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Sample records for developing rat cerebellum

  1. De rijping van het cerebellum; a study of the postnatal development of the rat cerebellum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebels, E.J.

    1969-01-01

    Chapter I: INTRODUCTION In this investigation the development of the rat cerebellum from 0 -30 days after birth is studied morphologically, by means of enzymchistochemistry and electronmicroscopy. Enzymchistochemistry and electronmicroscopy were chosen because changes in enzyme content or enzyme

  2. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN THE DEVELOPING RAT CEREBELLUM AND HIPPOCAMPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of the nervous system is a complex program, involving coordinated growth of axons and their targets. In rodents, rapid brain growth occurs during early postnatal development. At this time, several fundamental processes, such as dendritic and axonal outgrowth and the e...

  3. Physiological properties of afferents to the rat cerebellum during normal development and after postnatal x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puro, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The consequences of an altered cerebellar cortical development on afferent transmission and terminal organization were analyzed in adult rats which had received x irradiation to the cerebellum postnatally. Rats, anesthetized with 0.5 percent halothane, were studied in various ages from day 3 to adult. The ascending mossy and climbing fiber systems were activated by electrical stimulation of the limbs with needle electrodes. Stimulation of the motor cortex activated the descending climbing fiber pathways. Extracellular responses from cerebellar Purkinje cells were observed on an oscilloscope as poststimulus time histograms were constructed ''on-line''. Conclusions and assertions include: (1) Synaptogenesis between incoming afferent fibers and target neurons takes place early in cerebellar cortical development. (2) Mossy fiber transmission is mature before the bulk of cerebellar synaptogenesis occurs. (3) The ascending and descending components of the climbing fiber system mature, with respect to latency, in synchrony. (4) The terminal synaptic organization has little effect on the development of transmission characteristics in these afferent systems. (5) One possible mechanism by which an adult neural structure can have an abnormal synaptic organization is to maintain immature synaptic relationships due to the neonatal loss of interneurons

  4. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Alters the Postnatal Development of the Rat Cerebellum.

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    McDougall, Annie R A; Wiradjaja, Vanny; Azhan, Aminath; Li, Anqi; Hale, Nadia; Wlodek, Mary E; Hooper, Stuart B; Wallace, Megan J; Tolcos, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a major cause of antenatal brain injury. We aimed to characterize cerebellar deficits following IUGR and to investigate the potential underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. At embryonic day 18, pregnant rats underwent either sham surgery (controls; n = 23) or bilateral uterine vessel ligation to restrict blood flow to fetuses (IUGR; n = 20). Offspring were collected at postnatal day 2 (P2), P7, and P35. Body weights were reduced at P2, P7, and P35 in IUGR offspring (p < 0.05) compared with controls. At P7, the width of the external granule layer (EGL) was 30% greater in IUGR than control rats (p < 0.05); there was no difference in the width of the proliferative zone or in the density of Ki67-positive cells in the EGL. Bergmann glia were disorganized at P7 and P35 in IUGR pups, and by P35, there was a 10% decrease in Bergmann glial fiber density (p < 0.05) compared with controls. At P7, trophoblast antigen-2 (Trop2) mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum were decreased by 88 and 40%, respectively, and astrotactin 1 mRNA levels were increased by 20% in the IUGR rats (p < 0.05) compared with controls; there was no difference in ASTN1 protein. The expressions of other factors known to regulate cerebellar development (astrotactin 2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 4, neuregulin 1, sonic hedgehog and somatostatin) were not different between IUGR and control rats at P7 or P35. These data suggest that damage to the migratory scaffold (Bergmann glial fibers) and alterations in the genes that influence migration (Trop2 and Astn1) may underlie the deficits in postnatal cerebellar development following IUGR. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. A comparison of effects between accelerated heavy ion irradiation and X-irradiation on the development of rat cerebellum

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    Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Murata, Yoshiharu; Takahashi, Sentaro; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to compare the effects of 290 MeV/u carbon-ion irradiation and X-irradiation on the development of rat cerebellum. Pregnant rats were exposed to carbon-ion beams at a single dose of 1.5 Gy on day 19.0 of gestation. Other groups of pregnant rats were exposed to X-rays on day 19.0 at single doses of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 Gy. Their fetuses were removed 8 hr after exposure, and an acute effect examined microscopically for cell death in the external granular layer of the cerebellum. Other dams were allowed to give birth and rear their litters. The offspring were sacrificed at 6 weeks of age, and their cerebella were examined for foliar malformation. The results showed that the effect of 1.5 Gy carbon-ion irradiation on the development of cerebellum was stronger than that of 1.5 Gy X-irradiation and similar to 2.0-2.5 Gy X-irradiation. (author)

  6. Quantification of 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptors in the cerebellum of normal and x-irradiated rats during postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthiessen, L.; Daval, G.; Bailly, Y.; Gozlan, H.; Hamon, M.; Verge, D.

    1992-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors were studied in rats during the first postnatal month in the normal cerebellum and in the granule cell-deprived cerebellum produced by X-irradiation at postnatal day 5. Quantitative autoradiographic studies on sagittal sections of cerebellar vermis, using [ 125 1]BH-8-MeO-N-PAT as radioligand or specific anti-receptor antibodies, revealed that 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors existed in the molecular/Purkinje cell layer but at variable density from one lobule to another. Thus, in both normal and X-irradiated rats, the posterior lobules were more heavily labelled than the anterior ones, and the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A sites decreased progressively in all the cerebellar folia down to hardly detectable levels at postnatal day 21. However, the intensity of labelling remained higher at postnatal day 8 and postnatal day 12 in X-irradiated rats than in age-paired controls. Measurements of [ 3 H]8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] specific binding to membranes from whole cerebellum confirmed that the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A sites per mg membrane protein (B max ) was higher in X-irradiated animals than in age-paired controls. However, on a ''per cerebellum'' basis, no significant difference could be detected between the total number of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A sites, which progressively increased in both control and X-irradiated animals during the first postnatal month. These results therefore show that 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors are not located on developing granule cells. (author)

  7. Delayed neurochemical effects of prenatal exposure to MeHg in the cerebellum of developing rats.

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    Heimfarth, Luana; Delgado, Jeferson; Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Pureur, Regina Pessoa; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2018-03-01

    Human fetuses and neonates are particularly vulnerable to methylmercury (MeHg)-induced brain damage and are sensitive even to low exposure levels. Previous work of our group evidence that prenatal exposure to MeHg causes cognitive and behavioral alterations and disrupt hippocampus signaling. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of gestational exposure of rats to MeHg at low doses (1 or 2 mg/kg) on parameters of redox imbalance and key signaling pathways in the cerebellum of their offspring. Pregnant females received MeHg (treated group) or 0.9% saline water (control group) by gavage in alternated days from gestational day 5 (GD5) until parturition and analyzes were proceed in the cerebellum of 30-day-old pups. We found increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation levels as well as decreased SH content in pups prenatally exposed to 2 mg/kg MeHg. In addition, misregulated SOD/catalase activities supported imbalanced redox equilibrium. We found decreased GSK3β(Ser9) phosphorylation, suggesting activation of this enzyme and dephosphorylation/inhibition of ERK1/2 and JNK pathways. Increased PKAα catalytic subunit could be upstream of hyperphosphorylated c-Raf(Ser259) and downregulated MAPK pathway. In addition, we found raised levels of the Ca 2+ -dependent protein phosphatase 2 B (PP2B). We also found preserved immunohistochemical staining for both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NeuN in MeHg-exposed pups. Western blot analysis showed unaltered levels of BAX/BCL-XL, BAD/BCL-2 and active caspase 3. Together, these findings support absence of reactive astrocytes, neuronal damage and apoptotic cell death in the cerebellum of MeHg treated pups. The present study provides evidence that prenatal exposure to MeHg leads to later redox imbalance and disrupted signaling mechanisms in the cerebellum of 30-day-old pups potentially predisposing them to long-lasting neurological impairments in CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Trace element distribution in the rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Reuhl, K.R.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1989-10-01

    Spatial distributions and concentrations of trace elements (TE) in the brain are important because TE perform catalytic structural functions in enzymes which regulate brain function and development. We have investigated the distributions of TE in rat cerebellum. Structures were sectioned and analyzed by the Synchrotron Radiation Induced X-ray Emission (SRIXE) method using the NSLS X-26 white-light microprobe facility. Advantages important for TE analysis of biological specimens with x-ray microscopy include short time of measurement, high brightness and flux, good spatial resolution, multielemental detection, good sensitivity, and non-destructive irradiation. Trace elements were measured in thin rat brain sections of 20-micrometers thickness. The analyses were performed on sample volumes as small as 0.2 nl with Minimum Detectable Limits (MDL) of 50 ppb wet weight for Fe, 100 ppb wet weight for Cu, and Zn, and 1 ppM wet weight for Pb. The distribution of TE in the molecular cell layer, granule cell layer and fiber tract of rat cerebella was investigated. Both point analyses and two-dimensional semi-quantitative mapping of the TE distribution in a section were used

  9. Production rates and turnover of triiodothyronine in rat-developing cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Responses to hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.E.; Matthews, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    Local 5'-deiodination of serum thyroxine (T4) is the main source of triiodothyronine (T3) for the brain. Since we noted in previous studies that the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats tolerated marked reductions in serum T4 without biochemical hypothyroidism, we examined the in vivo T4 and T3 metabolism in that tissue and in the cerebellum of euthyroid and hypothyroid 2-wk-old rats. We also assessed the contribution of enhanced tissue T4 to T3 conversion and decreased T3 removal from the tissues to the T3 homeostasis in hypothyroid brain. Congenital and neonatal hypothyroidism was induced by adding methimazole to the drinking water. Serum, cerebral cortex (Cx), cerebellum (Cm), liver (L) and kidney (R) concentrations of 125I-T4, 125I-T3(T4), and 131I-T3 were measured at various times after injecting 125I-T4 and 131I-T3. The rate of T3 removal from the tissues was measured after injecting an excess of anti-T3-antibody to rats previously injected with tracer T3. In hypothyroidism, the fractional removal rates and clearances were reduced in all tissues, in cortex and cerebellum by 70%, and in liver and kidney ranging from 30 to 50%. While greater than 80% of the 125I-T3(T4) in the brain tissues of euthyroid rats was locally produced, in hypothyroid cerebral cortex and cerebellum the integrated concentrations of 125I-T3(T4) were 2.7- and 1.5-fold greater than in euthyroid rats

  10. Cerebellum Augmented Rover Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    Bio-Inspired Technologies and Systems (BITS) are a very natural result of thinking about Nature's way of solving problems. Knowledge of animal behaviors an be used in developing robotic behaviors intended for planetary exploration. This is the expertise of the JFL BITS Group and has served as a philosophical model for NMSU RioRobolab. Navigation is a vital function for any autonomous system. Systems must have the ability to determine a safe path between their current location and some target location. The MER mission, as well as other JPL rover missions, uses a method known as dead-reckoning to determine position information. Dead-reckoning uses wheel encoders to sense the wheel's rotation. In a sandy environment such as Mars, this method is highly inaccurate because the wheels will slip in the sand. Improving positioning error will allow the speed of an autonomous navigating rover to be greatly increased. Therefore, local navigation based upon landmark tracking is desirable in planetary exploration. The BITS Group is developing navigation technology based upon landmark tracking. Integration of the current rover architecture with a cerebellar neural network tracking algorithm will demonstrate that this approach to navigation is feasible and should be implemented in future rover and spacecraft missions.

  11. Role of Neurotrophins in Mediating the Effect of Altered Gravity on the Developing Rat Cerebellum.

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    Sajdel-Sulkowska, Elizabeth

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in oxidative stress that may contribute to the decrease in Purkinje cell number and the impairment of motor coordination in hypergravity-exposed rat neonates. However, the increase in oxidative stress markers was not uniformly observed in males and females. In the present study we explored the possibility that exposure to hypergravity may result in altered level of neurotrophins, which have been recognized as mediators of both neurodegenerative and neuroprotective mechanisms in the central nervous system. An elevation of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) has been observed in animal models of hypoxia. To test this hypothesis we compared cerebellar levels of NT-3 between stationary control (SC) and rat neonates exposed perinatally to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge. The levels of NT-3 were determined by specific ELISA. Preliminary data suggests a 123

  12. Quantification of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors in the cerebellum of normal and x-irradiated rats during postnatal development

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    Matthiessen, L; Daval, G; Bailly, Y [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France). Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UA; Gozlan, H; Hamon, M; Verge, D [INSERM, Paris (France). Lab. de Neurobiologie Cellulaire et Fonctionnelle

    1992-11-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors were studied in rats during the first postnatal month in the normal cerebellum and in the granule cell-deprived cerebellum produced by X-irradiation at postnatal day 5. Quantitative autoradiographic studies on sagittal sections of cerebellar vermis, using [[sup 125]1]BH-8-MeO-N-PAT as radioligand or specific anti-receptor antibodies, revealed that 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors existed in the molecular/Purkinje cell layer but at variable density from one lobule to another. Thus, in both normal and X-irradiated rats, the posterior lobules were more heavily labelled than the anterior ones, and the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] sites decreased progressively in all the cerebellar folia down to hardly detectable levels at postnatal day 21. However, the intensity of labelling remained higher at postnatal day 8 and postnatal day 12 in X-irradiated rats than in age-paired controls. Measurements of [[sup 3]H]8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] specific binding to membranes from whole cerebellum confirmed that the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] sites per mg membrane protein (B[sub max]) was higher in X-irradiated animals than in age-paired controls. However, on a ''per cerebellum'' basis, no significant difference could be detected between the total number of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] sites, which progressively increased in both control and X-irradiated animals during the first postnatal month. These results therefore show that 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors are not located on developing granule cells. (author).

  13. Hydroxyurea Treatment and Development of the Rat Cerebellum: Effects on the Neurogenetic Profiles and Settled Patterns of Purkinje Cells and Deep Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons.

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    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, M C; Serra, Roger; Hervás, José P

    2016-11-01

    The current paper analyzes the development of the male and female rat cerebellum exposed to hydroxyurea (HU) (300 or 600 mg/kg) as embryo and collected at postnatal day 90. Our study reveals that the administration of this drug compromises neither the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex nor deep nuclei (DCN). However, in comparison with the saline group, we observed that several cerebellar parameters were lower in the HU injected groups. These parameters included area of the cerebellum, cerebellar cortex length, molecular layer area, Purkinje cell number, granule cell counts, internal granular layer, white matter and cerebellar nuclei areas, and number of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. These features were larger in the rats injected with saline, smaller in those exposed to 300 mg/kg of HU and smallest in the group receiving 600 mg/kg of this agent. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. In addition, we infer the neurogenetic timetables and the neurogenetic gradients of PCs and DCN neurons in rats exposed to either saline or HU as embryos. For this purpose, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected into pregnant rats previously administered with saline or HU. This thymidine analog was administered following a progressively delayed cumulative labeling method. The data presented here show that systematic differences exist in the pattern of neurogenesis and in the spatial location of cerebellar neurons between rats injected with saline or HU. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. These findings have implications for the administration of this compound to women in gestation as the effects of HU on the development of the cerebellum might persist throughout their offsprings' life.

  14. Serotonergic control of the developing cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostland, M.

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis gives insights in the mechanism behind the serotonergic control of the cerebellum during postnatal development. The findings present a powerful role for serotonin in the physiology of the developing cerebellum. The effects of the serotonergic control extend both

  15. Cellular commitment in the developing cerebellum

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    Marzban, Hassan; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Alizadeh, Javad; Ghavami, Saeid; Zachariah, Robby M.; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is located in the posterior cranial fossa and is critical for motor coordination and non-motor functions including cognitive and emotional processes. The anatomical structure of cerebellum is distinct with a three-layered cortex. During development, neurogenesis and fate decisions of cerebellar primordium cells are orchestrated through tightly controlled molecular events involving multiple genetic pathways. In this review, we will highlight the anatomical structure of human and mouse cerebellum, the cellular composition of developing cerebellum, and the underlying gene expression programs involved in cell fate commitments in the cerebellum. A critical evaluation of the cell death literature suggests that apoptosis occurs in ~5% of cerebellar cells, most shortly after mitosis. Apoptosis and cellular autophagy likely play significant roles in cerebellar development, we provide a comprehensive discussion of their role in cerebellar development and organization. We also address the possible function of unfolded protein response in regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis. We discuss recent advancements in understanding the epigenetic signature of cerebellar compartments and possible connections between DNA methylation, microRNAs and cerebellar neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss genetic diseases associated with cerebellar dysfunction and their role in the aging cerebellum. PMID:25628535

  16. Cellular Commitment in the Developing Cerebellum

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    Hassan eMarzban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian cerebellum is located in the posterior cranial fossa and is critical for motor coordination and non-motor functions including cognitive and emotional processes. The anatomical structure of cerebellum is distinct with a three-layered cortex. During development, neurogenesis and fate decisions of cerebellar primordium cells are orchestrated through tightly controlled molecular events involving multiple genetic pathways. In this review, we will highlight the anatomical structure of human and mouse cerebellum, the cellular composition of developing cerebellum, and the underlying gene expression programs involved in cell fate commitments in the cerebellum. A critical evaluation of the cell death literature suggests that apoptosis occurs in ~5% of cerebellar cells, most shortly after mitosis. Apoptosis and cellular autophagy likely play significant roles in cerebellar development, we provide a comprehensive discussion of their role in cerebellar development and organization. We also address the possible function of unfolded protein response in regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis. We discuss recent advancements in understanding the epigenetic signature of cerebellar compartments and possible connections between DNA methylation, microRNAs and cerebellar neurodegeneration. Finally, we then discuss genetic diseases associated with cerebellar dysfunction and their role in the aging cerebellum.

  17. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crepel, F.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Dupont, J.L.; Sotelo, C.

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields. (author)

  18. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

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    Crepel, F; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N; Dupont, J L [Paris-5 Univ., 75 (France); Sotelo, C [Hopital Foch, 92 - Suresnes (France). Centre Medico-Chirurgical

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields.

  19. Impairment of DNA synthesis in Gunn rat cerebellum.

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    Yamada, N; Sawasaki, Y; Nakajima, H

    1977-05-06

    Brain DNA synthesis was developmentally investigated in Gunn rat with marked cerebellar hypoplasia due to hereditary hyperbilirubinemia. In this mutant rat, the Purkinje cell was nearly selectively affected in the cerebellar cortex by bilirubin. The impaired DNA synthesis was observed in homozygous (jj) Gunn rat cerebellum, in which the DNA content and [3H]thymidine incorporation rate into DNA decreased after 10 days of age compared to those in the heterozygous (Jj)littermate. In contrast, these impairments were not found in the non-cerebellar parts of the brain and liver of jj Gunn rat. The activity of cerebellar thymidine kinase in jj Gunn rat decreased from a very early stae, being 80% of Jj rat at 6 days, and 50% at 10 days of age. The enzyme activity was not affected in the non-cerebellar parts of the brain. Although bilirubin competitively inhibited cerebellar thymidine kinase activity in vitro (15% at 10(-5) M), such bilirubin level was found to be about 1000-fold that in vivo. Moreover, photo-degradation of bilirubin in jj cerebellum exhibited no improvement in thymidine kinase activity, and the presence of an enzyme inactivator was not suggested in jj cerebellum. These results seem to indicate that the induction of thymidine kinase might be affected in jj Gunn rat cerebellum. The possibility that the impaired DNA synthesis in the external granular cells in jj cerebellum may be due to Purkinje cell damage is discussed.

  20. Exposure to altered gravity during specific developmental periods differentially affects growth, development, the cerebellum and motor functions in male and female rats

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    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar structure and motor coordination in rat neonates. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that neonatal cerebellar structure and motor coordination may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of hypergravity during specific developmental stages. To test this hypothesis, we compared neurodevelopment, motor behavior and cerebellar structure in rat neonates exposed to 1.65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge during discrete periods of time: the 2nd week of pregnancy [gestational day (G) 8 through G15; group A], the 3rd week of pregnancy (G15 through birth on G22/G23; group B), the 1st week of nursing [birth through postnatal day (P) 6; group C], the 2nd and 3rd weeks of nursing (P6 through P21; group D), the combined 2nd and 3rd weeks of pregnancy and nursing (G8 through P21; group E) and stationary control (SC) neonates (group F). Prenatal exposure to hypergravity resulted in intrauterine growth retardation as reflected by a decrease in the number of pups in a litter and lower average mass at birth. Exposure to hypergravity immediately after birth impaired the righting response on P3, while the startle response in both males and females was most affected by exposure during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth. Hypergravity exposure also impaired motor functions, as evidenced by poorer performance on a rotarod; while both males and females exposed to hypergravity during the 2nd and 3rd weeks after birth performed poorly on P21, male neonates were most dramatically affected by exposure to hypergravity during the second week of gestation, when the duration of their recorded stay on the rotarod was one half that of SC males. Cerebellar mass was most reduced by later postnatal exposure. Thus, for the developing rat cerebellum, the postnatal period that overlaps the brain growth spurt is the most vulnerable to hypergravity. However, male motor behavior is also affected by midpregnancy exposure to

  1. Evidence for oxidative stress in the developing cerebellum of the rat after chronic mild carbon monoxide exposure (0.0025% in air

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    Lopez Ivan A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that chronic very mild prenatal carbon monoxide (CO exposure (25 parts per million subverts the normal development of the rat cerebellar cortex. Studies at this chronic low CO exposure over the earliest periods of mammalian development have not been performed to date. Pregnant rats were exposed chronically to CO from gestational day E5 to E20. In the postnatal period, rat pups were grouped as follows: Group A: prenatal exposure to CO only; group B: prenatal exposure to CO then exposed to CO from postnatal day 5 (P5 to P20; group C: postnatal exposure only, from P5 to P20, and group D, controls (air without CO. At P20, immunocytochemical analyses of oxidative stress markers, and structural and functional proteins were assessed in the cerebellar cortex of the four groups. Quantitative real time PCR assays were performed for inducible (iNOS, neuronal (nNOS, and endothelial (eNOS nitric oxide synthases. Results Superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1, SOD2, and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 immunoreactivity increased in cells of the cerebellar cortex of CO-exposed pups. INOS and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity also increased in blood vessels and Purkinje cells (PCs of pups from group-A, B and C. By contrast, nNOS immunoreactivity decreased in PCs from group-B. Endothelial NOS immunoreactivity showed no changes in any CO-exposed group. The mRNA levels for iNOS were significantly up-regulated in the cerebellum of rats from group B; however, mRNA levels for nNOS and eNOS remained relatively unchanged in groups A, B and C. Ferritin-H immunoreactivity increased in group-B. Immunocytochemistry for neurofilaments (structural protein, synapsin-1 (functional protein, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, were decreased in groups A and B. Immunoreactivity for two calcium binding proteins, parvalbumin and calbindin, remained

  2. Effect of Maternal Diabetes on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Neonatal Rats

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    Z Khaksar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pregnant mothers, maternal diabetes occurs when pancreas can't produce enough insulin resulting in increased blood glucose levels in the mother and subsequently in the fetus. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of maternal diabetes on cerebellum of offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM, which was carried out at the veterinary faculty of Shiraz University in 2007-2008. Methods: This was an experimental study that included sixteen normal adult female rats divided in two groups. Diabetes was induced in one group by Alloxan agent. Both groups became pregnant by natural mating . At 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after birth, the cerebellum of all offsprings were collected and the weight of neonates was also measured. After producing histological slides, Olympus BX51 microscope and ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Olysia softwarwere used. Various histological parameters used included gray and white matters thicknesses (µ, the number of cells in gray and white matter separately per unit and the ratio of gray matter to white matter. Results: Cerebellar parameters decreased in ODM as compared to the control group. The body weight of ODM was significantly more than that of the control group (p< 0.05. Conclusions: Maternal hyperglycaemia exhibited deleterious effects on cerebellum during fetal life, which remained persistent during postneonatal period. Maternal diabetes also resulted in reduction of number of cells and thicknesses of both gray and white matter.

  3. Effect of x irradiation on the biochemical maturation of rat cerebellum: postnatal cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, A.J.; Balazs, R.; Altman, J.; Anderson, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Rat cerebellum was irradiated with 100 R daily doses from birth to 10 days of age, and the animals were studied during the next 13 days. The growth of the body and of the forebrain were little affected, but that of the cerebellum was severely retarded. This was primarily due to a depression in new cell acquisition which during the irradiation period was only about 10 percent of that in the controls. On the other hand, it seems that the development of cells formed prior to irradiation was little affected; at day 10, the average size and the RNA and protein contents of the cells were significantly higher than at birth and they were more than double the values observed in the control. However, cell formation was not irreversibly affected: in the fortnight after the termination of irradiation the rise in cell numbers was more than 80 percent of that occurring in the control rats. A relatively normal development of the cerebellar cortex was indicated by the finding that the molecular and the internal granular layers increased substantially in size during the postirradiation period. Further, by 23 days of age the external granular layer, which is a main germinal site in the cerebellum disappeared, as in controls, and the concentration of DNA (packing density of cells) and the cellular contents of RNA and protein were normal. However, restitution was not complete: at 23 days of age, in comparison with controls, the weight of the cerebellum was 60 percent and the reduction in the total number of cells (-40 percent) was similar to the reduction in size of the internal granular layer, which contains the highest concentration of nerve cells in the cerebellum. (U.S.)

  4. Functional imaging and the cerebellum: recent developments and challenges. Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Recent neuroimaging developments allow a better in vivo characterization of the structural and functional connectivity of the human cerebellum. Ultrahigh fields, which considerably increase spatial resolution, enable to visualize deep cerebellar nuclei and cerebello-cortical sublayers. Tractography reconstructs afferent and efferent pathway of the cerebellum. Resting-state functional connectivity individualizes the prewired, parallel close-looped sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective networks passing through the cerebellum. These results are un agreement with activation maps obtained during stimulation functional neuroimaging or inferred from neurological deficits due to cerebellar lesions. Therefore, neuroimaging supports the hypothesis that cerebellum constitutes a general modulator involved in optimizing mental performance and computing internal models. However, the great challenges will remain to unravel: (1) the functional role of red and bulbar olivary nuclei, (2) the information processing in the cerebellar microcircuitry, and (3) the abstract computation performed by the cerebellum and shared by sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective domains.

  5. Alcohol exposure decreases CREB binding protein expression and histone acetylation in the developing cerebellum.

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    Weixiang Guo

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol exposure affects 1 in 100 children making it the leading cause of mental retardation in the US. It has long been known that alcohol affects cerebellum development and function. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear.We demonstrate that CREB binding protein (CBP is widely expressed in granule and Purkinje neurons of the developing cerebellar cortex of naïve rats. We also show that exposure to ethanol during the 3(rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy reduces CBP levels. CBP is a histone acetyltransferase, a component of the epigenetic mechanism controlling neuronal gene expression. We further demonstrate that the acetylation of both histone H3 and H4 is reduced in the cerebellum of ethanol-treated rats.These findings indicate that ethanol exposure decreases the expression and function of CBP in the developing cerebellum. This effect of ethanol may be responsible for the motor coordination deficits that characterize fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

  6. Alternative kynurenic acid synthesis routes studied in the rat cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonali eBlanco Ayala

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kynurenic acid (KYNA, an astrocyte-derived, endogenous antagonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine and excitatory amino acid receptors, regulates glutamatergic, GABAergic, cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in several regions of the rodent brain. Synthesis of KYNA in the brain and elsewhere is generally attributed to the enzymatic conversion of L-kynurenine (L-KYN by kynurenine aminotransferases (KATs. However, alternative routes, including KYNA formation from D-kynurenine (D-KYN by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO and the direct transformation of kynurenine to KYNA by reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been demonstrated in the rat brain. Using the rat cerebellum, a region of low KAT activity and high DAAO activity, the present experiments were designed to examine KYNA production from L-KYN or D-KYN by KAT and DAAO, respectively, and to investigate the effect of ROS on KYNA synthesis. In chemical combinatorial systems, both L-KYN and D-KYN interacted directly with peroxynitrite (ONOO- and hydroxyl radicals (OH•, resulting in the formation of KYNA. In tissue homogenates, the non-specific KAT inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA; 1 mM reduced KYNA production from L-KYN and D-KYN by 85.1 ± 1.7% and 27.1 ± 4.5%, respectively. Addition of DAAO inhibitors (benzoic acid, kojic acid or 3-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid; 5 µM each attenuated KYNA formation from L-KYN and D-KYN by ~35% and ~66%, respectively. ONOO- (25 µM potentiated KYNA production from both L-KYN and D-KYN, and these effects were reduced by DAAO inhibition. AOAA attenuated KYNA production from L-KYN + ONOO- but not from D-KYN + ONOO-. In vivo, extracellular KYNA levels increased rapidly after perfusion of ONOO- and, more prominently, after subsequent perfusion with L-KYN or D-KYN (100 µM. Taken together, these results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in KYNA production in the rat cerebellum, and that, specifically, DAAO and ROS can function as alternative routes

  7. Selective survival of β1-adenergic receptors in rat cerebellum following neonatal X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minneman, K.P.; Pittman, R.N.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the cellular localization of β 1 - and β 2 -adrenergic receptors, the effects of intermittent neonatal X-irradiation focused on the cerebellum were determined on the densities of the two subtypes of β-adrenergic receptor. This treatment destroys the late-maturing cerebellar interneurons including the granule, basket and stellate cells. The total number of β 2 -adrenergic receptors per cerebellum was reduced by 81-83% in 6- and 12-week-old X-irradiated rats. However, the number of β 1 -adrenergic receptors per cerebellum in 6- and 12-week-old X-irradiated rats was not significantly different from that in control animals. The results suggest that β 2 receptors in the rat cerebellum are primarily associated with the small interneurons destroyed by neonatal X-irradiation. The β 1 receptors may be located on a cell population which is unaffected by this treatment, possibly on cerebellar Purkinje cells. (Auth.)

  8. Postnatal Expression of V2 Vasopressin Receptor Splice Variants in the Rat Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Karina J.; Sarmiento, José M.; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Añazco, Carolina C.; Villanueva, Carolina I.; Carmona, Pamela L.; Brenet, Marianne; Navarro, Javier; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Figueroa, Carlos D.; González, Carlos B.

    2010-01-01

    The V2 vasopressin receptor gene contains an alternative splice site in exon-3, which leads to the generation of two splice variants (V2a and V2b) first identified in the kidney. The open reading frame of the alternatively spliced V2b transcripten codes a truncated receptor, showing the same amino acid sequence as the canonical V2a receptor up to the 6th transmembrane segment, but displaying a distinct sequence to the corresponding 7th transmembrane segment and C-terminal domain relative to the V2a receptor. Here, we demonstrate the postnatal expression of V2a and V2b variants in the rat cerebellum. Most importantly, we showed by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry that both V2 splice variants were preferentially expressed in Purkinje cells, from early to late postnatal development. In addition, both variants were transiently expressed in the neuroblastic external granule cells and Bergmann fibers. These results indicate that the cellular distributions of both splice variants are developmentally regulated, and suggest that the transient expression of the V2 receptor is involved in the mechanisms of cerebellar cytodifferentiation by AVP. Finally, transfected CHO-K1 .expressing similar amounts of both V2 splice variants, as that found in the cerebellum, showed a significant reduction in the surface expression of V2a receptors, suggesting that the differential expression of the V2 splice variants regulate the vasopressin signaling in the cerebellum. PMID:19281786

  9. X-ray-induced cell death by apoptosis in the immature rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, B.V.; Allan, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The cells of the external granular layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum are known to be particularly sensitive to radiation. In the past, changes induced in this layer by irradiation have been referred to by non-specific terms such as pyknotic cells and the mode of cell death has been assumed to be necrosis. However, in published light micrographs of these dying cells, the appearance is suggestive of apoptosis, a distinctive mode of cell death which occurs spontaneously in normal adult and embryonic tissues and can also be triggered by certain pathological stimuli. This light and transmission electron microscopic study of control and irradiated (7 h post-irradiation) rat cerebellum from 18 day fetuses and 5 day-old neonates showed that the cell death was effected by apoptosis. The apoptosis was markedly enhanced by x-irradiation and quantification of the cell death in the EGL of 5 day-old rats exposed to 4, 8, 25, 100, and 400 cGy x-irradiation demonstrated that there was a positive dose response relationship. The extent of cell death by apoptosis which was 0.2% in control, ranged from 0.8% after 4 cGy to 62.3% after 400 cGy x-irradiation. The recognition that cell death by apoptosis can be a major component of x-irradiation damage has important implications for radiobiological studies

  10. Effects of focal lesions produced by beta irradiating the cerebellums in fetal and infant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulliam, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    A beam of beta radiation, 2mm in diameter, was used to irradiate the cerebellum in 29 rat fetuses and in 90 infant rats and to irradiate the cerebrum in 51 rat fetuses and in 72 infant rats. The age range of the rats was from the 15th fetal day to the 6th postnatal day. Localized beta radiation produced lesions limited to the cerebrum, to the cerebellum, to one cerebral hemisphere, or to one cerebellar hemisphere and the vermis in rat fetes and in infant rats. Varying degrees of ataxia were produced in the irradiated rats. This ataxia was proportional to the hypoplasia of the cerebellum. Severe reduction in the size of the cerebrum caused no motor deficits. The lesions produced by localized beta radiation were similar to lesions produced by x radiation, except that beta radiation produced lesions that were more localized and that were asymmetrical. Also the beta radiation offered the investigator more flexibility in selecting the site of the lesion regardless to the age of the rat fetus or the infant rat

  11. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors in synaptic membranes from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautens, L.

    1986-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor ligand binding sites have been characterized in synaptic membranes from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum using radioligand binding techniques. The equilibrium and kinetic properties of binding were assessed. The binding sites were non-interacting and exhibited two states of agonist binding which were sensitive to guanyl nucleotide. Synaptic membranes from cerebral cortex contained an equal number of beta 1 - and beta 2 -receptors; membranes from cerebellum possessed more beta 2 -than beta 1 -receptors. Photoaffinity labeling experiments revealed two different beta-adrenergic receptor polypeptides, R 1 and R 2 (and possibly a third, R 3 ) in synaptic membranes. The ratios of incorporation of photoaffinity label into R 1 : 2 were approximately 1:1 (cerebral cortex) and 5:1 (cerebellum). Photoaffinity labeling of R 1 and R 2 was inhibited equally well by both agonist and antagonist in synaptic membranes from cerebellum; whereas agonist was a less potent inhibitor in membranes from cerebral cortex. Both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors exhibited the same apparent molecular weight in synaptic membranes from cerebral cortex. The beta-adrenergic receptors in synaptic membranes from cerebral cortex and cerebellum were glycoproteins which exhibited the same apparent molecular weight after exposure to endoglycosidase F. The partial proteolytic digest maps of photoaffinity labeled beta-adrenergic receptors from rat cerebral cortex, cerebellum, lung and heart were compared

  12. Nitric oxide in the rat cerebellum after hypoxia/ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, José; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Alonso, David; Serrano, Julia; Fernández-Vizarra, Paula; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Bentura, María Luisa; Martinez, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a regulatory biological substance and an important intracellular messenger that acts as a specific mediator of various neuropathological disorders. In mammals and invertebrates, nitric oxide is synthesized from L-arginine in the central and peripheral neural structures by the endothelial, neuronal and inducible enzymatic isoforms of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide may affect the function of various neurotransmitter-specific systems, and is involved in neuromodulation, reproductive function, immune response, and regulation of the cerebral blood circulation. This makes nitric oxide the main candidate in brain responses to brain ischemia/hypoxia. The cerebellum has been reported to be the area of the brain that has the highest nitric oxide synthase activity and the highest concentration of glutamate and aspartate. By glutamate receptors and physiological action of nitric oxide, cyclic guanisine-5'-monophosphate may be rapidly increased. The cerebellum significantly differs with respect to ischemia and hypoxia, this response being directly related to the duration and intensity of the injury. The cerebellum could cover the eventual need for nitric oxide during the hypoxia, boosting the nitric oxide synthase activity, but overall ischemia would require de novo protein synthesis, activating the inducible nitric oxide synthase to cope with the new situation. The specific inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis show neuroprotective effects.

  13. The effect of the timing of prenatal exposure to x-irradiation on Purkinje cell numbers in rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, T.; Satriotomo, I.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kuma, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Gu

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to X-irradiation is known to cause various deleterious consequences. We have examined the effects of prenatal X-irradiation on the development of the cerebellum. Wistar rats were exposed to 1.5 Gy X-irradiation either on the 14, 15 or 16th day of gestation (E14, E15, E16). Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. At seven postnatal weeks of age, male rats were deeply anesthetized and killed by intracardiac perfusion with 2.5 % glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer. The unbiased stereological procedure known as the fractionator method was used to estimate the total number of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Body and cerebellar weights from E14 and E15, but not E16 irradiated rats showed significant deficits compared to control animals. Rats irradiated on E16 and control rats had about 285,100 - 304,800 Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. There was no significant difference between these values. However, E14 and E15 irradiated animals had about 117,500 and 196,300 Purkinje cells, respectively. These estimates were significantly different from those observed in both control and E16 irradiated rats. Given that the phase of division of Purkinje cell progenitors is mainly between E14-E15 and the phase of differentiation and migration is between E16-E20, it is concluded that the vulnerable period of the Purkinje cells to X-irradiation closely overlaps the phase of division of progenitors

  14. Pristanic acid provokes lipid, protein, and DNA oxidative damage and reduces the antioxidant defenses in cerebellum of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Lobato, Vannessa Gonçalves Araujo; Zanatta, Ângela; Borges, Clarissa Günther; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Manfredini, Vanusa; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Vargas, Carmen Regla; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Wajner, Moacir

    2014-12-01

    Zellweger syndrome (ZS) and some peroxisomal diseases are severe inherited disorders mainly characterized by neurological symptoms and cerebellum abnormalities, whose pathogenesis is poorly understood. Biochemically, these diseases are mainly characterized by accumulation of pristanic acid (Prist) and other fatty acids in the brain and other tissues. In this work, we evaluated the in vitro influence of Prist on redox homeostasis by measuring lipid, protein, and DNA damage, as well as the antioxidant defenses and the activities of aconitase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase in cerebellum of 30-day-old rats. The effect of Prist on DNA damage was also evaluated in blood of these animals. Some parameters were also evaluated in cerebellum from neonatal rats and in cerebellum neuronal cultures. Prist significantly increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and carbonyl formation and reduced sulfhydryl content and glutathione (GSH) concentrations in cerebellum of young rats. It also caused DNA strand damage in cerebellum and induced a high micronuclei frequency in blood. On the other hand, this fatty acid significantly reduced α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and aconitase activities in rat cerebellum. We also verified that Prist-induced increase of MDA levels was totally prevented by melatonin and attenuated by α-tocopherol but not by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indicating the involvement of reactive oxygen species in this effect. Cerebellum from neonate rats also showed marked alterations of redox homeostasis, including an increase of MDA levels and a decrease of sulfhydryl content and GSH concentrations elicited by Prist. Finally, Prist provoked an increase of dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation in cerebellum-cultivated neurons. Our present data indicate that Prist compromises redox homeostasis in rat cerebellum and blood and inhibits critical enzymes of the citric acid cycle that are susceptible to free radical attack. The

  15. Cutaneous and periodontal inputs to the cerebellum of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarko, Diana K; Leitch, Duncan B; Catania, Kenneth C

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a small fossorial rodent with specialized dentition that is reflected by the large cortical area dedicated to representation of the prominent incisors. Due to naked mole-rats' behavioral reliance on the incisors for digging and for manipulating objects, as well as their ability to move the lower incisors independently, we hypothesized that expanded somatosensory representations of the incisors would be present within the cerebellum in order to accommodate a greater degree of proprioceptive, cutaneous, and periodontal input. Multiunit electrophysiological recordings targeting the ansiform lobule were used to investigate tactile inputs from receptive fields on the entire body with a focus on the incisors. Similar to other rodents, a fractured somatotopy appeared to be present with discrete representations of the same receptive fields repeated within each folium of the cerebellum. These findings confirm the presence of somatosensory inputs to a large area of the naked mole-rat cerebellum with particularly extensive representations of the lower incisors and mystacial vibrissae. We speculate that these extensive inputs facilitate processing of tactile cues as part of a sensorimotor integration network that optimizes how sensory stimuli are acquired through active exploration and in turn adjusts motor outputs (such as independent movement of the lower incisors). These results highlight the diverse sensory specializations and corresponding brain organizational schemes that have evolved in different mammals to facilitate exploration of and interaction with their environment.

  16. CEREBELLUM: LINKS BETWEEN DEVELOPMENT, DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS AND MOTOR LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario U Manto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the links and interactions between development and motor learning has noticeable implications for the understanding and management of neurodevelopmental disorders. This is particularly relevant for the cerebellum which is critical for sensorimotor learning. The olivocerebellar pathway is a key pathway contributing to learning of motor skills. Its developmental maturation and remodelling are being unravelled. Advances in genetics have led to major improvements in our appraisal of the genes involved in cerebellar development, especially studies in mutant mice. Cerebellar neurogenesis is compartmentalized in relationship with neurotransmitter fate. The Engrailed-2 gene is a major actor of the specification of cerebellar cell types and late embryogenic morphogenesis. Math1, expressed by the rhombic lip (RL, is required for the genesis of glutamatergic neurons. Mutants deficient for the transcription factor Ptf1a display a lack of Purkinje cells and gabaergic interneurons. Rora gene contributes to the developmental signalling between granule cells and Purkinje neurons. The expression profile of SHH (Sonic hedgehog in postnatal stages determines the final size/shape of the cerebellum. Genes affecting the development impact upon the physiological properties of the cerebellar circuits. For instance, receptors are developmentally regulated and their action interferes directly with developmental processes. Another field of research which is expanding relates to very preterm neonates. They are at risk for cerebellar lesions, which may themselves impair the developmental events. Very preterm neonates often show sensori-motor deficits, highlighting another major link between impaired development and learning deficiencies. Pathways playing a critical role in cerebellar development are likely to become therapeutical targets for several neurodevelopmental disorders.

  17. Neonicotinoid Insecticides Alter the Gene Expression Profile of Neuron-Enriched Cultures from Neonatal Rat Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Kimura-Kuroda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids are considered safe because of their low affinities to mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs relative to insect nAChRs. However, because of importance of nAChRs in mammalian brain development, there remains a need to establish the safety of chronic neonicotinoid exposures with regards to children’s health. Here we examined the effects of longterm (14 days and low dose (1 μM exposure of neuron-enriched cultures from neonatal rat cerebellum to nicotine and two neonicotinoids: acetamiprid and imidacloprid. Immunocytochemistry revealed no differences in the number or morphology of immature neurons or glial cells in any group versus untreated control cultures. However, a slight disturbance in Purkinje cell dendritic arborization was observed in the exposed cultures. Next we performed transcriptome analysis on total RNAs using microarrays, and identified significant differential expression (p < 0.05, q < 0.05, ≥1.5 fold between control cultures versus nicotine-, acetamiprid-, or imidacloprid-exposed cultures in 34, 48, and 67 genes, respectively. Common to all exposed groups were nine genes essential for neurodevelopment, suggesting that chronic neonicotinoid exposure alters the transcriptome of the developing mammalian brain in a similar way to nicotine exposure. Our results highlight the need for further careful investigations into the effects of neonicotinoids in the developing mammalian brain.

  18. Chronic lithium treatment with or without haloperidol fails to affect the morphology of the rat cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, R W; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Smith, D

    2003-01-01

    We used unbiased stereological principles to determine whether long-term administration of lithium at human therapeutic levels, with or without haloperidol, affects the number or sizes of cerebellar Purkinje cells or the volume of histological layers in the rat cerebellum. Twenty-eight rats were...... randomly divided into three groups, receiving either no treatment, lithium, or lithium combined with haloperidol. The serum lithium levels ranged from 0.50 to 0.77 mmol/l. Haloperidol was given at a daily dose of 1 mg/kg. After 30 weeks of treatment, the animals were killed and the cerebelli were...

  19. Hypoglycemia induced changes in cholinergic receptor expression in the cerebellum of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju TR

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose homeostasis in humans is an important factor for the functioning of nervous system. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia is found to be associated with central and peripheral nerve system dysfunction. Changes in acetylcholine receptors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. In the present study we showed the effects of insulin induced hypoglycemia and streptozotocin induced diabetes on the cerebellar cholinergic receptors, GLUT3 and muscle cholinergic activity. Results showed enhanced binding parameters and gene expression of Muscarinic M1, M3 receptor subtypes in cerebellum of diabetic (D and hypoglycemic group (D + IIH and C + IIH. α7nAchR gene expression showed a significant upregulation in diabetic group and showed further upregulated expression in both D + IIH and C + IIH group. AchE expression significantly upregulated in hypoglycemic and diabetic group. ChAT showed downregulation and GLUT3 expression showed a significant upregulation in D + IIH and C + IIH and diabetic group. AchE activity enhanced in the muscle of hypoglycemic and diabetic rats. Our studies demonstrated a functional disturbance in the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 in the cerebellum during insulin induced hypoglycemia in diabetic rats. Altered expression of muscarinic M1, M3 and α7nAchR and increased muscle AchE activity in hypoglycemic rats in cerebellum is suggested to cause cognitive and motor dysfunction. Hypoglycemia induced changes in ChAT and AchE gene expression is suggested to cause impaired acetycholine metabolism in the cerebellum. Cerebellar dysfunction is associated with seizure generation, motor deficits and memory impairment. The results shows that cerebellar cholinergic neurotransmission is impaired during hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia and the hypoglycemia is causing more prominent imbalance in cholinergic neurotransmission which is suggested to be a cause of cerebellar

  20. Cutaneous and periodontal inputs to the cerebellum of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K Sarko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber is a small fossorial rodent with specialized dentition that is reflected by the large cortical area dedicated to representation of the prominent incisors. Due to naked mole-rats’ behavioral reliance on the incisors for digging and for manipulating objects, as well as their ability to move the lower incisors independently, we hypothesized that expanded somatosensory representations of the incisors would be present within the cerebellum in order to accommodate a greater degree of proprioceptive, cutaneous, and periodontal input. Multiunit electrophysiological recordings targeting the ansiform lobule were used to investigate tactile inputs from receptive fields on the entire body with a focus on the incisors. Similar to other rodents, a fractured somatotopy appeared to be present with discrete representations of the same receptive fields repeated within each folium of the cerebellum. These findings confirm the presence of somatosensory inputs to a large area of the naked mole-rat cerebellum with particularly extensive representations of the lower incisors and mystacial vibrissae. We speculate that these extensive inputs facilitate processing of tactile cues as part of a sensorimotor integration network that optimizes how sensory stimuli are acquired through active exploration and in turn adjusts motor outputs (such as independent movement of the lower incisors. These results highlight the diverse sensory specializations and corresponding brain organizational schemes that have evolved in different mammals to facilitate exploration of and interaction with their environment.

  1. Ethanol Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum: Underlying Mechanisms and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is the main constituent of alcoholic beverages that exerts toxicity to neuronal development. Ethanol affects synaptogenesis and prevents proper brain development. In humans, synaptogenesis takes place during the third trimester of pregnancy, and in rodents this period corresponds to the initial few weeks of postnatal development. In this period neuronal maturation and differentiation begin and neuronal cells start migrating to their ultimate destinations. Although the neuronal development of all areas of the brain is affected, the cerebellum and cerebellar neurons are more susceptible to the damaging effects of ethanol. Ethanol’s harmful effects include neuronal cell death, impaired differentiation, reduction of neuronal numbers, and weakening of neuronal plasticity. Neuronal development requires many hormones and growth factors such as retinoic acid, nerve growth factors, and cytokines. These factors regulate development and differentiation of neurons by acting through various receptors and their signaling pathways. Ethanol exposure during development impairs neuronal signaling mechanisms mediated by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptors, the retinoic acid receptors, and by growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. In combination, these ethanol effects disrupt cellular homeostasis, reduce the survival and migration of neurons, and lead to various developmental defects in the brain. Here we review the signaling mechanisms that are required for proper neuronal development, and how these processes are impaired by ethanol resulting in harmful consequences to brain development.

  2. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2015-05-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine 1week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple affinity forms of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor in rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, T.K.; Fisher, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Binding of 125I-calcitonin gene-related peptide (125I-CGRP) to rat cerebellum membranes and the sensitivity to guanine nucleotides of binding were investigated. Cerebellum binding sites labeled by 125I-CGRP appear to be highly specific, inasmuch as CGRP inhibited binding with an IC50 of 100 pM but other peptides were inactive or much less active in displacing 125I-CGRP from these sites. 125I-CGRP binding sites in cerebellum membranes were saturable and of high affinity. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding data revealed a homogeneous population of binding sites, with a KD of 224 ± 28 pM and Bmax of 131 ± 15 fmol/mg of protein. In the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) (100 microM), a single population of binding sites, with a KD of 464 ± 77 pM and Bmax of 100 ± 14 fmol/mg of protein, was observed. The kinetics of association of 125I-CGRP with cerebellum membranes were monophasic at all ligand concentrations tested. However, the observed association rate constant (kobs) was not dependent on [125I-CGRP] in a linear fashion in either the absence or the presence of GTP gamma S (100 microM). The kinetics of dissociation of 125I-CGRP from cerebellum membranes were multiexponential, with fast and slow dissociating components having rate constants of 0.34 ± 0.01 and 0.025 ± 0.001 min-1, respectively. The fast dissociating component represented 60 ± 2% of the total specific binding sites. Dissociation of 125I-CGRP from cerebellum sites was much faster in the presence of GTP gamma S (100 microM) but still exhibited dissociation from two affinity components. The rate constants for these components of dissociation were 0.67 ± 0.03 and 0.077 ± 0.007 min-1, with the faster dissociating component representing 66 ± 1% of the total specific binding sites

  4. Physiological and pharmacological properties of Purkinje cells in rat cerebellum degranulated by postnatal x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, D.J.; Hoffer, B.J.; Altman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Elimination of most granule, basket, and stellate interneurons in the rat cerebellum was achieved by repeated doses of low level x irradiation applied during the first two weeks of postnatal life. Purkinje neurons in these rats, studied when adults, exhibited sustained spiking activity in Halothane anesthetized preparations. Mean firing rates were 35 to 40/sec, no different from normal. Spontaneous bursts presumed to be generated by climbing fiber synaptic activity differed from normal by often consisting of full sized spikes rather than characteristic inactivation responses. Intracellularly observed correlates of bursts consisted of epsp's of several discretely different amplitudes appearing independently in time. Stimulation of white matter revealed evidence for, a) graded synaptic excitation of Purkinje cells indicating more than one converging excitatory synapse, and b) inhibitory actions on Purkinje cells either through a few remaining inhibitory interneurons or through Purkinje cell recurrent collaterals. Iontophoretic drug application studies showed normal chemosensitivity of the Purkinje cell membrane, i.e., excitation by flutamate and inhibition by gamma-amino butyric acid, serotonin, norepinephrine, and 3'5' cyclic AMP. These studies indicate considerable autonomy of Purkinje cell ontogenesis in the absence of normal interneuronal input. A unique synaptic relation only rarely found in normal cerebellum is the innervation of single Purkinje cells by more than one climbing fiber. (U.S.)

  5. Structural and Ultrastructural Analysis of Cerebral Cortex, Cerebellum, and Hypothalamus from Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Hernández-Fonseca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic and peripheral neuropathies are well-described complications in diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is also associated to central nervous system damage. This little-known complication is characterized by impairment of brain functions and electrophysiological changes associated with neurochemical and structural abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate brain structural and ultrastructural changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum were obtained from controls and 8 weeks diabetic rats. Light and electron microscope studies showed degenerative changes of neurons and glia, perivascular and mitochondrial swelling, disarrangement of myelin sheath, increased area of myelinated axons, presynaptic vesicle dispersion in swollen axonal boutoms, fragmentation of neurofilaments, and oligodendrocyte abnormalities. In addition, depressive mood was observed in diabetic animals. The brain morphological alterations observed in diabetic animals could be related to brain pathologic process leading to abnormal function, cellular death, and depressive behavioral.

  6. The morphofunctional state of Purkin'e cells in the cerebellum of new-born rats following laser and gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkova, S.M.; Popov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    Following of local laser (632.8 nm, 6.3. J/cm 2 ) and whole-body Gy gamma-ray exposures of new-born rats the contrast changes of morphometrical indices, RNA amount, and chromatophilia of Purkin'e cells in the cerebellum were seen. The preliminary laser exposure of new-born rat cerebellum artially increased activity of karyogene structures of the cerebellum cells which were inhibited by 6.37 Gy gamma-rays

  7. Perinatal intermittent hypoxia alters γ-aminobutyric acid: a receptor levels in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Eung-Kwon; Yoon, Audrey J; Ahuja, Bhoomika; Lau, Gary W; Nguyen, Daniel D; Kim, Yong; Harper, Ronald M

    2011-12-01

    Perinatal hypoxia commonly causes brain injury in infants, but the time course and mechanisms underlying the preferential male injury are unclear. Intermittent hypoxia disturbs cerebellar γ-aminobutyric (GABA)-A receptor profiles during the perinatal period, possibly responding to transient excitatory processes associated with GABA(A) receptors. We examined whether hypoxic insults were particularly damaging to the male rodent cerebellum during a specific developmental time window. We evaluated cerebellar injury and GABA(A) receptor profiles following 5-h intermittent hypoxia (IH: 20.8% and 10.3% ambient oxygen, switched every 240s) or room-air control in groups of male and female rat pups on postnatal d 1-2, wk 1, or wk 3. The cerebella were harvested and compared between groups. The mRNA levels of GABA(A) receptors α6, normalized to a house-keeping gene GAPDH, and assessed using real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR assays were up-regulated by IH at wk 1, more extensively in male rats, with sex influencing the regulatory time-course. In contrast, GABA(A) α6 receptor protein expression levels, assessed using Western blot assays, reached a nadir at wk 1 in both male and female rats, possibly indicating involvement of a post-transcriptional mechanism. The extent of cerebellar damage and level of apoptosis, assessed by DNA fragmentation, were greatest in the wk 3 IH-exposed group. The findings suggest partial protection for female rats against early hypoxic insult in the cerebellum, and that down-regulation of GABA(A) receptors, rather than direct neural injury assessed by DNA fragmentation may modify cerebellar function, with potential later motor and other deficits. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene expression in the developing cerebellum during perinatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, B C; Almazan, G; Ma, Y; Tetzlaff, W; Miller, F D; Cuello, A C

    1993-03-01

    The intensity of p75NGFR receptor-like immunoreactivity and the mRNAs encoding p75NGFR, T alpha 1 alpha-tubulin, GAP-43 and the myelin proteins MBP and PLP were measured in the developing cerebellum to study the effects of perinatal thyroid hormone imbalance in rats. Results compared to age-matched controls provide in vivo evidence for differential gene regulation by thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum. We found that p75NGFR immunoreactivity was strikingly elevated in hypothyroid rats, whereas p75NGFR mRNA content remained only twice as high as that of control levels on postnatal day 15 (P15). When p75NGFR immunoreactivity was still elevated in hypothyroid rats, Purkinje cells exhibited proximal axonal varicosities, axonal twisting and differences in axonal caliber. The mRNAs encoding proteins involved with neurite growth-promoting elements, T alpha 1 alpha-tubulin and GAP-43, were also increased in hypothyroidism, possibly reflecting a neuronal response to a deficiency in, or damage to, cerebellar neurons, or a general delay in their down regulation. Similar increases were not observed for the myelin specific genes. MBP and PLP mRNAs were first detected on P2 of hyperthyroid rats, and they increased with age. Hypo- or hyperthyroidism did not affect the initial onset of MBP and PLP expression, however, hyperthyroidism increased levels of PLP and MBP mRNAs between P2 and P10. By contrast, the most consistent decrease in MBP and PLP mRNAs in rats with thyroid hormone deficiency was observed only on P10. At later times (P15 and P30), the two mRNA levels were similar to controls in all groups. These results are consistent with a role for thyroid hormone in the earlier stages of cerebellar myelination. Hypothryoidism led to specific increases in T alpha 1 alpha-tubulin and GAP-43 mRNAs, and in the immunoreactivity and mRNA levels of p75NGFR receptor--all changes that may play a role in the observed abnormal neuronal outgrowth.

  9. Cocaine promotes oxidative stress and microglial-macrophage activation in rat cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M López-Pedrajas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress alterations. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, considered a sensor of oxidative stress and inflammation, is involved in drug toxicity and addiction. NF-κB is a key mediator for immune responses that induces microglial/macrophage activation under inflammatory processes and neuronal injury/degeneration. Although cerebellum is commonly associated to motor control, muscular tone and balance. Its relation with addiction is getting relevance, being associated to compulsive and perseverative behaviors. Some reports indicate that cerebellar microglial activation induced by cannabis or ethanol, promote cerebellar alterations and these alterations could be associated to addictive-related behaviors. After considering the effects of some drugs on cerebellum, the aim of the present work analyzes pro-inflammatory changes after cocaine exposure. Rats received daily 15 mg/kg cocaine i.p. for 18 days. Reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione (GSH and GSSG, glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity and glutamate were determined in cerebellar homogenates. NF-κB activity, CD68 and GFAP expression were determined.Cerebellar GPx activity and GSH/GSSG ratio are significantly decreased after cocaine exposure. A significant increase of glutamate concentration is also observed. Interestingly, increased NF-κB activity is also accompanied by an increased expression of the lysosomal mononuclear phagocytic marker ED1 without GFAP alterations.Current trends in addiction biology are focusing on the role of cerebellum on addictive behaviors. Cocaine-induced cerebellar changes described herein fit with previosus data showing cerebellar alterations on addict subjects and support the proposed role of cerebelum in addiction.

  10. Effects of developmental exposure to a Commercial PBDE mixture (DE-71) on protein networks in the rat Cerebellum and Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title (20 words): Effects of developmental exposure to a Commercial PBDE mixture (DE-71) on protein networks in the rat Cerebellum and Hippocampus. Introduction (120 words): Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE5) possess neurotoxic effects similar to those of PCBs. The cellular a...

  11. Daily rhythms of benzodiazepine receptor numbers in frontal lobe and cerebellum of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.J.W.; Volicer, L.; Moore-Ede, M.C.; Borsook, D.

    1985-01-01

    Behavioral, biochemical and neurophysiological evidence suggests that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may play an important role in the neural control of circadian rhythms. Central receptors for benzodiazepines are functionally coupled to GABA receptors and appear to mediate behavioral effects of exogenous benzodiazepines. The binding of 3 H-flunitrazepam to synaptic plasma membranes prepared from various regions of rat brain was examined at 6-hour intervals over a 36-hour period. Prominent daily rhythms in receptor number (Bmax) were observed in the frontal lobe and the cerebellum but not in the temporoparietal regions, hypothalamus or medulla/pons. Binding was highest during periods of sleep/low activity with a significant decrease occurring just prior to waking. These results suggest that daily fluctuations in benzodiazepine receptor numbers may be related to the temporal control of sleep/wake and muscle activity cycles. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  12. Motor learning induces plastic changes in Purkinje cell dendritic spines in the rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tapia, D; González-Ramírez, M M; Vázquez-Hernández, N; González-Burgos, I

    2017-12-14

    The paramedian lobule of the cerebellum is involved in learning to correctly perform motor skills through practice. Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that regulate excitatory synaptic stimulation. We studied plastic changes occurring in the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells from the paramedian lobule of rats during motor learning. Adult male rats were trained over a 6-day period using an acrobatic motor learning paradigm; the density and type of dendritic spines were determined every day during the study period using a modified version of the Golgi method. The learning curve reflected a considerable decrease in the number of errors made by rats as the training period progressed. We observed more dendritic spines on days 2 and 6, particularly more thin spines on days 1, 3, and 6, fewer mushroom spines on day 3, fewer stubby spines on day 1, and more thick spines on days 4 and 6. The initial stage of motor learning may be associated with fast processing of the underlying synaptic information combined with an apparent "silencing" of memory consolidation processes, based on the regulation of the neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Hippocampus and cerebellum function following imipenem treatment in male and female rats: evaluation of sex differences during developmental stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golchin, Leila; Golchin, Lale; Vahidi, Ali Asghar; Shabani, Mohammad

    2013-02-15

    The B-Lactam antibiotics have been suggested to have some degree of neurotoxicity in experimental animals as well as in clinical situations. This study has been elucidated the alteration in hippocampal and cerebellum function following adolescent imipenem exposure in male and female rats. Hippocampus and cerebellum related behavioral dysfunction in imipenem -treated [intraperitoneally, 40 and 80 mg/kg/day for one week from 23-day-old] rats were analyzed using explorative, motor function, learning and memory tasks [grasping, rotarod, open field shuttle box and Morris water maze tests]. Exposure to imipenem especially in high dosage impaired the motor coordination in male and female rats. There weren't any differences in grasping time in male and female rats. When the rearing and grooming frequency of their recorded in open field test, both males and females were dramatically affected by exposure to imipenem. Compared to the saline, male and female rats trained one week after imipenem injection showed significant memory deficits in the shuttle box and Morris water maze tests. Results in this study suggested that animals treated with imipenem suffer from motor activity and cognitive impairment. However, hippocampal and cerebellum functions of male and female rats were profoundly affected by exposure to imipenem while no sex-differences in the most variable were evident.

  14. Cell-type-specific expression of NFIX in the developing and adult cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, James; Essebier, Alexandra; Gronostajski, Richard M; Boden, Mikael; Wainwright, Brandon J; Harvey, Tracey J; Piper, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Transcription factors from the nuclear factor one (NFI) family have been shown to play a central role in regulating neural progenitor cell differentiation within the embryonic and post-natal brain. NFIA and NFIB, for instance, promote the differentiation and functional maturation of granule neurons within the cerebellum. Mice lacking Nfix exhibit delays in the development of neuronal and glial lineages within the cerebellum, but the cell-type-specific expression of this transcription factor remains undefined. Here, we examined the expression of NFIX, together with various cell-type-specific markers, within the developing and adult cerebellum using both chromogenic immunohistochemistry and co-immunofluorescence labelling and confocal microscopy. In embryos, NFIX was expressed by progenitor cells within the rhombic lip and ventricular zone. After birth, progenitor cells within the external granule layer, as well as migrating and mature granule neurons, expressed NFIX. Within the adult cerebellum, NFIX displayed a broad expression profile, and was evident within granule cells, Bergmann glia, and interneurons, but not within Purkinje neurons. Furthermore, transcriptomic profiling of cerebellar granule neuron progenitor cells showed that multiple splice variants of Nfix are expressed within this germinal zone of the post-natal brain. Collectively, these data suggest that NFIX plays a role in regulating progenitor cell biology within the embryonic and post-natal cerebellum, as well as an ongoing role within multiple neuronal and glial populations within the adult cerebellum.

  15. Experimental analysis of embryogenesis of cerebellum in rat. II. Morphogenetic malformations following x-ray irradiation on day 18 of gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    Rat embryos of 18 days gestation were exposed in utero to 170 R of x-ray irradiation. Embryos were collected six hours, 1, 2, and 3 days after irradiation, and animals of 2-, 6-, 15- and 30-day-old postnatal age were sacrificed. Six hours after irradiation pyknosis of cells was noticed in the external granular layer along the posterior aspect of the cerebellum. Neuroblasts, destined to differentiate into Purkinje cells, were found arrested in their migratory path. During subsequent periods of embryogenesis the external granular layer was found recovered, and clustering of the neuroblasts were disorganized and fragmented. This abnormal clustering of neuroblasts was permanent, and the external granular layer followed the same abnormal pattern in its growth. During postnatal development the internal granular layer also was found to follow the abnormal pattern of Purkinje cell layer. Those abnormal developmental events were seen to lead to malformed folia in the anterior regions of the cerebellum. In addition to it the cerebellum of x-ray irradiated animals appeared smaller than the normal. Issues having a bearing on the differential radiosensitivity of different cells, factors determining the small size of the cerebellum, and cellular events determining the morphogenetic malformations are discussed

  16. Gross morphometric reduction of rats' cerebellum by gamma irradiation was mitigated by pretreatment with Vernonia amygdalina leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, O; Farombi, E O; Onwuka, S K

    2011-01-01

    The methanolic extract of Vernonia amygdalina (M) or "bitter leaf" is known for its antioxidant activity, and antioxidants are noted to mitigate radiation damage in tissues. The aim of the present study was to observe the radioprotective effect of M on the cerebellum of gamma irradiated rats using alpha-tocopherol (TOCO) as a reference antioxidant. Forty-two male Wistar rats (n=42) weighing 200-240 g were taken for the study. The study comprised of seven groups, with each group comprising of six (n=6) rats i.e. control, M at 250, and 500 mg/kg/day, radiation only, radiation plus M at 250, and 500 mg/kg/day, and TOCO. After 14 days of treatment administered via oral gavage, rats were irradiated with a single dose of 2.0 Gy of gamma rays on the 15-th day and euthanized the next day. Rats cerebella were removed, fixed in 10% formalin saline, weighed and vernier caliper used to obtain cerebellar dimensions as follows: (i) maximum width, (ii) rostrocaudal dimension, and (iii) dorsoventral extent. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with post-test. Gamma radiation caused a statistically significant reduction of the relative weight of the rats' whole brain, relative weight of the cerebellum, the maximum width, rostrocaudal dimension, and dorsoventral extent of the cerebellum. However, pretreatment with M and TOCO significantly mitigated these effects. This study demonstrated that administration of M and TOCO before 2.0 Gy gamma irradiation reduced significantly the radiation induced gross morphometry changes in rats' cerebellum, suggesting that M may qualify for consideration as a medicinal radioprotector.

  17. Ethanol Influences on Bax Associations with Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins in Neonatal Rat Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra; Paiva, Michael; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Kubovec, Stacey; Coursen, Mary; Madorsky, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    These studies investigated interactions taking place at the mitochondrial membrane in neonatal rat cerebellum following ethanol exposure, and focused on interactions between pro-apoptotic Bax and proteins of the permeability transition pore (PTP), voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes, respectively. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to assess the role of these interactions in ethanol neurotoxicity. Analyses were made at the age of maximal cerebellar ethanol vulnerability (P4), compared to the later age of relative resistance (P7), to determine whether differential ethanol sensitivity was mirrored by differences in these molecular interactions. We found that following ethanol exposure, Bax pro-apoptotic associations with both VDAC and ANT were increased, particularly at the age of greater ethanol sensitivity, and these interactions were sustained at this age for at least two hours post-exposure. Since Bax:VDAC interactions disrupt protective VDAC interactions with mitochondrial hexokinase (HXK), we also assessed VDAC:HXK associations following ethanol treatment, and found such interactions were altered by ethanol treatment, but only at two-hours post-exposure, and only in the P4, ethanol-sensitive cerebellum. Ethanol neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal preparations was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of both VDAC and ANT interactions with Bax, but not by a Bax channel blocker. Therefore, we conclude that at this age, within the constraints of our experimental model, a primary mode of Bax-induced initiation of the apoptosis cascade following ethanol insult involves interactions with proteins of the PTP complex, and not channel formation independent of PTP constituents. PMID:22767450

  18. Reduction of GABA/sub B/ receptor binding induced by climbing fiber degeneration in the rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.; Fukuda, H.

    1985-01-01

    When the rat cerebellar climbing fibers degenerated, as induced by lesioning the inferior olive with 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP), GABA/sub B/ receptor binding determined with 3 H-(+/-)baclofen was reduced in the cerebellum but not in the cerebral cortex of rats. Computer analysis of saturation data revealed two components of the binding sites, and indicated that decrease of the binding in the cerebellum was due to reduction in receptor density, mainly of the high-affinity sites, the B/sub max/ of which was reduced to one-third that in the control animals. In vitro treatment with 3-AP, of the membranes prepared from either the cerebellum or the cerebral cortex, induced no alteration in the binding sites, thereby indicating that the alteration of GABA/sub B/ sites induced by in vivo treatment with 3-AP is not due to a direct action of 3-AP on the receptor. GABA/sub A/ and benzodiazepine receptor binding labelled with 3 H-muscimol and 3 H-diazepam, respectively, in both of brain regions was not affected by destruction of the inferior olive. These results provide evidence that some of the GABA/sub B/ sites but neither GABA/sub A/ nor benzodiazepine receptors in the cerebellum are located at the climbing fiber terminals. 28 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  19. CD44-positive cells are candidates for astrocyte precursor cells in developing mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Na; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Okano-Uchida, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-03-01

    Neural stem cells are generally considered to be committed to becoming precursor cells before terminally differentiating into either neurons or glial cells during neural development. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte precursor cells have been identified in several areas in the murine central nervous system. The presence of astrocyte precursor cells (APCs) is not so well understood. The present study provides several lines of evidence that CD44-positive cells are APCs in the early postnatal mouse cerebellum. In developing mouse cerebellum, CD44-positive cells, mostly located in the white matter, were positive for the markers of the astrocyte lineage, but negative for the markers of mature astrocytes. CD44-positive cells were purified from postnatal cerebellum by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and characterized in vitro. In the absence of any signaling molecule, many cells died by apoptosis. The surviving cells gradually expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for mature astrocytes, indicating that differentiation into mature astrocytes is the default program for these cells. The cells produced no neurospheres nor neurons nor oligodendrocytes under any condition examined, indicating these cells are not neural stem cells. Leukemia inhibitory factor greatly promoted astrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive cells, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) did not. Fibroblast growth factor-2 was a potent mitogen for these cells, but was insufficient for survival. BMP4 inhibited activation of caspase-3 and greatly promoted survival, suggesting a novel role for BMP4 in the control of development of astrocytes in cerebellum. We isolated and characterized only CD44 strongly positive large cells and discarded small and/or CD44 weakly positive cells in this study. Further studies are necessary to characterize these cells to help determine whether CD44 is a selective and specific marker for APCs in the developing mouse cerebellum. In conclusion, we succeeded in

  20. Impaired redox state and respiratory chain enzyme activities in the cerebellum of vitamin A-treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcos Roberto de; Fonseca Moreira, Jose Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin A is a micronutrient that participates in the maintenance of the mammalian cells homeostasis. However, excess of vitamin A, which may be achieved through increased intake of the vitamin either therapeutically or inadvertently, induces several deleterious effects in a wide range of mammalian cells, including neuronal cells. Vitamin A is a redox-active molecule, and it was previously demonstrated that it induces oxidative stress in several cell types. Therefore, in the present work, we investigated the effects of vitamin A supplementation at clinical doses (1000-9000 IU/(kg day)) on redox environment and respiratory chain activity in the adult rat cerebellum. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme activity was also measured here. The animals were treated for 3, 7, or 28 days with vitamin A as retinol palmitate. We found increased levels of molecular markers of oxidative damage in the rat cerebellum in any period analyzed. Additionally, vitamin A supplementation impaired cerebellar mitochondrial electron transfer chain (METC) activity. GST enzyme activity was increased in the cerebellum of rats chronically treated with vitamin A. Based on our results and data previously published, we recommend more caution in prescribing vitamin A at high doses even clinically, since there is a growing concern regarding toxic effects associated to vitamin A intake

  1. Aluminium and Acrylamide Disrupt Cerebellum Redox States, Cholinergic Function and Membrane-Bound ATPase in Adult Rats and Their Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Amara, Ibtissem Ben; Ktari, Naourez; Elwej, Awatef; Boudawara, Ons; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-12-01

    Accumulation of aluminium and acrylamide in food is a major source of human exposure. Their adverse effects are well documented, but there is no information about the health problems arising from their combined exposure. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neurotoxic effects after co-exposure of pregnant and lactating rats to aluminium and acrylamide in order to evaluate redox state, cholinergic function and membrane-bound ATPases in the cerebellum of adult rats and their progeny. Pregnant female rats have received aluminium (50 mg/kg body weight) via drinking water and acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight) by gavage, either individually or in combination from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. Exposure to these toxicants provoked an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels and a decrease in SOD, CAT, GPx, Na + K + -ATPase, Mg 2+ -ATPase and AChE activities in the cerebellum of mothers and their suckling pups. A reduction in GSH, NPSH and vitamin C levels was also observed. These changes were confirmed by histological results. Interestingly, co-exposure to these toxicants exhibited synergism based on physical and biochemical variables in the cerebellum of mothers and their progeny.

  2. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacconi, M.T.; Salmona, M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (/sup 3/H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Influence of prenatal application of angiotensin II and postnatal salt diet on GABAergic and oxytocin system in rat brain steam and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackova, L.; Olexova, L.; Svitok, P.; Senko, T.; Stefanik, P.

    2015-01-01

    Our goal was to determinate how gene expression of GABA transporter 1 (GAT1), glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and oxytocin receptor (OTR) is influenced with prenatal exposition to angiotensin II (Ang II) and postnatal salt diet in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and cerebellum in rats. In NTS we observed strong tendency in different reaction of OTR gene expression between Ang II prenatal treatment and control rats after high salt diet. We observed significant influence of sex on GAD67 gene expression in cerebellum. Also, sex in combination with salt diet is significant factor in expression of GAT1 gene in cerebellum. (authors)

  4. Deficient PKR in RAX/PKR Association Ameliorates Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Chen, Jian; Qi, Yuanlin; Dai, Lu; Zhang, Mingfang; Frank, Jacqueline A; Handshoe, Jonathan W; Cui, Jiajun; Xu, Wenhua; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol-induced neuronal loss is closely related to the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most sensitive to ethanol. The mechanism underlying ethanol neurotoxicity remains unclear. Our previous in vitro studies have shown that the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) regulates neuronal apoptosis upon ethanol exposure and ethanol activates PKR through association with its intracellular activator RAX. However, the role of PKR and its interaction with RAX in vivo have not been investigated. In the current study, by utilizing N-PKR-/- mice, C57BL/6J mice with a deficient RAX-binding domain in PKR, we determined the critical role of RAX/PKR association in PKR-regulated ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum. Our data indicate that while N-PKR-/- mice have a similar BAC profile as wild-type mice, ethanol induces less brain/body mass reduction as well as cerebellar neuronal loss. In addition, ethanol promotes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, and IL-1β is a master cytokine regulating inflammatory response. Importantly, ethanol-promoted IL-1β secretion is inhibited in the developing cerebellum of N-PKR-/- mice. Thus, RAX/PKR interaction and PKR activation regulate ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum, which may involve ethanol-induced neuroinflammation. Further, PKR could be a possible target for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).

  5. Effect of neonatal undernutrition on various forms of DNA-dependent DNA polymerases in cerebellum and liver of rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksi, K.; Kumar, A.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of neonatal undernutrition on the two forms of DNA polymerases obtained by DEAF-cellulose column chromatography of the solubilized nuclei and the high speed supernatant fractions of cerebellum and liver of rats has been studied. The form of DNA polymerase eluting with 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) was significantly reduced, whereas that eluting with 0.3 M buffer (pH 7.5) was devoid of neonatal undernutrition effect. The properties of the separated DNA polymerases, both from cerebellum and liver, of control and undernourished groups were also studied. [Me- 3 H]thymidine-5--'triphosphate has been used in the study. (author)

  6. Quantification of cell death in developing cerebellum by a 14C tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, W.S.; Woodward, D.J.; Chanda, R.

    1978-01-01

    To study the question of whether or not cell death contributes significantly to normal or stressed postnatal brain development in a way which is biochemically quantifiable, we carried out an experiment to assess the amount of cell death in developing cerebellum. By measuring the loss of DNA content and the loss of 14 C from labelled thymidine previously incorporated into the DNA fraction (DNAF) in X-irradiated neonatal animals, shown by histological methods to have cell death to the degree of degranulating the external granular layer (EGL), we showed that when cells die both label and DNA content are greatly decreased in the cerebellum. Experiments on both normal and malnourished animals showed that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development in either malnutrition-stressed or normal animals. Here, we present a biochemical tool for assessing cell death and evidence that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development

  7. The volume of Purkinje cells decreases in the cerebellum of acrylamide-intoxicated rats, but no cells are lost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Tandrup, T; Braendgaard, H

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acrylamide intoxication on the numbers of granule and Purkinje cells and the volume of Purkinje cell perikarya have been evaluated with stereological methods. The analysis was carried out in the cerebella of rats that had received a dose of 33.3 mg/kg acrylamide, twice a week, for 7.......5 weeks. The total numbers of cerebellar granule and Purkinje cells were estimated using the optical fractionator and the mean volume of the Purkinje cell perikarya was estimated with the vertical rotator technique. The volumes of the molecular layer, the granular cell layer and the white matter were...... estimated using the Cavalieri principle. The mean weight of the cerebellum of the intoxicated rats was 7% lower than that of the control rats (2P = 0.001). The numbers of the Purkinje cells and granule cells were the same in both groups, but the mean volume of the perikarya of the Purkinje cells...

  8. Effects of hyper- and hypothyroidism on acetylcholinesterase, (Na(+), K (+))- and Mg ( 2+ )-ATPase activities of adult rat hypothalamus and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carageorgiou, Haris; Pantos, Constantinos; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Mourouzis, Iordanis; Cokkinos, Dennis; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2007-03-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are recognized as key metabolic hormones, and the metabolic rate increases in hyperthyroidism, while it decreases in hypothyroidism. The aim of this work was to investigate how changes in metabolism induced by THs could affect the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), (Na(+), K(+))- and Mg(2+)-ATPase in the hypothalamus and the cerebellum of adult rats. Hyperthyroidism was induced by subcutaneous administration of thyroxine (25 microg/100 g body weight) once daily for 14 days, while hypothyroidism was induced by oral administration of propylthiouracil (0.05%) for 21 days. All enzyme activities were evaluated spectrophotometrically in the homogenated brain regions of 10 three-animal pools. Neither hyper-, nor hypothyroidism had any effect on the examined hypothalamic enzyme activities. In the cerebellum, hyperthyroidism provoked a significant decrease in both the AChE (-23%, p activities (-26%, p activities: AChE (-17%, p activity was found unaltered in both the hyper- and the hypothyroid brain regions. neither hyper-, nor hypothyroidism had any effect on the examined hypothalamic enzyme activities. In the cerebellum, hyperthyroidism provoked a significant decrease in both the AChE and the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities. The decreased (by the THs) Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities may increase the synaptic acetylcholine release, and thus, could result in a decrease in the cerebellar AChE activity. Moreover, the above TH-induced changes may affect the monoamine neurotransmitter systems.

  9. Study of the damage induced by radiations with different linear energy transfer in the nerve cells of the rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasavin, E.A.; Mashinskaya, T.E.; Ryzhov, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    The increase in space flight duration suggests the study of damage induced by high-fluxes of ionizing radiations in the tissues of the nervous system of the man. The quantitative and qualitative changes in the cerebellar granular cells of the rats of early postnatal period, affected by 25 and 50 MeV protons, 180 kV X-rays and Co 60 gamma-rays have been studied. It has been found that the radiosensitivity of neurons in different compartments of the cerebellar cortex varies significantly. Radiosensitivity of the inner and outer granular layers of the cerebellum to irradiation with 25 MeV protons was similar

  10. Regional expression and ultrastructural localization of EphA7 in the hippocampus and cerebellum of adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amegandjin, Clara A; Jammow, Wafaa; Laforest, Sylvie; Riad, Mustapha; Baharnoori, Moogeh; Badeaux, Frédérique; DesGroseillers, Luc; Murai, Keith K; Pasquale, Elena B; Drolet, Guy; Doucet, Guy

    2016-08-15

    EphA7 is expressed in the adult central nervous system (CNS), where its roles are yet poorly defined. We mapped its distribution using in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) combined with light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) in adult rat and mouse brain. The strongest ISH signal was in the hippocampal pyramidal and granule cell layers. Moderate levels were detected in habenula, striatum, amygdala, the cingulate, piriform and entorhinal cortex, and in cerebellum, notably the Purkinje cell layer. The IHC signal distribution was consistent with ISH results, with transport of the protein to processes, as exemplified in the hippocampal neuropil layers and weakly stained pyramidal cell layers. In contrast, in the cerebellum, the Purkinje cell bodies were the most strongly immunolabeled elements. EM localized the cell surface-expression of EphA7 essentially in postsynaptic densities (PSDs) of dendritic spines and shafts, and on some astrocytic leaflets, in both hippocampus and cerebellum. Perikaryal and dendritic labeling was mostly intracellular, associated with the synthetic and trafficking machineries. Immunopositive vesicles were also observed in axons and axon terminals. Quantitative analysis in EM showed significant differences in the frequency of labeled elements between regions. Notably, labeled dendrites were ∼3-5 times less frequent in cerebellum than in hippocampus, but they were individually endowed with ∼10-40 times higher frequencies of PSDs, on their shafts and spines. The cell surface localization of EphA7, being preferentially in PSDs, and in perisynaptic astrocytic leaflets, provides morphologic evidence that EphA7 plays key roles in adult CNS synaptic maintenance, plasticity, or function. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2462-2478, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cerebellum of chronic hepatic encephalopathy rats is associated with up-regulation of NADPH-producing pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Santosh; Trigun, Surendra K

    2010-09-01

    Cerebellum-associated functions get affected during mild hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) in patients with chronic liver failure (CLF). Involvement of nitrosative and antioxidant factors in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic encephalopathy is an evolving concept and needs to be defined in a true CLF animal model. This article describes profiles of NADPH-dependent neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and those of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase (GR) vis-a-vis regulation of NADPH-producing pathway in the cerebellum of CLF rats induced by administration of thioacetamide (100 mg kg⁻¹ b.w., i.p.) up to 10 days and confirming MHE on Morris water maze tests. Significant increases in the expression of nNOS protein and nitric oxide (NOx) level coincided with a similar increment in NADPH-diaphorase activity in the cerebellum of CLF rats. Glutathione peroxidase and GR utilize NADPH to regenerate reduced glutathione (GSH) in the cells. Both these enzymes and GSH level were found to be static and thus suggested efficient turnover of GSH in the cerebellum of MHE rats. Relative levels of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) vs. phosphofructokinase 2 (PFK2) determine the rate of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) responsible to synthesize NADPH. The cerebellum of CLF rats showed overactivation of G6PD with a significant decline in the expression of PFK2 and thus suggested activation of PPP in the cerebellum during MHE. It is concluded that concordant activations of PPP and nNOS in cerebellum of MHE rats could be associated with the implication of NOx in the pathogenesis of MHE.

  12. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Osorio, Cristina; Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram; Alzate, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca 2+ -mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit β (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254. ► Cerebellum and

  13. A single episode of neonatal seizures alters the cerebellum of immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lomoio, S.; Necchi, D.; Mareš, Vladislav; Scherini, E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 1 (2011), s. 17-24 ISSN 0920-1211 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : metrazol seizures * cerebellum * Purkinje cells * GluR2/3 * GLT1 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.290, year: 2011

  14. Effects of a whole body gamma irradiation on GABA repartition in infant rats cerebellum and hippocampal formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Vernois, Y.; Court, L.

    1992-01-01

    'Full-Text:' Thirteen-day-old rats were exposed to a single dose of 4 or 0,5 Gy of gamma at a dose rate of 0,25 Gy/min and were killed about 5h after. Fixation was achieved in situ using glutaraldehyde. For GABA immunocytochemistry transversal sections were incubated with antiserum against GABA, then with PAP and revealed with diaminobenzidine. Proliferative layers are still observed in the infant rat cerebellum (external granular layer) and hippocampal formation (subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus). When irradiation occurs a high percent of these two layers cells are pycnotic. In the normal cerebellum, no immunostaining is observed in external granular layer cell bodies. The only labelled structures are few cytoplasmic expansions coming from subjacent layers. When irradiated, a strong GABA staining appears around pycnotic cells as a network with labelled meshes. GABA staining and pycnotic cells were more especially important when the irradiation increases. Further studies are needed to specify the nature of labelled meshes. In the normal hippocampal formation, subgranular cells are not GABA stained. Staining occurs in cells which are not granule cells. They are scattered throughout cell layers of the dentate gyrus with predominance in the hilus. After irradiation, GABA repartition is not modified. After a 4 Gy whole body gamma irradiation, the inhibitory GABA system is not injured. Other amino-acid neurotransmitters such as Glutamate could be modified. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness of carbon ion beams in the cerebellum using the rat organotypic slice culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yukari; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Al-Jahdari, Wael S.; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of carbon ion (C) beams in normal brain tissues, a rat organotypic slice culture system was used. The cerebellum was dissected from 10-day-old Wistar rats, cut parasagittally into approximately 600-μm-thick slices and cultivated using a membrane-based culture system with a liquid-air interface. Slices were irradiated with 140 kV X-rays and 18.3 MeV/amu C-beams (linear energy transfer=108 keV/μm). After irradiation, the slices were evaluated histopathologically using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and apoptosis was quantified using the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Disorganization of the external granule cell layer (EGL) and apoptosis of the external granule cells (EGCs) were induced within 24 h after exposure to doses of more than 5 Gy from C-beams and X-rays. In the early postnatal cerebellum, morphological changes following exposure to C-beams were similar to those following exposure to X-rays. The RBEs values of C-beams using the EGL disorganization and the EGC TUNEL index endpoints ranged from 1.4 to 1.5. This system represents a useful model for assaying the biological effects of radiation on the brain, especially physiological and time-dependent phenomena. (author)

  16. The effect of trichlorfon and methylazoxymethanol on the development of guinea pig cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehl, Anna; Schanke, Tore M.; Torvik, Ansgar; Fonnum, Frode

    2007-01-01

    The pesticide trichlorfon (125 mg/kg on days 42-44 in gestation) gives hypoplasia of Brain of the offspring without any significant reduction in their body weights. The hypoplasia may be caused by trichlorfon itself or by its metabolite dichlorvos. This period of development coincides with the growth spurt period of guinea pig brain. The largest changes occurred in the cerebellum. Electron microscopic examination of the cerebellar cortex showed increased apoptotic death of cells in the granule cell layer after trichlorfon treatment. A reduction in thickness of the external germinal layer of the cerebellar cortex and an elevated amount of pyknotic and karyorrhexic cells in the granule cell layer was found. There was a significant reduction in choline esterase, choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase activities in the cerebellum. Methylazoxymethanol (15 mg/kg body weight, day 43) was examined for comparison and caused similar hypoplasia of the guinea pig cerebellum, but did also induce a reduction in body weight. Trichloroethanol, the main metabolite of trichlorfon, did not give brain hypoplasia

  17. Effects of Melatonin on the Cerebellum of Infant Rat Following Kaolin-Induced Hydrocephalus: a Histochemical and Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanıkgil, Yiğit; Turgut, Mehmet; Baka, Meral

    2017-02-01

    Hydrocephalus is a developmental disorder causing abnormally collected cerebrospinal fluid within the cerebral ventricles. It leads to bigger skulls and many dysfunctions related to the nervous system. Here, we addressed whether exogenous melatonin administration could reverse the clinical features of kaolin-induced hydrocephalus in infantile rats. A controlled double-blinded study was conducted in 2-week-old 45 Wistar albino rats, which were divided into three groups: Group A, the control group, received intracisternal sham injection with solely the needle insertion; group B, the hydrocephalus group, was treated with isotonic NaCl after kaolin injection; and group C, the hydrocephalus + melatonin group, was given i.p. exogenous melatonin at a dose of 0.5 mg/100 g body weight after kaolin injection. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed after the induction of hydrocephalus and melatonin administration. Glial fibrillary acidic protein was stained by immunohistochemical method. TUNEL method was used to define and quantitate apoptosis in the cerebellar tissues. Statistical analysis was performed by nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis H test, and once significance was determined among means, post hoc pairwise comparisons were carried out using Mann-Whitney U test. We found that melatonin administration significantly ameliorated ratio of substantia grisea area/substantia alba area in the cerebellum of infantile rats. Histologically, there was a significant reduction in the number of cerebellar apoptotic cells after the hydrocephalus induced by kaolin (P cerebellum were reversed by systemic melatonin administration in infantile rats with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to suggest melatonin as a candidate protective drug in children with hydrocephalus.

  18. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase c gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Naijil

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, Bmax showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes.

  19. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase C gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, T Peeyush; Antony, Sherin; Gireesh, G; George, Naijil; Paulose, C S

    2010-05-31

    Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, B(max) showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes.

  20. A comparative study of the effect of diet and soda carbonated drinks on the histology of the cerebellum of adult female albino Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluwa, M A; Inyangmme, I I; Akpantah, A O; Ekanem, T B; Ekong, M B; Asuquo, O R; Nwakanma, A A

    2013-09-01

    Carbonated drinks are widely consumed because of their taste and their ability to refresh and quench thirst. These carbonated drinks also exist in the form of diet drinks, for example Diet Coke®, Pepsi®, extra. A comparative effect of the diet and regular soda carbonated drinks on the histology of the cerebellum of female albino Wistar rats was investigated. Fifteen adult female Wistar rats weighing between 180-200 g were divided into 3 groups; designated as groups A, B and C, and each group consisted of five rats. Group A was the Control group and received distilled water, while groups B and C were the experimental groups. Group B was administered 50 ml of regular soda (RS), and group C was administered 50 ml of diet soda (DS) each per day for 21 days, and the rats were sacrificed on Day 22, and their cerebellums excised and preserved. Histological result of the sections of the cerebellum showed shrunken and degenerated Purkinje cells with hypertrophied dendrites, especially in the DS group, which was less in the RS group compared to the control group. These results suggest that diet soda has adverse effect on the cerebellum of adult female albino Wistar rats.

  1. Effect of x irradiation on the biochemical maturation of rat cerebellum: Metabolism of [14C]glucose and [14C]acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, A.J.; Balazs, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effect was studied of selective x-irradiation of the cerebellum (100 R daily in the first 10 days after birth) on the maturation of glucose metabolism and the development of metabolic compartmentation, in 10-, 16-, and 23-day-old rats by using, respectively, [2- 14 C]glucose and [1- 14 C] acetate (40 μ Ci/100 g body weight each) as precursors. At day 10 significant changes, in comparison with the unirradiated controls, were observed: aspartate and γ-aminobutyrate, respectively, contained 36 percent and 64 percent more and glutamine 42 percent less glucose-carbon combined in amino acids; the glutamine/glutamate specific radioactivity ratio (RSA) was 25 percent less, and the conversion of both glucose and acetate carbons into acid-insoluble constituents was markedly reduced. However, in the postirradiation period both the conversion of glucose carbon into amino acids, and the RSA of glutamine after the administration of [ 14 C]acetate increased in a more or less normal fashion, although certain quantitative differences were noted. It seems, therefore, that the normal progress of biochemical differentiation was only affected to a small degree by the irradiation of the cerebellum, although the treatment interfered severely with cell proliferation. (U.S.)

  2. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  3. Glufosinate ammonium stimulates nitric oxide production through N-methyl D-aspartate receptors in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaki, T; Mishima, A; Suzuki, E; Shintani, F; Fujii, T

    2000-09-01

    Glufosinate ammonium, a structural analogue of glutamate, is an active herbicidal ingredient. The neuronal activities of this compound were investigated by use of a microdialysis system that allowed us to measure nitric oxide production in the rat cerebellum in vivo. Kainate (0.3-30 nmol/10 microliter), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (3-300 nmol/10 microliter) and glufosinate ammonium (30-3000 nmol/10 microliter), which were administered through the microdialysis probe at a rate of 1 microliter/min for 10 min, stimulated nitric oxide production. The glufosinate ammonium-elicited increase in nitric oxide production was suppressed by an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase and was antagonized by NMDA receptor antagonists, but not by a kainate/(+/-)-alphaamino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor antagonist. These results suggest that glufosinate ammonium stimulates nitric oxide production through NMDA receptors.

  4. Impacts on prenatal development of the human cerebellum: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Irene V; Tielemans, Myrte J; Hoebeek, Freek E; Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Reiss, Irwin K M; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P M; Dudink, Jeroen

    2017-10-01

    The cerebellum is essential for normal neurodevelopment and is particularly susceptible for intra-uterine disruptions. Although some causal prenatal exposures have been identified, the origin of neurodevelopmental disorders remains mostly unclear. Therefore, a systematic literature search was conducted to provide an overview of parental environmental exposures and intrinsic factors influencing prenatal cerebellar growth and development in humans. The literature search was limited to human studies in the English language and was conducted in Embase, Medline, Cochrane, Web of Science, Pubmed and GoogleScholar. Eligible studies were selected by three independent reviewers and study quality was scored by two independent reviewers. The search yielded 3872 articles. We found 15 eligible studies reporting associations between cerebellar development and maternal smoking (4), use of alcohol (3), in vitro fertilization mediums (1), mercury (1), mifepristone (2), aminopropionitriles (1), ethnicity (2) and cortisol levels (1). No studies reported on paternal factors. Current literature on associations between parental environmental exposures, intrinsic factors and human cerebellar development is scarce. Yet, this systematic review provided an essential overview of human studies demonstrating the vulnerability of the cerebellum to the intra-uterine environment.

  5. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S., E-mail: kodavanti.prasada@epa.gov [Neurotoxicology Branch, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States); Osorio, Cristina [Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Program on Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram [Genetic and Cellular Toxicology Branch, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States); Alzate, Oscar [Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Program on Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca{sup 2+}-mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit {beta} (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant

  6. Preliminary morphological and morphometric study of rat cerebellum following sodium arsenite exposure during rapid brain growth (RBG) period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, Pushpa; Mohari, Nivedita; Mehra, Raj D.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of arsenic exposure during rapid brain growth (RBG) period were studied in rat brains with emphasis on the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. The RBG period in rats extends from postnatal day 4 (PND 4) to postnatal day 10 (PND 10) and is reported to be highly vulnerable to environmental insults. Mother reared Wistar rat pups were administered intraperitoneal injections (i.p.) of sodium arsenite (aqueous solution) in doses of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) to groups II, III and IV (n = 6 animals/group) from PND 4 to 10 (sub acute). Control animals (group I) received distilled water by the same route. On PND 11, the animals were perfusion fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (PB) with pH 7.4. The cerebellum obtained from these animals was post-fixed and processed for paraffin embedding. Besides studying the morphological characteristics of Purkinje cells in cresyl violet (CV) stained paraffin sections (10 μm), morphometric analysis of Purkinje cells was carried out using Image Analysis System (Image Proplus software version 4.5) attached to Nikon Microphot-FX microscope. The results showed that on PND 11, the Purkinje cells were arranged in multiple layers extending from Purkinje cell layer (PL) to outer part of granule cell layer (GL) in experimental animals (contrary to monolayer arrangement within PL in control animals). Also, delayed maturation (well defined apical cytoplasmic cones and intense basal basophilia) was evident in Purkinje cells of experimental animals on PND 11. The mean Purkinje cell nuclear area was significantly increased in the arsenic treated animals compared to the control animals. The observations of the present study (faulty migration, delayed maturation and alteration in nuclear area measurements of Purkinje cells subsequent to arsenic exposure) thus provided the morphological evidence of structural alterations subsequent to arsenite induced developmental neurotoxicity which could be presumed to be

  7. Bacopa monnieri Extract (CDRI-08 Modulates the NMDA Receptor Subunits and nNOS-Apoptosis Axis in Cerebellum of Hepatic Encephalopathy Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papia Mondal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, characterized by impaired cerebellar functions during chronic liver failure (CLF, involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR overactivation in the brain cells. Bacopa monnieri (BM extract is a known neuroprotectant. The present paper evaluates whether BM extract is able to modulate the two NMDAR subunits (NR2A and NR2B and its downstream mediators in cerebellum of rats with chronic liver failure (CLF, induced by administration of 50 mg/kg bw thioacetamide (TAA i.p. for 14 days, and in the TAA group rats orally treated with 200 mg/kg bw BM extract from days 8 to 14. NR2A is known to impart neuroprotection and that of NR2B induces neuronal death during NMDAR activation. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase- (nNOS- apoptosis pathway is known to mediate NMDAR led excitotoxicity. The level of NR2A was found to be significantly reduced with a concomitant increase of NR2B in cerebellum of the CLF rats. This was consistent with significantly enhanced nNOS expression, nitric oxide level, and reduced Bcl2/Bax ratio. Moreover, treatment with BM extract reversed the NR2A/NR2B ratio and also normalized the levels of nNOS-apoptotic factors in cerebellum of those rats. The findings suggest modulation of NR2A and NR2B expression by BM extract to prevent neurochemical alterations associated with HE.

  8. Effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitor pretreatment on nitric oxide production, nNOS and iNOS expression in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, G; Farina, M; Riberio, M L; Ogando, D; Aisemberg, J; de los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Franchi, A M

    2003-07-01

    1. The therapeutic effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is thought to be due mainly to its inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, but there is a growing body of research that now demonstrates a variety of NSAIDs effects on cellular signal transduction pathways other than those involving prostaglandins. 2. Nitric oxide (NO) as a free radical and an agent that gives rise to highly toxic oxidants (peroxynitrile, nitric dioxide, nitron ion), becomes a cause of neuronal damage and death in some brain lesions such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease, and Huntington's chorea. 3. In the present study, the in vivo effect of three NSAIDs (lysine clonixinate (LC), indomethacine (INDO) and meloxicam (MELO)) on NO production and nitric oxide synthase expression in rat cerebellar slices was analysed. Rats were treated with (a) saline, (b) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg kg(-1), i.p.), (c) saline in combination with different doses of NSAIDs and (d) LPS in combination with different doses of NSAIDs and then killed 6 h after treatment. 4. NO synthesis, evaluated by Bred and Snyder technique, was increased by LPS. This augmentation was inhibited by coadministration of the three NSAIDs assayed. None of the NSAIDs tested was able to modify control NO synthesis. 5. Expression of iNOS and neural NOS (nNOS) was detected by Western blotting in control and LPS-treated rats. LC and INDO, but not MELO, were able to inhibit the expression of these enzymes. 6. Therefore, reduction of iNOS and nNOS levels in cerebellum may explain, in part, the anti-inflammatory effect of these NSAIDs and may also have importance in the prevention of NO-mediated neuronal injury.

  9. Cerebellum neurotransmission during postnatal development: [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin and neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolini, Valeria Maria; Esposito, Alessandra; Dal Bo, Veronica; Insolia, Violetta; Bottone, Maria Grazia; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo; Bernocchi, Graziella

    2015-02-01

    Several chemotherapeutic drugs are known to cause neurotoxicity. Platinum-based agents in use or in clinical trials display neurotoxic potential accompanied by neurological complications; recent studies have identified a large number of behavioural issues in paediatric oncology patients. To understand the toxicity of platinum drugs at the molecular and cellular levels, this study compares the possible cytotoxic effects of an older platinum compound, cisplatin and a new platinum compound, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], on the CNS of postnatally developing rats, which is much more vulnerable to injury than the CNS of adult rats. Since several drugs interact with neurotransmitters during neuronal maturation, we performed immunostainings with antibodies raised against markers of glutamate and GABA, the major neurotransmitters in the cerebellum. After a single injection of cisplatin at postnatal day 10 (PD10), the labelling of Purkinje cells with the neurotransmitter markers evidenced alterations between PD11 and PD30, i.e. atrophy of the dendrite tree, changes in the distribution of synaptic contacts of parallel and climbing fibres, delay in the elimination of transient synapses on cell soma and severely impaired pinceau formation at the axon hillock. After treatment with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], the sole relevant change concerned the timing of climbing fibres elimination; the transient synapses disappearance on the Purkinje cell soma was delayed in some cells; instead, the growth of Purkinje cell dendrite tree was normal as was the formation of inhibitory synaptic contacts on these neurons. These findings add new evidence not only on the lower neurotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin but also on the involvement of neurotransmitters and relative synaptic connections in the maturation of central nerve tissue. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antioxidant Activity of Grapevine Leaf Extracts against Oxidative Stress Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus and Cerebellum of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Wohlenberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has become increasingly important to study the beneficial properties of derivatives of grapes and grapevine. The objective of this study was to determine the antioxidant activity of Vitis labrusca leaf extracts, comparing conventional and organic grapevines, in different brain areas of rats. We used male Wistar rats treated with grapevine leaf extracts for a period of 14 days, and on the 15th day, we administered in half of the rats, mineral oil and the other half, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. The animals were euthanized by decapitation and the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were removed to assess oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS were unchanged. However, CCl4 induced oxidative damage to proteins in all tissues studied, and this injury was prevented by both extracts. Superoxide dismutase (SOD activity was increased by CCl4 in the cerebral cortex and decreased in other tissues. However, CCl4 increased catalase (CAT activity in the cerebellum and decreased it in the cerebral cortex. The SOD/CAT ratio was restored in the cerebellum by both extracts and only in the cerebral cortex by the organic extract.

  11. Chronic treadmill exercise in rats delicately alters the Purkinje cell structure to improve motor performance and toxin resistance in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Lin, Lung-Sheng; Cho, Keng-Chi; Chen, Shean-Jen; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Lung; Wu, Fong-Sen; Chuang, Jih-Ing; Chen, Hsiun-Ing; Jen, Chauying J

    2012-09-01

    Although exercise usually improves motor performance, the underlying cellular changes in the cerebellum remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate whether and how chronic treadmill exercise in young rats induced Purkinje cell changes to improve motor performance and rendered the cerebellum less vulnerable to toxin insults. After 1-wk familiarization of treadmill running, 6-wk-old male Wistar rats were divided into exercise and sedentary groups. The exercise group was then subjected to 8 wk of exercise training at moderate intensity. The rotarod test was carried out to evaluate motor performance. Purkinje cells in cerebellar slices were visualized by lucifer yellow labeling in single neurons and by calbindin immunostaining in groups of neurons. Compared with sedentary control rats, exercised rats not only performed better in the rotarod task, but also showed finer Purkinje cell structure (higher dendritic volume and spine density with the same dendritic field). The exercise-improved cerebellar functions were further evaluated by monitoring the long-lasting effects of intraventricular application of OX7-saporin. In the sedentary group, OX7-saporin treatment retarded the rotarod performance and induced ∼60% Purkinje cell loss in 3 wk. As a comparison, the exercise group showed much milder injuries in the cerebellum by the same toxin treatment. In conclusion, exercise training in young rats increased the dendritic density of Purkinje cells, which might play an important role in improving the motor performance. Furthermore, as Purkinje cells in the exercise group were relatively toxin resistant, the exercised rats showed good motor performance, even under toxin-treated conditions.

  12. Retrograde Signaling from Progranulin to Sort1 Counteracts Synapse Elimination in the Developing Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesaka, Naofumi; Abe, Manabu; Konno, Kohtarou; Yamazaki, Maya; Sakoori, Kazuto; Watanabe, Takaki; Kao, Tzu-Huei; Mikuni, Takayasu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kano, Masanobu

    2018-02-21

    Elimination of redundant synapses formed early in development and strengthening of necessary connections are crucial for shaping functional neural circuits. Purkinje cells (PCs) in the neonatal cerebellum are innervated by multiple climbing fibers (CFs) with similar strengths. A single CF is strengthened whereas the other CFs are eliminated in each PC during postnatal development. The underlying mechanisms, particularly for the strengthening of single CFs, are poorly understood. Here we report that progranulin, a multi-functional growth factor implicated in the pathogenesis of frontotemporal dementia, strengthens developing CF synaptic inputs and counteracts their elimination from postnatal day 11 to 16. Progranulin derived from PCs acts retrogradely onto its putative receptor Sort1 on CFs. This effect is independent of semaphorin 3A, another retrograde signaling molecule that counteracts CF synapse elimination. We propose that progranulin-Sort1 signaling strengthens and maintains developing CF inputs, and may contribute to selection of single "winner" CFs that survive synapse elimination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The neurotoxic effects of artemether on the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum of adult male wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelaja, A.A.; Shokunbi, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    In a 70kg adult man, artemether is given at a total dosage of 480mg for five days in the treatment of malarial. Using t-test analysis technique at 95% confidence interval i.e t < 0.05 and P - value = 2.26, no significant difference was observed between the average brain and cerebellar weight, the average width of cerebellar cortical layers, the density and the average size of Purkinje Cells in the control groups C1 and C2 and the experimental group E. In the present study, there were no gross or morphological differences between the two groups of animals (control and experimental groups) on day 7 at the completion of experimental procedure. A significant statistical increase in average body weight was observed in the control groups C1 (which received only standard diet and water) and C2 (which received 1.23mg/kg body weight of normal saline intramuscularly in addition to standard diet and water) from 140 + 19.65g on day 1 to 146 + 19.90g on day 7 and 151 + 12.0g on day 1 to 156.2 + 12.2g on Day 7 respectively. There was a non-statistically significant apparent reduction in body weight in the experimental group E, (which received intramuscular injection of 1.23mg/kg body weight of artemether), from 160 + 9.0g on day 1 to 157.4 + 8.0g on day 7. The rats in the control groups CI and C2 displayed normal balance and co-ordination, while rats in the experimental group E, showed abnormalities of balance and co-ordination. This study investigated the effects of corresponding 1.23mg/kg body weight of artemether for a period of seven days on the functions of rats after drug administration. (author)

  14. Fighting Oxidative Stress: Increased Resistance of Male Rat Cerebellum at Weaning Induced by Low Omega 6/Omega 3 Ratio in a Protein-Deficient Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Ricielle Lopes; Isaac, Alinny Rosendo; Silva-Júnior, Ivanildo Inácio da; Santana, David Filipe de; Ferreira, Diorginis José Soares; Lagranha, Claudia Jacques; Gonçalves-Pimentel, Catarina; Rodrigues, Marcelo Cairrão Araujo; Andrade-da-Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira

    2017-02-01

    The cerebellum is vulnerable to malnutrition effects. Notwithstanding, it is able to incorporate higher amount of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) than the cerebral cortex (Cx) when low n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio is present in a multideficient diet. Considering importance of DHA for brain redox balance, we hypothesize that this cerebellum feature improves its antioxidant status compared to the Cx. A chronic malnutrition status was induced on dams before mating and kept until weaning or adulthood (offspring). A group nutritionally rehabilitated from weaning was also analyzed. Morphometric parameters, total-superoxide dismutase (t-SOD) and catalase activities, lipoperoxidation (LP), nitric oxide (NO), reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/phosphate levels were assessed. Both ROS and LP levels were increased (∼53 %) in the Cx of malnourished young animals while the opposite was seen in the cerebellum (72 and 20 % of the control, respectively). Consistently, lower (∼35 %) and higher t-SOD (∼153 %) and catalase (CAT) (∼38 %) activities were respectively detected in the Cx and cerebellum compared to the control. In malnourished adult animals, redox balance was maintained in the cerebellum and recovered in the Cx (lower ROS and LP levels and higher GSH/GSSG ratio). NO production was impaired by malnutrition at either age, mainly in the cerebellum. The findings suggest that despite a multinutrient deficiency and a modified structural development, a low dietary n-6/n-3 ratio favors early antioxidant resources in the male cerebellum and indicates an important role of astrocytes in the redox balance recovery of Cx in adulthood.

  15. The Contribution of the Cerebellum in the Hierarchial Development of the Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Dönmez, Aslıhan; Ülsalver, Barış Önen

    2015-12-01

    What distinguishes human beings from other living organisms is that a human perceives himself as a "self". The self is developed hierarchially in a multi-layered process, which is based on the evolutionary maturation of the nervous system and patterns according to the rules and demands of the external world. Many researchers have attempted to explain the different aspects of the self, as well as the related neural substrates. In this paper, we first review the previously proposed ideas regarding the neurobiology of the self. We then suggest a new hypothesis regarding the hierarchial self, which proposes that the self is developed at three stages: subjective, objective, and reflective selves. In the second part, we attempt to answer the question "Why do we need a self?" We therefore explain that different parts of the self developed in an effort to identify stability in space, stability against constantly changing objects, and stability against changing cognitions. Finally, we discuss the role of the cerebellum as the neural substrate for the self.

  16. Sensitivity difference between anterior and posterior lobes of rat cerebellum to prenatal exposure to 2.5 Gy X-irradiation. A histological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmanto, W.; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.M.; Inouye, Minoru

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the histological differences in abnormality between anterior lobes (vermian lobules II, III and culmen IV, V) and posterior lobes (lobules IX, X) of the rat cerebellum following prenatal exposure to X-irradiation. Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.5 Gy X-irradiation at gestation day-21 (GD-21), and pups were sacrificed from birth through 15 days of age. Their cerebella were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for glial fibrillary acidic protein in Bergmann fibers. Extensive cell death was found in the external granular layer (EGL) of the cerebellum on the day of birth. In the anterior lobes, the number of cell deaths was higher than in the posterior lobes. During 5 days after birth, the recovery of EGL was earlier in the posterior lobes than in the anterior lobes. Seven days after birth, Bergmann fibers were more irregular in the anterior lobes than in the posterior lobes. The number of Purkinje cells in ectopic locations was higher in the anterior lobes than in the posterior lobes. The EGL and migrating Purkinje cells showed different responses to X-irradiation in the anterior than in the posterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  17. Spatiotemporal expression of chondroitin sulfate sulfotransferases in the postnatal developing mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Maki; Maeda, Nobuaki

    2008-08-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans are major components of the cell surface and the extracellular matrix in the developing brain and bind to various proteins via CS chains in a CS structure-dependent manner. This study demonstrated the expression pattern of three CS sulfotransferase genes, dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase (D4ST), uronyl 2-O-sulfotransferase (UST), and N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase (GalNAc4S-6ST), in the mouse postnatal cerebellum. These sulfotransferases are responsible for the biosynthesis of oversulfated structures in CS chains such as B, D, and E units, which constitute the binding sites for various heparin-binding proteins. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the expression of UST increased remarkably during cerebellar development. The amounts of B and D units, which are generated by UST activity, in the cerebellar CS chains also increased during development. In contrast, the expression of GalNAc4S-6ST and its biosynthetic product, E unit, decreased during postnatal development. In situ hybridization experiments revealed the levels of UST and GalNAc4S-6ST mRNAs to correlate inversely in many cells including Purkinje cells, granule cells in the external granular layer, and inhibitory interneurons. In these neurons, the expression of UST increased and that of GalNAc4S-6ST decreased during development and/or maturation. D4ST was also expressed by many neurons, but its expression was not simply correlated with development, which might contribute to the diversification of CS structures expressed by distinct neurons. These results suggest that the CS structures of various cerebellar neurons change during development and such changes of CS are involved in the regulation of various signaling pathways.

  18. Metabolomic method: UPLC-q-ToF polar and non-polar metabolites in the healthy rat cerebellum using an in-vial dual extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amera A Ebshiana

    Full Text Available Unbiased metabolomic analysis of biological samples is a powerful and increasingly commonly utilised tool, especially for the analysis of bio-fluids to identify candidate biomarkers. To date however only a small number of metabolomic studies have been applied to studying the metabolite composition of tissue samples, this is due, in part to a number of technical challenges including scarcity of material and difficulty in extracting metabolites. The aim of this study was to develop a method for maximising the biological information obtained from small tissue samples by optimising sample preparation, LC-MS analysis and metabolite identification. Here we describe an in-vial dual extraction (IVDE method, with reversed phase and hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography (HILIC which reproducibly measured over 4,000 metabolite features from as little as 3mg of brain tissue. The aqueous phase was analysed in positive and negative modes following HILIC separation in which 2,838 metabolite features were consistently measured including amino acids, sugars and purine bases. The non-aqueous phase was also analysed in positive and negative modes following reversed phase separation gradients respectively from which 1,183 metabolite features were consistently measured representing metabolites such as phosphatidylcholines, sphingolipids and triacylglycerides. The described metabolomics method includes a database for 200 metabolites, retention time, mass and relative intensity, and presents the basal metabolite composition for brain tissue in the healthy rat cerebellum.

  19. Further studies of the effects of aging on arginine metabolites in the rat vestibular nucleus and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P; Gupta, N; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Zhang, H; Smith, P F

    2017-04-21

    Some studies have demonstrated that aging is associated with impaired vestibular reflexes, especially otolithic reflexes, resulting in postural instability. However, the neurochemical basis of these age-related changes is still poorly understood. The l-arginine metabolic system has been implicated in changes in the brain associated with aging. In the current study, we examined the levels of l-arginine and its metabolizing enzymes and downstream metabolites in the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC) and cerebellum (CE) of rats with and without behavioral testing which were young (4months old), middle-aged (12months old) or aged (24months old). We found that aging was associated with lower nitric oxide synthase activity in the CE of animals with testing and increased arginase in the VNC and CE of animals with testing. l-citrulline and l-ornithine were lower in the VNC of aged animals irrespective of testing, while l-arginine and l-citrulline were lower in the CE with and without testing, respectively. In the VNC and CE, aging was associated with lower levels of glutamate in the VNC, irrespective of testing. In the VNC it was associated with higher levels of agmatine and putrescine, irrespective of testing. In the CE, aging was associated with higher levels of putrescine in animals without testing and with higher levels of spermine in animals with testing, and spermidine, irrespective of testing. Multivariate analyses indicated significant predictive relationships between the different variables, and there were correlations between some of the neurochemical variables and behavioral measurements. Cluster analyses revealed that aging altered the relationships between l-arginine and its metabolites. The results of this study demonstrate that there are major changes occurring in l-arginine metabolism in the VNC and CE as a result of age, as well as behavioral activity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dose dependent qualitative analysis of the effects of tritiated water (HTO) on the developing mouse cerebellum from 15th day Post - Coitum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, N.; Bhatia, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of tritium toxicity in the developing mouse brain has demonstrated that the cerebellum is fairly vulnerable to tritium exposure even in young adult mice. Tritium toxicity in the postnatally developing mouse cerebellum with respect to the radiopathological changes has also been reported. In the absence of adequate dose response data on inhaled beta emitting radionuclides in man, it is necessary to obtain such information in experimental animals. This presentation is an attempt to look into the toxicity of tritium on the cerebellum of developing Swiss albino mice and hence, to collect such dose response data which are necessary to establish the safety standards for the personnel involved with radiation protection programs

  1. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Medeiros, Niara; Koslowsky Marder, Roberta; Farias Wohlenberg, Mariane; Funchal, Cláudia; Dani, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (carbonyl), sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings. PMID:26649198

  2. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niara da Silva Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS, protein oxidation (carbonyl, sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings.

  3. Barhl1 is directly regulated by thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hongyan, E-mail: hongyan_dong@hc-sc.gc.ca [Hazard Identification Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L. [Mechanistic Studies Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada); Wade, Michael G. [Hazard Identification Division, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone receptor binds to the promoter region of Barhl1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barhl1 expression in cerebellum is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Negative regulation of Barhl1 by thyroid hormone was confirmed in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thyroid hormone may play a role in normal brain development through transcriptional control of Barhl1. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the brain development. Despite considerable effort, few genes directly regulated by THs have been identified. In this study, we investigate the effects of THs on the regulation of Barhl1, a transcription factor that regulates sensorineural development. Using DNA microarray combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), we identified a TR{beta} binding site in the promoter of Barhl1. The binding was further confirmed by ChIP-PCR. The site is located approximately 755 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Reporter vectors containing the binding site or mutated fragments were transfected into GH3 cells. T3 treatment decreased the transcriptional activity of the wild fragment but not the mutant. Two 28 bp oligonucleotides containing sequences that resemble known TH response elements (TREs) were derived from this binding site and DNA-protein interaction was performed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Binding analysis in a nuclear extract containing TR{beta} revealed that one of these fragments bound TR{beta}. This complex was shifted with the addition of anti-TR{beta} antibody. We investigated Barhl1 expression in animal models and TH-treated cultured cells. Both long term treatment with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil and short-term treatment with 0.05% methimazole/1% sodium perchlorate (both treatments render mice hypothyroid) resulted in up-regulation of Barhl1. TH supplementation of hypothyroid mice caused a decrease in the expression of Barhl1

  4. Barhl1 is directly regulated by thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Hongyan; Yauk, Carole L.; Wade, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thyroid hormone receptor binds to the promoter region of Barhl1. ► Barhl1 expression in cerebellum is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone. ► Negative regulation of Barhl1 by thyroid hormone was confirmed in vitro. ► Thyroid hormone may play a role in normal brain development through transcriptional control of Barhl1. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the brain development. Despite considerable effort, few genes directly regulated by THs have been identified. In this study, we investigate the effects of THs on the regulation of Barhl1, a transcription factor that regulates sensorineural development. Using DNA microarray combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), we identified a TRβ binding site in the promoter of Barhl1. The binding was further confirmed by ChIP-PCR. The site is located approximately 755 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Reporter vectors containing the binding site or mutated fragments were transfected into GH3 cells. T3 treatment decreased the transcriptional activity of the wild fragment but not the mutant. Two 28 bp oligonucleotides containing sequences that resemble known TH response elements (TREs) were derived from this binding site and DNA–protein interaction was performed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Binding analysis in a nuclear extract containing TRβ revealed that one of these fragments bound TRβ. This complex was shifted with the addition of anti-TRβ antibody. We investigated Barhl1 expression in animal models and TH-treated cultured cells. Both long term treatment with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil and short-term treatment with 0.05% methimazole/1% sodium perchlorate (both treatments render mice hypothyroid) resulted in up-regulation of Barhl1. TH supplementation of hypothyroid mice caused a decrease in the expression of Barhl1 compared to control animals. Similarly, the expression of Barhl1 in cultured GH3 decreased with the addition of T3. Given

  5. Effects of combined prenatal stress and toluene exposure on apoptotic neurodegeneration in cerebellum and hippocampus of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Ole; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hass, Ulla

    2004-01-01

    the offspring for developmental neurotoxicity and level of apoptosis in the brain. The number of apoptotic cells in cerebellum postnatal day 22, 24, and 27 and in hippocampus (postnatal day 22, 24, and 27) were counted after visualization by the TUNEL staining or measured by DNA-laddering technique. Caspase-3...

  6. Gene transfer to the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Strayer, David S

    2010-12-01

    There are several diseases for which gene transfer therapy to the cerebellum might be practicable. In these studies, we used recombinant Tag-deleted SV40-derived vectors (rSV40s) to study gene delivery targeting the cerebellum. These vectors transduce neurons and microglia very effectively in vitro and in vivo, and so we tested them to evaluate gene transfer to the cerebellum in vivo. Using a rSV40 vector carrying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-Nef with a C-terminal FLAG epitope, we characterized the distribution, duration, and cell types transduced. Rats received test and control vectors by stereotaxic injection into the cerebellum. Transgene expression was assessed 1, 2, and 4 weeks later by immunostaining of serial brain sections. FLAG epitope-expressing cells were seen, at all times after vector administration, principally detected in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, identified as immunopositive for calbindin. Occasional microglial cells were tranduced; transgene expression was not detected in astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. No inflammatory or other reaction was detected at any time. Thus, SV40-derived vectors can deliver effective, safe, and durable transgene expression to the cerebellum.

  7. Vitamin C protects rat cerebellum and encephalon from oxidative stress following exposure to radiofrequency wave generated by a BTS antenna model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Abolfazl; Jelodar, Gholamali; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-06-01

    Radio frequency wave (RFW) generated by base transceiver station has been reported to produce deleterious effects on the central nervous system function, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of RFW-induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum and encephalon and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on theses tissues by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity, including: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and malondialdehyde (MDA). Thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four equal groups. The control group; the control-vitamin C group received L-ascorbic acid (200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage) for 45 days. The RFW group was exposed to RFW and the RFW+ vitamin C group was exposed to RFW and received vitamin C. At the end of the experiment, all groups were killed and encephalon and cerebellum of all rats were removed and stored at -70 °C for measurement of antioxidant enzymes activity and MDA. The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p < 0.05). The protective role of vitamin C in the treated group improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared with the test group (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in the brain and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  8. Free amino acids in synaptic vesicles isolated from the cerebellum and cerebral hemispheres of control and neonatally X-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcana, T.; Hudson, D.B.; Timiras, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    X-irradiation of the rat brain (1000R, at two days of age), suppresses the normal age-related increase in the weight of the cerebellum and cerebral hemispheres and influences amino acid levels. The decrease in glutamic acid concentration, particularly in the cerebellum, supports the previously advanced proposition that this amino acid may be associated with or may be the transmitter of, the rat cerebellar granule cells. Subfractionation of the cerebellar tissue reveals that the decrease in the glutamic acid level consequent to the loss of granule cells, is reflected in the cytoplasmic fraction but not in the synaptic vesicle subfraction, where glutamic acid was increased. The reduced weight gain in the cerebral hemispheres after irradiation, is accompanied by a significant decrease of aspartate in the cytoplasmic fraction, changes which suggest that a specific cell type, with aspartic acid as its neurotransmitter (possibly in the hippocampus), may also be radiosensitive in the early postnatal period. In contrast, in the synaptic vesicle fraction from cerebral hemispheres, all free amino acids, with the exception of glutamine, increased significantly. Overall, the changes in free amino acid concentration induced by X-irradiation in the cytoplasmic fraction in both brain regions studied are opposite to those found in the synaptic vesicle fraction and although they may indicate changes in specific cell populations, as proposed above, they could also reflect changes in cellular compartmentalization and metabolism or changes in the relative axonal arborization of the affected regions

  9. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl-L-cystein on 3,4-Methylene Dioxymethamphetamie-Induced Neurotoxicity in Cerebellum of Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soleimani Asl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: 3-4, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA causes apoptosis in nervous system and several studies suggest that oxidative stress contributes to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of N-acetyl-L-Cystein (NAC as an antioxidant on MDMA-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: 21 Sprague dawley male rats (200-250mg were treated with MDMA (2×0,5mg/kg or MDMA plus NAC (100mg/kg IP for 7 day. After last administration of MDMA, rats were killed, cerebellum was removed and Bax and Bcl-2 expression was assessed by western blotting method. Results: The results of this study showed that MDMA causes up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and NAC administration attenuated MDMA-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: The present study suggests that NAC treatment may improve MDMA-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl-L-cystein on 3,4-Methylene Dioxymethamphetamie-Induced Neurotoxicity in Cerebellum of Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soleimani Asl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 3-4, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA causes apoptosis in nervous system and several studies suggest that oxidative stress contributes to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of N-acetyl-L-Cystein (NAC as an antioxidant on MDMA-induced apoptosis. Methods: 21 Sprague dawley male rats (200-250mg were treated with MDMA (2×0,5mg/kg or MDMA plus NAC (100mg/kg IP for 7 day. After last administration of MDMA, rats were killed, cerebellum was removed and Bax and Bcl-2 expression was assessed by western blotting method. Results: The results of this study showed that MDMA causes up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and NAC administration attenuated MDMA-induced apoptosis. Discussion: The present study suggests that NAC treatment may improve MDMA-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. Maternal exposure of rats to nicotine via infusion during gestation produces neurobehavioral deficits and elevated expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the cerebellum and CA1 subfield in the offspring at puberty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Dechkovskaia, Anjelika M.; Sutton, Jazmine M.; Chen, Wei-Chung; Guan, Xiangrong; Khan, Wasiuddin A.; Abou-Donia, Mohamed B.

    2005-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is known to be a significant contributor to developmental neurological health problems in the offspring. In animal studies, nicotine treatment via injection during gestation has been shown to produce episodic hypoxia in the developing fetus. Nicotine delivery via mini osmotic pump, while avoiding effects due to hypoxia-ischemia, it also provides a steady level of nicotine in the plasma. In the present study timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were treated with nicotine (3.3 mg/kg, in bacteriostatic water via s.c. implantation of mini osmotic pump) from gestational days (GD) 4-20. Control animals were treated with bacteriostatic water via s.c. implantation of mini osmotic pump. Offspring on postnatal day (PND) 30 and 60, were evaluated for changes in the ligand binding for various types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neuropathological alterations. Neurobehavioral evaluations for sensorimotor functions, beam-walk score, beam-walk time, incline plane and grip time response were carried out on PND 60 offspring. Beam-walk time and forepaw grip time showed significant impairments in both male and female offspring. Ligand binding densities for [ 3 H]epibatidine, [ 3 H]cytisine and [ 3 H]α-bungarotoxin did not show any significant changes in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors subtypes in the cortex at PND 30 and 60. Histopathological evaluation using cresyl violet staining showed significant decrease in surviving Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum and a decrease in surviving neurons in the CA1 subfield of hippocampus on PND 30 and 60. An increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immuno-staining was observed in cerebellum white matter as well as granular cell layer of cerebellum and the CA1 subfield of hippocampus on PND 30 and 60 of both male and female offspring. These results indicate that maternal exposure to nicotine produces significant neurobehavioral deficits, a decrease in the surviving neurons and an

  12. Prenatal low-dose methylmercury exposure impairs neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression and suppresses TrkA pathway activity and eEF1A1 expression in the rat cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Masatake, E-mail: fujimura@nimd.go.jp [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Kumamoto (Japan); Usuki, Fusako [Department of Clinical Medicine, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Kumamoto (Japan); Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a highly neurotoxic environmental chemical that can cause developmental impairments. Human fetuses and neonates are particularly susceptible to MeHg toxicity; however, the mechanisms governing its effects in the developing brain are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of prenatal and lactational MeHg exposure on the developing cerebellum in rats. We demonstrated that exposure to 5 ppm MeHg decreased postnatal expression of pre- and postsynaptic proteins, suggesting an impairment in synaptic development. MeHg exposure also reduced neurite outgrowth, as shown by a decrease in the expression of the neurite marker neurofilament H. These changes were not observed in rats exposed to 1 ppm MeHg. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we investigated the effects of MeHg exposure on the tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) A pathway, which plays important roles in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation. We demonstrated suppression of the TrkA pathway on gestation day 20 in rats exposed to 5 ppm MeHg. In addition, down-regulation of eukaryotic elongation factor 1A1 (eEF1A1) was observed on postnatal day 1. eEF1A1 knockdown in differentiating PC12 cells impaired neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression, similar to the results of MeHg exposure in the cerebellum. These results suggest that suppression of the TrkA pathway and subsequent decreases in eEF1A1 expression induced by prenatal exposure to MeHg may lead to reduced neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression in the developing cerebellum. - Highlights: • Prenatal exposure to MeHg decreased postnatal expression of synaptic proteins. • MeHg exposure also reduced neurite outgrowth postnatally. • Suppression of the TrkA pathway and eEF1A1 expression was induced by MeHg exposure. • eEF1A1 knockdown impaired neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression.

  13. Prenatal low-dose methylmercury exposure impairs neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression and suppresses TrkA pathway activity and eEF1A1 expression in the rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Masatake; Usuki, Fusako; Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a highly neurotoxic environmental chemical that can cause developmental impairments. Human fetuses and neonates are particularly susceptible to MeHg toxicity; however, the mechanisms governing its effects in the developing brain are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of prenatal and lactational MeHg exposure on the developing cerebellum in rats. We demonstrated that exposure to 5 ppm MeHg decreased postnatal expression of pre- and postsynaptic proteins, suggesting an impairment in synaptic development. MeHg exposure also reduced neurite outgrowth, as shown by a decrease in the expression of the neurite marker neurofilament H. These changes were not observed in rats exposed to 1 ppm MeHg. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we investigated the effects of MeHg exposure on the tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) A pathway, which plays important roles in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation. We demonstrated suppression of the TrkA pathway on gestation day 20 in rats exposed to 5 ppm MeHg. In addition, down-regulation of eukaryotic elongation factor 1A1 (eEF1A1) was observed on postnatal day 1. eEF1A1 knockdown in differentiating PC12 cells impaired neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression, similar to the results of MeHg exposure in the cerebellum. These results suggest that suppression of the TrkA pathway and subsequent decreases in eEF1A1 expression induced by prenatal exposure to MeHg may lead to reduced neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression in the developing cerebellum. - Highlights: • Prenatal exposure to MeHg decreased postnatal expression of synaptic proteins. • MeHg exposure also reduced neurite outgrowth postnatally. • Suppression of the TrkA pathway and eEF1A1 expression was induced by MeHg exposure. • eEF1A1 knockdown impaired neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression.

  14. Effects of x irradiation on the postnatally-forming granule cell populations in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, S.A.; Altman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Beginning on the second postnatal day, either two (2X group), four (4X group) or six (6X group) daily or alternate daily exposures to low-level x irradiation (150 to 200 R) were used to interfere with the acquisition of granule cells in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat. At 60 days of age, the relationship between post-irradiation recovery and permanent granule cell loss was assessed with two quantitative techniques. First, the total number of granule cells was determined to estimate the magnitude of permanent loss. Secondly, the number of labeled granule cells were counted on day 60 after a 3 H-thymidine injection given on either day 15 or on day 20 to estimate differential rates of cell proliferation during the recovery period. Permanent loss of granule cells was sustained in all regions by all schedules of irradiation. The time for the most effective exposures was earlier in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb than in the cerebellum. In all regions, both the irradiated groups and the controls showed a decrease in the level of cell proliferation between 15 and 20 days. The number of cells that could be labeled after either the 15 or 20 day injection was below control levels for all groups in the hippocampus, at control levels for all groups in the cerebellum, and either at (2X and 4X) or below (6X) control levels in the olfactory bulb. These results are discussed in the light of the formation time of the granule cells in each region

  15. Effects of x-irradiation on the postnatally-forming granule cell populations in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, S.A.; Altman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Beginning on the second postnatal day, either two (2X group), four (4X group) or six (6X group) daily or alternate daily exposures to low-level x irradiation (150-200 r) were used to interfere with the acquisition of granule cells in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat. At 60 days of age, the relationship between post-irradiation recovery and permanent granule cell loss was assessed with two quantitative techniques. First, the total number of granule cells was determined to estimate the magnitude of permanent loss. Secondly, the number of labeled granule cells were counted on day 60 after a 3 H-thymidine injection given on either day 15 or on day 20 to estimate differential rates of cell proliferation during the recovery period. Permanent loss of granule cells was sustained in all regions by all schedules of irradiation. The time for the most effective exposures was earlier in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb than in the cerebellum. In all regions, both the irradiated groups and the controls showed a decrease in the level of cell proliferation between 15 and 20 days. The number of cells that could be labeled after either the 15 or 20 day injection was below control levels for all groups in the hippocampus, at control levels for all groups in the cerebellum, and either at (2X and 4X) or below (6X) control levels in the olfactory bulb. These results are discussed in the light of the formation time of the granule cells in each region

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Portulaca oleraceae Ethanolic Extract Ameliorates Methylmercury Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Cerebellum and Cortex of Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Christinal, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is highly toxic, and its principal target tissue in human is the nervous system, which has made MeHg intoxication a public health concern for many decades. Portulaca oleraceae (purslane), a member of the Portulacaceae family, is widespread as a weed and has been ranked the eighth most common plant in the world. In this study, we sought for potential beneficial effects of Portulaca oleracea ethanolic extract (POEE) against the neurotoxicity induced by MeHg in cerebellum and cortex of rats. Male Wistar rats were administered with MeHg orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. for 21 days. Experimental rats were given MeHg and also administered with POEE (4 mg/kg, orally) 1 h prior to the administration of MeHg for 21 days. After MeHg exposure, we determine the mercury concentration by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS); mercury content was observed high in MeHg-induced group. POEE reduced the mercury content. We also observed that the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and the level of glutathione were reduced. The levels of glutathione reductase and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were found to be increased. The above biochemical changes were found to be reversed with POEE. Behavioral changes like decrease tail flick response, longer immobility time, and decreased motor activity were noted down during MeHg exposure. POEE pretreatment offered protection from these behavioral changes. MeHg intoxication also caused histopathological changes in cerebellum and cortex, which was found to be normalized by treatment with POEE. The present results indicate that POEE has protective effect against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Photoaffinity labeling of [3H]flunitrazepam- and [3H]Ro15-4513-bound pellets in rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, T.H.; Yu, Onnfoh; Rosenberg, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    Irreversible incorporation of [ 3 H]flunitrazepam and [ 3 H]Ro15-4513 into GABA/benzodiazepine receptor subunits was studied by UV/irradiation using ligand-bound membrane pellets from rat cerebral cortical and cerebellar synaptic membranes. Specific incorporation for [ 3 H]flunitrazepam was greater in the pellet than in the suspension. The incorporation was identical for [ 3 H]Ro15-4513 in both pellet and suspension. With the ligand-bound pellets, 50% of the available binding sites were photolabeled by both ligands in cortex and cerebellum. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of [ 3 H]flunitrazepam photo-labeled receptor revealed the same number of major sites in both brain regions. In contrast, [ 3 H]Ro15-4513 appears to label fewer sites in cortex and cerebellum. Photoaffinity labeling with [ 3 H]flunitrazepam in ligand-bound membrane pellet provides a more selective and reliable method for studying the subunit structure of GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

  18. Structure–function relationships in the developing cerebellum: evidence from early-life cerebellar injury and neurodevelopmental disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoodley, Catherine J.; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The increasing appreciation of the role of the cerebellum in motor and non-motor functions is crucial to understanding the outcomes of acquired cerebellar injury and developmental lesions in high-risk fetal and neonatal populations, children with cerebellar damage (e.g. posterior fossa tumors), and neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). We review available data regarding the relationship between the topography of cerebellar injury or abnormality and functional outcomes. We report emerging structure–function relationships with specific symptoms: cerebellar regions that interconnect with sensorimotor cortices are associated with motor impairments when damaged; disruption to posterolateral cerebellar regions that form circuits with association cortices impact long-term cognitive outcomes; and midline posterior vermal damage is associated with behavioral dysregulation and an autism-like phenotype. We also explore the impact of age and the potential role for critical periods on cerebellar structure and child function. These findings suggest that the cerebellum plays a critical role in motor, cognitive, and social–behavioral development, possibly via modulatory effects on the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:27184461

  19. Nicotinamide Inhibits Ethanol-Induced Caspase-3 and PARP-1 Over-activation and Subsequent Neurodegeneration in the Developing Mouse Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Herrera, Daniel G

    2018-06-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the principal preventable cause of mental retardation in the western countries resulting from alcohol exposure during pregnancy. Ethanol-induced massive neuronal cell death occurs mainly in immature neurons during the brain growth spurt period. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most sensitive to ethanol neurotoxicity. Currently, there is no effective treatment that targets the causes of these disorders and efficient treatments to counteract or reverse FASD are desirable. In this study, we investigated the effects of nicotinamide on ethanol-induced neuronal cell death in the developing cerebellum. Subcutaneous administration of ethanol in postnatal 4-day-old mice induced an over-activation of caspase-3 and PARP-1 followed by a massive neurodegeneration in the developing cerebellum. Interestingly, treatment with nicotinamide, immediately or 2 h after ethanol exposure, diminished caspase-3 and PARP-1 over-activation and reduced ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. Conversely, treatment with 3-aminobenzadine, a specific PARP-1 inhibitor, was able to completely block PARP-1 activation, but not caspase-3 activation or ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in the developing cerebellum. Our results showed that nicotinamide reduces ethanol-induced neuronal cell death and inhibits both caspase-3 and PARP-1 alcohol-induced activation in the developing cerebellum, suggesting that nicotinamide might be a promising and safe neuroprotective agent for treating FASD and other neurodegenerative disorders in the developing brain that shares similar cell death pathways.

  20. Mosaic Expression of Thyroid Hormone Regulatory Genes Defines Cell Type-Specific Dependency in the Developing Chicken Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbaere, Joke; Van Herck, Stijn L J; Bourgeois, Nele M A; Vancamp, Pieter; Yang, Shuo; Wingate, Richard J T; Darras, Veerle M

    2016-12-01

    The cerebellum is a morphologically unique brain structure that requires thyroid hormones (THs) for the correct coordination of key cellular events driving its development. Unravelling the interplay between the multiple factors that can regulate intracellular TH levels is a key step to understanding their role in the regulation of these cellular processes. We therefore investigated the regional/cell-specific expression pattern of TH transporters and deiodinases in the cerebellum using the chicken embryo as a model. In situ hybridisation revealed expression of the TH transporters monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) and 10 (MCT10), L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1C1 (OATP1C1) as well as the inactivating type 3 deiodinase (D3) in the fourth ventricle choroid plexus, suggesting a possible contribution of the resulting proteins to TH exchange and subsequent inactivation of excess hormone at the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Exclusive expression of LAT1 and the activating type 2 deiodinase (D2) mRNA was found at the level of the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a concerted function for LAT1 and D2 in the direct access of active T 3 to the developing cerebellum via the capillary endothelial cells. The presence of MCT8 mRNA in Purkinje cells and cerebellar nuclei during the first 2 weeks of embryonic development points to a potential role of this transporter in the uptake of T 3 in central neurons. At later stages, together with MCT10, detection of MCT8 signal in close association with the Purkinje cell dendritic tree suggests a role of both transporters in TH signalling during Purkinje cell synaptogenesis. MCT10 was also expressed in late-born cells in the rhombic lip lineage with a clear hybridisation signal in the outer external granular layer, indicating a potential role for MCT10 in the proliferation of granule cell precursors. By contrast, expression of D3 in the first-born rhombic lip-derived population may

  1. Essential Function of Dicer in Resolving DNA Damage in the Rapidly Dividing Cells of the Developing and Malignant Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Swahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical during neurodevelopment, particularly in rapidly dividing cerebellar granule neuronal precursors that experience constitutive replication-associated DNA damage. As Dicer was recently recognized to have an unexpected function in the DNA damage response, we examined whether Dicer was important for preserving genomic integrity in the developing brain. We report that deletion of Dicer in the developing mouse cerebellum resulted in the accumulation of DNA damage leading to cerebellar progenitor degeneration, which was rescued with p53 deficiency; deletion of DGCR8 also resulted in similar DNA damage and cerebellar degeneration. Dicer deficiency also resulted in DNA damage and death in other rapidly dividing cells including embryonic stem cells and the malignant cerebellar progenitors in a mouse model of medulloblastoma. Together, these results identify an essential function of Dicer in resolving the spontaneous DNA damage that occurs during the rapid proliferation of developmental progenitors and malignant cells.

  2. Cerebellum - function (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cerebellum processes input from other areas of the brain, spinal cord and sensory receptors to provide precise timing ... the skeletal muscular system. A stroke affecting the cerebellum may cause dizziness, nausea, balance and coordination problems.

  3. Vitamin D-dependent rat renal calcium-binding protein: development of a radioimmunoassay, tissue distribution, and immunologic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenberg, J.; Pansini, A.R.; Christakos, S.

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive double antibody RIA has been developed for the 28,000 mol wt rat renal vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein. Using this assay, concentrations of calcium-binding protein (CaBP) as low as 30 ng can be measured. The assay is precise (intraassay variability, 5.0%) and reproductible (interassay variability, 8.2%). Measurements of renal CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the chelex resin assay and by polyacrylamide gel analysis by densitometric tracing using a purified CaBP marker. The concentration of CaBP in the vitamin D-replete rat kidney is 7.3 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM) micrograms/mg protein. In vitamin D-deficient rats the level of renal CaBP is 2.6 +/- 0.3 micrograms/mg protein. Tissue distribution of immunoreactive rat renal CaBP showed the highest concentration of CaBP in the rat cerebellum (38.3 +/- 5.1 micrograms/mg protein). Lower concentrations of immunoreactive CaBP were detected in several other rat tissues. No immunoreactive CaBP was detected in rat or human serum. In necropsy human kidney and cerebellum, high levels of immunoreactive CaBP were also detected (1.5 +/- 0.1 and 27.3 +/- 2.1 micrograms/mg protein, respectively). When extracts of rat kidney and brain and human cerebellum and kidney were assayed at several dilutions, immunodisplacement curves parallel to that of pure renal CaBP were observed, indicating immunochemical similarity. Fractionation of extracts of rat cerebellum, human kidney, and human cerebellum on Sephadex G-100 revealed immunoreactivity and calcium-binding activity in the 28,000 mol wt region similar to rat kidney

  4. The Cerebellum and Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoodley, Catherine J

    2016-02-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is evident in several developmental disorders, including autism, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and developmental dyslexia, and damage to the cerebellum early in development can have long-term effects on movement, cognition, and affective regulation. Early cerebellar damage is often associated with poorer outcomes than cerebellar damage in adulthood, suggesting that the cerebellum is particularly important during development. Differences in cerebellar development and/or early cerebellar damage could impact a wide range of behaviors via the closed-loop circuits connecting the cerebellum with multiple cerebral cortical regions. Based on these anatomical circuits, behavioral outcomes should depend on which cerebro-cerebellar circuits are affected. Here, we briefly review cerebellar structural and functional differences in autism, ADHD, and developmental dyslexia, and discuss clinical outcomes following pediatric cerebellar damage. These data confirm the prediction that abnormalities in different cerebellar subregions produce behavioral symptoms related to the functional disruption of specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits. These circuits might also be crucial to structural brain development, as peri-natal cerebellar lesions have been associated with impaired growth of the contralateral cerebral cortex. The specific contribution of the cerebellum to typical development may therefore involve the optimization of both the structure and function of cerebro-cerebellar circuits underlying skill acquisition in multiple domains; when this process is disrupted, particularly in early development, there could be long-term alterations of these neural circuits, with significant impacts on behavior.

  5. Neurog1 Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping (GIFM) Reveals the Existence of Complex Spatiotemporal Cyto-Architectures in the Developing Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, Edwin A; Lundell, Travis G; Yi, Kevin J; Radomski, Kryslaine L; Zhou, Qiong; Doughty, Martin L

    2015-06-01

    Neurog1 is a pro-neural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor expressed in progenitor cells located in the ventricular zone and subsequently the presumptive white matter tracts of the developing mouse cerebellum. We used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) with a transgenic Neurog1-CreER allele to characterize the contributions of Neurog1 lineages to cerebellar circuit formation in mice. GIFM reveals Neurog1-expressing progenitors are fate-mapped to become Purkinje cells and all GABAergic interneuron cell types of the cerebellar cortex but not glia. The spatiotemporal sequence of GIFM is unique to each neuronal cell type. GIFM on embryonic days (E) 10.5 to E12.5 labels Purkinje cells with different medial-lateral settling patterns depending on the day of tamoxifen delivery. GIFM on E11.5 to P7 labels interneurons and the timing of tamoxifen administration correlates with the final inside-to-outside resting position of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebellar cortex. Proliferative status and long-term BrdU retention of GIFM lineages reveals Purkinje cells express Neurog1 around the time they become post-mitotic. In contrast, GIFM labels mitotic and post-mitotic interneurons. Neurog1-CreER GIFM reveals a correlation between the timing of Neurog1 expression and the spatial organization of GABAergic neurons in the cerebellar cortex with possible implications for cerebellar circuit assembly.

  6. Apoptosis of Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellum following chronic ethanol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Suelen A; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Fioruci-Fontanelli, Beatriz Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Novais, Paulo Cezar; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Oishi, Jorge Camargo; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Stefanini, Maira Aparecida; Martinez, Marcelo; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol alters motricity, learning, cognition, and cellular metabolism in the cerebellum. We evaluated the effect of ethanol on apoptosis in Golgi, Purkinje, and granule cells of the cerebellum in adult rats. There were two groups of 20 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (cerebellum of adult UChA rats.

  7. PCB-INDUCED CHANGES IN THE DNA BINDING OF SEVERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of persistent chemical pollutants prevalent in the environment despite the ban of their use for decades. Disturbances in brain development and cognition are among the neurotoxic manifestations of PCBs. The cellular and molecular basis...

  8. Oligodendrocyte ablation affects the coordinated interaction between granule and Purkinje neurons during cerebellum development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, Ludovic; Doretto, Sandrine; Malerba, Monica; Ruat, Martial; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2007-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS) classically known to be devoted to the formation of myelin sheaths around most axons of the vertebrate brain. We have addressed the role of these cells during cerebellar development, by ablating OLs in vivo. Previous analyses had indicated that OL ablation during the first six postnatal days results into a striking cerebellar phenotype, whose major features are a strong reduction of granule neurons and aberrant Purkinje cells development. These two cell types are highly interconnected during cerebellar development through the production of molecules that help their proliferation, differentiation and maintenance. In this article, we present data showing that OL ablation has major effects on the physiology of Purkinje (PC) and granule cells (GC). In particular, OL ablation results into a reduction of sonic hedgehog (Shh), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), and Reelin (Rln) expression. These results indicate that absence of OLs profoundly alters the normal cerebellar developmental program

  9. Morphometric Studies Of The Cerebellum And Forebrain Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphometric studies were undertaken using the brains of six African giant rats. The mean of weights and lengths (tip of the olfactory bulb to the caudal border of the cerebellum) were observed tobe 4.88 0.183g and 4.40 0.193g, respectively. Similarly, the mean weight and length of the cerebellum and the forebrain ...

  10. The effects of heavy ion particles on the developing murine cerebellum, with special reference to cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Chikako; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Nojima, Kumie

    2003-01-01

    We report here the effects of heavy ion beams on postnatal mouse cerebellar development, with reference to cell death. Eight-day-old B6C3F1 mice were irradiated with single doses of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy, using a carbon beam of 290 MeV delivered from a heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). To compare the effects of X-rays with those of accelerated carbon ions, 8-day-old mice were exposed to X-rays single doses of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy, respectively. Pups were fixed at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hr after exposure to HIMAC beams or X-rays. Four-μm-thick parasagittal sections of the cerebella were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining as well as for staining with the TUNEL (terminal dUTP nick-end labeling) technique. The density of fragmented nuclei in the external granular layer increased with time, peaking at 6 hr after exposure, in both the HIMAC and X-irradiated groups. In the HIMAC groups, the density was significantly higher in those animals exposed to 0.25 Gy or more compared to 0 Gy, whereas in the X-irradiated groups it was significantly higher in those mice exposed to 0.5 Gy or more. Electron microscopic examinations revealed chromatin condensation in the cell nuclei in the HIMAC groups. This is the first in vivo evidence that apoptotic cell death is induced in developing mouse cerebellum after exposure to heavy ion particles. The difference in the frequency of dying cells between exposure to heavy ion particles and to X-rays may reflect the high linear energy transfer (LET) associated with a heavy ion beam. (author)

  11. Injury of the developing cerebellum: a brief review of the effects of endotoxin and asphyxial challenges in the late gestation sheep fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Lisa C; Yan, Edwin; Yawno, Tamara; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Hirst, Jon J; Walker, David W

    2014-12-01

    The vulnerability of the fetal and newborn brain to events in utero or at birth that cause damage arising from perturbations of cerebral blood flow and metabolism, such as the accumulation of free radicals and excitatory transmitters to neurotoxic levels, has received considerable attention over the last few decades. Attention has usually been on the damage to cerebral structures, particularly, periventricular white matter. The rapid growth of the cerebellum in the latter half of fetal life in species with long gestations, such as the human and sheep, suggests that this may be a particularly important time for the development of cerebellar structure and function. In this short review, we summarize data from recent studies with fetal sheep showing that the developing cerebellum is particularly sensitive to infectious processes, chronic hypoxia and asphyxia. The data demonstrates that the cerebellum should be further studied in insults of this nature as it responds differently to the remainder of the brain. Damage to this region of the brain has implications not only for the development of motor control and posture, but also for higher cognitive processes and the subsequent development of complex behaviours, such as learning, memory and attention.

  12. Energy metabolism of synaptosomes from different neuronal systems of rat cerebellum during aging: a functional proteomic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella; Villa, Roberto Federico

    2015-01-01

    Functional proteomics was used to characterize age-related changes in energy metabolism of different neuronal pathways within the cerebellar cortex of Wistar rats aged 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The "large" synaptosomes, derived from the glutamatergic mossy fibre endings which make synaptic contact with the granule cells of the granular layer, and the "small" synaptosomes, derived from the pre-synaptic terminals of granule cells making synaptic contact with the dendrites of Purkinje cells, were isolated by a combined differential/gradient centrifugation technique. Because most brain disorders are associated with bioenergetic changes, the maximum rate (Vmax) of selected enzymes of glycolysis, Krebs' cycle, glutamate and amino acids metabolism, and acetylcholine catabolism were evaluated. The results show that "large" and "small" synaptosomes possess specific and independent metabolic features. This study represents a reliable model to study in vivo (1) the physiopathological molecular mechanisms of some brain diseases dependent on energy metabolism, (2) the responsiveness to noxious stimuli, and (3) the effects of drugs, discriminating their action sites at subcellular level on specific neuronal pathways.

  13. Ameliorative effect of Pimpinella anisum oil on immunohistochemical and ultrastuctural changes of cerebellum of albino rats induced by aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hamid, Manal; Gallaly, Sanaa Rida

    2014-05-01

    The study aims to investigate the protective effect of Pimpinella anisum oil on aspartame (ASP) which resulted in cerebellar changes. The rats were divided into four equal groups: Group 1: (control group): served as control animals. Group 2: control P. anisum oil received .5 mL/kg/d/b wt. once daily. Group 3 (ASP group): received daily 250 mg/kg/b wt. of ASP dissolved in distilled water and given orally to the animals by intra-gastric tube for 2 months. Group 4: received .5 mL/kg/b wt. of prophylactic P. anisum oil once daily, followed by ASP after 2 h for 2 months. The histopathological approach revealed marked changes in the Purkinje cells, myleinated nerve fibers and granular cells of ASP-treated animals. Some of these cells appeared with deeply stained cytoplasm. Ultrastructural examination showed Purkinje cells with dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and condensed mitochondria. Granular cells appeared with less c nuclei and surrounded by dissolution of most Mossy rosettes structures. Most myelinated nerve fibers showed thickening of myelinated sheath and others showed splitting of their myelin sheath. The histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations were much less observed in concomitant use of P. anisum oil with ASP. Cerebellar cortex is considered target areas of ASP neurotoxicity, while P. anisum oil, when used in combination with ASP displays a protective action against neurotoxicity.

  14. Effect of neurotrophin-3 precursor on glutamate-induced calcium homeostasis deregulation in rat cerebellum granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, Dina R; Surin, Alexander M; Pinelis, Vsevolod G; Kostrov, Sergey V

    2015-12-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) belongs to the family of highly conserved dimeric growth factors that controls the differentiation and activity of various neuronal populations. Mammals contain both the mature (NT-3) and the precursor (pro-NT-3) forms of neurotrophin. Members of the neurotrophin family are involved in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in neurons; however, the role of NT-3 and pro-NT-3 in this process remains unclear. The current study explores the effects of NT-3 and pro-NT-3 on disturbed calcium homeostasis and decline of mitochondrial potential induced by a neurotoxic concentration of glutamate (Glu; 100 µM) in the primary culture of rat cerebellar granule cells. In this Glu excitotoxicity model, mature NT-3 had no effect on the induced changes in Ca²⁺ homeostasis. In contrast, pro-NT-3 decreased the period of delayed calcium deregulation (DCD) and concurrent strong mitochondrial depolarization. According to the amplitude of the increase in the intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]i ) and Fura-2 fluorescence quenching by Mn²⁺ within the first 20 sec of exposure to Glu, pro-NT-3 had no effect on the initial rate of Ca²⁺ entry into neurons. During the lag period preceding DCD, the mean amplitude of [Ca²⁺]i rise was 1.2-fold greater in the presence of pro-NT-3 than in the presence of Glu alone (1.67 ±  0.07 and 1.39 ± 0.04, respectively, P < 0.05). The Glu-induced changes in Са²⁺ homeostasis in the presence of pro-NT-3 likely are due to the decreased rate of Са²⁺ removal from the cytosol during the DCD latency period. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Stereospecific recognition sites for [3H]inositol(1,4,5)-triphosphate in particulate preparations of rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willcocks, A.L.; Cooke, A.M.; Potter, B.V.; Nahorski, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    A very high density of stereospecific binding sites for inositol-(1,4,5)P3 have been identified in rat cerebellar membranes using [ 3 H]inositol-(1,4,5)P3 and a rapid centrifugation step to separate free and bound ligand. Binding was shown to be rapid and reversible and of relatively high affinity (KD 23 nM). Incubations were carried out at 4 degrees and under these conditions HPLC analysis demonstrated that there was no significant metabolism of [ 3 H]-(1,4,5)P3 in the presence or absence of ATP over 15 min. The specificity of the site has been carefully evaluated using both natural and novel synthetic inositol phosphates. The stereospecificity is very marked with the D-, DL- and L-isomers of Ins(1,4,5)P3 showing a 1:4:2000 ratio of affinity for the binding site. D-Ins(2,4,5)P3 was the only other phosphate to show relatively high affinity (KD 1500 nM). HPLC-pure Ins(1,3,4)P3 and Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 were substantially weaker and Ins(1,4)P2, Ins-2-P1, Ins-1-P1, Ins(1,2)-cyclic P1 and inositol were totally inactive at concentrations less than 50 microM. These data are discussed in relation to a putative receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum by which Ins(1,4,5)P3 can initiate the release of bound Ca 2+

  16. Cannabinoid receptor expression and phosphorylation are differentially regulated between male and female cerebellum and brain stem after repeated stress: implication for PTSD and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guoqiang; Carlton, Janis; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Xiaolong; Fullerton, Carol; Li, He; Ursano, Robert

    2011-09-08

    Recent study demonstrated a close relationship between cerebellum atrophy and symptom severity of pediatric maltreatment-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It has also been known that females are more vulnerable than males in developing anxiety disorders after exposure to traumatic stress. The mechanisms are unknown. Because cannabinoid receptors (CB₁ and CB₂) are neuroprotective and highly expressed in the cerebellum, we investigated cerebellar CB expression in stressed rats. Young male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were given 40 unpredictable electric tail-shocks for 2h daily on 3 consecutive days. CB₁ and CB₂ mRNA and protein levels in rat cerebellum and brain stem were determined using quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant gender and stress effects on cerebellar CB₁ mRNA expression, with females and non-stressed rats exhibiting higher CB₁ mRNA levels than the males (3 fold, pstressed rats (30%, pstress increased the level of phosphorylated CB₁ receptors, the inactivated CB₁, in rat cerebellum (pstress interaction. Thus, repeated severe stress caused greater CB₁ mRNA suppression and CB₁ receptor phosphorylation in female cerebellum that could lead to increased susceptibility to stress-related anxiety disorders including PTSD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of differential postnatal exposure of the rat cerebellum to x-rays on spatial discrimination learning as a function of age and position preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to analyze the effects of postnatal exposure of the cerebellum to x-irradiation on the use of proprioceptive feedback in spatial learning. A total of 337 naive male Long-Evans hooded rats were assigned at birth to one of four treatments: 12-15x, 4-5x, 4-15x and control. Subjects assigned to the 12-15x treatment were exposed to 200R at 12 and 13 days of age, and to 150R at 15 days of age. The subjects exposed to the 4-5x schedule received 200R on days 4 and 5. The 4-15x subjects are exposed to 200R on days 4 and 5, and to 150R on days 7, 9, 11, 13, 15. Subjects from each treatment started spatial discrimination testing in a T-shaped water maze at 30 to 31, 60 to 63, or 180 to 185 days of age. A preference effect was evident in the control, 12-15x and 4-5x subjects, but not in the 4-15x subjects during acquisition testing. Those control, 12-15x and 4-5x subjects trained against their preference made more errors and required more trials to attain acquisition criterion than did those subjects trained toward their preference. The absence of a position preference in the 4-15x subjects is attributed to the absence of the mossy fiber channel of input to the Purkinje cells in this preparation. Deficits in spatial learning were evident in both the 12-15x and 4-15x subjects, the former differing significantly from control subjects and the latter from the 4-5x subjects in the number of trials needed to complete reversal testing and/or the number of errors made during this phase of the testing. It is the upper portion of the molecular layer, absent in the 12-15x and 4-15x preparations, which receives afferent input from the spinal cord

  18. The Cerebellum, Sensitive Periods, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Samuel S.-H.; Kloth, Alexander D.; Badura, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar research has focused principally on adult motor function. However, the cerebellum also maintains abundant connections with nonmotor brain regions throughout postnatal life. Here we review evidence that the cerebellum may guide the maturation of remote nonmotor neural circuitry and influence cognitive development, with a focus on its relationship with autism. Specific cerebellar zones influence neocortical substrates for social interaction, and we propose that sensitive-period disruption of such internal brain communication can account for autism's key features. PMID:25102558

  19. CERES: A new cerebellum lobule segmentation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jose E; Coupé, Pierrick; Giraud, Rémi; Ta, Vinh-Thong; Fonov, Vladimir; Park, Min Tae M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Manjón, Jose V

    2017-02-15

    The human cerebellum is involved in language, motor tasks and cognitive processes such as attention or emotional processing. Therefore, an automatic and accurate segmentation method is highly desirable to measure and understand the cerebellum role in normal and pathological brain development. In this work, we propose a patch-based multi-atlas segmentation tool called CERES (CEREbellum Segmentation) that is able to automatically parcellate the cerebellum lobules. The proposed method works with standard resolution magnetic resonance T1-weighted images and uses the Optimized PatchMatch algorithm to speed up the patch matching process. The proposed method was compared with related recent state-of-the-art methods showing competitive results in both accuracy (average DICE of 0.7729) and execution time (around 5 minutes). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Implication of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase and its Novel Variants in the Hippocampus and Cerebellum During the Developing and Adult Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kanai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO is a first and rate-limiting enzyme for the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. Using Tdo-/-mice, we have recently shown that TDO plays a pivotal role in systemic tryptophan metabolism and brain serotonin synthesis as well as emotional status and adult neurogenesis. However, the expression of TDO in the brain has not yet been well characterized, in contrast to its predominant expression in the liver. To further examine the possible role of local TDO in the brain, we quantified the levels of tdo mRNA in various nervous tissues, using Northern blot and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Higher levels of tdo mRNA expression were detected in the cerebellum and hippocampus. We also identified two novel variants of the tdo gene, termed tdo variant1 and variant2, in the brain. Similar to the known TDO form (TDO full-form, tetramer formation and enzymatic activity were obtained when these variant forms were expressed in vitro. While quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that the tissue distribution of these variants was similar to that of tdo full-form, the expression patterns of these variants during early postnatal development in the hippocampus and cerebellum differed. Our findings indicate that in addition to hepatic TDO, TDO and its variants in the brain might function in the developing and adult nervous system. Given the previously reported associations of tdo gene polymorphisms in the patients with autism and Tourette syndrome, the expression of TDO in the brain suggests the possible influence of TDO on psychiatric status. Potential functions of TDOs in the cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex under physiological and pathological conditions are discussed.

  1. Implication of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase and its Novel Variants in the Hippocampus and Cerebellum during the Developing and Adult Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kanai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO is a first and rate-limiting enzyme for the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. Using Tdo −/− mice, we have recently shown that TDO plays a pivotal role in systemic tryptophan metabolism and brain serotonin synthesis as well as emotional status and adult neurogenesis. However, the expression of TDO in the brain has not yet been well characterized, in contrast to its predominant expression in the liver. To further examine the possible role of local TDO in the brain, we quantified the levels of tdo mRNA in various nervous tissues, using Northern blot and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Higher levels of tdo mRNA expression were detected in the cerebellum and hippocampus. We also identified two novel variants of the tdo gene, termed tdo variant1 and variant2, in the brain. Similar to the known TDO form (TDO full-form, tetramer formation and enzymatic activity were obtained when these variant forms were expressed in vitro . While quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that the tissue distribution of these variants was similar to that of tdo full-form, the expression patterns of these variants during early postnatal development in the hippocampus and cerebellum differed. Our findings indicate that in addition to hepatic TDO, TDO and its variants in the brain might function in the developing and adult nervous system. Given the previously reported associations of tdo gene polymorphisms in the patients with autism and Tourette syndrome, the expression of TDO in the brain suggests the possible influence of TDO on psychiatric status. Potential functions of TDOs in the cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex under physiological and pathological conditions are discussed.

  2. Cerebellum and apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; van Dun, Kim; Verhoeven, Jo

    2015-02-01

    As early as the beginning of the nineteenth century, a variety of nonmotor cognitive and affective impairments associated with cerebellar pathology were occasionally documented. A causal link between cerebellar disease and nonmotor cognitive and affective disorders has, however, been dismissed for almost two centuries. During the past decades, the prevailing view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor function has changed fundamentally. Substantial progress has been made in elucidating the neuroanatomical connections of the cerebellum with the supratentorial association cortices that subserve nonmotor cognition and affect. Furthermore, functional neuroimaging studies and neurophysiological and neuropsychological research have shown that the cerebellum is crucially involved in modulating cognitive and affective processes. This paper presents an overview of the clinical and neuroradiological evidence supporting the view that the cerebellum plays an intrinsic part in purposeful, skilled motor actions. Despite the increasing number of studies devoted to a further refinement of the typology and anatomoclinical configurations of apraxia related to cerebellar pathology, the exact underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of cerebellar involvement remain to be elucidated. As genuine planning, organization, and execution disorders of skilled motor actions not due to motor, sensory, or general intellectual failure, the apraxias following disruption of the cerebrocerebellar network may be hypothetically considered to form part of the executive cluster of the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS), a highly influential concept defined by Schmahmann and Sherman (Brain 121:561-579, 1998) on the basis of four symptom clusters grouping related neurocognitive and affective deficits (executive, visuospatial, affective, and linguistic impairments). However, since only a handful of studies have explored the possible role of the cerebellum in

  3. Development of antibodies against the rat brain somatostatin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveniau, M; Rens-Domiano, S; Law, S F; Rougon, G; Reisine, T

    1992-05-15

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a neurotransmitter in the brain involved in the regulation of motor activity and cognition. It induces its physiological actions by interacting with receptors. We have developed antibodies against the receptor to investigate its structural properties. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were generated against the rat brain SRIF receptor. These antibodies (F4) were able to immunoprecipitate solubilized SRIF receptors from rat brain and the cell line AtT-20. The specificity of the interaction of these antibodies with SRIF receptors was further demonstrated by immunoblotting. F4 detected SRIF receptors of 60 kDa from rat brain and adrenal cortex and the cell lines AtT-20, GH3, and NG-108, which express high densities of SRIF receptors. They did not detect immunoreactive material from rat liver or COS-1, HEPG, or CRL cells, which do not express functional SRIF receptors. In rat brain, 60-kDa immunoreactivity was detected by F4 in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and striatum, which have high densities of SRIF receptors. However, F4 did not interact with proteins from cerebellum and brain stem, which express few SRIF receptors. Immunoreactive material cannot be detected in rat pancreas or pituitary, which have been reported to express a 90-kDa SRIF receptor subtype. The selective detection of 60-kDa SRIF receptors by F4 indicates that the 60- and 90-kDa SRIF receptor subtypes are immunologically distinct. The availability of antibodies that selectively detect native and denatured brain SRIF receptors provides us with a feasible approach to clone the brain SRIF receptor gene(s).

  4. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana G. Polotow

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA. However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation, drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions.

  5. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotow, Tatiana G; Poppe, Sandra C; Vardaris, Cristina V; Ganini, Douglas; Guariroba, Maísa; Mattei, Rita; Hatanaka, Elaine; Martins, Maria F; Bondan, Eduardo F; Barros, Marcelo P

    2015-09-28

    Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs) and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA). However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3)/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients) on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation), drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions.

  6. EFFECTS OF PCB 84 ENANTIOMERS ON 3H-PHORBOL ESTER BINDING IN RAT CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS AND 45CA2+-UPTAKE IN RAT CEREBELLUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first report showing the effects of 2,2,3,3,6-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 84) enantiomers on key neurochemical events involved in the development and function of the nervous system. Our previous reports provided evidence that ortho-substituted PCBs like PCB 84 have pot...

  7. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  8. The emotional cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strata, Piergiorgio

    2015-10-01

    Great attention has been given so far to cerebellar control of posture and of skilled movements despite the well-demonstrated interconnections between the cerebellum and the autonomic nervous system. Here is a review of the link between these two structures and a report on the recently acquired evidence for its involvement in the world of emotions. In rodents, the reversible inactivation of the vermis during the consolidation or the reconsolidation period hampers the retention of the fear memory trace. In this region, there is a long-term potentiation of both the excitatory synapses between the parallel fibres and the Purkinje cells and of the feed-forward inhibition mediated by molecular layer interneurons. This concomitant potentiation ensures the temporal fidelity of the system. Additional contacts between mossy fibre terminals and Golgi cells provide morphological evidence of the potentiation of another feed-forward inhibition in the granular layer. Imaging experiments show that also in humans the cerebellum is activated during mental recall of emotional personal episodes and during learning of a conditioned or unconditioned association involving emotions. The vermis participates in fear learning and memory mechanisms related to the expression of autonomic and motor responses of emotions. In humans, the cerebellar hemispheres are also involved at a higher emotional level. The importance of these findings is evident when considering the cerebellar malfunctioning in psychiatric diseases like autism and schizophrenia which are characterized behaviourally by emotion processing impairments.

  9. Cerebellum and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosini, Laura; Cutuli, Debora; Picerni, Eleonora; Laricchiuta, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    Personality traits are multidimensional traits comprising cognitive, emotional, and behavioral characteristics, and a wide array of cerebral structures mediate individual variability. Differences in personality traits covary with brain morphometry in specific brain regions. A cerebellar role in emotional and affective processing and on personality characteristics has been suggested. In a large sample of healthy subjects of both sexes and differently aged, the macro- and micro-structural variations of the cerebellum were correlated with the scores obtained in the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) by Cloninger. Cerebellar volumes were associated positively with Novelty Seeking scores and negatively with Harm Avoidance scores. Given the cerebellar contribution in personality traits and emotional processing, we investigated the cerebellar involvement even in alexithymia, construct of personality characterized by impairment in cognitive, emotional, and affective processing. Interestingly, the subjects with high alexithymic traits had larger volumes in the bilateral Crus 1. The cerebellar substrate for some personality dimensions extends the relationship between personality and brain areas to a structure up to now thought to be involved mainly in motor and cognitive functions, much less in emotional processes and even less in personality individual differences. The enlarged volumes of Crus 1 in novelty seekers and alexithymics support the tendency to action featuring both personality constructs. In fact, Novelty Seeking and alexithymia are rooted in behavior and inescapably have a strong action component, resulting in stronger responses in the structures more focused on action and embodiment, as the cerebellum is.

  10. Consensus Paper: The Cerebellum's Role in Movement and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F.; Budding, Deborah; Andreasen, Nancy; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Bulgheroni, Sara; Imamizu, Hiroshi; Ito, Masao; Manto, Mario; Marvel, Cherie; Parker, Krystal; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Ramnani, Narender; Riva, Daria; Schmahmann, Jeremy; Vandervert, Larry; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    While the cerebellum's role in motor function is well recognized, the nature of its concurrent role in cognitive function remains considerably less clear. The current consensus paper gathers diverse views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum across a range of cognitive and emotional functions. This paper considers the cerebellum in relation to neurocognitive development, language function, working memory, executive function, and the development of cerebellar internal control models and reflects upon some of the ways in which better understanding the cerebellum's status as a “supervised learning machine” can enrich our ability to understand human function and adaptation. As all contributors agree that the cerebellum plays a role in cognition, there is also an agreement that this conclusion remains highly inferential. Many conclusions about the role of the cerebellum in cognition originate from applying known information about cerebellar contributions to the coordination and quality of movement. These inferences are based on the uniformity of the cerebellum's compositional infrastructure and its apparent modular organization. There is considerable support for this view, based upon observations of patients with pathology within the cerebellum. PMID:23996631

  11. Regional functionality of the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, Laurens; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, advances in brain imaging, optogenetics and viral tracing have greatly advanced our understanding of the cerebellum and its connectivity. It has become clear that the cerebellum can be divided into functional units, each connected with particular brain areas involved in

  12. The Sleeping Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Cathrin B; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Bruinsma, Bastiaan; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-05-01

    We sleep almost one-third of our lives and sleep plays an important role in critical brain functions like memory formation and consolidation. The role of sleep in cerebellar processing, however, constitutes an enigma in the field of neuroscience; we know little about cerebellar sleep-physiology, cerebro-cerebellar interactions during sleep, or the contributions of sleep to cerebellum-dependent memory consolidation. Likewise, we do not understand why cerebellar malfunction can lead to changes in the sleep-wake cycle and sleep disorders. In this review, we evaluate how sleep and cerebellar processing may influence one another and highlight which scientific routes and technical approaches could be taken to uncover the mechanisms underlying these interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of enriched uranium on developing brain damage of neonatal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Guixiong; Zhu Shoupeng; Wang Liuyi; Yang Shuqin; Zhu Lingli

    2001-01-01

    The model of irradiation-induced brain damage in vivo was settled first of all. The micro-auto-radiographic tracing showed that when the rat's brain at postnatal day after lateral ventricle injection with enriched uranium 235 U the radionuclides were mainly accumulated in the nucleus. At the same time autoradiographic tracks appeared in the cytoplasm and interval between cells. The effects of cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium on somatic growth and neuro-behavior development of neonatal rats were examined by determination of multiple parameters. In the growth and development of the neonatal rat's cerebrum exposure to enriched uranium, the somatic growth such as body weight and brain weight increase was lower significantly. The data indicated that the neonatal wistar rats having cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium showed delayed growth and abnormal neuro-behavior. The changes of neuron specific enolase (NSE), interleukin-1 β (IL- β), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and endothelin (ET) in cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, diencephalons of the rat brain after expose to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium were examined with radioimmunoassay. The results showed that SOD and ET can be elevated by the low dose irradiation of enriched uranium, and can be distinctly inhibited by the high dose. The data in view of biochemistry indicated firstly that alpha irradiation from enriched uranium on the developing brain damage of neonatal rats were of sensibility, fragility and compensation in nervous cells

  14. Effects of enriched uranium on developing brain damage of neonatal rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guixiong, Gu; Shoupeng, Zhu; Liuyi, Wang; Shuqin, Yang; Lingli, Zhu [Suzhou Medical College, Suzhou (China)

    2001-04-01

    The model of irradiation-induced brain damage in vivo was settled first of all. The micro-auto-radiographic tracing showed that when the rat's brain at postnatal day after lateral ventricle injection with enriched uranium {sup 235}U the radionuclides were mainly accumulated in the nucleus. At the same time autoradiographic tracks appeared in the cytoplasm and interval between cells. The effects of cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium on somatic growth and neuro-behavior development of neonatal rats were examined by determination of multiple parameters. In the growth and development of the neonatal rat's cerebrum exposure to enriched uranium, the somatic growth such as body weight and brain weight increase was lower significantly. The data indicated that the neonatal wistar rats having cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium showed delayed growth and abnormal neuro-behavior. The changes of neuron specific enolase (NSE), interleukin-1 {beta} (IL- {beta}), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and endothelin (ET) in cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, diencephalons of the rat brain after expose to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium were examined with radioimmunoassay. The results showed that SOD and ET can be elevated by the low dose irradiation of enriched uranium, and can be distinctly inhibited by the high dose. The data in view of biochemistry indicated firstly that alpha irradiation from enriched uranium on the developing brain damage of neonatal rats were of sensibility, fragility and compensation in nervous cells.

  15. A robot conditioned reflex system modeled after the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Reduction of a theory of cerebellar function to computer software for the control of a mechanical manipulator. This reduction is achieved by considering the cerebellum, along with the higher-level brain centers which control it, as a type of finite-state machine with input entering the cerebellum via mossy fibers from the periphery and output from the cerebellum occurring via Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that the cerebellum learns by an error-correction system similar to Perceptron training algorithms. An electromechanical model of the cerebellum is then developed for the control of a mechanical arm. The problem of modeling the granular layer which selects the set of parallel fibers which are active at any instant of time is considered, and a relevance matrix is constructed to model the relative degree of influence which mossy fibers from the various joints have on the sets of granule cells unique to each joint.

  16. Neuroimmune regulation of neurophysiology in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruol, Donna L

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have established the existence of an innate immune system in the central nervous system (CNS) and implicated a critical role for this system in both normal and pathological processes. Astrocytes and microglia, normal components of the CNS, are the primary cell types that comprise the innate immune system of the CNS. Basic to their role during normal and adverse conditions is the production of neuroimmune factors such as cytokines and chemokines, which are signaling molecules that initiate or coordinate downstream cellular actions. During adverse conditions, cytokines and chemokines function in defensive and repair. However, if expression of these factors becomes dysregulated, abnormal CNS function can result. Both neurons and glial cells of the CNS express receptors for cytokines and chemokines, but the biological consequence of receptor activation has yet to be fully resolved. Our studies show that neuroadaptive changes are produced in primary cultures of rat cerebellar cells chronically treated with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and in the cerebellum of transgenic mice that chronically express elevated levels of IL-6 in the CNS. In the cerebellum in culture and in vivo, the neuroadaptive changes included alterations in the level of expression of proteins involved in gene expression, signal transduction, and synaptic transmission. Associated with these changes were alterations in neuronal function. A comparison of results from the cultured cerebellar cells and cerebellum of the transgenic mice indicated that the effects of IL-6 can vary across neuronal types. However, alterations in mechanisms involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis were observed in all cell types studied. These results indicate that modifications in cerebellar function are likely to occur in disorders associated with elevated levels of IL-6 in the cerebellum.

  17. CNS development under altered gravity: cerebellar glial and neuronal protein expression in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguon, K.; Li, G.-H.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity, specifically in relation to the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously employed a hypergravity paradigm to assess the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum [Exp. Biol. Med. 226 (2000) 790]. The present study addresses the molecular mechanisms involved in the cerebellar response to hypergravity. Specifically, the study focuses on the expression of selected glial and neuronal cerebellar proteins in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5 G) from embryonic day (E)11 to postnatal day (P)6 or P9 (the time of maximal cerebellar changes) comparing them against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Proteins were analyzed by quantitative Western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using quantitative PCR. Densitometric analysis of Western blots suggested a reduction in glial (glial acidic protein, GFAP) and neuronal (neuronal cell adhesion moiecule, NCAM-L1, synaptophysin) proteins, but the changes in individual cerebellar proteins in hypergravity-exposed neonates appeared both age- and gender-specific. RNA analysis suggested a reduction in GFAP and synaptophysin mRNAs on P6. These data suggest that exposure to hypergravity may interfere with the expression of selected cerebellar proteins. These changes in protein expression may be involved in mediating the effect of hypergravity on the developing rat cerebellum.

  18. The cerebellum mediates conflict resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Tom A; Oriet, Chris; Meiran, Nachshon; Alexander, Michael P; Cusimano, Michael; Stuss, Donald T

    2007-12-01

    Regions within the frontal and parietal cortex have been implicated as important neural correlates for cognitive control during conflict resolution. Despite the extensive reciprocal connectivity between the cerebellum and these putatively critical cortical areas, a role for the cerebellum in conflict resolution has never been identified. We used a task-switching paradigm that separates processes related to task-set switching and the management of response conflict independent of motor processing. Eleven patients with chronic, focal lesions to the cerebellum and 11 healthy controls were compared. Patients were slower and less accurate in conditions involving conflict resolution. In the absence of response conflict, however, tasks-witching abilities were not impaired in our patients. The cerebellum may play an important role in coordinating with other areas of cortex to modulate active response states. These results are the first demonstration of impaired conflict resolution following cerebellar lesions in the presence of an intact prefrontal cortex.

  19. Autoradiographic localization of binding sites for (/sup 3/H). gamma. -aminobutyrate, (/sup 3/H) muscimol, (+) (/sup 3/H) bicuculline methiodide and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam in cultures of rat cerebellum and spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoesli, E; Hoesli, L [Basel Univ. (Switzerland); Moehler, H; Richards, J G [Hoffmann-La Roche (F.) and Co., Basel (Switzerland)

    1980-01-01

    Cultures of rat cerebellum and spinal cord were used to visualize sites for (/sup 3/H)..gamma..-aminobutyrate, (/sup 3/H)muscimol, (/sup 3/H)bicuculline methiodide and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam by autoradiography. In cerebellar cultures, many large neurons (presumably Purkinje cells) and interneurons were labelled. In spinal cord cultures, these compounds were mainly bound to small and medium-sized neurons, whereas the majority of large neurons were unlabelled. No binding sites for these radioligands were found on glial cells. Binding of (/sup 3/H)..gamma..-aminobutyrate, (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)bicuculline methiodide was markedly reduced or inhibited by adding unlabelled ..gamma..-aminobutyrate, muscimol and bicuculline (10/sup -3/M) respectively to the incubation medium. Addition of a thienobenzazepine markedly reduced binding with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam. It is concluded that tissues cultures are an excellent tool to visualize the cellular localization of binding sites for neurotransmitters and drugs using autoradiography.

  20. Consensus Paper: Cerebellum and Emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamaszek, M; D'Agata, F; Ferrucci, R; Habas, C; Keulen, S; Kirkby, K C; Leggio, M; Mariën, P; Molinari, M; Moulton, E; Orsi, L; Van Overwalle, F; Papadelis, C; Priori, A; Sacchetti, B; Schutter, D J; Styliadis, C; Verhoeven, J

    2017-04-01

    Over the past three decades, insights into the role of the cerebellum in emotional processing have substantially increased. Indeed, methodological refinements in cerebellar lesion studies and major technological advancements in the field of neuroscience are in particular responsible to an exponential growth of knowledge on the topic. It is timely to review the available data and to critically evaluate the current status of the role of the cerebellum in emotion and related domains. The main aim of this article is to present an overview of current facts and ongoing debates relating to clinical, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological findings on the role of the cerebellum in key aspects of emotion. Experts in the field of cerebellar research discuss the range of cerebellar contributions to emotion in nine topics. Topics include the role of the cerebellum in perception and recognition, forwarding and encoding of emotional information, and the experience and regulation of emotional states in relation to motor, cognitive, and social behaviors. In addition, perspectives including cerebellar involvement in emotional learning, pain, emotional aspects of speech, and neuropsychiatric aspects of the cerebellum in mood disorders are briefly discussed. Results of this consensus paper illustrate how theory and empirical research have converged to produce a composite picture of brain topography, physiology, and function that establishes the role of the cerebellum in many aspects of emotional processing.

  1. An Integrated Approach Identifies Nhlh1 and Insm1 as Sonic Hedgehog-regulated Genes in Developing Cerebellum and Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico De Smaele

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood arising from deregulated cerebellar development. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh pathway plays a critical role in cerebellar development and its aberrant expression has been identified in MB. Gene expression profiling of cerebella from 1- to 14-day-old mice unveiled a cluster of genes whose expression correlates with the levels of Hedgehog (HH activity. From this cluster, we identified Insm1 and Nhlh1/NSCL1 as novel HH targets induced by Shh treatment in cultured cerebellar granule cell progenitors. Nhlh1 promoter was found to be bound and activated by Gli1 transcription factor. Remarkably, the expression of these genes is also upregulated in mouse and human HH-dependent MBs, suggesting that they may be either a part of the HH-induced tumorigenic process or a specific trait of HH-dependent tumor cells.

  2. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Neurochemical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Lahoz, Juan; Gironell, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    The pathophysiology and the exact anatomy of essential tremor (ET) is not well known. One of the pillars that support the cerebellum as the main anatomical locus in ET is neurochemistry. This review examines the link between neurochemical abnormalities found in ET and cerebellum. The review is based on published data about neurochemical abnormalities described in ET both in human and in animal studies. We try to link those findings with cerebellum. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main neurotransmitter involved in the pathophysiology of ET. There are several studies about GABA that clearly points to a main role of the cerebellum. There are few data about other neurochemical abnormalities in ET. These include studies with noradrenaline, glutamate, adenosine, proteins, and T-type calcium channels. One single study reveals high levels of noradrenaline in the cerebellar cortex. Another study about serotonin neurotransmitter results negative for cerebellum involvement. Finally, studies on T-type calcium channels yield positive results linking the rhythmicity of ET and cerebellum. Neurochemistry supports the cerebellum as the main anatomical locus in ET. The main neurotransmitter involved is GABA, and the GABA hypothesis remains the most robust pathophysiological theory of ET to date. However, this hypothesis does not rule out other mechanisms and may be seen as the main scaffold to support findings in other systems. We clearly need to perform more studies about neurochemistry in ET to better understand the relations among the diverse systems implied in ET. This is mandatory to develop more effective pharmacological therapies.

  3. Effects of low doses of gamma radiation on DNA synthesis in the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, H.

    1983-01-01

    Rats of one or ten days of age were irradiated with low doses of gamma radiation, and synthesis of DNA was examined by the incorporation of 3 H-thymidine in the cerebellum and the rest of the brain in vivo. DNA synthesis was depressed in both parts of the brain but the effects were larger in cerebellum. A minimum was found about 10 hours after irradiation in the older rats and later (18 h) in the younger ones. The dose response in 10 day-old rats, was biphasic and showed that cerebellum was more affected. Autoradiographs showed that fewer cells entered the cycle and those synthesizing showed a depressed rate of synthesis. These findings are discussed in relation to induction of cell death. (Auth.)

  4. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1α, NRF-1α and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  5. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Godbole, Madan M., E-mail: madangodbole@yahoo.co.in [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  6. Differential Effects of Ethanol on c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase, 14-3-3 Proteins, and Bax in Postnatal Day 4 and Postnatal Day 7 Rat Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Paiva, Michael; Kubovic, Stacey; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Swanson, Eric; Madorsky, Vladimir; Posados, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    These studies investigated ethanol effects on upstream cellular elements and interactions which contribute to Bax-related apoptosis in neonatal rat cerebellum at ages of peak ethanol sensitivity (postnatal day 4 [P4]), compared to later ages of relative resistance (P7). Analyses were made of basal levels of the pro-apoptotic c-jun N-termimal kinase (JNK), Bax, and the 14-3-3 anchoring proteins, as well as the responsiveness of these substances to ethanol at P4 versus P7. Dimerization of Bax with 14-3-3 was also investigated at the two ages following ethanol treatment, a process which sequesters Bax in the cytosol, thus inhibiting its mitochondrial translocation and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to examine the protective potential of JNK inhibition on ethanol-mediated cell death. Basal levels of JNK were significantly higher at P4 than P7, but no differences in the other proteins were found. Activated JNK, and cytosolic and mitochondrially-translocated Bax were increased in P4 but not P7 animals following ethanol exposure, while protective 14-3-3 proteins were increased only at P7. Ethanol treatment resulted in decreases in Bax:14-3-3 heterodimers at P4, but not at P7. Inhibition of JNK activity in vitro provided partial protection against ethanol neurotoxicity. Thus, differential temporal vulnerability to ethanol in this CNS region correlates with differences in both levels of apoptosis-related substances (e.g., JNK), and differential cellular responsiveness, favoring apoptosis at the most sensitive age and survival at the resistant age. The upstream elements contributing to this vulnerability can be targets for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:22169498

  7. Effects of β-alanine administration on selected parameters of oxidative stress and phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Tanise; de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Bonorino, Nariélle Ferner; Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Funchal, Cláudia; Filho, Carlos Severo Dutra; Wannmacher, Clovis Milton Duval

    β-Alanine is a β-amino acid derivative of the degradation of pyrimidine uracil and precursor of the oxidative substrate acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). The accumulation of β-alanine occurs in β-alaninemia, an inborn error of metabolism. Patients with β-alaninemia may develop neurological

  8. CHANGES IN THE DNA-BINDING OF SEVERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS IN THE DEVELOPING RAT CEREBELLUM BY PCBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PCBs are a class of persistent halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon chemical pollutants and considered as one of the major environmental contaminants resulting from intensive industrial use and inadequate disposal. In utero exposure to PCBs has been known to cause delayed neuronal de...

  9. The development of the cholinergic system in rat hippocampus following postnatal X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Barak, J.

    1981-01-01

    Postnatal X-irradiation of the rat hippocampus results in a marked reduction in the number of the postnatally developing granular neurons in the dentate gyrus and also caused a marked increase in the specific activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) and a slight but consistent increase in the activity per whole hippocampus of AChE. The effect of irradiation on the granular neurons and on the cholinergic enzymes was found to be dose and age dependent. Drastic increase in specific enzymatic activities is also observed in the irradiated cerebellum whose granular neurons differentiate postnatally and to a lesser extent in the cerebral cortex in which cell formation is accomplished prior to birth. (Auth.)

  10. The Effect of Spaceflight on the Ultrastructure of the Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2003-01-01

    In weightlessness, astronauts and cosmonauts may experience postural illusions as well as motion sickness symptoms known as the space adaptation syndrome. Upon return to Earth, they have irregularities in posture and balance. The adaptation to microgravity and subsequent re-adaptation to Earth occurs over several days. At the cellular level, a process called neuronal plasticity may mediate this adaptation. The term plasticity refers to the flexibility and modifiability in the architecture and functions of the nervous system. In fact, plastic changes are thought to underlie not just behavioral adaptation, but also the more generalized phenomena of learning and memory. The goal of this experiment was to identify some of the structural alterations that occur in the rat brain during the sensory and motor adaptation to microgravity. One brain region where plasticity has been studied extensively is the cerebellar cortex-a structure thought to be critical for motor control, coordination, the timing of movements, and, most relevant to the present experiment, motor learning. Also, there are direct as well as indirect connections between projections from the gravity-sensing otolith organs and several subregions of the cerebellum. We tested the hypothesis that alterations in the ultrastructural (the structure within the cell) architecture of rat cerebellar cortex occur during the early period of adaptation to microgravity, as the cerebellum adapts to the absence of the usual gravitational inputs. The results show ultrastructural evidence for neuronal plasticity in the central nervous system of adult rats after 24 hours of spaceflight. Qualitative studies conducted on tissue from the cerebellar cortex (specifically, the nodulus of the cerebellum) indicate that ultrastructural signs of plasticity are present in the cerebellar zones that receive input from the gravity-sensing organs in the inner ear (the otoliths). These changes are not observed in this region in cagematched

  11. Locomotion, physical development, and brain myelination in rats treated with ionizing radiation in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on the emergence of locomotion skill and some physical development parameters were studied in laboratory rats (Fisher F-344 inbred strain). Rats were treated with 3 different doses of radiation (150 R, 15 R, and 6.8 R) delivered on the 20th day of the prenatal life. Results indicated that relatively moderate (15 R) to high (150 R) doses of radiation have effects on certain locomotion and physical development parameters. Exposure to 150 R affected pivoting, cliff-avoidance, upper jaw tooth eruption, body weight, and organs, such as brain, cerebral cortex, ovary, kidney, heart and spleen weights. Other parameters, such as negative geotaxis, eye opening, and lower jaw tooth eruption appeared to be affected in the 150 R treated animals. Exposure to 15 R affected pivoting and cliff-avoidance parameters. The cerebral cortex weight of the 15 R treated animals was found to be reduced at the age of day 30. Exposure to 6.8 R had no adverse effects on these parameters. Prenatal exposure to 150 R of radiation reduced the cerebral cortex weight by 22.07% at 30 days of age, and 20.15% at 52 days of age which caused a reduction in cerebral cortex myelin content by 20.16, and 22.89% at the ages of day 30 and day 52 respectively. Exposure to 150 R did not affect the myelin content of the cerebellum or the brain stem; or the myelin concentration (mg myelin/g brain tissue weight) of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and the brain stem. Exposure to 15 R, and 6.8 R did not affect either the myelin content or the myelin concentration of these brain areas

  12. Does the cerebellum initiate movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, W T

    2014-02-01

    Opinion is divided on what the exact function of the cerebellum is. Experiments are summarized that support the following views: (1) the cerebellum is a combiner of multiple movement factors; (2) it contains anatomically fixed permanent focal representation of individual body parts (muscles and segments) and movement modes (e.g., vestibular driven vs. cognitive driven); (3) it contains flexible changing representations/memory of physical properties of the body parts including muscle strength, segment inertia, joint viscosity, and segmental interaction torques (dynamics); (4) it contains mechanisms for learning and storage of the properties in item no. 3 through trial-and-error practice; (5) it provides for linkage of body parts, motor modes, and motordynamics via the parallel fiber system; (6) it combines and integrates the many factors so as to initiate coordinated movements of the many body parts; (7) it is thus enabled to play the unique role of initiating coordinated movements; and (8) this unique causative role is evidenced by the fact that: (a) electrical stimulation of the cerebellum can initiate compound coordinated movements; (b) in naturally initiated compound movements, cerebellar discharge precedes that in downstream target structures such as motor cerebral cortex; and (c) cerebellar ablation abolishes the natural production of compound movements in the awake alert individuals.

  13. Consensus paper: Language and the cerebellum: an ongoing enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; Ackermann, Herman; Adamaszek, Michael; Barwood, Caroline H S; Beaton, Alan; Desmond, John; De Witte, Elke; Fawcett, Angela J; Hertrich, Ingo; Küper, Michael; Leggio, Maria; Marvel, Cherie; Molinari, Marco; Murdoch, Bruce E; Nicolson, Roderick I; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Stoodley, Catherine J; Thürling, Markus; Timmann, Dagmar; Wouters, Ellen; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2014-06-01

    In less than three decades, the concept "cerebellar neurocognition" has evolved from a mere afterthought to an entirely new and multifaceted area of neuroscientific research. A close interplay between three main strands of contemporary neuroscience induced a substantial modification of the traditional view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor functions. Indeed, the wealth of current evidence derived from detailed neuroanatomical investigations, functional neuroimaging studies with healthy subjects and patients and in-depth neuropsychological assessment of patients with cerebellar disorders shows that the cerebellum has a cardinal role to play in affective regulation, cognitive processing, and linguistic function. Although considerable progress has been made in models of cerebellar function, controversy remains regarding the exact role of the "linguistic cerebellum" in a broad variety of nonmotor language processes. This consensus paper brings together a range of different viewpoints and opinions regarding the contribution of the cerebellum to language function. Recent developments and insights in the nonmotor modulatory role of the cerebellum in language and some related disorders will be discussed. The role of the cerebellum in speech and language perception, in motor speech planning including apraxia of speech, in verbal working memory, in phonological and semantic verbal fluency, in syntax processing, in the dynamics of language production, in reading and in writing will be addressed. In addition, the functional topography of the linguistic cerebellum and the contribution of the deep nuclei to linguistic function will be briefly discussed. As such, a framework for debate and discussion will be offered in this consensus paper.

  14. Microarray Analysis of the Developing Rat Mandible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideo KABURAGI; Naoyuki SUGANO; Maiko OSHIKAWA; Ryosuke KOSHI; Naoki SENDA; Kazuhiro KAWAMOTO; Koichi ITO

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the molecular events that occur in the developing mandible, we examined the expression of 8803 genes from samples taken at different time points during rat postnatal mandible development.Total RNA was extracted from the mandibles of 1-day-old, 1-week-old, and 2-week-old rats. Complementary RNA (cRNA) was synthesized from cDNA and biotinylated. Fragmented cRNA was hybridized to RGU34A GeneChip arrays. Among the 8803 genes tested, 4344 were detectable. We identified 148 genes with significantly increased expression, and 19 genes with significantly decreased expression. A comprehensive analysis appears to be an effective method of studying the complex process of development.

  15. Arterial territories of human brain: brainstem and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatu, L.; Moulin, T.; Bogousslavsky, J.; Duvernoy, H.

    1997-01-01

    The development of neuroimaging has allowed clinicians to improve clinico-anatomic correlations in patients with strokes. Brainstem and cerebellum structures are well delineated on MRI, but there is a lack of standardization in their arterial supply. We present a system of 12 brainstem and cerebellum axial sections, depicting the dominant arterial territories and the most important anatomic structures. These sections may be used as a practical tool to determine arterial territories on MRI, and may help establish consistent clinico-anatomic correlations in patients with brainstem and cerebellar ischemic strokes. (authors)

  16. Consensus Paper: Language and the Cerebellum: an Ongoing Enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; Ackermann, Herman; Adamaszek, Michael; Barwood, Caroline H. S.; Beaton, Alan; Desmond, John; De Witte, Elke; Fawcett, Angela J.; Hertrich, Ingo; Küper, Michael; Leggio, Maria; Marvel, Cherie; Molinari, Marco; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Nicolson, Roderick I.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Stoodley, Catherine J.; Thürling, Markus; Timmann, Dagmar; Wouters, Ellen; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    In less than three decades, the concept “cerebellar neurocognition” has evolved from a mere afterthought to an entirely new and multifaceted area of neuroscientific research. A close interplay between three main strands of contemporary neuroscience induced a substantial modification of the traditional view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor functions. Indeed, the wealth of current evidence derived from detailed neuroanatomical investigations, functional neuroimaging studies with healthy subjects and patients and in-depth neuropsychological assessment of patients with cerebellar disorders shows that the cerebellum has a cardinal role to play in affective regulation, cognitive processing, and linguistic function. Although considerable progress has been made in models of cerebellar function, controversy remains regarding the exact role of the “linguistic cerebellum” in a broad variety of nonmotor language processes. This consensus paper brings together a range of different viewpoints and opinions regarding the contribution of the cerebellum to language function. Recent developments and insights in the nonmotor modulatory role of the cerebellum in language and some related disorders will be discussed. The role of the cerebellum in speech and language perception, in motor speech planning including apraxia of speech, in verbal working memory, in phonological and semantic verbal fluency, in syntax processing, in the dynamics of language production, in reading and in writing will be addressed. In addition, the functional topography of the linguistic cerebellum and the contribution of the deep nuclei to linguistic function will be briefly discussed. As such, a framework for debate and discussion will be offered in this consensus paper. PMID:24318484

  17. Study on developing brain damage of neonatal rats induced by enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Guixiong; Zhu Shoupeng; Yang Shuqin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The injurious effects of enriched uranium 235 U on developing brain of neonatal Wistar pure bred rats were studied. Methods: The model of irradiation induced brain damage in vivo was settled. The effects of cerebrum exposure by 235 U on somatic growth and neuro-behavior development of neonatal rats were examined by thirteen index determination of multiple parameters. The dynamic retention of autoradiographic tracks of 235 U in cells of developing brain was observed. The changes of NSE, IL-1β, SOD, and ET in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum after expose to 235 U were examined with radioimmunoassay. Results: The somatic growth such as increase of body weight and brain weight was lower significantly. The retardation of development was found such as eye opening, sensuous function as auditory startle, movement and coordination function and activity as swimming, physiological reflexes as negative geotaxis, surface righting, grasping reflex suspension and the tendency behavior. The data showed delayed growth and abnormal neuro-behavior. The micro-autoradiographic tracing showed that the tracks of 235 U were mainly accumulated in the nucleus of developing brain. At the same time only few tracks appeared in the cytoplasm and interval between cells. Experimental study showed that when the dose of 235 U irradiation was increased, the level of NSE was decreased and the IL-1β was increased. However, the results indicated that SOD and ET can be elevated by the low dose irradiation of 235 U, and can be inhibited by the high dose. Conclusion: The behavior of internal irradiation from 235 U on the developing brain damage of neonatal rats were of sensibility and compensation in nervous cells

  18. Adult and embryonic GAD transcripts are spatiotemporally regulated during postnatal development in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Popp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD. GAD exists in two adult isoforms, GAD65 and GAD67. During embryonic brain development at least two additional transcripts exist, I-80 and I-86, which are distinguished by insertions of 80 or 86 bp into GAD67 mRNA, respectively. Though it was described that embryonic GAD67 transcripts are not detectable during adulthood there are evidences suggesting re-expression under certain pathological conditions in the adult brain. In the present study we systematically analyzed for the first time the spatiotemporal distribution of different GADs with emphasis on embryonic GAD67 mRNAs in the postnatal brain using highly sensitive methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: QPCR was used to precisely investigate the postnatal expression level of GAD related mRNAs in cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb of rats from P1 throughout adulthood. Within the first three postnatal weeks the expression of both GAD65 and GAD67 mRNAs reached adult levels in hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum. The olfactory bulb showed by far the highest expression of GAD65 as well as GAD67 transcripts. Embryonic GAD67 splice variants were still detectable at birth. They continuously declined to barely detectable levels during postnatal development in all investigated regions with exception of a comparatively high expression in the olfactory bulb. Radioactive in situ hybridizations confirmed the occurrence of embryonic GAD67 transcripts in the olfactory bulb and furthermore detected their localization mainly in the subventricular zone and the rostral migratory stream. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Embryonic GAD67 transcripts can hardly be detected in the adult brain, except for specific regions associated with neurogenesis and high synaptic plasticity. Therefore a functional role in processes like proliferation, migration or

  19. Evolutionary mechanisms that generate morphology and neural-circuit diversity of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Masahiko; Matsuda, Koji; Takeuchi, Miki; Shimizu, Takashi; Murakami, Yasunori

    2017-05-01

    The cerebellum is derived from the dorsal part of the anterior-most hindbrain. The vertebrate cerebellum contains glutamatergic granule cells (GCs) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic Purkinje cells (PCs). These cerebellar neurons are generated from neuronal progenitors or neural stem cells by mechanisms that are conserved among vertebrates. However, vertebrate cerebella are widely diverse with respect to their gross morphology and neural circuits. The cerebellum of cyclostomes, the basal vertebrates, has a negligible structure. Cartilaginous fishes have a cerebellum containing GCs, PCs, and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCNs), which include projection neurons. Ray-finned fish lack DCNs but have projection neurons termed eurydendroid cells (ECs) in the vicinity of the PCs. Among ray-finned fishes, the cerebellum of teleost zebrafish has a simple lobular structure, whereas that of weakly electric mormyrid fish is large and foliated. Amniotes, which include mammals, independently evolved a large, foliated cerebellum, which contains massive numbers of GCs and has functional connections with the dorsal telencephalon (neocortex). Recent studies of cyclostomes and cartilaginous fish suggest that the genetic program for cerebellum development was already encoded in the genome of ancestral vertebrates. In this review, we discuss how alterations of the genetic and cellular programs generated diversity of the cerebellum during evolution. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  20. Effect of thyroid status on the development of the different molecular forms of Na+,K+-ATPase in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atterwill, C K; Reid, J; Athayde, C M

    1985-05-01

    The effect of thyroid status on the postnatal development of the two molecular forms of Na+,K+-ATPase, distinguished kinetically on the basis of their ouabain sensitivity, was examined in rat brain. Hypothyroidism induced by PTU from day 1 postnatally significantly reduced the Na+,K+-ATPase activity in cerebellum (22-30 days) but not forebrain, whereas hyperthyroidism (T4 treatment from day 1) had no effect. The hypothyroidism-induced reduction in cerebellum was reflected by a 20-45% reduction in the activity of the alpha(+) form of Na+,K+-ATPase (high ouabain affinity) against control brains compared to a 60-70% reduction in the activity of the alpha form (low ouabain affinity). These results show that neonatally induced hypothyroidism leads to a selectively greater impairment of the ontogenesis of the activity of cerebellar alpha form of Na+,K+-ATPase. This may possibly reflect a retarded development of a selective cerebellar cell population containing predominantly the alpha form of the enzyme.

  1. Effects of Cinnamon Extract on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Diabetic Rats’ Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Rafati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: In pregnant women, maternal diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, so glucose increases in the mother's blood and the blood of the fetus therefore causing many complications in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cinnamon on morphometric histologic changes on fetal cerebellum of diabetic rats at days 18 and 20. Methods: In this study, 32 healthy female Wistar rats were prepared and randomly divided into four groups, normal control, diabetic, healthy subjects treated with cinnamon and cinnamon extract-treated diabetic groups. Diabetic groups were subjected by intraperitoneal of streptozotocin. All groups were charged with natural mating and they received a dose of 60 mg/ kg of cinnamon at the first day off pregnancy. After formation of the nervous system, in the eighteenth and twentieth day of pregnancy, the mother of the four mice were anesthetized and the fetus was removed for sampling. The histological slides were prepared and various parameters were studied in the cerebellum. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: The thickness of gray matter, and the gray matter white cells in the cerebellum of diabetic rats compared to other groups tested at days of18 and 20 and embryonic cells in the white matter of the cerebellum at day 18 was significantly decreased (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Administration of cinnamon extract reduces mothers’ blood sugar levels therefore preventing the complications of diabetes on the fetal cerebellum. Key words: cinnamon extract, Diabetes, cerebellum, Rat.

  2. New roles for the cerebellum in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L Reeber

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has a well-established role in maintaining motor coordination and studies of cerebellar learning suggest that it does this by recognizing neural patterns, which it uses to predict optimal movements. Serious damage to the cerebellum impairs this learning and results in a set of motor disturbances called ataxia. However, recent work implicates the cerebellum in cognition and emotion, and it has been argued that cerebellar dysfunction contributes to non-motor conditions such as autism spectrum disorders. Based on human and animal model studies, two major questions arise. Does the cerebellum contribute to non-motor as well as motor diseases, and if so, how does altering its function contribute to such diverse symptoms? The architecture and connectivity of cerebellar circuits may hold the answers to these questions. An emerging view is that cerebellar defects can trigger motor and non-motor neurological conditions by globally influencing brain function. Furthermore, during development cerebellar circuits may play a role in wiring events necessary for higher cognitive functions such as social behavior and language. We discuss genetic, electrophysiological, and behavioral evidence that implicates Purkinje cell dysfunction as a major culprit in several diseases and offer a hypothesis as to how canonical cerebellar functions might be at fault in non-motor as well as motor diseases.

  3. Effects of perinatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the levels of nerve growth factor and its low-affinity receptor in cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, B C; Otten, U; Strauss, S; Volk, B; Maysinger, D

    1993-04-16

    Deficits or excesses of thyroid hormones during critical periods of mammalian cerebellar development can lead to profound biochemical and morphological abnormalities in this system. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of perinatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the ontogeny of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its low-affinity receptor (p75NGFR) in the rat cerebellum. The concentration of NGF and of p75NGFR immunoreactivity (IR) were measured, several days after birth, in cerebella of rats which had received propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroxine. NGF concentration was markedly enhanced only on postnatal day 2 (P2) in hyperthyroid rats, whereas in hypothyroid (PTU-treated) rats NGF values were similar to age-matched controls. These observations suggest that thyroid hormone affects NGF synthesis during early periods of cerebellar development. In Purkinje cells of control animals, p75NGFR IR peaked at P10. In hypothyroid rats, the expression of p75NGFR was retarded, peaking at P15, whereas in hyperthyroid rats it was advanced, peaking at P8. The increased p75NGFR IR found in Purkinje cell bodies and the delayed disappearance of p75NGFR IR from the external granular layer of hypothyroid rats suggest different roles for thyroid hormone in the developing cerebellum. We conclude that p75NGFR and NGF are independently regulated by thyroid hormone during critical periods of cerebellar development. The effect of thyroid hormone deficiency on p75NGFR content in Purkinje cells may involve complex mechanisms such as impaired efficiency of axonal transport.

  4. Dissecting the links between cerebellum and dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Ailish; Manto, Mario; Hass, Chris

    2014-12-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions. These contractions generate twisting and repetitive movements or typical abnormal postures, often exacerbated by voluntary movement. Dystonia can affect almost all the voluntary muscles. For several decades, the discussion on the pathogenesis has been focused on basal ganglia circuits, especially striatal networks. So far, although dystonia has been observed in some forms of ataxia such as dominant ataxias, the link between the cerebellum and dystonia has remained unclear. Recent human studies and experimental data mainly in rodents show that the cerebellum circuitry could also be a key player in the pathogenesis of some forms of dystonia. In particular, studies based on behavioral adaptation paradigm shed light on the links between dystonia and cerebellum. The spectrum of movement disorders in which the cerebellum is implicated is continuously expanding, and manipulation of cerebellar circuits might even emerge as a candidate therapy in the coming years.

  5. Red sorrel (Hibiscus Sabdariffa) prevents the ethanol-induced deficits of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, S; Partadiredja, G; Atthobari, J

    2015-01-01

    The present study is aimed at investigating the possible protective effects of H. sabdariffa on ethanol-elicited deficits of motor coordination and estimated total number of the Purkinje cells of the cerebellums of adolescent male Wistar rats. Forty male Wistar rats aged 21 days were divided into five groups. Na/wtr group was given water orally and injected with normal saline intra peritoneally (ip). Eth/wtr group was given water orally and ethanol (ip). Another three experimental groups (Eth/Hsab) were given different dosages of H. sabdariffa and ethanol (ip). All groups were treated intermittently for the total period of treatment of two weeks. The motor coordination of rats was tested prior and subsequent to the treatments. The rats were euthanized, and their cerebellums were examined. The total number of Purkinje cells was estimated using physical fractionator method. Upon revolving drum test, the number of falls of rats increased following ethanol treatment. There was no significant difference between the total number of falls prior and subsequent to treatment in all Eth/Hsab groups. The estimated total number of Purkinje cells in Eth/Hsab groups was higher than in Eth/wtr group. H. sabdariffa may prevent the ethanol-induced deficits of motor coordination and estimated total number of Purkinje cells of the cerebellums in adolescent rats (Tab. 3, Fig. 1, Ref. 42).

  6. Cerebellar abnormalities following hypoxia alone compared to hypoxic-ischemic forebrain injury in the developing rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biran, V.; Heine, V.M.; Verney, C.; Sheldon, R.A.; Spadafora, R.; Vexler, Z.S.; Rowitch, D.H.; Ferriero, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Two-day-old (P2) rat pups were subjected to either a global hypoxia or to electrocoagulation of the right carotid artery followed by 2.5. h hypoxia. Cellular and regional injury in the cerebellum (CB) was studied at 1, 2 and 19. days using immunohistology. Following hypoxia and hypoxia-ischemia, all

  7. Development of rat telencephalic neurons after prenatal x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, S.

    1979-01-01

    Telencephalic neurons of rats, irradiated at day 15 of gestation with 125 R, develop synaptic connections on dendrites during maturation which appear to be normal spines in Golgi-stained light microscope preparations. At six weeks of postnatal age both control and irradiated rats have spiny dendritic processes on cortical pyramidal cells and caudate Golgi type II neurons. However, when the rats are 6 months old the irradiated rats have more neurons with beaded dendritic processes that lack spines or neurons and are likely to be degenerating neurons. The apparently normal development of the neurons followed by degeneration in the irradiated rat has a parallel in previous reports of the delayed hyperactivity which develops in rats irradiated on the fifteenth gestational day

  8. Cerebellum developmental challenges: From morphology to molecular issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Cosma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that, throughout the development of the nervous system, the cellular migratory routes are an important part of its expansion; therefore, the cerebellum is ‘sprinkled’ with cellular changes during its growth. The aim of this study was to analyse the morphological features of the cerebellum cells in all the layers, during its development. Material and methods: We examined 14 cases of human cerebellum, ranging between 1 to 12 months by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Results: Haematoxylin and eosin staining method confirmed the age-linked migration of the cells from the external granular layer into the internal granular layer. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation using PROX1 and NFAP showed positivity for the Purkinje cells. However, these cells exposed negativity on NSE stained specimens. On the other hand, the transience of the EGL was analyzed using OCT3/4, which showed the migration of the EGL cells through the molecular layer to the IGL. Also, GFAP and NFAP proved to be a useful tool for the identification of the climbing fibres and the variation of their density connected the age of the patient. Conclusions: The human cerebellum undergoes different morphological and molecular changes throughout its evolution during embryogenesis. The markers used in our study have proved to present a differential, stage-dependant reactivity and appeared as useful tools for the identification of different cerebellar structures. Our study is a challenging attempt to understand the basics of cerebellar development at a morphological and molecular level and may bring new perspectives for a better approach of cerebellar associated pathologies.

  9. CEREBELLUM DEVELOPMENTAL CHALLENGES: FROM MORPHOLOGY TO MOLECULAR ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Cosma ¹

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: It is known that, throughout the development of the nervous system, the cellular migratory routes are an important part of its expansion; therefore, the cerebellum is ‘sprinkled’ with cellular changes during its growth. The aim of this study was to analyse the morphological features of the cerebellum cells in all the layers, during its development. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We examined 14 cases of human cerebellum, ranging between 1 month to 12 years by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Haematoxylin and eosin staining method confirmed the age-linked migration of the cells from the external granular layer into the internal granular layer. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation using PROX1 and NFAP showed positivity for the Purkinje cells. However, these cells exposed negativity on NSE stained specimens. On the other hand, the transience of the EGL was analysed using OCT3/4, which showed the migration of the EGL cells through the molecular layer to the IGL. Also, GFAP and NFAP proved to be a useful tool for the identification of the climbing fibres and the variation of their density connected the age of the patient. CONCLUSIONS: The human cerebellum undergoes different morphological and molecular changes throughout its evolution during embryogenesis. The markers used in our study have proved to present a differential, stage-dependant reactivity and appeared as useful tools for the identification of different cerebellar structures. Our study is a challenging attempt to understand the basics of cerebellar development at a morphological and molecular level and may bring new perspectives for a better approach of cerebellar associated pathologies.

  10. Development of ELISA kit for rat albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhigang; Han Shiquan; Liu Yibing; Xu Wenge; Jia Juanjuan

    2009-01-01

    The Anti-rat albumin serum was prepared by immunized the sheep with rat albumin. A ELISA method was established for rat albumin. The measurement range of the assay was 1-50 mg/L, sensitivity of the assay was 0.42 mg/L, recovery rate was 85.0%-106.0%. Intra-and inter-assay variation coefficients were <8.9% and <12.8% respectively. The correlation coefficients between measured and expected values were 0.999 after serial dilution of the urine samples with high concentrations of rat albumin. A good correlation was observed between the ELISA and RIA methods, and the kit for rat albumin might provide a convenience in exploitation of renal drugs and experimental injury of the kidney. (authors)

  11. Intelligent Network Management and Functional Cerebellum Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebner, Egon E.

    1989-01-01

    Transdisciplinary modeling of the cerebellum across histology, physiology, and network engineering provides preliminary results at three organization levels: input/output links to central nervous system networks; links between the six neuron populations in the cerebellum; and computation among the neurons of the populations. Older models probably underestimated the importance and role of climbing fiber input which seems to supply write as well as read signals, not just to Purkinje but also to basket and stellate neurons. The well-known mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell system should also respond to inputs originating from climbing fibers. Corticonuclear microcomplexing might be aided by stellate and basket computation and associate processing. Technological and scientific implications of the proposed cerebellum model are discussed.

  12. Computational Architecture of the Granular Layer of Cerebellum-Like Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratby, Peter; Sneyd, James; Montgomery, John

    2017-02-01

    In the adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, the granular layer performs a recoding which expands incoming mossy fibre signals into a temporally diverse set of basis signals. The underlying neural mechanism is not well understood, although various mechanisms have been proposed, including delay lines, spectral timing and echo state networks. Here, we develop a computational simulation based on a network of leaky integrator neurons, and an adaptive filter performance measure, which allows candidate mechanisms to be compared. We demonstrate that increasing the circuit complexity improves adaptive filter performance, and relate this to evolutionary innovations in the cerebellum and cerebellum-like structures in sharks and electric fish. We show how recurrence enables an increase in basis signal duration, which suggest a possible explanation for the explosion in granule cell numbers in the mammalian cerebellum.

  13. The Cerebellum and Its Wrapping Meninge: Developmental Interplay between Two Major Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catala, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Meninges have long been considered as a protective and supportive tissue for the central nervous system. Nevertheless, new developmental roles are now attributed to them. The meninges that surround the cerebellum come from the cephalic mesoderm. They are essential for the cerebellum to develop normally. They induce and maintain the basal lamina and glia limitans. In the absence of these structures, the external granular cells of the cerebellum migrate aberrantly and penetrate the subarachnoid space. The molecules involved in the recognition between the cerebellar primordium and the basal lamina belong to two groups in humans: dystroglycan and laminin on the one hand, and GPR56 and collagen III on the other. Finally, molecules secreted by the meninges and acting on the cerebellum begin to be demonstrated; such is the case of SDF1 secreted under the action of FOXC1. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Overexpression of Lin28b in Neural Stem Cells is Insufficient for Brain Tumor Formation, but Induces Pathological Lobulation of the Developing Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Annika K; Lindner, Sven; Schulte, Johannes H; Schüller, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    LIN28B is a homologue of the RNA-binding protein LIN28A and regulates gene expression during development and carcinogenesis. It is strongly upregulated in a variety of brain tumors, such as medulloblastoma, embryonal tumor with multilayered rosettes (ETMR), atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT), or glioblastoma, but the effect of an in vivo overexpression of LIN28B on the developing central nervous system is unknown. We generated transgenic mice that either overexpressed Lin28b in Math1-positive cerebellar granule neuron precursors or in a broad range of Nestin-positive neural precursors. Sections of the cerebellar vermis from adult Math1-Cre::lsl-Lin28b mice had an additional subfissure in lobule IV. Vermes from p0 and p7 Nestin-Cre::lsl-Lin28b mice appeared normal, but we found a pronounced vermal hypersublobulation at p15 and p21 in these mice. Also, the external granule cell layer (EGL) was thicker at p15 than in controls, contained more proliferating cells, and persisted up to p21. Consistently, some Pax6- and NeuN-positive cells were present in the EGL of Nestin-Cre::lsl-Lin28b mice even at p21, and we detected more NeuN-positive granule neuron precursors in the molecular layer (ML) as compared to control. Finally, we found some residual Pax2-positive precursors of inhibitory interneurons in the ML of Nestin-Cre::lsl-Lin28b mice at p21, which have already disappeared in controls. We conclude that while overexpression of LIN28B in Nestin-positive cells does not lead to tumor formation, it results in a protracted development of granule cells and inhibitory interneurons and leads to a hypersublobulation of the cerebellar vermis.

  15. Cerebellar nicotinic cholinergic receptors are intrinsic to the cerebellum: implications for diverse functional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jill R; Ortinski, Pavel I; Sherrard, Rachel M; Kellar, Kenneth J

    2011-12-01

    Although recent studies have delineated the specific nicotinic subtypes present in the mammalian cerebellum, very little is known about their location or function within the cerebellum. This is of increased interest since nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the cerebellum have recently been implicated in the pathology of autism spectrum disorders. To begin to better understand the roles of these heteromeric nAChRs in the cerebellar circuitry and their therapeutic potential as targets for drug development, we used various chemical and stereotaxic lesion models in conjunction with slice electrophysiology to examine how specific heteromeric nAChR subtypes may influence the surrounding cerebellar circuitry. Using subunit-specific immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled nAChRs in the cerebella following N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride, p-chloroamphetamine, and pendunculotomy lesions, we show that most, if not all, cerebellar nicotinic receptors are present in cells within the cerebellum itself and not in extracerebellar afferents. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the β4-containing, but not the β2-containing, nAChRs intrinsic to the cerebellum can regulate inhibitory synaptic efficacy at two major classes of cerebellar neurons. These tandem findings suggest that nAChRs may present a potential drug target for disorders involving the cerebellum.

  16. Autism spectrum disorders and neuropathology of the cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Hampson, David R.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes ...

  17. Cerebellar level of neurotransmitters in rats exposed to paracetamol during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Jawna-Zboińska, Katarzyna; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Piechal, Agnieszka; Wawer, Adriana; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa

    2016-12-01

    The present study was designed to clarify the effect of prenatal and postnatal paracetamol administration on the neurotransmitter level and balance of amino acids in the cerebellum. Biochemical analysis to determine the concentration of neurotransmitters in this brain structure was performed on two-month-old Wistar male rats previously exposed to paracetamol in doses of 5 (P5, n=10) or 15mg/kg (P15, n=10) throughout the entire prenatal period, lactation and until the completion of the second month of life, when the experiment was terminated. Control animals were given tapped water (Con, n=10). The cerebellar concentration of monoamines, their metabolites and amino acids were assayed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The present experiment demonstrates that prenatal and postnatal paracetamol exposure results in modulation of cerebellar neurotransmission with changes concerning mainly 5-HIAA and MHPG levels. The effect of paracetamol on monoaminergic neurotransmission in the cerebellum is reflected by changes in the level of catabolic end-products of serotonin (5-HIAA) and noradrenaline (MHPG) degradation. Further work is required to define the mechanism of action and impact of prenatal and postnatal exposure to paracetamol in the cerebellum and other structures of the central nervous system (CNS). Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. The Proteome Profiles of the Cerebellum of Juvenile, Adult and Aged Rats—An Ontogenetic Study

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    Michael Wille

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we searched for proteins that change their expression in the cerebellum (Ce of rats during ontogenesis. This study focuses on the question of whether specific proteins exist which are differentially expressed with regard to postnatal stages of development. A better characterization of the microenvironment and its development may result from these study findings. A differential two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of the samples revealed that the number of proteins of the functional classes differed depending on the developmental stages. Especially members of the functional classes of biosynthesis, regulatory proteins, chaperones and structural proteins show the highest differential expression within the analyzed stages of development. Therefore, members of these functional protein groups seem to be involved in the development and differentiation of the Ce within the analyzed development stages. In this study, changes in the expression of proteins in the Ce at different postnatal developmental stages (postnatal days (P 7, 90, and 637 could be observed. At the same time, an identification of proteins which are involved in cell migration and differentiation was possible. Especially proteins involved in processes of the biosynthesis and regulation, the dynamic organization of the cytoskeleton as well as chaperones showed a high amount of differentially expressed proteins between the analyzed dates.

  19. A Low Ethanol Dose Affects all Types of Cells in Mixed Long-Term Embryonic Cultures of the Cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickering, Chris; Wicher, Grzegorz; Rosendahl, Sofi

    2010-01-01

    of this ethanol dose, cultures were exposed for 30 days. After this period, virtually no neurons or myelinating oligodendrocytes were present in the ethanol-treated cultures. In conclusion, chronic exposure to ethanol, even at small doses, dramatically and persistently affects normal development........ We exposed a primary culture of rat cerebellum from embryonic day 17 (corresponding to second trimester in humans) to ethanol at a concentration of 17.6 mM which is roughly equivalent to one glass of wine. Acutely, there was no change in cell viability after 5 or 8 days of exposure relative...... to control. By 11 days, a reduction in the number of viable cells was observed without an accompanying change in caspase-3 activity (marker of apoptotic cell death), suggesting changes in cell proliferation. As the proportion of nestin-positive cells was higher in the ethanol-treated cultures after 5 days...

  20. Gene expression profiles in the cerebellum and hippocampus following exposure to a neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Developmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royland, Joyce E.; Wu, Jinfang; Zawia, Nasser H.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-01-01

    The developmental consequences of exposure to the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been widely studied, making PCBs a unique model to understand issues related to environmental mixture of persistent chemicals. PCB exposure in humans adversely affects neurocognitive development, causes psychomotor difficulties, and contributes to attention deficits in children, all of which seem to be associated with altered patterns of neuronal connectivity. In the present study, we examined gene expression profiles in the rat nervous system following PCB developmental exposure. Pregnant rats (Long-Evans) were dosed perinatally with 0 or 6 mg/kg/day of Aroclor 1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21. Gene expression in cerebellum and hippocampus from PND7 and PND14 animals was analyzed with an emphasis on developmental aspects. Changes in gene expression (≥ 1.5 fold) in control animals identified normal developmental changes. These basal levels of expression were compared to data from Aroclor 1254-treated animals to determine the impact of gestational PCB exposure on developmental parameters. The results indicate that the expression of a number of developmental genes related to cell cycle, synaptic function, cell maintenance, and neurogenesis is significantly altered from PND7 to PND14. Aroclor 1254 treatment appears to dampen the overall growth-related gene expression levels in both regions with the effect being more pronounced in the cerebellum. Functional analysis suggests that Aroclor 1254 delays maturation of the developing nervous system, with the consequences dependent on the ontological state of the brain area and the functional role of the individual gene. Such changes may underlie learning and memory deficits observed in PCB exposed animals and humans

  1. Effects of Ethanol on the Cerebellum: Advances and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol abuse causes cerebellar dysfunction and cerebellar ataxia is a common feature in alcoholics. Alcohol exposure during development also impacts the cerebellum. Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) show many symptoms associated specifically with cerebellar deficits. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms are unclear. This special issue discusses the most recent advances in the study of mechanisms underlying alcoholinduced cerebellar deficits. The alteration in GABAA receptor-dependent neurotransmission is a potential mechanism for ethanol-induced cerebellar dysfunction. Recent advances indicate ethanol-induced increases in GABA release are not only in Purkinje cells (PCs), but also in molecular layer interneurons and granule cells. Ethanol is shown to disrupt the molecular events at the mossy fiber - granule cell - Golgi cell (MGG) synaptic site and granule cell parallel fibers - PCs (GPP) synaptic site, which may be responsible for ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia. Aging and ethanol may affect the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) of PC dendrites and cause dendritic regression. Ethanol withdrawal causes mitochondrial damage and aberrant gene modifications in the cerebellum. The interaction between these events may result in neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Ethanol activates doublestranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) and PKR activation is involved ethanolinduced neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum. Ethanol alters the development of cerebellar circuitry following the loss of PCs, which could result in modifications of the structure and function of other brain regions that receive cerebellar inputs. Lastly, choline, an essential nutrient is evaluated for its potential protection against ethanol-induced cerebellar damages. Choline is shown to ameliorate ethanol-induced cerebellar dysfunction when given before ethanol exposure.

  2. [Subcutaneous transplants of juvenile rat testicular tissues continue to develop and secret androgen in adult rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhou; Wang, Tong; Cui, Jiangbo; Song, Yajuan; Ma, Xianjie; Su, Yingjun; Peng, Pai

    2017-12-01

    Objective To explore the effects of subcutaneous microenvironment of adult rats on survival, development and androgen secretion of Leydig cells of transplanted juvenile rat testis. Methods Healthy adult SD rats were randomly divided into control group, sham group, castrated group and non-castrated group. Rats in the control group were kept intact, no testis was transplanted subcutaneously after adult recipients were castrated in the sham group; 5-7-day juvenile rat testes were transplanted subcutaneously in the castrated group, with one testis per side; Testes resected from juvenile rats were directly transplanted subcutaneously on both sides of the recipients in the non-castrated group. The grafts were obtained and weighed 4 weeks later. Then the histological features of the grafts were examined by HE staining; the expression and distribution of hydroxysteroid 17-beta dehydrogenase 1 (HSD-17β1) were investigated by immunohistochemistry; and the serum androgen level was determined by ELISA. Results The average mass of grafts obtained from the castrated group was significantly higher than that of the non-castrated group. Immunohistochemistry indicated that Leydig cells were visible in the tissues from both the castrated and non-castrated groups, but the number of HSD-17β1-posotive cells in the castrated group was larger than that in the non-castrated group. ELISA results showed that the serum androgen level was higher in the control group and non-castrated group than in the sham group and castrated group, and compared with the sham group, the serum androgen level in the castrated group was significantly higher. Conclusion The juvenile rat testis subcutaneously transplanted could further develop under the adult recipient rat skin, and the Leydig cells of grafts harbored the ability to produce and secret androgen.

  3. Developmental Anatomy of Cerebellum of Long-Tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis at the First Trimester of Gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wahyu Pangestiningsih

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Long tailed macaque was one of animal models in biomedical research because it has  many similarities with humans, both anatomical and physiological properties. There were many research about cerebellum associated with its role in the coordination of muscle activity. Understanding of normal development of cerebellum long tailed macaque may help to understand about the development in human cerebellum and its abnormalities. Embryonic and fetal brain samples were obtained through caesarean section and were  then made for histological preparation stained with cresyl violet. Staining results were observed using a microscope with a digital camera. Images obtained are processed by graphics software Adobe Photoshop CS 8.0. Cerebellum Macaca fascicularis Ed40 showed the isthmus and rhombic lip that were composed of ventricular layer, mantle layer, and marginal layer. Cerebellum Macaca fascicularis Fd55 showed future lobes and future  fissures, but the cortex and medulla are not bounded clear. The cortex consisted of the external granular layer, neuroblast basket, and neuroblast stellate, while the  medulla consisted of neuroblast deep cerebellar nuclei. From this research, we concluded that neurons were on stage of proliferation and migration in the embryo aged 40 days, then differentiated and migrated to form cortex  cerebellum and deep cerebellar nuclei at the age of 55 days, but the development of the cerebellum was not fully completed yet.

  4. Spontaneous anaplasia in pilocytic astrocytoma of cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, B; Al Shail, E; Patay, Z

    2003-06-01

    We report a cystic cerebellar astrocytoma with a mural nodule that contained an additional focus of astrocytoma with the histological features of anaplasia, and showed up to 48% of aneuploid and 3% S-phase cells on flow cytometry. This focus was detectable on the enhanced, as well as non-enhanced T1 and T2 images. This appears to be the first case of pilocytic astrocytoma of cerebellum with focal anaplasia detected on histological and radiological studies.

  5. Visuomotor cerebellum in human and nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogd, Jan; Schraa-Tam, Caroline K L; van der Geest, Jos N; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we will review the anatomical components of the visuomotor cerebellum in human and, where possible, in non-human primates and discuss their function in relation to those of extracerebellar visuomotor regions with which they are connected. The floccular lobe, the dorsal paraflocculus, the oculomotor vermis, the uvula-nodulus, and the ansiform lobule are more or less independent components of the visuomotor cerebellum that are involved in different corticocerebellar and/or brain stem olivocerebellar loops. The floccular lobe and the oculomotor vermis share different mossy fiber inputs from the brain stem; the dorsal paraflocculus and the ansiform lobule receive corticopontine mossy fibers from postrolandic visual areas and the frontal eye fields, respectively. Of the visuomotor functions of the cerebellum, the vestibulo-ocular reflex is controlled by the floccular lobe; saccadic eye movements are controlled by the oculomotor vermis and ansiform lobule, while control of smooth pursuit involves all these cerebellar visuomotor regions. Functional imaging studies in humans further emphasize cerebellar involvement in visual reflexive eye movements and are discussed.

  6. Gluconeogenesis in rat placenta during foetal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagewadikar, R.S.; Sharma, C.; Nadkarni, G.B.

    1977-01-01

    Variations in glycogen levels in rat placenta have been correlated with gluconeogenesis in this tissue. Placental homogenate could synthesize substantial amounts of glucose from L-alanine-U- 14 C in early pregnancy. This has been substantiated by the observed enhancement in the activities of glucose 6-phosphatase, fructose 1, 6-diphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Gluconeogenic activity in placenta could proceed till the foetal liver was able to take over this function. The increase or decrease in placental glycogen is concomitant with glycogen synthetase, but not phosphorylase, activity. The reversible catalytic properties of placental aldolase also show subtle functional changes during and late phases of gestation. (author)

  7. Gluconeogenesis in rat placenta during foetal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagewadikar, R S; Sharma, C; Nadkarni, G B [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biochemistry and Food Technology Div.

    1977-01-01

    Variations in glycogen levels in rat placenta have been correlated with gluconeogenesis in this tissue. Placental homogenate could synthesize substantial amounts of glucose from L-alanine-U-/sup 14/C in early pregnancy. This has been substantiated by the observed enhancement in the activities of glucose 6-phosphatase, fructose 1, 6-diphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Gluconeogenic activity in placenta could proceed till the foetal liver was able to take over this function. The increase or decrease in placental glycogen is concomitant with glycogen synthetase, but not phosphorylase, activity. The reversible catalytic properties of placental aldolase also show subtle functional changes during and late phases of gestation.

  8. Right Lateral Cerebellum Represents Linguistic Predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Elise; Hansen, Peter C; Miall, R Chris

    2017-06-28

    Mounting evidence indicates that posterolateral portions of the cerebellum (right Crus I/II) contribute to language processing, but the nature of this role remains unclear. Based on a well-supported theory of cerebellar motor function, which ascribes to the cerebellum a role in short-term prediction through internal modeling, we hypothesize that right cerebellar Crus I/II supports prediction of upcoming sentence content. We tested this hypothesis using event-related fMRI in male and female human subjects by manipulating the predictability of written sentences. Our design controlled for motor planning and execution, as well as for linguistic features and working memory load; it also allowed separation of the prediction interval from the presentation of the final sentence item. In addition, three further fMRI tasks captured semantic, phonological, and orthographic processing to shed light on the nature of the information processed. As hypothesized, activity in right posterolateral cerebellum correlated with the predictability of the upcoming target word. This cerebellar region also responded to prediction error during the outcome of the trial. Further, this region was engaged in phonological, but not semantic or orthographic, processing. This is the first imaging study to demonstrate a right cerebellar contribution in language comprehension independently from motor, cognitive, and linguistic confounds. These results complement our work using other methodologies showing cerebellar engagement in linguistic prediction and suggest that internal modeling of phonological representations aids language production and comprehension. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The cerebellum is traditionally seen as a motor structure that allows for smooth movement by predicting upcoming signals. However, the cerebellum is also consistently implicated in nonmotor functions such as language and working memory. Using fMRI, we identify a cerebellar area that is active when words are predicted and

  9. Autoradiography of 90Sr in developing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, I.; Jonsen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution patterns of 90 Sr in five littermate, 8-day-old Wistar rats were studied by whole body autoradiography. Rats were killed 15 min, 1, 4, 24, and 72 h after a single intraperitoneal injection of the isotope. Immediately after administration, 90 Sr was distributed throughout most of the soft tissues of the body. The soft tissue deposits had practically disappeared after 4 h. In the hard tissues of the body 90 Sr accumulated up to 24-72 h. Fifteen minutes after injection the uptake of 90 Sr in the enamel of the teeth was highest in the occlusal and incisal regions. 90 Sr gradually accumulated throughout the enamel and after 72 h its distribution in this layer was fairly uniform. Immediately after injection a narrow zone of radioactivity appeared in the dentin near the pulp. This zone broadened with time towards the dentinoenamel junction and included the intire dentin layer 72 h after injection. Initially, the uptake of 90 Sr was higher in the dentin than in the enamel, particularly in the cervical areas of the crown. This difference became less apparent with time. There was good correlation between the uptake in the teeth and bones, supporting the use of teeth as indicators of the 90 Sr body burden. (author)

  10. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study on the Metabolism Changes of Cerebellum in Patients with Post-Stroke Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Sui, Ru-Bo

    2017-01-01

    To study the metabolic changes of cerebellum by proton magnetic resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and discuss the relationships between the cerebellar changes and depression severity in patients with post-stroke depression. Data of demographic characteristics, individual history and life style of all subjects were collected. 40 patients with stroke and 20 controls were enrolled. All groups received T1WI, T2WI, DWI and 1H-MRS examination. The cerebral infarction volume and the distribution and severity of leukoaraiosis were evaluated. The ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA in the cerebellum were calculated. There were no statistical significant difference in the NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in bilateral cerebellum between CONT group and NORM group. The Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in the cerebellum contralateral to the stroke region were higher in PSD group than those in NORM and CONT groups, and the Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in the cerebellum ipsilateral to the stroke region were similar with those in NORM and CONT groups. However, there were no statistical significant difference in the NAA/Cr ratios in bilateral cerebellum among three groups. The result shows preliminarily that the cerebellum involves in the development of post-stroke depression. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The cerebellum and cognition: evidence from functional imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoodley, Catherine J

    2012-06-01

    Evidence for a role of the human cerebellum in cognitive functions comes from anatomical, clinical and neuroimaging data. Functional neuroimaging reveals cerebellar activation during a variety of cognitive tasks, including language, visual-spatial, executive, and working memory processes. It is important to note that overt movement is not a prerequisite for cerebellar activation: the cerebellum is engaged during conditions which either control for motor output or do not involve motor responses. Resting-state functional connectivity data reveal that, in addition to networks underlying motor control, the cerebellum is part of "cognitive" networks with prefrontal and parietal association cortices. Consistent with these findings, regional differences in activation patterns within the cerebellum are evident depending on the task demands, suggesting that the cerebellum can be broadly divided into functional regions based on the patterns of anatomical connectivity between different regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor and association areas of the cerebral cortex. However, the distinct contribution of the cerebellum to cognitive tasks is not clear. Here, the functional neuroimaging evidence for cerebellar involvement in cognitive functions is reviewed and related to hypotheses as to why the cerebellum is active during such tasks. Identifying the precise role of the cerebellum in cognition-as well as the mechanism by which the cerebellum modulates performance during a wide range of tasks-remains a challenge for future investigations.

  12. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of 125 I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR

  13. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Autoradiography using 125 I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat

  14. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Autoradiography using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat.

  15. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor types 1 and 2 are differentially expressed in pre- and post-synaptic elements in the post-natal developing rat cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinny, JD; Kalicharan, D; Blaauw, EH; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Shi, F; Gramsbergen, A; van der Want, JJL

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-like proteins act via two G-protein-coupled receptors (CRF-R1 and CRF-R2) playing important neuromodulatory roles in stress responses and synaptic plasticity. The cerebellar expression of corticotropin-releasing factor-like ligands has been well documented, but

  16. Myelin basic protein in brains of rats with low dose lead encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundstroem, R; Karlsson, B

    1987-02-01

    In the present study control rats and lead exposed rats which did not have any retardation of growth were examined by radioimmunological assay of myelin basic protein (MBP) of homogenates of cerebrum and cerebellum at 30, 60 and 120 days of age. Lead was administered on postnatal days 1-15 by daily intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg lead nitrate/kg body weight. This lead dose results in light microscopically discernible hemorrhagic encephalopathy in the cerebellum of 15-day old rats, but does not induce growth retardation. The controls were injected with vehicle only. The amount of lead in the blood and brain homogenates of lead-exposed and control rats 15-200 days old was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant differences between the lead-exposed and control rats were not found in the cerebral or cerebellar content of MBP. Considering the results of previous investigations, the findings do not exclude a hypo-myelinating effect of lead, but they suggest that exposure to lead without concomitant malnutrition does not cause hypo-myelination in the cerebrum and cerebellum of the developing rat.

  17. The cerebellum for jocks and nerds alike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Laurentiu S; Hewitt, Angela L; Ebner, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Historically the cerebellum has been implicated in the control of movement. However, the cerebellum's role in non-motor functions, including cognitive and emotional processes, has also received increasing attention. Starting from the premise that the uniform architecture of the cerebellum underlies a common mode of information processing, this review examines recent electrophysiological findings on the motor signals encoded in the cerebellar cortex and then relates these signals to observations in the non-motor domain. Simple spike firing of individual Purkinje cells encodes performance errors, both predicting upcoming errors as well as providing feedback about those errors. Further, this dual temporal encoding of prediction and feedback involves a change in the sign of the simple spike modulation. Therefore, Purkinje cell simple spike firing both predicts and responds to feedback about a specific parameter, consistent with computing sensory prediction errors in which the predictions about the consequences of a motor command are compared with the feedback resulting from the motor command execution. These new findings are in contrast with the historical view that complex spikes encode errors. Evaluation of the kinematic coding in the simple spike discharge shows the same dual temporal encoding, suggesting this is a common mode of signal processing in the cerebellar cortex. Decoding analyses show the considerable accuracy of the predictions provided by Purkinje cells across a range of times. Further, individual Purkinje cells encode linearly and independently a multitude of signals, both kinematic and performance errors. Therefore, the cerebellar cortex's capacity to make associations across different sensory, motor and non-motor signals is large. The results from studying how Purkinje cells encode movement signals suggest that the cerebellar cortex circuitry can support associative learning, sequencing, working memory, and forward internal models in non

  18. Cerebellum: from Fundamentals to Translational Approaches. The Seventh International Symposium of the Society for Research on the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2016-02-01

    In terms of cerebellar research and ataxiology, a most fascinating period is currently going on. Numerous academic groups are now focusing their innovative research on the so-called little brain, hidden at the bottom of our brain. Indeed, its unique anatomical features make the cerebellum a wonderful window to address major questions about the central nervous system. The seventh international symposium of the SRC was held in Brussels at the Palace of Academies from May 8 to 10, 2015. The main goal of this dense symposium was to gather in a 2-day meeting senior researchers of exceptional scientific quality and talented junior scientists from all over the world working in the multidisciplinary field of cerebellar research. Fundamental and clinical researchers shared the latest knowledge and developments in this rapidly growing field. New ideas, addressed in a variety of inspiring talks, provoked a vivid debate. Advances in genetics, development, electrophysiology, neuroimaging, neurocognition and affect, as well as in the cerebellar ataxias and the controversies on the roles and functions of the cerebellum were presented. The Ferdinando Rossi lecture and the key-note lecture were delivered by Jan Voogd and Chris De Zeeuw, respectively. Contacts between researchers of different neuroscientific disciplines established a robust basis for novel trends and promising new cooperations between researchers and their centers spread all over the world.

  19. Postnatal development of plasma amino acids in hyperphagic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadó, M J; Segués, T; Arola, L

    1991-01-01

    The effect of feeding a highly palatable high-energy cafeteria diet on individual amino acid levels in plasma during postnatal development of the rat has been evaluated and compared to chow-fed controls. The cafeteria diet selected by the rats was hypercaloric and hyperlipidic, with practically the same amount of carbohydrate as the control diet, and slightly hyperproteic. In response to cafeteria feeding, significant decreases were observed in plasma serine and cysteine along the period studied. Significant changes with age during the growth period were shown by cafeteria-fed animals, which were not observed in control rats. Citrulline levels were lower on days 10 and 14 in cafeteria pups than in chow pups. Methionine was highest on day 30. Threonine was also higher at days 20 and 30, as was valine but with a nadir at day 10. Lysine showed maximal values on days 14 and 30.

  20. The evolution of the vertebrate cerebellum: absence of a proliferative external granule layer in a basal ray-finned fish

    OpenAIRE

    Butts, Thomas; Modrell, Melinda S.; Baker, Clare V. H.; Wingate, Richard J. T.

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum represents one of the most morphologically variable structures in the vertebrate brain. To shed light on its evolutionary history, we have examined the molecular anatomy and proliferation of the developing cerebellum of the North American paddlefish, Polyodon spathula. Absence of an external proliferative cerebellar layer and the restriction of Atonal1 expression to the rhombic lip and valvular primordium demonstrate that transit amplification in a cerebellar external germinal ...

  1. Functionally heterogenous ryanodine receptors in avian cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierralta, J; Fill, M; Suárez-Isla, B A

    1996-07-19

    The functional heterogeneity of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in avian cerebellum was defined. Heavy endoplasmic reticulum microsomes had significant levels of ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding. Scatchard analysis and kinetic studies indicated the existence of at least two distinct ryanodine binding sites. Ryanodine binding was calcium-dependent but was not significantly enhanced by caffeine. Incorporation of microsomes into planar lipid bilayers revealed ion channels with pharmacological features (calcium, magnesium, ATP, and caffeine sensitivity) similar to the RyR channels found in mammalian striated muscle. Despite a wide range of unitary conductances (220-500 picosiemens, symmetrical cesium methanesulfonate), ryanodine locked both channels into a characteristic slow gating subconductance state, positively identifying them as RyR channels. Two populations of avian RyR channels were functionally distinguished by single channel calcium sensitivity. One population was defined by a bell-shaped calcium sensitivity analogous to the skeletal muscle RyR isoform (type I). The calcium sensitivity of the second RyR population was sigmoidal and analogous to the cardiac muscle RyR isoform (type II). These data show that there are at least two functionally distinct RyR channel populations in avian cerebellum. This leads to the possibility that these functionally distinct RyR channels are involved in different intracellular calcium signaling pathways.

  2. The Cerebellum and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Berman, Steven M; London, Edythe D

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum constitutes ten percent of brain volume and contains the majority of brain neurons. Although it was historically viewed primarily as processing motoric computations, current evidence supports a more comprehensive role, where cerebro-cerebellar feedback loops also modulate various forms of cognitive and affective processing. Here we present evidence for a role of the cerebellum in premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), which is characterized by severe negative mood symptoms during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Although a link between menstruation and cyclical dysphoria has long been recognized, neuroscientific investigations of this common disorder have only recently been explored. This article reviews functional and structural brain imaging studies of PMDD and the similar but less well defined condition of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). The most consistent findings are that women with premenstrual dysphoria exhibit greater relative activity than other women in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior lobules VI and VII of the neocerebellum. Since both brain areas have been implicated in emotional processing and mood disorders, working memory and executive functions, this greater activity probably represents coactivation within a cerebro-cerebellar feedback loop regulating emotional and cognitive processing. Some of the evidence suggests that increased activity within this circuit may preserve cerebellar structure during aging, and possible mechanisms and implications of this finding are discussed.

  3. The cerebellum and decision making under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Nigel; Ffytche, Dominic; Simmons, Andrew; Bentall, Richard; Murray, Robin; Howard, Robert

    2004-06-01

    This study aimed to identify the neural basis of probabilistic reasoning, a type of inductive inference that aids decision making under conditions of uncertainty. Eight normal subjects performed two separate two-alternative-choice tasks (the balls in a bottle and personality survey tasks) while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The experimental conditions within each task were chosen so that they differed only in their requirement to make a decision under conditions of uncertainty (probabilistic reasoning and frequency determination required) or under conditions of certainty (frequency determination required). The same visual stimuli and motor responses were used in the experimental conditions. We provide evidence that the neo-cerebellum, in conjunction with the premotor cortex, inferior parietal lobule and medial occipital cortex, mediates the probabilistic inferences that guide decision making under uncertainty. We hypothesise that the neo-cerebellum constructs internal working models of uncertain events in the external world, and that such probabilistic models subserve the predictive capacity central to induction. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Transient developmental Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in healthy and ataxic mouse cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovisa Ljungberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is carried out of the cerebellar cortical microcircuit via action potentials propagated along Purkinje cell axons. In several human neurodegenerative diseases, focal axonal swellings on Purkinje cells – known as torpedoes – have been associated with Purkinje cell loss. Interestingly, torpedoes are also reported to appear transiently during development in rat cerebellum. The function of Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in health as well as in disease is poorly understood. We investigated the properties of developmental torpedoes in the postnatal mouse cerebellum of wildtype and transgenic mice. We found that Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes transiently appeared on axons of Purkinje neurons, with the largest number of torpedoes observed at postnatal day 11 (P11. This was after peak developmental apoptosis had occurred, when Purkinje cell counts in a lobule were static, suggesting that most developmental torpedoes appear on axons of neurons that persist into adulthood. We found that developmental torpedoes were not associated with a presynaptic GABAergic marker, indicating that they are not synapses. They were seldom found at axonal collateral branch points, and lacked microglia enrichment, suggesting that they are unlikely to be involved in axonal refinement. Interestingly, we found several differences between developmental torpedoes and disease-related torpedoes: developmental torpedoes occured largely on myelinated axons, and were not associated with changes in basket cell innervation on their parent soma. Disease-related torpedoes are typically reported to contain neurofilament; while the majority of developmental torpedoes did as well, a fraction of smaller developmental torpedoes did not. These differences indicate that developmental torpedoes may not be functionally identical to disease-related torpedoes. To study this further, we used a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6, and found elevated disease

  5. Astrocyte morphology, heterogeneity and density in the developing African Giant Rat (Cricetomys gambianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Olukayode Olopade

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocyte morphologies and heterogeneity were described in male African giant rats (AGR (Cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse across three age groups (5 neonates, 5 juveniles and 5 adults using Silver impregnation method and immunohistochemistry against glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Immunopositive cell signaling, cell size and population were least in neonates, followed by adults and juveniles respectively. In neonates, astrocyte processes were mostly detected within the glia limitans of the mid and hind brain; their cell bodies measuring 32±4.8 µm in diameter against 91±5.4µm and 75± 1.9µm in juveniles and adults respectively. Astrocyte heterogeneity in juvenile and adult groups revealed eight subtypes to include fibrous astrocytes chiefly in the corpus callosum and brain stem, protoplasmic astrocytes in the cortex and dentate gyrus (DG; radial glia were found along the olfactory bulb (OB and subventricular zone (SVZ; velate astrocytes were mainly found in the cerebellum and hippocampus; marginal astrocytes close to the pia mater; Bergmann glia in the molecular layer of the cerebellum; perivascular and periventricular astrocytes in the cortex and third ventricle respectively. Cell counts from twelve anatomical regions of the brain were significantly higher in juveniles than in adults (p≤0.01 using unpaired student t-test in the cerebral cortex, pia, corpus callosum, rostral migratory stream (RMS, DG and cerebellum. Highest astrocyte count was found in the DG, while the least count was in the brain stem and sub cortex. Astrocytes along the periventricular layer of the OB are believed to be part of the radial glia system that transport newly formed cells towards the hippocampus and play roles in neurogenesis migration and homeostasis in the AGR. Therefore, astrocyte heterogeneity was examined across age groups in the AGR to determine whether age influences astrocytes population in different regions of the AGR brain and discuss

  6. Development of the rat larynx: a histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alli, Opeyemi; Berzofsky, Craig; Sharma, Sansar; Pitman, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate and describe the cartilaginous and muscular development of the rat larynx. Histologic evaluation. The larynges of Sprague Dawley rats of embryonic day (E) 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, postnatal day 0, 14, and adult of 250 gm were collected. Four larynges of each age were harvested, cut into 15-μm serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated under light microscopy. Representative digital images were recorded and evaluated at the preglottic (supraglottic in humans), glottic, and postglottic (subglottic in humans) levels. Brachial arches were observed at E13. At E17, immature structures of the larynx, including skeletal muscle, cartilage, and the lumen were identifiable. Chondrification and muscle formation were clearly seen by E19. The muscular and cartilagenous components of the larynx were well established by E21. During the span between birth and adult maturation, the size of the larynx increased from a height of 1.10 mm to 2.90 mm, and from a width of 1.80 mm to 5.40 mm, and from a length of 1.38 mm to 4.77 mm in the stained section. Although developed at E21, the laryngeal structures continued to grow by approximately 30%. Rat laryngeal development parallels that in mice and humans. In the rat, at E17 immature structures of the larynx are identifiable, they are well developed at birth and grow by approximately 30% into adulthood. Understanding the chronology and morphology of the embryogenesis of the rat laryngeal musculature is essential and will allow for further evaluation of the embryologic innervation of these muscles. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Phenomenon of hormesis on γ-irradiated developing rat pups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruda, V.P.; Kuzin, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    Development of rat pups was shown to accelerate body mass up 121% of control) afetr γ-irradiation on day 21 of the postnatal development (2.88 cGy, dose-rate of 0.12 cGy/h). Higher cumulative doses (14.4 and 144 cGy) did not influence the body mass growth, and inhibition was only caused by doses exceeding 150 cGy

  8. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2013-01-01

    in the cerebellum in MS. This might be caused by a functional disruption of cortico-ponto-cerebellar and spino-cerebellar inputs, since patients with higher lesion load in the left cerebellar peduncles showed a stronger reduction in cerebellar homogeneity. In patients, two clusters in the left posterior cerebellum...

  9. Role of cerebellum in deglutition and deglutition disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarathnam, Balaji; Kamarunas, Erin; McCullough, Gary H

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this review is to gather available evidence regarding the role of the cerebellum in swallowing-related functions. We reviewed literature on cerebellar functions related to healthy swallowing, patterns of dysphagia in individuals with cerebellar lesions, and the role of the cerebellum in therapeutic intervention of neurogenic dysphagia since 1980. A collective understanding of these studies suggests that both hemispheres of the cerebellum, predominantly the left, participate in healthy swallowing. Also, it appears that the cerebellum contributes to specific physiological functions within the entire act of swallowing, but this is not clearly understood. The understanding of patterns of dysphagia in cerebellar lesions remains ambiguous with equivocal results across a small number of studies. The cerebellum appears to be involved in oral exercises for dysphagia in the relationship between oral movements in such exercises, and deglutition remains uncertain. There is increasing evidence to suggest successful use of transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebellum to improve neuromotor control of swallowing. Future studies should address activation of the cerebellum with swallowing of different consistencies and tastes in healthy adults to gain better insights. Studies should also investigate dynamics of neural activation during different stages of recovery from dysphagia following strokes to cortical centers to determine if the cerebellum plays a compensatory role during instances of increased neural demands.

  10. How the cerebellum may monitor sensory information for spatial representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondi-Reig, Laure; Paradis, Anne-Lise; Lefort, Julie M.; Babayan, Benedicte M.; Tobin, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum has already been shown to participate in the navigation function. We propose here that this structure is involved in maintaining a sense of direction and location during self-motion by monitoring sensory information and interacting with navigation circuits to update the mental representation of space. To better understand the processing performed by the cerebellum in the navigation function, we have reviewed: the anatomical pathways that convey self-motion information to the cerebellum; the computational algorithm(s) thought to be performed by the cerebellum from these multi-source inputs; the cerebellar outputs directed toward navigation circuits and the influence of self-motion information on space-modulated cells receiving cerebellar outputs. This review highlights that the cerebellum is adequately wired to combine the diversity of sensory signals to be monitored during self-motion and fuel the navigation circuits. The direct anatomical projections of the cerebellum toward the head-direction cell system and the parietal cortex make those structures possible relays of the cerebellum influence on the hippocampal spatial map. We describe computational models of the cerebellar function showing that the cerebellum can filter out the components of the sensory signals that are predictable, and provides a novelty output. We finally speculate that this novelty output is taken into account by the navigation structures, which implement an update over time of position and stabilize perception during navigation. PMID:25408638

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Study of Non-conventional Morphological Brains: malnourished rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition during brain development can cause serious problems that can be irreversible. Dysfunctional patterns of brain activity can be detected with functional MRI. We used BOLD functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to investigate region differences of brain activity between control and malnourished rats. The food-competition method was applied to a rat model to induce malnutrition during lactation. A 7T magnet was used to detect changes of the BOLD signal associated with changes in brain activity caused by the trigeminal nerve stimulation in malnourished and control rats. Major neuronal activation was observed in malnourished rats in several brain regions, including cerebellum, somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. Statistical analysis of the BOLD signals from various brain areas revealed significant differences in somatosensory cortex between the control and experimental groups, as well as a significant difference between the cerebellum and other structures in the experimental group. This study, particularly in malnourished rats, demonstrates increased BOLD activation in the cerebellum.

  12. The cerebellum: a neuronal learning machine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.; Mauk, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of two seemingly quite different behaviors yields a surprisingly consistent picture of the role of the cerebellum in motor learning. Behavioral and physiological data about classical conditioning of the eyelid response and motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex suggests that (i) plasticity is distributed between the cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei; (ii) the cerebellar cortex plays a special role in learning the timing of movement; and (iii) the cerebellar cortex guides learning in the deep nuclei, which may allow learning to be transferred from the cortex to the deep nuclei. Because many of the similarities in the data from the two systems typify general features of cerebellar organization, the cerebellar mechanisms of learning in these two systems may represent principles that apply to many motor systems.

  13. The cerebellum for jocks and nerds alike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentiu ePopa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically the cerebellum has been implicated in the control of movement. However, the cerebellum’s role in non-motor functions, including cognitive and emotional processes, has also received increasing attention. Starting from the premise that the uniform architecture of the cerebellum underlies a common mode of information processing, this review examines recent electrophysiological findings on the motor signals encoded in the cerebellar cortex and then relates these signals to observations in the non-motor domain. Simple spike firing of individual Purkinje cells encodes performance errors, both predicting upcoming errors as well as providing feedback about those errors. Further, this dual temporal encoding of prediction and feedback involves a change in the sign of the simple spike modulation. Therefore, Purkinje cell simple spike firing both predicts and responds to feedback about a specific parameter, consistent with computing sensory prediction errors in which the predictions about the consequences of a motor command are compared with the feedback resulting from the motor command execution. These new findings are in contrast with the historical view that complex spikes encode errors. Evaluation of the kinematic coding in the simple spike discharge shows the same dual temporal encoding, suggesting this is a common mode of signal processing in the cerebellar cortex. Decoding analyses show the considerable accuracy of the predictions provided by Purkinje cells across a range of times. Further, individual Purkinje cells encode linearly and independently a multitude of signals, both kinematic and performance errors. Therefore, the cerebellar cortex’s capacity to make associations across different sensory, motor and non-motor signals is large. The results from studying how Purkinje cells encode movement signals suggest that the cerebellar cortex circuitry can support associative learning, sequencing, working memory, and forward internal

  14. Development of the adrenal axis in the neonatal rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, Ronnie [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Plasma corticosterone and ACTH concentrations were determined in neonatal rats 1, 7, 14, and 21 days old, under a variety of experimental conditions, to obtain more information on the postnatal development of the rat hypothalamo-adrenal (HHA) axis. The results indicate that: (1) there is a diminution followed by an increase in responsiveness of the adrenal gland, but the pituitary response to direct hormonal stimulation is unchanged during the first three postnatal weeks; (2) continued stimulation of the adrenal by ACTH or of the central nervous system (CNS) or hypothalamus by corticosterone is necessary during early postnatal development to allow normal maturation of the HHA axis; and (3) feedback inhibition is operative by birth, at least to a moderate degree. Taken together, the studies suggest that both the adrenal and pituitary glands are potentially functional at birth, but that the hypothalamic and CNS mediators of the stress response are not mature until at least the second or third postnatal week. (ERB)

  15. Passive stiffness of rat skeletal muscle undernourished during fetal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elisa Toscano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of fetal undernutrition on the passive mechanical properties of skeletal muscle of weaned and young adult rats. INTRODUCTION: A poor nutrition supply during fetal development affects physiological functions of the fetus. From a mechanical point of view, skeletal muscle can be also characterized by its resistance to passive stretch. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups according to their mother's diet during pregnancy: a control group (mothers fed a 17% protein diet and an isocaloric low-protein group (mothers fed a 7.8% protein diet. At birth, all mothers received a standardized meal ad libitum. At the age of 25 and 90 days, the soleus muscle and extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles were removed in order to test the passive mechanical properties. A first mechanical test consisted of an incremental stepwise extension test using fast velocity stretching (500 mm/s enabling us to measure, for each extension stepwise, the dynamic stress (σd and the steady stress (σs. A second test consisted of a slow velocity stretch in order to calculate normalized stiffness and tangent modulus from the stress-strain relationship. RESULTS: The results for the mechanical properties showed an important increase in passive stiffness in both the soleus and EDL muscles in weaned rat. In contrast, no modification was observed in young adult rats. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in passive stiffness in skeletal muscle of weaned rat submitted to intrauterine undernutrition it is most likely due to changes in muscle passive stiffness.

  16. Fibronectin distribution during the development of fetal rat skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibson, W T; Couchman, J R; Weaver, A C

    1983-01-01

    Fibronectin distribution during fetal rat skin development has been studied immunocytochemically at the light and electron microscope level from 16 days of gestation to birth. The dermal-epidermal junction, the dermis, and connective tissue around developing muscle were shown by light microscopy......, and there was also staining associated with the underlying fine collagen fibrils. These observations are further evidence for the proposed role of fibronectin as a mediator of the cell-matrix interactions which are of importance for tissue development and maintenance....

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Neuro-Vascular Coupling in Rat Cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tina

    Activity in the neurons called climbing fibers causes blood flow changes. But the physiological mechanisms which mediate the coupling are not well understood. This PhD thesis investigates the mechanisms of neuro-vascular coupling by means of mathematical methods. In experiments, the extracellularly...... measured field potential is used as an indicator of neuronal activity, and the cortical blood flow is measured by means of laser-Doppler flowmetry. Using system identification methods, these measurements have been used to construct and validate parametric mathematical models of the neuro-vascular system...

  18. HIV-1 transgenic rats develop T cell abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, William; Abdelwahab, Sayed; Sadowska, Mariola; Huso, David; Neal, Ashley; Ahearn, Aaron; Bryant, Joseph; Gallo, Robert C.; Lewis, George K.; Reitz, Marvin

    2004-01-01

    HIV-1 infection leads to impaired antigen-specific T cell proliferation, increased susceptibility of T cells to apoptosis, progressive impairment of T-helper 1 (Th1) responses, and altered maturation of HIV-1-specific memory cells. We have identified similar impairments in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Tg rats developed an absolute reduction in CD4 + and CD8 + T cells able to produce IFN-γ following activation and an increased susceptibility of T cells to activation-induced apoptosis. CD4 + and CD8 + effector/memory (CD45RC - CD62L - ) pools were significantly smaller in Tg rats compared to non-Tg controls, although the converse was true for the naieve (CD45RC + CD62L + ) T cell pool. Our interpretation is that the HIV transgene causes defects in the development of T cell effector function and generation of specific effector/memory T cell subsets, and that activation-induced apoptosis may be an essential factor in this process

  19. Spaceflight Affects Postnatal Development of the Aortic Wall in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Katsuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effect of microgravity environment during spaceflight on postnatal development of the rheological properties of the aorta in rats. The neonate rats were randomly divided at 7 days of age into the spaceflight, asynchronous ground control, and vivarium control groups (8 pups for one dam. The spaceflight group rats at 9 days of age were exposed to microgravity environment for 16 days. A longitudinal wall strip of the proximal descending thoracic aorta was subjected to stress-strain and stress-relaxation tests. Wall tensile force was significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, whereas there were no significant differences in wall stress or incremental elastic modulus at each strain among the three groups. Wall thickness and number of smooth muscle fibers were significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, but there were no significant differences in amounts of either the elastin or collagen fibers among the three groups. The decreased thickness was mainly caused by the decreased number of smooth muscle cells. Plastic deformation was observed only in the spaceflight group in the stress-strain test. A microgravity environment during spaceflight could affect postnatal development of the morphological and rheological properties of the aorta.

  20. Overexpression of mutant ataxin-3 in mouse cerebellum induces ataxia and cerebellar neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Conceição, Mariana; Déglon, Nicole; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2013-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is a fatal, dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Clinical manifestations include cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs culminating in severe neuronal degeneration. Currently, there is no therapy able to modify disease progression. In the present study, we aimed at investigating one of the most severely affected brain regions in the disorder--the cerebellum--and the behavioral defects associated with the neuropathology in this region. For this purpose, we injected lentiviral vectors encoding full-length human mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum of 3-week-old C57/BL6 mice. We show that circumscribed expression of human mutant ataxin-3 in the cerebellum mediates within a short time frame--6 weeks, the development of a behavioral phenotype including reduced motor coordination, wide-based ataxic gait, and hyperactivity. Furthermore, the expression of mutant ataxin-3 resulted in the accumulation of intranuclear inclusions, neuropathological abnormalities, and neuronal death. These data show that lentiviral-based expression of mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum induces localized neuropathology, which is sufficient to generate a behavioral ataxic phenotype. Moreover, this approach provides a physiologically relevant, cost-effective and time-effective animal model to gain further insights into the pathogenesis of MJD and for the evaluation of experimental therapeutics of MJD.

  1. The role of the cerebellum in the regulation of language functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Moskała, Marek; Krzyżewski, Roger M; Kwinta, Borys; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław; Milczarek, Olga; Rajtar-Zembaty, Anna; Przewoźnik, Dorota

    2017-08-29

    The present paper is a review of studies on the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of language functions. This brain structure until recently associated chiefly with motor skills, visual-motor coordination and balance, proves to be significant also for cognitive functioning. With regard to language functions, studies show that the cerebellum determines verbal fluency (both semantic and formal) expressive and receptive grammar processing, the ability to identify and correct language mistakes, and writing skills. Cerebellar damage is a possible cause of aphasia or the cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS). Decreased cerebellocortical connectivity as well as anomalies in the structure of the cerebellum are emphasized in numerous developmental dyslexia theories. The cerebellum is characterized by linguistic lateralization. From the neuroanatomical perspective, its right hemisphere and dentate nucleus, having multiple cerebellocortical connections with the cerebral cortical language areas, are particularly important for language functions. Usually, language deficits developed as a result of a cerebellar damage have subclinical intensity and require applying sensitive neuropsychological diagnostic tools designed to assess higher verbal functions.

  2. Development of neuropeptide Y-mediated heart innervation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin; Emanuilov, Andrey I; Anikina, Tatyana A; Zverev, Alexey A; Nozdrachev, Alexandr D

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a trophic role in the nervous and vascular systems and in cardiac hypertrophy. However, there is no report concerning the expression of NPY and its receptors in the heart during postnatal development. In the current study, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis was used to label NPY, and Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R receptors in the heart tissue and intramural cardiac ganglia from rats of different ages (newborn, 10 days old, 20 days old, 30 days old, 60 days old, 1 year old, and 2 years old).The obtained data suggest age-dependent changes of NPY-mediated heart innervation. The density of NPY-immunoreactive (IR) fibers was the least in newborn animals and increased in the first 20 days of life. In the atria of newborn and 10-day-old rats, NPY-IR fibers were more abundant compared with the ventricles. The vast majority of NPY-IR fibers also contained tyrosine hydroxylase, a key enzyme in catecholamine synthesis.The expression of Y1R increased between 10 and 20 days of life. Faint Y2R immunoreactivity was observed in the atria and ventricles of 20-day-old and older rats. In contrast, the highest level of the expression of Y5R was found in newborn pups comparing with more adult rats. All intramural ganglionic neurons were also Y1R-IR and Y5R-IR and Y2R-negative in all studied animals.Thus, the increasing of density of NPY-containing nerve fibers accompanies changes in relation of different subtypes of NPY receptors in the heart during development.

  3. Development of acute hydrocephalus does not change brain tissue mechanical properties in adult rats, but in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pong, Alice C; Jugé, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2017-01-01

    Regional changes in brain stiffness were previously demonstrated in an experimental obstructive hydrocephalus juvenile rat model. The open cranial sutures in the juvenile rats have influenced brain compression and mechanical properties during hydrocephalus development and the extent by which closed cranial sutures in adult hydrocephalic rat models affect brain stiffness in-vivo remains unclear. The aims of this study were to determine changes in brain tissue mechanical properties and brain structure size during hydrocephalus development in adult rat with fixed cranial volume and how these changes were related to brain tissue deformation. Hydrocephalus was induced in 9 female ten weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats by injecting 60 μL of a kaolin suspension (25%) into the cisterna magna under anaesthesia. 6 sham-injected age-matched female SD rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before and then at 3 days post injection. T2-weighted anatomical MR images were collected to quantify ventricle and brain tissue cross-sectional areas. MR elastography (800 Hz) was used to measure the brain stiffness (G*, shear modulus). Brain tissue in the adult hydrocephalic rats was more compressed than the juvenile hydrocephalic rats because the skulls of the adult hydrocephalic rats were unable to expand like the juvenile rats. In the adult hydrocephalic rats, the cortical gray matter thickness and the caudate-putamen cross-sectional area decreased (Spearman, P hydrocephalus is complex and is not solely dependent on brain tissue deformation. Further studies on the interactions between brain tissue stiffness, deformation, tissue oedema and neural damage are necessary before MRE can be used as a tool to track changes in brain biomechanics in hydrocephalus.

  4. Active Inference and Learning in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl; Herreros, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    This letter offers a computational account of Pavlovian conditioning in the cerebellum based on active inference and predictive coding. Using eyeblink conditioning as a canonical paradigm, we formulate a minimal generative model that can account for spontaneous blinking, startle responses, and (delay or trace) conditioning. We then establish the face validity of the model using simulated responses to unconditioned and conditioned stimuli to reproduce the sorts of behavior that are observed empirically. The scheme's anatomical validity is then addressed by associating variables in the predictive coding scheme with nuclei and neuronal populations to match the (extrinsic and intrinsic) connectivity of the cerebellar (eyeblink conditioning) system. Finally, we try to establish predictive validity by reproducing selective failures of delay conditioning, trace conditioning, and extinction using (simulated and reversible) focal lesions. Although rather metaphorical, the ensuing scheme can account for a remarkable range of anatomical and neurophysiological aspects of cerebellar circuitry-and the specificity of lesion-deficit mappings that have been established experimentally. From a computational perspective, this work shows how conditioning or learning can be formulated in terms of minimizing variational free energy (or maximizing Bayesian model evidence) using exactly the same principles that underlie predictive coding in perception.

  5. The 5-HT1A Receptor PET Radioligand 11C-CUMI-101 Has Significant Binding to α1-Adrenoceptors in Human Cerebellum, Limiting Its Use as a Reference Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Stal S; Liow, Jeih-San; Jenko, Kimberly; Ikawa, Masamichi; Zoghbi, Sami S; Innis, Robert B

    2016-12-01

    Prazosin, a potent and selective α 1 -adrenoceptor antagonist, displaces 25% of 11 C-CUMI-101 ([O-methyl- 11 C]2-(4-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-4-methyl-1,2,4-triazine-3,5(2H,4H)dione) binding in monkey cerebellum. We sought to estimate the percentage contamination of 11 C-CUMI-101 binding to α 1 -adrenoceptors in human cerebellum under in vivo conditions. In vitro receptor-binding techniques were used to measure α 1 -adrenoceptor density and the affinity of CUMI-101 for these receptors in human, monkey, and rat cerebellum. Binding potential (maximum number of binding sites × affinity [(1/dissociation constant]) was determined using in vitro homogenate binding assays in human, monkey, and rat cerebellum. 3 H-prazosin was used to determine the maximum number of binding sites, as well as the dissociation constant of 3 H-prazosin and the inhibition constant of CUMI-101. α 1 -adrenoceptor density and the affinity of CUMI-101 for these receptors were similar across species. Cerebellar binding potentials were 3.7 for humans, 2.3 for monkeys, and 3.4 for rats. Reasoning by analogy, 25% of 11 C-CUMI-101 uptake in human cerebellum reflects binding to α 1 -adrenoceptors, suggesting that the cerebellum is of limited usefulness as a reference tissue for quantification in human studies. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. Cerebellar Insulin/IGF-1 signaling in diabetic rats: Effects of exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Mariana Eiras; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Arantes, Luciana Mendonça; Luciano, Eliete; de Moura, Leandro Pereira; de Almeida Leme, José Alexandre Curiacos; Medeiros, Alessandra; Bertolini, Natália Oliveira; Sibuya, Clarice Yoshiko; Gomes, Ricardo José

    2017-02-03

    The Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease associated with loss of brain regions such as the cerebellum, increasing the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In the brain of diabetic and PD organisms the insulin/IGF-1 signaling is altered. Exercise training is an effective intervention for the prevention of neurodegerative diseases since it release neurotrophic factors and regulating insulin/IGF-1 signaling in the brain. This study aimed to evaluate the proteins involved in the insulin/IGF-1 pathway in the cerebellum of diabetic rats subjected to exercise training protocol. Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: sedentary control (SC), trained control (TC), sedentary diabetic (SD) and trained diabetic (TD). Diabetes was induced by Alloxan (ALX) (32mg/kgb.w.). The training program consisted in swimming 5days/week, 1h/day, during 6 weeks, supporting an overload corresponding to 90% of the anaerobic threshold. At the end, cerebellum was extracted to determinate the protein expression of GSK-3β, IRβ and IGF-1R and the phosphorylation of β-amyloid, Tau, ERK1+ERK2 by Western Blot analysis. All dependent variables were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance with significance level of 5%. Diabetes causes hyperglycemia in both diabetic groups; however, in TD, there was a reduction in hyperglycemia compared to SD. Diabetes increased Tau and β-amyloid phosphorylation in both SD and TD groups. Furthermore, aerobic exercise increased ERK1+ERK2 expression in TC. The data showed that in cerebellum of diabetic rats induced by alloxan there are some proteins expression like Parkinson cerebellum increased, and the exercise training was not able to modulate the expression of these proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The cerebellum on the rise in human emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, J. van

    2005-01-01

    For decennia the cerebellum has largely been excluded from scientific enquiry beyond motor function. However, the intimate afferent and efferent connections to the midbrain and limbic system provide for the neuroanatomical foundation of cerebellar involvement in emotion and emotional disorders.

  8. Prefrontal control of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Li; Xu, Yan; Wu, Guang-yan; Yao, Juan; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Zhi-ru; Hu, Zhi-an; Sui, Jian-feng; Hu, Bo

    2014-02-01

    Behavioral studies have demonstrated that both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and cerebellum play critical roles in trace eyeblink conditioning. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which the two brain regions interact. By use of electrical stimulation of the caudal mPFC as a conditioned stimulus, we show evidence that persistent outputs from the mPFC to cerebellum are necessary and sufficient for the acquisition and expression of a trace conditioned response (CR)-like response. Specifically, the persistent outputs of caudal mPFC are relayed to the cerebellum via the rostral part of lateral pontine nuclei. Moreover, interfering with persistent activity by blockade of the muscarinic Ach receptor in the caudal mPFC impairs the expression of learned trace CRs. These results suggest an important way for the caudal mPFC to interact with the cerebellum during associative motor learning.

  9. Effect of lead acetate on neurobehavioral development of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello C.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of lead exposure during the pre- and postnatal period on the neurobehavioral development of female Wistar rats (70-75 days of age, 120-150 g using a protocol of lead intoxication that does not affect weight gain. Wistar rats were submitted to lead acetate intoxication by giving their dams 1.0 mM lead acetate. Control dams received deionized water. Growth and neuromotor development were assessed by monitoring daily the following parameters in 20 litters: body weight, ear unfolding, incisor eruption, eye opening, righting, palmar grasp, negative geotaxis, cliff avoidance and startle reflex. Spontaneous alternation was assessed on postnatal day 17 using a T maze. The animals' ability to equilibrate on a beaker rim was measured on postnatal day 19. Lead intoxication was confirmed by measuring renal, hepatic and cerebral lead concentration in dams and litters. Lead treatment hastened the day of appearance of the following parameters: eye opening (control: 13.5 ± 0.6, N = 88; lead: 12.9 ± 0.6, N = 72; P<0.05, startle reflex (control: 13.0 ± 0.8, N = 88; lead: 12.0 ± 0.7, N = 72; P<0.05 and negative geotaxis. On the other hand, spontaneous alternation performance was hindered in lead-exposed animals (control: 37.6 ± 19.7; lead: 57.5 ± 28.3% of alternating animals; P<0.05. These results suggest that lead exposure without concomitant undernutrition alters rat development, affecting specific subsets of motor skills.

  10. Wistar-Kyoto Female Rats Are More Susceptible to Develop Sugar Binging: A Comparison with Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Papacostas-Quintanilla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The hedonic component of the feeding behavior involves the mesolimbic reward system and resembles addictions. Nowadays, the excessive consumption of sucrose is considered addictive. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat strain is prone to develop anxiety and addiction-like behavior; nevertheless, a lack of information regarding their vulnerability to develop sugar binging-like behavior (SBLB and how it affects the reward system persist. Therefore, the first aim of the present study was to compare the different predisposition of two rat strains, Wistar (W and WKY to develop the SBLB in female and male rats. Also, we studied if the SBLB-inducing protocol produces changes in anxiety-like behavior using the plus-maze test (PMT and, analyzed serotonin (5-HT and noradrenaline (NA concentrations in brain areas related to anxiety and ingestive behavior (brain stem, hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. Finally, we evaluated whether fluoxetine, a drug that has been effective in reducing the binge-eating frequency, body weight, and severity of binge eating disorder, could also block this behavior. Briefly, WKY and W female rats were exposed to 30% sucrose solution (2 h, 3 days/week for 4 weeks, and fed up ad libitum. PMT was performed between the last two test periods. Immediately after the last test where sucrose access was available, rats were decapitated and brain areas extracted for high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The results showed that both W and WKY female and male rats developed the SBLB. WKY rats consumed more calories and ingested a bigger amount of sucrose solution than their W counterpart. This behavior was reversed by using fluoxetine, rats exposed to the SBLB-inducing protocol presented a rebound effect during the washout period. On female rats, the SBLB-inducing protocol induced changes in NA concentrations on WKY, but not on W rats. No changes were found in 5-HT levels. Finally, animals that developed SBLB showed increased

  11. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla Bjørnbak; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides...... diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post...

  12. Developing a Speaker Identification System for the DARPA RATS Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plchot, O; Matsoukas, S; Matejka, P

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the speaker identification (SID) system developed by the Patrol team for the first phase of the DARPA RATS (Robust Automatic Transcription of Speech) program, which seeks to advance state of the art detection capabilities on audio from highly degraded communication channels. ...... such as CFCCs out-perform MFCC front-ends on noisy audio, and (c) fusion of multiple systems provides 24% relative improvement in EER compared to the single best system when using a novel SVM-based fusion algorithm that uses side information such as gender, language, and channel id....

  13. Olfactory granule cell development in normal and hyperthyroid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunjes, P C; Schwark, H D; Greenough, W T

    1982-10-01

    Dendritic development was examined in olfactory bulbs of both normal 7-, 14-, 21- and 60-day-old rats and littermates treated on postnatal days 1-4 with 1 microgram/g body weight of L-thyroxine sodium. Tissue was processed via the Golgi-Cox technique and subjected to quantitative analyses of mitral and internal layer granule cell development. These populations of granule cells were selected because their pattern of late proliferation suggested potentially greater susceptibility to postnatal hormonal alterations. Although neonatal hyperthyroidism induces widespread acceleration of maturation, including precocious chemosensitivity, granule cell development was unaffected relative to littermate controls. Both normal and hyperthyroid groups exhibited an inverted U-shaped pattern of cellular development, with rapid dendritic dendritic growth and expansion occurring during the earliest ages tested, but with loss of processes and dendritic field size occurring after day 21.

  14. Autism spectrum disorders and neuropathology of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, David R; Blatt, Gene J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  15. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neuropathology of the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Hampson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  16. Pancreatic morphogenesis and extracellular matrix organization during rat development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaoka, M; Haratake, J; Hashimoto, H

    1993-07-01

    We investigated the rat pancreatic morphology at various developmental stages ranging from 12 days of gestation to the neonatal stage, with special emphasis on alterations in extracellular matrix organization in vivo. The rat pancreatic development in utero could be divided into four representative stages as follows: (1) initial epithelial buds (12 days of gestation), (2) elongated and branching epithelium (13-14 days), (3) tubular structure (15-16 days), and (4) acinar structure (17 days or more). Ultrastructurally, the fetal and neonatal pancreata were almost constantly encompassed by continuous basal lamina, except for the earliest stage, in which minute disruptions of basal lamina were observed. Through the disruption, the direct epithelial-mesenchymal contact was formed between an endocrine cell and an adjacent mesenchymal cell, which implied epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in processes of endocrine cell differentiation. Collagen fibrils were frequently accumulated at the cleft (branchpoint) of the branching epithelium during the second and third stages mentioned above. Immunohistochemically, fibronectin and collagen type-I were localized particularly beside the neck (narrow part) or cleft of the pancreatic epithelium at these stages, although continuous linear localization of these matrices was noted around the initial pancreatic bud. This was in contrast to invariable linear localization of laminin and collagen type-IV at the epithelial/mesenchymal interface throughout the pancreatic development. Diffuse fibrillar localization of fibronectin and collagen type-I in the mesenchyme was pronounced at the later stages and after birth. Collagen type-III was only focally detectable around the pancreatic epithelium from the second stage, and its distinct localization was noted in the interlobular connective tissue after birth. Thus, chronological changes in extracellular matrix organization seemed to be closely related to morphogenetic processes of the rat

  17. Optimization of reagent concentration for radioiodination of rat C-peptide II in development of radioimmunoassay procedure for rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B R Manupriya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat C-peptide is a polypeptide molecule made up of 31 amino acids and secreted from pancreas into circulation in two isoforms I and II. Quantification of rat C-peptide II in rat serum is important as it is directly related to the diagnosis of carbohydrate metabolism abnormalities, pancreatic performance analysis, monitoring of hypoglycemia, and diabetes-related illness in rat model. The aim of the present work is to develop a tracer by chloramine-T method for radioimmunoassay (RIA procedure and to determine the optimum amount of chloramine-T required for the preparation of stable radioiodinated product with a specific activity of around 24.97 MBq/μg, corresponding to 1 125I atom per molecule of the peptide. Tyrosylated rat C-peptide II was selected for the radioiodination procedure as rat C-peptide II does not contain either tyrosine or histidine which is mandatory for the incorporation of 125I atom to the rat C-peptide II. Tyrosylated rat C-peptide II was subjected to radioiodination by chloramine-T method with different concentrations of chloramine-T and sodium metabisulfite (MBS to obtain a stable radiolabeled compound. Optimized reaction conditions relating to the concentration of chloramine-T (10 μg and MBS (20 μg yielded a stable 125I-rat C-peptide II with specific activity of 21.01 MBq/μg corresponding to 0.84 125I atoms per molecule of the peptide. Preparation of high integrity tracer of rat C-peptide II was achieved by combining one molecule of oxidant (chloramine-T and two molecule of reductant (MBS.

  18. The cerebellum after trauma: Resting-state functional connectivity of the cerebellum in posttraumatic stress disorder and its dissociative subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabellino, Daniela; Densmore, Maria; Théberge, Jean; McKinnon, Margaret C; Lanius, Ruth A

    2018-04-17

    The cerebellum plays a key role not only in motor function but also in affect and cognition. Although several psychopathological disorders have been associated with overall cerebellar dysfunction, it remains unclear whether different regions of the cerebellum contribute uniquely to psychopathology. Accordingly, we compared seed-based resting-state functional connectivity of the anterior cerebellum (lobule IV-V), of the posterior cerebellum (Crus I), and of the anterior vermis across posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; n = 65), its dissociative subtype (PTSD + DS; n = 37), and non-trauma-exposed healthy controls (HC; n = 47). Here, we observed decreased functional connectivity of the anterior cerebellum and anterior vermis with brain regions involved in somatosensory processing, multisensory integration, and bodily self-consciousness (temporo-parietal junction, postcentral gyrus, and superior parietal lobule) in PTSD + DS as compared to PTSD and HC. Moreover, the PTSD + DS group showed increased functional connectivity of the posterior cerebellum with cortical areas related to emotion regulation (ventromedial prefrontal and orbito-frontal cortex, subgenual anterior cingulum) as compared to PTSD. By contrast, PTSD showed increased functional connectivity of the anterior cerebellum with cortical areas associated with visual processing (fusiform gyrus), interoceptive awareness (posterior insula), memory retrieval, and contextual processing (hippocampus) as compared to HC. Finally, we observed decreased functional connectivity between the posterior cerebellum and prefrontal regions involved in emotion regulation, in PTSD as compared to HC. These findings not only highlight the crucial role of each cerebellar region examined in the psychopathology of PTSD but also reveal unique alterations in functional connectivity distinguishing the dissociative subtype of PTSD versus PTSD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dose response relationship of disturbed migration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum due to X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmanto, W.; Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.; Murata, Yoshiharu

    1998-01-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.0, 2.25 or 2.5 Gy X-irradiation on gestation day 21. Pups were sacrificed 12 hr after exposure, and on postnatal day 5 (P5), P7 and P9. Their cerebella were observed immunohistochemically using anti-inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate (IP3) receptor antibody to identify Purkinje cells. These cells were disturbed to migrate and remained in the internal granular layer and white matter of the cerebellum. They had short dendrites, and some showed an abnormal direction of dendrites in rats exposed to 2.25 or 2.5 Gy. Alignment of Purkinje cells was also disturbed when examined either on P5, P7 or P9 especially by doses of 2.25 and 2.5 Gy. There was a relationship between X-ray doses and the number of cells piling up in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The dose-response relationship with the number of ectopic Purkinje cells was noted in the anterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  20. Volumetric analysis of regional variability in the cerebellum of children with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Vindia G; Stuebing, Karla; Juranek, Jenifer; Fletcher, Jack M

    2013-12-01

    Cerebellar deficits and subsequent impairment in procedural learning may contribute to both motor difficulties and reading impairment in dyslexia. We used quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the role of regional variation in cerebellar anatomy in children with single-word decoding impairments (N = 23), children with impairment in fluency alone (N = 8), and typically developing children (N = 16). Children with decoding impairments (dyslexia) demonstrated no statistically significant differences in overall grey and white matter volumes or cerebellar asymmetry; however, reduced volume in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum relative to typically developing children was observed. These results implicate cerebellar involvement in dyslexia and establish an important foundation for future research on the connectivity of the cerebellum and cortical regions typically associated with reading impairment.

  1. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  2. [The effects of strontium in drinking water on growth and development of rat bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F; Zhang, X; Liu, J; Fan, M

    1997-05-01

    Effects of strontium at a high level in drinking water on growth and development of rat bone were studied. The results showed that Sr2+ concentration from 5 to 500 mg/L in drinking water could increase the contents of strontium in blood serum, urine, femur, mixilla and tooth in Wistar rats exposed to Sr2+ for 12 weeks with an obvious dose-response relationship. In addition, strontium at over 50 mg/L could decrease the contents of calcium in bone, increase the contents of calcium in tooth and bone density, and decrease the levels of calcium in blood serum except female rats at the 12th week. Effects of Sr2+ on body weight, body length, AKP activity of serum, calcium content of urine and breaking load of bended femur for rats were not found. However, there are differences in the effects of strontium on growth and development of bone between male and female rats. At the 12th week the content of calcium in blood serum decreased in male rats but increased in female rats in exposed groups. At the 4th and 8th weeks, urine Hop/Cr in male rats increased but it remained normal level in female rats. Sr2+ increased the bone density of mixilla in male rats but it did not increase that of femur in female rats. It is suggested that such changes may be a result of the differences in endocritic regulation and metabolic process between two sexes.

  3. Critical androgen-sensitive periods of rat penis and clitoris development

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, M.; Macleod, D. J.; Walker, M.; Smith, L. B.; Sharpe, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Androgen control of penis development/growth is unclear. In rats, androgen action in a foetal 'masculinisation programming window' (MPW; e15.5-e18.5)' predetermines penile length and hypospadias occurrence. This has implications for humans (e.g. micropenis). Our studies aimed to establish in rats when androgen action/administration affects development/growth of the penis and if deficits in MPW androgen action were rescuable postnatally. Thus, pregnant rats were treated with flutamide during t...

  4. Implications of Lateral Cerebellum in Proactive Control of Saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimatsu, Jun; Suzuki, Tomoki W; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-06-29

    Although several lines of evidence establish the involvement of the medial and vestibular parts of the cerebellum in the adaptive control of eye movements, the role of the lateral hemisphere of the cerebellum in eye movements remains unclear. Ascending projections from the lateral cerebellum to the frontal and parietal association cortices via the thalamus are consistent with a role of these pathways in higher-order oculomotor control. In support of this, previous functional imaging studies and recent analyses in subjects with cerebellar lesions have indicated a role for the lateral cerebellum in volitional eye movements such as anti-saccades. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we recorded from single neurons in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum in monkeys performing anti-saccade/pro-saccade tasks. We found that neurons in the posterior part of the dentate nucleus showed higher firing rates during the preparation of anti-saccades compared with pro-saccades. When the animals made erroneous saccades to the visual stimuli in the anti-saccade trials, the firing rate during the preparatory period decreased. Furthermore, local inactivation of the recording sites with muscimol moderately increased the proportion of error trials, while successful anti-saccades were more variable and often had shorter latency during inactivation. Thus, our results show that neuronal activity in the cerebellar dentate nucleus causally regulates anti-saccade performance. Neuronal signals from the lateral cerebellum to the frontal cortex might modulate the proactive control signals in the corticobasal ganglia circuitry that inhibit early reactive responses and possibly optimize the speed and accuracy of anti-saccades. Although the lateral cerebellum is interconnected with the cortical eye fields via the thalamus and the pons, its role in eye movements remains unclear. We found that neurons in the caudal part of the lateral (dentate) nucleus of the cerebellum showed the increased

  5. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author)

  6. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author).

  7. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Physiological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Pavel; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Manto, Mario-Ubaldo; Bareš, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET), clinically characterized by postural and kinetic tremors, predominantly in the upper extremities, originates from pathological activity in the dynamic oscillatory network comprising the majority of nodes in the central motor network. Evidence indicates dysfunction in the thalamus, the olivocerebellar loops, and intermittent cortical engagement. Pathology of the cerebellum, a structure with architecture intrinsically predisposed to oscillatory activity, has also been implicated in ET as shown by clinical, neuroimaging, and pathological studies. Despite electrophysiological studies assessing cerebellar impairment in ET being scarce, their impact is tangible, as summarized in this review. The electromyography-magnetoencephalography combination provided the first direct evidence of pathological alteration in cortico-subcortical communication, with a significant emphasis on the cerebellum. Furthermore, complex electromyography studies showed disruptions in the timing of agonist and antagonist muscle activation, a process generally attributed to the cerebellum. Evidence pointing to cerebellar engagement in ET has also been found in electrooculography measurements, cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studies, and, indirectly, in complex analyses of the activity of the ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (an area primarily receiving inputs from the cerebellum), which is also used in the advanced treatment of ET. In summary, further progress in therapy will require comprehensive electrophysiological and physiological analyses to elucidate the precise mechanisms leading to disease symptoms. The cerebellum, as a major node of this dynamic oscillatory network, requires further study to aid this endeavor.

  8. Consensus paper: the role of the cerebellum in perceptual processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Oliver; Borra, Ronald J; Bower, James M; Cullen, Kathleen E; Habas, Christophe; Ivry, Richard B; Leggio, Maria; Mattingley, Jason B; Molinari, Marco; Moulton, Eric A; Paulin, Michael G; Pavlova, Marina A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Sokolov, Arseny A

    2015-04-01

    Various lines of evidence accumulated over the past 30 years indicate that the cerebellum, long recognized as essential for motor control, also has considerable influence on perceptual processes. In this paper, we bring together experts from psychology and neuroscience, with the aim of providing a succinct but comprehensive overview of key findings related to the involvement of the cerebellum in sensory perception. The contributions cover such topics as anatomical and functional connectivity, evolutionary and comparative perspectives, visual and auditory processing, biological motion perception, nociception, self-motion, timing, predictive processing, and perceptual sequencing. While no single explanation has yet emerged concerning the role of the cerebellum in perceptual processes, this consensus paper summarizes the impressive empirical evidence on this problem and highlights diversities as well as commonalities between existing hypotheses. In addition to work with healthy individuals and patients with cerebellar disorders, it is also apparent that several neurological conditions in which perceptual disturbances occur, including autism and schizophrenia, are associated with cerebellar pathology. A better understanding of the involvement of the cerebellum in perceptual processes will thus likely be important for identifying and treating perceptual deficits that may at present go unnoticed and untreated. This paper provides a useful framework for further debate and empirical investigations into the influence of the cerebellum on sensory perception.

  9. The evolution of the vertebrate cerebellum: absence of a proliferative external granule layer in a non-teleost ray-finned fish

    OpenAIRE

    Butts, Thomas; Modrell, Melinda Sue; Baker, Clare Victoria; Wingate, Richard JT

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum represents one of the most morphologically variable structures in the vertebrate brain. To shed light on its evolutionary history, we have examined the molecular anatomy and proliferation of the developing cerebellum of the North American paddlefish, Polyodon spathula. Absence of an external proliferative cerebellar layer and the restriction of Atonal1 expression to the rhombic lip and valvular primordium demonstrate that transit amplification in a cerebellar external germinal ...

  10. Abnormal trajectories in cerebellum and brainstem volumes in carriers of the fragile X premutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Yi; Hessl, David; Hagerman, Randi J; Simon, Tony J; Tassone, Flora; Ferrer, Emilio; Rivera, Susan M

    2017-07-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder typically affecting male premutation carriers with 55-200 CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene after age 50. The aim of this study was to examine whether cerebellar and brainstem changes emerge during development or aging in late life. We retrospectively analyzed magnetic resonance imaging scans from 322 males (age 8-81 years). Volume changes in the cerebellum and brainstem were contrasted with those in the ventricles and whole brain. Compared to the controls, premutation carriers without FXTAS showed significantly accelerated volume decrease in the cerebellum and whole brain, flatter inverted U-shaped trajectory of the brainstem, and larger ventricles. Compared to both older controls and premutation carriers without FXTAS, carriers with FXTAS exhibited significant volume decrease in the cerebellum and whole brain and accelerated volume decrease in the brainstem. We therefore conclude that cerebellar and brainstem volumes were likely affected during both development and progression of neurodegeneration in premutation carriers, suggesting that interventions may need to start early in adulthood to be most effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Corvitin restores metallothionein and glial fibrillary acidic protein levels in rat brain affected by pituitrin-izadrin

    OpenAIRE

    H. N. Shiyntum; O. O. Dovban; Y. P. Kovalchuk; T. Ya. Yaroshenko2; G. A. Ushakova1

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the effect of pituitrin-izadrin induced injury on the levels of metallothionein (MT) and soluble and filament forms of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the hippocampus, cerebellum, thalamus, and the cerebral cortex, and examined the effect of corvitin on the brain under the noted changes. Our results showed oppositely directed changes – a decrease in the level of MT and an increase in GFAP in the rat brain, with a tendency to astrogliosis development...

  12. Oral Morphine Consumption Reduces Lens Development in Rat Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bahadoran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Consumption of morphine, during pregnancy, in addition to inducing defects in the mother’s nervous system function, caused defects or delays in the formation and evolution of embryonic visual system. In the present study, changes in lens development was assessed in embryos exposed in utero to morphine. Material and Methods: Female Wistar rats (250-300 g were mated with male rats and pregnancy was determined by sperm observation in vaginal smear. This day was considered as embryonic day zero (E0. The females were then divided randomly into the experimental and the control groups. The control group received tap water and the experimental group received morphine (0.05 mg/ml in their water. On embryonic day 13 ( E13, blood samples were collected from the retro-orbital sinus of all animals for plasma corticosterone detection. On embryonic day 17(E17, the animals were killed by an overdose of chloroform and the embryos were taken out surgically. The embryos were fixed in 10% formalin for 30 days. At this time, the head of the embryos were removed for tissue processing and Hematoxylin- Eosin (H&E staining. The samples were evaluated using light microscope and MOTIC software. Results: Our data indicated that plasma corticosterone level was dramatically increased and the lens was thinner in the experimental group. (Although the proliferation of lens cells increased in the experiment group but that lens had delay in removing the proliferated and elongation cells with abnormal density in the lateral part of the lens in compare with control group. I have no idea what the authors are stating here. Moreover, the opening of the eyelids was delayed in the off springs of the mothers who received morphine. Conclusions: This study showed that morphine consumption during pregnancy leads to defects in fetal visual system development, particularly in the lens, and eyelids.

  13. Rapid development of Leydig cell tumors in a Wistar rat substrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerds, K. J.; de rooij, D. G.; de Jong, F. H.; Rommerts, F. F.

    1991-01-01

    In 78% of the Wistar rats (substrain U) studied, spontaneous Leydig cell tumors developed between the ages of 12 and 30 months. The first signs of tumor development, in the form of nodules of Leydig cells, were already apparent in 1-month-old U-rats. These nodules of Leydig cells were found in all

  14. The effect of electromagnetic radiation on the rat brain: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Olcay; Songur, Ahmet; Aktas, Cevat; Karavelioglu, Ergun; Caglar, Veli; Aylak, Firdevs; Ozguner, Fehmi; Kanter, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the structural changes of electromagnetic waves in the frontal cortex, brain stem and cerebellum. 24 Wistar Albino adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups: group I consisted of control rats, and groups II-IV comprised electromagnetically irradiated (EMR) with 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz. The heads of the rats were exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz microwaves irradiation for 1h per day for 2 months. While the histopathological changes in the frontal cortex and brain stem were normal in the control group, there were severe degenerative changes, shrunken cytoplasm and extensively dark pyknotic nuclei in the EMR groups. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that the Total Antioxidative Capacity level was significantly decreased in the EMR groups and also Total Oxidative Capacity and Oxidative Stress Index levels were significantly increased in the frontal cortex, brain stem and cerebellum. IL-1β level was significantly increased in the EMR groups in the brain stem. EMR causes to structural changes in the frontal cortex, brain stem and cerebellum and impair the oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine system. This deterioration can cause to disease including loss of these areas function and cancer development.

  15. Role of the cerebellum in reaching movements in humans. II. A neural model of the intermediate cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, N; Spoelstra, J; Arbib, M A; Kawato, M

    1998-01-01

    The cerebellum is essential for the control of multijoint movements; when the cerebellum is lesioned, the performance error is more than the summed errors produced by single joints. In the companion paper (Schweighofer et al., 1998), a functional anatomical model for visually guided arm movement was proposed. The model comprised a basic feedforward/feedback controller with realistic transmission delays and was connected to a two-link, six-muscle, planar arm. In the present study, we examined the role of the cerebellum in reaching movements by embedding a novel, detailed cerebellar neural network in this functional control model. We could derive realistic cerebellar inputs and the role of the cerebellum in learning to control the arm was assessed. This cerebellar network learned the part of the inverse dynamics of the arm not provided by the basic feedforward/feedback controller. Despite realistically low inferior olive firing rates and noisy mossy fibre inputs, the model could reduce the error between intended and planned movements. The responses of the different cell groups were comparable to those of biological cell groups. In particular, the modelled Purkinje cells exhibited directional tuning after learning and the parallel fibres, due to their length, provide Purkinje cells with the input required for this coordination task. The inferior olive responses contained two different components; the earlier response, locked to movement onset, was always present and the later response disappeared after learning. These results support the theory that the cerebellum is involved in motor learning.

  16. [123I]epidepride binding to cerebellar dopamine D2/D3 receptors is displaceable: implications for the use of cerebellum as a reference region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Videbaek, Charlotte; Ziebell, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The low density of cerebellar dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors provides the basis for using the cerebellum as a representation of free- and non-specifically bound radioligand in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies. With the development...... of ultra high-affinity dopamine D(2)/D(3) ligands like [(123)I]epidepride, [(18)F]fallypride, and [(11)C]FLB-457, quantification of extrastriatal low density receptor populations including the cerebellum is possible with important implications for calculation of binding parameters. [(123)I...... [(123)I]epidepride binding to dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors in the cerebellum. Using the cerebellum as a representation of free and non-specifically bound radioligand and neglecting the specifically bound component may lead to results that erroneously imply that antipsychotic drugs bind to extrastriatal...

  17. Where did the motor function of the cerebellum come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Marinella; Perciavalle, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Until the end of 18th century, the role of the cerebellum remained obscure. The turning point occurred when Luigi Galvani showed that muscle contraction is due to electricity and Alessandro Volta produced the battery, an apparatus based on the pairing of silver and zinc plates separated by brine soaked paper disks, capable to generate electricity. Luigi Rolando, at beginning of 19th century, was impressed by these two observations. He thought that, since the brain generates the movement, it must contain a device generating electricity. As a battery, it should be formed by overlapping disks and the cerebellum for Rolando seemed to be the right structure for such a characteristic laminar organization. He argued that, if the cerebellum is the battery that produces electricity for muscle activity, its removal would produce paralysis. Consequently, Rolando removed the cerebellum in a young goat and observed that the animal, before dying, could no longer stand up. He concluded that the cerebellum is a motor structure as it generates the electricity which produces the movement. The conclusions of Rolando were criticized by Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens who observed that animals undergoing cerebellectomy were still able to move, even if with problems of balance. Flourens concluded that the role of the cerebellum "is to put in order or to coordinate movements wanted by certain parts of the nervous system, excited by others". It was necessary to wait up to 1891 when Luigi Luciani, observing a dog survived the cerebellectomy, described a triad of symptoms (asthenia, atony and astasis), unquestionably of cerebellar origin.

  18. Purkinje Cell Compartmentation in the Cerebellum of the Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase 2 Mutant Mouse (Nax - Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Karen; Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Mannan, Ashraf; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Marzban, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The Acp2 gene encodes the beta subunit of lysosomal acid phosphatase, which is an isoenzyme that hydrolyzes orthophosphoric monoesters. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in Acp2 results in severe cerebellar defects. These include a reduced size, abnormal lobulation, and an apparent anterior cerebellar disorder with an absent or hypoplastic vermis. Based on differential gene expression in the cerebellum, the mouse cerebellar cortex can normally be compartmentalized anteroposteriorly into four transverse zones and mediolaterally into parasagittal stripes. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed using various Purkinje cell compartmentation markers to examine their expression patterns in the Acp2 mutant. Despite the abnormal lobulation and anterior cerebellar defects, zebrin II and PLCβ4 showed similar expression patterns in the nax mutant and wild type cerebellum. However, fewer stripes were found in the anterior zone of the nax mutant, which could be due to a lack of Purkinje cells or altered expression of the stripe markers. HSP25 expression was uniform in the central zone of the nax mutant cerebellum at around postnatal day (P) 18–19, suggesting that HSP25 immunonegative Purkinje cells are absent or delayed in stripe pattern expression compared to the wild type. HSP25 expression became heterogeneous around P22–23, with twice the number of parasagittal stripes in the nax mutant compared to the wild type. Aside from reduced size and cortical disorganization, both the posterior zone and nodular zone in the nax mutant appeared less abnormal than the rest of the cerebellum. From these results, it is evident that the anterior zone of the nax mutant cerebellum is the most severely affected, and this extends beyond the primary fissure into the rostral central zone/vermis. This suggests that ACP2 has critical roles in the development of the anterior cerebellum and it may regulate anterior and central zone compartmentation. PMID:24722417

  19. Cerebellum-specific and age-dependent expression of an endogenous retrovirus with intact coding potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Takayuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs, including murine leukemia virus (MuLV type-ERVs (MuLV-ERVs, are presumed to occupy ~10% of the mouse genome. In this study, following the identification of a full-length MuLV-ERV by in silico survey of the C57BL/6J mouse genome, its distribution in different mouse strains and expression characteristics were investigated. Results Application of a set of ERV mining protocols identified a MuLV-ERV locus with full coding potential on chromosome 8 (named ERVmch8. It appears that ERVmch8 shares the same genomic locus with a replication-incompetent MuLV-ERV, called Emv2; however, it was not confirmed due to a lack of relevant annotation and Emv2 sequence information. The ERVmch8 sequence was more prevalent in laboratory strains compared to wild-derived strains. Among 16 different tissues of ~12 week-old female C57BL/6J mice, brain homogenate was the only tissue with evident expression of ERVmch8. Further ERVmch8 expression analysis in six different brain compartments and four peripheral neuronal tissues of C57BL/6J mice revealed no significant expression except for the cerebellum in which the ERVmch8 locus' low methylation status was unique compared to the other brain compartments. The ERVmch8 locus was found to be surrounded by genes associated with neuronal development and/or inflammation. Interestingly, cerebellum-specific ERVmch8 expression was age-dependent with almost no expression at 2 weeks and a plateau at 6 weeks. Conclusions The ecotropic ERVmch8 locus on the C57BL/6J mouse genome was relatively undermethylated in the cerebellum, and its expression was cerebellum-specific and age-dependent.

  20. The evolution of cerebellum structure correlates with nest complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zachary J; Street, Sally E; Healy, Susan D

    2013-01-01

    Across the brains of different bird species, the cerebellum varies greatly in the amount of surface folding (foliation). The degree of cerebellar foliation is thought to correlate positively with the processing capacity of the cerebellum, supporting complex motor abilities, particularly manipulative skills. Here, we tested this hypothesis by investigating the relationship between cerebellar foliation and species-typical nest structure in birds. Increasing complexity of nest structure is a measure of a bird's ability to manipulate nesting material into the required shape. Consistent with our hypothesis, avian cerebellar foliation increases as the complexity of the nest built increases, setting the scene for the exploration of nest building at the neural level.

  1. Multiple zebrafish atoh1 genes specify a diversity of neuronal types in the zebrafish cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Chelsea U; Su, Chen-Ying; Hibi, Masahiko; Moens, Cecilia B

    2018-06-01

    A single Atoh1 basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor specifies multiple neuron types in the mammalian cerebellum and anterior hindbrain. The zebrafish genome encodes three paralagous atoh1 genes whose functions in cerebellum and anterior hindbrain development we explore here. With use of a transgenic reporter, we report that zebrafish atoh1c-expressing cells are organized in two distinct domains that are separated both by space and developmental time. An early isthmic expression domain gives rise to an extracerebellar population in rhombomere 1 and an upper rhombic lip domain gives rise to granule cell progenitors that migrate to populate all four granule cell territories of the fish cerebellum. Using genetic mutants we find that of the three zebrafish atoh1 paralogs, atoh1c and atoh1a are required for the full complement of granule neurons. Surprisingly, the two genes are expressed in non-overlapping granule cell progenitor populations, indicating that fish use duplicate atoh1 genes to generate granule cell diversity that is not detected in mammals. Finally, live imaging of granule cell migration in wildtype and atoh1c mutant embryos reveals that while atoh1c is not required for granule cell specification per se, it is required for granule cells to delaminate and migrate away from the rhombic lip. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Sub- acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... substances in rat brain regions are altered during acute and sub-acute .... Different areas of the brain such as cerebral cortex (CC), cerebellum (CB), .... dopamine metabolism and differential motor behavioral tolerance.

  3. The development of radioimmunoassay kit for rat albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhigang; Han Shiquan; Liu Yibing; Xu Wenge

    2006-01-01

    The Anti-rat albumin serum is prepared by immunized the sheep with rat albumin. A radioimmunoassay method is established for rat albumin. The measurement range of the assay is 1-50 mg/L, sensitivity of the assay is 0.12 mg/L, recovery rate is 97.8%- 108.4%. Intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients are <4.0% and <8.2% respectively. The correlation coefficients between measured and expected values are more than 0.990 after serial dilution of the urine samples with high concentrations of rat albumin. The kit for rat albumin might provide a convenience in exploitation of renal drugs and experimental in- jury of the kidney. (authors)

  4. Epidermal growth factor and lung development in the offspring of the diabetic rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    2000-01-01

    Fetuses of diabetic mothers who were exposed to excessive glucose show delayed maturation. Under these conditions, altered growth factor expression or signaling may have important regulatory influences. We examined the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in lung development and maternal diabetes...... in the rat. In order to evaluate the possible role of glucose for the expression of EGF and the growth of lung tissue, we performed in vitro studies with organotypic cultures of fetal alveolar cells obtained from control rats. Compared to pups of normal rats, the newborn rats of untreated diabetic rats had...... and was associated with a reduced intensity of surfactant protein A-IR. The only difference observed between pups of treated diabetic rats and controls was a decrease in the lung weight:body weight ratio. In organotypic cultures, the presence of 13 mmol/L glucose in the cell media increased immunoreactive staining...

  5. Development of obesity in Zucker obese (fafa) rat in absence of hyperphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, M P; Vasselli, J R; Greenwood, M R

    1980-03-01

    The free-feeding, genetically obese rat is hyperphagic, hyperinsulinemic, and hypertriglyceridemic and has increased fat cell size and number compared to its lean littermate. These experiments demonstrate that, when fafa rats are prevented from expressing hyperphagia throughout life, the complete obese "syndrome" still develops. Furthermore, life-long food restriction does not prevent increased lipoprotein lipase in the fafa rat. The data support the concept that a peripheral metabolic adaptation, probably in lipid metabolism, results in preferential shunting of dietary substrate in the restricted obese rats to adipose tissue with concomitant decreases in other tissues.

  6. Signalling by CGRP and Adrenomedullin in the Cerebellum and Other Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Poyner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The best characterised signalling pathway activated by both CGRP and adrenomedullin is stimulation of adenylate cyclase via Gs. However, it is clear that in some circumstances the peptides can activate other signal transduction pathways, e.g., increases in intracellular calcium. Many of these signalling pathways can be observed in cultured cells but it is important also to examine isolated tissues to discover the full repertoire of transduction events. In the rat cerebellum there are receptors that respond to both CGRP and adrenomedullin. These seem to be located postsynaptically on Parallel Fibre nerve terminals and modulate transmission to Purkinje cells. Adrenomedullin acts via cAMP, apparently to augment neurotransmitter release. By contrast, CGRP decreases transmitter release, via a non-cAMP mediated pathway. We are currently examining the role of NO and tyrosine kinases in the responses to these peptides.

  7. Tartrazine and the developing nervous system of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, T J; Brodie, R E; Spaid, S L

    1977-05-01

    Rat dams were exposed to the artificial food color tartrazine (FD&C Yellow no. 5) at dietary levels of 0, 1, and 2% during gestation and lactation. The experimental offspring were continued on the same diets for approximately 3 months after weaning. No adverse physical or behavioral effects were noted in the dams. Fetal development and postnatal viability of the offspring were also normal. The only effect on postnatal development of the central nervous system (CNS) was a small transient change in neuromotor clinging ability of female offspring. The limited effect of tartrazine on the CNS was further evidenced by the facts that (1) the neurobehavioral profiles of the experimental weanlings revealed no significant abnormalities, and (2) morphochemical analysis of brain tissue, as well as brain weights, revealed no abnormalities. Tartrazine did appear to exert more general signs of toxicity in the offspring--namely, depressed body weight, an apparent reduction in thymus weight, and a slight elevation of red blood cells and hemoglobin.

  8. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N

    1998-01-01

    The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats....

  9. Effects of prenatal exposure to xylene on postnatal development and behavior in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Lund, S. P.; Simonsen, L.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure to the organic solvent xylene (dimethylbenzene, GAS-no 1330-20-7) on postnatal development and behavior in rats were studied. Pregnant rats (Mol:WIST) were exposed to 500 ppm technical xylene 6 h per day on gestation days 7-20. The dose level was selected so as no...

  10. Oscillations, Timing, Plasticity, and Learning in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Márquez-Ruiz, J; Dan, B

    2016-04-01

    The highly stereotyped, crystal-like architecture of the cerebellum has long served as a basis for hypotheses with regard to the function(s) that it subserves. Historically, most clinical observations and experimental work have focused on the involvement of the cerebellum in motor control, with particular emphasis on coordination and learning. Two main models have been suggested to account for cerebellar functioning. According to Llinás's theory, the cerebellum acts as a control machine that uses the rhythmic activity of the inferior olive to synchronize Purkinje cell populations for fine-tuning of coordination. In contrast, the Ito-Marr-Albus theory views the cerebellum as a motor learning machine that heuristically refines synaptic weights of the Purkinje cell based on error signals coming from the inferior olive. Here, we review the role of timing of neuronal events, oscillatory behavior, and synaptic and non-synaptic influences in functional plasticity that can be recorded in awake animals in various physiological and pathological models in a perspective that also includes non-motor aspects of cerebellar function. We discuss organizational levels from genes through intracellular signaling, synaptic network to system and behavior, as well as processes from signal production and processing to memory, delegation, and actual learning. We suggest an integrative concept for control and learning based on articulated oscillation templates.

  11. In vivo three-photon imaging of deep cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengran; Wang, Tianyu; Wu, Chunyan; Li, Bo; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Sinefeld, David; Guru, Akash; Nam, Hyung-Song; Capecchi, Mario R.; Warden, Melissa R.; Xu, Chris

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate three-photon microscopy (3PM) of mouse cerebellum at 1 mm depth by imaging both blood vessels and neurons. We compared 3PM and 2PM in the mouse cerebellum for imaging green (using excitation sources at 1300 nm and 920 nm, respectively) and red fluorescence (using excitation sources at 1680 nm and 1064 nm, respectively). 3PM enabled deeper imaging than 2PM because the use of longer excitation wavelength reduces the scattering in biological tissue and the higher order nonlinear excitation provides better 3D localization. To illustrate these two advantages quantitatively, we measured the signal decay as well as the signal-to-background ratio (SBR) as a function of depth. We performed 2-photon imaging from the brain surface all the way down to the area where the SBR reaches 1, while at the same depth, 3PM still has SBR above 30. The segmented decay curve shows that the mouse cerebellum has different effective attenuation lengths at different depths, indicating heterogeneous tissue property for this brain region. We compared the third harmonic generation (THG) signal, which is used to visualize myelinated fibers, with the decay curve. We found that the regions with shorter effective attenuation lengths correspond to the regions with more fibers. Our results indicate that the widespread, non-uniformly distributed myelinated fibers adds heterogeneity to mouse cerebellum, which poses additional challenges in deep imaging of this brain region.

  12. Cerebellum, Language, and Cognition in Autism and Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Steven M.; Makris, Nikos; Kennedy, David N.; Caviness, Verne S., Jr.; Howard, James; McGrath, Lauren; Steele, Shelly; Frazier, Jean A.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Harris, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed cerebellum segmentation and parcellation on magnetic resonance images from right-handed boys, aged 6-13 years, including 22 boys with autism [16 with language impairment (ALI)], 9 boys with Specific Language Impairment (SLI), and 11 normal controls. Language-impaired groups had reversed asymmetry relative to unimpaired groups in…

  13. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) might be a family of diseases unified by the presence of kinetic tremor, but also showing etiological, pathological, and clinical heterogeneity. In this review, we will describe the most significant clinical evidence, which suggests that ET is linked to the cerebellum. Data for this review were identified by searching PUBMED (January 1966 to May 2015) crossing the terms "essential tremor" (ET) and "cerebellum," which yielded 201 entries, 11 of which included the term "cerebellum" in the article title. This was supplemented by articles in the author's files that pertained to this topic. The wide spectrum of clinical features of ET that suggest that it originates as a cerebellar or cerebellar outflow problem include the presence of intentional tremor, gait and balance abnormalities, subtle features of dysarthria, and oculomotor abnormalities, as well as deficits in eye-hand coordination, motor learning deficits, incoordination during spiral drawing task, abnormalities in motor timing and visual reaction time, impairment of social abilities, improvement in tremor after cerebellar stroke, efficacy of deep brain stimulation (which blocks cerebellar outflow), and cognitive dysfunction. It is unlikely, however, that cerebellar dysfunction, per se, fully explains ET-associated dementia, because the cognitive deficits that have been described in patients with cerebellar lesions are generally mild. Overall, a variety of clinical findings suggest that in at least a sizable proportion of patients with ET, there is an underlying abnormality of the cerebellum and/or its pathways.

  14. The Cerebellum and Language: Evidence from Patients with Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoodley, Catherine J.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and imaging studies suggest that the cerebellum is involved in language tasks, but the extent to which slowed language production in cerebellar patients contributes to their poor performance on these tasks is not clear. We explored this relationship in 18 patients with cerebellar degeneration and 16 healthy controls who completed measures…

  15. Editorial: The Cerebellum: Not Just an Anatomical Structure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidences from cognitive studies further suggest that cerebellar pathology may be associated with alterations mainly in mental function, instead of motor processes. These pools of evidences continue to attract a sizeable number of researches into the neuroanatomy, neurobiology and neurobehavioral role of the cerebellum ...

  16. Relationship between blood-retinal barrier development and formation of selenite nuclear cataract in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between development of blood-retinal barrier and formation of selenite nuclear cataract in rat. METHODS: Activity of GPx, MDA level in lens and selenium content in the eyeballs of different ages rats were determined. Besides, lanthanum hydroxide \\〖La(OH3\\〗 tracer method was used to detect development status of blood-retina barrier at different ages. RESULTS: The result showed that the enzyme activity of GPx was highest in young rats before open eyes, but then decreased gradually with age. Distribution of La(OH3 in retinal pigment epithelial layer of 20-day-old rats was significantly less than 11-day-old rats. Injecting sodium selenite to 9-day-old rats, lanthanum hydroxide increased obviously and extended to the inner layers of the retina after 48h, and the retinal pigment epithelial layer was damaged seriously; while injecting sodium selenite to 18-day-old rats with the same dose, number of lanthanum hydroxide decreased significantly and did not extend to the inner layer after 48h.Before opening eyes, the content of MDA in the lens of rats was the highest, and decreased significantly after opening eyes. The Se group was 5 times as that of the control group. Besides, in these groups of rats, selenium content in the eyeballs and MDA level in the lens were in agreement with the change of La(OH3 distribution. CONCLUSION: These results indicated that antioxidant capacity in the eyelid unopened rats is not the main reason for selenite induced cataract formation. The real reason is that blood-retina barrier development is not mature in the eyelid unopened rats.

  17. [3H]GABA uptake as a marker for cell type in primary cultures of cerebellum and olfactory bulb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, D.N.; Dutton, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    Uptake of [ 3 H]GABA into cell cultures of rat cerebellum and olfactory bulb was studied by autoradiography, using β-alanine and aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid to distinguish neuronal-specific and glial-specific uptake. Neurons and astrocytes were also labelled by tetanus toxin and anti-GFAP respectively. This combination of markers allowed identification and quantification of several cell types. Cerebellar cultures were found to contain 77% granule neurons, 7.5% inhibitory neurons (probably stellate and basket cells) and 15% astrocytes. Olfactory bulb cultures were over 50% in small neurons which accumulated GABA, the olfactory bulb granule neuron being GABAergic in vivo. (Auth.)

  18. Dual odontogenic origins develop at the early stage of rat maxillary incisor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriangkrai, Rungarun; Iseki, Sachiko; Eto, Kazuhiro; Chareonvit, Suconta

    2006-03-01

    Developmental process of rat maxillary incisor has been studied through histological analysis and investigation of tooth-related gene expression patterns at initial tooth development. The tooth-related genes studied here are fibroblast growth factor-8 (Fgf-8), pituitary homeobox gene-2 (Pitx-2), sonic hedgehog (Shh), muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1), paired box-9 (Pax-9) and bone morphogenetic protein-4 (Bmp-4). The genes are expressed in oral epithelium and/or ectomesenchyme at the stage of epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development. Both the histological observation and tooth-related gene expression patterns during early stage of maxillary incisor development demonstrate that dual odontogenic origins aligned medio-laterally in the medial nasal process develop, subsequently only single functional maxillary incisor dental placode forms. The cascade of tooth-related gene expression patterns in rat maxillary incisor studied here is quite similar to those of the previous studies in mouse mandibular molar, even though the origins of oral epithelium and ectomesenchyme involved in development of maxillary incisor and mandibular molar are different. Thus, we conclude that maxillary incisor and mandibular molar share a similar signaling control of Fgf-8, Pitx-2, Shh, Msx-1, Pax-9 and Bmp-4 genes at the stage of oral epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development.

  19. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong JS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeong-Sup Hong,1,2 Myeong-Kyu Park,1 Min-Seok Kim,1 Jeong-Hyeon Lim,1 Gil-Jong Park,1 Eun-Ho Maeng,1 Jae-Ho Shin,3 Meyoung-Kon Kim,4 Jayoung Jeong,5 Jin-A Park,2 Jong-Choon Kim,6 Ho-Chul Shin2 1Health Care Research Laboratory, Korea Testing and Research Institute, Gimpo, South Korea; 2College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Eulji University, Seongnam-si, South Korea; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, South Korea; 5Toxicological Research Division, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Chungcheongbuk-do, South Korea; 6College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, South Korea Abstract: This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnOSM20(+ NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm on pregnant dams and embryo–fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5–19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnOSM20(+ NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%; resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after

  20. [The cerebellum as a major player in motor disturbances related to Autistic Syndrome Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, M

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders associated with disturbances in communication, social interactions, cognition and affect. ASD are also accompanied by complex movement disorders, including ataxia. A special focus of recent research in this area is made on the striatum and the cerebellum, two structures known not only to control movement but also to be involved in cognitive functions such as memory and language. Dysfunction within the motor system may be associated with abnormal movements in ASD that are translated into ataxia, abnormal pattern of righting, gait sequencing, development of walking, and hand positioning. This line of study may generate new knowledge and understanding of motor symptoms associated with ASD and aims to deliver fresh perspectives for early diagnosis and therapeutic strategies against ASD. Despite the relative paucity of research in this area (compared to the social, linguistic, and behavioural disturbances in ASD), there is evidence that the frontostriatal motor system and/or the cerebellar motor systems may be the site of dysfunction in ASD. Indeed, the cerebellum seems to be essential in the development of basic social capabilities, communication, repetitive/restrictive behaviors, and motor and cognitive behaviors that are all impaired in ASD. Cerebellar neuropathology including cerebellar hypoplasia and reduced cerebellar Purkinje cell numbers are the most consistent neuropathologies linked to ASD. The functional state of the cerebellum and its impact on brain function in ASD is the focus of this review. This review starts by recapitulating historical findings pointing towards an implication of the cerebellum, and to a lesser extent the basal ganglia structures, in TSA. We then detail the structure/function of the cerebellum at the regional and cellular levels before describing human and animal findings indicating a role of the cerebellum and basal ganglia in ASD. Several studies have attempted to

  1. Induction of brain CYP2E1 by chronic ethanol treatment and related oxidative stress in hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yanjun; Dong, Guicheng; Luo, Haiguang; Cao, Jie; Wang, Chang; Wu, Jianyuan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yue, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is one of the most commonly abused substances, and oxidative stress is an important causative factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is involved in ethanol metabolism in the brain. This study investigates the role of brain CYP2E1 in the susceptibility of certain brain regions to ethanol neurotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intragastrically treated with ethanol (3.0 g/kg, 30 days). CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and catalytic activity in various brain regions were respectively assessed by immunoblotting, quantitative quantum dot immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR, and LC–MS. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed using a laser confocal scanning microscope. The hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem were selectively damaged after ethanol treatment, indicated by both lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and histopathological analysis. Ethanol markedly increased the levels of CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and activity in the hippocampus and cerebellum. CYP2E1 protein and activity were significantly increased by ethanol in the brainstem, with no change in mRNA expression. ROS levels induced by ethanol paralleled the enhanced CYP2E1 proteins in the hippocampus, granular layer and white matter of cerebellum as well as brainstem. Brain CYP2E1 activity was positively correlated with the damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem. These results suggest that the selective sensitivity of brain regions to ethanol neurodegeneration may be attributed to the regional and cellular-specific induction of CYP2E1 by ethanol. The inhibition of CYP2E1 levels may attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative stress via ROS generation.

  2. Development of an UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantitation of 11 d-amino acids in different regions of rat brain: Application to a study on the associations of d-amino acid concentration changes and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Xing, Yuping; Guo, Xingjie; Cui, Yan

    2017-07-15

    There are significant differences in d-amino acid concentrations between healthy people and Alzheimer's disease patients. In order to investigate the potential correlation between d-amino acids and Alzheimer's disease, a simple and sensitive ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed. The method was applied to simultaneous determination of 11 d-amino acids in different regions of rat brain. Rat brain homogenates were firstly pretreated with protein precipitation procedure and then derivatized with (S)-N-(4-nitrophenoxycarbonyl) phenylalanine methoxyethyl ester [(S)-NIFE]. Baseline separation of the derivatives was achieved on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH C 18 column (2.1 mm×50mm, 1.7μm). The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water (containing 8mM ammonium hydrogen carbonate) and the flow rate was 0.6mLmin -1 . The derived analytes were sensitively detected by multiple reaction monitoring in the positive ion mode. The lower limits of quantitation ranged from 0.06 to 10ngmL -1 with excellent linearity (r≥0.9909). The intra- and inter-day RSD were in the range of 3.6-12% and 5.7-12%, respectively. The recovery rate was 82.5%-95.3%. With this UPLC-MS/MS method, the 11 d-amino acids in hippocampus, cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb and cerebellum from Alzheimer's disease rats and age-matched controls could be simultaneously determined. Compared with the normal controls, the concentrations of d-serine, d-alanine, d-leucine, and d-proline in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of Alzheimer's disease rat brain were significantly decreased, while no differences in olfactory bulb and cerebellum of all the d-amino acids were observed. The different amounts and distribution of d-amino acids in brain between the two groups, which regulated by particular pathological changes of Alzheimer's disease, would give new insights into further study in neuropathogenesis and provide novel therapeutic targets of Alzheimer

  3. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. Semiautomated volumetry of the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe on brain magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an automated method of segmenting the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe simultaneously on magnetic resonance (MR) images. We obtained T1-weighted MR images from 10 normal subjects and 19 patients with brain atrophy. To perform automated volumetry from MR images, we performed the following three steps: segmentation of the brain region; separation between the cerebrum and the cerebellum-brain stem; and segmentation of the temporal lobe. Evaluation was based on the correctly recognized region (CRR) (i.e., the region recognized by both the automated and manual methods). The mean CRRs of the normal and atrophic brains were 98.2% and 97.9% for the cerebrum, 87.9% and 88.5% for the cerebellum-brain stem, and 76.9% and 85.8% for the temporal lobe, respectively. We introduce an automated volumetric method for the cerebrum, cerebellum-brain stem, and temporal lobe on brain MR images. Our method can be applied to not only the normal brain but also the atrophic brain. (author)

  5. Functional categorization of gene expression changes in the cerebellum of a Cln3-knockout mouse model for Batten disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Andrew I; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mitchison, Hannah M; Nussbaum, Robert L; Pearce, David A

    2003-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten Disease) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder of childhood. The disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and is the result of mutations in the CLN3 gene. One brain region severely affected in Batten disease is the cerebellum. Using a mouse model for Batten disease which shares pathological similarities to the disease in humans we have used oligonucleotide arrays to profile approximately 19000 mRNAs in the cerebellum. We have identified reproducible changes of twofold or more in the expression of 756 gene products in the cerebellum of 10-week-old Cln3-knockout mice as compared to wild-type controls. We have subsequently divided these genes with altered expression into 14 functional categories. We report a significant alteration in expression of genes associated with neurotransmission, neuronal cell structure and development, immune response and inflammation, and lipid metabolism. An apparent shift in metabolism toward gluconeogenesis is also evident in Cln3-knockout mice. Further experimentation will be necessary to understand the contribution of these changes in expression to a disease state. Detailed analysis of the functional consequences of altered expression of genes in the cerebellum of the Cln3-knockout mice may provide valuable clues in understanding the molecular basis of the pathological mechanisms underlying Batten disease.

  6. Neuroanatomy-based matrix-guided trimming protocol for the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, Rossella; Criado, Ana; Zantedeschi, Valentina; Scanziani, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    Brain trimming through defined neuroanatomical landmarks is recommended to obtain consistent sections in rat toxicity studies. In this article, we describe a matrix-guided trimming protocol that uses channels to reproduce coronal levels of anatomical landmarks. Both setup phase and validation study were performed on Han Wistar male rats (Crl:WI(Han)), 10-week-old, with bodyweight of 298 ± 29 (SD) g, using a matrix (ASI-Instruments(®), Houston, TX) fitted for brains of rats with 200 to 400 g bodyweight. In the setup phase, we identified eight channels, that is, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 21, matching the recommended landmarks midway to the optic chiasm, frontal pole, optic chiasm, infundibulum, mamillary bodies, midbrain, middle cerebellum, and posterior cerebellum, respectively. In the validation study, we trimmed the immersion-fixed brains of 60 rats using the selected channels to determine how consistently the channels reproduced anatomical landmarks. Percentage of success (i.e., presence of expected targets for each level) ranged from 89 to 100%. Where 100% success was not achieved, it was noted that the shift in brain trimming was toward the caudal pole. In conclusion, we developed and validated a trimming protocol for the rat brain that allow comparable extensiveness, homology, and relevance of coronal sections as the landmark-guided trimming with the advantage of being quickly learned by technicians. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  7. Development of rat visual system after prenatal X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, G.; Biesold, D.; Mares, V.

    1980-01-01

    Rats pregnant for 16 or 19 days (ED 16 or 19) were irradiated with 1 Gy and killed after 24 hrs or at age 24 or 180 days. The primary influence of X-rays consists in a lethal lesion of cells located in the periventricular zone as well as some of the more differentiated cells in the brain parenchyma. After irradiation on ED 16, the acute damage was greater in the cerebral cortex and the superior colliculus (SC) than in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Irradiation on ED 19 damaged mainly the cortical part of the visual system. In adult animals the acute radiation damage results in a deficit in packing density and the total number of neurons. Animals irradiated on ED 16 revealed more pronounced changes in deep layers of the cortex (L VI) than in the superficial layers. The deficit was smaller in the SC, and in the LGN an increase in the packing density of nerve cells was found. In animals irradiated on ED 19, the deficit in neurons density occurred mainly in more superficial layers of the cortex, with a maximum deficit in layer IV. From comparison of acute and final changes it may be concluded that the damage of preneuroblastic cell populations is compensated during later embryonic development, while the damage induced in populations already at early neuroblast stage is irreversible and leads to a permanent deficit. Glia cell population is altered in a similar way as the number of neurons in regions poor in myelin, while in regions rich in myelin the number of glia cells seems to depend on changes in the number of efferent and afferent nerve fibres. (author)

  8. Expression and location of α-fetoprotein during rat colon development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Dong, Dan; Sun, Peng; Du, Jun; Gu, Luo; Ge, Ying-Bin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of α-fetoprotein (AFP), a cancer-associated fetal glycoprotein, and its involvement during rat colon development. METHODS: Colons from Sprague-Dawley rat fetuses, young and adult (8 wk old) animals were used in this study. Expression levels of AFP in colons of different development stage were detected by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. To identify the cell location of AFP in the developing rat colons, double-immunofluorescent staining was performed using antibodies to specific cell markers and AFP, respectively. RESULTS: The highest levels of AFP mRNA were detected in colons of rats at embryonic day 18.5 (e18.5). Compared to e18.5 d, the AFP expression was significantly decreased during rat development [85% for e20.5, P colon from the embryo to the weaning stage by immunofluorescence and presents 72-kDa isoform in the developing rat colons by Western blotting. The dynamic expression of AFP in the various developmental stages of the colon indicates that AFP might be involved in many aspects of colon development. PMID:19360917

  9. Effects of experimentally induced maternal hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on the development of rat offspring: I. The development of the thyroid hormones-neurotransmitters and adenosinergic system interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, O M; Abd El-Tawab, S M; Ahmed, R G

    2010-10-01

    The adequate functioning of the maternal thyroid gland plays an important role to ensure that the offspring develop normally. Thus, maternal hypo- and hyperthyroidism are used from the gestation day 1 to lactation day 21, in general, to recognize the alleged association of offspring abnormalities associated with the different thyroid status. In maternal rats during pregnancy and lactation, hypothyroidism in one group was performed by antithyroid drug, methimazole (MMI) that was added in drinking water at concentration 0.02% and hyperthyroidism in the other group was induced by exogenous thyroxine (T4) (from 50 microg to 200 microg/kg body weight) intragastric administration beside adding 0.002% T4 to the drinking water. The hypothyroid and hyperthyroid states in mothers during pregnancy and lactation periods were confirmed by measuring total thyroxine (TT4) and triiodothyronine (TT3) at gestational day 10 and 10 days post-partum, respectively; the effect was more pronounced at the later period than the first. In offspring of control maternal rats, the free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), thyrotropin (TSH) and growth hormone (GH) concentrations were pronouncedly increased as the age progressed from 1 to 3 weeks. In hypothyroid group, a marked decrease in serum FT3, FT4 and GH levels was observed while there was a significant increase in TSH level with age progress as compared with the corresponding control. The reverse pattern to latter state was recorded in hyperthyroid group. The thyroid gland of offspring of hypothyroid group, exhibited some histopathological changes as luminal obliteration of follicles, hyperplasia, fibroblastic proliferation and some degenerative changes throughout the experimental period. The offspring of hyperthyroid rats showed larger and less thyroid follicles with flattened cell lining epithelium, decreased thyroid gland size and some degenerative changes along the experimental period. On the other hand, the biochemical data

  10. Targeting the Cerebellum by Noninvasive Neurostimulation: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Kim; Bodranghien, Florian; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the brain are novel and highly promising techniques currently employed in both research and clinical practice. Improving or rehabilitating brain functions by modulating excitability with these noninvasive tools is an exciting new area in neuroscience. Since the cerebellum is closely connected with the cerebral regions subserving motor, associative, and affective functions, the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways are an interesting target for these new techniques. Targeting the cerebellum represents a novel way to modulate the excitability of remote cortical regions and their functions. This review brings together the studies that have applied cerebellar stimulation, magnetic and electric, and presents an overview of the current knowledge and unsolved issues. Some recommendations for future research are implemented as well.

  11. Maternal stress in pregnancy affects myelination and neurosteroid regulatory pathways in the guinea pig cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Greer A; Palliser, Hannah K; Shaw, Julia C; Palazzi, Kerrin L; Walker, David W; Hirst, Jonathan J

    2017-11-01

    Prenatal stress predisposes offspring to behavioral pathologies. These may be attributed to effects on cerebellar neurosteroids and GABAergic inhibitory signaling, which can be linked to hyperactivity disorders. The aims were to determine the effect of prenatal stress on markers of cerebellar development, a key enzyme in neurosteroid synthesis and the expression of GABA A receptor (GABA A R) subunits involved in neurosteroid signaling. We used a model of prenatal stress (strobe light exposure, 2 h on gestational day 50, 55, 60 and 65) in guinea pigs, in which we have characterized anxiety and neophobic behavioral outcomes. The cerebellum and plasma were collected from control and prenatally stressed offspring at term (control fetus: n = 9 male, n = 7 female; stressed fetus: n = 7 male, n = 8 female) and postnatal day (PND) 21 (control: n = 8 male, n = 8 female; stressed: n = 9 male, n = 6 female). We found that term female offspring exposed to prenatal stress showed decreased expression of mature oligodendrocytes (∼40% reduction) and these deficits improved to control levels by PND21. Reactive astrocyte expression was lower (∼40% reduction) following prenatal stress. GABA A R subunit (δ and α6) expression and circulating allopregnanolone concentrations were not affected by prenatal stress. Prenatal stress increased expression (∼150-250% increase) of 5α-reductase type-1 mRNA in the cerebellum, which may be a neuroprotective response to promote GABAergic inhibition and aid in repair. These observations indicate that prenatal stress exposure has marked effects on the development of the cerebellum. These findings suggest cerebellar changes after prenatal stress may contribute to adverse behavioral outcomes after exposure to these stresses.

  12. A role for cerebellum in the hereditary dystonia DYT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont, Rachel; Tewari, Ambika; Angueyra, Chantal; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    DYT1 is a debilitating movement disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in torsinA. How these mutations cause dystonia remains unknown. Mouse models which have embryonically targeted torsinA have failed to recapitulate the dystonia seen in patients, possibly due to differential developmental compensation between rodents and humans. To address this issue, torsinA was acutely knocked down in select brain regions of adult mice using shRNAs. TorsinA knockdown in the cerebellum, but not in the basal ganglia, was sufficient to induce dystonia. In agreement with a potential developmental compensation for loss of torsinA in rodents, torsinA knockdown in the immature cerebellum failed to produce dystonia. Abnormal motor symptoms in knockdown animals were associated with irregular cerebellar output caused by changes in the intrinsic activity of both Purkinje cells and neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei. These data identify the cerebellum as the main site of dysfunction in DYT1, and offer new therapeutic targets. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22775.001 PMID:28198698

  13. Functional relationship between the cerebrum and cerebellum in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Arai, Hisayuki; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Abe, Shinei; Katsunuma, Hideyo

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether a functional relationship between the cerebrum and cerebellum exists in normal subjects, the correlation between asymmetry in cerebral blood flow and asymmetry in cerebellar blood flow was investigated. Twenty-one healthy right-handed subjects were studied using SPECT with N-isopropyl-p-( 123 I)iodoamphetamine while in a resting state. The asymmetry index (AI) for both the cerebral and cerebellar hemisphere was calculated as follows. AI=right side - left side/right side + left side/200 (%). A negative correlation was found between AI in the cerebellum and AI in the cerebrum. Especially, AI in the cerebellar hemisphere was significantly correlated with AIs in the upper frontal cortex (r=-0.58, p<0.01), middle frontal cortex (r=-0.55, p<0.02), lower frontal cortex (r=-0.49, p<0.05), and mean cerebral hemisphere (r=-0.52, p<0.02). These results suggest the existence of a functional relationship between the cerebral hemisphere and the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere in the resting state of normal subjects. We strongly suspect that the frontal cortex exert an influence on the function in the contralateral cerebellum, probably due to a transneuronal mechanism, mainly through the corticopontocerebellar pathway. (author)

  14. Regional alterations of brain biogenic amines and GABA/glutamate levels in rats following chronic lead exposure during neonatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shailesh Kumar, M V; Desiraju, T [National Inst. of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Neurophysiology

    1990-06-01

    Wistar rat pups were administered either a high dose of lead acetate (400 {mu}g lead-g body weight/day) or a low dose (100 {mu}g lead/g body weight/day) by gastric intubation, from 2 days through 60 days of age. The rats on both these doses exhibited statistically significant decreases in body and brain weights throughout the lead treatment period. A group of rats on high dose was also rehabilitated by discontinuing the lead from 60 days of age. In these rats, at 160 days of age, the body weight but not the brain weight recovered to normal levels. During the lead intake, the rats on high dose revealed significant elevations in the levels of noradrenaline (NA) in the hippocampus (HI), cerebellum (CE), hypothalamus (HY), brainstem (BS), and accumbens-striatum (SA). The elevated levels in all the above regions except in the HY persisted even after rehabilitation. The dopamine (DA) levels changed significantly in opposite directions in HY (elevation) and BS (reduction) during the lead treatment, and the HY recovered after rehabilitation. Under lead, the serotonin (5HT) levels were elevated significantly in the HI, BS and MC (motor cortex), while after rehabilitation the abnormality persisted only in the MC. Low dose lead treatment was also effective on the same areas of brain. In the low dose group, estimation of the levels of GABA and glutamate were also done, and a significant decrease of GABA in CE and glutamate in MC was observed. The differences observed in the neurotoxic effects (none or significant) of lead in the different regions for each of the transmitters (NA, DA, 5HT) supports the interesting conclusion that the vulnerability of the axon terminals of any given type is dependent on some regional factors, although the projections of the different regions originate from an apparently similar category of neurons in the brain stem. (orig.).

  15. Organization of spinocerebellar projection map in three types of agranular cerebellum: Purkinje cells vs. granule cells as organizer element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenio Nunes, M.L.; Sotelo, C.; Wehrle, R.

    1988-01-01

    The organization of the spinocerebellar projection was analysed by the anterograde axonal WGA-HRP (horseradish peroxidase-wheat germ agglutinin conjugate) tracing method in three different types of agranular cerebellar cortex either induced experimentally by X-irradiation or occurring spontaneously in weaver (wv/wv) and staggerer (sg/sg) mutant mice. The results of this study show that in the X-irradiated rat and weaver mouse, in both of which the granule cells are directly affected and die early in development, the spinal axons reproduce, with few differences, the normal spinocerebellar pattern. Conversely, in staggerer mouse, in which the Purkinje cells are intrinsically affected and granule neurons do not seem to be primarily perturbed by the staggerer gene action, the spinocerebellar organization is severely modified. These findings appear somewhat paradoxical because if granule cells, the synaptic targets of mossy spinocerebellar fibers, were necessary for the organization of spinocerebellar projection, the staggerer cerebellum would exhibit a much more normal projectional map than the weaver and the X-irradiated cerebella. It is, therefore, obvious that granule cells, and even specific synaptogenesis, are not essential for the establishment of the normal spinocerebellar topography. On the other hand, the fact that the Purkinje cells are primarily affected in the unique agranular cortex in which the spinocerebellar organization is severely modified suggests that these neurons could be the main element in the organization of the spinocerebellar projection map. This hypothesis is discussed in correlation with already-reported findings on the zonation of the cerebellar cortex by biochemically different clusters of Purkinje cells

  16. Prenatal PCBs disrupt early neuroendocrine development of the rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Cunningham, Stephanie L.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can interfere with hormone-sensitive developmental processes, including brain sexual differentiation. We hypothesized that disruption of these processes by gestational PCB exposure would be detectable as early as the day after birth (postnatal day (P) 1) through alterations in hypothalamic gene and protein expression. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected twice, once each on gestational days 16 and 18, with one of the following: DMSO vehicle; the industrial PCB mixture Aroclor 1221 (A1221); a reconstituted mixture of the three most prevalent congeners found in humans, PCB138, PCB153, and PCB180; or estradiol benzoate (EB). On P1, litter composition, anogenital distance (AGD), and body weight were assessed. Pups were euthanized for immunohistochemistry of estrogen receptor α (ERα) or TUNEL labeling of apoptotic cells or quantitative PCR of 48 selected genes in the preoptic area (POA). We found that treatment with EB or A1221 had a sex-specific effect on developmental apoptosis in the neonatal anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a sexually dimorphic hypothalamic region involved in the regulation of reproductive neuroendocrine function. In this region, exposed females had increased numbers of apoptotic nuclei, whereas there was no effect of treatment in males. For ERα, EB treatment increased immunoreactive cell numbers and density in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of both males and females, while A1221 and the PCB mixture had no effect. PCR analysis of gene expression in the POA identified nine genes that were significantly altered by prenatal EDC exposure, in a manner that varied by sex and treatment. These genes included brain-derived neurotrophic factor, GABA B receptors-1 and -2, IGF-1, kisspeptin receptor, NMDA receptor subunits NR2b and NR2c, prodynorphin, and TGFα. Collectively, these results suggest that the disrupted sexual differentiation

  17. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, K; Senda, M

    1999-08-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D2-like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11C-labeled analog ([11C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [11C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [11C]NEM and one of six dopamine D2-like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [11C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [11C]NEM was reduced by D2-like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D2-like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [11C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [11C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D2-like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum.

  18. Using a million cell simulation of the cerebellum: network scaling and task generality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Ke; Hausknecht, Matthew J; Stone, Peter; Mauk, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    Several factors combine to make it feasible to build computer simulations of the cerebellum and to test them in biologically realistic ways. These simulations can be used to help understand the computational contributions of various cerebellar components, including the relevance of the enormous number of neurons in the granule cell layer. In previous work we have used a simulation containing 12000 granule cells to develop new predictions and to account for various aspects of eyelid conditioning, a form of motor learning mediated by the cerebellum. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of scaling up this simulation to over one million granule cells using parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) technology. We observe that this increase in number of granule cells requires only twice the execution time of the smaller simulation on the GPU. We demonstrate that this simulation, like its smaller predecessor, can emulate certain basic features of conditioned eyelid responses, with a slight improvement in performance in one measure. We also use this simulation to examine the generality of the computation properties that we have derived from studying eyelid conditioning. We demonstrate that this scaled up simulation can learn a high level of performance in a classic machine learning task, the cart-pole balancing task. These results suggest that this parallel GPU technology can be used to build very large-scale simulations whose connectivity ratios match those of the real cerebellum and that these simulations can be used guide future studies on cerebellar mediated tasks and on machine learning problems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Senda, Michio

    1999-01-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11 C-labeled analog ([ 11 C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [ 11 C]NEM and one of six dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D 4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [ 11 C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D 2 -like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum

  20. Tissue-specific splicing pattern of fibronectin messenger RNA precursor during development and aging in rat

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Fibronectin isoforms are generated by the alternative splicing of a primary transcript derived from a single gene. In rat at least three regions of the molecule are involved: EIIIA, EIIIB, and V. This study investigated the splicing patterns of these regions during development and aging, by means of ribonuclease protection analysis. Between fetal and adult rat, the extent of inclusion of the EIIIA and/or EIIIB region in fibronectin mRNA varied according to the type of tissue analyzed; but the...

  1. The effect of prenatal exposure to diazepam on aspects of postnatal development and behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, N; Grimm, V E

    1982-01-01

    In the present study the effects of chronic treatment of pregnant rats with diazepam on the physical and behavioral development of their offspring were investigated. Rats that were diazepam-exposed prenatally were compared to age-matched controls in terms of the following: number of littermates; birth weight and weight gain until weaning: motor development and coordination; simple motor learning; open field activity; performance on learning tasks of varying complexity; retention of these tasks. Nulliparous Wistar rats were injected s.c. for 16 days of their pregnancy was either 2.5, 5, of 10 mg/kg diazepam or an equal volume of vehicle. Prenatal diazepam treatment did not alter litter size, birth weight, or the righting reflex, but seemed to retard early motor development transiently. Diazepam pups showed longer latencies and less rearing in the open field. There were no differences between animals exposed to drug and vehicle in simple motor learning or in acquiring a simple successive discrimination task. However, there were significant dose-dependent differences on a complex six-choice simultaneous discrimination learning task, the diazepam-exposed rats making more errors and taking more time to reach the goal. A significant difference was seen again between diazepam- and vehicle-exposed rats on the retention test 10 days later. The results indicate that diazepam administered to pregnant rats has long-range effects on the behavior of the offspring, some becoming manifest even in maturity.

  2. Neurogenin1 Expression and Function in the Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    comic relief to everyone excluding perhaps Dr. Doughty. Krys provided an enormous amount of support and I thank her for playing a dual role as my lab...telencephalic neurons. Genes Dev 14:67-80. Frampton M (2008) Embodiments of Will: Anatomical and Physiological Theories of Voluntary Animal Motion from

  3. Development of a population pharmacokinetic model to predict brain distribution and dopamine D2 receptor occupancy of raclopride in non-anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yin Cheong; Ilkova, Trayana; van Wijk, Rob C; Hartman, Robin; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2018-01-01

    Raclopride is a selective antagonist of the dopamine D2 receptor. It is one of the most frequently used in vivo D2 tracers (at low doses) for assessing drug-induced receptor occupancy (RO) in animals and humans. It is also commonly used as a pharmacological blocker (at high doses) to occupy the available D2 receptors and antagonize the action of dopamine or drugs on D2 in preclinical studies. The aims of this study were to comprehensively evaluate its pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in different brain compartments and to establish a PK-RO model that could predict the brain distribution and RO of raclopride in the freely moving rat using a LC-MS based approach. Rats (n=24) received a 10-min IV infusion of non-radiolabeled raclopride (1.61μmol/kg, i.e. 0.56mg/kg). Plasma and the brain tissues of striatum (with high density of D2 receptors) and cerebellum (with negligible amount of D2 receptors) were collected. Additional microdialysis experiments were performed in some rats (n=7) to measure the free drug concentration in the extracellular fluid of the striatum and cerebellum. Raclopride concentrations in all samples were analyzed by LC-MS. A population PK-RO model was constructed in NONMEM to describe the concentration-time profiles in the unbound plasma, brain extracellular fluid and brain tissue compartments and to estimate the RO based on raclopride-D2 receptor binding kinetics. In plasma raclopride showed a rapid distribution phase followed by a slower elimination phase. The striatum tissue concentrations were consistently higher than that of cerebellum tissue throughout the whole experimental period (10-h) due to higher non-specific tissue binding and D2 receptor binding in the striatum. Model-based simulations accurately predicted the literature data on rat plasma PK, brain tissue PK and D2 RO at different time points after intravenous or subcutaneous administration of raclopride at tracer dose (RO 30%). For the first time a predictive model that could describe

  4. Perinatal and chronic hypothyroidism impair behavioural development in male and female rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van N.; Rijntjes, E.; Heijning, van de B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal and chronic hypothyroidism impair behavioural development in male and female rats. EXP PHYSIOL 00(0) 000-000, 0000. - A lack of thyroid hormone, i.e. hypothyroidism, during early development results in multiple morphological and functional alterations in the developing brain. In the

  5. Sexual dimorphism in development of kidney damage in aging Fischer-344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, Jennifer M; Akinsiku, Oladele; Moningka, Natasha C; Jerzewski, Katie; Baylis, Chris; LeBlanc, Amanda J; Kang, Lori S; Sindler, Amy L; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2012-08-01

    Aging kidneys exhibit slowly developing injury and women are usually protected compared with men, in association with maintained renal nitric oxide. Our purpose was to test 2 hypotheses: (1) that aging intact Fischer-344 (F344) female rats exhibit less glomerular damage than similarly aged males, and (2) that loss of female ovarian hormones would lead to greater structural injury and dysregulation of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in aging F344 rat kidneys. We compared renal injury in F344 rats in intact, ovariectomized, and ovariectomized with estrogen replaced young (6 month) and old (24 month) female rats with young and old intact male rats and measured renal protein abundance of NOS isoforms and oxidative stress. There was no difference in age-dependent glomerular damage between young or old intact male and female F344 rats, and neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement affected renal injury; however, tubulointerstitial injury was greater in old males than in old females. These data suggest that ovarian hormones do not influence these aspects of kidney aging in F344 rats and that the greater tubulointerstitial injury is caused by male sex. Old males had greater kidney cortex NOS3 abundance than females, and NOS1 abundance (alpha and beta isoforms) was increased in old males compared with both young males and old females. NOS abundance was preserved with age in intact females, ovariectomy did not reduce NOS1 or NOS3 protein abundance, and estrogen replacement did not uniformly elevate NOS proteins, suggesting that estrogens are not primary regulators of renal NOS abundance in this strain. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-dependent superoxide production and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity were increased in aging male rat kidneys compared with females, which could compromise renal nitric oxide production and/or bioavailability. The kidney damage expressed in aging F344 rats is fairly mild and is not related to loss of renal cortex NOS3

  6. Ablation of BRaf impairs neuronal differentiation in the postnatal hippocampus and cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Pfeiffer

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the role of the kinase BRaf in postnatal brain development. Mice expressing truncated, non-functional BRaf in neural stem cell-derived brain tissue demonstrate alterations in the cerebellum, with decreased sizes and fuzzy borders of the glomeruli in the granule cell layer. In addition we observed reduced numbers and misplaced ectopic Purkinje cells that showed an altered structure of their dendritic arborizations in the hippocampus, while the overall cornus ammonis architecture appeared to be unchanged. In male mice lacking BRaf in the hippocampus the size of the granule cell layer was normal at postnatal day 12 (P12 but diminished at P21, as compared to control littermates. This defect was caused by a reduced ability of dentate gyrus progenitor cells to differentiate into NeuN positive granule cell neurons. In vitro cell culture of P0/P1 hippocampal cells revealed that BRaf deficient cells were impaired in their ability to form microtubule-associated protein 2 positive neurons. Together with the alterations in behaviour, such as autoaggression and loss of balance fitness, these observations indicate that in the absence of BRaf all neuronal cellular structures develop, but neuronal circuits in the cerebellum and hippocampus are partially disturbed besides impaired neuronal generation in both structures.

  7. Enhancement of Spatial Learning-Memory in Developing Rats via Mozart Music

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Gao Yao; Yang Xia; Sheng-Jun Dai; Guang-Zhan Fang; Hua Guo; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of musical stimulations on the capability of the spatial learning-memory in developing rats by behavioral and electro-physiological techniques.Rats,which are exposed to Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major,complete learning tasks of the Moriss water maze with significantly shorter latencies,and the power spectrum of alpha band of electrohippocampogram (EHG) significantly increase,compared with the control rats and rats exposed to the horror music.The results indicate that if given the stimulation of Mozart music in the developmental period of the auditory cortex,the capability of the spatial learning-memory can be significantly changed.The enhancement of alpha band of EHG may be related to the change of this function mainly.

  8. Free radical activity during development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, O.M.; Akerblom, H.K.; Sariola, H.; Andersson, S.M. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Martin, J.M. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Hallman, M. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Free radical-induced lipid peroxidation was quantified by measuring expired pentane from diabetic prone BB Wistar rats of 45-90 d of age. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus was manifest at the age of 71 {plus minus} 8 d. Expired pentane increased from 2.1 {plus minus} 0.7 to 5.0 {plus minus}3.0 pmol/100g/min (p <0.01) at manifestation of the disease and remained high throughout the test period. In healthy age-matched control rats it persisted low. In rats made diabetic with streptozotocin, expired pentane remained low. The changes in expired pentane suggest that the development of endogenous insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in BB rats is associated with increased free radical activity. This is not due to hyperglycemia or ketosis per se, and reflects a fundamental difference in the free radical activity between the spontaneously diabetic BB rats and the disease produced by streptozotocin. Development of spontaneous insulin-dependent diabetes in BB rats is associated with increased free radical activity that persists after the manifestation of the disease.

  9. Efficacy of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Neonatal Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Naser; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza; Bakhtiyari, Mehrdad; Mousavi, Neda; Safakheil, Hosein; Jafari, Leila; Sarveazad, Arash; Yari, Abazar; Ramezani, Sara; Faghihi, Faezeh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-05-01

    Kernicterus is a neurological syndrome associated with indirect bilirubin accumulation and damages to the basal ganglia, cerebellum and brain stem nuclei particularly the cochlear nucleus. To mimic haemolysis in a rat model such that it was similar to what is observed in a preterm human, we injected phenylhydrazine in 7-day-old rats to induce haemolysis and then infused sulfisoxazole into the same rats at day 9 to block bilirubin binding sites in the albumin. We have investigated the effectiveness of human adiposity-derived stem cells as a therapeutic paradigm for perinatal neuronal repair in a kernicterus animal model. The level of total bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, brain bilirubin and brain iron was significantly increased in the modelling group. There was a significant decreased in all severity levels of the auditory brainstem response test in the two modelling group. Akinesia, bradykinesia and slip were significantly declined in the experience group. Apoptosis in basal ganglia and cerebellum were significantly decreased in the stem cell-treated group in comparison to the vehicle group. All severity levels of the auditory brainstem response tests were significantly decreased in 2-month-old rats. Transplantation results in the substantial alleviation of walking impairment, apoptosis and auditory dysfunction. This study provides important information for the development of therapeutic strategies using human adiposity-derived stem cells in prenatal brain damage to reduce potential sensori motor deficit.

  10. The therapeutic potential of the cerebellum in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Lynn Parker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive role of the cerebellum is critically tied to its distributed connections throughout the brain. Accumulating evidence from anatomical, structural and functional imaging, and lesion studies advocate a cognitive network involving indirect connections between the cerebellum and non-motor areas in the prefrontal cortex. Cerebellar stimulation dynamically influences activity in several regions of the frontal cortex and effectively improves cognition in schizophrenia. In this manuscript, we summarize current literature on the cingulocerebellar circuit and we introduce a method to interrogate this circuit combining opotogenetics, neuropharmacology, and electrophysiology in awake-behaving animals while minimizing incidental stimulation of neighboring cerebellar nuclei. We propose the novel hypothesis that optogenetic cerebellar stimulation can restore aberrant frontal activity and rescue impaired cognition in schizophrenia. We focus on how a known cognitive region in the frontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, is influenced by the cerebellum. This circuit is of particular interest because it has been confirmed using tracing studies, neuroimaging reveals its role in cognitive tasks, it is conserved from rodents to humans, and diseases such as schizophrenia and autism appear in its aberrancy. Novel tract tracing results presented here provide support for how these two areas communicate. The primary pathway involves a disynaptic connection between the cerebellar dentate nuclei and the anterior cingulate cortex. Secondarily, the pathway from cerebellar fastigial nuclei to the ventral tegmental area, which supplies dopamine to the prefrontal cortex, may play a role as schizophrenia characteristically involves dopamine deficiencies. We hope that the hypothesis described here will inspire new therapeutic strategies targeting currently untreatable cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  11. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Neuropathological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental question about essential tremor (ET) is whether its associated pathological changes and disease mechanisms are linkable to a specific brain region. To that end, recent tissue-based studies have made significant strides in elucidating changes in the ET brain. Emerging from these studies is increasing neuropathological evidence linking ET to the cerebellum. These studies have systematically identified a broad range of structural, degenerative changes in the ET cerebellum, spanning across all Purkinje cell compartments. These include the dendritic compartment (where there is an increase in number of Purkinje cell dendritic swellings, a pruning of the dendritic arbor, and a reduction in spine density), the cell body (where, aside from reductions in Purkinje cell linear density in some studies, there is an increase in the number of heterotopic Purkinje cell soma), and the axonal compartment (where a plethora of changes in axonal morphology have been observed, including an increase in the number of thickened axonal profiles, torpedoes, axonal recurrent collaterals, axonal branching, and terminal axonal sprouting). Additional changes, possibly due to secondary remodeling, have been observed in neighboring neuronal populations. These include a hypertrophy of basket cell axonal processes and changes in the distribution of climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses. These changes all distinguish ET from normal control brains. Initial studies further indicate that the profile (i.e., constellation) of these changes may separate ET from other diseases of the cerebellum, thereby serving as a disease signature. With the discovery of these changes, a new model of ET has arisen, which posits that it may be a neurodegenerative disorder centered in the cerebellar cortex. These newly emerging neuropathological studies pave the way for anatomically focused, hypothesis-driven, molecular mechanistic studies of disease pathogenesis.

  12. Automated measurement of uptake in cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body FDG PET/CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christian; Sun, Shanhui; Sun, Wenqing; Otis, Justin; Wallace, Audrey; Smith, Brian J; Sunderland, John J; Graham, Michael M; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate fully automated methods for uptake measurement of cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body PET/CT scans. Such measurements are of interest in the context of uptake normalization for quantitative assessment of metabolic activity and/or automated image quality control. Cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch regions were segmented with different automated approaches. Cerebella were segmented in PET volumes by means of a robust active shape model (ASM) based method. For liver segmentation, a largest possible hyperellipsoid was fitted to the liver in PET scans. The aortic arch was first segmented in CT images of a PET/CT scan by a tubular structure analysis approach, and the segmented result was then mapped to the corresponding PET scan. For each of the segmented structures, the average standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. To generate an independent reference standard for method validation, expert image analysts were asked to segment several cross sections of each of the three structures in 134 F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT scans. For each case, the true average SUV was estimated by utilizing statistical models and served as the independent reference standard. For automated aorta and liver SUV measurements, no statistically significant scale or shift differences were observed between automated results and the independent standard. In the case of the cerebellum, the scale and shift were not significantly different, if measured in the same cross sections that were utilized for generating the reference. In contrast, automated results were scaled 5% lower on average although not shifted, if FDG uptake was calculated from the whole segmented cerebellum volume. The estimated reduction in total SUV measurement error ranged between 54.7% and 99.2%, and the reduction was found to be statistically significant for cerebellum and aortic arch. With the proposed methods, the authors have demonstrated that

  13. The human cerebellum: a review of physiologic neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaei, Tina; Nazeri, Arash; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Minagar, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    The cerebellum resides in the posterior cranial fossa dorsal to the brainstem and has diverse connections to the cerebrum, brain stem, and spinal cord. It is anatomically and physiologically divided into distinct functional compartments and is composed of highly regular arrays of neuronal units, each sharing the same basic cerebellar microcircuitry. Its circuitry is critically involved in motor control and motor learning, and its role in nonmotor cognitive and affective functions is becoming increasingly recognized. This article describes the cerebellar gross and histologic neuroanatomy in relation to its function, and the relevance of cerebellar circuitry and firing patterns to motor learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative analysis of development and aging of genital corpuscles in glans penis of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiino, Mizuho; Hoshi, Hideo; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Ishikawa, Youichi; Takayanagi, Masaaki; Murakami, Kunio; Kishi, Kiyoshi; Sato, Fumi

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present postnatal developmental study was to determine densities of unique genital corpuscles (GCs) in glans penis of developing and aged rats. GCs were identified as corpuscular endings consisting of highly branched and coiled axons with many varicosities, which were immunoreactive for protein gene product 9.5. In addition, GCs were immunoreactive for calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P, but not for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and neuropeptide Y. GCs were not found in the glans penis of 1 week old rats. Densities of GCs were low at 3 weeks, significantly increased at 5 and 10 weeks, reached the peak of density at 40 weeks, and tended to decrease at 70 and 100 weeks. Sizes of GCs were small in 3 weeks old rats, increased at 5 and 10 weeks, reached the peak-size at 40 weeks and reduced in size at 70 and 100 weeks. Considering sexual maturation of the rat, the results reveal that GCs of the rat begins to develop postnatal and reaches to the peak of their development after puberty and continues to exist until old age, in contrast to prenatal and early postnatal development of other sensory receptors of glabrous skin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak, Piotr; Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy.

  16. From movement to thought: executive function, embodied cognition, and the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Budding, Deborah Ely; Chidekel, Dana

    2012-06-01

    This paper posits that the brain evolved for the control of action rather than for the development of cognition per se. We note that the terms commonly used to describe brain-behavior relationships define, and in many ways limit, how we conceptualize and investigate them and may therefore constrain the questions we ask and the utility of the "answers" we generate. Many constructs are so nonspecific and over-inclusive as to be scientifically meaningless. "Executive function" is one such term in common usage. As the construct is increasingly focal in neuroscience research, defining it clearly is critical. We propose a definition that places executive function within a model of continuous sensorimotor interaction with the environment. We posit that control of behavior is the essence of "executive function," and we explore the evolutionary advantage conferred by being able to anticipate and control behavior with both implicit and explicit mechanisms. We focus on the cerebellum's critical role in these control processes. We then hypothesize about the ways in which procedural (skill) learning contributes to the acquisition of declarative (semantic) knowledge. We hypothesize how these systems might interact in the process of grounding knowledge in sensorimotor anticipation, thereby directly linking movement to thought and "embodied cognition." We close with a discussion of ways in which the cerebellum instructs frontal systems how to think ahead by providing anticipatory control mechanisms, and we briefly review this model's potential applications.

  17. Asthma pregnancy alters postnatal development of chromaffin cells in the rat adrenal medulla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Ming Wu

    Full Text Available Adrenal neuroendocrine plays an important role in asthma. The activity of the sympathoadrenal system could be altered by early life events. The effects of maternal asthma during pregnancy on the adrenal medulla of offspring remain unknown.This study aims to explore the influence of maternal asthma during pregnancy on the development and function of adrenal medulla in offspring from postnatal day 3 (P3 to postnatal day 60 (P60. Asthmatic pregnant rats (AP, nerve growth factor (NGF-treated pregnant rats (NP and NGF antibody-treated pregnant rats (ANP were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA; NP and ANP were treated with NGF and NGF antibody respectively. Offspring rats from the maternal group were divided into four groups: offspring from control pregnant rats (OCP, offspring from AP (OAP, offspring from NP (ONP, and offspring from ANP (OANP. The expressions of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT protein in adrenal medulla were analyzed. The concentrations of epinephrine (EPI, corticosterone and NGF in serum were measured. Adrenal medulla chromaffin cells (AMCC were prone to differentiate into sympathetic nerve cells in OAP and ONP. Both EPI and PNMT were decreased in OAP from P3 to P14, and then reached normal level gradually from P30 to P60, which were lower from birth to adulthood in ONP. Corticosterone concentration increased significantly in OAP and ONP.Asthma pregnancy may promote AMCC to differentiate into sympathetic neurons in offspring rats and inhibit the synthesis of EPI, resulting in dysfunction of bronchial relaxation.

  18. Impact of environmental noise on growth and neuropsychological development of newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Meng, Meng; Zhao, Congmin; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Yuping; Wang, Liyan; Wen, Enyi

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of environmental noise exposure on the growth and neuropsychological development in neonatal rats. Twenty-four postnatal 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into control, high-noise and reduced noise groups. The rats in the high-noise group were exposed to 90 dB white noise, and those in the control group were grown under standard condition, while those in the reduced noise group were exposed to standard condition with sound-absorbing cotton. Ten, 15, and 20 days post noise exposure, both the body weight and length of the rats in high-noise group were lower than those in the control and reduced noise groups, respectively. The secretion of growth hormone was significantly decreased in the rats exposed to high noise environment, compared to those exposed to standard condition and reduced noise. More interestingly, the swimming distance was apparently increased and the swimming speed was significantly decreased in high-noise group compared with those in control and reduced noise groups. Importantly, the mRNA and protein levels of SYP in the rats hippocampus were significantly decreased in high-noise group compare with those in control and reduced noise groups. Similarly, the positive expression of SYP in the CA1 region of hippocampus was also significantly decreased in the high noise group rats. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that high noise exposure could decrease the production of growth hormone and SYP in neonatal rats, which may retard the growth of weight and length and the capability of learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Spontaneous motor activity during the development and maintenance of diet-induced obesity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, B E

    1991-09-01

    More than 80% of most daily spontaneous activities (assessed in an Omnitech activity monitor) occurred during the last hour of light and 12 h of the dark phase in 8 chow-fed male Sprague-Dawley rats. Thirty additional rats were, therefore, monitored over this 13-h period to assess the relationship of activity to the development and maintenance of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on a diet high in energy, fat and sucrose (CM diet). Nine of 20 rats became obese after 3 months on the CM diet, with 71% greater weight gain than 10 chow-fed controls. Eleven of 20 rats were diet resistant (DR), gaining the same amount of weight as chow-fed rats. Neither initial activity levels nor initial body weights on chow (Period I) differed significantly across retrospectively identified groups. After 3 months on CM diet or chow (Period II), as well as after an additional 3 months after CM diet-fed rats returned to chow (Period III), there were significant inverse correlations (r = -.606 to -.370) between body weight at the time of testing and various measures of movement in the horizontal plane. There was no relationship to dietary content nor consistent correlations of body weight or diet group to vertical movements, an indirect measure of ingestive behavior. Patterns of time spent in the vertical position were significantly different for DIO vs. DR rats in Period III, however. Thus, differences in food intake and metabolic efficiency, rather than differences in nocturnal activity, are probably responsible for the greater weight gain in DIO-prone rats placed on CM diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Diet composition determines course of hyperphagia in developing Zucker obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, J R; Maggio, C A

    1990-12-01

    Previous observations from this laboratory indicate that, during growth, the hyperphagia of the male genetically obese Zucker rat reaches a peak or "breakpoint" and then declines. To examine the effect of dietary macronutrient content on the course of hyperphagia, groups of male lean and obese rats were maintained from 5-28 weeks of age on powdered chow, or isocaloric diets (3.6 kcal/g) containing 72% of calories as corn oil, dextrose, or soy isolate protein (n = 5 lean and obese rats/diet). On chow, hyperphagia was maintained at a level of 7-8 g above lean control intake until a "breakpoint" was reached at 17 weeks, and obese intake declined to lean control level. On the fat diet, hyperphagia was increased to 10 g/day when a breakpoint was reached at 8 weeks. On the dextrose and protein diets, hyperphagia at a level of 3-4 g/day reached breakpoints at weeks 18 and 16, respectively. On all diets, the intakes of obese rats were precisely equal to the intakes of lean control rats by weeks 19-20. These data show that the magnitude and duration of hyperphagia in the developing obese rat are influenced by diet composition. Previously, we have proposed that the obese rat's hyperphagia arises from rapid adipocyte filling. Since high-fat diets facilitate adipocyte enlargement, the early "breakpoint" of hyperphagia seen with the high-fat diet may indicate that this feeding stimulation decreases as the fat cells of the obese rat approach maximal size.

  1. Expression of nitric oxide synthase during the development of RCS rat retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R K; Warfvinge, K; Ehinger, B

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be both neurodestructive and neuroprotective in the central nervous system and could possibly play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders. On the assumption that NO synthesis may influence degenerative processes in the retina, we have examined the development and distribution of nitric-oxide-synthase(NOS)-immunoreactive cells in developing Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat retinas, which is an animal model for retinal degeneration. An antibody against constitutive neuronal NOS was used for immunocytochemistry on RCS rat retinas from postnatal (PN) days 3, 7, 10, 14, 35, 70 and 281 and compared with that in the normal rats of PN days 3, 7, 10, 14, 54 and adults. Immunoreactive cells were not seen in PN 3 retinas but were distinctly seen in the PN 7 retina along with a plexus in the inner plexiform layer. In both groups (normal and RCS rats) a distinct sublayering of the plexus in the inner plexiform layer could be seen at PN 10, which became more distinct at PN 14. The immunoreactive cells were detected also in the oldest retina examined, which was PN 281 in the case of RCS rats. In both groups, certain amacrine cells, certain bipolar cells and certain horizontal cells were found to be immunoreactive. In conclusion, the developmental timetable of the NOS immunoreactivity was identical in the normal and the RCS rat retinas. The NOS-immunoreactive cells persisted in the RCS retinas even when the retina had degenerated extensively. Abnormalities with the inducible isoforms of NOS cannot be ruled out from this study. We conclude that the chronological and qualitative development of the constitutive neuronal NOS immunoreactivity is normal in RCS rat retinas. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Weanling piglet cerebellum: a surrogate for tolerance to MRT (microbeam radiation therapy) in pediatric neuro-oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Blattmann, Hans; Di Michiel, Marco; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Guzman, Raphael; Zimmermann, Werner; Birrer, Stephan; Bley, Tim; Kircher, Patrick; Stettler, Regina; Fatzer, Rosmarie; Jaggy, Andre; Smilowitz, Henry; Brauer, Elke; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Thomlinson, William C.; Stepanek, Jiri; Wagner, Hans-Peter

    2001-12-01

    The cerebellum of the weanling piglet (Yorkshire) was used as a surrogate for the radiosensitive human infant cerebellum in a Swiss-led program of experimental microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) at the ESRF. Five weanlings in a 47 day old litter of seven, and eight weanlings in a 40 day old litter of eleven were irradiated in November, 1999 and June, 2000, respectively. A 1.5 cm-wide x 1.5 xm-high array of equally space approximately equals 20-30 micrometers wide, upright microbeams spaced at 210 micrometers intervals was propagated horizontally, left to right, through the cerebella of the prone, anesthetized piglets. Skin-entrance intra-microbeam peak adsorbed doses were uniform, either 150, 300, 425, or 600 gray (Gy). Peak and inter-microbeam (valley) absorbed doses in the cerebellum were computed with the PSI version of the Monte Carlo code GEANT and benchmarked using Gafchromic and radiochromic film microdosimetry. For approximately equals 66 weeks [first litter; until euthanasia], or approximately equals 57 weeks [second litter; until July 30, 2001] after irradiation, the littermates were developmentally, behaviorally, neurologically and radiologically normal as observed and tested by experienced farmers and veterinary scientists unaware of which piglets were irradiated or sham-irradiated. Morever, MRT implemented at the ESRF with a similar array of microbeams and a uniform skin-entrance peak dose of 625 Gy, followed by immunoprophylaxis, was shown to be palliative or curative in young adult rats bearing intracerebral gliosarcomas. These observations give further credence to MRT's potential as an adjunct therapy for brain tumors in infancy, when seamless therapeutic irradiation of the brain is hazardous.

  3. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Niladri; Stamler, Christopher J.; Loua, Kovana Marcel; Chan, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl 2 ) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl 2 and MeHg on [ 3 H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([ 3 H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B max ) and ligand affinity (K d ). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl 2 or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K i ). Results demonstrate that HgCl 2 is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [ 3 H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies

  4. Current Opinions and Areas of Consensus on the Role of the Cerebellum in Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Batla, Amit; Bhatia, Kailash; Dauer, William T; Dresel, Christian; Niethammer, Martin; Eidelberg, David; Raike, Robert S; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, H A; Hess, Ellen J; Meunier, Sabine; Hallett, Mark; Fremont, Rachel; Khodakhah, Kamran; LeDoux, Mark S; Popa, Traian; Gallea, Cécile; Lehericy, Stéphane; Bostan, Andreea C; Strick, Peter L

    2017-04-01

    A role for the cerebellum in causing ataxia, a disorder characterized by uncoordinated movement, is widely accepted. Recent work has suggested that alterations in activity, connectivity, and structure of the cerebellum are also associated with dystonia, a neurological disorder characterized by abnormal and sustained muscle contractions often leading to abnormal maintained postures. In this manuscript, the authors discuss their views on how the cerebellum may play a role in dystonia. The following topics are discussed: The relationships between neuronal/network dysfunctions and motor abnormalities in rodent models of dystonia. Data about brain structure, cerebellar metabolism, cerebellar connections, and noninvasive cerebellar stimulation that support (or not) a role for the cerebellum in human dystonia. Connections between the cerebellum and motor cortical and sub-cortical structures that could support a role for the cerebellum in dystonia. Overall points of consensus include: Neuronal dysfunction originating in the cerebellum can drive dystonic movements in rodent model systems. Imaging and neurophysiological studies in humans suggest that the cerebellum plays a role in the pathophysiology of dystonia, but do not provide conclusive evidence that the cerebellum is the primary or sole neuroanatomical site of origin.

  5. Role of association cortices and cerebellum during motor consolidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Ken; Wright, David K.; Box, Georgia A.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral circulation activated during the first (naive) and second (learned) visual-motor tasks were performed to confirm the hypothesis that activated brain regions are different before and after the motor work. Subjects were 30 normal healthy right-handed volunteers (av. age 21 y), who had the first 10 tasks of cursor tracing (regular tracing, rt), as rapidly and accurately as possible, along the given star features and then second 15 tasks of tracing with the cursor with inverse polarity (mirror tracing, mt). During the tasks, PET images were obtained at 7th and 9th rt, and 10 times (1st-15th) during mt, with the high-resolution positron camera (HEADTOME V) to measure the cerebral blood flow after intravenous 15 O-water and were processed into 3D for statistics. At the 1st mt (under the most unfamiliar condition), stimulated were the right frontal and supplementary motor areas and temporal lobe, bilateral centriciput lobe, anterior cingulated gyrus, and left cerebellum hemisphere. Under the learned condition (at 15th mt), the primary motor area, lingual gyrus, cuneus, anterior cuneus, occipital lobe involving posterior cingulated gyrus and left cerebellum hemisphere were activated. Thus the hypothesis above was confirmed: reconfirmation of the brain plasticity. (R.T.)

  6. The cerebellum: a new key structure in the navigation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle eRochefort

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Early investigations of cerebellar function focused on motor learning, in particular on eyeblink conditioning and adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, and led to the general view that cerebellar Long Term Depression (LTD at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses is the neural correlate of cerebellar motor learning. Thereafter, while the full complexity of cerebellar plasticities was being unraveled, cerebellar involvement in more cognitive tasks - including spatial navigation - was further investigated. However, cerebellar implication in spatial navigation remains a matter of debate because motor deficits frequently associated with cerebellar damage often prevent the dissociation between its role in spatial cognition from its implication in motor function. Here, we review recent findings from behavioral and electrophysiological analyses of cerebellar mutant mouse models, which show that the cerebellum might participate in the construction of hippocampal spatial representation map (i.e. place cells and thereby in goal-directed navigation. These recent advances in cerebellar research point toward a model in which computation from the cerebellum could be required for spatial representation and would involve the integration of multi-source self-motion information to: 1 transform the reference frame of vestibular signals and 2 distinguish between self- and externally-generated vestibular signals. We eventually present herein anatomical and functional connectivity data supporting a cerebello-hippocampal interaction. Whilst a direct cerebello-hippocampal projection has been suggested, recent investigations rather favor a multi-synaptic pathway involving posterior parietal and retrosplenial cortices, two regions critically involved in spatial navigation.

  7. Intrinsic connectivity networks within cerebellum and beyond in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amianto, F; D'Agata, F; Lavagnino, L; Caroppo, P; Abbate-Daga, G; Righi, D; Scarone, S; Bergui, M; Mortara, P; Fassino, S

    2013-10-01

    Cerebellum seems to have a role both in feeding behavior and emotion regulation; therefore, it is a region that warrants further neuroimaging studies in eating disorders, severe conditions that determine a significant impairment in the physical and psychological domain. The aim of this study was to examine the cerebellum intrinsic connectivity during functional magnetic resonance imaging resting state in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and healthy controls (CN). Resting state brain activity was decomposed into intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) using group spatial independent component analysis on the resting blood oxygenation level dependent time courses of 12 AN, 12 BN, and 10 CN. We extracted the cerebellar ICN and compared it between groups. Intrinsic connectivity within the cerebellar network showed some common alterations in eating disordered compared to healthy subjects (e.g., a greater connectivity with insulae, vermis, and paravermis and a lesser connectivity with parietal lobe); AN and BN patients were characterized by some peculiar alterations in connectivity patterns (e.g., greater connectivity with the insulae in AN compared to BN, greater connectivity with anterior cingulate cortex in BN compared to AN). Our data are consistent with the presence of different alterations in the cerebellar network in AN and BN patients that could be related to psychopathologic dimensions of eating disorders.

  8. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum-Neuroimaging Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most common pathological tremor disorder in the world, and post-mortem evidence has shown that the cerebellum is the most consistent area of pathology in ET. In the last few years, advanced neuroimaging has tried to confirm this evidence. The aim of the present review is to discuss to what extent the evidence provided by this field of study may be generalised. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms ET with the following keywords: MRI, VBM, MRS, DTI, fMRI, PET and SPECT. We summarised and discussed each study and placed the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the cerebellar involvement in ET. A total of 51 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 32 functional studies. Despite clinical and methodological differences, both functional and structural imaging studies showed similar findings but without defining a clear topography of neurodegeneration. Indeed, the vast majority of studies found functional and structural abnormalities in several parts of the anterior and posterior cerebellar lobules, but it remains to be established to what degree these neural changes contribute to clinical symptoms of ET. Currently, advanced neuroimaging has confirmed the involvement of the cerebellum in pathophysiological processes of ET, although a high variability in results persists. For this reason, the translation of this knowledge into daily clinical practice is again partially limited, although new advanced multivariate neuroimaging approaches (machine-learning) are proving interesting changes of perspective.

  9. Lessons From Experiments in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Gramsbergen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this essay a few relevant aspects of the neural and behavioral development of the brain in the human and in the rat are reviewed and related to the consequences of lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system at early and later age. Movements initially are generated by local circuits in the spinal cord and without the involvement of descending projections. After birth, both in humans and in rats it seems that the devlopment of postural control is the limiting factor for several motor behaviors to mature. Strong indications exist that the cerebellum is significantly involved in this control. Lesions in the CNS at early stages interfere with fundamental processes of neural development, such as the establishment of fiber connections and cell death patterns. Consequently, the functional effects are strongly dependent on the stage of development. The young and undisturbed CNS, on the other hand, has a much greater capacity than the adult nervous system for compensating abnormal reinnervation in the peripheral nervous system. Animal experiments indicated that the cerebellar cortex might play an important part in this compensation. This possibility should be investigated further as it might offer important perspectives for treatment in the human.

  10. A New Rat Model of Epileptic Spasms Based on Methylazoxymethanol-Induced Malformations of Cortical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hee Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Malformations of cortical development (MCDs can cause medically intractable epilepsies and cognitive disabilities in children. We developed a new model of MCD-associated epileptic spasms by treating rats prenatally with methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM to induce cortical malformations and postnatally with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA to induce spasms. To produce cortical malformations to infant rats, two dosages of MAM (15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally were injected to pregnant rats at gestational day 15. In prenatally MAM-exposed rats and the controls, spasms were triggered by single (6 mg/kg on postnatal day 12 (P12 or 10 mg/kg on P13 or 15 mg/kg on P15 or multiple doses (P12, P13, and P15 of NMDA. In prenatally MAM-exposed rats with single NMDA-provoked spasms at P15, we obtain the intracranial electroencephalography and examine the pretreatment response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH or vigabatrin. Rat pups prenatally exposed to MAM exhibited a significantly greater number of spasms in response to single and multiple postnatal NMDA doses than vehicle-exposed controls. Vigabatrin treatment prior to a single NMDA dose on P15 significantly suppressed spasms in MAM group rats (p < 0.05, while ACTH did not. The MAM group also showed significantly higher fast oscillation (25–100 Hz power during NMDA-induced spasms than controls (p = 0.047. This new model of MCD-based epileptic spasms with corresponding features of human spasms will be valuable for future research of the developmental epilepsy.

  11. Morphological Characterization of the African Giant Rat (Cricetomys ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    gambianus, Waterhouse) Brain Across Age Groups: Gross Features of. Cortices ... Keywords: African giant rats, Brain, Morphology, Cerebrum, Cerebellum, Olfactory bulb ..... as shrinkage with aging rather than selective .... lasting increase in the number of proliferating cells, ... radial glia in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

  12. Altered expression of genes involved in GABAergic transmission and neuromodulation of granule cell activity in the cerebellum of schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, W Michael; Cardon, Karen; Bustillo, Juan; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I

    2008-12-01

    Deficits in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling have been described in the prefrontal cortex, limbic system, and cerebellum in individuals with schizophrenia. The purpose of the present study was to further investigate cerebellar gene expression alterations as they relate to decreases in GABAergic transmission by examining the expression of GABAergic markers, N-methyl-d-aspartic-acid (NMDA) receptor subunits, and cerebellum neuromodulators in individuals with schizophrenia. Subjects were postmortem men with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (N=13) and a postmortem interval-matched non-psychiatric male comparison group (N=13). The authors utilized real-time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to measure mRNA levels of the following GABAergic markers: glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 and 67; GABA plasma membrane transporter-1 (GAT-1); GABA type A (GABA(A)) receptor subunits alpha(6), beta(3), and delta; and parvalbumin. In addition, real-time-quantitative PCR was utilized to assess mRNA levels of the NMDA receptor (NR) subunits NR1, NR2-A, NR2-B, NR2-C, and NR2-D as well as the cerebellar neuromodulators glutamate receptor (GluR)-6, kainate-preferring glutamate receptor subunit-2 (KA2), metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-2 and mGluR3, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Measurements for mRNA levels were determined using lateral cerebellar hemisphere tissue from both schizophrenia and comparison subjects. Schizophrenia subjects showed significant decreases in mRNA levels of GAD(67), GAD(65), GAT-1, mGluR2, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Increases in GABA(A)-alpha(6 )and GABA(A)-delta as well as GluR6 and KA2 were also observed. Medication effects on the expression of the same genes were examined in rats treated with either haloperidol (Sprague-Dawley rats [N=16]) or clozapine (Long-Evans rats [N=20]). Both haloperidol and clozapine increased the levels of GAD(67) in the cerebellum and altered the expression of other cerebellar mRNAs. These

  13. Development of rat female genital cortex and control of female puberty by sexual touch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Lenschow

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rat somatosensory cortex contains a large sexually monomorphic genital representation. Genital cortex undergoes an unusual 2-fold expansion during puberty. Here, we investigate genital cortex development and female rat sexual maturation. Ovariectomies and estradiol injections suggested sex hormones cause the pubertal genital cortex expansion but not its maintenance at adult size. Genital cortex expanded by thalamic afferents invading surrounding dysgranular cortex. Genital touch was a dominant factor driving female sexual maturation. Raising female rats in contact with adult males promoted genital cortex expansion, whereas contact to adult females or nontactile (audio-visual-olfactory male cues did not. Genital touch imposed by human experimenters powerfully advanced female genital cortex development and sexual maturation. Long-term blocking of genital cortex by tetrodotoxin in pubescent females housed with males prevented genital cortex expansion and decelerated vaginal opening. Sex hormones, sexual experience, and neural activity shape genital cortex, which contributes to the puberty promoting effects of sexual touch.

  14. Development of rat female genital cortex and control of female puberty by sexual touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenschow, Constanze; Sigl-Glöckner, Johanna; Brecht, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Rat somatosensory cortex contains a large sexually monomorphic genital representation. Genital cortex undergoes an unusual 2-fold expansion during puberty. Here, we investigate genital cortex development and female rat sexual maturation. Ovariectomies and estradiol injections suggested sex hormones cause the pubertal genital cortex expansion but not its maintenance at adult size. Genital cortex expanded by thalamic afferents invading surrounding dysgranular cortex. Genital touch was a dominant factor driving female sexual maturation. Raising female rats in contact with adult males promoted genital cortex expansion, whereas contact to adult females or nontactile (audio-visual-olfactory) male cues did not. Genital touch imposed by human experimenters powerfully advanced female genital cortex development and sexual maturation. Long-term blocking of genital cortex by tetrodotoxin in pubescent females housed with males prevented genital cortex expansion and decelerated vaginal opening. Sex hormones, sexual experience, and neural activity shape genital cortex, which contributes to the puberty promoting effects of sexual touch.

  15. Lack of toxic effect of technical azadirachtin during postnatal development of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, M K; Raizada, R B

    2007-03-01

    Azadirachtin, a biopesticide has been evaluated for its possible toxic effects during postnatal development of rats over two generations. Rats were fed 100, 500 and 1000ppm technical azadirachtin through diet which is equivalent to 5, 25 and 50mg/kg body weight of rats. Technical azadirachtin has not produced any adverse effects on reproductive function and data were comparable to control animals over two generations. There were no toxicological effect in parent rats as evidenced by clinical signs of toxicity, enzymatic parameters like AST, ALT, ALP, S. bilirubin, S. cholesterol, total protein and histopathology of liver, brain, kidney and testes/ovary. The litters of F(1B) and F(2B) generations were devoid of any morphological, visceral and teratological changes. The percent cumulative loss and growth index of pups were also comparable to respective controls in successive growth period of 0, 4, 7, 14 and 21 days in two generations. There were no major malformations in fetuses while some insignificant minor skeletal variations like missing 5th sternebrae and bipartite thoracic centre found were not compound or dose related. No significant pathomorphological changes were observed in liver, kidney, brain and gonads of F(2B) pups. In conclusion rats fed technical azadirachtin showed no evidence of cumulative effects on postnatal development and reproductive performance over two generations. Absence of any major adverse reproductive effects in adults as well as in 21 days old pups of F(2B) generation suggest the safe use of technical azadirachtin as a biopesticide.

  16. Development of T Lymphocytes in the Nasal-associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT from Growing Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Sosa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present report was to study the development of several T-lymphocyte subsets in the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT of growing Wistar rats. CD5+ and CD4+ lymphocytes gradually increased with age. A predominance of CD8α+ over CD4+ T cells was found from 7 to 45 days but from 45 to 60 days of age T helper cells outnumbered the cytotoxic subpopulation. The majority of CD8+ T lymphocytes expressed the heterodimeric isoform. The most relevant findings by immunohistochemistry are: (1 the predominance of TCRγδ+ and CD8α+ cells at 7 days postpartum over all the other T-cell subpopulations; and (2 that TCRγβ+ outnumbered TCRαβ+ T cells from 7 to 45 days postpartum whereas αβ T cells predominated in 45- and 60-day-old rats. Besides, cytometric studies have shown that the percentages of TCRγ+, CD8+, as well as the population coexpressing both phenotypes (TCRγδ+CD8α+, were significantly higher in rats at 7 days postpartum when compared to 60 day-old rats. In the present study, the finding of a high number of γδ+ and CD8+ T cells early in NALT development may indicate the importance of these subpopulations in the protection of the nasal mucosa in suckling and weaning Wistar rats.

  17. Caspase-3/-8/-9, Bax and Bcl-2 expression in the cerebellum, lymph nodes and leukocytes of dogs naturally infected with canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, H L; Martins, A S; Moro, L; Milsted, A; Alves, F; Braz, G F; Vasconcelos, A C

    2010-01-26

    Canine distemper is an immunosuppressive disease caused by the canine distemper virus (CDV). Pathogenesis mainly involves the central nervous system and immunosuppression. Dogs naturally infected with CDV develop apoptotic cells in lymphoid tissues and the cerebellum, but this apoptotic mechanism is not well characterized. To better understand this process, we evaluated the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3, -8 and -9, by evaluating mRNA levels in the peripheral blood, lymph nodes and cerebellum of CDV-infected (CDV+) and uninfected (CDV-) dogs by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Blood samples from 12 CDV+ and 8 CDV- dogs, diagnosed by reverse transcription-PCR, were subjected to hematological analysis and apoptotic gene expression was evaluated using real-time-PCR. Tissues from the cerebellum and lymph nodes of four CDV+ and three CDV-dogs were also subjected to real time-PCR. No significant differences were found between CDV+ and CDV- dogs in the hemotological results or in the expression of caspase-3, -8, -9, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the peripheral blood. However, expression of Bax, caspase-3, -8 and -9 was significantly higher in the cerebellum of CDV+ compared to CDV- dogs. Expression of caspase-3 and -8 was significantly higher in the lymph nodes of CDV+ compared to CDV- dogs. We concluded that infection with CDV induces apoptosis in the cerebellum and lymph nodes in different ways. Lymph node apoptosis apparently occurs via caspase-3 activation, through the caspase-8 pathway, and cerebellum apoptosis apparently occurs via caspase-3 activation, through the caspase-8 and mitochondrial pathways.

  18. HMGB1 promotes the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Sadamura-Takenaka

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right ventricular failure and death. Recent studies have suggested that chronic inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving inflammation have not been fully elucidated.To elucidate the roles of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a ubiquitous DNA-binding protein with extracellular pro-inflammatory activity, in a rat model of PAH.Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered monocrotaline (MCT. Concentrations of HMGB1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum, and localization of HMGB1 in the lung were examined over time. The protective effects of anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody against MCT-induced PAH were tested.HMGB1 levels in BALF were elevated 1 week after MCT injection, and this elevation preceded increases of other pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, and the development of PAH. In contrast, serum HMGB1 levels were elevated 4 weeks after MCT injection, at which time the rats began to die. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that HMGB1 was translocated to the extranuclear space in periarterial infiltrating cells, alveolar macrophages, and bronchial epithelial cells of MCT-injected rats. Anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody protected rats against MCT-induced lung inflammation, thickening of the pulmonary artery wall, and elevation of right ventricular systolic pressure, and significantly improved the survival of the MCT-induced PAH rats.Our results identify extracellular HMGB1 as a promoting factor for MCT-induced PAH. The blockade of HMGB1 activity improved survival of MCT-induced PAH rats, and thus might be a promising therapy for the treatment of PAH.

  19. Regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase expression in the developing rat liver: control at different levels in the prenatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Salvadó, J.; Boon, L.; Biharie, G.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1996-01-01

    To study the regulation of the expression of glutamate dehydrogenase (Glu-DH) in rat liver during development, the Glu-DH mRNA concentration in the liver of rats ranging in age from 14 days prenatal development to 3 months after birth was determined. This concentration increased up to two days

  20. Disrupted social development enhances the motivation for cocaine in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarendse, P.J.J.; Limpens, J.H.W.; Vanderschuren, L.J.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126514917

    2014-01-01

    for behavioural development. In particular, social play behaviour during post-weaning development is thought to facilitate the attainment of social, emotional and cognitive capacities. Conversely, social insults during development can cause longlasting behavioural impairments and increase the

  1. Chronic intermittent hyperoxia alters the development of the hypoxic ventilatory response in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Sarah; Tobin, Kristina E; Fallon, Sarah C; Deng, Kevin S; McDonough, Amy B; Bavis, Ryan W

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to sustained hyperoxia alters the development of the respiratory control system, but the respiratory effects of chronic intermittent hyperoxia have rarely been investigated. We exposed newborn rats to short, repeated bouts of 30% O2 or 60% O2 (5 bouts h(-1)) for 4-15 days and then assessed their hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR; 10 min at 12% O2) by plethysmography. The HVR tended to be enhanced by intermittent hyperoxia at P4 (early phase of the HVR), but it was significantly reduced at P14-15 (primarily late phase of the HVR) compared to age-matched controls; the HVR recovered when individuals were returned to room air and re-studied as adults. To investigate the role of carotid body function in this plasticity, single-unit carotid chemoafferent activity was recorded in vitro. Intermittent hyperoxia tended to decrease spontaneous action potential frequency under normoxic conditions but, contrary to expectations, hypoxic responses were only reduced at P4 (not at P14) and only in rats exposed to higher O2 levels (i.e., intermittent 60% O2). Rats exposed to intermittent hyperoxia had smaller carotid bodies, and this morphological change may contribute to the blunted HVR. In contrast to rats exposed to intermittent hyperoxia beginning at birth, two weeks of intermittent 60% O2 had no effect on the HVR or carotid body size of rats exposed beginning at P28; therefore, intermittent hyperoxia-induced respiratory plasticity appears to be unique to development. Although both intermittent and sustained hyperoxia alter carotid body development and the HVR of rats, the specific effects and time course of this plasticity differs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of microwave exposure on motor learning and GluR2 phosphorylation in rabbit cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Wang Denggao; Zhang Guangbin; Zhou Wen; Yang Xuesen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of microwave exposure on motor learning and Glutamate receptor 2(GluR2) phosphorylation in rat cerebellum. Methods: The rabbits were trained for seven days to form eye-blink conditioning, and then divided randomly into control and microwave exposure group (at hours 0,3,24 and 72 subgroups after exposure, respectively). The rabbits were accepted 90 mW/cm 2 microwave exposure for 30 minutes, and the rectal temperature were detected immediately after exposure and specific absorption rate (SAR) value were calculated. Eye-blink conditioning were detected immediately after exposure, and cerebellar GluR2 protein and GluR2 phosphorylation were detected with Western blotting. Results: Rectal temperature of rabbits were increased by 3.02 degree C after exposure, and SAR value was 8.74 W/kg. The eye-blink conditioning decreased significantly after exposure, and cerebellar GluR2 protein expression had no significant alteration but phosphorylation reduced significantly after exposure. Conclusions: 90 mW/cm 2 microwave exposure has injurious effects on cerebellar GluR2 phosphorylation and motor learning. (authors)

  3. [123I]epidepride binding to cerebellar dopamine D2/D3 receptors is displaceable: implications for the use of cerebellum as a reference region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Videbaek, Charlotte; Ziebell, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The low density of cerebellar dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors provides the basis for using the cerebellum as a representation of free- and non-specifically bound radioligand in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies. With the development of ...

  4. Development of pulmonary oxygen toxicity in rats after hyperoxic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siermontowski Piotr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on lung aeration on an animal experimental model and compare the obtained results with the anticipated scope of damage to pulmonary parenchyma in humans under the same exposure conditions. The research was carried out on Black Hood rats that were kept in a hyperbaric chamber designed for animals in an atmosphere of pure oxygen and at overpressures of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 MPa for 1, 2 or 4 h. After sacrificing the animals, histopathological specimens were obtained encompassing cross-sections of entire lungs, which were subjected to qualitative and quantitative examination with the use of the 121-point Haug grid. A statistically significant decrease in pulmonary parenchyma was observed as a result of an increasing oxygen partial pressure as well as with prolonged exposure time. The intensification of changes observed was much higher than expected on the basis of calculations performed with the use of tables.

  5. The Origin of Mathematics and Number Sense in the Cerebellum: with Implications for Finger Counting and Dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervert, Larry

    2017-01-01

    Mathematicians and scientists have struggled to adequately describe the ultimate foundations of mathematics. Nobel laureates Albert Einstein and Eugene Wigner were perplexed by this issue, with Wigner concluding that the workability of mathematics in the real world is a mystery we cannot explain. In response to this classic enigma, the major purpose of this article is to provide a theoretical model of the ultimate origin of mathematics and "number sense" (as defined by S. Dehaene) that is proposed to involve the learning of inverse dynamics models through the collaboration of the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex (but prominently cerebellum-driven). This model is based upon (1) the modern definition of mathematics as the "science of patterns," (2) cerebellar sequence (pattern) detection, and (3) findings that the manipulation of numbers is automated in the cerebellum. This cerebro-cerebellar approach does not necessarily conflict with mathematics or number sense models that focus on brain functions associated with especially the intraparietal sulcus region of the cerebral cortex. A direct corollary purpose of this article is to offer a cerebellar inner speech explanation for difficulty in developing "number sense" in developmental dyscalculia. It is argued that during infancy the cerebellum learns (1) a first tier of internal models for a primitive physics that constitutes the foundations of visual-spatial working memory, and (2) a second (and more abstract) tier of internal models based on (1) that learns "number" and relationships among dimensions across the primitive physics of the first tier. Within this context it is further argued that difficulty in the early development of the second tier of abstraction (and "number sense") is based on the more demanding attentional requirements imposed on cerebellar inner speech executive control during the learning of cerebellar inverse dynamics models. Finally, it is argued that finger counting improves (does not

  6. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures...

  7. Effects of prenatal exposure to toluene on postnatal development and behavior in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K. S.; Hass, Ulla; Lund, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    Development and neurobehavioral effects of prenatal exposure to toluene (CAS 108-88-3) were studied after exposing pregnant rats (Mol:WIST) to 1800 ppm of the solvent for 6 h daily on days 7-20 of gestation. Body weights of exposed offspring were lower until day 10 after parturition. Neurobehavio...

  8. Selenium prevents tumor development in a rat model for chemical carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorkhem-Bergman, L.; Torndal, U. B.; Eken, S.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans have shown that selenium compounds can prevent cancer development. In this work we studied the tumor preventive effect of selenium supplementation, administrated as selenite, in the initiation, promotion and progression phases in a synchronized rat model for...

  9. Cortical interhemispheric responses to rhythmic stimulation are influenced by status epilepticus in developing rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsenov, Grygoriy; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S6 (2005), s. 209-210 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /26./. 28.08.2005-01.09.2005, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : status epilepticus * interhemispheric responses * developing rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  10. Influence of age and immunization on development of gingivitis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekic, P; Klausen, B; Friis-Hasché, E

    1989-01-01

    To study the effect of age and antigenic priming on the development of gingivitis, 33 healthy rats were placed in contact with Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Bacteroides gingivalis. On days 0, 3, 7, and 14 after inoculation, the gingival condition...

  11. Postnatal development and behaviour of Wistar rats after prenatal toluene exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, R. [Fachbereich Humanmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Benjamin Franklin, Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Embryopharmakologie, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Chahoud, I. [Fachbereich Humanmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Benjamin Franklin, Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Embryopharmakologie, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with different concentrations of toluene by inhalation (300, 600, 1000 and 1200 ppm) from day 9 to day 21 of pregnancy for 6 h a day in a whole-body inhalation chamber (controls inhaled fresh air only). From day 22, rats were kept single-caged and were allowed to deliver. Besides a detailed evaluation of the physical development of the offspring we performed the following tests: forelimb-grasp reflex, righting reflex, cliff-drop aversion reflex, maintainance of balance on a rotating rod, measurement of locomotor activity and learning ability in a discrimination learning test. A toluene exposure of 1200 ppm resulted in a reduced body weight of rat dams and offspring and a higher mortality until weaning. The physical development (incisor eruption, eye opening and vaginal opening) was retarded in this group. There were no clear-cut and concentration-dependent differences in the development of reflexes, rota rod performance and locomotor activity between the offspring of animals exposed to toluene and the controls. Likewise, no effects were found on learning ability in the operant conditioning task. Compared to the controls there were no differences in mating, fertility and pregnancy indexes in the F{sub 1}-generation. The tests performed have provided no evidence that toluene exposures {<=} 1200 ppm induce adverse effects on the behaviour of rat offspring exposed during late embryonic and fetal development. (orig.). With 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist MPEP on learning in developing rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulecká, Anna; Mareš, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, Suppl. 1 (2007), S48-S48 ISSN 0955-8810. [Biennial Meeting of the European Behavioural Pharmacology Society /12./. 31.08.2007-03.09.2007, Tübingen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : MPEP * developing rats * behavioral parameters Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  13. Oxidative Stress in the Developing Rat Brain due to Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, Jiří; Vytášek, Richard; Uhlík, Jiří; Vajner, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 2016 (2016), č. článku 5057610. ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : oxidative stress * developing rat brain * lipid peroxidation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.593, year: 2016

  14. IPRODIONE DELAYS MALE RAT PUBERTAL DEVELOPMENT, REDUCING SERUM TESTOSTERONE AND EX VIVO TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iprodione (IPRO) is a dichlorophenyl dicarboximide fungicide similar to the androgen receptor (AR) antagonist vinclozolin. The current studies were designed to determine if IPRO would delay male rat pubertal development like vinclozolin and to identify the mechanism(s) of action...

  15. Extinction, Reacquisition, and Rapid Forgetting of Eyeblink Conditioning in Developing Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kevin L.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning is a well-established model for studying the developmental neurobiology of associative learning and memory. However, age differences in extinction and subsequent reacquisition have yet to be studied using this model. The present study examined extinction and reacquisition of eyeblink conditioning in developing rats. In…

  16. Myenteric denervation differentially reduces enteroendocrine serotonin cell population in rats during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Luzmarina; Fernandes, Marilda da Cruz; Pereira, Lucieni Cristina Marques da Silva; Freitas, Priscila de; Gama, Patrícia; Alvares, Eliana Parisi

    2006-05-01

    The enteric nervous and enteroendocrine systems regulate different processes in the small intestine. Ablation of myenteric plexus with benzalkonium chloride (BAC) stimulates epithelial cell proliferation, whereas endocrine serotonin cells may inhibit the process. To evaluate the connection between the systems and the influence of myenteric plexus on serotoninergic cells in rats during postnatal development, the ileal plexus was partially removed with BAC. Rats were treated at 13 or 21 days and sacrificed after 15 days. The cell bodies of myenteric neurons were stained by beta NADH-diaphorase to detect the extension of denervation. The number of enteroendocrine cells in the ileum was estimated in crypts and villi in paraffin sections immunostained for serotonin. The number of neurons was reduced by 27.6 and 45% in rats treated on the 13th and 21st days, respectively. We tried to establish a correlation of denervation and the serotonin population according to the age of treatment. We observed a reduction of immunolabelled cells in the crypts of rats treated at 13 days, whereas this effect was seen in the villi of rats denervated at 21 days. These results suggest that the enteric nervous system might control the enteroendocrine cell population and this complex mechanism could be correlated to changes in cell proliferation.

  17. Rats with steroid-induced polycystic ovaries develop hypertension and increased sympathetic nervous system activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploj Karolina

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder associated with ovulatory dysfunction, abdominal obesity, hyperandrogenism, hypertension, and insulin resistance. Methods Our objectives in this study were (1 to estimate sympathetic-adrenal medullary (SAM activity by measuring mean systolic blood pressure (MSAP in rats with estradiol valerate (EV-induced PCO; (2 to estimate alpha1a and alpha2a adrenoceptor expression in a brain area thought to mediate central effects on MSAP regulation and in the adrenal medulla; (3 to assess hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis regulation by measuring adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and corticosterone (CORT levels in response to novel-environment stress; and (4 to measure abdominal obesity, sex steroids, and insulin sensitivity. Results The PCO rats had significantly higher MSAP than controls, higher levels of alpha1a adrenoceptor mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, and lower levels of alpha2a adrenoceptor mRNA in the PVN and adrenal medulla. After exposure to stress, PCO rats had higher ACTH and CORT levels. Plasma testosterone concentrations were lower in PCO rats, and no differences in insulin sensitivity or in the weight of intraabdominal fat depots were found. Conclusion Thus, rats with EV-induced PCO develop hypertension and increased sympathetic and HPA-axis activity without reduced insulin sensitivity, obesity, or hyperandrogenism. These findings may have implications for mechanisms underlying hypertension in PCOS.

  18. Development of mPMab-1, a Mouse-Rat Chimeric Antibody Against Mouse Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Ichii, Osamu; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), the ligand of C-type lectin-like receptor-2, is used as a lymphatic endothelial marker. We previously established clone PMab-1 of rat IgG 2a as a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) against mouse PDPN. PMab-1 is also very sensitive in immunohistochemical analysis; however, rat mAbs seem to be unfavorable for pathologists because anti-mouse IgG and anti-rabbit IgG are usually used as secondary antibodies in commercially available kits for immunohistochemical analysis. In this study, we develop a mouse-rat chimeric antibody, mPMab-1 of mouse IgG 2a , which was derived from rat PMab-1 mAb. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that mPMab-1 detects podocytes of the kidney, lymphatic endothelial cells of the colon, and type I alveolar cells of the lung. Importantly, mPMab-1 is more sensitive than PMab-1. This conversion strategy from rat mAb to mouse mAb could be applicable to other mAbs.

  19. Disturbed sensorimotor and electrophysiological patterns in lead intoxicated rats during development are restored by curcumin I.

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    Hind Benammi

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is one of the most significant health problem of environmental origin. It is known to cause different damages in the central and peripheral nervous system which could be represented by several neurophysiological and behavioral symptoms. In this study we firstly investigated the effect of lead prenatal exposure in rats to (3g/L, from neonatal to young age, on the motor/sensory performances, excitability of the spinal cord and gaits during development. Then we evaluated neuroprotective effects of curcumin I (Cur I against lead neurotoxicity, by means of grasping and cliff avoidance tests to reveal the impairment of the sensorimotor functions in neonatal rats exposed prenatally to lead. In addition, extracellular recordings of motor output in spinal cord revealed an hyper-excitability of spinal networks in lead treated rats. The frequency of induced fictive locomotion was also increased in treated rats. At the young age, rats exhibited an impaired locomotor gait. All those abnormalities were attenuated by Cur I treatment at a dose of 16g/kg. Based on our finding, Cur I has shown features of a potent chemical compound able to restore the neuronal and the relative locomotor behaviors disturbances induced by lead intoxication. Therefore, this chemical can be recommended as a new therapeutic trial against lead induced neurotoxicity.

  20. Effects of combined exposure to anti-androgens on development and sexual dimorphic behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie

    Summary Background: Androgens are key regulators of male sexual differentiation during the in utero and early postnatal development. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that counteract androgen action at some stage in these periods can permanently demasculinise male foetuses and lead......?  Is sexually dimorphic behaviour in rats affected at lower dose levels of anti-androgens and thereby a more sensitive endpoint than morphological effects on the male external reproductive organs? The thesis is based on the results of in vivo studies where mated female Wistar rats were exposed to anti......-androgens either alone or in mixtures during pregnancy and lactation. The endpoints examined for anti-androgenic effects in the offspring were: Anogenital distance (AGD), nipple retention (NR), and external (morphological) malformations in pups and sexually mature male rats. Furthermore, the effects of the anti...

  1. Effects of experimentally induced maternal hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on the development of rat offspring: II-the developmental pattern of neurons in relation to oxidative stress and antioxidant defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, O M; Ahmed, R G; El-Gareib, A W; El-Bakry, A M; Abd El-Tawab, S M

    2012-10-01

    and one oxidative stress marker (lipid peroxidation, LPO) followed a synchronized course of alterations in cerebrum, cerebellum and medulla oblongata. In both thyroid states, the oxidative damage has been demonstrated by the increased LPO and inhibition of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in most examined ages and brain regions. These disturbances in the antioxidant defense system led to deterioration in the neuronal maturation and development. In conclusion, it can be suggested that the maldevelopment of neurons and dendrites in different brain regions of offspring of hypothyroid and hyperthyroid mother rat dams may be attributed, at least in part, to the excess oxidative stress and deteriorated antioxidant defense system in such conditions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Vygotsky Meets Neuroscience: The Cerebellum and the Rise of Culture through Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervert, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The author suggests the brain's cerebellum and cerebral cortex are the origin of culture and considers the cerebellar models that came to constitute culture to be derived specifically from play. He summarizes recent research on the behavioral, cognitive, and affective evolution of the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex that shows the development…

  3. Interactions between Prefrontal Cortex and Cerebellum Revealed by Trace Eyelid Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Brian E.; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Kreider, Joy C.; Riusech, Frank; Mauk, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Eyelid conditioning has proven useful for analysis of learning and computation in the cerebellum. Two variants, delay and trace conditioning, differ only by the relative timing of the training stimuli. Despite the subtlety of this difference, trace eyelid conditioning is prevented by lesions of the cerebellum, hippocampus, or medial prefrontal…

  4. Glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum: description of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccarelli, G

    1980-01-01

    Only 43 cases of glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum have been reported in the literature. This report is based on the findings of 3 cerebellar glioblastomas in a review of 1,206 consecutive confirmed cases of glioblastoma operated on between 1947 and 1977 at the Istituto Neurologico of Milan, giving an incidence of 0.24%. Clinical features are similar to those of any other fast-growing subtentorial tumour. Neuroradiological studies, including CAT, are of little help in predicting the exact nature of these tumours before surgery. A correct diagnosis can be reached only by microscopic examination. Histological patterns appear in no way to differ from those of cerebral glioblastoma. The biological behaviour of these tumours is in all respects identical to that of glioblastoma of cerebral hemispheres.

  5. Wavelet analysis of MR functional data from the cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karen, Romero Sánchez; Vásquez Reyes Marcos, A.; González Gómez Dulce, I.; Hernández López, Javier M.; Silvia, Hidalgo Tobón; Pilar, Dies Suarez; Eduardo, Barragán Pérez; Benito, De Celis Alonso

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to create a computer algorithm based on wavelet analysis of BOLD signals, which automatically diagnosed ADHD using information from resting state MR experiments. Male right handed volunteers (infants with ages between 7 and 11 years old) were studied and compared with age matched controls. Wavelet analysis, which is a mathematical tool used to decompose time series into elementary constituents and detect hidden information, was applied here to the BOLD signal obtained from the cerebellum 8 region of all our volunteers. Statistical differences between the values of the a parameters of wavelet analysis was found and showed significant differences (p<0.02) between groups. This difference might help in the future to distinguish healthy from ADHD patients and therefore diagnose ADHD

  6. Wavelet analysis of MR functional data from the cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen, Romero Sánchez, E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; Vásquez Reyes Marcos, A., E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; González Gómez Dulce, I., E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; Hernández López, Javier M., E-mail: javierh@fcfm.buap.mx [Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, BUAP, Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Silvia, Hidalgo Tobón, E-mail: shidbon@gmail.com [Infant Hospital of Mexico, Federico Gómez, Mexico DF. Mexico and Physics Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa, Mexico DF. (Mexico); Pilar, Dies Suarez, E-mail: pilydies@yahoo.com, E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx; Eduardo, Barragán Pérez, E-mail: pilydies@yahoo.com, E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx [Infant Hospital of Mexico, Federico Gómez, Mexico DF. (Mexico); Benito, De Celis Alonso, E-mail: benileon@yahoo.com [Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, BUAP, Puebla, Pue. Mexico and Foundation for Development Carlos Sigüenza. Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The main goal of this project was to create a computer algorithm based on wavelet analysis of BOLD signals, which automatically diagnosed ADHD using information from resting state MR experiments. Male right handed volunteers (infants with ages between 7 and 11 years old) were studied and compared with age matched controls. Wavelet analysis, which is a mathematical tool used to decompose time series into elementary constituents and detect hidden information, was applied here to the BOLD signal obtained from the cerebellum 8 region of all our volunteers. Statistical differences between the values of the a parameters of wavelet analysis was found and showed significant differences (p<0.02) between groups. This difference might help in the future to distinguish healthy from ADHD patients and therefore diagnose ADHD.

  7. Detection of expressional changes induced by intrauterine growth restriction in the developing rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Wei; Dai, Yuee; Zhu, Ziyang; Liu, Qianqi

    2016-07-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is a disorder that can result in permanent changes in the physiology and metabolism of the newborn, which increased the risk of disease in adulthood. Evidence supports IUGR as a risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus, which could reflect changes in pancreas developmental pathways. We sought to characterize the IUGR-induced alterations of the complex pathways of pancreas development in a rat model of IUGR. We analyzed the pancreases of Sprague Dawley rats after inducing IUGR by feeding a maternal low calorie diet from gestational day 1 until term. IUGR altered the pancreatic structure, islet areas, and islet quantities and resulted in abnormal morphological changes during pancreatic development, as determined by HE staining and light microscopy. We identified multiple differentially expressed genes in the pancreas by RT-PCR. The genes of the insulin/FoxO1/Pdx1/MafA signaling pathway were first expressed at embryonic day 14 (E14). The expressions of insulin and MafA increased as the fetus grew while the expressions of FoxO1 and Pdx1 decreased. Compared with the control rats, the expressions of FoxO1, Pdx1, and MafA were lower in the IUGR rats, whereas insulin levels showed no change. Microarray profiling, in combination with quantitative real-time PCR, uncovered a subset of microRNAs that changed in their degree of expression throughout pancreatic development. In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that IUGR influences the development of the rat pancreas. We also identified new pathways that appear to be programmed by IUGR. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  8. Cerebellum and cognition in multiple sclerosis: the fall status matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Allali, Gilles; Achiron, Anat

    2018-04-01

    Cerebellar volume has been linked with cognitive performances in MS; however, the association in terms of fall status has never been compared. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to compare cognitive performance with cerebellar volume between MS fallers and non-fallers. The cross-sectional study included 140 PwMS (96 women). MRI volumetric analysis was based on the FreeSurfer image analysis suite. Volumes of the cerebellar gray and white matter were identified as the region of interest. Cognitive function included scores obtained from a computerized cognitive battery of tests. The sample was divided into fallers and non-fallers. MS fallers demonstrated a lower global cognitive performance and reduced gray and white matter cerebellar volumes compared to non-fallers. A significant association was found between total gray and white matter cerebellar volume and visual spatial subdomain (P value = 0.044 and 0.032, respectively) in the non-fallers group. The association remained significant after controlling for the total cranial volume and neurological disability (P value = 0.026 and 0.047, respectively). A relationship was found between the visual spatial score and the left gray matter cerebellum volume; R 2  = 0.44, P value = 0.021. We believe that a unique relationship exists between the cerebellum structure and cognitive processing according to fall history in PwMS and should be considered when investigating the association between brain functioning and cognitive performances in MS.

  9. Effects of iron supplementation on growth, gut microbiota, metabolomics and cognitive development of rat pups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica E Alexeev

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is common during infancy and therefore iron supplementation is recommended. Recent reports suggest that iron supplementation in already iron replete infants may adversely affect growth, cognitive development, and morbidity.Normal and growth restricted rat pups were given iron daily (30 or 150 μg/d from birth to postnatal day (PD 20, and followed to PD56. At PD20, hematology, tissue iron, and the hepatic metabolome were measured. The plasma metabolome and colonic microbial ecology were assessed at PD20 and PD56. T-maze (PD35 and passive avoidance (PD40 tests were used to evaluate cognitive development.Iron supplementation increased iron status in a dose-dependent manner in both groups, but no significant effect of iron on growth was observed. Passive avoidance was significantly lower only in normal rats given high iron compared with controls. In plasma and liver of normal and growth-restricted rats, excess iron increased 3-hydroxybutyrate and decreased several amino acids, urea and myo-inositol. While a profound difference in gut microbiota of normal and growth-restricted rats was observed, with iron supplementation differences in the abundance of strict anaerobes were observed.Excess iron adversely affects cognitive development, which may be a consequence of altered metabolism and/or shifts in gut microbiota.

  10. Studies on the postnatal development of the rat liver plasma membrane following maternal ethanol ingestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovinski, B

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the developing rat liver and on the structure and function of the postnatal rat liver plasma membrane were carried out following maternal consumption of alcohol during pregnancy and lactation. A developmental study of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) indicated that both the activity and certain kinetic properties of the enzyme from the progeny of alcohol-fed and pair-fed mothers were similar. Fatty liver, however, developed in the alcoholic progeny only after ADH appeared on a day 19 of gestation. Further studies on structural and functional changes were then undertaken on the postnatal development of the rat liver plasma membrane. Radioligand binding studies performed using the hapatic alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor as a plasma membrane probe demonstrated a significant decrease in receptor density in the alcoholic progeny, but no changes in binding affinity. Finally, the fatty acid composition of constituent phospholipids and the cholesterol content of rat liver plasma membranes were determined. All these observations suggest that membrane alterations in the newborn may be partially responsible for the deleterious action(s) of maternal alcoholism at the molecular level.

  11. Effect of maternal excessive sodium intake on postnatal brain development in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-a; Ahn, Young-mo; Lee, Hye-ah; Park, Hyesook; Kim, Young-ju; Lee, Hwa-young

    2015-04-01

    Postnatal brain development is affected by the in utero environment. Modern people usually have a high sodium intake. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium hyperingestion during pregnancy on the postnatal brain development of rat offspring. The sodium-overloaded rats received 1.8% NaCl in their drinking water for 7 days during the last week of gestation. Their body weight, urine, and blood levels of sodium and other parameters were measured. Some rats were sacrificed at pregnancy day 22 and the weight and length of the placenta and foetus were measured. The cerebral cortex and hippocampus were obtained from their offspring at postnatal day 1 and at postnatal weeks 1, 2, 4, and 8. Western blot analyses were conducted with brain tissue lysates. The sodium-overloaded animals had decreased weight gain in the last week of gestation as well as decreased food intake, increased water intake, urine volume, urine sodium, and serum sodium. There were no differences in placental weight and length. The foetuses of sodium-overloaded rats showed decreased body weight and size, and this difference was maintained postnatally for 2 weeks. In the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the offspring, the protein levels of myelin basic protein, calmodulin/calcium-dependent protein kinase II, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were decreased or aberrantly expressed. The present data suggest that increased sodium intake during pregnancy affects the brain development of the offspring.

  12. Chronic Oral Capsaicin Exposure During Development Leads to Adult Rats with Reduced Taste Bud Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelian, Jacquelyn M; Samson, Kaeli K; Sollars, Suzanne I

    2016-09-01

    Cross-sensory interaction between gustatory and trigeminal nerves occurs in the anterior tongue. Surgical manipulations have demonstrated that the strength of this relationship varies across development. Capsaicin is a neurotoxin that affects fibers of the somatosensory lingual nerve surrounding taste buds, but not fibers of the gustatory chorda tympani nerve which synapse with taste receptor cells. Since capsaicin is commonly consumed by many species, including humans, experimental use of this neurotoxin provides a naturalistic perturbation of the lingual trigeminal system. Neonatal or adults rats consumed oral capsaicin for 40 days and we examined the cross-sensory effect on the morphology of taste buds across development. Rats received moderate doses of oral capsaicin, with chronic treatments occurring either before or after taste system maturation. Tongue morphology was examined either 2 or 50 days after treatment cessation. Edema, which has been previously suggested as a cause of changes in capsaicin-related gustatory function, was also assessed. Reductions in taste bud volume occurred 50 days, but not 2 days post-treatment for rats treated as neonates. Adult rats at either time post-treatment were unaffected. Edema was not found to occur with the 5 ppm concentration of capsaicin we used. Results further elucidate the cooperative relationship between these discrete sensory systems and highlight the developmentally mediated aspect of this interaction. Chronic exposure to even moderate levels of noxious stimuli during development has the ability to impact the orosensory environment, and these changes may not be evident until long after exposure has ceased.

  13. Perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) induces ultrastructural and molecular alterations in synapses of rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąssowska, Magdalena; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Moczydłowska, Joanna; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Gewartowska, Magdalena; Strużyńska, Lidia; Gutowska, Izabela; Chlubek, Dariusz; Adamczyk, Agata

    2016-12-12

    Lead (Pb), environmentally abundant heavy-metal pollutant, is a strong toxicant for the developing central nervous system. Pb intoxication in children, even at low doses, is found to affect learning and memorizing, with devastating effects on cognitive function and intellectual development. However, the precise mechanism by which Pb impairs synaptic plasticity is not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of pre- and neonatal exposure to low dose of Pb (with Pb concentrations in whole blood below 10μg/dL) on the synaptic structure and the pre- and postsynaptic proteins expression in the developing rat brain. Furthermore, the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was analyzed. Pregnant female Wistar rats received 0.1% lead acetate (PbAc) in drinking water from the first day of gestation until weaning of the offspring, while the control animals received drinking water. During the feeding of pups, mothers from the Pb-group were continuously receiving PbAc. Pups of both groups were weaned at postnatal day 21 and then until postnatal day 28 received only drinking water. 28-day old pups were sacrificed and the ultrastructural changes as well as expression of presynaptic (VAMP1/2, synaptophysin, synaptotagmin-1, SNAP25, syntaxin-1) and postsynaptic (PSD-95) proteins were analyzed in: forebrain cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus. Our data revealed that pre- and neonatal exposure to low dose of Pb promotes pathological changes in synapses, including nerve endings swelling, blurred and thickened synaptic cleft structure as well as enhanced density of synaptic vesicles in the presynaptic area. Moreover, synaptic mitochondria were elongated, swollen or shrunken in Pb-treated animals. These structural abnormalities were accompanied by decrease in the level of key synaptic proteins: synaptotagmin-1 in cerebellum, SNAP25 in hippocampus and syntaxin-1 in cerebellum and hippocampus. In turn, increased level of synaptophysin was

  14. The cerebellum and visual perceptual learning: evidence from a motion extrapolation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, Cristina; Golzar, Ashkan; Santandrea, Elisa; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Eštočinová, Jana; Moretto, Giuseppe; Fiaschi, Antonio; Panzeri, Marta; Mariotti, Caterina; Tinazzi, Michele; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2014-09-01

    Visual perceptual learning is widely assumed to reflect plastic changes occurring along the cerebro-cortical visual pathways, including at the earliest stages of processing, though increasing evidence indicates that higher-level brain areas are also involved. Here we addressed the possibility that the cerebellum plays an important role in visual perceptual learning. Within the realm of motor control, the cerebellum supports learning of new skills and recalibration of motor commands when movement execution is consistently perturbed (adaptation). Growing evidence indicates that the cerebellum is also involved in cognition and mediates forms of cognitive learning. Therefore, the obvious question arises whether the cerebellum might play a similar role in learning and adaptation within the perceptual domain. We explored a possible deficit in visual perceptual learning (and adaptation) in patients with cerebellar damage using variants of a novel motion extrapolation, psychophysical paradigm. Compared to their age- and gender-matched controls, patients with focal damage to the posterior (but not the anterior) cerebellum showed strongly diminished learning, in terms of both rate and amount of improvement over time. Consistent with a double-dissociation pattern, patients with focal damage to the anterior cerebellum instead showed more severe clinical motor deficits, indicative of a distinct role of the anterior cerebellum in the motor domain. The collected evidence demonstrates that a pure form of slow-incremental visual perceptual learning is crucially dependent on the intact cerebellum, bearing the notion that the human cerebellum acts as a learning device for motor, cognitive and perceptual functions. We interpret the deficit in terms of an inability to fine-tune predictive models of the incoming flow of visual perceptual input over time. Moreover, our results suggest a strong dissociation between the role of different portions of the cerebellum in motor versus

  15. Melatonin modulates rat myotube-acetylcholine receptors by inhibiting calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida-Paula, Lidiana Duarte; Costa-Lotufo, Leticia V; Silva Ferreira, Zulma; Monteiro, Amanda Elisa G; Isoldi, Mauro Cesar; Godinho, Rosely O; Markus, Regina P

    2005-11-21

    Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, modulates alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in sympathetic nerve terminals, cerebellum and chick retina imposing a diurnal variation in functional responses [Markus, R.P., Zago, W.M., Carneiro, R.C., 1996. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat vas deferens. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 279, 18-22; Markus, R.P., Santos, J.M., Zago, W., Reno, L.A., 2003. Melatonin nocturnal surge modulates nicotinic receptors and nicotine-induced [3HI] glutamate release in rat cerebellum slices. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 305, 525-530; Sampaio, L.F.S., Hamassaki-Britto, D.E., Markus, R.P., 2005. Influence of melatonin on the development of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured chick retinal cells. Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. 38, 603-613]. Here we show that in rat myotubes forskolin and melatonin reduced the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in plasma membrane. In addition, these cells expressed melatonin MT1 receptors, which are known to be coupled to G(i)-protein. However, the pharmacological profile of melatonin analogs regarding the reduction in cyclic AMP accumulation and number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors did not point to a mechanism mediated by activation of G(i)-protein coupled receptors. On the other hand, calmidazolium, a classical inhibitor of calmodulin, reduced in a similar manner both effects. Considering that one isoform of adenylyl cyclase present in rat myotubes is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin, we propose that melatonin modulates the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via reduction in cyclic AMP accumulation.

  16. Repercussions of mild diabetes on pregnancy in Wistar rats and on the fetal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Felipe H

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental models are necessary to elucidate diabetes pathophysiological mechanisms not yet understood in humans. Objective: To evaluate the repercussions of the mild diabetes, considering two methodologies, on the pregnancy of Wistar rats and on the development of their offspring. Methods In the 1st induction, female offspring were distributed into two experimental groups: Group streptozotocin (STZ, n = 67: received the β-cytotoxic agent (100 mg STZ/kg body weight - sc on the 1st day of the life; and Non-diabetic Group (ND, n = 14: received the vehicle in a similar time period. In the adult life, the animals were mated. After a positive diagnosis of pregnancy (0, female rats from group STZ presenting with lower glycemia than 120 mg/dL received more 20 mg STZ/kg (ip at day 7 of pregnancy (2nd induction. The female rats with glycemia higher than 120 mg/dL were discarded because they reproduced results already found in the literature. In the mornings of days 0, 7, 14 and 21 of the pregnancy glycemia was determined. At day 21 of pregnancy (at term, the female rats were anesthetized and killed for maternal reproductive performance and fetal development analysis. The data were analyzed using Student-Newman-Keuls, Chi-square and Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP Tests (p Results STZ rats presented increased rates of pre (STZ = 22.0%; ND = 5.1% and post-implantation losses (STZ = 26.1%; ND = 5.7%, reduced rates of fetuses with appropriate weight for gestational age (STZ = 66%; ND = 93% and reduced degree of development (ossification sites. Conclusion Mild diabetes led a negative impact on maternal reproductive performance and caused intrauterine growth restriction and impaired fetal development.

  17. The cerebellum does more than sensory prediction error-based learning in sensorimotor adaptation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Peter A; Ivry, Richard B; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Rydz, David; Krakauer, John W; Taylor, Jordan A

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with damage to the cerebellum perform poorly in sensorimotor adaptation paradigms. This deficit has been attributed to impairment in sensory prediction error-based updating of an internal forward model, a form of implicit learning. These individuals can, however, successfully counter a perturbation when instructed with an explicit aiming strategy. This successful use of an instructed aiming strategy presents a paradox: In adaptation tasks, why do individuals with cerebellar damage not come up with an aiming solution on their own to compensate for their implicit learning deficit? To explore this question, we employed a variant of a visuomotor rotation task in which, before executing a movement on each trial, the participants verbally reported their intended aiming location. Compared with healthy control participants, participants with spinocerebellar ataxia displayed impairments in both implicit learning and aiming. This was observed when the visuomotor rotation was introduced abruptly ( experiment 1 ) or gradually ( experiment 2 ). This dual deficit does not appear to be related to the increased movement variance associated with ataxia: Healthy undergraduates showed little change in implicit learning or aiming when their movement feedback was artificially manipulated to produce similar levels of variability ( experiment 3 ). Taken together the results indicate that a consequence of cerebellar dysfunction is not only impaired sensory prediction error-based learning but also a difficulty in developing and/or maintaining an aiming solution in response to a visuomotor perturbation. We suggest that this dual deficit can be explained by the cerebellum forming part of a network that learns and maintains action-outcome associations across trials. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Individuals with cerebellar pathology are impaired in sensorimotor adaptation. This deficit has been attributed to an impairment in error-based learning, specifically, from a deficit in using sensory

  18. Motor System Development Depends on Experience: A Microgravity Study of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Kerry D.; Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Kalb, Robert; Hillman, Dean; DeFelipe, Javier; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Animals move about their environment by sensing their surroundings and making adjustments according to need. All animals take the force of gravity into account when the brain and spinal cord undertake the planning and execution of movements. To what extent must animals learn to factor in the force of gravity when making neural calculations about movement? Are animals born knowing how to respond to gravity, or must the young nervous system learn to enter gravity into the equation? To study this issue, young rats were reared in two different gravitational environments (the one-G of Earth and the microgravity of low Earth orbit) that necessitated two different types of motor operations (movements) for optimal behavior. We inquired whether those portions of the young nervous system involved in movement, the motor system, can adapt to different gravitational levels and, if so, the cellular basis for this phenomenon. We studied two groups of rats that had been raised for 16 days in microgravity (eight or 14 days old at launch) and compared their walking and righting (ability to go from upside down to upright) and brain structure to those of control rats that developed on Earth. Flight rats were easily distinguished from the age-matched ground control rats in terms of both motor function and central nervous system structure. Mature surface righting predominated in control rats on the day of landing (R+O), while immature righting predominated in the flight rats on landing day and 30 days after landing. Some of these changes appear to be permanent. Several conclusions can be drawn from these studies: (1) Many aspects of motor behavior are preprogrammed into the young nervous system. In addition, several aspects of motor behavior are acquired as a function of the interaction of the developing organism and the rearing environment; (2) Widespread neuroanatomical differences between one-G- and microgravity-reared rats indicate that there is a structural basis for the adaptation

  19. Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bhupendra; Mense, Sarah M.; Bhat, Nimee K.; Putty, Sandeep; Guthiel, William A.; Remotti, Fabrizio; Bhat, Hari K.

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol (E 2 ). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E 2 -induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E 2 pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E 2 -induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin + E 2 -treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin + E 2 group relative to those in the E 2 group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F 2α (8-iso-PGF 2α ) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E 2 -induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E 2 -induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E 2 -treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E 2 and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E 2 and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox cycling to estrogen metabolites, and thus quercetin may exacerbate E 2 -induced

  20. Specific binding of 125I-salmon calcitonin to rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamuta, Hiromichi; Furukawa, Shinichi; Koida, Masao; Yajima, Haruaki; Orlowski, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Rat brain particulate fraction was found to contain binding sites for 125 I-Salmon Calcitonin-I ( 125 I-SCT). Maximum binding occurred in the physiological pH range of 7.25 - 7.5. The binding reaction proceeded in a temperature-dependent manner. Binding sites were broadly distributed among the various rat brain regions and considerable regional differences existed in the affinity and density as detected by Scatchard analysis. The highest affinity was recorded in the case of the hypothalamus and the lowest in the case of the cerebellum. The KD (nM) and Bmax (pmole/mg protein) estimated for the binding to four regions were as follows: hypothalamus: 1.4 and 0.19, midbrain, hippocampus plus striatum: 1.5 and 0.08, pon plus medulla oblongata: 3.0 and 0.15 and cerebellum: 8.3 and 0.20. Using a particulate fraction of rat brain void of cerebellum and cortices, a binding assay for calcitonins was developed. Binding of 125 I-SCT was inhibited by unlabeled salmon, [Asu sup(1,7)]-eel and porcine calcitonins in a dose-dependent manner and the IC50s were 2.0, 8.0 and 30 nM, respectively. The IC50s were comparable to those estimated using a kidney particulate fraction. Human calcitonin, β-endorphin and substance P were weak inhibitors of the binding. Other peptides, drugs and putative neurotransmitters tested (totally 23 substances) failed to inhibit the binding at concentrations of 1.0 μM. The physiological significance of brain binding sites for calcitonin, with the possibility that the brain may possess endogenous ligands for these sites are discussed. (author)

  1. Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun-Hung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maternal undernutrition (MUN during pregnancy may lead to fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, which itself predisposes to adult risk of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. IUGR may stem from insufficient maternal nutrient supply or reduced placental nutrient transfer. In addition, a critical role for maternal stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs has been suggested to contribute to both IUGR and the ensuing risk of adult metabolic syndrome. While GC-induced fetal organ defects have been examined, there have been few studies on placental responses to MUN-induced maternal stress. Therefore, we hypothesize that 50% MUN associates with increased maternal GC levels and decreased placental HSD11B. This in turn leads to decreased placental and fetal growth, hence the need to investigate nutrient transporters. We measured maternal serum levels of corticosterone, and the placental basal and labyrinth zone expression of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B 1 (HSD11B-1 predominantly activates cortisone to cortisol and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11-DHC to corticosterone, although can sometimes drive the opposing (inactivating reaction, and HSD11B-2 (only inactivates and converts corticosterone to 11-DHC in rodents in control and MUN rats at embryonic day 20 (E20. Moreover, we evaluated the expression of nutrient transporters for glucose (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and amino acids (SLC38A1, 2, and 4. Our results show that MUN dams displayed significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels compared to control dams. Further, a reduction in fetal and placental weights was observed in both the mid-horn and proximal-horn positions. Notably, the placental labyrinth zone, the site of feto-maternal exchange, showed decreased expression of HSD11B1-2 in both horns, and increased HSD11B-1 in proximal-horn placentas, but no change in NR3C1. The reduced placental GCs catabolic capacity was accompanied by downregulation of SLC2A3, SLC

  2. The Effect of Gallic Acid on Histopathologic Evaluation of Cerebellum in Valproic Acid-Induced Autism Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Samimi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is counted as a worldwide public health problem. The possible causes of ASD are reactive oxygen species and free radicals. So, this study is aimed to evaluate the effects of Gallic acid, as an effective antioxidant, on histopathologic disorder of the cerebellum in valproic acid-induced autism animal models. 30 pregnant female rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, including: control, autism (or VAP and experimental 1, 2 and 3. Using a gavage needle, Gallic acid administered orally until about2 months of age. After the end of the treatment period, the rats were anesthetized with ether and their cerebellar tissues were removed for histopathologic studies. A significant decrease in the number of Purkinje and granular cells was observed in this study in VAP group compared to the control group (P≤0.05. A trend toward improvement was observed in the groups received 100 and 200 mg/kg of Gallic acid (P≤0.05. The results of this research revealed that Gallic acid reduces the side effects caused by valproic acid on cerebellar tissue of autistic rats. So, it should be considered for therapeutic goals.

  3. Evaluation of Neonatal Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rat Model for the Development of Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhoosudan A. Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D generally follows prediabetes (PD conditions such as impaired fasting glucose (IFG and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT. Although studies reported an association of IGT or IFG with cataract, the experimental basis for PD associated cataract is not known. Hence, we evaluated neonatal streptozotocin (nSTZ induced rat model to study PD associated cataractogenesis by injecting STZ to two-day old rats. While majority (70% of nSTZ injected pups developed IGT (nSTZ-PD by two months but not cataract even after seven months, remaining (30% nSTZ rats developed hyperglycemia (nSTZ-D by two months and mature cataract by seven months. Lens biochemical analysis indicated increased oxidative stress as indicated by increased SOD activity, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonyl levels in nSTZ-D cataractous lens. There was also increased polyol pathway as assessed by aldose reductase activity and sorbitol levels. Though nSTZ-PD animals have not shown any signs of lenticular opacity, insolubilization of proteins along with enhanced polyol pathway was observed in the lens. Further there was increased oxidative stress in lens of IGT animals. These results suggest that oxidative stress along with increased polyol pathway might play a role in IGT-associated lens abnormalities. In conclusion, nSTZ-PD rat model could aid to investigate IGT-associated lens abnormalities.

  4. Effect of Marine Collagen Peptides on Physiological and Neurobehavioral Development of Male Rats with Perinatal Asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Asphyxia during delivery produces long-term deficits in brain development. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of marine collagen peptides (MCPs, isolated from Chum Salmon skin by enzymatic hydrolysis, on male rats with perinatal asphyxia (PA. PA was performed by immersing rat fetuses with uterine horns removed from ready-to-deliver rats into a water bath for 15 min. Caesarean-delivered pups were used as controls. PA rats were intragastrically administered with 0.33 g/kg, 1.0 g/kg and 3.0 g/kg body weight MCPs from postnatal day 0 (PND 0 till the age of 90-days. Behavioral tests were carried out at PND21, PND 28 and PND 90. The results indicated that MCPs facilitated early body weight gain of the PA pups, however had little effects on early physiological development. Behavioral tests revealed that MCPs facilitated long-term learning and memory of the pups with PA through reducing oxidative damage and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity in the brain, and increasing hippocampus phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (p-CREB and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression.

  5. Gross hepatic changes in developing albino rats exposed to valproic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Khattak, S.T.; Elahi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Valproid Acid (VPA) is a broad spectrum antiepileptic drug. Its use during pregnancy has been associated with congenital anomalies and hepatotoxicity. This study was designed to assess the effects of VPA on the gross structure of liver in developing albino rats exposed to the drug during various trimesters of pregnancy. Methods: In this experimental study 40 pregnant rats were divided into 4 equal groups A, B, C and D. Group A received VPA in a dose of 500 mg/Kg/day intraperitonealy (I/P) on days 3, 4 and 5 of gestation. Group B received the drug in a dose of 500 mg/Kg/day I/P on days 8, 9 and 10 of gestation. Group C received VPA in a dose of 500 mg/Kg/day I/P on days 16, 17 and 18 of gestation. Group D received no treatment and was kept as a control group. On day 21, the rats were euthanised by cervical dislocation. The liver of the foetuses were dissected out for the assessment of their gross structure. Results: Foetal liver of the experimental groups showed significant decrease in weight as well as relative tissue weight index (RTWI) as compared to the control group, although the gross appearance of the foetal liver was normal in all the groups. Conclusion: The use of VPA during various trimesters of pregnancy produces hepatotoxicity in the developing rats. So, the use of this drug during pregnancy should be carefully decided. (author)

  6. Development and adaptation to resection of infant rat gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. de Vries

    1982-01-01

    textabstractInfants with malrotation of the gut easily develop midgut volvuluse If this volvulus is not treated immediately, ischemic necrosis of the small bowel may develop rapidly. The treatment of these children requires extensive small bowel resection. Infrequently, children are born with

  7. The importance of dietary control in the development of a peanut allergy model in Brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, J.D. de; Knippels, L.M.J.; Ezendam, J.; Odink, J.; Penninks, A.H.; Loveren, H. van

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the further development of a peanut allergy model in Brown Norway (BN) rats and in particular the importance of allergen-free breeding of the laboratory animals for the allergen to be used. For this purpose BN rats were bred for 3 generations on soy- and peanut-free feed since

  8. Cytomegalovirus-enhanced development of transplant arteriosclerosis in the rat; effect of timing of infection and recipient responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrands, JL; van Dam, JG; Onuta, G; Klatter, FA; Grauls, G; Bruggeman, CA; Rozing, J

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is put forward as a risk factor for transplant arteriosclerosis (TA). In this article, we studied CMV-enhanced development of TA in rats in different donor/recipient combinations in relation to the timing of infection. Recipient rats transplanted with an aortic allograft (BN to

  9. Effect of hypothyroidism on ovarian follicular development, granulosa cell proliferation and peripheral hormone levels in the prepubertal rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, G.; de rooij, D. G.; de Jong, F. H.; van den Hurk, R.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of prepubertal hypothyroidism on ovarian development in rats. Therefore, from birth up to day 40 postpartum, rats were given 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) via the drinking water of mothers and pups. At ages ranging from 12 to 40 days, ovarian weights

  10. Adverse effects on sexual development in rat offspring after low dose exposure to a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a mixture of low doses of five environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting pesticides, epoxiconazole, mancozeb, prochloraz, tebuconazole and procymidone, would cause adverse developmental toxicity effects in rats. In rat dams, a significant increase...... and cumulative intake, because of the potentially serious impact of mixed exposure on development and reproduction in humans....

  11. Expression patterns and role of PTEN in rat peripheral nerve development and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Xiang, Jianping; Wu, Junxia; He, Bo; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zheng, Canbin

    2018-05-29

    Studies have suggested that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) plays an important role in neuroprotection and neuronal regeneration. To better understand the potential role of PTEN with respect to peripheral nerve development and injury, we investigated the expression pattern of PTEN at different stages of rat peripheral nerve development and injury and subsequently assessed the effect of pharmacological inhibition of PTEN using bpV(pic) on axonal regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. During the early stages of development, PTEN exhibits low expression in neuronal cell bodies and axons. From embryonic day (E) 18.5 and postnatal day (P)5 to adult, PTEN protein becomes more detectable, with high expression in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and axons. PTEN expression is inhibited in peripheral nerves, preceding myelination during neuronal development and remyelination after acute nerve injury. Low PTEN expression after nerve injury promotes Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway activity. In vivo pharmacological inhibition of PTEN using bpV(pic) promoted axonal regrowth, increased the number of myelinated nerve fibers, improved locomotive recovery and enhanced the amplitude response and nerve conduction velocity following stimulation in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. Thus, we suggest that PTEN may play potential roles in peripheral nerve development and regeneration and that inhibition of PTEN expression is beneficial for nerve regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of maternal exposure to trichloroethylene on glucose uptake and nucleic acid and protein levels in the brains of developing rat pups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbec, E.A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread contaminant of drinking water sources. This study examined several biochemical aspects of the hippocampus and cerebellum of rat pups that were exposed prenatally (gestational) and postnatally (lactational) to TCE via their dams' drinking water. The effects of TCE on glucose uptake, and on nucleic and protein levels in brain tissue were examined in these pups. Glucose uptake in the cerebellum, hippocampus and whole brain of the pups during the first 21 days of life was measured using the tritium-labeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) dissection/scintillation counting technique. The author determined that 312 mg TCE/I in drinking water (total dam exposure was 684 mg) significantly depressed 2-DG uptake in the whole brains and cerebella of 7- to 21-day old pups. This concentration also reduced 2-DG uptake in the hippocampus of exposed pups at 7, 11, and 16 days, but the uptake returned to control levels by 21 days. No overt toxicity, such as lower body or brain weight, was observed at this exposure level. This decrease in 2-DG uptake is a reflection of a decreased relative glucose uptake in the TCE exposed animals. Total DNA and RNA were extracted and measured using a modification of the Schmidt-Thannhauser procedure and Schneider technique, respectively. Proteins were determined based on the method of Bradford (1976)

  13. CDKL5 knockout leads to altered inhibitory transmission in the cerebellum of adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivilia, S; Mangano, C; Beggiato, S; Giuliani, A; Torricella, R; Baldassarro, V A; Fernandez, M; Lorenzini, L; Giardino, L; Borelli, A C; Ferraro, L; Calzà, L

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) are associated to severe neurodevelopmental alterations including motor symptoms. In order to elucidate the neurobiological substrate of motor symptoms in CDKL5 syndrome, we investigated the motor function, GABA and glutamate pathways in the cerebellum of CDKL5 knockout female mice. Behavioural data indicate that CDKL5-KO mice displayed impaired motor coordination on the Rotarod test, and altered steps, as measured by the gait analysis using the CatWalk test. A higher reduction in spontaneous GABA efflux, than that in glutamate, was observed in CDKL5-KO mouse cerebellar synaptosomes, leading to a significant increase of spontaneous glutamate/GABA efflux ratio in these animals. On the contrary, there were no differences between groups in K(+) -evoked GABA and glutamate efflux. The anatomical analysis of cerebellar excitatory and inhibitory pathways showed a selective defect of the GABA-related marker GAD67 in the molecular layer in CDKL5-KO mice, while the glutamatergic marker VGLUT1 was unchanged in the same area. Fine cerebellar structural abnormalities such as a reduction of the inhibitory basket 'net' estimated volume and an increase of the pinceau estimated volume were also observed in CDKL5-KO mice. Finally, the BDNF mRNA expression level in the cerebellum, but not in the hippocampus, was reduced compared with WT animals. These data suggest that CDKL5 deletion during development more markedly impairs the establishment of a correct GABAergic cerebellar network than that of glutamatergic one, leading to the behavioural symptoms associated with CDKL5 mutation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  14. Development of mechanical hypersensitivity in rats during heroin and ethanol dependence: alleviation by CRF₁ receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Misra, Kaushik K; Wee, Sunmee; Park, Paula E; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F

    2012-02-01

    Animal models of drug dependence have described both reductions in brain reward processes and potentiation of stress-like (or anti-reward) mechanisms, including a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling. Accordingly, chronic exposure to opiates often leads to the development of mechanical hypersensitivity. We measured paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) in male Wistar rats allowed limited (short access group: ShA) or extended (long access group: LgA) access to heroin or cocaine self-administration, or in rats made dependent on ethanol via ethanol vapor exposure (ethanol-dependent group). In heroin self-administering animals, after transition to LgA conditions, thresholds were reduced to around 50% of levels observed at baseline, and were also significantly lower than thresholds measured in animals remaining on the ShA schedule. In contrast, thresholds in animals self-administering cocaine under either ShA (1 h) or LgA (6 h) conditions were unaltered. Similar to heroin LgA rats, ethanol-dependent rats also developed mechanical hypersensitivity after eight weeks of ethanol vapor exposure compared to non-dependent animals. Systemic administration of the CRF1R antagonist MPZP significantly alleviated the hypersensitivity observed in rats dependent on heroin or ethanol. The emergence of mechanical hypersensitivity with heroin and ethanol dependence may thus represent one critical drug-associated negative emotional state driving dependence on these substances. These results also suggest a recruitment of CRF-regulated nociceptive pathways associated with escalation of intake and dependence. A greater understanding of relationships between chronic drug exposure and pain-related states may provide insight into mechanisms underlying the transition to drug addiction, as well as reveal new treatment opportunities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal Style Selectively Shapes Amygdalar Development and Social Behavior in Rats Genetically Prone to High Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua L; Glover, Matthew E; Pugh, Phyllis C; Fant, Andrew D; Simmons, Rebecca K; Akil, Huda; Kerman, Ilan A; Clinton, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    The early-life environment critically influences neurodevelopment and later psychological health. To elucidate neural and environmental elements that shape emotional behavior, we developed a rat model of individual differences in temperament and environmental reactivity. We selectively bred rats for high versus low behavioral response to novelty and found that high-reactive (bred high-responder, bHR) rats displayed greater risk-taking, impulsivity and aggression relative to low-reactive (bred low-responder, bLR) rats, which showed high levels of anxiety/depression-like behavior and certain stress vulnerability. The bHR/bLR traits are heritable, but prior work revealed bHR/bLR maternal style differences, with bLR dams showing more maternal attention than bHRs. The present study implemented a cross-fostering paradigm to examine the contribution of maternal behavior to the brain development and emotional behavior of bLR offspring. bLR offspring were reared by biological bLR mothers or fostered to a bLR or bHR mother and then evaluated to determine the effects on the following: (1) developmental gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala and (2) adult anxiety/depression-like behavior. Genome-wide expression profiling showed that cross-fostering bLR rats to bHR mothers shifted developmental gene expression in the amygdala (but not hippocampus), reduced adult anxiety and enhanced social interaction. Our findings illustrate how an early-life manipulation such as cross-fostering changes the brain's developmental trajectory and ultimately impacts adult behavior. Moreover, while earlier studies highlighted hippocampal differences contributing to the bHR/bLR phenotypes, our results point to a role of the amygdala as well. Future work will pursue genetic and cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that contribute to bHR/bLR behavior either at baseline or following environmental manipulations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Development of telmisartan in the therapy of spinal cord injury: pre-clinical study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin CM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chien-Min Lin,1,* Jo-Ting Tsai,2,* Chen Kuei Chang,1 Juei-Tang Cheng,3 Jia-Wei Lin11Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shuang Ho Hospital-Taipei Medical University, 3Institute of Medical Science, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan City, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Decrease of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-δ (PPARδ expression has been observed after spinal cord injury (SCI. Increase of PPARδ may improve the damage in SCI. Telmisartan, the antihypertensive agent, has been mentioned to increase the expression of PPARδ. Thus, we are going to screen the effectiveness of telmisartan in SCI for the development of it in clinical application.Methods: In the present study, we used compressive SCI in rats. Telmisartan was then used to evaluate the influence in rats after SCI. Change in PPARδ expression was identified by Western blots. Also, behavioral tests were performed to check the recovery of damage.Results: Recovery of damage from SCI was observed in telmisartan-treated rats. Additionally, this action of telmisartan was inhibited by GSK0660 at the dose sufficient to block PPARδ. However, metformin at the dose enough to activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase failed to produce similar action as telmisartan. Thus, mediation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in this action of telmisartan can be rule out. Moreover, telmisartan reversed the expressions of PPARδ in rats with SCI.Conclusion: The obtained data suggest that telmisartan can improve the damage of SCI in rats through an increase in PPARδ expression. Thus, telmisartan is useful to be developed as an agent in the therapy of SCI.Keywords: PPARδ, AMPK, spinal cord injury, angiotensin receptor blocker, metformin

  17. Unilateral nasal obstruction affects motor representation development within the face primary motor cortex in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yasunori; Kato, Chiho; Uchima Koecklin, Karin Harumi; Okihara, Hidemasa; Ishida, Takayoshi; Fujita, Koichi; Yabushita, Tadachika; Kokai, Satoshi; Ono, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    Postnatal growth is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Nasal obstruction during growth alters the electromyographic activity of orofacial muscles. The facial primary motor area represents muscles of the tongue and jaw, which are essential in regulating orofacial motor functions, including chewing and jaw opening. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic unilateral nasal obstruction during growth on the motor representations within the face primary motor cortex (M1). Seventy-two 6-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control ( n = 36) and experimental ( n = 36) groups. Rats in the experimental group underwent unilateral nasal obstruction after cauterization of the external nostril at 8 days of age. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) mapping was performed when the rats were 5, 7, 9, and 11 wk old in control and experimental groups ( n = 9 per group per time point). Repeated-measures multivariate ANOVA was used for intergroup and intragroup statistical comparisons. In the control and experimental groups, the total number of positive ICMS sites for the genioglossus and anterior digastric muscles was significantly higher at 5, 7, and 9 wk, but there was no significant difference between 9 and 11 wk of age. Moreover, the total number of positive ICMS sites was significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control at each age. It is possible that nasal obstruction induced the initial changes in orofacial motor behavior in response to the altered respiratory pattern, which eventually contributed to face-M1 neuroplasticity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Unilateral nasal obstruction in rats during growth periods induced changes in arterial oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and altered development of the motor representation within the face primary cortex. Unilateral nasal obstruction occurring during growth periods may greatly affect not only respiratory function but also craniofacial function in rats. Nasal obstruction should be treated

  18. Emotion and Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia-Investigating the Role of the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Omar; Knee-Zaska, Charlotte; Donohoe, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Social cognitive dysfunction, including deficits in facial emotion recognition and theory of mind, is a core feature of schizophrenia and more strongly predicts functional outcome than neurocognition alone. Although traditionally considered to play an important role in motor coordination, the cerebellum has been suggested to play a role in emotion processing and theory of mind, and also shows structural and functional abnormalities in schizophrenia. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the specific role of the cerebellum in emotion and theory of mind deficits in schizophrenia using previously published functional neuroimaging studies. PubMed and PsycINFO were used to search for all functional neuroimaging studies reporting altered cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients during emotion processing or theory of mind tasks, published until December 2014. Overall, 14 functional neuroimaging studies were retrieved. Most emotion studies reported lower cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls. In contrast, the theory of mind studies reported mixed findings. Altered activity was observed across several posterior cerebellar regions involved in emotion and cognition. Weaker cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls during emotion processing may contribute to blunted affect and reduced ability to recognise emotion in others. This research could be expanded by examining the relationship between cerebellum function, symptomatology and behaviour, and examining cerebellum functional connectivity in patients during emotion and theory of mind tasks.

  19. [Effect of leptin on long-term spatial memory of rats with white matter damage in developing brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Er-Cui; Jiang, Li

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective effect of leptin by observing its effect on spatial memory of rats with white matter damage in developing brain. A total of 80 neonatal rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham-operation (n=27), model (n=27) and leptin intervention (n=27). The rats in the model and leptin intervention groups were used to prepare a model of white matter damage in developing brain, and the rats in the leptin intervention group were given leptin (100 μg/kg) diluted with normal saline immediately after modelling for 4 consecutive days. The survival rate of the rats was observed and the change in body weight was monitored. When the rats reached the age of 21 days, the Morris water maze test was used to evaluate spatial memory. There was no significant difference in the survival rate of rats between the three groups (P>0.05). Within 10 days after birth, the leptin intervention group had similar body weight as the sham-operation group and significantly lower body weight than the model group (P0.05). The results of place navigation showed that from the second day of experiment, there was a significant difference in the latency period between the three groups (Pmemory impairment of rats with white matter damage in developing brain. It thus exerts a neuroprotective effect, and is worthy of further research.

  20. The effect of a hyperdynamic environment on the development of the rat retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, D. M.; Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of a 2 G field on the retinal development of the layers in the rat and central visual system nuclei are investigated. The thickness of the retinal layers, ganglion cells, and brains of male and female Wistar rats suspended from an 18 foot diameter centrifuge creating a 2 G field are evaluated and compared with a control group. A decrease in the thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of 37.1 percent, of 58.5 percent in the inner nuclear layer (INL), and of 28.8 percent in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and a reduction in body weight are observed in the 2-G rats. The data reveal that the ganglion cells and visual system nuclei activity correspond well with the control data; however, the medial terminal nucleus (MTN) activity is inhibited in the 2-G rats. It is concluded that the differences in ONL and IPL are attributed to body weight reduction, but the INL and MTN are affected by the 2-G conditions.

  1. The organization of the human cerebellum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krienen, Fenna M.; Castellanos, Angela; Diaz, Julio C.; Yeo, B. T. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cerebral cortex communicates with the cerebellum via polysynaptic circuits. Separate regions of the cerebellum are connected to distinct cerebral areas, forming a complex topography. In this study we explored the organization of cerebrocerebellar circuits in the human using resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI). Data from 1,000 subjects were registered using nonlinear deformation of the cerebellum in combination with surface-based alignment of the cerebral cortex. The foot, hand, and tongue representations were localized in subjects performing movements. fcMRI maps derived from seed regions placed in different parts of the motor body representation yielded the expected inverted map of somatomotor topography in the anterior lobe and the upright map in the posterior lobe. Next, we mapped the complete topography of the cerebellum by estimating the principal cerebral target for each point in the cerebellum in a discovery sample of 500 subjects and replicated the topography in 500 independent subjects. The majority of the human cerebellum maps to association areas. Quantitative analysis of 17 distinct cerebral networks revealed that the extent of the cerebellum dedicated to each network is proportional to the network's extent in the cerebrum with a few exceptions, including primary visual cortex, which is not represented in the cerebellum. Like somatomotor representations, cerebellar regions linked to association cortex have separate anterior and posterior representations that are oriented as mirror images of one another. The orderly topography of the representations suggests that the cerebellum possesses at least two large, homotopic maps of the full cerebrum and possibly a smaller third map. PMID:21795627

  2. A quantitative magnetic resonance histology atlas of postnatal rat brain development with regional estimates of growth and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Evan; Badea, Alexandra; Watson, Charles; Johnson, G Allan

    2013-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the role of postnatal brain development in the etiology of several neurologic diseases. The rat has long been recognized as a powerful model system for studying neuropathology and the safety of pharmacologic treatments. However, the complex spatiotemporal changes that occur during rat neurodevelopment remain to be elucidated. This work establishes the first magnetic resonance histology (MRH) atlas of the developing rat brain, with an emphasis on quantitation. The atlas comprises five specimens at each of nine time points, imaged with eight distinct MR contrasts and segmented into 26 developmentally defined brain regions. The atlas was used to establish a timeline of morphometric changes and variability throughout neurodevelopment and represents a quantitative database of rat neurodevelopment for characterizing rat models of human neurologic disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Postdependent state in rats as a model for medication development in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Marcus W; Sommer, Wolfgang H

    2015-01-01

    Rational development of novel therapeutic strategies for alcoholism requires understanding of its underlying neurobiology and pathophysiology. Obtaining this knowledge largely relies on animal studies. Thus, choosing the appropriate animal model is one of the most critical steps in pre-clinical medication development. Among the range of animal models that have been used to investigate excessive alcohol consumption in rodents, the postdependent model stands out. It was specifically developed to test the role of negative affect as a key driving force in a perpetuating addiction cycle for alcoholism. Here, we will describe our approach to make rats dependent via chronic intermittent exposure to alcohol, discuss the validity of this model, and compare it with other commonly used animal models of alcoholism. We will summarize evidence that postdependent rats fulfill several criteria of a 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV/V-like' diagnostic system. Importantly, these animals show long-lasting excessive consumption of and increased motivation for alcohol, and evidence for loss of control over alcohol intake. Our conclusion that postdependent rats are an excellent model for medication development for alcoholism is underscored by a summary of more than two dozen pharmacological tests aimed at reversing these abnormal alcohol responses. We will end with open questions on the use of this model. In the tradition of the Sanchis-Segura and Spanagel review, we provide comic strips that illustrate the postdependent procedure and relevant phenotypes in this review. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Effects of hyper- and hypothyroidism on the development and proliferation of testicular cells in prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlalla, Mohamed Babo; Wei, Quanwei; Fedail, Jaafar Sulieman; Mehfooz, Asif; Mao, Dagan; Shi, Fangxiong

    2017-12-01

    Thyroid hormones are important in the development and regulation of testes. This study was conducted to determine the effects of hyper- and hypothyroidism on testicular development in prepubertal rats aged 20-70 days. Weaning male rats (20 days old) until day 70 age were randomly divided into four groups: control, hyperthyroid (hyper-T), hypothyroid (hypo-T) and hypothyroid treated with thyroxine (T4) (hypo-T+T4). The results indicated that thyroid hormones caused a significant effect in body and testis weights, and food and water consumption. In addition there were changes in serum concentrations of tri-iodothyronine, T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and testosterone. Histomorphology showed a significant decrease in seminiferous tubule diameter in hyper-T compared to the other groups. Leydig cell numbers showed a significant elevation in hyper-T but not in hypo-T groups. Immunostaining indicated that TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid hormone receptors α/β (TRαβ) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) have the roles in testicular development. Our findings suggest that hyper- and hypo-thyroidism regulate testicular cell proliferation and spermatogenesis in prepubertal rats, indicating that expression of TSHR, TRαβ and PCNA may be regulated by thyroid hormones that are involved in testicular development; and that the administration of T4 to the hypo-T+T4 group leads to an improvement in the testicular condition. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Maternal creatine supplementation affects the morpho-functional development of hippocampal neurons in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartini, S; Lattanzi, D; Ambrogini, P; Di Palma, M; Galati, C; Savelli, D; Polidori, E; Calcabrini, C; Rocchi, M B L; Sestili, P; Cuppini, R

    2016-01-15

    Creatine supplementation has been shown to protect neurons from oxidative damage due to its antioxidant and ergogenic functions. These features have led to the hypothesis of creatine supplementation use during pregnancy as prophylactic treatment to prevent CNS damage, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Unfortunately, very little is known on the effects of creatine supplementation during neuron differentiation, while in vitro studies revealed an influence on neuron excitability, leaving the possibility of creatine supplementation during the CNS development an open question. Using a multiple approach, we studied the hippocampal neuron morphological and functional development in neonatal rats born by dams supplemented with 1% creatine in drinking water during pregnancy. CA1 pyramidal neurons of supplemented newborn rats showed enhanced dendritic tree development, increased LTP maintenance, larger evoked-synaptic responses, and higher intrinsic excitability in comparison to controls. Moreover, a faster repolarizing phase of action potential with the appearance of a hyperpolarization were recorded in neurons of the creatine-treated group. Consistently, CA1 neurons of creatine exposed pups exhibited a higher maximum firing frequency than controls. In summary, we found that creatine supplementation during pregnancy positively affects morphological and electrophysiological development of CA1 neurons in offspring rats, increasing neuronal excitability. Altogether, these findings emphasize the need to evaluate the benefits and the safety of maternal intake of creatine in humans. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The control of a manipulator by a computer model of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Extension of previous work by Albus (1971, 1972) on the theory of cerebellar function to an application of a computer model of the cerebellum to manipulator control. Following a discussion of the cerebellar function and of a perceptron analogy of the cerebellum, particularly in regard to learning, an electromechanical model of the cerebellum is considered in the form of an IBM 1800 computer connected to a Rancho Los Amigos arm with seven degrees of freedom. It is shown that the computer memory makes it possible to train the arm on some representative sample of the universe of possible states and to achieve satisfactory performance.

  7. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellum SRX545939,SRX026427,SRX062951,SRX085450,SRX026429,SRX545929,SRX026428,SRX026430,SRX545934,SRX545933,SRX545924,SRX545923,SRX545926,SRX545940,SRX545936,SRX545935,SRX545938,SRX545937,SRX545928,SRX112921,SRX185818,SRX026433,SRX545930,SRX545925,SRX545927,SRX022870,SRX022871,SRX998311,SRX026434,SRX026432,SRX026431,SRX185811,SRX085441,SRX062950,SRX022869,SRX022868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum.bed ...

  8. Locomotion and physical development in rats treated with ionizing radiation in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman, M.S.; Hupp, E.W.; Lancaster, F.E.

    1993-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on the emergence of locomotor skill, and physical development were studied in laboratory rats (Fisher F-344 inbred strain). Rats were treated with 3 different doses of radiation (150 rad, 15 rad, and 6.8 rad) delivered on the 20th day of prenatal life. Results indicated that relatively moderate (15 rad) to high (150 rad) doses of radiation had effects on certain locomotion and physical development parameters. Exposure to 150 rad delayed pivoting, cliff-avoidance, upper jaw tooth eruption, and decreased body weights. Other parameters, such as negative geotaxis, eye opening, and lower jaw tooth eruption were marginally delayed in the 150 rad treated animals. Exposure to 15 rad delayed pivoting and cliff-avoidance

  9. Citric acid inhibits development of cataracts, proteinuria and ketosis in streptozotocin (type1) diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ryoji; Nagai, Mime; Shimasaki, Satoko; Baynes, John W.; Fujiwara, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Although many fruits such as lemon and orange contain citric acid, little is known about beneficial effects of citric acid on health. Here we measured the effect of citric acid on the pathogenesis of diabetic complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Although oral administration of citric acid to diabetic rats did not affect blood glucose concentration, it delayed the development of cataracts, inhibited accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) such as Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) in lens proteins, and protected against albuminuria and ketosis . We also show that incubation of protein with acetol, a metabolite formed from acetone by acetone monooxygenase, generate CEL, suggesting that inhibition of ketosis by citric acid may lead to the decrease in CEL in lens proteins. These results demonstrate that the oral administration of citric acid ameliorates ketosis and protects against the development of diabetic complications in an animal model of type 1 diabetes. PMID:20117096

  10. Early postnatal development of rat brain is accompanied by generation of lipofuscin-like pigments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, J.; Ivica, J.; Kagan, Dmytro; Svoboda, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 347, 1-2 (2011), s. 157-162 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110606 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : brain * early development * lipofuscin-like pigments * fluorescence * rat Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.057, year: 2011

  11. Anticonvulsant action of two antagonists of NMDA receptors in developing rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Lojková, Denisa; Mikulecká, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. S4 (2006), s. 314-314 ISSN 0013-9580. [Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and Canadian League against Epilepsy. 01.12.2006-05.12.2006, San Diego, CA] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : memantine * ifenprodil * developing rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  12. Development of the acoustic startle response in rats and its change after early acoustic trauma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybalko, Natalia; Chumak, Tetyana; Bureš, Zbyněk; Popelář, Jiří; Šuta, Daniel; Syka, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 286, jul 1 (2015), s. 212-221 ISSN 0166-4328 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1347; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : auditory system * rat * acoustic startle reflex * development * critical period * noise exposure Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.002, year: 2015

  13. Generation of hydrogen peroxide in the developing rat heart: the role of elastin metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, J.; Ošťádalová, Ivana; Vytášek, R.; Vajner, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 358, 1-2 (2011), s. 215-220 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat heart * ontogenetic development * hydrogen peroxide * elastin * fluorescence Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.057, year: 2011

  14. Periodization of the early postnatal development in the rat with particular attention to the weaning period

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádalová, Ivana; Babický, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl.1 (2012), S1-S7 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat * ontogenic development * presuckling period * suckling period * weaning period Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  15. Olanzapine-induced weight gain: lessons learned from developing rat models

    OpenAIRE

    van der Zwaal, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Olanzapine is an effective and commonly prescribed antipsychotic drug, used for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Unfortunately significant weight gain is a common side effect. In order to effectively address this side effect, it is crucial to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, this thesis describes the development of a number of rat models that were designed to determine the effects of olanzapine on different aspects of energy balance. In both short- a...

  16. Development of a bio-magnetic measurement system and sensor configuration analysis for rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, In-Seon; Kim, Kiwoong; Lim, Sanghyun; Kwon, Hyukchan; Kang, Chan Seok; Ahn, San; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2017-04-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) based on superconducting quantum interference devices enables the measurement of very weak magnetic fields (10-1000 fT) generated from the human or animal brain. In this article, we introduce a small MEG system that we developed specifically for use with rats. Our system has the following characteristics: (1) variable distance between the pick-up coil and outer Dewar bottom (˜5 mm), (2) small pick-up coil (4 mm) for high spatial resolution, (3) good field sensitivity (45 ˜ 80 fT /cm/√{Hz} ) , (4) the sensor interval satisfies the Nyquist spatial sampling theorem, and (5) small source localization error for the region to be investigated. To reduce source localization error, it is necessary to establish an optimal sensor layout. To this end, we simulated confidence volumes at each point on a grid on the surface of a virtual rat head. In this simulation, we used locally fitted spheres as model rat heads. This enabled us to consider more realistic volume currents. We constrained the model such that the dipoles could have only four possible orientations: the x- and y-axes from the original coordinates, and two tangentially layered dipoles (local x- and y-axes) in the locally fitted spheres. We considered the confidence volumes according to the sensor layout and dipole orientation and positions. We then conducted a preliminary test with a 4-channel MEG system prior to manufacturing the multi-channel system. Using the 4-channel MEG system, we measured rat magnetocardiograms. We obtained well defined P-, QRS-, and T-waves in rats with a maximum value of 15 pT/cm. Finally, we measured auditory evoked fields and steady state auditory evoked fields with maximum values 400 fT/cm and 250 fT/cm, respectively.

  17. Brain calbindin-D28k and an Mr 29,000 calcium binding protein in cerebellum are different but related proteins: Evidence obtained from sequence analysis by tandem mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielides, C.; Christakos, S.; McCormack, A.L.; Hunt, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    A calcium binding protein of M r 29,000 which cross-reacts with antibodies raised against chick calbindin-D 28k was previously reported to be present in rat cerebellum. It was suggested that the M r 29,000 protein represents another form of calbindin-D 28k . In the authors laboratory they were able to identify M r 28,000 and 29,000 proteins in rat, human, and chick cerebellum by their ability to bind 45 Ca in a 45 Ca blot assay. Two calcium binding proteins of M r 27,680 and 29,450 were isolated from rat cerebelli by the use of gel permeation chromatography and preparative gel electrophoresis. After reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) the proteins were sequenced. Sequence analysis by tandem mass spectrometry indicated only 52% identity between the rat cerebellar M r 28,000 and 29,000 proteins. Thus they are not different forms of the same protein, as previously suggested. Eighty-nine percent identity was observed between the rate cerebellar M r 29,000 protein and chick calretinin. The difference in identity between the rat cerebellar M r 29,000 protein and chick calretinin may be due to species differences, and thus this protein is most likely rat calretinin. These results suggest either posttranscriptional regulation of calretinin in cerebellum or species differences. The study also suggests that previous immunocytochemical mapping for calbindin using antisera which cross-reacted with both proteins detected brain regions that expressed not only calbindin but also calretinin or a calretinin-like protein

  18. Abnormal expression of ephrin-A5 affects brain development of congenital hypothyroidism rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Guihai; Shen, Feifei; Sun, Baolan; Song, Honghua; Xu, Meiyu; Wu, Youjia

    2018-05-14

    EphA5 and its ligand ephrin-A5 interaction can trigger synaptogenesis during early hippocampus development. We have previously reported that abnormal EphA5 expression can result in synaptogenesis disorder in congenital hypothyroidism (CH) rats. To better understand its precise molecular mechanism, we further analyzed the characteristics of ephrin-A5 expression in the hippocampus of CH rats. Our study revealed that ephrin-A5 expression was downregulated by thyroid hormone deficiency in the developing hippocampus and hippocampal neurons in rats. Thyroxine treatment for hypothyroid hippocampus and triiodothyronine treatment for hypothyroid hippocampal neurons significantly improved ephrin-A5 expression but could not restore its expression to control levels. Hypothyroid hippocampal neurons in-vitro showed synaptogenesis disorder characterized by a reduction in the number and length of neurites. Furthermore, the synaptogenesis-associated molecular expressions of NMDAR-1 (NR1), PSD95 and CaMKII were all downregulated correspondingly. These results suggest that ephrin-A5 expression may be decreased in CH, and abnormal activation of ephrin-A5/EphA5 signaling affects synaptogenesis during brain development. Such findings provide an important basis for exploring the pathogenesis of CH genetically.

  19. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C.; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E.; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P hydrocephalus development. PMID:26848844

  20. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on early sexual development in male and female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Boberg, Julie

    2014-01-01

    the influence of BPA on early sexual development in male and female rats at dose levels covering both regulatory no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) (5 and 50 mg/kg bw per day) as well as doses in the microgram per kilogram dose range (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg bw per day). Time-mated Wistar rats (n=22) were...... in both sexes indicates effects on prenatal sexual development and provides new evidence of low-dose adverse effects of BPA in rats in the microgram per kilogram dose range. The NOAEL in this study is clearly below 5 mg/kg for BPA, which is used as the basis for establishment of the current tolerable......Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely detected in human urine and blood. BPA has been reported to impair many endpoints for reproductive and neurological development; however, it is controversial whether BPA has effects in the microgram per kilogram dose range. The aim of the current study was to examine...

  1. In utero exposure to chloroquine alters sexual development in the male fetal rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clewell, Rebecca A.; Pluta, Linda; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), a drug that has been used extensively for the prevention and treatment of malaria, is currently considered safe for use during pregnancy. However, CQ has been shown to disrupt steroid homeostasis in adult rats and similar compounds, such as quinacrine, inhibit steroid production in the Leydig cell in vitro. To explore the effect of in utero CQ exposure on fetal male sexual development, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a daily dose of either water or chloroquine diphosphate from GD 16-18 by oral gavage. Chloroquine was administered as 200 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16, followed by two maintenance doses of 100 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16 and 18. Three days of CQ treatment resulted in reduced maternal and fetal weight on GD 19 and increased necrosis and steatosis in the maternal liver. Fetal livers also displayed mild lipid accumulation. Maternal serum progesterone was increased after CQ administration. Fetal testes testosterone, however, was significantly decreased. Examination of the fetal testes revealed significant alterations in vascularization and seminiferous tubule development after short-term CQ treatment. Anogenital distance was not altered. Microarray and RT-PCR showed down-regulation of several genes associated with cholesterol transport and steroid synthesis in the fetal testes. This study indicates that CQ inhibits testosterone synthesis and normal testis development in the rat fetus at human relevant doses.

  2. Cerebellum engages in automation of verb-generation skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Paula; Weng, Xuchu; Bandettini, Peter A

    2014-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown cerebellar involvement in item-specific association, a form of explicit learning. However, very few have demonstrated cerebellar participation in automation of non-motor cognitive tasks. Applying fMRI to a repeated verb-generation task, we sought to distinguish cerebellar involvement in learning of item-specific noun-verb association and automation of verb generation skill. The same set of nouns was repeated in six verb-generation blocks so that subjects practiced generating verbs for the nouns. The practice was followed by a novel block with a different set of nouns. The cerebellar vermis (IV/V) and the right cerebellar lobule VI showed decreased activation following practice; activation in the right cerebellar Crus I was significantly lower in the novel challenge than in the initial verb-generation task. Furthermore, activation in this region during well-practiced blocks strongly correlated with improvement of behavioral performance in both the well-practiced and the novel blocks, suggesting its role in the learning of general mental skills not specific to the practiced noun-verb pairs. Therefore, the cerebellum processes both explicit verbal associative learning and automation of cognitive tasks. Different cerebellar regions predominate in this processing: lobule VI during the acquisition of item-specific association, and Crus I during automation of verb-generation skills through practice.

  3. Consensus Paper: Pathological Role of the Cerebellum in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Aldinger, Kimberly A.; Ashwood, Paul; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blaha, Charles D.; Blatt, Gene J.; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Dager, Stephen R.; Dickson, Price E.; Estes, Annette M.; Goldowitz, Dan; Heck, Detlef H.; Kemper, Thomas L.; King, Bryan H.; Martin, Loren A.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Mittleman, Guy; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Persico, Antonio M.; Sweeney, John A.; Webb, Sara J.; Welsh, John P.

    2013-01-01

    There has been significant advancement in various aspects of scientific knowledge concerning the role of cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of autism. In the current consensus paper, we will observe the diversity of opinions regarding the involvement of this important site in the pathology of autism. Recent emergent findings in literature related to cerebellar involvement in autism are discussed, including: cerebellar pathology, cerebellar imaging and symptom expression in autism, cerebellar genetics, cerebellar immune function, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems, cholinergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and oxytocin related changes in autism, motor control and cognitive deficits, cerebellar coordination of movements and cognition, gene-environment interactions, therapeutics in autism and relevant animal models of autism. Points of consensus include presence of abnormal cerebellar anatomy, abnormal neurotransmitter systems, oxidative stress, cerebellar motor and cognitive deficits, and neuroinflammation in subjects with autism. Undefined areas or areas requiring further investigation include lack of treatment options for core symptoms of autism, vermal hypoplasia and other vermal abnormalities as a consistent feature of autism, mechanisms underlying cerebellar contributions to cognition, and unknown mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation. PMID:22370873

  4. [Pulmonary nocardiasis with abscesses spreading to cerebrum, cerebellum and orbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, M; von der Mülbe, B; Teikemeier, F; Theegarten, D

    2006-05-12

    A 71-year-old woman presented with suspected tuberculosis. She reported having productive coughs, unwanted weight loss and subfebrile temperature in the preceding 3 months. She was known to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with corticoids given systemically and by inhalation. She was a heavy smoker. Computed tomography revealed a left apical lung abscess. In the further course of the disease magnetic resonance imaging of the head demonstrated multiple abscesses in both cerebral hemispheres and an abscess, 3.4 cm in diameter, in the right side of the cerebellum, as well as a intra-orbital tumor on the right. Needle aspirate of the eyeball grew Nocardia farcinica. Over 3 weeks antimicrobial treatment was given with imipenem and amikacin, followed by oral cotrimoxazole for 12 months. The abscesses completely regressed and after 12 months no recurrence was demonstrated either radiologically or clinically. Although nocardiasis is rare in Germany it must be included in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia with abscesses. This is especially so if acid-fast bacilli are found. As the resistance pattern of N. farcinica to antibiotics varies, early treatment is essential with antibiotics to which it is sensitive.

  5. Switching On Depression and Potentiation in the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Gallimore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term depression (LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP in the cerebellum are important for motor learning. However, the signaling mechanisms controlling whether LTD or LTP is induced in response to synaptic stimulation remain obscure. Using a unified model of LTD and LTP at the cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC synapse, we delineate the coordinated pre- and postsynaptic signaling that determines the direction of plasticity. We show that LTP is the default response to PF stimulation above a well-defined frequency threshold. However, if the calcium signal surpasses the threshold for CaMKII activation, then an ultrasensitive “on switch” activates an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK-based positive feedback loop that triggers LTD instead. This postsynaptic feedback loop is sustained by another, trans-synaptic, feedback loop that maintains nitric oxide production throughout LTD induction. When full depression is achieved, an automatic “off switch” inactivates the feedback loops, returning the network to its basal state and demarcating the end of the early phase of LTD.

  6. Consensus paper: pathological role of the cerebellum in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S Hossein; Aldinger, Kimberly A; Ashwood, Paul; Bauman, Margaret L; Blaha, Charles D; Blatt, Gene J; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Dager, Stephen R; Dickson, Price E; Estes, Annette M; Goldowitz, Dan; Heck, Detlef H; Kemper, Thomas L; King, Bryan H; Martin, Loren A; Millen, Kathleen J; Mittleman, Guy; Mosconi, Matthew W; Persico, Antonio M; Sweeney, John A; Webb, Sara J; Welsh, John P

    2012-09-01

    There has been significant advancement in various aspects of scientific knowledge concerning the role of cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of autism. In the current consensus paper, we will observe the diversity of opinions regarding the involvement of this important site in the pathology of autism. Recent emergent findings in literature related to cerebellar involvement in autism are discussed, including: cerebellar pathology, cerebellar imaging and symptom expression in autism, cerebellar genetics, cerebellar immune function, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems, cholinergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and oxytocin-related changes in autism, motor control and cognitive deficits, cerebellar coordination of movements and cognition, gene-environment interactions, therapeutics in autism, and relevant animal models of autism. Points of consensus include presence of abnormal cerebellar anatomy, abnormal neurotransmitter systems, oxidative stress, cerebellar motor and cognitive deficits, and neuroinflammation in subjects with autism. Undefined areas or areas requiring further investigation include lack of treatment options for core symptoms of autism, vermal hypoplasia, and other vermal abnormalities as a consistent feature of autism, mechanisms underlying cerebellar contributions to cognition, and unknown mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation.

  7. Dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum (Lhermitte-Duclos disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uki, Jiro; Kanda, Shinji; Asakura, Ken; Takeda, Fumikazu

    1985-01-01

    A case of dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum, or Lhermitte-Duclos disease, is reported along with its CT findings, and the cases so far reported in the literature are reviewed. This is the 50th case report since the first description in 1920. This 61-year-old female had suffered from right hemifacial spasms for more than 20 years and from bilateral tinnitus with auditory disturbances for two years. Four years before admission, she underwent gastric resection and cancer chemotherapy for gastric cancer. Plain craniograms showed a thinned and ballooned occipital squama on the right side. Vertebral angiograms revealed a large tumor stain, with early venous filling, in the right posterior fossa. A CT scan showed a large, low-density mass, with small calcified areas in it, in the right posterior fossa. A postcontrast CT scan revealed no contrast enhancement, except for dilated vascular enhancement, within the tumor. No hydrocephalus was observed. Metrizamide CT cisternography revealed a huge intraaxial mass compressing the brain stem. (J.P.N.)

  8. Genetic Regulation of Development of Thymic Lymphomas Induced by N‐Propyl‐N‐nitrosourea in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Hiroko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Matsuyama, Mutsushi

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the linkage between Hbb and Tls‐1 (thymic lymphoma susceptible‐1) loci and to investigate other loci concerned in thymic lymphomagenesis, the BUF/Mna rat, which is highly sensitive to the lymphomagenic activity of N‐propyl‐N‐nitrosourea (PNU), the WKY/NCrj rat, reported to be resistant, and their cross offspring were subjected to genetic analysis. F1 hybrid and backcross generations were raised from the 2 strains, and 6 genetic markers including Hbb were analyzed in individuals of the backcross generation. However, no linkage between Hbb and Tls‐1 loci could be demonstrated since WKY rats also developed a high incidence of thymic lymphomas in response to PNU. Nevertheless, thymic lymphomas developed more rapidly and reached a larger size in the BUF rats. F1 rats expressed a rather rapid and large tumor growth phenotype, while the [(WKY × BUF) × WKY] backcross generation consisted of rats with either rapidly growing or slowly growing tumors. It was thus concluded that rapid development of thymic lymphomas is determined by a gene, provisionally designated Tls‐3. Analysis of the relationship between 6 genetic markers and development of thymic lymphoma in the backcross generation demonstrated that the Tls‐3 locus is loosely linked to the Gc locus, suggesting a possible location on rat chromosome 14. Tls‐3 may not be identical with Tls‐1 and other genes known to be relevant to thymic tumors, but its relationship with Tls‐2 remains obscure. PMID:7559080

  9. Segmental neuropathic pain does not develop in male rats with complete spinal transections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubscher, Charles H; Kaddumi, Ezidin G; Johnson, Richard D

    2008-10-01

    In a previous study using male rats, a correlation was found between the development of "at-level" allodynia in T6-7 dermatomes following severe T8 spinal contusion injury and the sparing of some myelinated axons within the core of the lesion epicenter. To further test our hypothesis that this sparing is important for the expression of allodynia and the supraspinal plasticity that ensues, an injury that severs all axons (i.e., a complete spinal cord transection) was made in 15 male rats. Behavioral assessments were done at level throughout the 30-day recovery period followed by terminal electrophysiological recordings (urethane anesthesia) from single medullary reticular formation (MRF) neurons receiving convergent nociceptive inputs from receptive fields above, at, and below the lesion level. None of the rats developed signs of at-level allodynia (versus 18 of 26 male rats following severe contusion). However, the terminal recording (206 MRF neurons) data resembled those obtained previously post-contusion. That is, there was evidence of neuronal hyper-excitability (relative to previous data from intact controls) to high- and low-threshold mechanical stimulation for "at-level" (dorsal trunk) and "above-level" (eyelids and face) cutaneous territories. These results, when combined with prior data on intact controls and severe/moderate contusions, indicate that (1) an anatomically incomplete injury (some lesion epicenter axonal sparing) following severe contusion is likely important for the development of allodynia and (2) the neuronal hyper-excitability at the level of the medulla is likely involved in nociceptive processes that are not directly related to the conscious expression of pain-like avoidance behaviors that are being used as evidence of allodynia.

  10. Maternal deprivation decelerates postnatal morphological lung development of F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupa, Katharina Luise; Schmiedl, Andreas; Pabst, Reinhard; Von Hörsten, Stephan; Stephan, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Intensive medical care at premature born infants is often associated with separation of neonates from their mothers. Here, early artificial prolonged separation of rat pups from their dams (Maternal Deprivation, MD) was used to study potential impact on morphological lung maturation. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of an endogenous deficiency of the neuropeptide-cleaving dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4), since the effects of MD are known to be partly mediated via neuropeptidergic effects, hypothesizing that MD will lead to a retardation of postnatal lung development, DPP4-dependendly. We used wild type and CD26/DPP4 deficient rats. For MD, the dam was placed each day into a separate cage for 2 h, while the pups remained in the nest on their own. Morphological lung maturation and cell proliferation at the postnatal days 7, 10, 14, and 21 were determined morphometrically. Maternally deprived wild types showed a retarded postnatal lung development compared with untreated controls in both substrains. During alveolarization, an increased thickness of alveolar septa and a decreased surface of septa about 50% were found. At the end of the morphological lung maturation, the surface of the alveolar septa was decreased at about 25% and the septal thickness remained increased about 20%. The proliferation rate was also decreased about 50% on day 14. However, the MD induced effects were less pronounced in DPP4-deficient rats, due to a significant deceleration already induced by DPP4-deficiency. Thus, MD as a model for postnatal stress experience influences remarkably postnatal development of rats, which is significantly modulated by the DPP4-system. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of the phytoestrogen genistein on the development of the reproductive system of Sprague Dawley rats

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    Siti Rosmani Md Zin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Genistein is known to influence reproductive system development through its binding affinity for estrogen receptors. The present study aimed to further explore the effect of Genistein on the development of the reproductive system of experimental rats. METHODS: Eighteen post-weaning female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into the following groups: (i a control group that received vehicle (distilled water and Tween 80; (ii a group treated with 10 mg/kg body weight (BW of Genistein (Gen 10; and (iii a group treated with a higher dose of Genistein (Gen 100. The rats were treated daily for three weeks from postnatal day 22 (P22 to P42. After the animals were sacrificed, blood samples were collected, and the uteri and ovaries were harvested and subjected to light microscopy and immunohistochemical study. RESULTS: A reduction of the mean weekly BW gain and organ weights (uteri and ovaries were observed in the Gen 10 group compared to the control group; these findings were reversed in the Gen 100 group. Follicle stimulating hormone and estrogen levels were increased in the Gen 10 group and reduced in the Gen 100 group. Luteinizing hormone was reduced in both groups of Genistein-treated animals, and there was a significant difference between the Gen 10 and control groups (p<0.05. These findings were consistent with increased atretic follicular count, a decreased number of corpus luteum and down-regulation of estrogen receptors-a in the uterine tissues of the Genistein-treated animals compared to the control animals. CONCLUSION: Post-weaning exposure to Genistein could affect the development of the reproductive system of ovarian-intact experimental rats because of its action on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by regulating hormones and estrogen receptors.

  12. Proneurotrophin-3 promotes cell cycle withdrawal of developing cerebellar granule cell progenitors via the p75 neurotrophin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Abercrombie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Wilma J

    2016-07-19

    Cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCP) proliferate extensively in the external granule layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum prior to differentiating and migrating. Mechanisms that regulate the appropriate timing of cell cycle withdrawal of these neuronal progenitors during brain development are not well defined. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) is highly expressed in the proliferating GCPs, but is downregulated once the cells leave the cell cycle. This receptor has primarily been characterized as a death receptor for its ability to induce neuronal apoptosis following injury. Here we demonstrate a novel function for p75(NTR) in regulating proper cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors in the developing rat and mouse EGL, which is stimulated by proNT3. In the absence of p75(NTR), GCPs continue to proliferate beyond their normal period, resulting in a larger cerebellum that persists into adulthood, with consequent motor deficits.

  13. Impaired brain development in the rat following prenatal exposure to methylazoxymethanol acetate at gestational day 17 and neurotrophin distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiore, M; Grace, AA; Korf, J; Stampachiacchiere, B; Aloe, L

    2004-01-01

    Several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, are the consequence of a disrupted development of the CNS. Accordingly, intrauterine exposure to toxins may increase the risk for psychopathology. We investigated whether prenatal exposure of rats to the neurotoxin methylaxoxymethanol

  14. TMS Over the Cerebellum Interferes with Short-term Memory of Visual Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C; Cattaneo, Z; Oldrati, V; Casiraghi, L; Castelli, F; D'Angelo, E; Vecchi, T

    2018-04-30

    Growing evidence suggests that the cerebellum is not only involved in motor functions, but it significantly contributes to sensory and cognitive processing as well. In particular, it has been hypothesized that the cerebellum identifies recurrent serial events and recognizes their violations. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to shed light on the role of the cerebellum in short-term memory of visual sequences. In two experiments, we found that TMS over the right cerebellar hemisphere impaired participants' ability to recognize the correct order of appearance of geometrical stimuli varying in shape and/or size. In turn, cerebellar TMS did not affect recognition of highly familiar short sequences of letters or numbers. Overall, our data suggest that the cerebellum is involved in memorizing the order in which (concatenated) stimuli appear, this process being important for sequence learning.

  15. A functional MRI study of somatotopic representation of somatosensory stimulation in the cerebellum

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    Takanashi, M.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T.; Sakoda, S. [Dept. of Neurology D4, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujita, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Somatotopic representation in the cerebral cortex of somatosensory stimulation has been widely reported, but that in the cerebellum has not. We investigated the latter in the human cerebellum by functional MRI (fMRI). Using a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained multislice blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI with single-shot gradient-echo echoplanar imaging in seven right-handed volunteers during electrical stimulation of the left index finger and big toe. In the anterior and posterior cerebellum, activated pixels for the index finger were separate from those for the toe. This suggests that somatosensory stimulation of different parts of the body may involve distinct areas of in the cerebellum as well as the cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  16. A functional MRI study of somatotopic representation of somatosensory stimulation in the cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, M.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T.; Sakoda, S.; Tanaka, H.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujita, N.

    2003-01-01

    Somatotopic representation in the cerebral cortex of somatosensory stimulation has been widely reported, but that in the cerebellum has not. We investigated the latter in the human cerebellum by functional MRI (fMRI). Using a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained multislice blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI with single-shot gradient-echo echoplanar imaging in seven right-handed volunteers during electrical stimulation of the left index finger and big toe. In the anterior and posterior cerebellum, activated pixels for the index finger were separate from those for the toe. This suggests that somatosensory stimulation of different parts of the body may involve distinct areas of in the cerebellum as well as the cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  17. The cerebellum: its role in language and related cognitive and affective functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Paquier, Philippe; Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The traditional view on the cerebellum as the sole coordinator of motor function has been substantially redefined during the past decades. Neuroanatomical, neuroimaging and clinical studies have extended the role of the cerebellum to the modulation of cognitive and affective processing. Neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated cerebellar connectivity with the supratentorial association areas involved in higher cognitive and affective functioning, while functional neuroimaging and clinical studies have provided evidence of cerebellar involvement in a variety of cognitive and affective tasks. This paper reviews the recently acknowledged role of the cerebellum in linguistic and related cognitive and behavioral-affective functions. In addition, typical cerebellar syndromes such as the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) and the posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) will be briefly discussed and the current hypotheses dealing with the presumed neurobiological mechanisms underlying the linguistic, cognitive and affective modulatory role of the cerebellum will be reviewed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychophysiological interaction between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and cerebellum: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, A. N.; Teng, X. L.; Ng, S. B.; Hamid, A. I. A.; Mukari, S. Z. M.

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to model the psychophysiological interaction (PPI) between the bilateral STG and cerebellum (lobule VI and lobule VII) during an arithmetic addition task. Eighteen young adults participated in this study. They were instructed to solve single-digit addition tasks in quiet and noisy backgrounds during an fMRI scan. Results showed that in both hemispheres, the response in the cerebellum was found to be linearly influenced by the activity in STG (vice-versa) for both in-quiet and in-noise conditions. However, the influence of the cerebellum on STG seemed to be modulated by noise. A two-way PPI model between STG and cerebellum is suggested. The connectivity between the two regions during a simple addition task in a noisy condition is modulated by the participants’ higher attention to perceive.

  19. Neuro-protective effects of Crocin on brain and cerebellum tissues in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... make the neurons and astrocytes more sensitive against oxidative damage. ... Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), blood glucose, HbA1c levels and ... appearence of the cerebrum and cerebellum were normal in the control group.

  20. Wfs1- deficient rats develop primary symptoms of Wolfram syndrome: insulin-dependent diabetes, optic nerve atrophy and medullary degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaas, Mario; Seppa, Kadri; Reimets, Riin; Jagomäe, Toomas; Toots, Maarja; Koppel, Tuuliki; Vallisoo, Tuuli; Nigul, Mait; Heinla, Indrek; Meier, Riho; Kaasik, Allen; Piirsoo, Andres; Hickey, Miriam A; Terasmaa, Anton; Vasar, Eero

    2017-08-31

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder that is caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene and is characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes, optic atrophy, hearing loss and a number of other complications. Here, we describe the creation and phenotype of Wfs1 mutant rats, in which exon 5 of the Wfs1 gene is deleted, resulting in a loss of 27 amino acids from the WFS1 protein sequence. These Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats show progressive glucose intolerance, which culminates in the development of diabetes mellitus, glycosuria, hyperglycaemia and severe body weight loss by 12 months of age. Beta cell mass is reduced in older mutant rats, which is accompanied by decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from 3 months of age. Medullary volume is decreased in older Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats, with the largest decreases at the level of the inferior olive. Finally, older Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats show retinal gliosis and optic nerve atrophy at 15 months of age. Electron microscopy revealed axonal degeneration and disorganization of the myelin in the optic nerves of older Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats. The phenotype of Wfs1-ex5-KO232 rats indicates that they have the core symptoms of WS. Therefore, we present a novel rat model of WS.

  1. Effects of chronic treatment with valproate and oxcarbazepine on testicular development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansu, Ali; Ekinci, Ozgür; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Gürgen, Seren Gulsen; Ekinci, Ozalp; Erdogan, Deniz; Coskun, Zafer Kutay; Tunc, Lutfi

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential effects of valproate (VPA) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) on testicular development in rats. Forty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of 14 rats each. Each group received the following via gavage over 90 days: group 1, tap water (control group); group 2, VPA (300mg/kg/day); group 3, OXC (100mg/kg/day). After sacrifice, body, testicular and epididymidis weights were measured. Testes were sampled, fixed and processed, and quantitative morphometric analysis of Sertoli cells, spermatocytes and spermatids was performed in stages II, V and XII by histopathological examination. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to transform growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and p53, and the apoptotic index was assessed using the TUNEL method. Testis and relative testis weights were significantly lower in the VPA group compared to the control group (p0.05). Apoptotic cell counts and p53 immunoreaction were significantly high and TGF-β1 expression was significantly lower in the VPA group compared to that of the control group (p0.05). Our results show that VPA treatment from prepuberty to adulthood significantly negatively affects spermatogenesis, not only by