough to be adopted and adapted to most technical skills curriculum needs.

  20. MRI findings predict radiographic progression and development of erosions in hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Ida K; Slatkowsky-Christensen, Barbara; Bøyesen, Pernille; Sesseng, Sølve; van der Heijde, Désirée; Kvien, Tore K

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether MRI features predict radiographic progression including erosive evolution in patients from the Oslo hand osteoarthritis (OA) cohort, which is the first longitudinal hand OA study with available MRI. We included 74 patients (91% female, mean (SD) age of 67.9 (5.3) years) with MRI of the dominant hand and conventional radiographs taken at baseline and 5-year follow-up. Baseline MRIs were read according to the Oslo hand OA MRI score. We used three definitions of radiographic progression: Progression of joint space narrowing (JSN, grades 0-3), increased Kellgren-Lawrence score (grades 0-4) or incident erosions (absent/present). For each definition, we examined whether MRI features predicted radiographic progression in the same joint using Generalised Estimating Equations. We adjusted for age, sex, Body Mass Index, follow-up time and other erosive joints (the latter for analyses on incident erosions only). MRI-defined moderate/severe synovitis (OR=3.52, 95% CI 1.29 to 9.59), bone marrow lesions (BML) (OR=2.73, 95% CI 1.29 to 5.78) and JSN (severe JSN: OR=11.05, 95% CI 3.22 to 37.90) at baseline predicted progression of radiographic JSN. Similar results were found for increasing Kellgren-Lawrence score, except for weaker association for JSN. Baseline synovitis, BMLs, JSN, bone damage, osteophytes and malalignment were significantly associated with development of radiographic erosions, of which malalignment showed the strongest association (OR=10.18, 95% CI 2.01 to 51.64). BMLs, synovitis and JSN were the strongest predictors for radiographic progression. Malalignment was associated with incident erosions only. Future studies should explore whether reducing BMLs and inflammation can decrease the risk of structural progression. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, Alice; Luu, Chi D; Guymer, Robyn H; Ayton, Lauren N

    2016-01-01

    Vision prostheses, or "bionic eyes", are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field.

  2. Development of In Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    detailed understanding of this pathogenesis in experimental settings may lead to the rational development of conceptually novel diagnostic tests and...good emotional balance. Others have deficits in cognitive function and emotional regulation that are static rather than progressive. Thus, a critical...antibody therapies . TASK 4: To develop an antibody-based assay for tau aggregating activity Brody Laboratory We have not performed any experiments

  3. Development of laser-ion beam photodissociation methods. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, D.H.

    1992-08-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on developing the tandem magnetic sector (EB)/reflection-time-of-flight (TOF) instrument, preliminary experiments with tandem TOF/TOF instruments, developing method for performing photodissociation with pulsed lasers, experiments with laser ionization of aerosol particles, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and ion-molecule reaction chemistry of ground and excited state transition metal ions. This progress report is divided into: photodissociation, MALDI (including aerosols), and ion chemistry fundamentals.

  4. Development of Allocentric Spatial Memory Abilities in Children from 18 months to 5 Years of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribordy, Farfalla; Jabes, Adeline; Lavenex, Pamela Banta; Lavenex, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Episodic memories for autobiographical events that happen in unique spatiotemporal contexts are central to defining who we are. Yet, before 2 years of age, children are unable to form or store episodic memories for recall later in life, a phenomenon known as infantile amnesia. Here, we studied the development of allocentric spatial memory, a…

  5. ENLUB - 12 Months Technical Report WP3: Development of simulative tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi

    A draw bead test has been developed at the Department of Manufacturing Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark. The purpose of the test equipment is to simulate an actual situation in industry where draw beads are applied to constrain movement of sheet material particular in stretch...

  6. Communicative Gestures and Vocabulary Development in 36-Month-Old Children with Down's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Laura; D'Odorico, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Background: Children with Down's syndrome seem to show a preference for the use of gestural rather than vocal productions during the first stages of language development. This "gestural advantage" could actually be due to a developmental strategy used to compensate the difficulties in verbal production that are typical of language…

  7. [Risk factors for iron deficiency anemia in infants aged 6 to 12 months and its effects on neuropsychological development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kang; Zhang, Cui-Mei; Huang, Lian-Hong; Fu, Si-Mao; Liu, Yu-Ling; Chen, Ang; Ou, Jun-Bin

    2015-08-01

    To study the risk factors for moderate and severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infants aged 6-12 months, and to preliminarily investigate the effects of IDA on the neuromotor development and temperament characteristics of infants. A total of 326 infants aged 6-12 months with IDA were classified into three groups: mild IDA (n=176), moderate IDA (n=111), and severe IDA (n=39) according to the severity of anemia. The risk factors for moderate or severe IDA were investigated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Three hundred and forty-six infants without IDA who showed matched age, sex, and other backgrounds were selected as the control group. The Gesell Development Diagnosis Scale was used to evaluate children's mental development. The Temperament Scale for infants was used for evaluating children's temperament. The univariate analysis showed that the severity of IDA was associated with sex, birth weight, gestational age, multiple birth, maternal anemia during pregnancy, and mother's lack of knowledge about IDA (Panemia during pregnancy, breast feeding, and mother's lack of knowledge about IDA were the risk factors for severe IDA (OR>1; P1; Panemia during pregnancy and mother's lack of knowledge about IDA in infants aged 6-12 months. Infants with IDA have delayed neuromotor development and most of them have negative temperaments. More attention should be paid to mental and behavior problems for the infants. It is necessary to provide guidance for their parents in feeding and education.

  8. Assessing Progress towards Public Health, Human Rights, and International Development Goals Using Frontier Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jeanne; Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Indicators to measure progress towards achieving public health, human rights, and international development targets, such as 100% access to improved drinking water or zero maternal mortality ratio, generally focus on status (i.e., level of attainment or coverage) or trends in status (i.e., rates of change). However, these indicators do not account for different levels of development that countries experience, thus making it difficult to compare progress between countries. We describe a recently developed new use of frontier analysis and apply this method to calculate country performance indices in three areas: maternal mortality ratio, poverty headcount ratio, and primary school completion rate. Frontier analysis is used to identify the maximum achievable rates of change, defined by the historically best-performing countries, as a function of coverage level. Performance indices are calculated by comparing a country's rate of change against the maximum achievable rate at the same coverage level. A country's performance can be positive or negative, corresponding to progression or regression, respectively. The calculated performance indices allow countries to be compared against each other regardless of whether they have only begun to make progress or whether they have almost achieved the target. This paper is the first to use frontier analysis to determine the maximum achievable rates as a function of coverage level and to calculate performance indices for public health, human rights, and international development indicators. The method can be applied to multiple fields and settings, for example health targets such as cessation in smoking or specific vaccine immunizations, and offers both a new approach to analyze existing data and a new data source for consideration when assessing progress achieved.

  9. Development of sociality and emergence of independence in a killer whale (Orcinus orca) calf from birth to 36 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Sara; Hill, Heather M; Sigman, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Dolphin calves spend most of their time swimming with their mother immediately after birth. As they mature, the calves become increasingly independent, and begin to interact more often with other calves, juveniles, and sub-adults. For bottlenose dolphin calves, sociality is related to maternal behaviors. Unfortunately, much less is known about the development of sociality and emergence of independence for killer whale calves. The purpose of this study was to examine the developmental changes in social behaviors and solitary activities of a killer whale calf across a 36-month period. Focal follow video recordings of a mother-calf pair housed at SeaWorld San Antonio were collected 2-6 times a day for 5-15 min at 6-month intervals. Using a sample of randomly selected video recordings at each month, developmental changes in swims and social interactions with her mother, swims and social interactions with non-maternal partners, and solitary activities (e.g., solitary swims, solitary play) were observed across the months. The calf spent most of her time swimming with the mother across the 36-month period. The time the calf socialized with her mother was greater than the time she socialized with others at each month. Besides her mother, the calf socialized more often with the other adult female compared to adult males. As the calf matured, the increase in the time she spent socializing with adult killer whales other than the mother corresponded with an increase in the rate and time spent in solitary play. The developmental trends of sociality and emerging independence replicate research conducted with calves of other dolphin species. Zoo Biol. 36:11-20, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Weight loss in the first month post-gastroplasty following diet progression with introduction of solid food three weeks after surgery

    OpenAIRE

    ANDRADE, Camila Garcia da Costa; LOBO, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery is an effective tool in treating severe obesity. It provides significant weight loss in morbidly obese people accompanied by improvement in comorbidities and quality of life. AIM: To investigate the weight loss outcomes in the first month after bariatric surgery after introduction of solids three weeks postoperatively. METHODS: Thirty-two charts of patients who underwent bariatric surgery were analyzed at a private nutritional clinic in São Sebastião do Para...

  11. Development Status of 4-24 Months Children Born to Teenage Mothers Referred to Health Care Centers in Yasuj, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afraz SF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: A developmental delay in children is considered as one of the world's health problems in developing and developed countries. This has a massive impact on children’s health and eventually has broader scale effect on society. The purpose of this study was to assess the developmental status of children age 4-24 months to teenage mothers referred to health care centers related to Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran, in 2013. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 mothers less than 19 years of age with children of 4-24 months referred to health centers of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences which were selected by multistage sampling. Data collection was conducted using demographic, midwifery ages and stages questionnaire in children aged 24-4 months. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test and chi-square test. Results: The results showed that the mean age of mothers during pregnancy were16.64±1.22 years with age range 12 to 18 years. Prevalence of delayed development in 4-24 month children was reported to be 7%. Most developmental delay was observed in gross motor area and the lowest was in the private personal and social domains. In this study, a significant difference was seen in birth weight between two groups of children, so that birth weight of children with developmental delay significantly lowers than children with normal development (P=0.027. Conclusion: the Pregnancy under the age of 19 years is considered as risk factors for children’s developmental disorder that by the implementation of appropriate education to reduce high-risk pregnancies in this age range can be prevented the developmental disorders and their adverse outcome.

  12. Current research status of mechanisms of the development and progression of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Mingcui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis is the intermediate process in the progression of various chronic liver diseases to liver cirrhosis, and its serious complications affect the prognosis of patients with chronic liver diseases. However, so far, there remain no effective drugs for the treatment of liver fibrosis. This article investigates the development and progression of liver fibrosis from the aspects of signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms and briefly introduces the latest research advances in the roles of signaling pathways, including transforming growth factor-β/Smad pathway, platelet-derived growth factor pathway, leptin signaling pathway, and connective tissue growth factor pathway, chemokines, neuroendocrine factors, and angiogenesis in the development of liver fibrosis, so as to enhance the knowledge of the development of liver fibrosis and provide a theoretical basis for the research on molecular-targeted drugs based on the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis.

  13. Developing a domain theory defining and exemplifying a learning theory of progressive attainments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, C Victor

    2011-01-01

    This article defines the concept of Domain Theory, or, when educational measurement is the goal, one might call it a "Learning Theory of Progressive Attainments in X Domain". The concept of Domain Theory is first shown to be rooted in validity theory, then the concept of domain theory is expanded to amplify its necessary but long neglected connection to design research disciplines. The development of a local learning theory of progressive attainments in the domain of Fluent Oral Reading is presented as an illustration. Such a theory is local to a defined domain of application, having well delineated boundaries. It depends on measures having a deep and valid connection to constructs, and the constructs back to the items or tasks at pertinent levels of the measurement scale. Thus instrument development and theory development, which occur in tandem, depend on establishing construct validity in a deep and thoroughgoing manner.

  14. Gestating for 22 months: luteal development and pregnancy maintenance in elephants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Imke; Niemuller, Cheryl; Rich, Peter; Gray, Charlie; Hermes, Robert; Goeritz, Frank; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    The corpus luteum, a temporally established endocrine gland, formed on the ovary from remaining cells of the ovulated follicle, plays a key role in maintaining the early mammalian pregnancy by secreting progesterone. Despite being a monovular species, 2–12 corpora lutea (CLs) were found on the elephant ovaries during their long pregnancy lasting on average 640 days. However, the function and the formation of the additional CLs and their meaning remain unexplained. Here, we show from the example of the elephant, the close relationship between the maternally determined luteal phase length, the formation of multiple luteal structures and their progestagen secretion, the timespan of early embryonic development until implantation and maternal recognition. Through three-dimensional and Colour Flow ultrasonography of the ovaries and the uterus, we conclude that pregnant elephants maintain active CL throughout gestation that appear as main source of progestagens. Two LH peaks during the follicular phase ensure the development of a set of 5.4 ± 2.7 CLs. Accessory CLs (acCLs) form prior to ovulation after the first luteinizing hormone (LH) peak, while the ovulatory CL (ovCL) forms after the second LH peak. After five to six weeks (the normal luteal phase lifespan), all existing CLs begin to regress. However, they resume growing as soon as an embryo becomes ultrasonographically apparent on day 49 ± 2. After this time, all pregnancy CLs grow significantly larger than in a non-conceptive luteal phase and are maintained until after parturition. The long luteal phase is congruent with a slow early embryonic development and luteal rescue only starts ‘last minute’, with presumed implantation of the embryo. Our findings demonstrate a highly successful reproductive solution, different from currently described mammalian models. PMID:22719030

  15. Iodine status and associations with feeding practices and psychomotor milestone development in six-month-old South African infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Jennifer; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Rothman, Marinel; Matsungo, Tonderayi M; Covic, Namukolo; Faber, Mieke; Smuts, Cornelius M

    2017-10-01

    Iodine is important for normal growth and psychomotor development. While infants below 6 months of age receive iodine from breast milk or fortified infant formula, the introduction of complementary foods poses a serious risk for deteriorating iodine status. This cross-sectional analysis assessed the iodine status of six-month-old South African infants and explored its associations with feeding practices and psychomotor milestone development. Iodine concentrations were measured in infant (n = 386) and maternal (n = 371) urine (urinary iodine concentration [UIC]), and in breast milk (n = 257 [breast milk iodine concentrations]). Feeding practices and psychomotor milestone development were assessed in all infants. The median (25th-75th percentile) UIC in infants was 345 (213-596) μg/L and was significantly lower in stunted (302 [195-504] μg/L) than non-stunted (366 [225-641] μg/L) infants. Only 6.7% of infants were deficient. Maternal UIC (128 [81-216] μg/L; r s  = 0.218, p psychomotor developmental scores were observed. Our results suggest that iodine intake in the studied six-month-old infants was adequate. Iodine in breast milk and commercial infant cereals potentially contributed to this adequate intake. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-03-15

    This document contains information on the progress of work for the Hanford facility for the month of February 1957. Included are personnel reports, research and development of various operations, radiation protection and invention reports.

  17. The Influence of HLA and KIR Genes on Malignant Melanoma Development and Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandilarova, Snezhina Mihailova; Paschen, Annette; Mihaylova, Anastassia; Ivanova, Milena; Schadendorf, Dirk; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2016-12-01

    Many studies have described the role of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their cognate human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands in the immune protection against melanoma, but the effect of these markers on intra-individual variations in tumor development and progression has remained less clear. We performed KIR, HLA, and KIR/ligand analysis in 283 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate their integrated influence on disease stage and progression. The patients were grouped according to AJCC staging, histological type of the primary tumor, progression, and survival rate. Analysis of HLA class I alleles revealed positive association of HLA-C*14 (Pc = 0.026, OR = 5.99) and negative association of HLA-C*02 (Pc = 0.026, OR = 0.43) with the disease. Decreased frequency of KIR2DS5 was observed in patients with rapid progression, as compared to those with slow progression. KIR BB genotype was prevalent in patients with metastasis (p = 0.004, OR = 0.025). KIR AA genotype was nearly twice as frequent in rapidly progressive cases, but without statistical relevance (p = 0.055, OR = 2.6). Significantly increased frequency of KIR2DL2 in the presence of C1 ligand (strong inhibition) was found in patients with AJCC III and IV, as compared to individuals with AJCC I stage (p = 0.045, OR = 1.93). In summary, our data imply that KIR/ligand gene content in patients could modulate the disease course towards unfavorable tumor behavior.

  18. Disease Progression in Mild Dementia due to Alzheimer Disease in an 18-Month Observational Study (GERAS): The Impact on Costs and Caregiver Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roy W; Lebrec, Jeremie; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Dell'Agnello, Grazia; Bruno, Giuseppe; Vellas, Bruno; Argimon, Josep M; Dodel, Richard; Haro, Josep Maria; Wimo, Anders; Reed, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    We assessed whether cognitive and functional decline in community-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia were associated with increased societal costs and caregiver burden and time outcomes. Cognitive decline was defined as a ≥3-point reduction in the Mini-Mental State Examination and functional decline as a decrease in the ability to perform one or more basic items of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory (ADCS-ADL) or ≥20% of instrumental ADL items. Total societal costs were estimated from resource use and caregiver hours using 2010 costs. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI); caregiver supervision and total hours were collected. Of 566 patients with mild AD enrolled in the GERAS study, 494 were suitable for the current analysis. Mean monthly total societal costs were greater for patients showing functional (+61%) or cognitive decline (+27%) compared with those without decline. In relation to a typical mean monthly cost of approximately EUR 1,400 at baseline, this translated into increases over 18 months to EUR 2,254 and 1,778 for patients with functional and cognitive decline, respectively. The number of patients requiring supervision doubled among patients showing functional or cognitive decline compared with those not showing decline, while caregiver total time increased by 70 and 33%, respectively and ZBI total score by 5.3 and 3.4 points, respectively. Cognitive and, more notably, functional decline were associated with increases in costs and caregiver outcomes in patients with mild AD dementia.

  19. Disease Progression in Mild Dementia due to Alzheimer Disease in an 18-Month Observational Study (GERAS): The Impact on Costs and Caregiver Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roy W.; Lebrec, Jeremie; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Dell'Agnello, Grazia; Bruno, Giuseppe; Vellas, Bruno; Argimon, Josep M.; Dodel, Richard; Haro, Josep Maria; Wimo, Anders; Reed, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims We assessed whether cognitive and functional decline in community-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia were associated with increased societal costs and caregiver burden and time outcomes. Methods Cognitive decline was defined as a ≥3-point reduction in the Mini-Mental State Examination and functional decline as a decrease in the ability to perform one or more basic items of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory (ADCS-ADL) or ≥20% of instrumental ADL items. Total societal costs were estimated from resource use and caregiver hours using 2010 costs. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI); caregiver supervision and total hours were collected. Results Of 566 patients with mild AD enrolled in the GERAS study, 494 were suitable for the current analysis. Mean monthly total societal costs were greater for patients showing functional (+61%) or cognitive decline (+27%) compared with those without decline. In relation to a typical mean monthly cost of approximately EUR 1,400 at baseline, this translated into increases over 18 months to EUR 2,254 and 1,778 for patients with functional and cognitive decline, respectively. The number of patients requiring supervision doubled among patients showing functional or cognitive decline compared with those not showing decline, while caregiver total time increased by 70 and 33%, respectively and ZBI total score by 5.3 and 3.4 points, respectively. Conclusion Cognitive and, more notably, functional decline were associated with increases in costs and caregiver outcomes in patients with mild AD dementia. PMID:28611822

  20. Disease Progression in Mild Dementia due to Alzheimer Disease in an 18-Month Observational Study (GERAS: The Impact on Costs and Caregiver Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy W. Jones

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We assessed whether cognitive and functional decline in community-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD dementia were associated with increased societal costs and caregiver burden and time outcomes. Methods: Cognitive decline was defined as a ≥3-point reduction in the Mini-Mental State Examination and functional decline as a decrease in the ability to perform one or more basic items of the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Inventory (ADCS-ADL or ≥20% of instrumental ADL items. Total societal costs were estimated from resource use and caregiver hours using 2010 costs. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI; caregiver supervision and total hours were collected. Results: Of 566 patients with mild AD enrolled in the GERAS study, 494 were suitable for the current analysis. Mean monthly total societal costs were greater for patients showing functional (+61% or cognitive decline (+27% compared with those without decline. In relation to a typical mean monthly cost of approximately EUR 1,400 at baseline, this translated into increases over 18 months to EUR 2,254 and 1,778 for patients with functional and cognitive decline, respectively. The number of patients requiring supervision doubled among patients showing functional or cognitive decline compared with those not showing decline, while caregiver total time increased by 70 and 33%, respectively and ZBI total score by 5.3 and 3.4 points, respectively. Conclusion: Cognitive and, more notably, functional decline were associated with increases in costs and caregiver outcomes in patients with mild AD dementia.

  1. Incidence of infection in 39-month-old ewes with TMEM154 diplotypes "1 1," "1 3," and "3 3" after natural exposure to ovine progressive pneumonia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leymaster, K A; Chitko-McKown, C G; Heaton, M P

    2015-01-01

    Production and well-being of sheep and goats in many countries are harmfully impacted by small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) that cause incurable, progressive diseases. Susceptibility to ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV), the North American form of SRLV, is influenced by variants of the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154). The experimental objective was to estimate additive and dominance effects of TMEM154 haplotypes 1 and 3 on susceptibility of breeding ewes to infection after natural exposure to OPPV from birth to 39 mo of age. Sires and dams were heterozygous for TMEM154 haplotypes 1 and 3, producing ewe lambs with diplotypes "1 1," "1 3," and "3 3." These lambs were raised by mature, infected dams to ensure natural, maternal exposure to OPPV. Ewe lambs (n = 108) were kept for breeding and joined an infected flock of ewes to guarantee natural, nonmaternal exposure to OPPV. Ewes were bred to lamb at 1, 2, and 3 yr of age. Serum samples were collected at breeding, 1 mo before lambing and shortly after weaning each year to monitor infection status to 39 mo of age. During the experiment, 9 of the 108 ewes died while uninfected and data collected on these ewes were not analyzed. Infection status of the remaining 99 ewes at 39 mo of age was analyzed using logistic regression procedures. Effects of ewe type of birth, ewe type of rearing, and breed type of dam were not detected (P > 0.10), and the estimated sire variance component was nil. Ewe diplotype affected infection status (P sheep that are genetically less susceptible to OPPV infection.

  2. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program: Analytical methods development. Progress report, FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this task are to develop and document extraction and analysis methods for organics in waste tanks, and to extend these methods to the analysis of actual core samples to support the Waste Tank organic Safety Program. This report documents progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (a) during FY 1994 on methods development, the analysis of waste from Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) and T-111, and the transfer of documented, developed analytical methods to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) and 222-S laboratory. This report is intended as an annual report, not a completed work

  3. Serologic test-systems development: immunoassays for antibiotics. Progress report, May 16, 1980-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, R.; Hollstein, U.; Hindman, K.

    1983-04-01

    Progress on development of immunoassays for the antibiotics gentamicin, tetracycline, and tylosin is discussed. The development of the gentamicin assay was completed and the assay was transferred to the Beltsville Laboratories of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Quality Service (FSQS). The sensitivity (1 ppB) is 50-fold greater than we have previously reported, and is satisfactory for the current needs. At year's end, work was still in progress on both the tetracycline and tylosin assays. Tetracycline presents a more difficult problem of chemistry than we had anticipated. Immunoassay reagents synthesized by diazonium coupling were only weakly immunoreactive; analysis suggests that this coupling procedure damages the tetracycline structure. Several tetracycline derivatives that offer promising alternative coupling procedures were synthesized. Tylosin was successfully coupled to peroxidase. With this conjugate and antiserum, obtained from R. Mageau of the USDA, some immune-specific binding was demonstrated. Several problems with the tylosin assay remain to be resolved.

  4. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik eLöser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging.After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge towards their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes.

  5. Drivers of inequality in Millennium Development Goal progress: a statistical analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stuckler

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many low- and middle-income countries are not on track to reach the public health targets set out in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. We evaluated whether differential progress towards health MDGs was associated with economic development, public health funding (both overall and as percentage of available domestic funds, or health system infrastructure. We also examined the impact of joint epidemics of HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, which may limit the ability of households to address child mortality and increase risks of infectious diseases.We calculated each country's distance from its MDG goals for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and infant and child mortality targets for the year 2005 using the United Nations MDG database for 227 countries from 1990 to the present. We studied the association of economic development (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita in purchasing-power-parity, the relative priority placed on health (health spending as a percentage of GDP, real health spending (health system expenditures in purchasing-power-parity, HIV/AIDS burden (prevalence rates among ages 15-49 y, and NCD burden (age-standardised chronic disease mortality rates, with measures of distance from attainment of health MDGs. To avoid spurious correlations that may exist simply because countries with high disease burdens would be expected to have low MDG progress, and to adjust for potential confounding arising from differences in countries' initial disease burdens, we analysed the variations in rates of change in MDG progress versus expected rates for each country. While economic development, health priority, health spending, and health infrastructure did not explain more than one-fifth of the differences in progress to health MDGs among countries, burdens of HIV and NCDs explained more than half of between-country inequalities in child mortality progress (R(2-infant mortality = 0.57, R(2-under 5 mortality = 0.54. HIV/AIDS and NCD burdens were

  6. Drivers of inequality in Millennium Development Goal progress: a statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin

    2010-03-02

    Many low- and middle-income countries are not on track to reach the public health targets set out in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We evaluated whether differential progress towards health MDGs was associated with economic development, public health funding (both overall and as percentage of available domestic funds), or health system infrastructure. We also examined the impact of joint epidemics of HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), which may limit the ability of households to address child mortality and increase risks of infectious diseases. We calculated each country's distance from its MDG goals for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and infant and child mortality targets for the year 2005 using the United Nations MDG database for 227 countries from 1990 to the present. We studied the association of economic development (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita in purchasing-power-parity), the relative priority placed on health (health spending as a percentage of GDP), real health spending (health system expenditures in purchasing-power-parity), HIV/AIDS burden (prevalence rates among ages 15-49 y), and NCD burden (age-standardised chronic disease mortality rates), with measures of distance from attainment of health MDGs. To avoid spurious correlations that may exist simply because countries with high disease burdens would be expected to have low MDG progress, and to adjust for potential confounding arising from differences in countries' initial disease burdens, we analysed the variations in rates of change in MDG progress versus expected rates for each country. While economic development, health priority, health spending, and health infrastructure did not explain more than one-fifth of the differences in progress to health MDGs among countries, burdens of HIV and NCDs explained more than half of between-country inequalities in child mortality progress (R(2)-infant mortality = 0.57, R(2)-under 5 mortality = 0.54). HIV/AIDS and NCD burdens were also

  7. Congenital peripheral developing odontoma accompanied by congenital teratomatous fibroma in a 9-month-old boy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Toshinari; Yagi, Masaatsu; Mizuki, Harumi; Takeda, Yasunori

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral odontoma is rare, and only two cases of congenital peripheral odontoma have been reported. Congenital oral fibroma is also rare. We describe a unique case of congenital peripheral developing odontoma accompanied by congenital teratomatous fibroma in an infant. Both tumors were difficult to detect on radiography. Two small masses were seen in the median anterior portion of the palatal mucosa of a 9-month-old boy. The masses had been present since birth and were surgically removed at age 28 months, when one of the masses had grown to a diameter of 8 mm. Histopathologic examination showed a fibrous lesion and a tooth germ-like rounded lesion composed of dental papilla, enamel organ, dentin, and cementum. Although congenital odontoma is rare, it should be considered when selecting appropriate treatment, as early radiographic detection is difficult.

  8. Development of socio-communicative skills in 9- to 12-month-old individuals with fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Sigafoos, Jeff; Urlesberger, Leo; Pokorny, Florian; Didden, Robert; Einspieler, Christa; Kaufmann, Walter E

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the early socio-communicative development of individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) by undertaking a retrospective analysis of family videos. Videos were analyzed to identify existing communicative forms and functions. Analyses were undertaken on seven children who were later diagnosed with FXS. The children were filmed when they were 9-12 months old and before being diagnosed. Fourteen different communicative forms and six different communicative functions were observed. All participants were observed to express the functions of 'Attention to self' and 'Answering', but none indicated 'Requesting action', 'Requesting information', 'Choice making', or 'Imitating'. Results suggest that children with FXS may have a limited range of communicative forms and functions when they are from 9 to 12 months of age. However, further research is necessary to gain a specific developmental profile of socio-communicative forms and functions in FXS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Children with Down syndrome: oral development and morphology after use of palatal plates between 6 and 48 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckman, Birgitta; Grevér-Sjölander, Ann-Christin; Bengtsson, Karin; Persson, Jenny; Johansson, Iréne

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the number of erupted teeth, sucking habits, tongue morphology, facial expression and speech in children with Down syndrome (DS) aged 48 +/- 6 months and treated from 6 months of age with palatal plates in combination with speech and language therapy. The research took the form of a multicentre, multidisciplinary, longitudinal study of children with DS followed from the age of 6 months. A total of 37 children with DS were included. One child could not cooperate at all and was excluded from the evaluations. In combination with speech and language intervention provided by speech and language therapists, the children used palatal plates provided by dentists from 6 months of age. In the evaluation, the children in the sample (n = 36) were compared with two similarly aged control groups: one group of children with DS who never had used palatal plates (n = 31) and one group of children with normal development (n = 36). The evaluation of oral parameters was performed by dentists after calibration. Registration of facial expression and speech was done by a speech and language therapist, and the evaluation was done by two speech and language therapists and one phonetician who were calibrated in joint discussions. In contrast to the children with DS in the control group, the subjects in the study were found to have as many erupted teeth as the children with normal development. The prevalence of sucking habits did not differ between the three groups. Only children with DS sucked their tongue, a toy or other things in addition to a thumb or dummy. The prevalence of tongue diastase in the study group with DS was of the same magnitude as in the evaluation at the age of 18 +/- 3 months. The palatal plates were used by 57-65% of the children without any larger problems. In the study sample, the possible beneficial effects of palatal plate therapy were a lower prevalence of posterior cross-bite, a higher prevalence of frontal cusp

  10. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reduce Progression of Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease but Develop Wilms’ Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Cristina Caldas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effect of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs on the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we sought to assess whether treatment with iPSs retards progression of CKD when compared with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. Untreated 5/6 nephrectomized rats were compared with CKD animals receiving BMSCs or iPSs. Renal function, histology, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression were studied. Implanted iPSs were tracked by the SRY gene expression analysis. Both treatments minimized elevation in serum creatinine, significantly improved clearance, and slowed down progression of disease. The proteinuria was reduced only in the iPS group. Both treatments reduced glomerulosclerosis, iPSs decreased macrophage infiltration, and TGF-β was reduced in kidneys from the BMSC group. Both types of treatments increased VEGF gene expression, TGF-β was upregulated only in the iPS group, and IL-10 had low expression in both groups. The SRY gene was found in 5/8 rats treated with iPSs. These 5 animals presented tumors with histology and cells highly staining positive for PCNA and Wilms’ tumor protein antibody characteristics of Wilms’ tumor. These results suggest that iPSs may be efficient to retard progression of CKD but carry the risk of Wilms’ tumor development.

  11. Equity in water and sanitation: developing an index to measure progressive realization of the human right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jeanne; Baum, Rachel; Bartram, Jamie

    2013-11-01

    We developed an index to measure progressive realization for the human right to water and sanitation. While in this study we demonstrate its application to the non-discrimination and equality component for water, the conceptual approach of the index can be used for all the different components of the human right. The index was composed of one structural, one process, and two outcome indicators and is bound between -1 and 1, where negative values indicate regression and positive values indicate progressive realization. For individual structural and process indicators, only discrete values such as -1, -0.5, 0, 0.5, and 1 were allowed. For the outcome indicators, any value between -1 and 1 was possible, and a State's progress was evaluated using rates of change. To create an index that would allow for fair comparisons between States and across time, these rates of change were compared to benchmarked rates, which reflect the maximum rates a State can achieve. Using this approach, we calculated the index score for 56 States in 2010 for which adequate data were available and demonstrated that these index scores were not dependent on factors such as achieved level of coverage or gross national income. The proposed index differs from existing measures of inequality as it measures rate of change and not level of achievement, and thus addresses the principle of progressive realization that is fundamental to human rights. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. The Ebola virus: a review of progress and development in research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitades Gebre

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ebola virus was identified in the year 1976 and has caused periodic outbreaks in West African countries. The disease has a case fatality rate up to 90%. Ebola has been classified as a biosafety level four pathogen and there is no currently approved vaccine or treatment for the virus. However, remarkable progress has been demonstrated by researchers in understanding the pathogenicity of the Ebola virus. Several animal models have been cultivated to develop diagnostics, vaccines and therapeutic drugs.

  13. Global Chance and nuclear energy. Ecology, environment and media. Science, progress and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A first set of contributions discusses the outcomes of the French electronuclear programme and the place of Superphenix in the plutonium management. The second set of contributions proposes comments and critics on three books about the environment (more particularly about the new ecological order, about the greenhouse effect as a world manipulation, and about the limits of scientific expertise on climate). The last article proposes a synthesis of a meeting about the relationship between science, progress and development

  14. Innovative progress and sustainable development of remote sensing for uranium geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dechang; Zhao Yingjun; Ye Fawang

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviewes the innovative process of remote sensing for the uranium geology in Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (BRIUG), discusses the science and technology progress of uranium geology due to remote sensing technique, and the way how to keep sustainable development of the remote sensing for uranium geology so as to play an important role in the uranium geology in the future. (authors)

  15. [Progress and technology development on hydrogen production through bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijie; Cao, Guangli; Xu, Chengjiao; Ren, Nanqi

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen production from lignocellulosic biomass is both sustainable and environmentally friendly, which is garnering more and more attention across the world, with an expectation to challenge the shortage of fossil fuels supply and climate change as well. In this article, the update research progress and technology development of biohydrogen production are reviewed, with a focus on biomass pretreatment, hydrogen-producing microorganisms and process engineering strategies. And in the meantime, a roadmap for more efficient and economic biohydrogen production is envisioned.

  16. RTS,S malaria vaccine development: progress and considerations for postapproval introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Asante KP; Adjei G; Enuameh Y; Owusu-Agyei S

    2016-01-01

    Kwaku Poku Asante, George Adjei, Yeetey Enuameh, Seth Owusu-Agyei Kintampo Health Research Centre, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana Abstract: Though the burden of malaria has decreased in the last decade in some sub-Saharan African countries, it is still high in others, and there is no malaria vaccine in use. The development of malaria vaccines in combination with current control programs could be effective in reducing the malaria burden. In this paper, we review and discuss the progress ...

  17. Progression of Ocular Sulfur Mustard Injury: Development of a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Issue: Thymosins in Health and Disease Progression of ocular sulfur mustard injury: development of a...suggesting either inmigration of CE cells or an expansion of the erosion. Changes in the size and shape of the margins between 24 and 48 h suggest a...dynamic interplay between ex- pansion and inmigration . The lesion is either sig- nificantly reduced in size or gone by 72 h, and is completely resolved

  18. The progress reports on the development of therapies of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerbrandt, G

    2009-01-01

    Summary The roots of the progress reports on the development of therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that since 2000 have been produced at Breitnau/Germany and distributed to the parents of DMD patients cover over 30 years of continual occupation with this disease. The beginning was marked by the development of an early detection programme for the genetic disposition for DMD in infant boys. The next step was the organisation of workshops on the management of DMD and the writing of progress reports on these and other relevant conferences. Getting acquainted with the ideas of the protagonists in the research field by holding interviews was a decisive prerequisite for this activity. This took place in tandem with the development of a new kind of multiplex “family letters” that attempted to answer frequently asked questions to many DMD families at the same time. When – with the beginning of the new millennium – the endeavours towards gene therapies for DMD started to boom all over the scientific world, progress reports designed to keep the families informed about research on DMD treatment were added to the family letters. These reports that give an account of the latest state of the research are written in a plain language that can be understood by laypersons. In the meantime the reports have adopted the character of reviews that are updated annually. They are written in English and German and translated into Spanish and many other languages. PMID:20128138

  19. Proinflammatory Cytokines in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression Promoted by High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to examine whether proinflammatory cytokines participated in prostate cancer (PCa development and progression promoted by high-fat diet (HFD. Methods. TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate mice were randomly divided into two groups: normal diet group and HFD group. Mortality rate and tumor formation rate were examined. TRAMP mice were sacrificed and sampled on the 20th, 24th, and 28th week, respectively. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, were tested by FlowCytomix. Prostate tissue of TRAMP mice was used for histology study. Results. A total of 13 deaths of TRAMP mice were observed, among which 3 (8.33% were from the normal diet group and 10 (27.78% from the HFD group. The mortality rate of TRAMP mice from HFD group was significantly higher than that of normal diet group (P=0.032. Tumor formation rate at 20th week of age of HFD group was significantly higher than that of normal diet group (P=0.045. Proinflammatory cytokines levels, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, were significantly higher in HFD TRAMP mice. Conclusions. HFD could promote TRAMP mouse PCa development and progression with elevated proinflammatory cytokines levels. Proinflammatory cytokines could contribute to PCa development and progression promoted by HFD.

  20. Intergenerational Consequences: Women's Experiences of Discrimination in Pregnancy Predict Infant Social-Emotional Development at 6 Months and 1 Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Lisa; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Moore, Joan M; Ferguson, Darrah N; Lewis, Tené T; Reid, Allecia E; Lewis, Jessica B; Stasko, Emily C; Tobin, Jonathan N; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2018-04-01

    Racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in infant development in the United States have lifelong consequences. Discrimination predicts poorer health and academic outcomes. This study explored for the first time intergenerational consequences of women's experiences of discrimination reported during pregnancy for their infants' social-emotional development in the first year of life. Data come from a longitudinal study with predominantly Black and Latina, socioeconomically disadvantaged, urban young women (N = 704, Mage = 18.53) across pregnancy through 1 year postpartum. Women were recruited from community hospitals and health centers in a Northeastern US city. Linear regression analyses examined whether women's experiences of everyday discrimination reported during pregnancy predicted social-emotional development outcomes among their infants at 6 months and 1 year of age, controlling for potentially confounding medical and sociodemographic factors. Path analyses tested if pregnancy distress, anxiety, or depressive symptoms mediated significant associations. Everyday discrimination reported during pregnancy prospectively predicted greater inhibition/separation problems and greater negative emotionality, but did not predict attention skills or positive emotionality, at 6 months and 1 year. Depressive symptoms mediated the association of discrimination with negative emotionality at 6 months, and pregnancy distress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms mediated the association of discrimination with negative emotionality at 1 year. Findings support that there are intergenerational consequences of discrimination, extending past findings to infant social-emotional development outcomes in the first year of life. It may be important to address discrimination before and during pregnancy and enhance support to mothers and infants exposed to discrimination to promote health equity across the life span.

  1. Development of a sensitive outcome for economical drug screening for progressive multiple sclerosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kosa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic advance in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS has been very slow. Based on the transformative role magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast-enhancing lesions had on drug development for relapsing-remitting MS, we consider the lack of sensitive outcomes to be the greatest barrier for developing new treatments for progressive MS. The purpose of this study was to compare 58 prospectively-acquired candidate outcomes in the real-world situation of progressive MS trials, to select and validate the best-performing outcome.The one year pre-treatment period of adaptively-designed IPPoMS (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00950248 and RIVITaLISe (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01212094 Phase II trials served to determine the primary outcome for the subsequent blinded treatment phase by comparing eight clinical, one electrophysiological, one optical coherence tomography, seven MRI volumetric, nine quantitative T1 MRI, and 32 diffusion tensor imaging MRI outcomes. Fifteen outcomes demonstrated significant progression over one year (Δ in the predetermined analysis and seven out of these were validated in two independent cohorts. Validated MRI outcomes had limited correlations with clinical scales, relatively poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR and recorded overlapping values between healthy subjects and MS patients with moderate-severe disability. Clinical measures correlated better, even though each reflects a somewhat different disability domain. Therefore, using machine-learning optimization, we developed a combinatorial weight-adjusted disability score (CombiWISE that integrates four clinical scales: expanded disability status scale (EDSS, Scripps neurological rating scale, 25 foot walk and nine hole peg test. CombiWISE outperformed all clinical scales (Δ=9.10%; p=0.0003 and all MRI outcomes. CombiWISE recorded no overlapping values between healthy subjects and disabled MS patients, had high SNR and predicted changes in EDSS in a longitudinal assessment of 98

  2. Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.; Leung, K.; Phillips, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described here. Appendices describe the structure of the database in detail.

  3. Retrieval process development and enhancements project Fiscal year 1995: Simulant development technology task progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golcar, G.R.; Bontha, J.R.; Darab, J.G. [and others

    1997-01-01

    The mission of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) project is to develop an understanding of retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, gather data on these technologies, and relate the data to specific tank problems such that end-users have the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. The development of waste simulants is an integral part of this effort. The work of the RPD&E simulant-development task is described in this document. The key FY95 accomplishments of the RPD&E simulant-development task are summarized below.

  4. Retrieval process development and enhancements project Fiscal year 1995: Simulant development technology task progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golcar, G.R.; Bontha, J.R.; Darab, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    The mission of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD ampersand E) project is to develop an understanding of retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, gather data on these technologies, and relate the data to specific tank problems such that end-users have the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. The development of waste simulants is an integral part of this effort. The work of the RPD ampersand E simulant-development task is described in this document. The key FY95 accomplishments of the RPD ampersand E simulant-development task are summarized below

  5. Development and Validation of a Learning Progression for Change of Seasons, Solar and Lunar Eclipses, and Moon Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Italo; Galano, Silvia; Leccia, Silvio; Puddu, Emanuella

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report about the development and validation of a learning progression about the Celestial Motion big idea. Existing curricula, research studies on alternative conceptions about these phenomena, and students' answers to an open questionnaire were the starting point to develop initial learning progressions about change of seasons,…

  6. Screening for Autistic Spectrum in Children Aged 14 to 15 Months. I: The Development of the Early Screening of Autistic Traits Questionnaire (ESAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Sophie H. N.; Dietz, Claudine; van Daalen, Emma; Kerkhof, Ine H. G. M.; van Engeland, Herman; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development of a screening instrument for young children. Screening items were tested first in a non-selected population of children aged 8-20 months (n = 478). Then, parents of children with clinically diagnosed ASD (n = 153, average age 87 months) or ADHD (n = 76, average age 112 months) were asked to score the items…

  7. Prospective dose selection and acceleration of paliperidone palmitate 3‐month formulation development using a pharmacometric bridging strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Partha; Ravenstijn, Paulien; Remmerie, Bart; Vermeulen, An; Russu, Alberto; D'hoore, Peter; Baum, Ellen Z.; Savitz, Adam; Gopal, Srihari; Hough, David

    2016-01-01

    Aims To prospectively select the dose of the paliperidone palmitate 3‐month (PP3M) formulation, using a pharmacometric bridging strategy based on the paliperidone palmitate 1‐month (PP1M) formulation previously approved for schizophrenia treatment. Methods Pharmacokinetic (PK) data from a 6‐month interim analysis of a single dose PP3M Phase I clinical trial was integrated with a previously developed PP1M population‐PK model. The model was updated to incorporate formulation as a covariate on absorption parameters and to explore the most critical design element of the Phase III study: the PP1M‐to‐PP3M dose multiplier for patients switching formulations. Plasma paliperidone concentrations were measured at predetermined intervals during Phase III, enabling comparison of the multiple‐dose PK between PP1M and PP3M. Exposure matching was assessed graphically to determine whether paliperidone plasma concentrations from the two formulations overlapped. Results Prospective steady‐state PK simulations revealed that a 3.5 multiple of the PP1M dose would yield a corresponding PP3M dose with comparable exposure. The prospective pharmacometric simulation and observed Phase III PK data agreed closely. Phase III results confirmed the hypothesis that efficacy of PP3M was noninferior to that of PP1M. The similarity in exposures between the two formulations was likely a key determinant of the equivalent efficacy between the two products observed in the Phase III study. Conclusions Successful prospective PP3M Phase III clinical trial dose selection was achieved through the use of pharmacometric bridging, without conducting a Phase II study and using only limited Phase I data for PP3M. We estimate that this strategy reduced development time by 3–5 years and may be applicable to other drug development projects. PMID:27333588

  8. Key components development progress updates of the 250W high power LPP-EUV light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabu, Takayuki; Kawasuji, Yasufumi; Hori, Tsukasa; Okamoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Miyao, Kenichi; Ishii, Takuya; Watanabe, Yukio; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Abe, Tamotsu; Kodama, Takeshi; Nakarai, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Taku; Itou, Noritoshi; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2017-10-01

    Gigaphoton Inc. is developing a CO2-Sn-LPP EUV light source based on unique and original technologies including a high power CO2laser with 15 nanosecond pulse duration, a solid-state pre-pulse laser with 10 picosecond pulse duration, a highly stabilized droplet generator, a precise laser-droplet shooting control system and a debris mitigation system using a magnetic field. In this paper, an update of the development progress of our 250W CO2-Sn-LPP EUV light source and of the key components is presented.

  9. Measurability of Social Development. Reflections on the Applicability of Social Progress Indices with Reference to Brexit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanyos János

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The question is how the global and local economic actors’ innovation-based local social and environmental objectives and results can modify the social cohesion strategies, how the disparities in economic and social development can be measured and evaluated at regional level in addition to a comparison across countries. We have seen that any one indicator in itself is not enough since it does not provide sufficient explanation for either the development disparities or their reasons. Anyway, in addition to GDP per capita, it is worth applying - and it is important to apply - such indicators as SPI and Well-Being, and various indices of social progress.

  10. Progress in the development of superconducting quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, B.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-05-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  11. Progress in the Development of Superconducting Quadrupoles forHeavy-ion Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  12. Serologic test systems development. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, G.C.; Clinard, E.H.; Bartlett, M.L.; Petersen, P.M.; Sanders, W.M.; Payne, R.J.; Martinez, E.

    1978-01-01

    Work has continued on the development and application of the Enzyme-Labeled Antibody (ELA) test to the USDA needs. Results on trichinosis, brucellosis, and staphylococcal enterotoxin A detection are very encouraging. A field test for trichinosis detection is being worked out in cooperation with Food Safety and Quality Service personnel. Work is in progress with the Technicon Instrument Corporation to develop a modification of their equipment to automatically process samples by the ELA procedure. An automated ELA readout instrument for 96-well trays has been completed and is being checked out.

  13. The Impact of Osteopontin Gene Variations on Multiple Sclerosis Development and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoforo Comi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopontin is a proinflammatory molecule, modulating TH1 and TH17 responses. Several reports suggest its involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS pathogenesis. We previously reported that OPN gene variations at the 3′ end are a predisposing factor for MS development and evolution. In this paper, we extended our analysis to a gene variation at the 5′ end on the -156G>GG single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and replicated our previous findings at the 3′ end on the +1239A>C SNP. We found that only +1239A>C SNP displayed a statistically significant association with MS development, but both +1239A>C and -156G>GG had an influence on MS progression, since patients homozygous for both +1239A and −156GG alleles displayed slower progression of disability and slower switch to secondary progression than those carrying +1239C and/or −156G and those homozygous for +1239A only. Moreover, patients homozygous for +1239A also displayed a significantly lower relapse rate than those carrying +1239C, which is in line with the established role of OPN in MS relapses.

  14. Applying the Rule Space Model to Develop a Learning Progression for Thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Zhang, Shanshan; Guo, Yanfang; Xin, Tao

    2017-12-01

    We used the Rule Space Model, a cognitive diagnostic model, to measure the learning progression for thermochemistry for senior high school students. We extracted five attributes and proposed their hierarchical relationships to model the construct of thermochemistry at four levels using a hypothesized learning progression. For this study, we developed 24 test items addressing the attributes of exothermic and endothermic reactions, chemical bonds and heat quantity change, reaction heat and enthalpy, thermochemical equations, and Hess's law. The test was administered to a sample base of 694 senior high school students taught in 3 schools across 2 cities. Results based on the Rule Space Model analysis indicated that (1) the test items developed by the Rule Space Model were of high psychometric quality for good analysis of difficulties, discriminations, reliabilities, and validities; (2) the Rule Space Model analysis classified the students into seven different attribute mastery patterns; and (3) the initial hypothesized learning progression was modified by the attribute mastery patterns and the learning paths to be more precise and detailed.

  15. Video evidence that parenting methods predict which infants develop long night-time sleep periods by three months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St James-Roberts, Ian; Roberts, Marion; Hovish, Kimberly; Owen, Charlie

    2017-05-01

    Aim To examine two hypotheses about the longitudinal relationship between night-time parenting behaviours in the first few postnatal weeks and infant night-time sleep-waking at five weeks, three months and six months of age in normal London home environments. Most western infants develop long night-time sleep periods by four months of age. However, around 20-30% of infants in many countries continue to sleep for short periods and cry out on waking in the night: the most common type of infant sleep behaviour problem. Preventive interventions may help families and improve services. There is evidence that 'limit-setting' parenting, which is common in western cultures, supports the development of settled infant night-time behaviour. However, this evidence has been challenged. The present study measures three components of limit-setting parenting (response delay, feeding interval, settling method), examines their stability, and assesses the predictive relationship between each of them and infant sleep-waking behaviours. Longitudinal observations comparing a General-Community (n=101) group and subgroups with a Bed-Sharing (n=19) group on infra-red video, diary and questionnaire measures of parenting behaviours and infant feeding and sleep-waking at night. Findings Bed-Sharing parenting was highly infant-cued and stable. General-Community parenting involved more limit-setting, but was less stable, than Bed-Sharing parenting. One element of General-Community parenting - consistently introducing a short interval before feeding - was associated with the development of longer infant night-time feed intervals and longer day-time feeds at five weeks, compared with other General-Community and Bed-Sharing infants. Twice as many General-Community infants whose parents introduced these short intervals before feeding in the early weeks slept for long night-time periods at three months of age on both video and parent-report measures, compared with other General-Community and Bed

  16. Millennium Development Goals progress: a perspective from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Mike; English, Rex; English, Atti

    2015-02-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is a highly diverse geo-political region. Any brief discussion of the progress made over the last 15 years towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) will therefore not do justice to the true complexity of context and events. Our focus will be MDG4-to reduce child mortality by 66% from 1990 levels. We will touch briefly on MDG1, to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, MDG2, to achieve universal primary education, and MDG5, to improve maternal health, which are inextricably linked with child well-being. We will also draw on an eclectic mix of additional global indicators. Acknowledging the limitations of this approach, we first offer a summary of expected progress and then point to debates on future goals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Millennium Development Goals progress: a perspective from sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Mike; English, Rex; English, Atti

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is a highly diverse geo-political region. Any brief discussion of the progress made over the last 15 years towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) will therefore not do justice to the true complexity of context and events. Our focus will be MDG4—to reduce child mortality by 66% from 1990 levels. We will touch briefly on MDG1, to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, MDG2, to achieve universal primary education, and MDG5, to improve maternal health, which are inextricably linked with child well-being. We will also draw on an eclectic mix of additional global indicators. Acknowledging the limitations of this approach, we first offer a summary of expected progress and then point to debates on future goals. PMID:25613971

  18. Effects of Motor Development Stimulation on Anthropometric Indices of Infants Aged 1-12 Months in Foster Care Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezou NikNezhad Jalali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The first three years of life have a pivotal role in growth and development of infants. Extra-uterine environment largely affects brain development of infants during the first year of life.However,no specific programs are available for brain development stimulation in foster homes. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of motor development stimulation package on anthropometric indices of infants staying in foster homes. Method: This experimental study was conducted on 50 infants aged 1-12 months at Ali Asghar foster home of Mashhad, Iran in 2013. Infants were randomly divided into two groups of intervention (n=25 and control (n=25. Motor development stimulation packages were used for intervention group three times a week for eight consecutive weeks (24 sessions, two hours each. Anthropometric indices of infants were evaluated using standard instruments before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.11.5 using independent T-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: In this study, mean age of infants in intervention and control groups was 6.04±3.48 and 4.3±3.70 months, respectively. In total, 68% of infants were male, and 32% were female. After intervention, Mann-Whitney test results showed no statistically significant difference in height (P=0.47 and head circumference (P=0.11 of infants between the groups. However, independent T-test showed a statistically significant difference in body weight of infants (P=0.007 between the groups after intervention with the stimulation care package. Implications for Practice: According to the results of this study, use of evidence-based motor development stimulation package for eight weeks resulted in increased weight of infants, while it had no effect on height and head circumference. Therefore, it is recommended that complementary studies be conducted in this regard.

  19. Progresses and Prospects in Developing Marine Geodetic Datum and Marine Navigation of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Yuanxi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Territorial water is a significant part of national sovereignty of China, thus the infrastructures of national space datum and location services should not only cover the land areas, but also the sea areas. China has established relatively complete geodetic datum in land areas over the past decades, including the new developed China Geodetic Coordinate System 2000 (CGCS 2000 and the national gravity datum 2000. However, the currently used geodetic infrastructures have not well covered the sea areas of China. The marine geodetic datum and marine navigation technologies need to be further developed and extended to satisfy the national demands of marine defense and marine economy development in new era of China. This paper mainly reviews the developing states and progress of Chinese marine geodetic datum and marine navigation, analyses key technologies in establishing the national marine geodetic datum. The develop current trends and future directions for the national marine geodetic datum and marine navigation technologies are listed.

  20. MHD air heater development technology. Technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-11-01

    The technology development of the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described. Progress is reported on the three tasks. The first task is materials selection, evaluation, and development. The objective of this task is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. Task two is operability, performance, and materials testing. The objectives of this task are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. The objectives of the full-scale design task are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. (WHK)

  1. Cell cycle in egg cell and its progression during zygotic development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukawa, Yumiko; Okamoto, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    Rice egg is arrested at G1 phase probably by OsKRP2. After fusion with sperm, karyogamy, OsWEE1-mediated parental DNA integrity in zygote nucleus, zygote progresses cell cycle to produce two-celled embryo. In angiosperms, female and male gametes exist in gametophytes after the complementation of meiosis and the progression of nuclear/cell division of the haploid cell. Within the embryo sac, the egg cell is specially differentiated for fertilization and subsequent embryogenesis, and cellular programs for embryonic development, such as restarting the cell cycle and de novo gene expression, are halted. There is only limited knowledge about how the cell cycle in egg cells restarts toward zygotic division, although the conversion of the cell cycle from a quiescent and arrested state to an active state is the most evident transition of cell status from egg cell to zygote. This is partly due to the difficulty in direct access and analysis of egg cells, zygotes and early embryos, which are deeply embedded in ovaries. In this study, precise relative DNA amounts in the nuclei of egg cells, developing zygotes and cells of early embryos were measured, and the cell cycle of a rice egg cell was estimated as the G1 phase with a 1C DNA level. In addition, increases in DNA content in zygote nuclei via karyogamy and DNA replication were also detectable according to progression of the cell cycle. In addition, expression profiles for cell cycle-related genes in egg cells and zygotes were also addressed, and it was suggested that OsKRP2 and OsWEE1 function in the inhibition of cell cycle progression in egg cells and in checkpoint of parental DNA integrity in zygote nucleus, respectively.

  2. Millennium development Goal 5: progress and challenges in reducing maternal deaths in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Nimakoh, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; McCann, Terence V

    2016-03-09

    High maternal deaths in developing countries are recognised as a public health issue. To address this concern, targets were set as part of the Millennium Development Goals, launched in 2000 by the United Nations General Assembly. However, despite focused efforts, the maternal health targets in developing regions may not be achieved by 2015. We highlight progress and challenges in reducing maternal deaths, with a particular focus on Ghana. We discuss key issues like the free maternal healthcare package, transportation and referral concerns, human resources challenges, as well as the introduction of direct-entry midwifery training and the Community-based Health and Planning Services rolled out to specifically help curb poor maternal health outcomes. A key contribution to the country's slow progress towards achieving Millennium Development Goal 5 is that policy choices have often been in response to emergency or advancing problems rather than the use of preventive measures. Ghana can benefit greatly from long-term preventive strategies, the development of human resources, infrastructure and community health education.

  3. Developing E-Governance in the Eurasian Economic Union: Progress, Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Vidiasova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available he article provides an overview of e-governance development in the members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU. There is a lack of integrated research on e-governance in the EEU countries, although given the strengthening of this regional bloc, new information and communication technologies (ICT could serve as significant growth driver. Given the history and specifics of regional cooperation in the post-Soviet space and international best practices in ICT use in regional blocs, this article reviews the development of e-governance in the EEU members The research methodology was based on a three-stage concept of regionalism [Van Langenhov, Coste, 2005]. The study examines three key components: progress in developing e-governance, barriers to that development and future prospects. It used qualitative and quantitative methods. Data sources included the results of the United Nations E-Government rating, EEU countries’ regulations based on 3,200 documents and the authors’ expert survey, in which 18 experts (12 EEU representatives and six international experts participated. The study revealed the progress made by EEU countries in improving technological development and reducing human capital development indicators. The survey identified key barriers to e-governance development in the EEU: low motivation and information technology skills among civil servants, and citizens’ low computer literacy. The analysis of EEU members’ national economic priorities revealed a common focus on ICT development. The authors concluded that prospects for e-governance in the EEU were associated with strengthening regional cooperation in standardizing information systems, implementing one-stop-shop services, managing electronic documents and expanding online services. The authors presented two areas for developing e-governance within the EEU. The first is external integration, which, if strengthened, would affect the economy positivelyand optimize business processes

  4. Search for major genes with progeny test data to accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pine. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-15

    This report details the progress of the three tasks of this project. The tasks are: (1) develop genetic models and analytical methods; (2) molecular confirmation of major gene segregation; and (3) develop strategies for marker-assisted breeding.

  5. Using Rasch models to develop and validate an environmental thinking learning progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Martell, Erin A.

    Environmental understanding is highly relevant in today's global society. Social, economic, and political structures are connected to the state of environmental degradation and exploitation, and disproportionately affect those in poor or urban communities (Brulle & Pellow, 2006; Executive Order No. 12898, 1994). Environmental education must challenge the way we live, and our social and ecological quality of life, with the goal of responsible action. The development of a learning progression in environmental thinking, along with a corresponding assessment, could provide a tool that could be used across environmental education programs to help evaluate and guide programmatic decisions. This study sought to determine if a scale could be constructed that allowed individuals to be ordered along a continuum of environmental thinking. First, I developed the Environmental Thinking Learning Progression, a scale of environmental thinking from novice to advanced, based on the current available research and literature. The scale consisted of four subscales, each measuring a different aspect of environmental thinking: place consciousness, human connection, agency, and science concepts. Second, a measurement instrument was developed, so that the data appropriately fit the model using Rasch analysis. A Rasch analysis of the data placed respondents along a continuum, given the range of item difficulty for each subscale. Across three iterations of instrument revision and data collection, findings indicated that the items were ordered in a hierarchical way that corresponded to the construct of environmental thinking. Comparisons between groups showed that the average score of respondents who had participated in environmental education programs was significantly higher than those who had not. A comparison between males and females showed no significant difference in average measure, however, there were varied significant differences between how racial/ethnic groups performed. Overall

  6. Validity and reliability of Preschool Language Scale 4 for measuring language development in children 48-59 months of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryani Sidarta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence rates for speech and language delay have been reported across wide ranges. Speech and language delay affects 5% to 8% of preschool children, often persisting into the school years.  A cross-sectional study was conducted in 208 children aged 48-59 months to determine the validity and reliability of the Indonesian edition of the Preschool Language Scale version 4 (PLS4 as a screening tool for the identification of language development disorders. Construct validity was examined by using Pearson correlation coefficient. Internal consistency was tested and repeated measurements were taken to establish the stability coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC for test-retest reliability. For construct validity, the Pearson correlation coefficient ranged from 0.151-0.526, indicating that all questions in this instrument were valid for measuring auditory comprehension (AC and expressive communication skills (EC. Cronbach’s alpha level ranged from 0.81-0.95 with standard error of measurement (SEM ranging from 3.1-3.3. Stability coefficients ranged from 0.98-.0.99 with ICC coefficient ranging from 0.97-0.99 both of which showed an excellent reliability. This study found that PLS-4 is a valid and reliable instrument. It is easy to handle and can be recommended for assessing language development in children aged 48-59 months.

  7. Progress with high priority R and D topics in support of ITER/BPX diagnostic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, A.J.H.; Costley, A.E.; Bindslev, H.

    2005-01-01

    The development of diagnostic systems for next step Burning Plasma experiments (BPX) such as ITER requires R and D in some key areas. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) Topical Group (TG) on Diagnostics has identified five topics as 'high priority' and these form the focus of the current work of the TG: (i) development of methods of measuring the energy and density distribution of confined and escaping α-particles; (ii) review of the requirements for measurements of the neutron/α source profile and assessment of possible methods of measurement; (iii) determination of the life-time of plasma facing mirrors used in optical systems; (iv) assessment of radiation effects on coils used for measuring the plasma equilibrium and development of new methods to measure steady state magnetic fields accurately in a nuclear environment; and (v) Development of measurement requirements and assessment of techniques for measurement of dust and erosion. This paper presents the recent progress in these areas. (author)

  8. US Progress on Property Characterization to Support LEU U-10 Mo Monolithic Fuel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Laboratory; Rabin, Barry H [Idaho National Laboratory; Smith, James Arthur [Idaho National Laboratory; Scott, Clark Landon [Idaho National Laboratory; Benefiel, Bradley Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Larsen, Eric David [Idaho National Laboratory; Lind, Robert Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Sell, David Alan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The US High Performance Research Reactor program is pursuing development and qualification of a new high density monolithic LEU fuel to facilitate conversion of five higher power research reactors located in the US (ATR, HFIR, NBSR, MIT and MURR). In order to support fabrication development and fuel performance evaluations, new testing capabilities are being developed to evaluate the properties of fuel specimens. Residual stress and fuel-cladding bond strength are two characteristics related to fuel performance that are being investigated. In this overview, new measurement capabilities being developed to assess these characteristics in both fresh and irradiated fuel are described. Progress on fresh fuel testing is summarized and on-going hot-cell implementation efforts to support future PIE campaigns are detailed. It is anticipated that benchmarking of as-fabricated fuel characteristics will be critical to establishing technical bases for specifications that optimize fuel fabrication and ensure acceptable in-reactor fuel performance.

  9. Distribution of cadmium among geochemical fractions in floodplain soils of progressing development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lair, G.J.; Graf, M.; Zehetner, F.; Gerzabek, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Initial soil development in river floodplains influences soil properties and processes. In this study, suites of young floodplain soils sampled at three European rivers (Danube/Austria, Ebro/Spain and Elbe/Germany) were used to link soil development to the soils' retention capacity for cadmium. Geochemichal fractionation of original and metal-spiked soils was conducted. Cadmium remained in weakly bound fractions in both original and spiked soils, representing an entirely different behaviour than observed for copper in an earlier study. The tendency of incorporation into more stable forms over time was only slightly expressed. Correlation analysis revealed the involvement of different sorption surfaces in soil, with no single soil constituent determining cadmium retention behaviour. Nevertheless, in the calcareous soils of the Danube floodplain, we found increased cadmium retention and decreased portions of desorbable cadmium with progressing soil development. - Distribution of cadmium among geochemical fractions in floodplain soils reveals high mobility but increased retention capacity with increasing soil age and development

  10. MHD air heater technology development. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-03-01

    Progress on the technology development of the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described in detail. The objective of task 1 is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. The objectives of task 2 are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. The objectives of task 3 are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. (WHK)

  11. Projects at the component development and integration facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; and Spray Casting Project

  12. Does tooth brushing influence the development and progression of non-inflammatory gingival recession? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, P Sunethra; McCracken, Giles I; Gwynnett, Erika; Steen, Nick D; Guentsch, Arndt; Heasman, Peter A

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to produce the best available evidence and pool appropriate data to evaluate the effect of tooth brushing on the initiation and progression of non-inflammatory gingival recession. A protocol was developed a priori for the question: "Do factors associated with tooth brushing predict the development and progression of non-inflammatory gingival recession in adults?" The search covered six electronic databases between January 1966 and July 2005. Hand searching included searches of the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontal Research and the Journal of Periodontology. Bibliographies of narrative reviews, conference proceedings and relevant texts known to the authors were also searched. Inclusion of titles, abstracts and ultimately full texts was based on consensus between three reviewers. The full texts of 29 papers were read and 18 texts were eligible for inclusion. One abstract from EuroPerio 5 reported a randomized-controlled clinical trial [Level I evidence] in which the authors concluded that the toothbrushes significantly reduced recessions on buccal tooth surfaces over 18 months. Of the remaining 17 observational studies, two concluded that there appeared to be no relationship between tooth brushing frequency and gingival recession. Eight studies reported a positive association between tooth brushing frequency and recession. Other potential risk factors were duration of tooth brushing, brushing force, frequency of changing the toothbrush, brush (bristle) hardness and tooth brushing technique. None of the observational studies satisfied all the specified criteria for quality appraisal and a valid appraisal of the quality of the randomized-controlled trial was not possible. The data to support or refute the association between tooth brushing and gingival recession are inconclusive.

  13. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Larry G.

    2000-01-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division

  14. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 2001 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.G. Hoffman; K. Alvar; T. Buhl; E. Foltyn; W. Hansen; B. Erdal; P. Fresquez; D. Lee; B. Reinert

    2002-05-01

    This progress report presents the results of 11 projects funded ($500K) in FY01 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division (ESH). Five projects fit into the Health Physics discipline, 5 projects are environmental science and one is industrial hygiene/safety. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published sixteen papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplement funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and workspace, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Divisions.

  15. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Hoffman

    2000-12-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division.

  16. Role of T-helper cell 17 in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Feifei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world. How to improve cure rate and reduce recurrence and metastasis of HCC have always been hot topics in research. T-helper cell 17 (Th17, an important subset of CD4+ T-helper cells, plays a critical role in infection, autoimmune response, and tumor microenvironment. This article introduces the discovery of Th17 and related cytokines, summarizes its mechanisms of action and clinical significance in the development and progression of HCC, and provides some clues for new targets in the treatment of HCC and prognosis prediction.

  17. FY 2014 Annual Progress Report - Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  18. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-12-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the VTP program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  19. Prenatal Second-Hand Smoke Exposure Measured with Urine Cotinine May Reduce Gross Motor Development at 18 Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evlampidou, Iro; Bagkeris, Manolis; Vardavas, Constantine; Koutra, Katerina; Patelarou, Evridiki; Koutis, Antonis; Chatzi, Leda; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the association of second-hand smoke exposure of pregnant mothers using urine cotinine with the neurodevelopment of their children at 18 months of age in the mother-child cohort in Crete (Rhea Study). Selected participants were Greek mothers with singleton pregnancies, had never smoked, and had available urine cotinine measurements in pregnancy, and their children for whom a neurodevelopmental assessment was completed. We performed face-to-face interviews twice during pregnancy and postnatally, and assessed children's neurodevelopment at 18 months of age using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition. We used linear regression and generalized additive models. Of 599 mothers, 175 (29%) met the inclusion criteria. Maternal urine cotinine levels were low (mean: 10.3 ng/mL, SD: 11.7 ng/mL). Reported passive smoking from different sources was strongly associated with urine cotinine levels. A negative association was observed between cotinine levels in pregnancy and child's gross motor function (beta = -3.22 per 10 ng/mL, 95% CI -5.09 to -1.34) after adjusting for factors potentially associated with neurodevelopment; results were similar in both sexes. A negative association was also observed for cognitive and receptive communication scales but the effect was small and not statistically significant. Maternal exposure during pregnancy to second-hand smoke measured through urine cotinine was associated with a decrease in gross motor function among 18-month-old children, even at low levels of exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-anvil, high pressure apparatus: a half-century of development and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann, Robert C.

    2011-12-01

    ? H. Tracy Hall and the cubic-anvil apparatus which he developed at Brigham Young University to produce diamonds without the belt apparatus. [Courtesy of the H. Tracy Hall Foundation]. In 1958, Tracy Hall invented the first multi-anvil, high pressure apparatus: a tetrahedral-anvil device capable of attaining simultaneous pressures of 10 GPa and temperatures above 3000 K. In the past half-century, multi-anvil apparatus (MAA) have evolved progressively and can now reach pressures close to 100 GPa at high temperatures. Many of these high pressure devices have been utilized in conjunction with in situ X-ray diffraction, especially with the advent of synchrotron radiation facilities in the early 1980s. There are a variety of technological approaches to generating high pressures in the laboratory, primarily motivated by the desire to study the behavior of materials at elevated pressures and temperatures; many of these approaches have been developed in the Earth science community due to the desire to replicate in the laboratory the P-T conditions of the Earth's deep interior. In addition to the dynamic techniques of shock-wave experiments, there have been two static techniques to achieve these goals: the diamond-anvil cell and the MAA. Although these two static techniques have occasionally been viewed as competitive, they are both useful and very complementary. The purpose of this paper is to review the development and progress in MAA.

  1. Development of new low level radioactive waste disposal sites: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Robert T.; Antonucci, George J.; Ryan, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The status of the development of three new low level radioactive waste disposal facilities for the Central Midwest (Illinois), Southeastern (North Carolina) and Appalachian (Pennsylvania) compacts is presented. These three sites will dispose of about 50-65 percent of the commercial low-level waste (LLW) generated in the U.S. annually. Chem-Nuclear, as developer and proposed operator of all three sites has used a common approach to site development. This approach has been based on their twenty-plus years of operating experience and a standard technical approach. The technology employed is an above-grade, multiple engineered barrier design. The paper also contrasts actual progress at each site with a generalized project schedule. Areas of schedule delays are noted along with the steps being taken to accelerate schedule. Finally, we note that continued progress and timely start-up of operations of these new sites is critical on a national basis. This is due to the possibility of near-term closure of the existing LLW disposal sites. (author)

  2. Progress on development of UV photocathodes for photon-counting applications at NASA GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, J.; Hilton, G.; Norton, T.; Woodgate, B.; Aslam, S.; Ulmer, M.

    2005-08-01

    The development of high quantum efficiency photemissive detectors is recognized as a significant advancement for astronomical missions requiring photon-counting detection. For solar-blind NUV detection, current missions (GALEX, STIS) using Cs2Te detectors are limited to ~10% DQE. Emphasis in recent years has been to develop high QE (>50%) GaN and AlGaN photocathodes (among a few others) that can then be integrated into imaging detectors suitable for future UV missions. We report on progress we have made in developing GaN photocathodes and discuss our observations related to parameters that effect efficiency and stability, including intrinsic material properties, surface preparation, and vacuum environment. We have achieved a QE in one case of 65% at 185 nm and are evaluating the stability of these high QEs. We also discuss plans for incorporating photocathodes into imaging and non-imaging sealed devices in order to demonstrate long term stability.

  3. Shale Gas Exploration and Development Progress in China and the Way Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianghua

    2018-02-01

    Shale gas exploration in China started late but is progressing very quickly with the strong support from Central Government. China has 21.8 tcm technically recoverable shale gas resources and 764.3 bcm proved shale gas reserve, mainly in marine facies in Sichuan basin. In 2016, overall shale gas production in China is around 7.9 bcm, while it is set to reach 10 bcm in 2017 and 30 bcm in 2020. BP is the only remaining IOC actor in shale gas exploration in China partnering with CNPC in 2 blocks in Sichuan basin. China is encouraging shale gas business both at Central level and at Provincial level through establishing development plan, continuation of subsidies and research funding. Engineering services for shale gas development and infrastructures are developing, while the overall cost and gas marketing conditions will be key factors for the success in shale gas industry.

  4. The effect of 12-month participation in osteogenic and non-osteogenic sports on bone development in adolescent male athletes. The PRO-BONE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Barker, Alan R; Ubago-Guisado, Esther

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Research investigating the longitudinal effects of the most popular sports on bone development in adolescent males is scarce. The aim is to investigate the effect of 12-month participation in osteogenic and non-osteogenic sports on bone development. DESIGN: A 12-month study...

  5. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF NUTRITION ON PHYSICAL AND NEUROPSYCHICAL DEVELOPMENT OF INFANTS: RESULTS OF 12-MONTHS OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Legon’kova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic ingredient of normal nutrition in infants is breast milk. If breast feeding is impossible the choice of artificial feeding formula should be made taking into account the qualities of formula which must be extremely close to that ones of breast milk. Objectives: to evaluate of state of health of infants having breast and artificial feeding. Methods: effectiveness and tolerance to adopted formula «Nutrilon Comfort» compared to standard milk formula and breast milk were analyzed. Dynamics of physical and neuro-psychical development of children was observed during 12 months. The cases of infectious diseases and tolerance to artificial feeding formulas were estimated. Results: prolonged observation of children from the group of adopted formula with immunomodulatory factors (long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and prebiotics showed its complex action (influence on physical, neuro-psychical development and infectious morbidity is similar to that one of breast feeding. Acute respiratory infections and atopic dermatitis in children having breast feeding and adopted formula developed rarely than in children from group of standard formula (p < 0.05. Conclusion: nutrition with «Nutrilon Comfort» formula in cases when breast feeding is impossible allows child’s development similar to children with breast feeding.

  6. Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Besmann, Theodore M.; Collins, Emory D.; Bell, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

  7. Expression of XPG protein in the development, progression and prognosis of gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG plays a critical role in preventing cells from oxidative DNA damage. This study aimed to investigate XPG protein expression in different gastric tissues and in patients with diverse prognoses, thus providing insights into its role in the development, progression and prognosis of gastric cancer (GC. METHODS: A total of 176 GC, 131 adjacent non-tumour tissues, 53 atrophic gastritis (AG and 49 superficial gastritis (SG samples were included. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect XPG protein expression. RESULTS: XPG expression was significantly higher in GC tissues compared with adjacent non-tumour tissues. In the progressive disease sequence SG→AG→GC, XPG expression was significantly higher in AG and GC compared with SG. Analysis of clinicopathological parameters and survival in GC patients demonstrated a significant association between XPG expression level and depth of tumour invasion, macroscopic type, Lauren's classification, smoking, Helicobacter pylori infection and family history. Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that patients with positive XPG expression had significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.020, HR = 0.394, 95%CI 0.179-0.866, especially in aged younger than 60 years (P = 0.027, HR = 0.361, 95%CI 0.147-0.888 and male patients (P = 0.002, HR = 0.209, 95%CI 0.077-0.571. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that XPG protein expression was related to the development, progression and prognosis of GC, and might thus serve as a potential biomarker for its diagnosis and prognosis.

  8. Parental separation: a risk for the psychomotor development of children aged 28 to 32 months? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacenelenbogen, Nadine; Dramaix-Wilmet, Michèle; Schetgen, M; Roland, M; Godin, Isabelle

    2016-07-11

    In Western countries, about a quarter of children are affected by parental separation and a number of authors have previously investigated how familial structure impacts children's health. The purpose of the work: to analyze the psychomotor development of children aged 28 to 32 months based on family structure (parents together or separated), independently of the influence of socio-economic environment that is well documented. To analyse the psychomotor development of children younger than 3 years based on family structure (parents together or separated) independently of the influence of socio-economic environment that is well documented. Cross-sectional study by examination of 28 871 children as part of a free preventive medicine consultation. The data came from an assessment conducted 28 to 32 months after birth during which information was collected about the psychomotor development: to perform a standing jump, dress themselves, draw a vertical line and circle, use the "I" pronoun, build a three-word sentence, and say their first name Ten percent of the children had separated parents. Compared to parents who were together, when adjusting for the socioeconomic environment, as well as all potential confounders, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95 % confidence interval [CI]) for children with separated parents, in terms of their ability to perform a standing jump, dress themselves, and draw a vertical line and circle were respectively 0.9 (0.7-1.1), 1.1 (0.9-1.2), 1.3 (1.1-1.4) and 1.2 (1.1-1.4). The adjusted ORs (95 % CI) for children's inability to say the "I" pronoun, build a three-word sentence, and say their first name were respectively 1.2 (1.1-1.3), 1.3 (1.2-1.5), and 1.2 (0.9-1.5). After adjusting for sociocultural factors and other potential confounders, we observed that the children exhibited slower progression in psychomotor development, especially in language and graphic abilities when their parents were separated. While the implications of our study

  9. The Role of Verbal Repetition in the Development of Infant Speech Preferences from 4 to 14 Months of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRoberts, Gerald W.; McDonough, Colleen; Lakusta, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments investigated infants' preferences for age-appropriate and age-inappropriate infant-directed speech (IDS) over adult-directed speech (ADS). Two initial experiments showed that 6-, 10-, and 14-month-olds preferred IDS directed toward younger infants, and 4-, 8-, 10-, and 14-month-olds, but not 6-month-olds, preferred IDS directed…

  10. RAGE-Aptamer Blocks the Development and Progression of Experimental Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takanori; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Nishino, Yuri; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) plays a central role in diabetic nephropathy. We screened DNA aptamers directed against RAGE (RAGE-aptamers) in vitro and examined the effects on the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. RAGE-aptamer bound to RAGE with a K d of 5.68 nmol/L and resultantly blocked the binding of AGEs to RAGE. When diabetic rats received continuous intraperitoneal injection of RAGE-aptamer from week 7 to 11 of diabetes, the increases in renal NADPH oxidase activity, oxidative stress generation, AGE, RAGE, inflammatory and fibrotic gene and protein levels, macrophage and extracellular matrix accumulation, and albuminuria were significantly suppressed, which were associated with improvement of podocyte damage. Two-week infusion of RAGE-aptamer just after the induction of diabetes also inhibited the AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress system and MCP-1 levels in the kidneys of 8-week-old diabetic rats and simultaneously ameliorated podocyte injury and albuminuria. Moreover, RAGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the AGE-induced oxidative stress generation and inflammatory and fibrotic reactions in human cultured mesangial cells. The findings suggest that continuous infusion of RAGE-aptamer could attenuate the development and progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the AGE-RAGE axis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Progress and Challenges in the Design and Clinical Development of Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Almagro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable progress in engineering and clinical development of therapeutic antibodies in the last 40 years, after the seminal work by Köhler and Milstein, has led to the approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA of 21 antibodies for cancer immunotherapy. We review here these approved antibodies, with emphasis on the methods used for their discovery, engineering, and optimization for therapeutic settings. These methods include antibody engineering via chimerization and humanization of non-human antibodies, as well as selection and further optimization of fully human antibodies isolated from human antibody phage-displayed libraries and immunization of transgenic mice capable of generating human antibodies. These technology platforms have progressively led to the development of therapeutic antibodies with higher human content and, thus, less immunogenicity. We also discuss the genetic engineering approaches that have allowed isotype switching and Fc modifications to modulate effector functions and bioavailability (half-life, which together with the technologies for engineering the Fv fragment, have been pivotal in generating more efficacious and better tolerated therapeutic antibodies to treat cancer.

  12. The Role of DNA Methylation in the Development and Progression of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Kerr

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, caused by smoking in ∼87% of cases, is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and Western Europe. Adenocarcinoma is now the most common type of lung cancer in men and women in the United States, and the histological subtype most frequently seen in never-smokers and former smokers. The increasing frequency of adenocarcinoma, which occurs more peripherally in the lung, is thought to be at least partially related to modifications in cigarette manufacturing that have led to a change in the depth of smoke inhalation. The rising incidence of lung adenocarcinoma and its lethal nature underline the importance of understanding the development and progression of this disease. Alterations in DNA methylation are recognized as key epigenetic changes in cancer, contributing to chromosomal instability through global hypomethylation, and aberrant gene expression through alterations in the methylation levels at promoter CpG islands. The identification of sequential changes in DNA methylation during progression and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma, and the elucidation of their interplay with genetic changes, will broaden our molecular understanding of this disease, providing insights that may be applicable to the development of targeted drugs, as well as powerful markers for early detection and patient classification.

  13. Progress on the Development of Future Airport Surface Wireless Communications Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Budinger, James M.; Brooks, David E.; Franklin, Morgan; DeHart, Steve; Dimond, Robert P.; Borden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Continuing advances in airport surface management and improvements in airport surface safety are required to enable future growth in air traffic throughout the airspace, as airport arrival and departure delays create a major system bottleneck. These airport management and safety advances will be built upon improved communications, navigation, surveillance, and weather sensing, creating an information environment supporting system automation. The efficient movement of the digital data generated from these systems requires an underlying communications network infrastructure to connect data sources with the intended users with the required quality of service. Current airport surface communications consists primarily of buried copper or fiber cable. Safety related communications with mobile airport surface assets occurs over 25 kHz VHF voice and data channels. The available VHF spectrum, already congested in many areas, will be insufficient to support future data traffic requirements. Therefore, a broadband wireless airport surface communications network is considered a requirement for the future airport component of the air transportation system. Progress has been made on defining the technology and frequency spectrum for the airport surface wireless communications network. The development of a test and demonstration facility and the definition of required testing and standards development are now underway. This paper will review the progress and planned future work.

  14. MHD air heater development technology. Technical progress report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Technology development for the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is described. Work is being done under three tasks as described in the following. (1) materials selection, evaluation, and development: The objective of this task is to continue development of ceramic materials technology for the directly-fired HTAH. The scope of the work will include compilation of materials data, materials selection for testing and design studies, materials property determination, liaison with refractory manufacturers and other organizations to encourage development of materials and fabrication technology, establishment of preliminary HTAH material specifications, analyses of test materials, and development of criteria for thermal stress limits for crack-tolerant refractory materials. (2) operability, performance, and materials testing: The objectives of this task are to demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating a directly-fired HTAH (including both the heater matrix and valves), to continue obtaining information on life and corrosion resistance of HTAH materials, and to obtain design information for full-scale studies and future design work. (3) full-scale design concepts: The objectives of this task are to begin the identification of HTAH control requirements and control system needs, and to continue full-scale study efforts incorporating updated materials and design information in order to identify development needs for the HTAH development program. Progress is described. (WHK)

  15. Psychomotor Ability in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methylmercury: The 18-Month Follow-Up of Tohoku Study of Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuta, Nozomi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Satoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Kunihiko

    2017-05-01

    Fish contain nutrients essential to the developing fetal brain, but they are contaminated with methylmercury. The Tohoku Study of Child Development, now underway in the Sanriku coastal area of Miyagi prefecture, Japan, follows mother-child pairs to examine the risks and benefits of fish consumption during pregnancy, especially the effects of prenatal exposures to methylmercury, selenium, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on child neurodevelopment. Children aged 18 months were administered the Bayley Scales of Infant Development second edition (BSID-II) and Kyoto Scale of Psychological Development (KSPD) in 2004-2008. Complete data of cord-blood total mercury (THg), cord-plasma selenium, maternal-plasma DHA, the above test scores, and confounders for 566 mother-child pairs were available. The median cord-blood THg level was 15.7 (range, 2.7-96.1) ng/g. Since the BSID-II and KSPD scores were significantly lower in the 285 boys than in the 281 girls, analyses were conducted separately. The Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) of BSID-II was significantly correlated with cord-blood THg only in the boys, and significance of the association remained unchanged after adjusting for possible confounders; i.e., a 10-fold increase in cord-blood THg was associated with a 8.3-point decrease in the score of the PDI. Other significant correlations of THg were not seen in the boys or girls. Selenium and DHA showed no significant correlations with the BSID-II or KSPD scores in either sex. In conclusion, intrauterine methylmercury exposure may affect psychomotor development, and boys appear to be more vulnerable to the exposure than girls.

  16. ATTAP/AGT101 - Year 2 progress in ceramic technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, J. R.; Lindberg, L. J.; Morey, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The progress made by the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) is summarized, with emphasis on the following areas: ceramic materials assessment and characterization, ceramic impact damage assessment, ceramic combustor evaluation, turbine inlet particle separator development, impact-tolerant turbine designs, and net-shape ceramic component fabrications. In the evolutionary ceramics development in the Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT101) and ATTAP programs initial designs were conceived to reduce stresses by using well-established criteria: bodies of revolution were preferred over nonaxisymmetric geometries, sharp corners were avoided, the contact area between components was kept as large as possible, and small parts were preferred over large when feasible. Projects discussed include: initial ceramic component fabrication by ceramic suppliers in 1990, engine test to 1371 C in 1991, 100-hr test bed engine durability test in 1991, and 300-hr test bed engine durability in 1992.

  17. Progress in the clinical development and utilization of vision prostheses: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandli A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alice Brandli, Chi D Luu, Robyn H Guymer, Lauren N Ayton Centre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology, The University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Vision prostheses, or “bionic eyes”, are implantable medical bionic devices with the potential to restore rudimentary sight to people with profound vision loss or blindness. In the past two decades, this field has rapidly progressed, and there are now two commercially available retinal prostheses in the US and Europe, and a number of next-generation devices in development. This review provides an update on the development of these devices and a discussion on the future directions for the field. Keywords: vision prostheses, bionic eye, vision restoration, blindness, medical bionics, retinitis pigmentosa

  18. Recent progress of the RD50 Collaboration – Development of radiation tolerant tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Moll, M

    2014-01-01

    The CERN RD50 Collaboration "Radiation hard semiconductor devices for high luminosity col- liders" is undertaking a massive R&D; programme across High Energy Physics (HEP) Experi- ments boundaries to develop silicon sensors with increased radiation tolerance. Highest priority is to provide concepts and prototypes of high performance silicon sensors for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Experiments at CERN and other future HEP Experiments op- erating in severe radiation environments. This paper gives an overview of the RD50 collaboration activities and describes some examples of recent developments. Emphasis is put on the charac- terization of microscopic radiation induced defects and their impact on the sensor performance, the evaluation and parametrization of electric fields inside irradiated sensors, progress in device modeling using TCAD tools, the use of p-type silicon as strip and pixel sensor material and finally the first steps towards the exploitation of impact ionization ( charge...

  19. Progress in biocatalysis with immobilized viable whole cells: systems development, reaction engineering and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakovič, Milan; Švitel, Juraj; Bučko, Marek; Filip, Jaroslav; Neděla, Vilém; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; Gemeiner, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Viable microbial cells are important biocatalysts in the production of fine chemicals and biofuels, in environmental applications and also in emerging applications such as biosensors or medicine. Their increasing significance is driven mainly by the intensive development of high performance recombinant strains supplying multienzyme cascade reaction pathways, and by advances in preservation of the native state and stability of whole-cell biocatalysts throughout their application. In many cases, the stability and performance of whole-cell biocatalysts can be highly improved by controlled immobilization techniques. This review summarizes the current progress in the development of immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts, the immobilization methods as well as in the bioreaction engineering aspects and economical aspects of their biocatalytic applications.

  20. Progress in the development of a SiC{sub f}/SiC creep test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Lewinsohn, C.A.; Jones, R.H.; Youngblood, G.E.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hecht, S.L.

    1996-10-01

    An effort is now underway to design an experiment that will allow the irradiation creep behavior of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites to be quantified. Numerous difficulties must be overcome to achieve this goal, including determining an appropriate specimen geometry that will fit their radiation volumes available and developing a fabrication procedure for such a specimen. A specimen design has been selected, and development of fabrication methods is proceeding. Thermal and stress analyses are being performed to evaluate the viability of the specimen and to assist with determining the design parameters. A possible alternate type of creep test is also being considered. Progress in each of these areas is described in this report.

  1. Facilitating Progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals through Open Scientific Data and Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. S.; Levy, M. A.; de Sherbinin, A. M.; Fischer, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent an unprecedented international commitment to a shared future encompassing sustainable management of the planet and significant improvement in the human condition around the world. The scientific community has both an ethical responsibility and substantial self-interest—as residents of this planet—to help the world community to better understand the complex, interlinked behavior of human and environmental systems and to elucidate pathways to achieve long-term sustainability. Critical to making progress towards the SDGs is the open availability of timely, reliable, usable, and well integrated data and indicators relevant to all SDGs and associated targets. Such data and indicators will not only be valuable in monitoring and evaluation of progress, but also in developing policies and making decisions on environmental and societal issues affecting sustainability from local to global scales. The open availability of such data and indicators can help motivate performance, promote accountability, and facilitate cooperation. A range of scientific, technical, organizational, political, and resource challenges need to be addressed in developing a coherent SDG monitoring and indicator framework. For example, assembling and integrating diverse data on consistent spatial and temporal scales across the relevant natural, social, health, and engineering sciences pose both scientific and technical difficulties, and may require new ways to interlink and organize existing cyberinfrastructure, reconcile different data policy regimes, and fund integration efforts. New information technologies promise more timely and efficient ways of collecting many types of data, but may also raise privacy, control, and equity issues. Scientific review processes to ensure data quality need to be coordinated with the types of quality control and review employed by national statistical agencies for trusted economic and social statistics. Although

  2. Progress in Developing a New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W. Jr.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Vision for Exploration of the Moon envisions a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. In the 1990s, Mechanical Technology, Inc.'s Stirling Engine Systems Division (now a part of Foster-Miller, Inc.) developed a 25 kWe free piston Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA and DoE have been developing dual 55 We and 80 We Stirling convertor systems for use with radioisotope heat sources. Total test times of all convertors in this effort exceed 120,000 hours. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in the Lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Auburn University awarded a subcontract to Foster-Miller, Inc. to undertake development of the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described

  3. Podoplanin expression in the development and progression of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Podoplanin expression is attracting interest as a marker for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. We therefore investigated the expression pattern and clinical significance of podoplanin during the development and progression of laryngeal carcinomas. Results Podoplanin expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 84 patients with laryngeal premalignancies and 53 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. We found podoplanin expression extending from the basal to the suprabasal layer of the epithelium in 37 (44%) of 84 dysplastic lesions, whereas normal epithelium showed negligible expression. Patients carrying podoplanin-positive lesions had a higher laryngeal cancer incidence than those with negative expression reaching borderline statistical significance (51% versus 30%, P = 0.071). Podoplanin expression in laryngeal carcinomas exhibited two distinct patterns. 20 (38%) cases showed diffuse expression in most tumour cells and 33 (62%) focal expression at the proliferating periphery of tumour nests. High podoplanin expression was inversely correlated with T classification (P = 0.033), disease stage (P = 0.006), and pathological grade (P = 0.04). There was a trend, although not significant, towards reduced disease-specific survival for patients with low podoplanin levels (P = 0.31) and diffuse expression pattern (P = 0.08). Conclusions Podoplanin expression increases in the early stages of laryngeal tumourigenesis and it seems to be associated with a higher laryngeal cancer risk. Podoplanin expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas, however, diminishes during tumour progression. Taken together, these data support a role for podoplanin expression in the initiation but not in the progression of laryngeal cancers. PMID:20196862

  4. Podoplanin expression in the development and progression of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresno Manuel F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podoplanin expression is attracting interest as a marker for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. We therefore investigated the expression pattern and clinical significance of podoplanin during the development and progression of laryngeal carcinomas. Results Podoplanin expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 84 patients with laryngeal premalignancies and 53 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. We found podoplanin expression extending from the basal to the suprabasal layer of the epithelium in 37 (44% of 84 dysplastic lesions, whereas normal epithelium showed negligible expression. Patients carrying podoplanin-positive lesions had a higher laryngeal cancer incidence than those with negative expression reaching borderline statistical significance (51% versus 30%, P = 0.071. Podoplanin expression in laryngeal carcinomas exhibited two distinct patterns. 20 (38% cases showed diffuse expression in most tumour cells and 33 (62% focal expression at the proliferating periphery of tumour nests. High podoplanin expression was inversely correlated with T classification (P = 0.033, disease stage (P = 0.006, and pathological grade (P = 0.04. There was a trend, although not significant, towards reduced disease-specific survival for patients with low podoplanin levels (P = 0.31 and diffuse expression pattern (P = 0.08. Conclusions Podoplanin expression increases in the early stages of laryngeal tumourigenesis and it seems to be associated with a higher laryngeal cancer risk. Podoplanin expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas, however, diminishes during tumour progression. Taken together, these data support a role for podoplanin expression in the initiation but not in the progression of laryngeal cancers.

  5. Assessing Progress and Pitfalls of the Millennium Development Goals in Zimbabwe: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Mutangabende

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe adopted the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs at their inception in 2000 and it has trends of its progress in its attempt to attain these MDGs as indicated in progress reports since 2004, 2010, 2012 and 2015. In these reports optimistic trends are chiefly found in MDG2 on universal primary education which is Zimbabwe’s pride in Africa, MDG3 regarding gender parity in schools and MDG6 on HIV and AIDS. The country continues to face its biggest challenges in attaining MDG1 which is eliminating extreme poverty and hunger and MDG5 which is increase nurturing mortality, whereas all the objectives under these goals are dubious that would be attained at the cut-off date. It was unfortunate that, the inception of the MDGs coincided with the deepening of socioeconomic, political and environmental crisis in the country which made it very difficult for Zimbabwe to accomplish all of its MDGs. The focal motive of this study was to check the progress, policies, programmes and strategies which were in place to promote the attainment of the MDGs from 2000-2015 and other strategies or policies in place to attain the SDGs 2016-2030. This paper recommended that there is need for institutionalisation of SDGs that is aligning them with Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socioeconomic Transformation (Zim-Asset cluster; for instance, value accumulation and beneficiation, nourishment security, poverty extermination, social services and strengthening partnership with all stakeholders. The research uses intensive secondary data analysis from various sources including government gazette, journal articles, e-books, and government website, reports, published and unpublished books.

  6. 24 month Progress Report from DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Savio, Enrico

    This report is made as a part of the project Easytrac, an EU project under the programme: Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No: G6RD-CT-2000-00188 coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines...

  7. EASYTRACK 30 month Progress Report from DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Savio, Enrico

    This report is made as a part of the project Easytrac, an EU project under the programme: Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No: G6RD-CT-2000-00188 coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines...

  8. THE CONCEPTION OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AS A NEW PARADIGM OF SOCIAL PROGRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kazhuro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern economic growth, accompanied by a stratification of society into rich and poor, contributes to the prosperity of the wealth’s cult and power of that wealth. It leads to wasteful use of natural resources, doesn’t solve and can’t solve the problem of mass poverty. In 1992, in Rio de Janeiro held the OUN Conference on environment and development, dedicated to the development of strategies for sustainable environmentally sound economic development of the world civilization. It stated the impossibility of developing countries’ movement in the way that came to their welfare developed countries. This model is recognized as a leading disaster and therefore proclaimed the need to move the world community on a sustainable path. Principles of sustainable development suggest that the current generation of people in the world should meet their needs so that in the age of our children and grandchildren ran out of resources too. So live allowing yourself to the constant growth of consumption is no longer possible today. The conference in Rio de Janeiro marked the beginning of a conscious turn of human civilization on a new path of development, in which a person restrain its consumer selfishness and try to live in harmony with Nature. Its over-exploitation today threatens retaliation, disastrous for humanity reactions. The essence of the global problem is how to ensure progress in solving a common problem based on two fundamental positions – development and the environment. It is believed that the ultimate aim of the world’s community development should be not an economic growth by itself, not the pace and size of the material wealths’ accumulation but the man himself. With this approach the production’s goal should be not in uncontrolled growth of the social product in order to satisfy the constantly growing people’s needs but to ensure rational (reasonable, vitally important material and spiritual man’s needs.

  9. Effects of Honey and Its Mechanisms of Action on the Development and Progression of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotayo O. Erejuwa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Honey is a natural product known for its varied biological or pharmacological activities—ranging from anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, antihypertensive to hypoglycemic effects. This review article focuses on the role of honey in modulating the development and progression of tumors or cancers. It reviews available evidence (some of which is very recent with regards to the antimetastatic, antiproliferative and anticancer effects of honey in various forms of cancer. These effects of honey have been thoroughly investigated in certain cancers such as breast, liver and colorectal cancer cell lines. In contrast, limited but promising data are available for other forms of cancers including prostate, bladder, endometrial, kidney, skin, cervical, oral and bone cancer cells. The article also underscores the various possible mechanisms by which honey may inhibit growth and proliferation of tumors or cancers. These include regulation of cell cycle, activation of mitochondrial pathway, induction of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, induction of apoptosis, modulation of oxidative stress, amelioration of inflammation, modulation of insulin signaling and inhibition of angiogenesis. Honey is highly cytotoxic against tumor or cancer cells while it is non-cytotoxic to normal cells. The data indicate that honey can inhibit carcinogenesis by modulating the molecular processes of initiation, promotion, and progression stages. Thus, it may serve as a potential and promising anticancer agent which warrants further experimental and clinical studies.

  10. Progress reports on SCWR-related development projects from Chinese universities for FY2008-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, L.K.H.

    2010-02-01

    Canada is participating in the international cooperative forum on system research for two designs (supercritical water-cooled reactor, SCWR, and Very High Temperature Reactor, VHTR) of the Gen-IV nuclear reactor. The forum is referred to as the Generation-IV International Forum (or GIF). The Canadian effort focuses mainly on the SCWR. Among various GIF participants, Canada is the leader of this design and has interest mainly on the pressure-tube type reactor, which is a natural extension of the existing CANDU reactor. Several critical research areas (such as material, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, instability, critical flow, etc.) have been identified in the system-research plan for supporting the SCWR design. Collaborative projects have been established between AECL and universities in China to expedite the CANDU SCWR design. These projects focus on research areas beyond the current scope of the AECL and the NSERC/NRCan/AECL collaborative research and development (CRD) project. AECL supports these projects directly and is contributing (in-kind) the results and findings to the Canadian national program. The collaboration between AECL and Chinese universities began in 2007 July. Most projects cover the duration of three years. The Chinese universities submit their annual progress reports each year prior to the project renewal. The objective of this report is to summarize the progress on collaborative projects between AECL and Chinese universities (namely the Tsinghua University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, and Xi'an Jiaotong University) over the duration of 2008 July to 2009 June. (author)

  11. Progress Made in Lunar In-Situ Resource Utilization Under NASA's Exploration Technology and Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Larson, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) and the production of mission critical consumables for 9 propulsion, power, and life support into mission architectures can greatly reduce the mass, cost, and risk of missions 10 leading to a sustainable and affordable approach to human exploration beyond Earth. ISRU and its products can 11 also greatly affect how other exploration systems are developed, including determining which technologies are 12 important or enabling. While the concept of lunar ISRU has existed for over 40 years, the technologies and systems 13 had not progressed much past simple laboratory proof-of-concept tests. With the release of the Vision for Space 14 Exploration in 2004 with the goal of harnessing the Moon.s resources, NASA initiated the ISRU Project in the 15 Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) to develop the technologies and systems needed to meet 16 this goal. In the five years of work in the ISRU Project, significant advancements and accomplishments occurred in 17 several important areas of lunar ISRU. Also, two analog field tests held in Hawaii in 2008 and 2010 demonstrated 18 all the steps in ISRU capabilities required along with the integration of ISRU products and hardware with 19 propulsion, power, and cryogenic storage systems. This paper will review the scope of the ISRU Project in the 20 ETDP, ISRU incorporation and development strategies utilized by the ISRU Project, and ISRU development and 21 test accomplishments over the five years of funded project activity.

  12. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-01

    This report is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report for US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC01-77ET10069 (formerly EF-77-A-01-2893) for Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) Coal Liquefaction Process Development - Phase V. The Laboratory Process Research and Development studies were conducted at various Exxon Research and Engineering Co. (ER and E) facilities: Research and Development Division at Baytown, Texas; Products Research Division at Linden, New Jersey; and the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Engineering Research and Development studies were performed at the Synthetic Fuels Engineering and Exxon Engineering Technology Departments of ER and E at Florham Park, New Jersey. The information dealing with the Management, Detailed Engineering, and Procurement activities related to revamp of the FLEXICOKING Prototype Unit was generated at Exxon Company, USA, Houston, Texas, and Exxon Engineering - Project Management Department of ER and E, Florham Park, New Jersey. The information dealing with operation of the 250 T/D Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant (ECLP) was generated at Exxon Company, USA, Houston, Texas.

  13. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Impaired germ cell development due to compromised cell cycle progression in Skp2-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Keiko

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gonads are responsible for the production of germ cells through both mitosis and meiosis. Skp2 is the receptor subunit of an SCF-type ubiquitin ligase and is a major regulator of the progression of cells into S phase of the cell cycle, which it promotes by mediating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of p27, an inhibitor of cell proliferation. However, the role of the Skp2-p27 pathway in germ cell development remains elusive. Results We now show that disruption of Skp2 in mice results in a marked impairment in the fertility of males, with the phenotypes resembling Sertoli cell-only syndrome in men. Testes of Skp2-/- mice manifested pronounced germ cell hypoplasia accompanied by massive apoptosis in spermatogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed an increased prevalence of polyploidy in spermatozoa, suggesting that the aneuploidy of these cells is responsible for the induction of apoptosis. Disruption of the p27 gene of Skp2-/- mice restored germ cell development, indicating that the testicular hypoplasia of Skp2-/- animals is attributable to the antiproliferative effect of p27 accumulation. Conclusion Our results thus suggest that compromised cell cycle progression caused by the accumulation of p27 results in aneuploidy and the induction of apoptosis in gonadal cells of Skp2-/- mice. The consequent reduction in the number of mature gametes accounts for the decreased fertility of these animals. These findings reinforce the importance of the Skp2-p27 pathway in cell cycle regulation and in germ cell development.

  15. Dietary broccoli protects against fatty liver development but not against progression of liver cancer in mice pretreated with diethylnitrosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Ju; Myracle, Angela D; Wallig, Matthew A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2016-06-01

    Western-style high fat, high sugar diets are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and increased liver cancer risk. Sulforaphane from broccoli may protect against these. Previously we initiated broccoli feeding to mice prior to exposure to the hepatocarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and saw protection against NAFLD and liver cancer. Here we administered DEN to unweaned mice, initiating broccoli feeding two weeks later, to determine if broccoli protects against cancer progression. Specifically, male 15-day-old C57BL/6J mice were given DEN and placed on a Western or Western+10%Broccoli diet from the age of 4 weeks through 7 months. Dietary broccoli decreased hepatic triacylglycerols, NAFLD, liver damage and tumour necrosis factor by month 5 without changing body weight or relative liver weight, but did not slow carcinogenesis, seen in 100% of mice. We conclude that broccoli, a good source of sulforaphane, slows progression of hepatic lipidosis, but not tumourigenesis in this robust model.

  16. New progresses in safe, clean and efficient development technologies for high-sulfur gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In China, there are a lot of high-sulfur gas reservoirs with total proved reserves of over 1 trillion m3, most of which were discovered in the Sichuan Basin. Most high-sulfur gas reservoirs in China, distributed in marine carbonate zones, are characterized by great buried depths, complex geologic conditions, high temperatures, high pressures, high H2S and CO2 content, presenting various challenges in gas field development engineering and production safety. Since the development of Sinian high-sulfur gas reservoirs in the Weiyuan area of the Sichuan Basin started in the 1960s, Wolonghe, Zhongba and other medium to small-scale gas reservoirs with medium to low sulfur content have been developed. Ever since 2009, successful production of Longgang and Puguang in the Sichuan Basin, together with some other high-sulfur gas reservoirs highlighted the breakthroughs in development technologies for high-sulfur gas reservoirs in China. This paper reviews the progress made in gas reservoir engineering, drilling and completion engineering, gas production, pipeline transportation, corrosion control, natural gas purification, HSE and other aspects with consideration of specific requirements related to safe, clean and high-efficient development of high-sulfur gas reservoirs since the “12th Five-Year Plan” period. Finally, considering the challenges in the development of high-sulfur gas reservoirs in China, we summarized the trend in future technological development with the following goals of reducing risks, minimizing environmental damages, and enhancing the efficiency of high-sulfur gas reservoir development.

  17. The progress in development and use of nuclear energy for the power in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrhovac, S.; Bojic, K.; Fabijancic, A.; Medvedec, I.; Vujovic, D.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear power plant Krsko from 1982, produces the power which is very useful for the electric power system of the country. At the same time, the investors of the nuclear power plants from republics and autonomous provinces of Yugoslavia have organized the construction of series of nuclear power plants up to 2000. The purpose of this report is to explain those activities which have initiated the process of development and the use of energy for the power in Yugoslavia, and to continue the attempts to place the near future to the progress of this process. The base of these efforts has to be solving the very problem of decision making regarding the best solution of nuclear fuel cycle, the type of nuclear power plants in Yugoslavia and their construction. (author)

  18. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

  19. Progress on the WOM (Wavelength-shifting optical module) development for IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebecker, Dustin [DESY Zeuthen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    For ongoing studies for the extension of the IceCube neutrino observatory to low energies (PINGU) and high energies the noise rate of the optical modules should be decreased and the effective area increased in order to improve energy resolution and overall sensitivity. The WOM (Wavelength-shifting optical module) targets this points by expanding the capture area while decreasing the size of the PMT and thus decreasing the noise rate. Photons are first captured in an organic wavelength-shifting material (WLS) that is coated on light guiding material to guide the light to two smaller PMTs. This allows to achieve a very large collection area and reduces the noise to the order of 10 Hz in comparison to 600-800 Hz (IceCube DOM). The progress on the necessary WLS paint development and substrate selection will be presented. Also a brief status / outlook on the prototype assembly will be given.

  20. Development and Validation of an 18-Item Medium Form of the Ravens Advanced Progressive Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon A. Sefcek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ravens Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM is a widely used measure of general intelligence (g, both across settings and cultures. Due to its lengthy 40-min administration time, several researchers have developed short-form scales, yet these forms typically yield a significantly lower reliability. This article describes the creation of an 18-item short form (APM-18 and its validation in three samples of Southwestern U.S. university students (total N = 633. The APM-18 shows similar psychometric properties to both the previously published 36-item long form and 12-item short form, but retains a reliability estimate closer to the original APM. This, plus the shorter administration time (25 min relative to the complete APM (40-60 min, makes it useful for time-constrained or mass-testing situations.

  1. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1998 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Hoffman; Kenneth Alvar; Thomas Buhl; Bruce Erdal; Philip Fresquez; Elizabeth Foltyn; Wayne Hansen; Bruce Reinert

    1999-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($504K) in FY98 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Nine projects are new for this year; two projects were completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published 19 papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space were also provided to the TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY98 included a new extremity dosimeter that replaced the previously used finger-ring dosimeters, a light and easy-to-use detector to measure energy deposited by neutron interactions, and a device that will allow workers to determine the severity of a hazard.

  2. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This report is the twenty-second in a series of Technical Progress Reports on ''Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance'' (ADIP), which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of energy. This report is organized along topical lines with Chapters 3 through 8 devoted to the various alloy classes that are currently under investigation. Thus the work of a given laboratory may appear at several different places in the report. The materials compatibility and environmental effects work on all alloy classes is collected together in Chapter 9. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader

  3. RTS,S malaria vaccine development: progress and considerations for postapproval introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asante KP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kwaku Poku Asante, George Adjei, Yeetey Enuameh, Seth Owusu-Agyei Kintampo Health Research Centre, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana Abstract: Though the burden of malaria has decreased in the last decade in some sub-Saharan African countries, it is still high in others, and there is no malaria vaccine in use. The development of malaria vaccines in combination with current control programs could be effective in reducing the malaria burden. In this paper, we review and discuss the progress made in the RTS,S malaria vaccine development and considerations for its postapproval process. We conclude that the development of malaria vaccines has been a long process confronted with challenges of funding, difficulty in identifying malaria antigens that correlate with protection, and development of adjuvant systems among others. The scientific approval of the vaccine by the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 and subsequent recommendations for pilot implementation studies by the World Health Organization made history as the first human parasite vaccine. It is also a major public health achievement as the vaccine has the potential to prevent thousands of malaria cases. However, there are implementation challenges such as cold chain systems, community acceptance, and monitoring of adverse events post-licensure that need to be carefully addressed. Keywords: malaria, vaccines, challenges, introduction, Africa, implementation considerations 

  4. Human resource development progress to sustain nuclear science and technology applications in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, A.; Nyobe, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Cameroon as a Member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has made full use of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme in his effort to promote peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology at national level. This paper presents the progress made in the development of reliable human resources. Results obtained have been achieved through national and regional technical co-operation projects. Over the past twenty years, the development of human resources in nuclear science and technology has focussed on the training of national scientists and engineers in various fields such as crop and animal production, human and animal nutrition, human health applications, medical physics, non destructive testing in industry, groundwater management, maintenance of medical and scientific equipment, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Efforts made also involve the development of graduate teaching in nuclear sciences at the national universities. However, the lack of adequate training facilities remains a major concern. The development of new training/learning methods is being considered at national level through network linking of national training centres with existing international training institutions, and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) which offer great flexibility with regard to the number of trainees and the actual needs. (author)

  5. Human resource development progress to sustain nuclear science and technology applications in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, A.; Nyobe, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Cameroon as a Member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has made full use of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme in his effort to promote peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology at national level. This paper presents the progress made in the development of reliable human resources. Results obtained have been achieved through national and regional technical co-operation projects. Over the past twenty years, the development of human resources in nuclear science and technology has focused on the training of national scientists and engineers in various fields such as crop and animal production, human and animal nutrition, human health applications, medical physics, non-destructive testing in industry, groundwater management, maintenance of medical and scientific equipment, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Efforts made also involve the development of graduate teaching in nuclear sciences at the national universities. However, the lack of adequate training facilities remains a major concern. The development of new training/learning methods is being considered at national level through network linking of national training centres with existing international training institutions, and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) which offer great flexibility with regard to the number of trainees and the actual needs. (author)

  6. Progress in Development of the ITER Plasma Control System Simulation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael; Humphreys, David; Sammuli, Brian; Ambrosino, Giuseppe; de Tommasi, Gianmaria; Mattei, Massimiliano; Raupp, Gerhard; Treutterer, Wolfgang; Winter, Axel

    2017-10-01

    We report on progress made and expected uses of the Plasma Control System Simulation Platform (PCSSP), the primary test environment for development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS). PCSSP will be used for verification and validation of the ITER PCS Final Design for First Plasma, to be completed in 2020. We discuss the objectives of PCSSP, its overall structure, selected features, application to existing devices, and expected evolution over the lifetime of the ITER PCS. We describe an archiving solution for simulation results, methods for incorporating physics models of the plasma and physical plant (tokamak, actuator, and diagnostic systems) into PCSSP, and defining characteristics of models suitable for a plasma control development environment such as PCSSP. Applications of PCSSP simulation models including resistive plasma equilibrium evolution are demonstrated. PCSSP development supported by ITER Organization under ITER/CTS/6000000037. Resistive evolution code developed under General Atomics' Internal funding. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization.

  7. Development of a wind farm noise propagation prediction model - project progress to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.; Bullmore, A.; Bass, J.; Sloth, E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a twelve month measurement campaign which is part of a European project (CEC Project JOR3-CT95-0051) with the aim to substantially reduce the uncertainties involved in predicting environmentally radiated noise levels from wind farms (1). This will be achieved by comparing noise levels measure at varying distances from single and multiple sources over differing complexities of terrain with those predicted using a number of currently adopted sound propagation models. Specific objectives within the project are to: establish the important parameters controlling the propagation of wind farm noise to the far field; develop a planning tool for predicting wind farm noise emission levels under practically encountered conditions; place confidence limits on the upper and lower bounds of the noise levels predicted, thus enabling developers to quantify the risk whether noise emission from wind farms will cause nuisance to nearby residents. (Author)

  8. Progress and status of the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel cycle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and the future plans and directions. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle, is based on the use of a metallic fuel alloy (U-Pu-Zr) that permits use of an innovative method for processing of spent fuel. This method, a combination of pyrometallurgical and electrochemical processes, has been termed pyroprocessing. It offers the advantages of a simple, compact processing system and limited volumes of stabilized high-level wastes. This translates to an economically viable system that is likely to receive favorable public response, particularly when combined with the other attributes of the Integral Fast Reactor. Substantial progress has been made in the development of the IFR pyroprocessing method. A comprehensive demonstration of the process will soon begin at the Argonne National Laboratory Idaho site, using spent fuel from the EBR-II reactor. An important advantage of the IFR is its ability to recycle fuel in the process of power generation, extending fuel resources by a considerable amount and assuring the continued viability of nuclear power stations by reducing dependence on external fuel supplies. Pyroprocessing is the means whereby the recycle process is accomplished. It can also be applied to the recovery of fuel constituents from spent fuel generated in the process of operation of conventional light water reactor power plants, offering the means to recover the valuable fuel resources remaining in that material

  9. [Effects of deformational plagiocephaly during the first 12 months on the psychomotor development of prematurely born infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre-Grenet, M; Garcia-Méric, P; Bernard-Niel, V; Guagliardo, V; Cortaredona, S; Aymeric-Ponsonnet, M

    2017-09-01

    The link between deformational plagiocephaly and psychomotor development is a recurrent question in medical publications. Main publications concentrate on term infants, but there is a lack of data on the impact of deformational plagiocephaly on the long-term neurodevelopment of premature infants. We attempted to establish a possible relation between deformational plagiocephaly during the 1st year of life and the psychomotor score at 4 years in prematurely born infants. Other risk factors potentially impacting the psychomotor score were also studied. A retrospective study of the files of the children followed by the "Naître et Devenir Région PACA Ouest Corse Sud" healthcare network and included in the database allowed us to select a cohort of 594 infants born prematurely at under 33 weeks of gestational age. These children were developmentally evaluated during the 1st year of life and at 4 years or age using the "EVAL Mater" test. The "Naître et Devenir" network is following up infants born prematurely at under 33 weeks of gestation in the West Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur and South Corsica region, from discharge to 7 years. A group of 170 specially trained pediatricians follow these infants developmentally at term, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months of corrected age and 3, 4 5, 6, and 7 years. Data are collected in a specially designed database. There was no significant link between deformational plagiocephaly during the 1st year of life and a pathological psychomotor score at age 4, but some risk factors were demonstrated: male gender, birth at under 28 weeks of gestational age, weight at birth under 1000g, having a Latal and Ferriero neuromotor score equal to or greater than 2 at 3 months of corrected age, and to a lesser extent having a prescription for physiotherapy during the 1st year. The research on deformational plagiocephaly in the full-term infant suggests a relation between deformational plagiocephaly and developmental delay predominantly

  10. Effects of progressive resistance training combined with a protein-enriched lean red meat diet on health-related quality of life in elderly women: secondary analysis of a 4-month cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Susan J; Robinson, Sian; Orellana, Liliana; O'Connell, Stella L; Grimes, Carley A; Mundell, Niamh L; Dunstan, David W; Nowson, Caryl A; Daly, Robin M

    2017-06-01

    Resistance training (RT) and increased dietary protein are recommended to attenuate age-related muscle loss in the elderly. This study examined the effect of a lean red meat protein-enriched diet combined with progressive resistance training (RT+Meat) on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in elderly women. In this 4-month cluster randomised controlled trial, 100 women aged 60-90 years (mean 73 years) from self-care retirement villages participated in RT twice a week and were allocated either 160 g/d (cooked) lean red meat consumed across 2 meals/d, 6 d/week or ≥1 serving/d (25-30 g) carbohydrates (control group, CRT). HR-QoL (SF-36 Health Survey questionnaire), lower limb maximum muscle strength and lean tissue mass (LTM) (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were assessed at baseline and 4 months. In all, ninety-one women (91 %) completed the study (RT+Meat (n 48); CRT (n 43)). Mean protein intake was greater in RT+Meat than CRT throughout the study (1·3 (sd 0·3) v. 1·1 (sd 0·3) g/kg per d, Pelderly women compared with RT alone, which was because of greater improvements in PCS rather than MCS.

  11. Progress report on research and development in 1991, Institute of Nuclear Physics, KfK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Progress report on research and development in 1991 Institute of Nuclear Physics. Within the framework of the KASCADE project to study air showers of cosmic radiation, a comprehensive detector field (array) and the central calorimeter have been developed and built. One of the working groups deals with neutrino physics at the spallation neutron source ISIS of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England. By means of the detector system KARMEN I, measurements are made in relation with neutrino oscillation, neutrino-core scattering, and neutrino-electron scattering. Nuclear physics activities mainly deal with experiments on nuclear astrophysics. To that effect, cross sections of neutron capture processes are measured in order to clarify the process of element transformation in stars. Other experiments use laser-spectroscopic methods to determine nuclear radii and moments of short-lived radioactive atoms. For the project 'Reprocessing and Waste Treatment' measuring instruments have been developed by which the isotopic composition and concentration of fissionable materials can be determined very precisely and quickly. (orig./DG) [de

  12. Synchronized Progression of Prestin Expression and Auditory Brainstem Response during Postnatal Development in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Hang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prestin is the motor protein expressed in the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs of mammalian inner ear. The electromotility of OHCs driven by prestin is responsible for the cochlear amplification which is required for normal hearing in adult animals. Postnatal expression of prestin and activity of OHCs may contribute to the maturation of hearing in rodents. However, the temporal and spatial expression of prestin in cochlea during the development is not well characterized. In the present study, we examined the expression and function of prestin from the OHCs in apical, middle, and basal turns of the cochleae of postnatal rats. Prestin first appeared at postnatal day 6 (P6 for basal turn, P7 in middle turn, and P9 for apical turn of cochlea. The expression level increased progressively over the next few days and by P14 reached the mature level for all three segments. By comparison with the time course of the development of auditory brainstem response for different frequencies, our data reveal that prestin expression synchronized with the hearing development. The present study suggests that the onset time of hearing may require the expression of prestin and is determined by the mature function of OHCs.

  13. CNS drug development in Europe--past progress and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J; Attridge, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Despite enormous progress in defining, diagnosing and treating mental disorders, EU health systems face a mounting challenge in responding to 'unmet need'. Mental illnesses produce a societal burden that exceeds that for either cancers or cardiovascular conditions. Leveraging advances in science and medicine to make available new innovative medicines is a key component in responding to this challenge. The dominant paradigm has been, is and will continue to be, one of incremental progress. Better medicines for depression, anxiety and psychoses in the working age population would add great value to patients and improve labour productivity. But psychotropic medicines face exceptional challenges in demonstrating their added value, due to uncertainty in patient diagnosis, selecting treatments and ensuring adherence. Also, there are major difficulties in estimating costs. Advances in understanding brain processes, identifying biomarkers and neuro-imaging techniques promise far more effective 'diagnostic-therapeutic' treatments and improved patient outcomes in the future. Currently there are valuable incremental innovations in late development, which may well fail to recover their R&D costs, because of very low reimbursed prices. This will send a signal to innovators not to persist with product development in this area. Recently several leading companies have withdrawn from R&D in these mental disorders. This is a worrying development since building the capabilities to succeed in any disease sector takes many years and, once dismantled, they cannot easily be re-established. Three policy interventions could improve innovation incentives: Further 'push' incentives under i) and streamlining under ii) alone will not reverse the decline in investment incentives. An EU consensus, based upon an innovation model which encompasses the Research, Development and Market phases as a single cyclical process, which addresses the weak 'market pull incentives' under iii) is needed. There

  14. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on several different projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Furnace Projects for waste destruction; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project for removal of radioactive materials; and Spray Casting Project.

  15. Developing a female-only flock for artificial insemination purposes in ostriches: Progress and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Maud; Malecki, Irek A; Brand, Zanell; Cloete, Schalk W P

    2017-05-01

    The development of a flock of females that can produce eggs and maintain egg production rate without the presence of males is a prerogative for a viable artificial insemination protocol in ostriches. Over six consecutive breeding seasons (May-December, 2009-2014), we recorded the egg production performance of 40 single-penned (ART) South African Black ostrich females (2-9 years of age), and compared these records with the egg production of 162 pair-mated females of comparable age from the breeding flock (BP). ART females laid significantly fewer eggs than BP females (mean±SEM: 3.49±0.13 eggs per month vs. 4.64±0.09 eggs per month respectively; Partificial insemination from high egg production performance parents could improve egg production of the ART flock. Studies are also needed to gain a better understanding of underlying physiological mechanisms promoting spontaneous ovulation in this species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Progress on standardization and automation in software development on W7X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehner, Georg, E-mail: kuehner@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bluhm, Torsten [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Heimann, Peter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hennig, Christine [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Kroiss, Hugo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Krom, Jon; Laqua, Heike; Lewerentz, Marc [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Maier, Josef [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schacht, Joerg; Spring, Anett; Werner, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Zilker, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For W7X software development the use of ISO/IEC15504-5 is further extended. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The standard provides a basis to manage software multi-projects for a large system project. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adoption of a scrum-like management allows for quick reaction on priority changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high degree of software build automation allows for quick responses to user requests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It provides additional resources to concentrate work on product quality (ISO/IEC 25000). - Abstract: For a complex experiment like W7X being subject to changes all along its projected lifetime the advantages of a formalized software development method have already been stated. Quality standards like ISO/IEC-12207 provide a guideline for structuring of development work and improving process and product quality. A considerable number of tools has emerged supporting and automating parts of development work. On W7X progress has been made during the last years in exploiting the benefit of automation and management during software development: -Continuous build, integration and automated test of software artefacts. Ring-Operator Syntax checks and code quality metrics. Ring-Operator Documentation generation. Ring-Operator Feedback for developers by temporal statistics. -Versioned repository for build products (libraries, executables). -Separate snapshot and release repositories and automatic deployment. -Semi-automatic provisioning of applications. -Feedback from testers and feature requests by ticket system. This toolset is working efficiently and allows the team to concentrate on development. The activity there is presently focused on increasing the quality of the existing software to become a dependable product. Testing of single functions and qualities must be simplified. So a restructuring is underway which relies more on small, individually testable components with standardized

  17. Progress on standardization and automation in software development on W7X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühner, Georg; Bluhm, Torsten; Heimann, Peter; Hennig, Christine; Kroiss, Hugo; Krom, Jon; Laqua, Heike; Lewerentz, Marc; Maier, Josef; Schacht, Jörg; Spring, Anett; Werner, Andreas; Zilker, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► For W7X software development the use of ISO/IEC15504-5 is further extended. ► The standard provides a basis to manage software multi-projects for a large system project. ► Adoption of a scrum-like management allows for quick reaction on priority changes. ► A high degree of software build automation allows for quick responses to user requests. ► It provides additional resources to concentrate work on product quality (ISO/IEC 25000). - Abstract: For a complex experiment like W7X being subject to changes all along its projected lifetime the advantages of a formalized software development method have already been stated. Quality standards like ISO/IEC-12207 provide a guideline for structuring of development work and improving process and product quality. A considerable number of tools has emerged supporting and automating parts of development work. On W7X progress has been made during the last years in exploiting the benefit of automation and management during software development: –Continuous build, integration and automated test of software artefacts. ∘Syntax checks and code quality metrics. ∘Documentation generation. ∘Feedback for developers by temporal statistics. –Versioned repository for build products (libraries, executables). –Separate snapshot and release repositories and automatic deployment. –Semi-automatic provisioning of applications. –Feedback from testers and feature requests by ticket system. This toolset is working efficiently and allows the team to concentrate on development. The activity there is presently focused on increasing the quality of the existing software to become a dependable product. Testing of single functions and qualities must be simplified. So a restructuring is underway which relies more on small, individually testable components with standardized interfaces providing the capability to construct arbitrary function aggregates for dedicated tests of quality attributes as availability, reliability

  18. Association between breast milk intake at 9-10 months of age and growth and development among Malawian young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumwenda, Chiza; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Phuka, John; Ashorn, Ulla; Arimond, Mary; Maleta, Kenneth; Prado, Elizabeth L; Haskell, Marjorie J; Dewey, Kathryn G; Ashorn, Per

    2018-01-19

    World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for infants for the first 6 months of life, followed by introduction of nutritious complementary foods alongside breastfeeding. Breast milk remains a significant source of nourishment in the second half of infancy and beyond; however, it is not clear whether more breast milk is always better. The present study was designed to determine the association between amount of breast milk intake at 9-10 months of age and infant growth and development by 12-18 months of age. The study was nested in a randomized controlled trial conducted in Malawi. Regression analysis was used to determine associations between breast milk intake and growth and development. Mean (SD) breast milk intake at 9-10 months of age was 752 (244) g/day. Mean (SD) length-for-age z-score at 12 months and change in length-for-age z-score between 12 and 18 months were -1.69 (1.0) and -0.17 (0.6), respectively. At 18 months, mean (SD) expressive vocabulary score was 32 (24) words and median (interquartile range) skills successfully performed for fine, gross, and overall motor skills were 21 (19-22), 18 (16-19), and 38 (26-40), respectively. Breast milk intake (g/day) was not associated with either growth or development. Proportion of total energy intake from breast milk was negatively associated with fine motor (β = -0.18, p = .015) but not other developmental scores in models adjusted for potential confounders. Among Malawian infants, neither breast milk intake nor percent of total energy intake from breast milk at 9-10 months was positively associated with subsequent growth between 12 and 18 months, or development at 18 months. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Methodological developments in US state-level Genuine Progress Indicators: toward GPI 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Berik, Günseli; Gaddis, Erica J. Brown

    2014-01-01

    The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) has emerged as an important monetary measure of economic well-being. Unlike mainstream economic indicators, primarily Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the GPI accounts for both the benefits and costs of economic production across diverse economic, social, and environmental domains in a more comprehensive manner. Recently, the GPI has gained traction in subnational policy in the United States, with GPI studies being conducted in a number of states and with their formal adoption by several state governments. As the GPI is applied in different locations, new methods are developed, different data sources are available, and new issues of policy relevance are addressed using its component indicators. This has led to a divergence in methods, reducing comparability between studies and yielding results that are of varying methodological sophistication. In this study, we review the “state of the art” in recent US state-level GPI studies, focusing on those from Hawaii, Maryland, Ohio, Utah, and Vermont. Through adoption of a consistent approach, these and future GPI studies could utilize a framework that supports more uniform, comparable, and accurate measurements of progress. We also identify longer-term issues, particularly related to treatment of nonrenewable resource depletion, government spending, income inequality, and ecosystem services. As these issues are successfully addressed and disseminated, a “GPI 2.0” will emerge that better measures economic well-being and has greater accuracy and policy relevance than past GPI measurements. As the GPI expands further into mainstream policy analysis, a more formal process by which methods could be updated, standardized, and applied is needed.

  20. The Community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear installations. Third annual progress report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual progress report of the European Community's programme (1984-88) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. It shows the status of the programme on 31 December 1987. The third progress report describes the objectives, scope and work programme of the 69 research contracts concluded, as well as the progress of work achieved and the results obtained in 1987

  1. The community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear installations. Fourth annual progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fourth annual progress report on the European Community's programme (1984-88) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. It shows the status of the programme at 31 December 1988. The fourth progress report describes the objectives, scope and work programme of the 72 research contracts concluded, as well as the progress of work achieved and the results obtained in 1988

  2. Progress report on fast breeder reactor development in Japan, June-March, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The experimental fast reactor ''Joyo'' started the second cycle operation of 50 MW on January 12, and finished it on February 26. The operation was very stable throughout this period. The preparation to raise the output to 75 MW has been in progress since then in parallel with the periodic inspection. Experimental fuel subassemblies and a control rod used for the 50 MW operation were removed. Installations of a fuel storage and handling facility, a water cooling and purifying plant, and an in-water cutting equipment were completed. The works related to the analysis of the core characteristics are reported. The construction preliminary design (2) of the prototype fast reactor ''Monju'' was finished. The wind tunnel experiment and the calculation of earthquake response to artificial seismic waves are being carried on. The works of developing codes and the surveys on the construction site are reported. The fourth preliminary design of the demonstration fast reactor was completed. The research and development of reactor physics, structural components, instrumentation and control, sodium technology, fuel materials, structures and structural materials, safety and steam generators are reported. The technological investigation into foreign LMFBRs was finished. (Kako, I.)

  3. Current progress of targetron technology: development, improvement and application in metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Jie; Cui, Gu-Zhen; Cui, Qiu

    2015-06-01

    Targetrons are mobile group II introns that can recognize their DNA target sites by base-pairing RNA-DNA interactions with the aid of site-specific binding reverse transcriptases. Targetron technology stands out from recently developed gene targeting methods because of the flexibility, feasibility, and efficiency, and is particularly suitable for the genetic engineering of difficult microorganisms, including cellulolytic bacteria that are considered promising candidates for biomass conversion via consolidated bioprocessing. Along with the development of the thermotargetron method for thermophiles, targetron technology becomes increasingly important for the metabolic engineering of industrial microorganisms aiming at biofuel/chemical production. To summarize the current progress of targetron technology and provide new insights on the use of the technology, this paper reviews the retrohoming mechanisms of both mesophilic and thermophilic targetron methods based on various group II introns, investigates the improvement of targetron tools for high target efficiency and specificity, and discusses the current applications in the metabolic engineering for bacterial producers. Although there are still intellectual property and technical restrictions in targetron applications, we propose that targetron technology will contribute to both biochemistry research and the metabolic engineering for industrial productions. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. EVALUATION OF STEROID HORMONES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Bennett

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones and their receptors have important roles in normal kidney biology, and alterations in their expression and function help explain the differences in development of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. The distinct gender difference in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, with males having almost twice the incidence as females globally, also suggests a role for sex hormones or their receptors in RCC development and progression. There was a peak in interest in evaluating the roles of androgen and estrogen receptors in RCC pathogenesis in the late 20th century, with some positive outcomes for RCC therapy that targeted estrogen receptors, especially for metastatic disease. Since that time, however, there have been few studies that look at use of steroid hormone modulators for RCC, especially in the light of new therapies such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and new immune therapies, which are having some success for treatment of metastatic RCC. This review summarises past and current literature and attempts to stimulate renewed interest in research into the steroid hormones and their receptors, which might be used to effect, for example, in combination with the other newer targeted therapies for RCC.

  5. Retinal dysplasia and progressive atrophy in dogs irradiated during ocular development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, D.J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Beagle dogs were given a single, whole-body gamma-radiation exposure at various stages during ocular development and were evaluated for the presence of ocular lesions. Dogs were exposed during middle or late pregnancy at 28 or 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or as neonates at 2 days postpartum (dpp). Mean whole-body and ocular doses ranged from 1.0 to 3.8 Gy. Dogs were sacrificed and ocular lesions were evaluated at 70 days, 2 years, or 4 years of age. Retinal dysplasias and atrophy were the most striking lesions related to radiation exposure. These lesions were bilateral and focal to diffuse in nature, and they increased in severity with increasing radiation dose. The stage of development at irradiation had a marked effect on the distribution of retinal lesions, with the most severe changes being present in that portion of the retina undergoing differentiation at the time of the insult. In dogs sacrificed at 70 days of age the lesions were primarily dysplasias consisting of ectopic nuclear aggregates in the photoreceptor layer, retinal folds, and retinal rosettes. With increasing age (up to 4 years), there appeared to be progression of the extent of the clinically evident lesions, and there was a change in the nature of the lesions from dysplasia to atrophy. This was accompanied by marked attenuation of the retinal vasculature

  6. The Multifunctional Protein Kinase C-ε in Cancer Development and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family proteins are important signal transducers and have long been the focus of cancer research. PKCɛ, a member of this family, is overexpressed in most solid tumors and plays critical roles in different processes that lead to cancer development. Studies using cell lines and animal models demonstrated the transforming potential of PKCɛ. While earlier research established the survival functions of PKCɛ, recent studies revealed its role in cell migration, invasion and cancer metastasis. PKCɛ has also been implicated in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which may be the underlying mechanism by which it contributes to cell motility. In addition, PKCɛ affects cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions by direct regulation of the cytoskeletal elements. Recent studies have also linked PKCɛ signaling to cancer stem cell functioning. This review focuses on the role of PKCɛ in different processes that lead to cancer development and progression. We also discussed current literatures on the pursuit of PKCɛ as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:24727247

  7. The Multifunctional Protein Kinase C-ε in Cancer Development and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase C (PKC family proteins are important signal transducers and have long been the focus of cancer research. PKCɛ, a member of this family, is overexpressed in most solid tumors and plays critical roles in different processes that lead to cancer development. Studies using cell lines and animal models demonstrated the transforming potential of PKCɛ. While earlier research established the survival functions of PKCɛ, recent studies revealed its role in cell migration, invasion and cancer metastasis. PKCɛ has also been implicated in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, which may be the underlying mechanism by which it contributes to cell motility. In addition, PKCɛ affects cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions by direct regulation of the cytoskeletal elements. Recent studies have also linked PKCɛ signaling to cancer stem cell functioning. This review focuses on the role of PKCɛ in different processes that lead to cancer development and progression. We also discussed current literatures on the pursuit of PKCɛ as a target for cancer therapy.

  8. The Multifunctional Protein Kinase C-ε in Cancer Development and Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family proteins are important signal transducers and have long been the focus of cancer research. PKCε, a member of this family, is overexpressed in most solid tumors and plays critical roles in different processes that lead to cancer development. Studies using cell lines and animal models demonstrated the transforming potential of PKCε. While earlier research established the survival functions of PKCε, recent studies revealed its role in cell migration, invasion and cancer metastasis. PKCε has also been implicated in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which may be the underlying mechanism by which it contributes to cell motility. In addition, PKCε affects cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions by direct regulation of the cytoskeletal elements. Recent studies have also linked PKCε signaling to cancer stem cell functioning. This review focuses on the role of PKCε in different processes that lead to cancer development and progression. We also discussed current literatures on the pursuit of PKCε as a target for cancer therapy.

  9. The Multifunctional Protein Kinase C-ε in Cancer Development and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular and Medical Genetics, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Institute for Cancer Research, and Focused on Resources for her Health Education and Research, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family proteins are important signal transducers and have long been the focus of cancer research. PKCε, a member of this family, is overexpressed in most solid tumors and plays critical roles in different processes that lead to cancer development. Studies using cell lines and animal models demonstrated the transforming potential of PKCε. While earlier research established the survival functions of PKCε, recent studies revealed its role in cell migration, invasion and cancer metastasis. PKCε has also been implicated in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which may be the underlying mechanism by which it contributes to cell motility. In addition, PKCε affects cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions by direct regulation of the cytoskeletal elements. Recent studies have also linked PKCε signaling to cancer stem cell functioning. This review focuses on the role of PKCε in different processes that lead to cancer development and progression. We also discussed current literatures on the pursuit of PKCε as a target for cancer therapy.

  10. PROGRESS ON DEVELOPING SONIC INFRARED IMAGING FOR DEFECT DETECTION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xiaoyan; He Qi; Li Wei; Newaz, Golam; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    At last year's QNDE conference, we presented our development of Sonic IR imaging technology in metal structures, with results from both experimental studies and theoretical computing. In the latest aircraft designs, such as the B787 from Boeing, composites have become the major materials in structures such as the fuselage and wings. This is in contrast to composites' use only in auxiliary components such as flaps and spoilers in the past. With today's advanced technology of fabrication, it is expected the new materials can be put in use in even more aircraft structures due to its light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, with increases in fuel cost, reducing the aircraft's body weight becomes more and more appealing. In this presentation, we describe the progress on our development of Sonic IR imaging for aircraft composite structures. In particular, we describe the some unexpected results discovered while modeling delaminations. These results were later experimentally verified with an engineered delamination.

  11. Clinical efficacy and safety of a light mask for prevention of dark adaptation in treating and preventing progression of early diabetic macular oedema at 24 months (CLEOPATRA): a multicentre, phase 3, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Vasconcelos, Joana C; Prevost, A Toby; Holmes, Helen; Hykin, Philip; George, Sheena; Murphy, Caroline; Kelly, Joanna; Arden, Geoffrey B

    2018-03-05

    We aimed to assess 24-month outcomes of wearing an organic light-emitting sleep mask as an intervention to treat and prevent progression of non-central diabetic macular oedema. CLEOPATRA was a phase 3, single-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial undertaken at 15 ophthalmic centres in the UK. Adults with non-centre-involving diabetic macular oedema were randomly assigned (1:1) to wearing either a light mask during sleep (Noctura 400 Sleep Mask, PolyPhotonix Medical, Sedgefield, UK) or a sham (non-light) mask, for 24 months. Randomisation was by minimisation generated by a central web-based computer system. Outcome assessors were masked technicians and optometrists. The primary outcome was the change in maximum retinal thickness on optical coherence tomography (OCT) at 24 months, analysed using a linear mixed-effects model incorporating 4-monthly measurements and baseline adjustment. Analysis was done using the intention-to-treat principle in all randomised patients with OCT data. Safety was assessed in all patients. This trial is registered with Controlled-Trials.com, number ISRCTN85596558. Between April 10, 2014, and June 15, 2015, 308 patients were randomly assigned to wearing the light mask (n=155) or a sham mask (n=153). 277 patients (144 assigned the light mask and 133 the sham mask) contributed to the mixed-effects model over time, including 246 patients with OCT data at 24 months. The change in maximum retinal thickness at 24 months did not differ between treatment groups (mean change -9·2 μm [SE 2·5] for the light mask vs -12·9 μm [SE 2·9] for the sham mask; adjusted mean difference -0·65 μm, 95% CI -6·90 to 5·59; p=0·84). Median compliance with wearing the light mask at 24 months was 19·5% (IQR 1·9-51·6). No serious adverse events were related to either mask. The most frequent adverse events related to the assigned treatment were discomfort on the eyes (14 with the light mask vs seven with the sham mask), painful, sticky, or

  12. The Academic Support Process (ASP) website: helping preceptors develop resident learning plans and track progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodel, Emma J; Montpetit, Madeleine; Eyre, Alison; Prentice, Michelle; Johnston, Mary

    2012-01-01

    At times, preceptors struggle with aspects of resident education. Many are looking for more support and faculty development in this area. To address preceptors' needs for resources and provide a proactive framework for their teaching, the Academic Support Process (ASP) website was developed and evaluated. Preceptors' (N = 35) experiences using the ASP website, as well as their perceptions of its usefulness in supporting resident education, were identified. The research comprised two phases: a self-directed workshop involving the creation of a web-based learning plan for a standardised scenario of a resident in difficulty followed by 3 months use of the ASP website with residents in their practice. Information on their experiences was solicited via surveys and focus group interviews. Findings revealed the ASP website enabled preceptors to find words for their concerns around resident competency, gave them a proactive teaching framework, expanded their arsenal of teaching strategies, and supported a customised approach for all learners along the performance spectrum. However, there were a number of challenges encountered by the preceptors that affected site use and buy in. Results are promising. Next steps involve developing a clear strategy for adoption.

  13. Developing a Learning Progression for Curriculum, Instruction, and Student Learning: An Example from Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonger, Nicole L.; Stephens, Ana; Blanton, Maria; Isler, Isil; Knuth, Eric; Gardiner, Angela Murphy

    2018-01-01

    Learning progressions have been demarcated by some for science education, or only concerned with levels of sophistication in student thinking as determined by logical analyses of the discipline. We take the stance that learning progressions can be leveraged in mathematics education as a form of curriculum research that advances a linked…

  14. Differences in Knowledge Development Exposed by Multi-Curricular Progress Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Schuwirth, Lambert W. T.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Progress testing provides data on the growth of students' knowledge over the course of the curriculum obtained from the results of all students in the curriculum on periodical similar tests pitched at end-of-curriculum level. Since 2001, three medical schools have jointly constructed and administered four progress tests annually. All students in…

  15. [Signal transduction in plant development: Chemical and biochemical approaches to receptor identification]. Progress report, [May 15, 1993--May 14, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Progress is reported on studies concerning NAD(P)H-2,6-DMBQ oxidoreductase of Striga asiatica aimed at elucidating basic biochemical parameters of Striga. Reported studies include characterization of the enzyme, development of Striga molecular genetics, and development of a redox model for germination control.

  16. Development and characterization of a preclinical model of breast cancer lung micrometastatic to macrometastatic progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora C Bailey-Downs

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients die with metastatic disease, thus, good models that recapitulate the natural process of metastasis including a dormancy period with micrometastatic cells would be beneficial in developing treatment strategies. Herein we report a model of natural metastasis that balances time to complete experiments with a reasonable dormancy period, which can be used to better study metastatic progression. The basis for the model is a 4T1 triple negative syngeneic breast cancer model without resection of the primary tumor. A cell titration from 500 to 15,000 GFP tagged 4T1 cells implanted into fat pad number four of immune proficient eight week female BALB/cJ mice optimized speed of the model while possessing metastatic processes including dormancy and beginning of reactivation. The frequency of primary tumors was less than 50% in animals implanted with 500-1500 cells. Although implantation with over 10,000 cells resulted in 100% primary tumor development, the tumors and macrometastases formed were highly aggressive, lacked dormancy, and offered no opportunity for treatment. Implantation of 7,500 cells resulted in >90% tumor take by 10 days; in 30-60 micrometastases in the lung (with many animals also having 2-30 brain micrometastases two weeks post-implantation, with the first small macrometastases present at five weeks; many animals displaying macrometastases at five weeks and animals becoming moribund by six weeks post-implantation. Using the optimum of 7,500 cells the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer, doxorubicin, given at its maximal tolerated dose (MTD; 1 mg/kg weekly was tested for an effect on metastasis. Doxorubicin treatment significantly reduced primary tumor growth and lung micrometastases but the number of macrometastases at experiment end was not significantly affected. This model should prove useful for development of drugs to target metastasis and to study the biology of metastasis.

  17. Development of novel agents for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: progress in target selection and clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, Thomas G; Smith, Victoria; Raghu, Ganesh

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal disease. Until recently, the standard therapy for this disease has been essentially supportive, with the exception of a minority of patients who were eligible for lung transplantation. The development pathway for novel medications for IPF has been complicated. There have been several challenges, including an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis, unpredictable clinical course, lack of validated biomarkers, the low clinical predictive value of animal models of lung injury, and the need to commit to large clinical trials of long duration to obtain initial evidence of clinical efficacy. Despite these challenges, the combination of recent advances in translational medicine and the unprecedented increase in clinical data accumulated from recent large clinical trials has stimulated an increase in the number of clinical development programs for IPF. Clinical programs are increasingly characterized by rational target selection, preclinical optimization of therapeutic molecules, and an emphasis on efficient clinical trial design. A lower rate of functional decline in patients treated with pirfenidone and nintedanib was demonstrated in large clinical trials. In October 2014, these two drugs became the first agents to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of IPF. (Pirfenidone had already been approved in several countries outside the United States.) In November 2014, the European Medicines Agency approved the use of nintedanib for IPF. The landscape for management of IPF has markedly changed with the advent of approved therapeutic options for IPF. In this article, we review the strategies that are being used to increase the likelihood of success in clinical development programs of novel disease-modifying agents in IPF.

  18. PTEN Deficiency Contributes to the Development and Progression of Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane H Squarize

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The sequencing of the head and neck cancer has provided a blueprint of the most frequent genetic alterations in this cancer type. They include inactivating mutations in Notch, p53, and p16ink4a tumor suppressor genes, in addition to nonoverlapping activating mutations of the PIK3CA and RAS oncogenes or inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. Notably, these genetic alterations, along with epigenetic changes, result in increased activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, which is present in most head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs. Moreover, we show here that approximately 30% of HNSCCs exhibit reduced PTEN expression. We challenged the biologic relevance of this finding by combining the intraoral administration of a tobacco surrogate, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, with a genetically defined animal model displaying reduced PTEN expression, achieved by the conditional deletion of Pten using the keratin promoter 14 CRE-lox system. This provided a specific genetic and environmentally defined animal model for HNSCC that resulted in the rapid development of oral-specific carcinomas. Under these experimental conditions, control mice did not develop HNSCC lesions. In contrast, most mice harboring Pten deficiency developed multiple SCC lesions in the lateral border and ventral part of the tongue and floor of the mouth, which are the preferred anatomic sites for human HNSCC. Overall, our study highlights the likely clinical relevance of reduced PTEN expression and/or inactivation in HNSCC progression, while the combined Pten deletion with exposure to tobacco carcinogens or their surrogates may provide a unique experimental model system to study novel molecular targeted treatments for HNSCC patients.

  19. Project Management Plan/Progress Report UT/GTKS Training Program Development for Commercial Building Operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-03-31

    Universidad del Turabo (UT), in a collaborative effort with Global Turn Key Services, Inc. (GTKS), proposed to develop a training program and a commercialization plan for the development of Commercial Building Operators (CBOs). The CBOs will operate energy efficient buildings to help maintain existing buildings up to their optimal energy performance level, and ensure that net-zero-energy buildings continuously operate at design specifications, thus helping achieve progress towards meeting BTP Strategic Goals of creating technologies and design approaches that enable net-zero-energy buildings at low incremental costs by 2025. The proposed objectives were then: (1) Develop a Commercial Building Operator (CBO) training program and accreditation that will in turn provide a certification to participants recognized by Accreditation Boards such as the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) and Leadership in Energy & Environmental Designs (LEED). (2) Develop and implement a commercialization and sustainability plan that details marketing, deployment, financial characterization, job placement, and other goals required for long-term sustainability of the project after the funding period. (3) After program development and deployment, provide potential candidates with the knowledge and skill sets to obtain employment in the commercial building green energy (net-zero-energy building) job market. The developed CBO training program will focus on providing skills for participants, such as displaced and unemployed workers, to enter the commercial building green energy (net-zeroenergy building) job market. This course was designed to allow a participant with minimal to no experience in commercial building green technology to obtain the required skill sets to enter the job market in as little as 12 weeks of intensive multi-faceted learning. After completion of the course, the CBO staff concluded the participant will meet minimum established accreditation

  20. Non-melanoma skin cancer: what drives tumor development and progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukamp, Petra

    2005-10-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer, i.e. basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most frequent tumors and their number is still increasing worldwide. Furthermore, immunosuppression in organ transplant patients strongly contributes to the increase in skin cancer incidence--being 65-250 times more frequent than in the general population. Often these patients suffer from a second and third lesion and the severity of these tumors is linked to their number. SCCs in transplant recipients also appear to be more aggressive. They tend to grow rapidly, show a higher rate of local recurrences and metastasize in 5-8% of the patients (all reviewed in Ref. 2). This largely differs from BCCs which are more frequent in the general population--at a ratio of 4:1 as compared with SCCs--but the number is only increased by a factor of 10 in transplant recipients. This may suggest that 'dormant' SCC precursor cells/lesions are present at a high frequency in the population but they are well controlled by the immune system. BCC, on the other hand, may be less dependent on immune surveillance thereby underlining its different etiology. While for BCC development the genetic hallmark is abrogation of the ptch-sonic hedgehog pathway, little is known about the causal alterations of SCCs. However, the complexity of the genetic alterations (numerical and structural aberration profiles) in SCCs argues for several levels of genomic instability involved in the generation and progression of skin cancer.

  1. Progress update on the development of the 3He linac for PET isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.; Sun, D.; Larson, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Anderson, K.; Bieniosek, F.; Schmidt, C.W.; Popovic, M.; McCrory, E.; Webber, R.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Bida, J.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995, Fermilab and SAIC formed a collaboration with partners from the University of Washington (UW) and the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana (BRF) to explore an innovative approach to the production of radioisotopes. The accelerator system that is being developed accelerates 3 He to 10.5 MeV and then delivers this beam to the target to produce the short lived radioisotopes of interest to the PET community ( 18 F, 15 0, 13 N, 11 C). Research is being conducted to investigate the contribution that this promising approach can make to clinical and research PET. The accelerator system has several very interesting aspects. These innovations include multiple RFQ accelerators configured in series, a gas stripper jet to doubly charge the low energy (1 MeV) 3 He beam, and an isochronous matching section to manipulate the transverse and maintain the longitudinal profile of the beam (without the use of an RF buncher) in the charge doubler transition section between RFQ's. This paper updates the progress of the PET 3 He RFQ accelerator, the current status of the design, and some of the interesting ongoing research. (author)

  2. Progress update on the development of the 3He linac for PET isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    In 1995, Fermilab and SAIC formed a collaboration with partners from the University of Washington (UW) and the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana (BRF) to explore an innovative approach to the production radioisotopes. The accelerator system that is being developed accelerates 3 He to 10.5 MeV and then delivers this beam to the target to produce the short lived radioisotopes of interest to the PET community ( 18 F, 15 0, 13 N, 11 C). Research is being conducted to investigate the contribution that this promising approach can make to clinical and research PET. The accelerator system has several very interesting aspects. These innovations include multiple RFQ accelerators configured in series, a gas stripper jet to doubly charge the low energy (I MeV) 3 He beam, and an isochronous matching section to manipulate the transverse and maintain the longitudinal profile of the beam (without the use of an RF buncher) in the charge doubler transition section between RFQ'S. This paper updates the progress of the PET 3 He RFQ accelerator, the current status of the design, and some of the interesting ongoing research

  3. Development of a transmission-blocking malaria vaccine: progress, challenges, and the path forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Julia K; Woods, Colleen; Carter, Terrell; Raphael, Theresa; Morin, Merribeth J; Diallo, Diadier; Leboulleux, Didier; Jain, Sanjay; Loucq, Christian; Kaslow, David C; Birkett, Ashley J

    2014-09-29

    New interventions are needed to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with malaria, as well as to accelerate elimination and eventual eradication. Interventions that can break the cycle of parasite transmission, and prevent its reintroduction, will be of particular importance in achieving the eradication goal. In this regard, vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission (VIMT) have been highlighted as an important intervention, including transmission-blocking vaccines that prevent human-to-mosquito transmission by targeting the sexual, sporogonic, or mosquito stages of the parasite (SSM-VIMT). While the significant potential of this vaccine approach has been appreciated for decades, the development and licensure pathways for vaccines that target transmission and the incidence of infection, as opposed to prevention of clinical malaria disease, remain ill-defined. This article describes the progress made in critical areas since 2010, highlights key challenges that remain, and outlines important next steps to maximize the potential for SSM-VIMTs to contribute to the broader malaria elimination and eradication objectives. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Coal-fired MHD test progress at the Component Development and Integration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, A.T.; Rivers, T.J.; Alsberg, C.M.; Filius, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) is a Department of Energy test facility operated by MSE, Inc. In the fall of 1984, a 50-MW t , pressurized, slag rejecting coal-fired combustor (CFC) replaced the oil-fired combustor in the test train. In the spring of 1989, a coal-fired precombustor was added to the test hardware, and current controls were installed in the spring of 1990. In the fall of 1990, the slag rejector was installed. MSE test hardware activities included installing the final workhorse channel and modifying the coalfired combustor by installing improved design and proof-of-concept (POC) test pieces. This paper discusses the involvement of this hardware in test progress during the past year. Testing during the last year emphasized the final workhorse hardware testing. This testing will be discussed. Facility modifications and system upgrades for improved operation and duration testing will be discussed. In addition, this paper will address long-term testing plans

  5. Progress in the development of MANIC: a monolithic nulling interferometer for characterizing extrasolar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Cook, Timothy A.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2010-07-01

    We present progress in the development of the monolithic achromatic nulling interference coronagraph (MANIC), an optic designed for enabling direct detection and characterization of exoplanetary systems around nearby stars. MANIC is a fully symmetric implementation of a rotational shearing interferometer consisting of fused quartz prisms and a symmetric beamsplitter optically contacted in an arrangement that geometrically flips the fields in the TR and RT arms about orthogonal axes such that upon recombination, a centro-symmetric, theoretically achromatic null is produced. In addition to a small inner working angle (measured. This measurement was used to fabricate compensator plates of varying thicknesses that were bonded to the optic to reduce dispersion imbalance, thereby improving broadband nulling performance. In performing this correction, initial OPD was reduced from 949 +/- 44 nm to 63 +/- 10 nm, which in the absence of any other asymmetries, corresponds to an increase in a 107 R-band (λc = 648 nm) nulling bandpass from monochromatic to 25%, or at the 106 level, from 5% to 50%. Current benchtop laser and polychromatic nulling strategies are described. The potential science return from using MANIC on a sub-orbital platform is discussed.

  6. Challenges and Recent Progress in the Development of a Closed-loop Artificial Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bequette, B Wayne

    2012-12-01

    Pursuit of a closed-loop artificial pancreas that automatically controls the blood glucose of individuals with type 1 diabetes has intensified during the past six years. Here we discuss the recent progress and challenges in the major steps towards a closed-loop system. Continuous insulin infusion pumps have been widely available for over two decades, but "smart pump" technology has made the devices easier to use and more powerful. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology has improved and the devices are more widely available. A number of approaches are currently under study for fully closed-loop systems; most manipulate only insulin, while others manipulate insulin and glucagon. Algorithms include on-off (for prevention of overnight hypoglycemia), proportional-integral-derivative (PID), model predictive control (MPC) and fuzzy logic based learning control. Meals cause a major "disturbance" to blood glucose, and we discuss techniques that our group has developed to predict when a meal is likely to be consumed and its effect. We further examine both physiology and device-related challenges, including insulin infusion set failure and sensor signal attenuation. Finally, we discuss the next steps required to make a closed-loop artificial pancreas a commercial reality.

  7. Developing an animal model for infantile spasms: pathogenesis, problems and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Eric D.; Golden, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Infantile spasms (IS), the most common of the early epileptic encephalopathies, afflicts thousands of children each year and results in significant disability. Also known as West syndrome, IS is characterized by intractable stereotyped seizures, poor developmental outcome and a characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern. IS often progresses into another epileptic encephalopathy known as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and continues with the patient being burdened by lifelong epilepsy and varying degrees of mental retardation. Little is known about the biological basis of IS. As the etiologies of IS are diverse, the multiple causes must converge into a final common pathway that results in this specific epilepsy phenotype. Finding a model or models to test this final pathway is necessary both to understand why the greatest susceptibility to seizure development occurs during infancy and early childhood, and what underlies the decreased cognitive potential associated with IS. Furthermore, appropriate models would permit better testing of potential therapies directed specifically at IS. This review will describe the clinical features and etiologies of IS; the ideal features that IS models should contain; and the IS models that exist currently. Finally, we will discuss the limitations of these models and the potential avenues for future research on IS. PMID:19553693

  8. Progress on the design and development of the continuous-flow total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Horvath, David J; Mielke, Nicole; Shiose, Akira; Kuban, Barry; Goodin, Mark; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Golding, Leonard A R

    2012-08-01

    Cleveland Clinic's continuous-flow total artificial heart has one motor and one rotating assembly supported by a hydrodynamic bearing. The right hydraulic output is self regulated by passive axial movement of the rotating assembly to balance itself with the left output. The purpose of this article is to present progress in four areas of development: the automatic speed control system, self-regulation to balance right/left inlet pressures and flows, hemolysis testing using calf blood, and coupled electromagnetics (EMAG) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The relationships between functions of motor power and speed, systemic flow, and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were used for the sensorless speed control algorithm and demonstrated close correlations. Based on those empirical relationships, systemic flow and SVR were calculated in the system module and showed good correlation with measured pump flow and SVR. The automatic system adjusted the pump's speed to obtain the target flow in response to the calculated SVR. Atrial pressure difference (left minus right atrial pressure) was maintained within ±10 mm Hg for a wide range of SVR/pulmonary vascular resistance ratios, demonstrating a wide margin of self-regulation under fixed-speed mode and 25% sinusoidally modulated speed mode. Hemolysis test results indicated acceptable values (normalized index of hemolysis <0.01 mg/dL). The coupled EMAG/CFD model was validated for use in further device development. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2012, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. MHD air heater development technology. Progress report, November 26, 1979-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    Work on the development of the directly-fired high temperature air heater (HTAH) for MHD power plants is reported. Progress is reported on three tasks: (1) materials selection, evaluation, and development, (2) operability, performance, and materials testing, and (3) full-scale design concepts. Under Task 1, efforts were carried out in several areas. Work on the computer data base for material properties was begun. Data were compiled for several HTAH materials. Materials selections for Valve Test 3 and full-scale studies were made. Test conditions were defined for and creep results obtained from Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology concerning candidate matrix and hot liner materials. Liaison efforts with refractory manufacturers were continued, and information was provided to Argonne National Laboratory and Babcock and Wilcox concerning the HRSR design. Analyses of materials samples from previous matrix and valve tests were completed. Finally, a thermal stress cycling experiment to be carried out at Montana Tech was designed. Under Task 2, efforts were directed toward running Valve Test 3. Problems were encountered with the VTF hot gas supply duct which necessitated two intermediate shutdowns without reaching the final test goal of 300 hours. Modifications necessary to complete the test were begun. Under Task 3, an example HTAH system was defined which will be used as a focal point for screening and definition of control systems and determination of operating methods. The system was defined using the size/cost and other HTAH computer codes. A layout of the system was made, and steady state performance was calculated with the SCAMP code. (WHK)

  10. Development of a Conceptual Model of Disease Progression for Use in Economic Modeling of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabberer, Maggie; Gonzalez-McQuire, Sebastian; Muellerova, Hana; Briggs, Andrew H; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Chambers, Mike; Lomas, David A

    2017-05-01

    To develop and validate a new conceptual model (CM) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for use in disease progression and economic modeling. The CM identifies and describes qualitative associations between disease attributes, progression and outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify any published CMs or literature reporting the impact and association of COPD disease attributes with outcomes. After critical analysis of the literature, a Steering Group of experts from the disciplines of health economics, epidemiology and clinical medicine was convened to develop a draft CM, which was refined using a Delphi process. The refined CM was validated by testing for associations between attributes using data from the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). Disease progression attributes included in the final CM were history and occurrence of exacerbations, lung function, exercise capacity, signs and symptoms (cough, sputum, dyspnea), cardiovascular disease comorbidities, 'other' comorbidities (including depression), body composition (body mass index), fibrinogen as a biomarker, smoking and demographic characteristics (age, gender). Mortality and health-related quality of life were determined to be the most relevant final outcome measures for this model, intended to be the foundation of an economic model of COPD. The CM is being used as the foundation for developing a new COPD model of disease progression and to provide a framework for the analysis of patient-level data. The CM is available as a reference for the implementation of further disease progression and economic models.

  11. Differences at 17 months : Productive language patterns in infants at familial risk for dyslexia and typically developing infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Charlotte; Been, PH; Krikhaar, EM; Zwarts, F; Diepstra, HD; van Leeuwen, Theo H.

    Productive vocabulary composition is investigated in 17-month-old children who are participating in an ongoing longitudinal dyslexia research project in the Netherlands. The project is searching for early precursors for dyslexia and follows a group of children who are genetically at risk for

  12. Lexical, Morphological and Syntactic Development in Toddlers between 16 and 30 Months Old: A Comparison across European Portuguese and Galician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Fernanda Leopoldina; Pérez-Pereira, Miguel; Cadime, Irene; Silva, Carla; Santos, Sandra; Ribeiro, Iolanda

    2017-01-01

    The main aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between the lexical size and the emergence of morphological and syntactic markers in toddlers between the ages of 16 and 30 months and to compare these results between Galician and European Portuguese. Parents of 3012 Portuguese toddlers and those of 1081 Galician toddlers completed…

  13. Developing ``SMART'' Equipment and Systems through Collaborative NERI Research and Development: A First Year of Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARMON,DARYL L.; GOLAY,MICHAEL W.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.; MAYNARD,KENNETH P.

    2000-09-11

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) created the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) in 1999 to conduct research and development with the objectives of: (1) overcoming the principal technical obstacles to expanded nuclear energy use, (2) advancing the state of nuclear technology to maintain its competitive position in domestic and world markets, and (3) improving the performance, efficiency, reliability, and economics of nuclear energy. The NERI program is now beginning its second year with increased funding and an emphasis on international participation. Among the programs selected for funding was the ``Smart Equipment and Systems to Improve Reliability and Safety in Future Nuclear Power Plant Operations''. This program is a 36 month collaborative effort bringing together the technical capabilities of Westinghouse Nuclear Automation, Sandia National Laboratories, Duke Engineering and Services (DE and S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The goal of the program is to design, develop, and evaluate an integrated set of tools and methodologies that can improve the reliability and safety of advanced nuclear power plants through the introduction of smart equipment and predictive maintenance technology. The results have implications for reduced construction costs. This paper discusses: (1) the goals and significance of the program, (2) the significant achievements of the program's first year and the current direction for its continuing efforts and (3) potential cooperation with the domestic nuclear and component manufacturing industries, and with international organizations.

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND INFLUENCE OF SPEED POWER ON RESULTS PROGRESSION OF LOW VISION JAVELIN THROWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Matić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Power is a motor skill important for low vision javelin throwers. The motor skill development (power, speed, endurance etc. linked to the fact that javelin is the lightest throwing device, we come to conclusion that the result in this discipline depends much more on the speed and flexibility than on the power. Nevertheless, development of speed power significantly influences the acquiring of good results in above mentioned discipline. While working with low vision sportsmen the attention should be focused on possible limitations in training of power that could be determined by some kind of illness or injury primarly caused the low vision. Experimental method od survey based on one sample was applied (case study. Equipment used in the experiments were adjusted to the needs, age and level of condition of examinee- Grlica Miloš (current European Record Breaker, 3rd on the World’s Championship 2012 in New Zealand, discipline of javlin throwing, category F12. The survey consisted of two-months cycle in the period from 01/04/2012 until 01/06/2012 as a part of preparation for Paralympic Games in London 2012. Measured variables include: 5kg ball throwing in front and above, standing long jump, 4kg ball throwing exercise aut. Based on the applied tests a conclusion can be made that the impact of force on acquiring better results, in this discipline, is very strong. Regardless the acquired results, in our opinion too big and too fast improvement in this area of physical preparation can be contraproductive due to the occurence of inadequate movements in joints which are esential for the discipline. Power development is definitely crucial segment in modeling of training process for javelin throwers. There are many surveys and articles about this topic but very little focusing on disabled people. Future work should examine special characteristics and differences regarding this population.

  15. Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffhauser, A.C.

    1976-09-01

    Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat-source containment materials; (3) isotope brayton system materials support; and (4) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

  16. THE ROLE OF MITOCHONDRIA IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Roberts

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer has expanded to include defects in mitochondrial genomics and biogenesis, apoptotic signaling and mitochondrial dynamics. This review will focus on the role of mitochondria and their influence on cancer initiation, progression and treatment in the lung.

  17. The influence of a hand preference for acquiring objects on the development of a hand preference for unimanual manipulation from 6 to 14 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Julie M; Marcinowski, Emily C; Babik, Iryna; Michel, George F

    2015-05-01

    Development of hand preferences for unimanual manipulation of objects was explored in 90 infants (57 males) tested monthly from 6 to 14 months. From a larger sample of 380 infants, 30 infants with a consistent left hand preference for acquiring objects were matched for sex and development of locomotion skills with 30 infants with a consistent right hand preference for acquisition and 30 with no preference. Although frequency of unimanual manipulations increased during 6-14 month period, infants with a hand preference for acquisition did more object manipulations than those without a preference for acquisition. Multilevel modeling of unimanual manipulation trajectories for the three hand-preference groups revealed that hand preferences for unimanual manipulation become more distinctive with age, and the preference is predicted by the hand preference for object acquisition. Infants with a right and left hand preference for object acquisition develop a right and left (respectively) hand preference for unimanual manipulation. However, the majority of infants at each month do not exhibit hand preferences for unimanual manipulation that are unlikely to occur by chance, even by 14 months. The results are consistent with a cascading theory of handedness development in which early preferences (i.e., for acquisition) are transferred to later developing preferences (i.e., for unimanual manipulation). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The Correlation between Providing Complementary Food and Breast-Feeding with the Growth and Development of Children under the Age of Five Years Old (6-24 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Cahya Rahmadiyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A toddler is a group on the stage of human development that is vulnerable to the risk affecting their health specifically about their growth and development. Providing the appropriate nutrition to toddlers during this risky age of 6 to 24 months is crucial in promoting a proper growth and development. The proper nourishment for toddlers at the age of 6 to 24 months includes breast-feeding and complimentary solid foods. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between the specific characteristics of a family or a household and the provision of complementary feeding about the growth and development of children (6-24 months in the village of Curug Cimanggis, Depok. This study used a descriptive correlational, cross-sectional approach using a sample that consisted of 102 children aged 6-24 months, which were collected using a proportional cluster sampling. Based on the Chi Square test, the researchers found no correlation between the provision of complementary feeding with a child’s growth and development. This is because breast-feeding as the source of nourishment is still the major factor that directly influences the growth and development of any toddler between the age of 6-24 months. However, by applying better financial management in conjunction with the ability to modify the practices of how families feed their toddlers, a family may raise and nurture their toddlers so they may grow according to the proper stages of development. The results of this study are expected to serve as an input in improving toddlers’ health care concerning their growth and development by promoting the importance of providing the appropriate complimentary food by the proper guidelines while continuing to breast feed toddlers between the age of 6 to 24 months.

  19. A follow-up of a randomised study of metformin and insulin in gestational diabetes mellitus: growth and development of the children at the age of 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijäs, H; Vääräsmäki, M; Saarela, T; Keravuo, R; Raudaskoski, T

    2015-06-01

    To compare the growth and development of children born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) requiring pharmacological treatment, and randomised to treatment with metformin or insulin. Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing metformin and insulin treatment of GDM. Data were gathered during routine visits to child welfare clinics at the ages of 6, 12, and 18 months, including weight and height measurements, and assessment of motor, social, and linguistic development. The children of mothers with GDM randomised to metformin (n = 47) or insulin (n = 50) treatment during pregnancy. Data were collected from the structured questionnaire filled in at the child welfare clinics. The growth and development of the children until the age of 18 months. Children exposed to metformin were significantly heavier (10.47 versus 9.85 kg, 95% CI 0.04-1.20) at the age of 12 months and taller and heavier (83.9 vs 82.2 cm, 95% CI 0.23-3.03, 12.05 vs 11.32 kg, 95% CI 0.04-1.43) at the age of 18 months. The mean ponderal index (PI) did not differ significantly. The motor, social, or linguistic development evaluated at the age of 18 months did not differ between the groups. Children prenatally exposed to metformin were heavier at the 12 months measurements and taller and heavier at the 18 months measurements than those exposed to insulin, but their body composition defined by PI did not differ. Over the short term, metformin does not seem to be harmful with regards to early motor, linguistic, or social development. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Progressive Development of PTH Resistance in Patients With Inactivating Mutations on the Maternal Allele of GNAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usardi, Alessia; Mamoune, Asmaa; Nattes, Elodie; Carel, Jean-Claude; Rothenbuhler, Anya; Linglart, Agnès

    2017-06-01

    Parathormone (PTH) resistance is characterized by hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated PTH in the absence of vitamin D deficiency. Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1A [PHP1A, or inactivating parathormone (PTH)/PTHrp signaling disorder 2, according to the new classification (iPPSD2)], is caused by mutations in the maternal GNAS allele. To assess PTH resistance over time in 20 patients affected by iPPSD2 (PHP1A), diagnosed because of family history, ectopic ossification, or short stature, and carrying a GNAS mutation. We gathered retrospective data for calcium, phosphate, thyrotropin (TSH), and PTH levels at regular intervals. PTH infusion testing (teriparatide) was performed in 1 patient. Patients were diagnosed at a mean age of 3.9 years and had a mean follow-up of 2 years. TSH resistance was already present at diagnosis in all patients (TSH, 13.3 ± 9.0 mIU/L). Over time, PTH levels increased (179 to 306 pg/mL; P PTH infusion, similar to that of controls, at 7 months of age, but an impaired response at 4 years of age. In patients with iPPSD2 (PHP1A), PTH resistance and hypocalcemia develop over time. These findings highlight the importance of screening for maternal GNAS mutations in the presence of ectopic ossifications or family history, even in the absence of PTH resistance and hypocalcemia. The follow-up of these patients should include regular assessments of calcium, phosphate, and PTH levels. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society