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Sample records for developing mouse skin

  1. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

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    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  2. Effects of Nicotinamide on Mouse Skin Tumor Development and lts Mode of Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KRISHNA P. GUPTA

    1999-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NA), a naturally occuring vitamin and a protease inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in treating some skin ailments. It inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell differentiation. This report shows the effects of NA on mouse skin tumor development and on the critical events involved in this process. NA reduced tumor growth, inhibited the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol- 13-acetate (TPA) induced ornithine decarboxylase activity, but induced the transglutaminase activity which was inhibited by TPA under different experimental conditions.The effects of NA on ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and transglutaminase (TG) indicated that nicotinamide (NA) probably programmmed the cells for their death in the natural course of time, I.e. Programed cell death. This observation indicates that NA might be a better agent for the detailed study and for the better use in prevention of cancer alone or in combination with other drugs.

  3. Development of a Bioengineered Skin-Humanized Mouse Model for Psoriasis : Dissecting Epidermal-Lymphocyte Interacting Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; García, Marta; Murillas, Rodolfo; Retamosa, Luisa; Illera, Nuria; Duarte, Blanca; Holguín, Almudena; Puig, Susana; Hernández, Maria Isabel; Meana, Alvaro; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; Carretero, Marta; del Río, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, whole skin xenotransplantation models that mimic different aspects of psoriasis have become available. However, these models are strongly constrained by the lack of skin donor availability and homogeneity. We present in this study a bioengineering-based skin-humanized mouse model for psoriasis, either in an autologous version using samples derived from psoriatic patients or, more importantly, in an allogeneic context, starting from skin biopsies and blood samples from...

  4. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is dispensable for virus-mediated liver and skin tumor development in mouse models.

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    Nguyen, Tung; Xu, Jianliang; Chikuma, Shunsuke; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Pfister, Herbert; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-07-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) not only promotes immune diversity by initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes but also provokes genomic instability by introducing translocations and mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes. To test whether AID is essential for virus-induced tumor development, we used two transgenic tumor models: mice expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) core proteins (HCV-Tg), driven by the hepatitis B virus promoter, and mice expressing human papillomavirus type 8 proteins (HPV8-Tg), driven by the Keratin 14 promoter. Both strains were analyzed in the absence and presence of AID by crossing each with AID (-/-) mice. There was no difference in the liver tumor frequency between the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) and HCV-Tg/AID (-/-) mice at 20 months of age although the AID (+/+) mice showed more severe histological findings and increased cytokine expression. Furthermore, a low level of AID transcript was detected in the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) liver tissue that was not derived from hepatocytes themselves but from intra-hepatic immune cells. Although AID may not be the direct cause of HCV-induced oncogenesis, AID expressed in B cells, not in hepatocytes, may prolong steatosis and cause increased lymphocyte infiltration into HCV core protein-induced liver lesions. Similarly, there was no difference in the time course of skin tumor development between the HPV8-Tg/AID (-/-) and HPV8-Tg/AID (+/+) groups. In conclusion, AID does not appear to be required for tumor development in the two virus-induced tumor mouse models tested although AID expressed in infiltrating B cells may promote inflammatory reactions in HCV core protein-induced liver pathogenesis.

  5. Calcium Glucarate Prevents Tumor Formation in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective Calcium Glucarate (Cag), Ca salt of D-glucaric acid is a naturally occurring non-toxic compound present in fruits, vegetables and seeds of some plants, and suppress tumor growth in different models. Due to lack of knowledge about its mode of action its uses are limited in cancer chemotherapy thus the objective of the study was to study the mechanism of action of Cag on mouse skin tumorigenesis. Methods We have estimated effect of Cag on DMBA induced mouse skin tumor development following complete carcinogenesis protocol. We measured, epidermal transglutaminase activity (TG), a marker of cell differentiation after DMBA and/or Cag treatment and [3H] thymidine incorporation into DNA as a marker for cell proliferation. Results Topical application of Cag suppressed the DMBA induced mouse skin tumor development. Topical application of Cag significantly modifies the critical events of proliferation and differentiation TG activity was found to be reduced after DMBA treatment. Reduction of the TG activity was dependent on the dose of DMBA and duration of DMBA exposure. Topical application of Cag significantly alleviated DMBA induced inhibition of TG. DMBA also caused stimulation of DNA synthesis in epidermis, which was inhibited by Cag. Conclusion Cag inhibits DMBA induced mouse skin tumor development. Since stimulation of DNA synthesis reflects proliferation and induction of TG represents differentiation, the antitumorigenic effect of Cag is considered to be possibly due to stimulation of differentiation and suppression of proliferation.

  6. Biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes.

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    Shi, Zhanquan; Ji, Kaiyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Zhang, Junzhen; Yao, Jianbo; Dong, Changsheng; Fan, Ruiwen

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the optimal passage number according to the biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes from different passages. Skin punch biopsies harvested from the dorsal region of 2-day old mice were used to establish melanocyte cultures. The cells from passage 4, 7, 10 and 13 were collected and evaluated for their melanogenic activity. Histochemical staining for tyrosinase (TYR) activity and immunostaining for the melanocyte specific markers including S-100 antigen, TYR, tyrosinase related protein 1 (TYRP1), tyrosinase related protein 2 (TYRP2) and micropthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF) confirmed purity and melanogenic capacity of melanocytes from different passages, with better melanogenic activity of passage 10 and 13 cells being observed. Treatment of passage 13 melanocytes with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) showed increased expression of MITF, TYR and TYRP2 mRNA. However, considering the TYR mRNA dramatically high expression which is the characteristics of melanoma cells, melanocytes from passage 10 was the optimal passage number for the further research. Our results demonstrate culture of pure populations of mouse melanocytes to at least 10 passages and illustrate the potential utility of passage 10 cells for studies of intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of genes controlling pigmentation and coat color in mouse.

  7. Notch1 functions as a tumor suppressor in mouse skin.

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    Nicolas, Michael; Wolfer, Anita; Raj, Kenneth; Kummer, J Alain; Mill, Pleasantine; van Noort, Mascha; Hui, Chi-chung; Clevers, Hans; Dotto, G Paolo; Radtke, Freddy

    2003-03-01

    Notch proteins are important in binary cell-fate decisions and inhibiting differentiation in many developmental systems, and aberrant Notch signaling is associated with tumorigenesis. The role of Notch signaling in mammalian skin is less well characterized and is mainly based on in vitro studies, which suggest that Notch signaling induces differentiation in mammalian skin. Conventional gene targeting is not applicable to establishing the role of Notch receptors or ligands in the skin because Notch1-/- embryos die during gestation. Therefore, we used a tissue-specific inducible gene-targeting approach to study the physiological role of the Notch1 receptor in the mouse epidermis and the corneal epithelium of adult mice. Unexpectedly, ablation of Notch1 results in epidermal and corneal hyperplasia followed by the development of skin tumors and facilitated chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. Notch1 deficiency in skin and in primary keratinocytes results in increased and sustained expression of Gli2, causing the development of basal-cell carcinoma-like tumors. Furthermore, Notch1 inactivation in the epidermis results in derepressed beta-catenin signaling in cells that should normally undergo differentiation. Enhanced beta-catenin signaling can be reversed by re-introduction of a dominant active form of the Notch1 receptor. This leads to a reduction in the signaling-competent pool of beta-catenin, indicating that Notch1 can inhibit beta-catenin-mediated signaling. Our results indicate that Notch1 functions as a tumor-suppressor gene in mammalian skin.

  8. Multistage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin

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    Slaga, T.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Weeks, C.E.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Skin tumors in mice can be induced by the sequential application of a subthreshold dose of a carcinogen (initiation phase) followed by repetitive treatment with a noncarcinogenic tumor promoter. The initiation phase requires only a single application of either a direct acting carcinogen or a procarcinogen which has to be metabolized before being active and is essentially an irreversible step which probably involves a somatic cell mutation. There is a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activites of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their ability to bind covalently to epidermal DNA. Laboratory results suggest that bay region diol-epoxides are the ultimate carcinogenic form of PAH carcinogens. Potent inhibitors and stimulators of PAH tumor initiation appear to affect the level of the PAH diol-epoxide reacting with specific DNA bases. Reecent data suggests that the tumor promotion stage involves at least three important steps: (1) the induction of embryonic looking cells (dark cells) in adult epidermis; (2) an increased production of epidermal prostaglandins and polyamines; (3) sustained proliferation of dark cells. Retinoic acid specifically inhibits step two whereas the anti-inflammatory steriod fluocinolone acetonide is a potent inhibitor of steps one and three. The mechanism and the importance of a specific sequence for each step in chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin are detailed.

  9. Protective effects of sodium-L-ascorbyl-2 phosphate on the development of UVB-induced damage in cultured mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayama, S; Takehana, M; Kanke, M; Itoh, S; Ogata, E; Kobayashi, S

    1999-12-01

    The protective effect of sodium-L-ascorbyl-2 phosphate (As-2P), a stable form of ascorbic acid (AsA), against photodamage induced by a single dose of UVB exposure (290-320 nm, Max 312 nm) was investigated using cultured mouse skin. When the cultured skin was treated with various As-2P concentrations, the cutaneous AsA level increased in proportion to the As-2P concentration. After 3 h of incubation, the AsA level in the cultured skin treated with 2, 20 and 100 mM As-2P increased 1.03-, 2.17- and 6.27-fold, respectively, compared with that of the control skin. These results suggest that As-2P was transported into the cultured mouse skin where it was converted to AsA. After 3 h, the cutaneous AsA level in irradiated (20 kJ/m2) skin was depleted to a half of that in the control skin. However, the level in skin pretreated with 20 mM As-2P was maintained within normal limits, even after 24 h. Pretreatment with 20 mM As-2P significantly prevented such photodamage as sunburn cell formation, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation, which were caused by a single dose of UVB irradiation. These results suggest that the protective effect of 20 mM As-2P on UVB-induced cutaneous damage is due to the maintenance of a normal As level by conversion of As-2P to As in skin tissue.

  10. The top skin-associated genes: a comparative analysis of human and mouse skin transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert; Hevezi, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The mouse represents a key model system for the study of the physiology and biochemistry of skin. Comparison of skin between mouse and human is critical for interpretation and application of data from mouse experiments to human disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on structure and immunology of mouse and human skin. Moreover, we present a systematic comparison of human and mouse skin transcriptomes. To this end, we have recently used a genome-wide database of human gene expression to identify genes highly expressed in skin, with no, or limited expression elsewhere - human skin-associated genes (hSAGs). Analysis of our set of hSAGs allowed us to generate a comprehensive molecular characterization of healthy human skin. Here, we used a similar database to generate a list of mouse skin-associated genes (mSAGs). A comparative analysis between the top human (n=666) and mouse (n=873) skin-associated genes (SAGs) revealed a total of only 30.2% identity between the two lists. The majority of shared genes encode proteins that participate in structural and barrier functions. Analysis of the top functional annotation terms revealed an overlap for morphogenesis, cell adhesion, structure, and signal transduction. The results of this analysis, discussed in the context of published data, illustrate the diversity between the molecular make up of skin of both species and grants a probable explanation, why results generated in murine in vivo models often fail to translate into the human.

  11. Analysis of a Mouse Skin Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

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    Guo, Yanan; Dreier, John R.; Cao, Juxiang; Du, Heng; Granter, Scott R.; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant tumor suppressor gene syndrome in which patients develop several types of tumors, including facial angiofibroma, subungual fibroma, Shagreen patch, angiomyolipomas, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis. It is due to inactivating mutations in TSC1 or TSC2. We sought to generate a mouse model of one or more of these tumor types by targeting deletion of the Tsc1 gene to fibroblasts using the Fsp-Cre allele. Mutant, Tsc1ccFsp-Cre+ mice survived a median of nearly a year, and developed tumors in multiple sites but did not develop angiomyolipoma or lymphangioleiomyomatosis. They did develop a prominent skin phenotype with marked thickening of the dermis with accumulation of mast cells, that was minimally responsive to systemic rapamycin therapy, and was quite different from the pathology seen in human TSC skin lesions. Recombination and loss of Tsc1 was demonstrated in skin fibroblasts in vivo and in cultured skin fibroblasts. Loss of Tsc1 in fibroblasts in mice does not lead to a model of angiomyolipoma or lymphangioleiomyomatosis. PMID:27907099

  12. Hyperelastic Material Properties of Mouse Skin under Compression.

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    Yuxiang Wang

    Full Text Available The skin is a dynamic organ whose complex material properties are capable of withstanding continuous mechanical stress while accommodating insults and organism growth. Moreover, synchronized hair cycles, comprising waves of hair growth, regression and rest, are accompanied by dramatic fluctuations in skin thickness in mice. Whether such structural changes alter skin mechanics is unknown. Mouse models are extensively used to study skin biology and pathophysiology, including aging, UV-induced skin damage and somatosensory signaling. As the skin serves a pivotal role in the transfer function from sensory stimuli to neuronal signaling, we sought to define the mechanical properties of mouse skin over a range of normal physiological states. Skin thickness, stiffness and modulus were quantitatively surveyed in adult, female mice (Mus musculus. These measures were analyzed under uniaxial compression, which is relevant for touch reception and compression injuries, rather than tension, which is typically used to analyze skin mechanics. Compression tests were performed with 105 full-thickness, freshly isolated specimens from the hairy skin of the hind limb. Physiological variables included body weight, hair-cycle stage, maturity level, skin site and individual animal differences. Skin thickness and stiffness were dominated by hair-cycle stage at young (6-10 weeks and intermediate (13-19 weeks adult ages but by body weight in mature mice (26-34 weeks. Interestingly, stiffness varied inversely with thickness so that hyperelastic modulus was consistent across hair-cycle stages and body weights. By contrast, the mechanics of hairy skin differs markedly with anatomical location. In particular, skin containing fascial structures such as nerves and blood vessels showed significantly greater modulus than adjacent sites. Collectively, this systematic survey indicates that, although its structure changes dramatically throughout adult life, mouse skin at a given

  13. Biological activity of the bryostatin analog Merle 23 on mouse epidermal cells and mouse skin.

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    Kelsey, Jessica S; Cataisson, Christophe; Chen, Jinqiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Petersen, Mark E; Baumann, David O; McGowan, Kevin M; Yuspa, Stuart H; Keck, Gary E; Blumberg, Peter M

    2016-12-01

    Bryostatin 1, a complex macrocyclic lactone, is the subject of multiple clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. Although bryostatin 1 biochemically functions like the classic mouse skin tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to bind to and activate protein kinase C, paradoxically, it fails to induce many of the typical phorbol ester responses, including tumor promotion. Intense synthetic efforts are currently underway to develop simplified bryostatin analogs that preserve the critical functional features of bryostatin 1, including its lack of tumor promoting activity. The degree to which bryostatin analogs maintain the unique pattern of biological behavior of bryostatin 1 depends on the specific cellular system and the specific response. Merle 23 is a significantly simplified bryostatin analog that retains bryostatin like activity only to a limited extent. Here, we show that in mouse epidermal cells the activity of Merle 23 was either similar to bryostatin 1 or intermediate between bryostatin 1 and PMA, depending on the specific parameter examined. We then examined the hyperplastic and tumor promoting activity of Merle 23 on mouse skin. Merle 23 showed substantially reduced hyperplasia and was not tumor promoting at a dose comparable to that for PMA. These results suggest that there may be substantial flexibility in the design of bryostatin analogs that retain its lack of tumor promoting activity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Metabolism of skin-absorbed resveratrol into its glucuronized form in mouse skin.

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    Murakami, Itsuo; Chaleckis, Romanas; Pluskal, Tomáš; Ito, Ken; Hori, Kousuke; Ebe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RESV) is a plant polyphenol, which is thought to have beneficial metabolic effects in laboratory animals as well as in humans. Following oral administration, RESV is immediately catabolized, resulting in low bioavailability. This study compared RESV metabolites and their tissue distribution after oral uptake and skin absorption. Metabolomic analysis of various mouse tissues revealed that RESV can be absorbed and metabolized through skin. We detected sulfated and glucuronidated RESV metabolites, as well as dihydroresveratrol. These metabolites are thought to have lower pharmacological activity than RESV. Similar quantities of most RESV metabolites were observed 4 h after oral or skin administration, except that glucuronidated RESV metabolites were more abundant in skin after topical RESV application than after oral administration. This result is consistent with our finding of glucuronidated RESV metabolites in cultured skin cells. RESV applied to mouse ears significantly suppressed inflammation in the TPA inflammation model. The skin absorption route could be a complementary, potent way to achieve therapeutic effects with RESV.

  15. Skin fragility in the wild-derived, inbred mouse strain Mus pahari/EiJ.

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    Herbert Pratt, C; Potter, Christopher S; Kuiper, Raoul V; Karst, Son Yong; Dadras, Soheil S; Roopenian, Derry C; Sundberg, John P

    2017-02-01

    Mus pahari is a wild-derived, inbred mouse strain. M. pahari colony managers observed fragility of this strain's skin resulting in separation of tail skin from the mouse if handled incorrectly. Tail skin tension testing of M. pahari resulted in significantly lowered force threshold for caudal skin rupture and loss in comparison to closely related inbred mouse species and subspecies and even more than a model for junctional epidermolysis bullosa. Histologically, the tail skin separated at the subdermal level with the dermis firmly attached to the epidermis, excluding the epidermolysis bullosa complex of diseases. The dermal collagen bundles were abnormally thickened and branched. Elastin fiber deposition was focally altered in the dermis adjacent to the hair follicle. Collagens present in the skin could not be differentiated between the species in protein gels following digestion with pepsin. Together these data suggest that M. pahari have altered extracellular matrix development resulting in separation of the skin below the level of the dermis with moderate force similar to the African spiny mouse (Acomys spp.). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The prostaglandin receptor EP2 activates multiple signaling pathways and beta-arrestin1 complex formation during mouse skin papilloma development.

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    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Lao, Huei-Chen; Trempus, Carol S; Okada, Manabu; Langenbach, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is elevated in many tumor types, but PGE(2)'s contributions to tumor growth are largely unknown. To investigate PGE(2)'s roles, the contributions of one of its receptors, EP2, were studied using the mouse skin initiation/promotion model. Initial studies indicated that protein kinase A (PKA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and several effectors-cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), H-Ras, Src, protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-were activated in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted papillomas and that PKA and EGFR inhibition (H89 and AG1478, respectively) decreased papilloma formation. EP2's contributions to the activation of these pathways and papilloma development were determined by inhibiting endogenous TPA-induced PGE(2) production with indomethacin (Indo) and concomitantly treating with the EP2 agonist, CAY10399 (CAY). CAY treatment restored papilloma formation in TPA/Indo-treated mice and increased cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and PKA activation as measured by p-CREB formation. CAY treatment also increased EGFR and Src activation and their inhibition by AG1478 and PP2 indicated that Src was upstream of EGFR. CAY also increased H-Ras, ERK1/2 and AKT activation, and AG1478 decreased their activation indicating EGFR being upstream. Supporting EP2's contribution, EP2-/- mice exhibited 65% fewer papillomas and reduced Src, EGFR, H-Ras, AKT and ERK1/2 activation. G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation of EGFR has been reported to involve Src's activation via a GPCR-beta-arrestin-Src complex. Indeed, immunoprecipitation of beta-arrestin1 or p-Src indicated the presence of an EP2-beta-arrestin1-p-Src complex in papillomas. The data indicated that EP2 contributed to tumor formation via activation of PKA and EGFR and that EP2 formed a complex with beta-arrestin1 and Src that contributed to signaling and/or EP2 desensitization.

  17. The prostaglandin receptor EP2 activates multiple signaling pathways and β-arrestin1 complex formation during mouse skin papilloma development

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    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Lao, Huei-Chen; Trempus, Carol S.; Okada, Manabu; Langenbach, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated in many tumor types, but PGE2's contributions to tumor growth are largely unknown. To investigate PGE2's roles, the contributions of one of its receptors, EP2, were studied using the mouse skin initiation/promotion model. Initial studies indicated that protein kinase A (PKA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and several effectors—cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), H-Ras, Src, protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2—were activated in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted papillomas and that PKA and EGFR inhibition (H89 and AG1478, respectively) decreased papilloma formation. EP2's contributions to the activation of these pathways and papilloma development were determined by inhibiting endogenous TPA-induced PGE2 production with indomethacin (Indo) and concomitantly treating with the EP2 agonist, CAY10399 (CAY). CAY treatment restored papilloma formation in TPA/Indo-treated mice and increased cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate and PKA activation as measured by p-CREB formation. CAY treatment also increased EGFR and Src activation and their inhibition by AG1478 and PP2 indicated that Src was upstream of EGFR. CAY also increased H-Ras, ERK1/2 and AKT activation, and AG1478 decreased their activation indicating EGFR being upstream. Supporting EP2's contribution, EP2−/− mice exhibited 65% fewer papillomas and reduced Src, EGFR, H-Ras, AKT and ERK1/2 activation. G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation of EGFR has been reported to involve Src's activation via a GPCR–β-arrestin–Src complex. Indeed, immunoprecipitation of β-arrestin1 or p-Src indicated the presence of an EP2–β-arrestin1–p-Src complex in papillomas. The data indicated that EP2 contributed to tumor formation via activation of PKA and EGFR and that EP2 formed a complex with β-arrestin1 and Src that contributed to signaling and/or EP2

  18. Development of prosthetic skin

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    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  19. A method for the immortalization of newborn mouse skin keratinocytes

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    Brianna O Hammiller

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and culture of mouse primary epidermal keratinocytes is a common technique that allows for easy genetic and environmental manipulation. However, due to their limited lifespan in culture, experiments utilizing primary keratinocytes require large numbers of animals, and are time consuming and expensive. To avoid these issues, we developed a method for the immortalization of primary mouse epidermal keratinocytes. Upon isolation of newborn epidermal keratinocytes according to established methods, the cells were cultured long-term in keratinocyte growth factor-containing medium. The cells senesced within a few weeks and eventually, small, slowly growing colonies emerged. After they regained confluency, the cells were passaged and slowly refilled the dish. With several rounds of subculture, the cells adapted to culture conditions, were easily subcultured, maintained normal morphology, and were apparently immortal. The immortalized cells retained the ability to differentiate with increased calcium concentrations, and were maintained to high passage numbers, while maintaining a relatively stable karyotype. Analysis of multiple immortalized cell lines as well as primary keratinocyte cultures, revealed increased numbers of chromosomes, especially in the primary keratinocytes, and chromosomal aberrations in most of the immortalized cultures and in the primary keratinocytes. Orthotopic grafting of immortalized keratinocytes together with fibroblasts onto nude mouse hosts produced skin while v-rasHa infection of the immortalized keratinocytes prior to grafting produced squamous cell carcinoma. In summary, this method of cell line generation allows for decreased use of animals, reduces the expense and time involved in research, and provides a useful model for cutaneous keratinocyte experimentation.

  20. Recovery and Cultivation of Keratinocytes From Shipped Mouse Skin.

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    Yang, Hsin-Ya; La, Thi Dinh; Gurenko, Zhanna; Steenhuis, Pieter; Liu, Wei; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2015-02-01

    Murine keratinocyte culture from neonatal skin is an important tool for studying the functional role of specific genes in epithelial biology. However, when the transgenic animal is only available in a geographically distant local, obtaining viable keratinocytes can be problematic. A method for transferring the isolated murine skin from collaborating labs could decrease the cost of shipping live animals, and would allow the efficient use of the tissues from the transgenic animals. Here we optimized shipping conditions and characterized the cells retrieved and cultured from mouse skin shipped for 48 h at 0 °C. The cultured keratinocytes from the control, non-shipped skin and the 2-day shipped skin were 43.6 +/- 7.8% viable, doubled every 2 days, and expressed comparable amounts of heat shock proteins and CD29/integrin beta-1. However, under the same shipping conditions, the 3-day shipped tissue failed to establish colonies in the culture. Therefore, this 2-day shipping technique allows the transfer mouse skin from distant locations with recovery of viable, propagatable keratinocytes, facilitating long-distance collaborations.

  1. Compression-induced HIF-1 enhances thrombosis and PAI-1 expression in mouse skin.

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    Kaneko, Maki; Minematsu, Takeo; Yoshida, Mikako; Nishijima, Yoshimi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yasunori; Nakagami, Gojiro; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-09-01

    Pressure ulcers result from tissue hypoxia caused by external forces. Thrombosis due to external forces is considered important, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master regulator of pressure ulcer development. To date, however, their causal relationship has not been determined. This study therefore investigated the mutual relationship between thrombosis and HIF-1 activation in compressed mouse skin, based on a hypothesis that HIF-1 regulation by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) enhances thrombosis. Compression of mouse skin significantly increased the numbers of thrombi and HIF-1α-positive cells compared with control skin. A thrombosis inhibitor significantly reduced the numbers of HIF-1α-positive cells and an HIF-1 inhibitor significantly inhibited thrombosis in compressed skin tissue, suggesting a mutual relationship between thrombosis and HIF-1 activation. Compression of mouse skin also enhanced the level of Pai-1 messenger RNA expression, but this increase was significantly reduced by treatment with an HIF-1 inhibitor, whereas a thrombosis inhibitor had no effect. These results suggested the involvement of PAI-1 in HIF-1-enhanced thrombosis and that an additional factor participates in regulating Pai-1 expression in compressed skin. These findings may suggest new strategies in pressure ulcer management.

  2. Metabolism of skin-absorbed resveratrol into its glucuronized form in mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuo Murakami

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (RESV is a plant polyphenol, which is thought to have beneficial metabolic effects in laboratory animals as well as in humans. Following oral administration, RESV is immediately catabolized, resulting in low bioavailability. This study compared RESV metabolites and their tissue distribution after oral uptake and skin absorption. Metabolomic analysis of various mouse tissues revealed that RESV can be absorbed and metabolized through skin. We detected sulfated and glucuronidated RESV metabolites, as well as dihydroresveratrol. These metabolites are thought to have lower pharmacological activity than RESV. Similar quantities of most RESV metabolites were observed 4 h after oral or skin administration, except that glucuronidated RESV metabolites were more abundant in skin after topical RESV application than after oral administration. This result is consistent with our finding of glucuronidated RESV metabolites in cultured skin cells. RESV applied to mouse ears significantly suppressed inflammation in the TPA inflammation model. The skin absorption route could be a complementary, potent way to achieve therapeutic effects with RESV.

  3. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zanivan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progresses through distinct stages, and mouse models recapitulating traits of this progression are frequently used to explore genetic, morphological, and pharmacological aspects of tumor development. To complement genomic investigations of this process, we here quantify phosphoproteomic changes in skin cancer development using the SILAC mouse technology coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. We distill protein expression signatures from our data that distinguish between skin cancer stages. A distinct phosphoproteome of the two stages of cancer progression is identified that correlates with perturbed cell growth and implicates cell adhesion as a major driver of malignancy. Importantly, integrated analysis of phosphoproteomic data and prediction of kinase activity revealed PAK4-PKC/SRC network to be highly deregulated in SCC but not in papilloma. This detailed molecular picture, both at the proteome and phosphoproteome level, will prove useful for the study of mechanisms of tumor progression.

  4. Long-term maintenance of skin immune system in a NOD-Scid IL2rγ(null) mouse model transplanted with human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Angèle; Boccara, David; Chonco, Louis; Yahia, Nora; Dufossée, Mélody; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Moris, Arnaud; Liard, Christelle; Joulin-Giet, Alix; Julithe, Marion; Mimoun, Maurice; Combadière, Béhazine; Perrin, Hélène

    2014-11-01

    We developed a NOD-Scid IL2rγ(null) mouse model transplanted with human skin that brings fundamental insight on in vivo cellular mechanisms of intradermal immunization and antigen presentation by dermal dendritic and epidermal Langerhans cells for skin T-cell immunity. Indeed, T-cell immunity is a crucial checkpoint for the induction of in vivo rapid control of skin infection. With the long-term preservation of a complete human skin immune system, this model offers the unique opportunity not only to better understand mechanisms of skin immune response but also to test new compounds and devices for cutaneous routes of vaccination, as well as new therapeutics approach for skin diseases, allergies or infections.

  5. The alpha/beta carboxy-terminal domains of p63 are required for skin and limb development. New insights from the Brdm2 mouse which is not a complete p63 knockout but expresses p63 gamma-like proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, S; Talos, F; Palacios, G;

    2009-01-01

    p63, an ancestral transcription factor of the p53 family, has three C-terminal isoforms whose relative in vivo functions are elusive. The p63 gene is essential for skin and limb development, as vividly shown by two independent global knockout mouse models. Both strains, although constructed diffe...

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 induces sebaceous gland atrophy in mouse and dog skin while overt alopecia is restricted to the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floettmann, Eike; Lees, David; Seeliger, Frank; Jones, Huw Bowen

    2015-04-01

    Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) plays an important role in synthesizing lipids, and inhibitors of DGAT1 have been investigated as potential treatments for diabetes and metabolic diseases. DGAT1 knockout (-/-) mice are resistant to obesity, have increased sensitivity to insulin, and exhibit sebaceous gland atrophy and alopecia. Prolonged pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 with AZD7687 in mice results in the same skin phenotype, including sebaceous gland atrophy and alopecia, as seen in the skin of DGAT1 (-/-) mice. AZD7687-mediated effects on the skin were dose- and time-dependent and reversible. They occurred only at substantial levels of continuous DGAT1 inhibition. Prolonged treatment of dogs with AZD7687 also resulted in sebaceous gland atrophy but did not result in the more adverse skin changes of hair loss and skin lesions. Our findings highlight a significant risk of generating the same lesions that were seen in mouse skin during clinical development of DGAT1 inhibitors in humans and also reveal a species difference in the effects on the skin, indicating that the mouse may be an especially sensitive species. Therefore, although human therapeutic doses may not have the same influence on skin morphology as seen in mice, monitoring of skin changes will be essential in clinical trials with DGAT1 inhibitors.

  7. Modulation of miR-203 and its regulators as a function of time during the development of 7, 12 dimethylbenz [a] anthracene induced mouse skin tumors in presence or absence of the antitumor agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Prakash; Gupta, Krishna P., E-mail: krishnag522@yahoo.co.in

    2014-07-15

    We investigated the chemopreventive effects of naturally occurring compounds like butyric acid (BA), nicotinamide (NA) and calcium glucarate (CAG) individually or in combination in 7, 12-dimethylbenz [a] anthracene (DMBA) treated mouse skin at 4 and 16 weeks, the time before and after the tumor development. DMBA application did not show any skin tumors at 4 weeks but well defined tumors appeared at 16 weeks. BA, NA or CAG prevented the tumor development significantly but the protection was highly enhanced when all these compounds were given together. In order to see the molecular changes progressing with tumors, we showed the downregulation of tumor suppressor miR-203 at 16 weeks and upregulation of histone deacetylases (HDAC), DNA methyltransferase, promoter methylation of miR-203 at 4 or 16 weeks. Regulators of micro RNA biogenesis such as DICER1 and Ago2 were also deregulated by DMBA. Proto-oncogene c-myc and BMI1 were upregulated and tumor suppressor gene p16 was downregulated by DMBA as a function of time. Effects of BA, NA or CAG were more pronounced after 16 weeks as compared to 4 weeks in preventing the tumor development and altered gene expression. Concomitant administration of BA, NA and CAG tried to prevent these alterations more effectively than that of individual compound possibly by regulating miR-203 status through epigenetic or biogenetic modulations before and after the tumor development. Study provides a rationale for chemoprevention by combination of different compounds targeting miR-203. - Highlights: • DMBA modulates miR-203 and its regulator before and after the onset of tumors. • Suppression of miR-203 and p16 could be the result of gene promoter methylation. • BA, NA or CAG prevents the effects of DMBA. • Combination of BA, NA or CAG is more effective in preventing the DMBA modulations.

  8. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W. [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S.; Kanai, T. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  9. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation p

  10. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    OpenAIRE

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of epidermal and SC features of AD skin and that AD epidermal features can be maintained in vitro when AD skin biopsies are used to generate explant-HSEs. The...

  11. Transcriptional Repression of Catalase in Mouse Skin Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Kwei

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that the elevation of reactive oxygen species levels and the repression of the antioxidant enzyme, catalase, played a critical role in the in vitro progression of benign papilloma cells to malignant carcinoma cells. Catalase message, protein levels, and activity levels were found to be downregulated in the malignantly progressed cells. The goal of this study is to further characterize the repression of catalase in malignant progression of mouse skin tumors. To validate the in vitro observations, we examined catalase expression in tumor samples generated by the multistep chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Higher levels of catalase mRNA and protein were observed in benign papillomas versus malignant carcinomas. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that catalase repression in the cultured malignant cells was transcription-dependent. Results from luciferase reporter assays indicated that malignant cells have lower catalase promoter activities than benign papilloma cells, in part through the Wilm's tumor suppressor 1 (WT1 binding site within the proximal promoter region. The WTi protein levels were found to be inversely correlated with the observed catalase promoter activities, with higher levels observed in the malignant cells versus the benign cells. These results led us to conclude that WTi is acting as a transcription repressor in catalase gene regulation during tumor progression.

  12. Iontophoretic transdermal delivery of buspirone hydrochloride in hairless mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalili, Mohammad; Meidan, Victor M; Michniak, Bozena B

    2003-01-01

    The transdermal delivery of buspirone hydrochloride across hairless mouse skin and the combined effect of iontophoresis and terpene enhancers were evaluated in vitro using Franz diffusion cells. Iontophoretic delivery was optimized by evaluating the effect of drug concentration, current density, and pH of the vehicle solution. Increasing the current density from 0.05 to 0.1 mA/cm2 resulted in doubling of the iontophoretic flux of buspirone hydrochloride, while increasing drug concentration from 1% to 2% had no effect on flux. Using phosphate buffer to adjust the pH of the drug solution decreased the buspirone hydrochloride iontophoretic flux relative to water solutions. Incorporating buspirone hydrochloride into ethanol:water (50:50 vol/vol) based gel formulations using carboxymethylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose had no effect on iontophoretic delivery. Incorporation of three terpene enhancers (menthol, cineole, and terpineol) into the gel resulted in a synergistic effect when combined with iontophoresis. Menthol was the most active enhancer, and when combined with iontophoresis it was possible to deliver 10 mg/cm2/day of buspirone hydrochloride.

  13. Developing Skin Analogues for a Robotic Octopus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinping Hou; Richard H.C.Bonser; George Jeronimidis

    2012-01-01

    In order to fabricate a biomimetic skin for an octopus inspired robot,a new process was developed based on mechanical properties measured from real octopus skin.Various knitted nylon textiles were tested and the one of 10-denier nylon was chosen as reinforcement.A combination of Ecoflex 0030 and 0010 silicone rubbers was used as matrix of the composite to obtain the right stiffness for the skin-analogue system.The open mould fabrication process developed allows air bubble to escape easily and the artificial skin produced was thin and waterproof.Material properties of the biomimetic skin were characterised using static tensile and instrumented scissors cutting tests.The Young's moduli of the artificial skin are 0.08 MPa and 0.13 MPa in the longitudinal and transverse directions,which are much lower than those of the octopus skin.The strength and fracture toughness of the artificial skin,on the other hand are higher than those of real octopus skins.Conically-shaped skin prototypes to be used to cover the robotic arm unit were manufactured and tested.The biomimetic skin prototype was stiff enough to maintain it conical shape when filled with water.The driving force for elongation was reduced significantly compared with previous prototypes.

  14. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT-Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. Methods The fresh frozen tissue sections (8m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. Results  The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. Conclusion The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  15. Matrine inhibits proliferation of mouse skin fibroblasts induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-an; GAO Chun-fang; WANG Hao; HUANG Chao; KONG Xian-tao

    2001-01-01

    To study the effect of matrine on proliferation of mouse skin fibroblasts induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). Methods: Mouse skin fibroblasts were obtained from newborn ⅠCR mice and propagated in vitro. Proliferation of cell was analyzed by mitochondrial reduction of tetrazolium salt MTT and actual cell count. Results: Matrine (50 to 500 μg/ml) caused dose-dependent reduction of serum-stimulated cell growth. Growth inhibition was totally reversed after removal of the drug. Matrine also inhibited PDGF-BB induced cell growth dose-dependently. Conclusion: Matrine exhibits potent anti-proliferation effect on mouse skin fibroblast. This effect appears to be mediated by decrease of PDGF-induced growth. These results suggest that matrine might have preventive and therapeutic implication in skin fibrosis.

  16. Antitopoisomerase I monoclonal autoantibodies from scleroderma patients and tight skin mouse interact with similar epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muryoi, T; Kasturi, K N; Kafina, M J; Cram, D S; Harrison, L C; Sasaki, T; Bona, C A

    1992-04-01

    We have generated for the first time monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for topoisomerase I (topo I) from scleroderma patients, and tight skin mice which develop a scleroderma-like syndrome. The epitope specificity of these antibodies has been determined using a series of fusion proteins containing contiguous portions of topo I polypeptide. Western blot analysis demonstrated that both human and mouse mAbs bound strongly to fusion protein C encompassing the NH2-terminal portion of the enzyme, and weakly to fusion proteins F and G containing regions close to the COOH-terminal end of the molecule. This crossreactivity is related to a tripeptide sequence homology in F, G, and C fusion proteins. It is interesting that a pentapeptide sequence homologous to that in fusion protein C was identified in the UL70 protein of cytomegalovirus, suggesting that activation of autoreactive B cell clones by molecular mimicry is possible. Both human and mouse mAbs exhibiting the same antigen specificity, also share an interspecies cross-reactive idiotope. These data suggest that B cell clones producing antitopo autoantibodies present in human and mouse repertoire are conserved during phylogeny, and are activated during the development of scleroderma disease.

  17. Skin melanocytes: biology and development

    OpenAIRE

    Cichorek, Mirosława; Wachulska, Małgorzata; Stasiewicz, Aneta; Tymińska, Agata

    2013-01-01

    In the human skin, melanocytes are present in the epidermis and hair follicles. The basic features of these cells are the ability to melanin production and the origin from neural crest cells. This last element is important because there are other cells able to produce melanin but of different embryonic origin (pigmented epithelium of retina, some neurons, adipocytes). The life cycle of melanocyte consists of several steps including differentiation of melanocyte lineage/s from neural crest, mi...

  18. Topical Application of Oleuropein Induces Anagen Hair Growth in Telogen Mouse Skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Tong

    Full Text Available Oleuropein promoted cultured human follicle dermal papilla cell proliferation and induced LEF1 and Cyc-D1 mRNA expression and β-catenin protein expression in dermal papilla cells. Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in dermal papilla cells was observed after oleuropein treatment. Topical application of oleuropein (0.4 mg/mouse/day to C57BL/6N mice accelerated the hair-growth induction and increased the size of hair follicles in telogenic mouse skin. The oleuropein-treated mouse skin showed substantial upregulation of Wnt10b, FZDR1, LRP5, LEF1, Cyc-D1, IGF-1, KGF, HGF, and VEGF mRNA expression and β-catenin protein expression.These results demonstrate that topical oleuroepin administration induced anagenic hair growth in telogenic C57BL/6N mouse skin. The hair-growth promoting effect of oleuropein in mice appeared to be associated with the stimulation of the Wnt10b/β-catenin signaling pathway and the upregulation of IGF-1, KGF, HGF, and VEGF gene expression in mouse skin tissue.

  19. Antiinflammatory and Antiphotodamaging Effects of Ergostatrien-3β-ol, Isolated from Antrodia camphorata, on Hairless Mouse Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Hsiung Kuo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ergostatrien-3β-ol (EK100, isolated from the submerged whole broth of Antrodia camphorata, has antidiabetic, hyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective activities. However, the antiphotodamage activity of EK100 has still not been revealed. Inflammation and collagen degradation contribute to skin photodamage and premature aging. In the present study, in vivo experiments were designed to investigate the antiinflammatory and antiphotodamaging activities of EK100 in hairless mice by physiological and histological analysis of the skin. Results indicated that topical application of EK100 (25 and 100 μM for 10 weeks efficiently inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB-induced wrinkle formation, erythema, and epidermal thickness in the mice skin. EK100 also restored UVB-induced collagen content reduction in hairless mice skin. In addition, the immunohistochemistry results indicated that EK100 significantly inhibited the UVB-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB in the mouse skin. The expression of these proteins was similar to the Normal group after 100 μM EK100 treatment. EK100 inhibited collagen degradation in the skin through MMP-1 inhibition and antiinflammation. EK100 significantly reduced the transepidermal water loss (TEWL, indicating that EK100 protected skin from UVB-induced damage. Our findings strongly suggest that EK100 has significant beneficial antiinflammatory and antiphotoaging activities and that EK100 can be developed as an antiphotodamaging agent.

  20. Collagen Content in Skin and Internal Organs of the Tight Skin Mouse: An Animal Model of Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi Manne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tight Skin mouse is a genetically induced animal model of tissue fibrosis caused by a large in-frame mutation in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (Fbn-1. We examined the influence of gender on the collagen content of tissues in C57BL/6J wild type (+/+ and mutant Tight Skin (Tsk/+ mice employing hydroxyproline assays. Tissue sections were stained with Masson’s trichrome to identify collagen in situ. Adult Tsk/+ mice skin contains ~15% more collagen, on average, than skin from +/+ mice of the same gender. The heart of Tsk/+ males had significantly more collagen than that of +/+ males. No significant gender differences were found in lungs and kidney collagen content. Overall, the collagen content of Tsk/+ males and +/+ males was higher than that of their Tsk/+ and +/+ female counterparts, respectively. Our data confirm increased deposition of collagen in skin and hearts of Tsk/+ mice; however, the effects of the Tsk mutation on collagen content are both tissue specific and gender specific. These results indicate that comparative studies of collagen content between normal and Tsk/+ mice skin and internal organs must take into account gender differences caused by expression of the androgen receptor.

  1. Exposure of mouse skin to organic peroxides: subchronic effects related to carcinogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanausek, Margaret; Walaszek, Zbigniew; Viaje, Aurora; LaBate, Michael; Spears, Erick; Farrell, David; Henrich, Richard; Tveit, Ann; Walborg, Earl F; Slaga, Thomas J

    2004-03-01

    Screening of newly synthesized organic peroxides for tumor initiating/promoting activity would be greatly facilitated if predictive methodologies could be developed using topical exposures shorter than those required for definitive tumor assessment in mouse skin models. Nine organic peroxides [benzoyl peroxide (BZP), di-t-butyl peroxide (DTBP), t-butyl peroxybenzoate (TBPB), p-t-butyl isopropylbenzene hydroperoxide (TBIBHP), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), dicetyl peroxydicarbonate (DPD), dicumyl peroxide (DCP), methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) and O,O-t-butyl-O-(2-ethylhexyl) monoperoxycarbonate (TBEC)] were evaluated for their ability to increase biomarkers of tumor promotion in mouse skin, i.e. sustained epidermal hyperplasia, dermal inflammation and oxidative DNA damage. Evaluations were performed using SENCAR mice exposed topically for 4 weeks. The organic peroxides varied in their effects on these biomarkers. BZP, TBPB and TBIBHP exhibited significant increases in all three biomarkers associated with tumor promoting activity, CHP produced increases only in sustained epidermal hyperplasia and dermal inflammation, MEKP and DCP produced increases only in sustained epidermal hyperplasia and TBEC produced an increase only in dermal inflammation. DTBP and DPD had no effect on the three parameters studied. TBPB and TBIBHP were selected for further examination of their ability to produce mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61 of the c-Ha-ras protooncogene, i.e. those mutations known to be involved in the initiation of mouse skin tumors, because they were the only peroxides to exhibit significant positive results in all assays except the Ha-ras mutation following 4 weeks of exposure. Evaluations were performed using SENCAR mice dosed topically for 8 or 12 weeks in a complete carcinogenesis protocol or 16 weeks in an initiation/promotion protocol using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, urethane, benzo[a]pyrene and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine as positive controls

  2. In vivo nonlinear spectral imaging in mouse skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Palero (Jonathan); H.S. de Bruijn (Riette); A. van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel (Angélique); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick); H.C. Gerritsen (Hans)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe report on two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic spectral imaging of live mouse tissues. The use of a high sensitivity detector and ultraviolet optics allowed us to record razor-sharp deep-tissue spectral images of weak autofluorescence and short-wavelength second harmonic

  3. Preparation of Single-cell Suspensions for Cytofluorimetric Analysis from Different Mouse Skin Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Achille; Cigni, Clara; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca

    2016-04-20

    The skin is a barrier organ that interacts with the external environment. Being continuously exposed to potential microbial invasion, the dermis and epidermis home a variety of immune cells in both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Tools to obtain skin cell release for cytofluorimetric analyses are, therefore, very useful in order to study the complex network of immune cells residing in the skin and their response to microbial stimuli. Here, we describe an efficient methodology for the digestion of mouse skin to rapidly and efficiently obtain single-cell suspensions. This protocol allows maintenance of maximum cell viability without compromising surface antigen expression. We also describe how to take and digest skin samples from different anatomical locations, such as the ear, trunk, tail, and footpad. The obtained suspensions are then stained and analyzed by flow cytometry to discriminate between different leukocyte populations.

  4. The optical properties of mouse skin in the visible and near infrared spectral regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Caetano P; Deana, Alessandro M; Yoshimura, Tania M; da Silva, Daniela F T; França, Cristiane M; Hamblin, Michael R; Ribeiro, Martha S

    2016-07-01

    Visible and near-infrared radiation is now widely employed in health science and technology. Pre-clinical trials are still essential to allow appropriate translation of optical methods into clinical practice. Our results stress the importance of considering the mouse strain and gender when planning pre-clinical experiments that depend on light-skin interactions. Here, we evaluated the optical properties of depilated albino and pigmented mouse skin using reproducible methods to determine parameters that have wide applicability in biomedical optics. Light penetration depth (δ), absorption (μa), reduced scattering (μ's) and reduced attenuation (μ't) coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model of photon transport and spectrophotometric measurements. Within a broad wavelength coverage (400-1400nm), the main optical tissue interactions of visible and near infrared radiation could be inferred. Histological analysis was performed to correlate the findings with tissue composition and structure. Disperse melanin granules present in depilated pigmented mouse skin were shown to be irrelevant for light absorption. Gender mostly affected optical properties in the visible range due to variations in blood and abundance of dense connective tissue. On the other hand, mouse strains could produce more variations in the hydration level of skin, leading to changes in absorption in the infrared spectral region. A spectral region of minimal light attenuation, commonly referred as the "optical window", was observed between 600 and 1350nm.

  5. Protective effects of black rice bran against chemically-induced inflammation of mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of black rice (cv. LK1-3-6-12-1-1) bran against 12-O-tetradecanolylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin edema and 2,4-dinitroflurobenzene (DNFB)-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in inflammatory mouse models. We also determined the effects of the bran...

  6. D-aspartic acid in aged mouse skin and lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Noriko; Muraoka, Shiro; Harada, Kaoru; Tamanoi, Itsuro; Joshima, Hisamasa; Kashima, Masatoshi

    1987-03-01

    D-aspartic acid (D-Asp) was detected in the skin and lens from naturally aged mice. An analysis of the amino acid composition indicated that D-Asp did not derive from collagen. An immunological analysis using Oucterlony's agar diffusion method also confirmed that the protein containing D-Asp was not a serum protein. The process producing D-Asp is regarded as one other than racemization because the life span of mice is not long enough to permit D-Asp by racemization. Continuous low-dose-rate gamma-irradiation (37R per day) for 102 to 112 days did not increase significantly the amount of D-Asp in skin and lens of mice.

  7. The biodisposition and hypertrichotic effects of bimatoprost in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, David F; Tang, Elaine S-H; Attar, Mayssa; Wang, Jenny W

    2013-02-01

    Studies on bimatoprost were performed with two objectives: (i) to determine whether bimatoprost possesses hair growth-stimulating properties beyond eyelash hypertrichosis and (ii) to investigate the biodisposition of bimatoprost in skin for the first time. Bimatoprost, at the dose used clinically for eyelash growth (0.03%) and given once daily for 14 days, increased pelage hair growth in C57/black 6 mice. This occurred as a much earlier onset of new hair growth in shaved mice and the time taken to achieve complete hair regrowth, according to photographic documentation and visual assessment. Bimatoprost biodisposition in the skin was determined at three concentrations: 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.06%. Dose-dependent C(max) values were obtained (3.41, 6.74, 12.3 μg/g tissue), and cutaneous bimatoprost was well maintained for 24 h following a single dose. Bimatoprost was recovered from the skin only as the intact molecule, with no detectable levels of metabolites. Thus, bimatoprost produces hypertrichosis as the intact molecule.

  8. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT—Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOESHWERSHUKLA

    2001-01-01

    Objective:Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium(NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated.Methods:The fresh frozen tissue sections(8m thickness)were prepared and incuated in medium containing NBT,reduced glutathione(GSH) and Phosphate uffer,The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange.Results:The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has een found to be localized in the areas rich in glutatione and actively proliferating area of the skin.Conclusion:The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutatione contents.

  9. Carcinogenicity of syncrudes relative to natural petroleum as assessed by repetative mouse skin application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, J.M.; Whitaker, M.S.; Wesley, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The relative carcinogenicities of coal and shale derived liquid crudes was compared with a composite blend of natural petroleum using discontinuous exposure of mouse skin. All of the syncrudes were carcinogenic while the natural crude composite was negative following three times weekly application of 50% w/v solutions for 22 wks followed by a 22 wk observation period. In addition to eliciting progressive squamous carcinomas the syncrudes were also capable of inducing persistent ulcerative dermatitis. This inflammatory or necrotizing potential appeared to be inversely proportional to the carcinogenicity of the material. A measure of the relative solubility of the materials in mouse skin was obtained by quantitation of native fluorescence in frozen sections of skin. There appeared to be a general, although non-quantitative association between fluorescence intensity in sebaceous glands and carcinogenicity in epidermal cells, however it will be necessary to examine a greater number of samples to establish such a correlation.

  10. Delayed tail loss during the invasion of mouse skin by cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Fang, Zheng-Ming; Lei, Jia-Hui; Guan, Fei; Liu, Wen-Qi; Bartlett, Ann; Whitfield, Phil; Li, Yong-Long

    2012-02-01

    A traditional assumption is that schistosome cercariae lose their tails at the onset of penetration. It has, however, recently been demonstrated that, for Schistosoma mansoni, cercarial tails were not invariably being shed as penetration took place and a high proportion of tails entered human skin under experimental conditions. This phenomenon was termed delayed tail loss (DTL). In this paper, we report that DTL also happens with S. japonicum cercariae during penetration of mouse skin. It occurred at all cercarial densities tested, from as few as 10 cercariae/2·25 cm(2) of mouse skin up to 200 cercariae. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that there was a density-dependent increase in DTL as cercarial densities increased. No such density-dependent enhancement was shown for percentage attachment over the same cercarial density range.

  11. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2004-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  12. Tumor initiating and promoting activities of various benzo(a)pyrene metabolites in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T J; Bracken, W M; Viaje, A; Berry, D L; Fischer, S M; Miller, D R; Levin, W; Conney, A H; Yagi, H; Jerina, D M

    1977-01-01

    The skin tumor-initiating activities of the twelve isomeric phenols of BP revealed that 2-OHBP was as potent as BP while 11-OHBP was moderately active and the others were weak or inactive. However, 2-OHBP has not been shown to be formed from BP in the skin or any other tissue. The (-)-trans-7,8-diol of BP skin was found to be more active as a skin tumor initiator than BP suggesting that it is a proximal carcinogen. The data on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and metabolism suggest that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is the ultimate carcinogenic form of BP. The skin tumor-initiating activities of the various BP metabolites correlate very well with their complete carcinogenic in mouse skin except for BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide. It was found to have skin tumor initiating activity but not complete carcinogenic activity. However, BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide was found to be a very potent complete carcinogen in newborn mice. It is possible that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is only a tumor initiator in which a promoting stimulus must be supplied for carcinogenic activity. A natural tumor promoting stimulus may be present in the newborn mouse. There is also a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activities of the various BP metabolites and their mutagenic activity in the V79 mammalian cell mediated mutagenesis system.

  13. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Orlicky, David J. [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Agarwal, Chapla [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); White, Carl W. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045USA (United States); Agarwal, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Agarwal@UCDenver.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  14. C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta are required for Sebocyte differentiation and stratified squamous differentiation in adult mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S House

    Full Text Available C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta are bZIP transcription factors that are highly expressed in the interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands of skin and yet germ line deletion of either family member alone has only mild or no effect on keratinocyte biology and their role in sebocyte biology has never been examined. To address possible functional redundancies and reveal functional roles of C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta in postnatal skin, mouse models were developed in which either family member could be acutely ablated alone or together in the epidermis and sebaceous glands of adult mice. Acute removal of either C/EBPalpha or C/EBPbeta alone in adult mouse skin revealed modest to no discernable changes in epidermis or sebaceous glands. In contrast, co-ablation of C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta in postnatal epidermis resulted in disruption of stratified squamous differentiation characterized by hyperproliferation of basal and suprabasal keratinocytes and a defective basal to spinous keratinocyte transition involving an expanded basal compartment and a diminished and delayed spinous compartment. Acute co-ablation of C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta in sebaceous glands resulted in severe morphological defects, and sebocyte differentiation was blocked as determined by lack of sebum production and reduced expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD3 and melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R, two markers of terminal sebocyte differentiation. Specialized sebocytes of Meibomian glands and preputial glands were also affected. Our results indicate that in adult mouse skin, C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta are critically involved in regulating sebocyte differentiation and epidermal homeostasis involving the basal to spinous keratinocyte transition and basal cell cycle withdrawal.

  15. High-power femtosecond-terahertz pulse induces a wound response in mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Jaehun; Jo, Sung Jin; Jung, Seonghoon; Kwon, Oh Sang; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Gun-Sik

    2013-08-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has emerged for biomedical applications such as scanning, molecular spectroscopy, and medical imaging. Although a thorough assessment to predict potential concerns has to precede before practical utilization of THz source, the biological effect of THz radiation is not yet fully understood with scant related investigations. Here, we applied a femtosecond-terahertz (fs-THz) pulse to mouse skin to evaluate non-thermal effects of THz radiation. Analysis of the genome-wide expression profile in fs-THz-irradiated skin indicated that wound responses were predominantly mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. We validated NFκB1- and Smad3/4-mediated transcriptional activation in fs-THz-irradiated skin by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Repeated fs-THz radiation delayed the closure of mouse skin punch wounds due to up-regulation of TGF-β. These findings suggest that fs-THz radiation initiate a wound-like signal in skin with increased expression of TGF-β and activation of its downstream target genes, which perturbs the wound healing process in vivo.

  16. Skin barrier disruption by acetone: observations in a hairless mouse skin model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rissmann, R.; Oudshoorn, M.H.M.; Hennink, W.E.; Ponec, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    To disrupt the barrier function of the skin, different in vivo methods have been established, e.g., by acetone wiping or tape-stripping. In this study, the acetone-induced barrier disruption of hairless mice was investigated in order to establish a reliable model to study beneficial, long-term effec

  17. Curcumin Stimulates the Antioxidant Mechanisms in Mouse Skin Exposed to Fractionated γ-Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Chandra Jagetia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractionated irradiation is one of the important radiotherapy regimens to treat different types of neoplasia. Despite of the immense therapeutic gains accrued by delivering fractionated irradiation to tumors, the radiation burden on skin increases significantly. Low doses of irradiation to skin adversely affect its molecular and metabolic status. The use of antioxidant/s may help to alleviate the radiation-induced changes in the skin and allow delivering a higher dose of radiation to attain better therapeutic gains. Curcumin is an antioxidant and a free radical scavenging dietary supplement, commonly used as a flavoring agent in curries. Therefore, the effect of 100 mg/kg body weight curcumin was studied on the antioxidant status of mice skin exposed to a total dose of 10, 20 and 40 Gy γ-radiation below the rib cage delivered as a single fraction of 2 Gy per day for 5, 10 or 20 days. Skin biopsies from both the curcumin treated or untreated irradiated groups were collected for the biochemical estimations at various post-irradiation times. The irradiation of animals caused a dose dependent decline in the glutathione concentration, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities and increased the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated skin. Curcumin treatment before irradiation resulted in a significant rise in the glutathione concentration and activities of both the glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in mouse skin, whereas lipid peroxidation declined significantly. The present study indicates that curcumin treatment increased the antioxidant status of mouse exposed to different doses of fractionated γ-radiation.

  18. Topical application of ochratoxin A causes DNA damage and tumor initiation in mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer and 2-3 million new cases are being diagnosed globally each year. Along with UV rays, environmental pollutants/chemicals including mycotoxins, contaminants of various foods and feed stuffs, could be one of the aetiological factors of skin cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the DNA damaging potential and dermal carcinogenicity of a mycotoxin, ochratoxin A (OTA, with the rationale that dermal exposure to OTA in workers may occur during their involvement in pre and post harvest stages of agriculture. A single topical application of OTA (20-80 µg/mouse resulted in significant DNA damage along with elevated γ-H2AX level in skin. Alteration in oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl, glutathione content and antioxidant enzymes was observed in a dose (20-80 µg/mouse and time-dependent (12-72 h manner. The oxidative stress was further emphasized by the suppression of Nrf2 translocation to nucleus following a single topical application of OTA (80 µg/mouse after 24 h. OTA (80 µg/mouse application for 12-72 h caused significant enhancement in- (a reactive oxygen species generation, (b activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPKs, (c cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase (37-67%, (d induction of apoptosis (2.0-11.0 fold, (e expression of p53, p21/waf1, (f Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, (g cytochrome c level, (h activities of caspase 9 (1.2-1.8 fold and 3 (1.7-2.2 fold as well as poly ADP ribose polymerase cleavage. In a two-stage mouse skin tumorigenesis protocol, it was observed that a single topical application of OTA (80 µg/mouse followed by twice weekly application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate for 24 week leads to tumor formation. These results suggest that OTA has skin tumor initiating property which may be related to oxidative stress, MAPKs signaling and DNA damage.

  19. Sprouty2 downregulates angiogenesis during mouse skin wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietecha, Mateusz S.; Chen, Lin; Ranzer, Matthew J.; Anderson, Kimberly; Ying, Chunyi; Patel, Tarun B.

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by signals received by receptor tyrosine kinases such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Mammalian Sprouty (Spry) proteins are known to function by specifically antagonizing the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway by receptor tyrosine kinases, a pathway known to promote angiogenesis. To examine the role of Spry2 in the regulation of angiogenesis during wound repair, we used a model of murine dermal wound healing. Full-thickness excisional wounds (3 mm) were made on the dorsum of anesthetized adult female FVB mice. Samples were harvested at multiple time points postwounding and analyzed using real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescent histochemistry. Spry2 mRNA and protein levels in the wound bed increased significantly during the resolving phases of healing, coincident with the onset of vascular regression in this wound model. In another experiment, intracellular levels of Spry2 or its dominant-negative mutant (Y55F) were elevated by a topical application to the wounds of controlled-release gel containing cell permeable, transactivator of transcription-tagged Spry2, Spry2Y55F, or green fluorescent protein (as control). Wound samples were analyzed for vascularity using CD31 immunofluorescent histochemistry as well as for total and phospho-Erk1/2 protein content. The treatment of wounds with Spry2 resulted in a significant decrease in vascularity and a reduced abundance of phospho-Erk1/2 compared with wounds treated with the green fluorescent protein control. In contrast, the wounds treated with the dominant-negative Spry2Y55F exhibited a moderate increase in vascularity and elevated phospho-Erk1/2 content. These results indicate that endogenous Spry2 functions to downregulate angiogenesis in the healing murine skin wound, potentially by inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:21076020

  20. Sprouty2 downregulates angiogenesis during mouse skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietecha, Mateusz S; Chen, Lin; Ranzer, Matthew J; Anderson, Kimberly; Ying, Chunyi; Patel, Tarun B; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2011-02-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by signals received by receptor tyrosine kinases such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Mammalian Sprouty (Spry) proteins are known to function by specifically antagonizing the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway by receptor tyrosine kinases, a pathway known to promote angiogenesis. To examine the role of Spry2 in the regulation of angiogenesis during wound repair, we used a model of murine dermal wound healing. Full-thickness excisional wounds (3 mm) were made on the dorsum of anesthetized adult female FVB mice. Samples were harvested at multiple time points postwounding and analyzed using real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescent histochemistry. Spry2 mRNA and protein levels in the wound bed increased significantly during the resolving phases of healing, coincident with the onset of vascular regression in this wound model. In another experiment, intracellular levels of Spry2 or its dominant-negative mutant (Y55F) were elevated by a topical application to the wounds of controlled-release gel containing cell permeable, transactivator of transcription-tagged Spry2, Spry2Y55F, or green fluorescent protein (as control). Wound samples were analyzed for vascularity using CD31 immunofluorescent histochemistry as well as for total and phospho-Erk1/2 protein content. The treatment of wounds with Spry2 resulted in a significant decrease in vascularity and a reduced abundance of phospho-Erk1/2 compared with wounds treated with the green fluorescent protein control. In contrast, the wounds treated with the dominant-negative Spry2Y55F exhibited a moderate increase in vascularity and elevated phospho-Erk1/2 content. These results indicate that endogenous Spry2 functions to downregulate angiogenesis in the healing murine skin wound, potentially by inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

  1. Immunoprotective UVA (320-400 nm) irradiation upregulates heme oxygenase-1 in the dermis and epidermis of hairless mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanson, Munif; Reeve, Vivienne E

    2004-04-01

    The induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by ultraviolet A (UVA) (320-400 nm) radiation provides a protective cellular defence against oxidative stress, and has been well demonstrated in cultured human skin fibroblasts, although keratinocytes were unreactive. The UVA responsiveness of HO-1 however, has not been confirmed in intact skin. Previously, we reported that UVA-inducible HO enzyme activity in mouse skin is protective against UVB-induced immunosuppression. This study identifies the induced HO isoform and its localization in mouse skin irradiated in vivo with such an immunoprotective UVA dose. We found that HO-1 mRNA was expressed in UVA-irradiated skin, but not in normal or UVB-irradiated skin, whereas constitutive HO-2 was always present. UVA-irradiated skin had increased HO enzyme activity and bilirubin content, and decreased heme content, consistent with HO-1 induction. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining localized HO-1 mRNA and protein to both epidermis and dermis, with strongest expression in basal keratinocytes and weaker expression in dermal fibroblast-like and other cells, in contrast with UVA-induced HO-1 in cultured human skin fibroblasts. This suggests that cultured skin cells may not fully represent skin functions in vivo, or that there may be inherent differences between human and hairless mouse skin HO-1 responses.

  2. Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse-psoriatic human skin xenograft model: A modern tool connecting bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Kundu-Raychaudhuri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease. Research into the pathogenesis of this disease is hindered by the lack of a proper animal model. Over the past two decades, many scientists were involved in the development of animal models that nearly mirror the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. One such model, which has opened doors to the study of molecular complexities of psoriasis as well as its treatment, is the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse-human skin chimera model. This model not only mirrors the clinical and histopathological features of psoriasis but also help in the study of cell proliferation, angiogenesis, function of T cells, neurogenic inflammation and cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. In this article, we have reviewed the prospects and the limitations of the SCID mouse model of psoriasis.

  3. Induction of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.A.; Dessypris, E.N.; Koury, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The production of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity (MEG-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting agents. A rapid induction of MEG-CSA was found in skin treated both with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a strong tumor promoter, and with mezerein, a weak tumor promoter, but no induction was found in untreated skin. The time course of induction of MEG-CSA following treatment of skin with PMA or mezerein was very similar to that previously demonstrated for the induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by these agents. The induced MEG-CSA was found in both the epidermis and the dermis. Pretreatment of the skin with US -methasone abrogated the MEG-CSA induction. The cell number response curve suggests that the MEG-CSA acts directly on the progenitor cells of the megakaryocyte colonies. That topical administration of diterpene esters results in the rapid, local induction of MEG-CSA which can be blocked by US -methasone pretreatment suggests a mechanism for the thrombocytosis associated with some inflammatory states. The indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells the production or release of growth regulatory factors for other cell types may also aid in understanding their carcinogenic properties.

  4. Ultraviolet light induction of skin carcinoma in the mouse; influence of cAMP modifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdela, F; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    A short review of pathogenic factors in U.V. light skin carcinogenesis in the mouse is presented. Caffeine and theophylline applied locally during U.V. irradiation caused a 50 percent reduction of skin tumour induction in Swiss mice. These two chemicals are inhibitors of DNA postreplication repair, but they also raise the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterase with, as a consequence, a possible slowing down of cellular growth. Control experiments using three different chemicals capable of raising the cAMP level in epidermal cells gave negative results. These experimental data are compatible with our original hypothesis according to which production of skin cancers by U.V. radiation is in same way related to DNA repair which helps the cell to survive but allows or favours the occurrence of errors in cellular DNA.

  5. Mueller matrix polarimetry for characterizing microstructural variation of nude mouse skin during tissue optical clearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zeng, Nan; Xie, Qiaolin; He, Honghui; Tuchin, Valery V; Ma, Hui

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the polarization features corresponding to changes in the microstructure of nude mouse skin during immersion in a glycerol solution. By comparing the Mueller matrix imaging experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, we examine in detail how the Mueller matrix elements vary with the immersion time. The results indicate that the polarization features represented by Mueller matrix elements m22&m33&m44 and the absolute values of m34&m43 are sensitive to the immersion time. To gain a deeper insight on how the microstructures of the skin vary during the tissue optical clearing (TOC), we set up a sphere-cylinder birefringence model (SCBM) of the skin and carry on simulations corresponding to different TOC mechanisms. The good agreement between the experimental and simulated results confirm that Mueller matrix imaging combined with Monte Carlo simulation is potentially a powerful tool for revealing microscopic features of biological tissues.

  6. [Development of cereal bar with pineapple skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Renata Siqueira; Del Santo, Victor Rogério; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Pereira, Cíntia Alessandra Matiucci

    2011-06-01

    The cereal bars are multi-component products consisting of cereals, dried fruit and syrup binder and may be added to the consumable parts of fruits and vegetables which usually are not exploited and have high nutritional value, thereby reducing food waste. It was developed a jam with pineapple skin, which it was utilized in 13.5% in the cereal bar formulation. The cereal bar was sensorial evaluated and had its centesimal and mineral composition determined. The new product achieved average of 8.3 for global impression using 9 points hedonic scale, 91% of acceptance rate and 67% of purchase intent. In this first use of pineapple skin jam as food ingredient it can be concluded that its aggregation in the cereal bar formula is feasible, making an accepted product with fibers, proteins and minerals, as an alternative to traditional cereal bars.

  7. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51% reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. PMID:25791923

  8. Long-term bezafibrate treatment improves skin and spleen phenotypes of the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloye M Dillon

    Full Text Available Pharmacological agents, such as bezafibrate, that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and PPAR γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α pathways have been shown to improve mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mouse is a mouse model of aging that harbors a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ. These mice develop many features of premature aging including hair loss, anemia, osteoporosis, sarcopenia and decreased lifespan. They also have increased mtDNA mutations and marked mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that mutator mice treated with bezafibrate for 8-months had delayed hair loss and improved skin and spleen aging-like phenotypes. Although we observed an increase in markers of fatty acid oxidation in these tissues, we did not detect a generalized increase in mitochondrial markers. On the other hand, there were no improvements in muscle function or lifespan of the mutator mouse, which we attributed to the rodent-specific hepatomegaly associated with fibrate treatment. These results showed that despite its secondary effects in rodent's liver, bezafibrate was able to improve some of the aging phenotypes in the mutator mouse. Because the associated hepatomegaly is not observed in primates, long-term bezafibrate treatment in humans could have beneficial effects on tissues undergoing chronic bioenergetic-related degeneration.

  9. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-02-14

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues.

  10. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues. PMID:28137859

  11. An Improved Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis and Suppression of Skin Lesions by an Inhibitor of Tec Family Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kawakami

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: We established a highly efficient, highly reproducible protocol to induce skin lesions in NC/Nga mice and successfully applied it to show the efficacy of terreic acid in treating skin lesions. This mouse model of atopic dermatitis will be useful to study the pathogenetic processes of atopic dermatitis and to evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates.

  12. Resveratrol and black tea polyphenol combination synergistically suppress mouse skin tumors growth by inhibition of activated MAPKs and p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine George

    Full Text Available Cancer chemoprevention by natural dietary agents has received considerable importance because of their cost-effectiveness and wide safety margin. However, single agent intervention has failed to bring the expected outcome in clinical trials; therefore, combinations of chemopreventive agents are gaining increasing popularity. The present study aims to evaluate the combinatorial chemopreventive effects of resveratrol and black tea polyphenol (BTP in suppressing two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA and TPA. Resveratrol/BTP alone treatment decreased tumor incidence by ∼67% and ∼75%, while combination of both at low doses synergistically decreased tumor incidence even more significantly by ∼89% (p<0.01. This combination also significantly regressed tumor volume and number (p<0.01. Mechanistic studies revealed that this combinatorial inhibition was associated with decreased expression of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase family proteins: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, p38 and increased in total p53 and phospho p53 (Ser 15 in skin tissue/tumor. Treatment with combinations of resveratrol and BTP also decreased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in mouse skin tissues/tumors than their solitary treatments as determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, histological and cell death analysis also confirmed that resveratrol and BTP treatment together inhibits cellular proliferation and markedly induces apoptosis. Taken together, our results for the first time lucidly illustrate that resveratrol and BTP in combination impart better suppressive activity than either of these agents alone and accentuate that development of novel combination therapies/chemoprevention using dietary agents will be more beneficial against cancer. This promising combination should be examined in therapeutic trials of skin and possibly other cancers.

  13. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Minjuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM. The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration.

  14. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration. PMID:27597871

  15. Berteroin Present in Cruciferous Vegetables Exerts Potent Anti-Inflammatory Properties in Murine Macrophages and Mouse Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Jin Jung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Berteroin (5-methylthiopentyl isothiocyanate is a sulforaphane analog present in cruciferous vegetables, including Chinese cabbage, rucola salad leaves, and mustard oil. We examined whether berteroin exerts anti-inflammatory activities using lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated Raw 264.7 macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA-induced mouse skin inflammation models. Berteroin decreased LPS-induced release of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Raw 264.7 macrophages. Berteroin inhibited LPS-induced degradation of inhibitor of κBα (IκBα and nuclear factor-κB p65 translocation to the nucleus and DNA binding activity. Furthermore, berteroin suppressed degradation of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase and phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1. Berteroin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, and AKT. In the mouse ear, berteroin effectively suppressed TPA-induced edema formation and down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression as well as phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2. These results demonstrate that berteroin exhibits potent anti-inflammatory properties and suggest that berteroin can be developed as a skin anti-inflammatory agent.

  16. Deoxynivalenol induced mouse skin cell proliferation and inflammation via MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Sakshi [Food Drug and Chemical Toxicology, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), P.O. Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Department of Biochemistry, Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Varanasi (India); Tripathi, Anurag [Food Drug and Chemical Toxicology, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), P.O. Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Chaudhari, Bhushan P. [Pathology Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), Mahatma Gandhi Marg, PO Box 80, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Dwivedi, Premendra D. [Food Drug and Chemical Toxicology, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), P.O. Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Pandey, Haushila P. [Department of Biochemistry, Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Varanasi (India); Das, Mukul, E-mail: mditrc@rediffmail.com [Food Drug and Chemical Toxicology, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), P.O. Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2014-09-01

    Several toxicological manifestations of deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, are well documented; however, dermal toxicity is not yet explored. The effect of topical application of DON to mice was studied using markers of skin proliferation, inflammation and tumor promotion. Single topical application of DON (84–672 nmol/mouse) significantly enhanced dermal hyperplasia and skin edema. DON (336 and 672 nmol) caused significant enhancement in [{sup 3}H]-thymidine uptake in DNA along with increased myeloperoxidase and ornithine decarboxylase activities, suggesting tissue inflammation and cell proliferation. Furthermore, DON (168 nmol) caused enhanced expression of RAS, and phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 MAPKs. DON exposure also showed activation of transcription factors, c-fos, c-jun and NF-κB along with phosphorylation of IkBα. Enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB by DON caused over expression of target proteins, COX-2, cyclin D1 and iNOS in skin. Though a single topical application of DMBA followed by twice weekly application of DON (84 and 168 nmol) showed no tumorigenesis after 24 weeks, however, histopathological studies suggested hyperplasia of the epidermis and hypertrophy of hair follicles. Interestingly, intestine was also found to be affected as enlarged Peyer's patches were observed, suggesting inflammatory effects which were supported by elevation of inflammatory cytokines after 24 weeks of topical application of DON. These results suggest that DON induced cell proliferation in mouse skin is through the activation of MAPK signaling pathway involving transcription factors NFκB and AP-1, further leading to transcriptional activation of downstream target proteins c-fos, c-jun, cyclin D1, iNOS and COX-2 which might be responsible for its inflammatory potential. - Highlights: • Topical application of DON enhanced epidermal inflammation and cell proliferation. • DON follows PI3K/Akt/MAPK signaling cascade, with activation of AP-1 and NF

  17. Cellular events during scar-free skin regeneration in the spiny mouse, Acomys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Jason O; Yoon, Jung H; Polvadore, Trey; Barbazuk, William Brad; Maden, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the lab mouse, Mus musculus, several species of spiny mouse, Acomys, can regenerate epidermis, dermis, hairs, sebaceous glands with smooth muscle erector pili muscles and skeletal muscle of the panniculus carnonsus after full thickness skin wounding. Here, we have compared the responses of these scarring and nonscarring organisms concentrating on the immune cells and wound cytokines, cell proliferation, and the collagenous components of the wound bed and scar. The blood of Acomys is very neutropenic but there are greater numbers of mast cells in the Acomys wound than the Mus wound. Most importantly there are no F4/80 macrophages in the Acomys wound and many proinflammatory cytokines are either absent or in very low levels which we suggest may be primarily responsible for the excellent regenerative properties of the skin of this species. There is little difference in cell proliferation in the two species either in the epidermis or mesenchymal tissues but the cell density and matrix composition of the wound is very different. In Mus there are 8 collagens which are up-regulated at least 5-fold in the wound creating a strongly trichrome-positive matrix whereas in Acomys there are very few collagens present and the matrix shows only light trichrome staining. The major component of the Mus matrix is collagen XII which is up-regulated between 10 and 30-fold after wounding. These results suggest that in the Acomys wound the absence of many cytokines resulting in the lack of macrophages is responsible for the failure to up-regulate fibrotic collagens, a situation which permits a regenerative response within the skin rather than the generation of a scar.

  18. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Quigley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways. Gene networks related to specific cell types and signaling pathways, including sonic hedgehog (Shh, Wnt, Lgr family stem cell markers, and keratins, differed at these tissue sites, suggesting mechanisms for the differential susceptibility of dorsal and tail skin to development of skin diseases and tumorigenesis. The Pten tumor suppressor gene network is rewired in premalignant tumors compared to normal tissue, but this response to perturbation is lost during malignant progression. We present a software package for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL network analysis and demonstrate how network analysis of whole tissues provides insights into interactions between cell compartments and signaling molecules.

  19. Study of the mechanisms of flux enhancement through hairless mouse skin by pulsed DC iontophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikal, M.J.; Shah, S. (Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly Co., Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Enhanced iontophoretic transport using pulsed DC is usually explained by citing the observed decrease in skin resistance caused by an increase in AC pulse frequency at very small currents. Alternately, it has been suggested that the on-to-off nature of pulsed DC imparts an impact energy to the fluid, thereby increasing transport. This report provides a test of these mechanisms for enhanced delivery via pulsed iontophoresis. The DC resistance of hairless mouse skin during continuous and pulsed DC iontophoresis is measured as a function of time for selected pulse frequencies and duty cycles using current densities ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mA/cm2. As a test of the impact energy mechanism, the iontophoretic transport of 14C-glucose measured with pulsed DC is compared with similar data obtained previously using continuous DC. It is suggested that pulsed current can yield lower resistance and enhanced drug delivery provided that (a) the steady-state current during the on phase of the pulse is very small and (b) the frequency is low enough to allow depolarization of the skin during the off phase of the pulse. The glucose transport results suggest that the impact energy concept does not apply to iontophoresis.

  20. ROCK inhibition prevents early mouse embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Chen, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-08-01

    ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is important for actin assembly and is involved in various cellular functions, including cell contraction, migration, motility, and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we investigated ROCK expression and function during early mouse embryo development. Inhibiting ROCK by Y-27632 treatment at the zygote stage resulted in first cleavage failure, and most embryos failed to develop to the 8-cell stage. When adding Y-27632 at the 8-cell stage, embryos failed to undergo compaction and could not develop into blastocysts. In addition, fluorescence staining intensity analysis indicated that actin expression at blastomere membranes was significantly reduced. After ROCK inhibition, two or more nuclei were observed in a cell, which indicated possible cytokinesis failure. Moreover, after ROCK inhibition with Y-27632, the phosphorylation levels of LIMK1/2, a downstream molecule of ROCK, were decreased at blastomere membranes. Thus, our results showed conserved roles for ROCK in this mammalian embryo model and indicated that a ROCK-LIMK1/2-actin pathway might regulate cleavage and blastocyst formation during early mouse embryo development.

  1. Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells help restore function to ovaries in a premature ovarian failure mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Lai

    Full Text Available Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs can differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers. For this reason, they are considered a powerful tool for therapeutic cloning and offer new possibilities for tissue therapy. Recent studies showed that skin-derived stem cells can differentiate into cells expressing germ-cell specific markers in vitro and form oocytes in vivo. The idea that SMSCs may be suitable for the treatment of intractable diseases or traumatic tissue damage has attracted attention. To determine the ability of SMSCs to reactivate injured ovaries, a mouse model with ovaries damaged by busulfan and cyclophosphamide was developed and is described here. Female skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (F-SMSCs and male skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (M-SMSCs from red fluorescence protein (RFP transgenic adult mice were used to investigate the restorative effects of SMSCs on ovarian function. Significant increases in total body weight and the weight of reproductive organs were observed in the treated animals. Both F-SMSCs and M-SMSCs were shown to be capable of partially restoring fertility in chemotherapy-treated females. Immunostaining with RFP and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH antibodies demonstrated that the grafted SMSCs survived, migrated to the recipient ovaries. After SMSCs were administered to the treated mice, real-time PCR showed that the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFNγ were significantly lower in the ovaries than in the untreated controls. Consistent with this observation, expression of oogenesis marker genes Nobox, Nanos3, and Lhx8 increased in ovaries of SMSCs-treated mice. These findings suggest that SMSCs may play a role within the ovarian follicle microenvironment in restoring the function of damaged ovaries and could be useful in reproductive health.

  2. Characterization of hair follicle development in engineered skin substitutes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penkanok Sriwiriyanont

    Full Text Available Generation of skin appendages in engineered skin substitutes has been limited by lack of trichogenic potency in cultured postnatal cells. To investigate the feasibility and the limitation of hair regeneration, engineered skin substitutes were prepared with chimeric populations of cultured human keratinocytes from neonatal foreskins and cultured murine dermal papilla cells from adult GFP transgenic mice and grafted orthotopically to full-thickness wounds on athymic mice. Non-cultured dissociated neonatal murine-only skin cells, or cultured human-only skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts without dermal papilla cells served as positive and negative controls respectively. In this study, neonatal murine-only skin substitutes formed external hairs and sebaceous glands, chimeric skin substitutes formed pigmented hairs without sebaceous glands, and human-only skin substitutes formed no follicles or glands. Although chimeric hair cannot erupt readily, removal of upper skin layer exposed keratinized hair shafts at the skin surface. Development of incomplete pilosebaceous units in chimeric hair corresponded with upregulation of hair-related genes, LEF1 and WNT10B, and downregulation of a marker of sebaceous glands, Steroyl-CoA desaturase. Transepidermal water loss was normal in all conditions. This study demonstrated that while sebaceous glands may be involved in hair eruption, they are not required for hair development in engineered skin substitutes.

  3. Photobiomodulation of early mouse embryo development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridova-Chailakhyan, T. A.; Fakhranurova, L. I.; Simonova, N. B.; Khramov, R. N.; Manokhin, A. A.; Paskevich, S. I.; Chailakhyan, L. M.

    2008-04-01

    The effect of artificial sunlight (AS) from a xenon source and of converted AS with an additional orange-red luminescent (λ MAX=626 nm) component (AS+L) on the development of mouse zygotes was investigated. A plastic screen with a photoluminophore layer was used for production of this orange-red luminescent (L) component. A single short-term (15 min) exposure produced a long-term stable positive effect on early embryo development of mice, which persisted during several days. After exposure to AS+L, a stimulating influence on preimplantation development was observed, in comparison with the control group without AS exposure. The positive effects were as follows: increase in percent of embryos (P <= 0.05) developed to the blastocyst stage (96.2 %) with hatching from the zona pellucida (80.8 %) within 82-96 hours in vitro compared to the control (67.1 % and 28.8 %, respectively).

  4. Oral administration of a novel RORγt antagonist attenuates psoriasis-like skin lesion of two independent mouse models through neutralization of IL-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaishi, Mikiro; Ishizaki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Isobe, Takashi; Shimozato, Takaichi; Sano, Shigetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Targeting the IL-17 pathway represents a highly effective strategy for the treatment of psoriasis, using antibodies against IL-17A and IL-17 receptor, suggesting that Th17 cells essentially contribute to development of psoriasis. Th17 differentiation depends on the key transcription factor, RORγt. To develop a novel RORγt antagonist which is effective on psoriasis via oral administration. A chemical library was screened using cell-based high-throughput methods, luciferase reporter assay, competitive binding assay, and T cell differentiation assay. To evaluate in vivo effects of a novel RORγt antagonist, A213, we orally administrated it to two independent mouse models of psoriasis; IL-23-injection model and K5.Stat3C transgenic mouse. Oral administration of A213 resulted in attenuation of skin inflammation in the both mouse models. At the same time, increased levels of IL-17A expression were significantly reduced in the skin lesions and skin-draining lymph nodes. These results implicate a new therapeutic application of RORγt antagonist for the treatment of psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biological and metabolic response in STS-135 space-flown mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, X W; Pecaut, M J; Stodieck, L S; Ferguson, V L; Bateman, T A; Bouxsein, M L; Gridley, D S

    2014-08-01

    There is evidence that space flight condition-induced biological damage is associated with increased oxidative stress and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To explore possible mechanisms, changes in gene expression profiles implicated in oxidative stress and in ECM remodeling in mouse skin were examined after space flight. The metabolic effects of space flight in skin tissues were also characterized. Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) was launched at the Kennedy Space Center on a 13-day mission. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the STS-135 using animal enclosure modules (AEMs). Within 3-5 h after landing, the mice were euthanized and skin samples were harvested for gene array analysis and metabolic biochemical assays. Many genes responsible for regulating production and metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly (p 1.5 compared to AEM control. For ECM profile, several genes encoding matrix and metalloproteinases involved in ECM remodeling were significantly up-/down-regulated following space flight. To characterize the metabolic effects of space flight, global biochemical profiles were evaluated. Of 332 named biochemicals, 19 differed significantly (p space flight skin samples and AEM ground controls, with 12 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated including altered amino acid, carbohydrate metabolism, cell signaling, and transmethylation pathways. Collectively, the data demonstrated that space flight condition leads to a shift in biological and metabolic homeostasis as the consequence of increased regulation in cellular antioxidants, ROS production, and tissue remodeling. This indicates that astronauts may be at increased risk for pathophysiologic damage or carcinogenesis in cutaneous tissue.

  6. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  7. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs...

  8. Development of a forensic skin colour predictive test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroñas, Olalla; Phillips, Chris; Söchtig, Jens; Gomez-Tato, Antonio; Cruz, Raquel; Alvarez-Dios, José; de Cal, María Casares; Ruiz, Yarimar; Fondevila, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, María V

    2014-11-01

    There is growing interest in skin colour prediction in the forensic field. However, a lack of consensus approaches for recording skin colour phenotype plus the complicating factors of epistatic effects, environmental influences such as exposure to the sun and unidentified genetic variants, present difficulties for the development of a forensic skin colour predictive test centred on the most strongly associated SNPs. Previous studies have analysed skin colour variation in single unadmixed population groups, including South Asians (Stokowski et al., 2007, Am. J. Hum. Genet, 81: 1119-32) and Europeans (Jacobs et al., 2013, Hum Genet. 132: 147-58). Nevertheless, a major challenge lies in the analysis of skin colour in admixed individuals, where co-ancestry proportions do not necessarily dictate any one person's skin colour. Our study sought to analyse genetic differences between African, European and admixed African-European subjects where direct spectrometric measurements and photographs of skin colour were made in parallel. We identified strong associations to skin colour variation in the subjects studied from a pigmentation SNP discovery panel of 59 markers and developed a forensic online classifier based on naïve Bayes analysis of the SNP profiles made. A skin colour predictive test is described using the ten most strongly associated SNPs in 8 genes linked to skin pigmentation variation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ► 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ► This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ► 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  10. Humanized mouse model of skin inflammation is characterized by disturbed keratinocyte differentiation and influx of IL-17A producing T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian L de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Humanized mouse models offer a challenging possibility to study human cell function in vivo. In the huPBL-SCID-huSkin allograft model human skin is transplanted onto immunodeficient mice and allowed to heal. Thereafter allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells are infused intra peritoneally to induce T cell mediated inflammation and microvessel destruction of the human skin. This model has great potential for in vivo study of human immune cells in (skin inflammatory processes and for preclinical screening of systemically administered immunomodulating agents. Here we studied the inflammatory skin response of human keratinocytes and human T cells and the concomitant systemic human T cell response.As new findings in the inflamed human skin of the huPBL-SCID-huSkin model we here identified: 1. Parameters of dermal pathology that enable precise quantification of the local skin inflammatory response exemplified by acanthosis, increased expression of human β-defensin-2, Elafin, K16, Ki67 and reduced expression of K10 by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. 2. Induction of human cytokines and chemokines using quantitative real-time PCR. 3. Influx of inflammation associated IL-17A-producing human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as immunoregulatory CD4+Foxp3+ cells using immunohistochemistry and -fluorescence, suggesting that active immune regulation is taking place locally in the inflamed skin. 4. Systemic responses that revealed activated and proliferating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that acquired homing marker expression of CD62L and CLA. Finally, we demonstrated the value of the newly identified parameters by showing significant changes upon systemic treatment with the T cell inhibitory agents cyclosporine-A and rapamycin. In summary, here we equipped the huPBL-SCID-huSkin humanized mouse model with relevant tools not only to quantify the inflammatory dermal response, but also to monitor the peripheral immune status. This combined approach

  11. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, E.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Boulware, S. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, M.C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  12. YAP Regulates the Expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in Mouse and Human Oral and Skin Epithelial Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Zhao, Shuangyun; Lin, Qingjie

    2015-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a Hippo signaling transcriptional coactivator that plays pivotal roles in stem cell proliferation, organ size control, and tumor development. The downstream targets of YAP have been shown to be highly context dependent. In this study, we used the embryonic mouse tooth germ as a tool to search for the downstream targets of YAP in ectoderm-derived tissues. Yap deficiency in the dental epithelium resulted in a small tooth germ with reduced epithelial cell proliferation. We compared the gene expression profiles of embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) Yap conditional knockout and YAP transgenic mouse tooth germs using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) and further confirmed the differentially expressed genes using real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. We found that YAP regulates the expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in oral and dental epithelial tissues as well as in the epidermis of skin during embryonic and adult stages. Sphere formation assay suggested that Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 are functionally involved in YAP-regulated epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay implies that YAP may regulate Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 expression through TEAD transcription factors. These results provide mechanistic insights into abnormal YAP activities in mice and humans. PMID:25691658

  13. YAP regulates the expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in mouse and human oral and skin epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Zhao, Shuangyun; Lin, Qingjie; Wang, Xiu-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a Hippo signaling transcriptional coactivator that plays pivotal roles in stem cell proliferation, organ size control, and tumor development. The downstream targets of YAP have been shown to be highly context dependent. In this study, we used the embryonic mouse tooth germ as a tool to search for the downstream targets of YAP in ectoderm-derived tissues. Yap deficiency in the dental epithelium resulted in a small tooth germ with reduced epithelial cell proliferation. We compared the gene expression profiles of embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) Yap conditional knockout and YAP transgenic mouse tooth germs using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) and further confirmed the differentially expressed genes using real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. We found that YAP regulates the expression of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 in oral and dental epithelial tissues as well as in the epidermis of skin during embryonic and adult stages. Sphere formation assay suggested that Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 are functionally involved in YAP-regulated epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay implies that YAP may regulate Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 expression through TEAD transcription factors. These results provide mechanistic insights into abnormal YAP activities in mice and humans.

  14. Intravital two-photon microscopy of host-pathogen interactions in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin abscess formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Jan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Novick, Richard P; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a frequent cause of severe skin infections. The ability to control the infection is largely dependent on the rapid recruitment of neutrophils (PMN). To gain more insight into the dynamics of PMN migration and host-pathogen interactions in vivo, we used intravital two-photon (2-P) microscopy to visualize S. aureus skin infections in the mouse. Reporter S. aureus strains expressing fluorescent proteins were developed, which allowed for detection of the bacteria in vivo. By employing LysM-EGFP mice to visualize PMN, we observed the rapid appearance of PMN in the extravascular space of the dermis and their directed movement towards the focus of infection, which led to the delineation of an abscess within 1 day. Moreover, tracking of transferred labelled bone-marrow neutrophils showed that PMN localization to the site of infection is dependent on the presence of G-protein-coupled receptors on the PMN, whereas Interleukin-1 receptor was required on host cells other than PMN. Furthermore, the S. aureus complement inhibitor Ecb could block PMN accumulation at thesite of infection. Our results establish that 2-P microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the orchestration of the immune cells, S. aureus location and gene expression in vivo on a single cell level.

  15. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  16. Identification of the Rage-dependent gene regulatory network in a mouse model of skin inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebhardt Christoffer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past, molecular mechanisms that drive the initiation of an inflammatory response have been studied intensively. However, corresponding mechanisms that sustain the expression of inflammatory response genes and hence contribute to the establishment of chronic disorders remain poorly understood. Recently, we provided genetic evidence that signaling via the receptor for advanced glycation end products (Rage drives the strength and maintenance of an inflammatory reaction. In order to decipher the mode of Rage function on gene transcription levels during inflammation, we applied global gene expression profiling on time-resolved samples of mouse back skin, which had been treated with the phorbol ester TPA, a potent inducer of skin inflammation. Results Ranking of TPA-regulated genes according to their time average mean and peak expression and superimposition of data sets from wild-type (wt and Rage-deficient mice revealed that Rage signaling is not essential for initial changes in TPA-induced transcription, but absolutely required for sustained alterations in transcript levels. Next, we used a data set of differentially expressed genes between TPA-treated wt and Rage-deficient skin and performed computational analysis of their proximal promoter regions. We found a highly significant enrichment for several transcription factor binding sites (TFBS leading to the prediction that corresponding transcription factors, such as Sp1, Tcfap2, E2f, Myc and Egr, are regulated by Rage signaling. Accordingly, we could confirm aberrant expression and regulation of members of the E2f protein family in epidermal keratinocytes of Rage-deficient mice. Conclusions In summary, our data support the model that engagement of Rage converts a transient cellular stimulation into sustained cellular dysfunction and highlight a novel role of the Rb-E2f pathway in Rage-dependent inflammation during pathological conditions.

  17. Role of ADARs in mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkley, Carl R; Liddicoat, Brian; Hartner, Jochen C

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing by deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I editing) is a physiologically important posttranscriptional mechanism that can regulate expression of genes by modifying their transcripts. A-to-I editing is mediated by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) that can catalytically exchange adenosines to inosines, with varying efficiency, depending on the structure of the RNA substrates. Significant progress in understanding the biological function of mammalian ADARs has been made in the past decade by the creation and analysis of gene-targeted mice with disrupted or modified ADAR alleles. These studies have revealed important roles of ADARs in neuronal and hematopoietic tissue during embryonic and postnatal stages of mouse development.

  18. Development of the springbok skin - colour pattern, hair slope and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-05-19

    May 19, 1988 ... Development of the springbok skin - colour pattern, hair slope and horn rudiments in Antidorcas ... No work has evidently been published on the development of .... some specimens a banking-up of melanocytes against the.

  19. Radionecrosis skin model induced an athymic mouse nude (Nu/Nu) for development of dermal-epidermal human substitute based regenerative therapy; Modelo de radionecrose cutanea induzida em camundongos Nude (Nu/Nu) para desenvolvimento de terapias regenerativas baseadas em substitutos dermo-epidermicos humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosca, Rodrigo Crespo

    2014-07-01

    The neoplasms incidence has increased significantly in recent years and continued population growth and aging will increase the statistics of this illness in the world's diseases. The cancer treatment usually consists in individual or combined use of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy depending on the etiology of the tumor. In cases where radiotherapy is used in addition to the therapeutic effects of radiation, specific complications can occur, and in the skin, these complications can be present with a clinical expression ranging from erythema to radionecrosis, and this latter being the adverse effect with greater severity. The radionecrosis treatment consists in debridement necrotic areas and covering the surgical wounds. Autologous grafts are most commonly used for this covering, however when large areas are affected, allografts can be used for occlusive treatment and the keratinocytes and adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) addition becomes an alternative, due to the knowing for immunomodulatory and regenerative response. For that reason, aiming to simulate the radionecrosis adverse effects, an animal model of induced cutaneous radionecrosis was created, in athymic mouse Nude (Nu/Nu), for developing regenerative therapies based on human dermal-epidermal substitutes containing keratinocytes and ADSC, which proved occlusive as an efficient treatment, furthermore, having this radionecrosis animal model established, new possibilities for treatment of diseases involving dermal regeneration, can be tested. (author)

  20. The regularity of sustained firing reveals two populations of slowly adapting touch receptors in mouse hairy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellnitz, Scott A; Lesniak, Daine R; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2010-06-01

    Touch is initiated by diverse somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin. The ability to manipulate and classify receptor subtypes is prerequisite for elucidating sensory mechanisms. Merkel cell-neurite complexes, which distinguish shapes and textures, are experimentally tractable mammalian touch receptors that mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses. The assessment of SAI function in mutant mice has been hindered because previous studies did not distinguish SAI responses from slowly adapting type II (SAII) responses, which are thought to arise from different end organs, such as Ruffini endings. Thus we sought methods to discriminate these afferent types. We developed an epidermis-up ex vivo skin-nerve chamber to record action potentials from afferents while imaging Merkel cells in intact receptive fields. Using model-based cluster analysis, we found that two types of slowly adapting receptors were readily distinguished based on the regularity of touch-evoked firing patterns. We identified these clusters as SAI (coefficient of variation = 0.78 +/- 0.09) and SAII responses (0.21 +/- 0.09). The identity of SAI afferents was confirmed by recording from transgenic mice with green fluorescent protein-expressing Merkel cells. SAI receptive fields always contained fluorescent Merkel cells (n = 10), whereas SAII receptive fields lacked these cells (n = 5). Consistent with reports from other vertebrates, mouse SAI and SAII responses arise from afferents exhibiting similar conduction velocities, receptive field sizes, mechanical thresholds, and firing rates. These results demonstrate that mice, like other vertebrates, have two classes of slowly adapting light-touch receptors, identify a simple method to distinguish these populations, and extend the utility of skin-nerve recordings for genetic dissection of touch receptor mechanisms.

  1. Development of an Active Topical Skin Protectant (aTSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    topical protectant to vulnerable skin surfaces prior to entry into a chemical combat arena was proposed as a protective measure against percutaneous...candidate formulations. The initial analytical method developed for evaluating the effectiveness of TSPs against penetration by HD used Fourier...Several evaluation techniques, including bioengineering analytical technologies, were used to evaluate skin damage under several protocols. Methods

  2. Characterization of Neurofibromas of the Skin and Spinal Roots in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    I and J) surrounding fat cells ([I], blue arrows), sebaceous glands ([I], arrows), and hair follicles ([I], arrowheads). Dermal tumors stained more in...respectively target an Nf1 mutation into neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) and more differentiated Schwann cells in mouse sciatic nerves. As shown in Figure...lay the foundation to design novel therapies for neurofibroma prevention and to target neurofibromas at early stages of development. 5 Task 2

  3. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar [College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon, E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  4. Development of hematopoietic stem cell activity in the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Müller (Albrecht); A. Medvinsky; J. Strouboulis (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe precise time of appearance of the first hematopoietic stem cell activity in the developing mouse embryo is unknown. Recently the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the developing mouse embryo has been shown to possess hematopoietic colony-forming activity (CFU-S) in irradiated recipie

  5. Development and Testing of Living Skin Equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    Model a) The use of Isografts in an inbred strain of rats. In a preliminary series of experiments the potential use of Fischer strain rats has been...tested by preparing a series of isografts made by grafting skin equivalents with cells from female donors to male hosts. On the average, wound...Autograft--rat 4 1 4 3 5 17 Autograft--rabbit 6 3 1 1 11 Isograft --rat 37 13 13 1 64 Allo fib., iso ker--rat 15 12 3 30 Allo fib, iso ker--rab 8 6 14 Iso

  6. Effects of oral administration of glucosylceramide on gene expression changes in hairless mouse skin: comparison of whole skin, epidermis, and dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Ryo; Le Vu, Phuong; Iwamoto, Taku; Satsu, Hideo; Totsuka, Mamoru; Chida, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of dietary glucosylceramide on the barrier function of the skin have been increasingly reported, but the entire mechanism has not been clarified. By DNA microarray, we investigated changes in gene expression in hairless mouse skin when a damage-inducing AD diet and a glucosylceramide diet (GluCer) were imposed. GluCer administration potentially suppressed the upregulation of six genes and the downregulation of four genes in the AD group. Examination of the epidermal and/or dermal expression of Npr3, Cyp17a1, Col1a1, S100a9, Sprr2f, Apol7a, Tppp, and Scd3 revealed responses of various parts of the skin to the diets. In normal hairless mice, GluCer administration induced an increase in the dermal expression of Cyp17a1 and the epidermal expression of Tppp, and a decrease in the epidermal expression of S100a9. Our results provide information on gene expression not only in whole skin but also in the epidermis and dermis that should prove useful in the search for the mechanisms underlying the effects of GluCer on damaged and normal skin.

  7. Topical glycerol monooleate/propylene glycol formulations enhance 5-aminolevulinic acid in vitro skin delivery and in vivo protophorphyrin IX accumulation in hairless mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steluti, Regilene; De Rosa, Fernanda Scarmato; Collett, John; Tedesco, Antônio Cláudio; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a potential therapy for cancer treatment, utilizes exogenously applied or endogenously formed photosensitizers, further activated by light in an appropriate wavelength and dose to induce cell death through free radical formation. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a pro-drug which can be converted to the effective photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). However, the use of 5-ALA in PDT is limited by the low penetration capacity of this highly hydrophilic molecule into appropriate skin layers. In the present study, we propose to increase 5-ALA penetration by using formulations containing glycerol monooleate (GMO), an interesting and useful component of pharmaceutical formulations. Propylene glycol solutions containing different concentrations of GMO significantly increased the in vitro skin permeation/retention of 5-ALA in comparison to control solutions. In vivo studies also showed increased PpIX accumulation in mouse hairless skin, after the use of topical 5-ALA formulations containing GMO in a concentration-dependent manner. The results show that skin 5-ALA penetration and PpIX accumulation, important factors for the success of topical 5-ALA-PDT in skin cancer, are optimized by GMO/propylene glycol formulations.

  8. Selenoproteins are essential for proper keratinocyte function and skin development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Sengupta

    Full Text Available Dietary selenium is known to protect skin against UV-induced damage and cancer and its topical application improves skin surface parameters in humans, while selenium deficiency compromises protective antioxidant enzymes in skin. Furthermore, skin and hair abnormalities in humans and rodents may be caused by selenium deficiency, which are overcome by dietary selenium supplementation. Most important biological functions of selenium are attributed to selenoproteins, proteins containing selenium in the form of the amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec. Sec insertion into proteins depends on Sec tRNA; thus, knocking out the Sec tRNA gene (Trsp ablates selenoprotein expression. We generated mice with targeted removal of selenoproteins in keratin 14 (K14 expressing cells and their differentiated descendents. The knockout progeny had a runt phenotype, developed skin abnormalities and experienced premature death. Lack of selenoproteins in epidermal cells led to the development of hyperplastic epidermis and aberrant hair follicle morphogenesis, accompanied by progressive alopecia after birth. Further analyses revealed that selenoproteins are essential antioxidants in skin and unveiled their role in keratinocyte growth and viability. This study links severe selenoprotein deficiency to abnormalities in skin and hair and provides genetic evidence for the role of these proteins in keratinocyte function and cutaneous development.

  9. Effect of Thai banana (Musa AA group) in reducing accumulation of oxidation end products in UVB-irradiated mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerach, Nontaphat; Yakaew, Swanya; Phimnuan, Preeyawass; Soimee, Wichuda; Nakyai, Wongnapa; Luangbudnark, Witoo; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2017-03-01

    Chronic UVB exposure causes skin disorders and cancer through DNA strand breaks and oxidation of numerous functional groups of proteins and lipids in the skin. In this study, we investigated the effects of Thai banana (Musa AA group, "Khai," and Musa ABB group, "Namwa") on the prevention of UVB-induced skin damage when fed to male ICR mice. Mice were orally fed banana (Khai or Namwa) fruit pulps at dose of 1mg/g body weight/day for 12weeks. The shaved backs of the mice were irradiated with UVB for 12weeks. The intensity dose of UVB-exposure was increased from 54mJ/cm(2)/exposure at week 1 to 126mJ/cm(2)/exposure at week 12. A significant increase in skin thickness, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation end products, and expression of MMP-1 was observed in UVB-irradiated mouse skin. A reduction in the accumulation of oxidation end products was found in the skin of UVB-irradiated mice receiving Khai. This occurred in conjunction with a reduction in MMP-1 expression, inhibition of epidermal thickening, and induction of γ-GCS expression. The dietary intake of Khai prevented skin damage from chronic UVB exposure by increased γ-GCS expression and reduced oxidation end products included carbonyls, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibitory effects of Momordica grosvenori Swingle extracts on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced skin inflammation and tumor promotion in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawatanakorn, Monthana; Yang, Ji-Rui; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Lai, Ching-Shu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2014-02-01

    Our previous data showed that the Momordica grosvenori Swingle extract (MSE) exhibited the anti-inflammatory effect through markedly suppressed LPS-induced up-regulation of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and ODC (ornithine decarboxylase) gene expression in RAW 264.7 cells. Regarding the link between inflammation and carcinogenesis, we further investigated the bio-molecular mechanisms of both anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities in vivo using a TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate)-stimulated mouse skin model. Pretreatment with MSE in mouse skin has led to the reduction of TPA-induced nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) subunits as well as phosphorylation of IκBα and p65 subsequent reduction of IκBα degradation. In addition, the MSE inhibitory effect on upstream of NFκB was found to involve the transcriptional effects of MAPK signaling as indicated by strong suppression on TPA-induced activation of extracellular signal regulate kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Moreover, MSE significantly inhibited 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-TPA-induced skin tumor formation in mice measured by the tumor multiplicity of papillomas at 20 weeks. The results suggested that MSE contained promising functional ingredients capable of preventing inflammation-associated tumorigenesis.

  11. Coordination by Cdc42 of Actin, Contractility, and Adhesion for Melanoblast Movement in Mouse Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodham, Emma F; Paul, Nikki R; Tyrrell, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The individual molecular pathways downstream of Cdc42, Rac, and Rho GTPases are well documented, but we know surprisingly little about how these pathways are coordinated when cells move in a complex environment in vivo. In the developing embryo, melanoblasts originating from the neural crest must...... traverse the dermis to reach the epidermis of the skin and hair follicles. We previously established that Rac1 signals via Scar/WAVE and Arp2/3 to effect pseudopod extension and migration of melanoblasts in skin. Here we show that RhoA is redundant in the melanocyte lineage but that Cdc42 coordinates...... multiple motility systems independent of Rac1. Similar to Rac1 knockouts, Cdc42 null mice displayed a severe loss of pigmentation, and melanoblasts showed cell-cycle progression, migration, and cytokinesis defects. However, unlike Rac1 knockouts, Cdc42 null melanoblasts were elongated and displayed large...

  12. Chemopreventive effects of the juice of Vitis coignetiae Pulliat on two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Yuhara, Yuta; Kamiya, Tomonori; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Goro

    2013-01-01

    Our study revealed the inhibitory effect of Vitis coignetiae Pulliat, known as Yamabudo in Japan, at the stages of multi-step carcinogenesis. The juice of Vitis coignetiae (Y-grape juice) was antimutagenic toward dimethylbenzo[a]anthracene (DMBA), aflatoxin B1, and benzo[a]pyrene in the Ames test. The Y-grape juice was also antigenotoxic in the micronucleus test using HepG2 cells toward DMBA and aflatoxin B1. Topical and oral administration of the Y-grape juice to mice inhibited the induction of inflammation of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Topical and oral administration of the Y-grape juice significantly decreased the incidence and mean number of tumors in mice skin with the 2-stage tumorigenesis protocol. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the antiinflammatory and antitumor promotion activity of the Y-grape juice, the effect of Y-grape juice on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity in mouse ear treated with TPA was studied. Both topical and oral application of the Y-grape juice inhibited the TPA-induced increase in COX-2 activity. Caftaric acid, isolated and identified from the Y-grape juice, was antimutagenic toward DMBA and prevented TPA-induced inflammation in mice, suggesting caftaric acid participates in chemopreventive effect/activities of Y-grape juice.

  13. Carcinogenicity and co-carcinogenicity studies on propoxur in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Y; Baqar, S M; Mehrotra, N K

    1998-12-01

    Propoxur (2-isopropoxyphenyl methylcarbamate) is a widely used broad spectrum carbamate insecticide mainly used to control household pests. Propoxur exposure is reported to inhibit cholinesterase activity in rodents. Apart from other toxic effects, propoxur was found to possess tumorigenic activity in rats after oral administration. Propoxur does not produce tumours in mice or hamsters, or bladder hyperplasia in dogs and monkeys following oral feeding. In this set of investigations the complete carcinogenic, tumour initiating and promoting potential of propoxur was evaluated in male and female Swiss albino mice, since no information was available following dermal exposure of propoxur. The animals were exposed to propoxur through topical painting on the interscapular region at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. The results revealed that propoxur has tumour promoting potential on mouse skin following a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, but it failed to induce the tumour(s) at a significant level, when tested for tumour initiating and complete carcinogenic property.

  14. Transport behavior of hairless mouse skin during constant current DC iontophoresis I: baseline studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Mark R; Li, S Kevin; Higuchi, William I

    2011-04-01

    The fluxes of charged and nonionic molecules across hairless mouse skin (HMS) were induced by direct current iontophoresis and used to characterize the transport pathways of the epidermal membrane. Experimental data were used to determine permeability coefficients from which the effective pore radii (Rp) of the transport pathways were calculated. Permeants used in these experiments were nonionic permeants (urea, mannitol, and raffinose), monovalent cationic permeants (sodium, tetraethylammonium, and tetraphenylphosphonium ions), and monovalent anionic permeants (chloride, salicylate, and taurocholate ions). The Rp estimates obtained by the anionic permeant pairs were 49, 22, and 20 Å for the chloride/salicylate (Cl:SA), chloride/taurocholate (Cl:TC), and salicylate/taurocholate (SA:TC) pairs, respectively; with the cationic permeant pairs, the Rp values obtained were 19, 30, and 24 Å for the sodium/tetraethylammonium (Na:TEA), sodium/tetraphenylphosphonium (Na:TPP), and the tetraethylammonium/tetraphenylphosphonium (TEA:TPP) pairs, respectively. Rp estimates for HMS obtained from nonionic permeant experiments ranged from 6.7 to 13.4 Å. When plotted versus their respective diffusion coefficients, all of the permeability coefficients for the cationic permeants were greater than those of the anionic permeants. Additionally, the magnitudes of permeability coefficients determined in the current study with HMS were of the same order of magnitude as those previously determined in our laboratory using human epidermal membrane under similar iontophoresis conditions.

  15. Formation of DNA adducts in the skin of psoriasis patients, in human skin in organ culture, and in mouse skin and lung following topical application of coal-tar and juniper tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoket, B; Horkay, I; Kósa, A; Páldeák, L; Hewer, A; Grover, P L; Phillips, D H

    1990-02-01

    Preparations of coal-tar and juniper tar (cade oil) that are used in the treatment of psoriasis are known to contain numerous potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Evidence of covalent binding to DNA by components of these mixtures was sought in a) human skin biopsy samples from 12 psoriasis patients receiving therapy with these agents, b) human skin explants maintained in organ culture and treated topically with the tars, and c) the skin and lungs of mice treated with repeated doses of the formulations following the regimen used in the clinic. DNA was isolated from the human and mouse tissues and digested enzymically to mononucleotides. 32P-Post-labeling analysis revealed the presence of aromatic DNA adducts in the biopsy samples at levels of up to 0.4 fmol total adducts/microgram DNA. Treatment of human skin in organ culture produced similar levels of adducts, while treatment with dithranol, a non-mutagenic therapeutic agent, resulted in chromatograms indistinguishable from those from untreated controls. In mouse skin, coal-tar ointment and juniper tar gave similar DNA adduct levels, with a similar time-course of removal: maximum levels (0.5 fmol/microgram DNA) at 24 h after the final treatment declined rapidly to 0.05 fmol/microgram at 7 d, thereafter declining slowly over the succeeding 25 d. However, while coal-tar ointment produced only very low levels of adducts in mouse lung (less than 0.03 fmol/microgram DNA), juniper tar produced adducts at a high level (0.7 fmol/microgram DNA) that were persistent in this tissue. These results provide direct evidence for the formation of potentially carcinogenic DNA damage in human and mouse tissue by components of these therapeutic tar preparations.

  16. FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162111.html FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research Researchers hope strain of mice will help speed development of vaccines, treatments To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this news ...

  17. Loss of Endogenous Interleukin-12 Activates Survival Signals in Ultraviolet-Exposed Mouse Skin and Skin Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M. Meeran

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12-deficiency promotes photocarcinogenesis in mice; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV radiation resulted in enhancement of the levels of cell survival kinases, such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, Akt (Ser473, p-ERK1/2, and p-p38 in the skin of IL-12p40 knockout (IL-12 KO mice compared with the skin of wild-type mice. UV-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB/p65 in the skin of IL-12 KO mice was also more prominent. The levels of NF-κB-targeted proteins, such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclooxygenase-2, cyclin D1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, were higher in the UV-exposed skin of IL-12 KO mice than the UV-exposed skin of wild types. In short-term UV irradiation experiments, subcutaneous treatment of IL-12 KO mice with recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12 or topical treatment with oridonin, an inhibitor of NF-κB, resulted in the inhibition of UV-induced increases in the levels of PCNA, cyclin D1, and NF-κB compared with non-rIL-12- or non-oridonin-treated IL-12 KO mice. UV-induced skin tumors of IL-12 KO mice had higher levels of PI3K, p-Akt (Ser473, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, NF-κB, and PCNA and fewer apoptotic cells than skin tumors of wild types. Together, these data suggest that the loss of endogenous IL-12 activates survival signals in UV-exposed skin and that may lead to the enhanced photocarcinogenesis in mice.

  18. T cell-mediated antitumor immune response eliminates skin tumors induced by mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Joongho; Chilton, Paula M; Wilcher, Sarah A; Zahin, Maryam; Park, Jino; Proctor, Mary L; Ghim, Shin-Je; Jenson, Alfred B

    2017-09-19

    Previous studies of naturally occurring mouse papillomavirus (PV) MmuPV1-induced tumors in B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu/nu) mice suggest that T cell deficiency is necessary and sufficient for the development of such tumors. To confirm this, MmuPV1-induced tumors were transplanted from T cell-deficient mice into immunocompetent congenic mice. Consequently, the tumors regressed and eventually disappeared. The elimination of MmuPV1-infected skin/tumors in immunocompetent mice was consistent with the induction of antitumor T cell immunity. This was confirmed by adoptive cell experiments using hyperimmune splenocytes collected from graft-recipient mice. In the present study, such splenocytes were injected into T cell-deficient mice infected with MmuPV1, and they eliminated both early-stage and fully formed tumors. We clearly show that anti-tumor T cell immunity activated during tumor regression in immunocompetent mice effectively eliminates tumors developing in T cell-deficient congenic mice. The results corroborate the notion that PV-induced tumors are strongly linked to the immune status of the host, and that PV antigens are major anti-tumor antigens. Successful anti-PV T cell responses should, therefore, lead to effective anti-tumor immune therapy in human PV-infected patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  20. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17.

  1. Relevance of the mouse skin initiation-promotion model for the classification of carcinogenic substances encountered at the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Michael; Thielmann, Heinz W; Meischner, Veronika; Fartasch, Manigé

    2015-06-01

    The Permanent Senate Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area (MAK Commission of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) evaluates chemical substances using scientific criteria to prevent adverse effects on health at the work place. As part of this task there is a need to evaluate tumor promoting activity of chemicals (enhancement of formation of squamous cell carcinomas via premalignant papillomas) obtained from two-stage initiation/promotion experiments using the mouse skin model. In the present communication we address this issue by comparing responses seen in mouse skin with those in humans. We conclude that tumor promotional effects seen in such animal models be carefully analyzed on a case by case basis. Substances that elicit a rather non-specific effect that is restricted to the high dose range are considered to be irrelevant to humans and thus do not require classification as carcinogens. In contrast, substances that might have both a mode of action and a potency similar to the specific effects seen with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), the prototype tumor promoter in mouse skin, which triggers receptor-mediated signal cascades in the very low dose range, have to be classified in a category for carcinogens.

  2. Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and human psoriatic skin chimeras. Validation of a new animal model.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Research into the cause and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying expression of psoriatric skin lesions has been hampered by lack of an appropriate animal model for this common and enigmatic cutaneous disease. These studies characterize normal skin, pre-psoriatic skin, and psoriatic plaque skin samples transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In this report we document that 1), normal, prepsoriatic, and psoriatic plaque keratome skin samples can be transplanted onto severe ...

  3. Gomisin A inhibits tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in two-stage carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, K; Ikeya, Y; Mitsuhashi, H; Iwasaki, M; Aburada, M; Nakagawa, S; Takeuchi, M; Takido, M

    1992-01-01

    Gomisin A, isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis, is one of the dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans. Application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, 1 microgram/ear), a tumor-promoting agent, to the ears of mice induces inflammation. Among seven dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans assayed, gomisin A, gomisin J, and wuweizisu C inhibited the inflammatory activity induced by TPA in mice. The ED50 of these compounds for TPA-induced inflammation was 1.4-4.4 mumol. Gomisin A, with an ED50 of 1.4 mumol, showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Furthermore, at 5 mumol/mouse, it markedly suppressed the promotion effect of TPA (2.5 micrograms/mouse) on skin tumor formation in mice following initiation with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (50 micrograms/mouse). It is assumed that the inhibition of tumor promotion by gomisin A is due to its anti-inflammatory activity.

  4. Effect of orally ingested diosgenin into diet on skin collagen content in a low collagen skin mouse model and its mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haratake, Akinori; Watase, Daisuke; Setoguchi, Shuichi; Nagata-Akaho, Nami; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Takata, Jiro

    2017-04-01

    Influence on collagen content with oral ingestion of diosgenin (Dios) was investigated in established low collagen skin mouse model. And its mechanism of action was investigated using primary cultured fibroblasts. Hairless mice were fed a low protein diet with Dios for 8weeks and the contents of collagen in skin were determined by measuring the content of hydroxyproline (Hyp). In primary cultured fibroblasts, the numbers of fibroblast were determined by incubating with Dios for 120h; the contents of Hyp were determined by incubating with Dios for 24 or 72h using fibroblasts of confluent state; the expressions of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) were determined by incubating with Dios for 24h. Oral ingestion of Dios in the diet for 8weeks led to a dose-dependent increase in the Hyp content as collagen content of skin. In proliferating of primary cultured fibroblasts, Dios treatment led to a decrease of adenosine 5'-triphosphate content indicating decrease of the cell number. In the cells reached to confluent, although increase of Hyp content in the control indicating progress of fibroblasts differentiation were observed, the content of Hyp remained unchanged with Dios treatment. Finally, addition of Dios led to a decrease the α-tubulin and c-fos mRNA expressions relating to the cell cycle. It is concluded that Dios can improve skin collagen content by shifting the dynamics of the fibroblasts from proliferation to differentiation via cell cycle arrest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell death induced on cell cultures and nude mouse skin by non-thermal, nanosecond-pulsed generated plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Duval

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. Non-thermal plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm(2 for the epidermis, 281 J/cm(2 for the dermis, and 394 J/cm(2 for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions.

  6. Development of a Vascularized Skin Construct Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Debrided Burned Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney K. Chan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Large body surface area burns pose significant therapeutic challenges. Clinically, the extent and depth of burn injury may mandate the use of allograft for temporary wound coverage while autografts are serially harvested from the same donor areas. The paucity of donor sites in patients with burns involving large surface areas highlights the need for better skin substitutes that can achieve early and complete coverage and retain normal skin durability with minimal donor requirements. We have isolated autologous stem cells from the adipose layer of surgically debrided burned skin (dsASCs, using a point-of-care stem cell isolation device. These cells, in a collagen—polyethylene glycol fibrin-based bilayer hydrogel, differentiate into an epithelial layer, a vascularized dermal layer, and a hypodermal layer. All-trans-retinoic acid and fenofibrate were used to differentiate dsASCs into epithelial-like cells. Immunocytochemical analysis showed a matrix- and time-dependent change in the expression of stromal, vascular, and epithelial cell markers. These results indicate that stem cells isolated from debrided skin can be used as a single autologous cell source to develop a vascularized skin construct without culture expansion or addition of exogenous growth factors. This technique may provide an alternative approach for cutaneous coverage after extensive burn injuries.

  7. Expression analysis of the mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Meghan; Emberley, Ethan D; Lizardo, Michael; Alowami, Salem; Qing, Gefei; Alfia'ar, Abdullah; Snell-Curtis, Linda J; Niu, Yulian; Civetta, Alberto; Myal, Yvonne; Shiu, Robert; Murphy, Leigh C; Watson, Peter H

    2005-02-17

    The human psoriasin (S100A7) gene has been implicated in inflammation and tumor progression. Implementation of a mouse model would facilitate further investigation of its function, however little is known of the murine psoriasin gene. In this study we have cloned the cDNA and characterized the expression of the potential murine ortholog of human S100A7/psoriasin in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis. On the basis of chromosomal location, phylogenetic analysis, amino acid sequence similarity, conservation of a putative Jab1-binding motif, and similarities of the patterns of mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene expression (measured by RT-PCR and in-situ hybridization) with those of human S100A7/psoriasin, we propose that mouse S100A7/psoriasin is the murine ortholog of human psoriasin/S100A7. Although mouse S100A7/psoriasin is poorly conserved relative to other S100 family members, its pattern of expression parallels that of the human psoriasin gene. In murine skin S100A7/psoriasin was significantly upregulated in relation to inflammation. In murine mammary gland expression is also upregulated in mammary tumors, where it is localized to areas of squamous differentiation. This mirrors the context of expression in human tumor types where both squamous and glandular differentiation occur, including cervical and lung carcinomas. Additionally, mouse S100A7/psoriasin possesses a putative Jab1 binding motif that mediates many downstream functions of the human S100A7 gene. These observations and results support the hypothesis that the mouse S100A7 gene is structurally and functionally similar to human S100A7 and may offer a relevant model system for studying its normal biological function and putative role in tumor progression.

  8. Expression analysis of the mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Yulian

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human psoriasin (S100A7 gene has been implicated in inflammation and tumor progression. Implementation of a mouse model would facilitate further investigation of its function, however little is known of the murine psoriasin gene. In this study we have cloned the cDNA and characterized the expression of the potential murine ortholog of human S100A7/psoriasin in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis. Methods On the basis of chromosomal location, phylogenetic analysis, amino acid sequence similarity, conservation of a putative Jab1-binding motif, and similarities of the patterns of mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene expression (measured by RT-PCR and in-situ hybridization with those of human S100A7/psoriasin, we propose that mouse S100A7/psoriasin is the murine ortholog of human psoriasin/S100A7. Results Although mouse S100A7/psoriasin is poorly conserved relative to other S100 family members, its pattern of expression parallels that of the human psoriasin gene. In murine skin S100A7/psoriasin was significantly upregulated in relation to inflammation. In murine mammary gland expression is also upregulated in mammary tumors, where it is localized to areas of squamous differentiation. This mirrors the context of expression in human tumor types where both squamous and glandular differentiation occur, including cervical and lung carcinomas. Additionally, mouse S100A7/psoriasin possesses a putative Jab1 binding motif that mediates many downstream functions of the human S100A7 gene. Conclusion These observations and results support the hypothesis that the mouse S100A7 gene is structurally and functionally similar to human S100A7 and may offer a relevant model system for studying its normal biological function and putative role in tumor progression.

  9. Effect of permeation enhancers on the release and permeation kinetics of Lincomycin hydrochloride gel formulations through mouse skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panigrahi L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lincomycin hydrochloride is a systemic antibiotic, which is active against most common gram positive bacteria. It has proved to be excellent for infectious diseases like acne, anthrax, pneumonia, and also for the treatment of furunculosis, carbuncles, impetigo, burns and wounds, carrying to gram positive bacteria. Gels were prepared using carbopol 940 as gelling agent, and isopropyl myristate and dimethyl sulfoxide as permeation enhancer. The formulations were evaluated for drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, homogeneity, skin irritation test, spreadability, and gel strength. A formulation containing 1.5% carbopol with 10% isopropyl myristate, showed better in vitro skin permeation through abdominal mouse skin, and was found to be the best.

  10. Development of human skin equivalents mimicking skin aging : contrast between papillary and reticular fibroblasts as a lead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janson, D.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of human skin equivalents that show characteristics of skin aging. The type of skin equivalent used was a fibroblast derived matrix equivalent, in which the dermal compartment is generated by fibroblasts and thus is fully of human origin. Two strategies are

  11. In vitro percutaneous absorption of tenoxicam from pressure-sensitive adhesive matrices across the hairless mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, H S; Chun, I K

    2001-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of developing a new tenoxicam plaster, the effects of vehicles and penetration enhancers on the in vitro permeation of tenoxicam from a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) matrices across the dorsal hairless mouse skin were studied. Vehicles employed in this study were propylene glycol (PG)-oleyl alcohol (OAI), PG-oleic acid (OA), and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME)-propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML) cosolvents with/without fatty acids. In this study, amines such as triethanolamine (TEA) and tromethamine (TM) were additionally used as a solubilizer. Among PSAs used, Duro-Tak 87-2510 showed much higher release rate than either Duro-Tak 87-2100 or Duro-Tak 87-2196. The relatively high flux rate was obtained with the formulation of DGME-PGML (40:60, v/v) with 3% OA and 5% TM, and the flux increased as a function of the dose; the initial flux up to 12 h was 4.98 +/- 1.38 microg/cm2/h at the tenoxicam dose of 50 mg/70 cm2. This flux was much higher than that of a commercial piroxicam patch (Trast) (1.24 +/- 0.73 microg/ cm2/hr) with almost only one-third that of the commercial patch. Therefore, these observations indicated that these composition of tenoxicam plaster may be practically applicable.

  12. Overexpression of galectin-7 in mouse epidermis leads to loss of cell junctions and defective skin repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Gendronneau

    Full Text Available The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo.We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury.The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis.These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations.

  13. Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

  14. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue.

  15. Inhibition of Akt Enhances the Chemopreventive Effects of Topical Rapamycin in Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Calvert, Valerie S; Einspahr, Janine; Dickinson, Jesse E; Stratton, Steven P; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S; Timothy Bowden, G

    2016-03-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared with those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here, we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared with controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared with vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  16. Inhibition of akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  17. Cellular and genetic analysis of mouse blastocyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, R A; Spindle, A I

    1979-01-01

    The development of mouse embryos was studied by both cellular and genetic approaches. In the cellular analysis, determination of cell fate in blastocysts and in cell populations derived from them was studied in an attempt to estimate the time that these cells become committed to their fate. In the genetic analysis, existing mutations that are lethal to mouse embryos were used to discern essential features of early development. In this review, the timing of cell determination in the inner cell mass and the primary ectoderm, and the manifestation of defects in mouse embryos that are homozygous for the A/sup y/ allele of the agouti locus were considered.

  18. Role of glucose in cloned mouse embryo development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhiming Han; Rita Vassena; Maggie M. Y. Chi; Santhi Potireddy; Miriam Sutovsky; Kelle H. Moley; Peter Sutovsky; Keith E. Latham

    2008-01-01

    Cloned mouse embryos display a marked preference for glucose-containing culture medium, with enhanced development to the blastocyst stage in glucose-containing medium attributable mainly to an early...

  19. DNA adducts in human and mouse skin maintained in short-term culture and treated with petrol and diesel engine lubricating oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, P L; Ni Shé, M; Phillips, D H

    1991-05-24

    Human and mouse skin samples maintained in short-term organ culture were treated topically with used engine oils from petrol- and diesel-powered vehicles. Mice were also treated topically in vivo for comparison. DNA was isolated and analysed by 32P-postlabelling and the labeled DNA digests were resolved on polyethyleneimine-cellulose tlc sheets. A large number of radioactive adduct spots were observed in DNA from skin treated with the used petrol-engine oil, indicating the formation of adducts by many components of the complex oil mixture. Total adduct levels were similar in mouse skin (both in vivo and in vitro) and in human skin, although qualitative differences in the adduct maps were apparent between the human and mouse skin DNA. Treatment with the used diesel engine oil produced adduct levels no greater than that of control samples in mouse skin (in vivo and in vitro), although significant levels were found in human skin DNA from one donor. The results correlate well with the carcinogenic activity of these oils in experimental animals, helping to substantiate the conclusion that petrol engine oils (but not diesel engine oils) may present a carcinogenic risk to man if appropriate measures to minimise skin contact are not observed.

  20. Progression of mouse skin carcinogenesis is associated with increased ERα levels and is repressed by a dominant negative form of ERα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Logotheti

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors (ER, namely ERα and ERβ, are hormone-activated transcription factors with an important role in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the implication of ERα in skin cancer, using chemically-induced mouse skin tumours, as well as cell lines representing distinct stages of mouse skin oncogenesis. First, using immunohistochemical staining we showed that ERα is markedly increased in aggressive mouse skin tumours in vivo as compared to the papilloma tumours, whereas ERβ levels are low and become even lower in the aggressive spindle tumours of carcinogen-treated mice. Then, using the multistage mouse skin carcinogenesis model, we showed that ERα gradually increases during promotion and progression stages of mouse skin carcinogenesis, peaking at the most aggressive stage, whereas ERβ levels only slightly change throughout skin carcinogenesis. Stable transfection of the aggressive, spindle CarB cells with a dominant negative form of ERα (dnERα resulted in reduced ERα levels and reduced binding to estrogen responsive elements (ERE-containing sequences. We characterized two highly conserved EREs on the mouse ERα promoter through which dnERα decreased endogenous ERα levels. The dnERα-transfected CarB cells presented altered protein levels of cytoskeletal and cell adhesion molecules, slower growth rate and impaired anchorage-independent growth in vitro, whereas they gave smaller tumours with extended latency period of tumour onset in vivo. Our findings suggest an implication of ERα in the aggressiveness of spindle mouse skin cancer cells, possibly through regulation of genes affecting cell shape and adhesion, and they also provide hints for the effective targeting of spindle cancer cells by dnERα.

  1. Human atopic dermatitis skin-derived T cells can induce a reaction in mouse keratinocytes in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta C; Blom, Lars; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    In atopic dermatitis (AD), the inflammatory response between skin infiltrating T cells and keratinocytes is fundamental to the development of chronic lesional eczema. The aim of this study was to investigate whether skin-derived T cells from AD patients could induce an inflammatory response in mice...

  2. Recovery of Aging-Related Size Increase of Skin Epithelial Cells: In vivo Mouse and In vitro Human Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20–40% for cells of older passage (6–8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin. PMID:25807526

  3. Overexpression of constitutively active BMP-receptor-IB in mouse skin causes an ichthyosis-vulgaris-like disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xueyan; Espinoza-Lewis, Ramón A; Sun, Cheng; Lin, Lisong; He, Fenglei; Xiong, Wei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Alun; Chen, Yiping

    2010-12-01

    The skin is the outer layer of protection against the environment. The development and formation of the skin is regulated by several genetic cascades including the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, which has been suggested to play an important role during embryonic organ development. Several skin defects and diseases are caused by genetic mutations or disorders. Ichthyosis is a common genetic skin disorder characterized by dry scaly skin. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene have been identified as the cause of the ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) phenotype; however, the direct regulation of filaggrin expression in vivo is unknown. We present evidence that BMP signaling regulates filaggrin expression in the epidermis. Mice expressing a constitutively active form of BMP-receptor-IB in the developing epidermis exhibit a phenotype resembling IV in humans, including dry flaky skin, compact hyperkeratosis, and an attenuated granular layer associated with a significantly downregulated expression of filaggrin. Regulation of filaggrin expression by BMP signaling has been further confirmed by the application of exogenous BMP2 in skin explants and by a transgenic model overexpressing Noggin in the epidermis. Our results demonstrate that aberrant BMP signaling in the epidermis causes overproliferation and hyperkeratinization, leading to an IV-like skin disease.

  4. Effects of skin-derived precursors on wound healing of denervated skin in a nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bin; Xie, Ju-Lin; Xu, Ying-Bin; Lai, Wen; Huang, Yong; Mao, Ren-Xiang; Liu, Xu-Sheng; Qi, Shao-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Denervated skin could result in impaired healing of wounds, such as decubitus ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Other studies indicated that cutaneous fiber density is reduced after inner nerve transection and that neuropeptide level depletes after denervation, leading to reduced cell proliferation around the wound and thus wound healing problems. Recent studies have revealed that skin-derived precursors (SKPs), which form a neural crest-related stem cell population in the dermis of skin, participate in cutaneous nerve regeneration. We hypothesized that injecting SKPs into denervated wound promotes healing. A bilateral denervation wound model was established followed by SKP transplantation. The wound healing rate was determined at 7, 14, and 21 d after injury. Cell proliferation activity during wound healing was analyzed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nerve fiber density was measured by S-100 IHC. The contents of nerve growth factor, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The rate of epithelization in the SKP-treated group was faster than that in the control group. Wound cell proliferation and nerve fiber density were obviously higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group. In addition, the content of neuropeptides was higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group during wound healing. In conclusion, SKPs can promote denervated wound healing through cell proliferation and nerve fiber regeneration, and can facilitate the release of neuropeptides.

  5. Transcription factor Ctip2 controls epidermal lipid metabolism and regulates expression of genes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis during skin development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixing; Kirkwood, Jay S.; Taylor, Alan W.; Stevens, Jan F.; Leid, Mark; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K.

    2012-01-01

    The stratum corneum is composed of protein-enriched corneocytes embedded in an intercellular matrix of nonpolar lipids organized as lamellar layers and give rise to epidermal permeability barrier (EPB). EPB defects play an important role in the pathophysiology of skin diseases such as eczema. The transcriptional control of skin lipid metabolism is poorly understood. We have discovered that mouse lacking a transcription factor COUP-TF interacting protein 2 (Ctip2) exhibit EPB defects including altered keratinocyte terminal differentiation, delayed skin barrier development and interrupted neutral lipid distribution in the epidermis. We adapted herein a targeted lipidomic approach using mass spectrometry, and have determined that Ctip2−/− mice (germline deletion of Ctip2 gene) display altered composition of major epidermal lipids such as ceramides and sphingomyelins compared to wildtype at different stages of skin development. Interestingly, expressions of several genes involved in skin sphingolipid biosynthesis and metabolism were altered in mutant skin. Ctip2 was found to be recruited to the promoter region of a subset of those genes, suggesting their possible direct regulation by Ctip2. Our results confirm an important role of Ctip2 in regulating skin lipid metabolism and indicate that profiling of epidermal sphingolipid could be useful for designing effective strategies to improve barrier dysfunctions. PMID:23096701

  6. Overexpression of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 results in enhanced skin tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Y M; He, G; Hwang, D H; Fischer, S M

    2006-09-07

    We previously showed that the EP2 knockout mice were resistant to chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the overexpression of the EP2 receptor in mouse skin carcinogenesis. To determine the effect of overexpression of EP2, we used EP2 transgenic (TG) mice and wild-type (WT) mice in a DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene)/TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) two-stage carcinogenesis protocol. EP2 TG mice developed significantly more tumors compared with WT mice. Overexpression of the EP2 receptor increased TPA-induced keratinocyte proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the epidermis of EP2 TG mice 48 h after topical TPA treatment was significantly thicker compared to that of WT mice. EP2 TG mice showed significantly increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the epidermis after prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) treatment. The inflammatory response to TPA was increased in EP2 TG mice, as demonstrated by an increased number of macrophages in the dermis. Tumors and 7 x TPA-treated and DMBA-TPA-treated (6 weeks) skins from EP2 TG mice produced more blood vessels than those of WT mice as determined by CD-31 immunostaining. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression was significantly increased in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples from EP2 TG mice compared that of WT mice. There was, however, no difference in the number of apoptotic cells in tumors from WT and EP2 TG mice. Together, our results suggest that the overexpression of the EP2 receptor plays a significant role in the protumorigenic action of PGE2 in mouse skin.

  7. Development of New Generation of Perspireable Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-20

    powder can be detrimental to the CNC machines as similarly happening in fabrication of the second approach as well. However, the precision required for...this approach is incredibly high which our CNC machine could not provide. Thus, we gave up on pursuing this approach. 4. Development of...Figure 9. The WO3+ZrO2 powder mixture was first partially sintered at 950°C for four hours, and subsequently CNC -milled, in order to obtain a certain

  8. Sarcophine-Diol, a Skin Cancer Chemopreventive Agent, Inhibits Proliferation and Stimulates Apoptosis in Mouse Melanoma B16F10 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Fahmy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarcodiol (SD is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B16F10 cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enhances fragmentation of DNA. We also evaluated the antitumor effect of SD on melanoma cell viability using several biomarkers for cell proliferation and apoptosis. SD inhibits the expression levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription protein (STAT-3 and cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4. SD treatment also enhances cellular level of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53 and stimulates cleavage of the nuclear poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (cleaved-PARP. SD also enhances cellular levels of cleaved Caspase-3, -8, -9 and stimulates enzymatic activities of Caspase-3, -8 and -9. These results, in addition to inhibition of cell viability, suggest that SD inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by arresting the cell-division cycle in a Go quiescent phase and activates programmed cell death (apoptosis via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Finally, these studies demonstrate that SD shows a very promising chemopreventive effect in melanoma B16F10 tumor cells.

  9. Sarcophine-diol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent, inhibits proliferation and stimulates apoptosis in mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Pawel T; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Ahmed, Safwat A; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham

    2012-01-01

    Sarcodiol (SD) is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enhances fragmentation of DNA. We also evaluated the antitumor effect of SD on melanoma cell viability using several biomarkers for cell proliferation and apoptosis. SD inhibits the expression levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription protein (STAT-3) and cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4). SD treatment also enhances cellular level of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and stimulates cleavage of the nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cleaved-PARP). SD also enhances cellular levels of cleaved Caspase-3, -8, -9 and stimulates enzymatic activities of Caspase-3, -8 and -9. These results, in addition to inhibition of cell viability, suggest that SD inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by arresting the cell-division cycle in a Go quiescent phase and activates programmed cell death (apoptosis) via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Finally, these studies demonstrate that SD shows a very promising chemopreventive effect in melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ tumor cells.

  10. Species identification of skins and development of sheep wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    to the development of a sheep wool that could be used for textile production in the Danish LN II or EBA I (2000-1500 BC). Changes of the wool seem to again take place in the Roman Iron Age (AD 1-400). The genetic analysis of DNA from wool textiles and sheep bones aimed at extracting the entire mitogenome and nuclear...... markers mapped to the reference genome. The resolution of sheep mitochondrial DNA is, however, too low to generate detailed information of sheep population history and therefore nuclear DNA should be the focus in the future. Three studies focused on the species identification of skins. Traditional species...... and skin production, fresh approaches are needed, including new methods. This thesis investigates archaeological and historical skin garments and textiles using an interdisciplinary approach that combines biomolecular methods, archaeology and textile research. The aims of this thesis are first...

  11. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  12. Curcumin Stimulates the Antioxidant Mechanisms in Mouse Skin Exposed to Fractionated γ-Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh Chandra Jagetia; Golgod Krishnamurthy Rajanikant

    2015-01-01

    Fractionated irradiation is one of the important radiotherapy regimens to treat different types of neoplasia. Despite of the immense therapeutic gains accrued by delivering fractionated irradiation to tumors, the radiation burden on skin increases significantly. Low doses of irradiation to skin adversely affect its molecular and metabolic status. The use of antioxidant/s may help to alleviate the radiation-induced changes in the skin and allow delivering a higher dose of radiation to attain b...

  13. A provisional gene regulatory atlas for mouse heart development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailin Chen

    Full Text Available Congenital Heart Disease (CHD is one of the most common birth defects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying normal cardiac development is an important step towards early identification of abnormalities during the developmental program and towards the creation of early intervention strategies. We developed a novel computational strategy for leveraging high-content data sets, including a large selection of microarray data associated with mouse cardiac development, mouse genome sequence, ChIP-seq data of selected mouse transcription factors and Y2H data of mouse protein-protein interactions, to infer the active transcriptional regulatory network of mouse cardiac development. We identified phase-specific expression activity for 765 overlapping gene co-expression modules that were defined for obtained cardiac lineage microarray data. For each co-expression module, we identified the phase of cardiac development where gene expression for that module was higher than other phases. Co-expression modules were found to be consistent with biological pathway knowledge in Wikipathways, and met expectations for enrichment of pathways involved in heart lineage development. Over 359,000 transcription factor-target relationships were inferred by analyzing the promoter sequences within each gene module for overrepresentation against the JASPAR database of Transcription Factor Binding Site (TFBS motifs. The provisional regulatory network will provide a framework of studying the genetic basis of CHD.

  14. Topical application of nitrosonifedipine, a novel radical scavenger, ameliorates ischemic skin flap necrosis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Yutaka; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Horinouchi, Yuya; Sairyo, Eriko; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Abe, Yoshiro; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2017-01-16

    Ischemic skin flap necrosis can occur in random pattern flaps. An excess amount of reactive oxygen species is generated and causes necrosis in the ischemic tissue. Nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF) has been demonstrated to possess potent radical scavenging ability. However, there has been no study on the effects of NO-NIF on ischemic skin flap necrosis. Therefore, they evaluated the potential of NO-NIF in ameliorating ischemic skin flap necrosis in a mouse model. A random pattern skin flap (1.0 × 3.0 cm) was elevated on the dorsum of C57BL/6 mice. NO-NIF was administered by topical injection immediately after surgery and every 24 hours thereafter. Flap survival was evaluated on postoperative day 7. Tissue samples from the skin flaps were harvested on postoperative days 1 and 3 to analyze oxidative stress, apoptosis and endothelial dysfunction. The viable area of the flap in the NO-NIF group was significantly increased (78.30 ± 7.041%) compared with that of the control group (47.77 ± 6.549%, p NIF reduced oxidative stress, apoptosis and endothelial dysfunction, which were evidenced by the decrease of malondialdehyde, p22phox protein expression, number of apoptotic cells, phosphorylated p38 MAPK protein expression, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 protein expression while endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression was increased. In conclusion, they demonstrated that NO-NIF ameliorated ischemic skin flap necrosis by reducing oxidative stress, apoptosis, and endothelial dysfunction. NO-NIF is considered to be a candidate for the treatment of ischemic flap necrosis.

  15. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-06

    Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  16. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 is responsible for cyclooxygenase-2 induction by prostaglandin E2 in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Kausar M; Sung, You Me; He, Guobin; Fischer, Susan M

    2007-10-01

    The EP2 prostanoid receptor is one of the four subtypes of receptors for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We previously reported that deletion of EP2 led to resistance to chemically induced mouse skin carcinogenesis, whereas overexpression of EP2 resulted in enhanced tumor development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that EP2 knockout mice had reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression after 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Further, primary keratinocytes from EP2 transgenic mice had increased COX-2 expression after either TPA or PGE2 treatment and COX-2 expression was blocked by 10 microM SQ 22,536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. EP2 knockout mice had significantly decreased, whereas EP2 transgenic mice had significantly increased PGE2 production in response to a single treatment of TPA. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was elevated to a greater extent in keratinocytes from EP2 transgenic mice compared with those of WT mice following PGE2 treatment. A protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor reduced PGE2-mediated CREB phosphorylation in keratinocytes from EP2 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we found that there was no CREB phosphorylation in EP2 knockout mice following PGE2 treatment. PGE2-induced DNA synthesis (cell proliferation) was significantly decreased in keratinocytes from EP2 knockout mice following pretreatment with 10 microM SQ 22,536. Taken together, EP2 activation of the PKA/CREB-signaling pathway is responsible for keratinocyte proliferation and our findings reveal a positive feedback loop between COX-2 and PGE2 that is mediated by the EP2 receptor.

  17. Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil in the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay and the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Govind J; Azuine, Magnus A; Tokuda, Harukuni; Takasaki, Midori; Mukainaka, Teruo; Konoshima, Takao; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-06-01

    Resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil are known natural dietary components with intrinsic cancer chemopreventive potentials. As a part of our study of dietary constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, we have assessed the anti-cancer potentials of these products in the promotion stage of cancer development employing the in vitro Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, we studied the activities of these compounds in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay as well as on the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging bioassay with a view to comparing some of the mechanisms of their anti-cancer activity. Finally, we compared the observed chemoprotective capabilities of the four products in the in vivo 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiated and TPA-promoted mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. All the products tested showed a profound inhibitory effect on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen induction using Raji cells. Comparatively, sesame oil was the most potent followed by sesamol and then resveratrol. Only sesamol and resveratrol showed a remarkable cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assays as well as profound free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH bioassay. In both test systems, sesamol exhibited a more remarkable activity than resveratrol while sesame oil and sunflower oil did not exhibit any appreciable activity even at the highest concentrations tested (4000 microg ml(-1) ). In our in vivo assay at a 50-fold molar ratio to TPA, sesamol offered 50% reduction in mouse skin papillomas at 20 weeks after promotion with TPA. Under an identical molar ratio to TPA, resveratrol offered a 60% reduction in the papillomas in mouse at 20 weeks. Thus sesamol seems to be an almost equally potent chemopreventive agent. Sesame oil and sunflower oil offered 20 and 40% protection, respectively, in the mouse

  18. Development of the mouse dermal adipose layer occurs independently of subcutaneous adipose tissue and is marked by restricted early expression of FABP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowicz, Kamila; Gledhill, Karl; Ambler, Carrie A; Manning, Craig B; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is a key animal model for studies of adipose biology, metabolism and disease, yet the developmental changes that occur in tissues and cells that become the adipose layer in mouse skin have received little attention. Moreover, the terminology around this adipose body is often confusing, as frequently no distinction is made between adipose tissue within the skin, and so called subcutaneous fat. Here adipocyte development in mouse dorsal skin was investigated from before birth to the end of the first hair follicle growth cycle. Using Oil Red O staining, immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and TUNEL staining we confirmed previous observations of a close spatio-temporal link between hair follicle development and the process of adipogenesis. However, unlike previous studies, we observed that the skin adipose layer was created from cells within the lower dermis. By day 16 of embryonic development (e16) the lower dermis was demarcated from the upper dermal layer, and commitment to adipogenesis in the lower dermis was signalled by expression of FABP4, a marker of adipocyte differentiation. In mature mice the skin adipose layer is separated from underlying subcutaneous adipose tissue by the panniculus carnosus. We observed that the skin adipose tissue did not combine or intermix with subcutaneous adipose tissue at any developmental time point. By transplanting skin isolated from e14.5 mice (prior to the start of adipogenesis), under the kidney capsule of adult mice, we showed that skin adipose tissue develops independently and without influence from subcutaneous depots. This study has reinforced the developmental link between hair follicles and skin adipocyte biology. We argue that because skin adipocytes develop from cells within the dermis and independently from subcutaneous adipose tissue, that it is accurately termed dermal adipose tissue and that, in laboratory mice at least, it represents a separate adipose depot.

  19. Development of the mouse dermal adipose layer occurs independently of subcutaneous adipose tissue and is marked by restricted early expression of FABP4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Wojciechowicz

    Full Text Available The laboratory mouse is a key animal model for studies of adipose biology, metabolism and disease, yet the developmental changes that occur in tissues and cells that become the adipose layer in mouse skin have received little attention. Moreover, the terminology around this adipose body is often confusing, as frequently no distinction is made between adipose tissue within the skin, and so called subcutaneous fat. Here adipocyte development in mouse dorsal skin was investigated from before birth to the end of the first hair follicle growth cycle. Using Oil Red O staining, immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and TUNEL staining we confirmed previous observations of a close spatio-temporal link between hair follicle development and the process of adipogenesis. However, unlike previous studies, we observed that the skin adipose layer was created from cells within the lower dermis. By day 16 of embryonic development (e16 the lower dermis was demarcated from the upper dermal layer, and commitment to adipogenesis in the lower dermis was signalled by expression of FABP4, a marker of adipocyte differentiation. In mature mice the skin adipose layer is separated from underlying subcutaneous adipose tissue by the panniculus carnosus. We observed that the skin adipose tissue did not combine or intermix with subcutaneous adipose tissue at any developmental time point. By transplanting skin isolated from e14.5 mice (prior to the start of adipogenesis, under the kidney capsule of adult mice, we showed that skin adipose tissue develops independently and without influence from subcutaneous depots. This study has reinforced the developmental link between hair follicles and skin adipocyte biology. We argue that because skin adipocytes develop from cells within the dermis and independently from subcutaneous adipose tissue, that it is accurately termed dermal adipose tissue and that, in laboratory mice at least, it represents a separate adipose depot.

  20. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Akihiro, E-mail: ayoneda@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan); Division of Molecular Therapeutics, Center for Food & Medical Innovation, Hokkaido University (Japan); Watanabe, Tomomasa [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  1. Daily intake of Jeju groundwater improves the skin condition of the model mouse for human atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akane; Jung, Kyungsook; Matsuda, Akira; Jang, Hyosun; Kajiwara, Naoki; Amagai, Yosuke; Oida, Kumiko; Ahn, Ginnae; Ohmori, Keitaro; Kang, Kyung-goo; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    Drinking water is an important nutrient for human health. The mineral ingredients included in drinking water may affect the physical condition of people. Various kinds of natural water are in circulation as bottled water in developed countries; however, its influence on clinical conditions of patients with certain diseases has not been fully evaluated. In this study, effects of the natural groundwater from Jeju Island on clinical symptoms and skin barrier function in atopic dermatitis (AD) were evaluated. NC/Tnd mice, a model for human AD, with moderate to severe dermatitis were used. Mice were given different natural groundwater or tap water for 8 weeks from 4 weeks of age. Clinical skin severity scores were recorded every week. Scratching analysis and measurement of transepidermal water loss were performed every other week. The pathological condition of the dorsal skin was evaluated histologically. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed for cytokine expression in the affected skin. The epidermal hyperplasia and allergic inflammation were reduced in atopic mice supplied with Jeju groundwater when compared to those supplied with tap water or other kinds of natural groundwater. The increase in scratching behavior with the aggravation of clinical severity of dermatitis was favorably controlled. Moreover, transepidermal water loss that reflects skin barrier function was recovered. The early inflammation and hypersensitivity in the atopic skin was alleviated in mice supplied with Jeju groundwater, suggesting its profitable potential on the daily care of patients with skin troubles including AD.

  2. Suppressive Effect of Dietary Fucoidan on Proinflammatory Immune Response and MMP-1 Expression in UVB-Irradiated Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Yoshinaga, Keiko; Nakano, Takahisa

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that ultraviolet B irradiation leads to dermal inflammation. In this study, we found that Mekabu fucoidan suppressed edema, decreased the thickness of the prickle cell layer, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 1 in the skin of mice irradiated with ultraviolet B. Moreover, we found that the mean level of interferon gamma of Mekabu fucoidan-treated, ultraviolet B-irradiated mice (approximately 2.2 ng/mL) was not significantly different from that in normal mice (approximately 2.5 ng/mL). In contrast, a significant decrease in the mean level of interferon gamma (approximately 1.3 ng/mL) in ultraviolet B-irradiated control mice was observed compared with that in Mekabu fucoidan-treated, ultraviolet B-irradiated mice. The mean thickness of the prickle cell layer in the skin of Mekabu fucoidan-treated, ultraviolet B-irradiated mice was less than that in the ultraviolet B-irradiated control mice. Metalloproteinase 1 activity was significantly higher in the skin of ultraviolet B-irradiated mice than in the skin of untreated, nonirradiated normal mice. Metalloproteinase 1 in the skin of ultraviolet B-irradiated, Mekabu fucoidan- or L(+)-ascorbic acid (vitamin C)-treated mice was significantly lower than that in the ultraviolet B-irradiated control mice. Mitigation of the morphological changes in Mekabu fucoidan-treated mice was correlated with a decrease in metalloproteinase 1 levels. These data indicate that Mekabu fucoidan is an effective suppressor of inflammation in an ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse model.

  3. Increased Skin Tumor Incidence and Keratinocyte Hyper-Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Annan; Currier, Duane; Poitras, Jennifer L; Reeves, Roger H

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). People with DS display multiple clinical traits as a result of the dosage imbalance of several hundred genes. While many outcomes of trisomy are deleterious, epidemiological studies have shown a significant risk reduction for most solid tumors in DS. Reduced tumor incidence has also been demonstrated in functional studies using trisomic DS mouse models. Therefore, it was interesting to find that Ts1Rhr trisomic mice developed more papillomas than did their euploid littermates in a DMBA-TPA chemical carcinogenesis paradigm. Papillomas in Ts1Rhr mice also proliferated faster. The increased proliferation was likely caused by a stronger response of trisomy to TPA induction. Treatment with TPA caused hyperkeratosis to a greater degree in Ts1Rhr mice than in euploid, reminiscent of hyperkeratosis seen in people with DS. Cultured trisomic keratinocytes also showed increased TPA-induced proliferation compared to euploid controls. These outcomes suggest that altered gene expression in trisomy could elevate a proliferation signalling pathway. Gene expression analysis of cultured keratinocytes revealed upregulation of several trisomic and disomic genes may contribute to this hyperproliferation. The contributions of these genes to hyper-proliferation were further validated in a siRNA knockdown experiment. The unexpected findings reported here add a new aspect to our understanding of tumorigenesis with clinical implications for DS and demonstrates the complexity of the tumor repression phenotype in this frequent condition.

  4. MicroRNA-27a-3p Inhibits Melanogenesis in Mouse Skin Melanocytes by Targeting Wnt3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Pengchao; Meng, Jinzhu; Ji, Yuankai; Xu, Dongmei; Chen, Tianzhi; Fan, Ruiwen; Yu, Xiuju; Yao, Jianbo; Dong, Changsheng

    2015-05-14

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in the regulation of almost all the biological processes, including melanogenesis. MiR-27a-3p is nearly six times higher in white alpaca skin compared to brown skin, which indicates that miR-27a-3p may be a candidate regulator for melanogenesis. Wnt3a plays an important role in promoting melanoblasts to differentiate into melanocytes and melanogenesis. To confirm the function of miR-27a-3p to melanogenesis in mammals, miR-27a-3p mimic, inhibitor and their negative control were transfected into mouse melanocytes. As a result, miR-27a-3p inhibits melanogenesis by repressing Wnt3a at post-transcriptional level. A significant decrease in Wnt3a luciferase activity was observed in 293T cells co-transfected with the matched luciferase reporter vector and pre-miR-27a. Furthermore, the presence of exogenous miR-27a-3p significantly decreased Wnt3a protein expression rather than mRNA and reduced β-catenin mRNA levels in melanocytes. The over-expression of miR-27a-3p significantly increased the melanin content of melanocytes. However, miR-27a-3p inhibitor performs an opposite effect on melanogenesis. Wnt3a is one target of miR-27a-3p. MiR-27a-3p could inhibit Wnt3a protein amount by post-transcriptional regulation and melanogenesis in mouse melanocytes. Previous studies reported that Wnt3a promoted melanogenensis in mouse melanocytes. Thus, miR-27-3p inhibits melanogenesis by repressing Wnt3a protein expression.

  5. Deoxynivalenol induced mouse skin tumor initiation: Elucidation of molecular mechanisms in human HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sakshi; Tewari, Prachi; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Pandey, Haushila P; Das, Mukul

    2016-11-01

    Among food contaminants, mycotoxins are toxic to both human and animal health. Our prior studies suggest that Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, behaves as a tumor promoter by inducing edema, hyperplasia, ODC activity and activation of MAPK's in mouse skin. In this study, topical application of DON, 336 and 672 nmol significantly enhanced ROS levels, DNA damage and apoptosis with concomitant downregulation of Ki-67, cyclin D, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK2) thereby resulting in tumor initiation in mouse skin. Further, the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of tumor initiation by DON (0.42-3.37 nmol/ml) in HaCaT keratinocytes, revealed (i) enhanced ROS generation with cell cycle phase arrest in G0/G1 phase, (ii) increase in levels of 8-OxoG (6-24 hr) and γH2AX protein, (iii) significant enhancement in oxidative stress marker enzymes LPO, GSH, GR with concomitant decrease in antioxidant enzymes catalase, GPx, GST, SOD and mitochondrial membrane potential after DON (1.68 nmol) treatment, (iv) suppression of Nrf2 translocation to nucleus, enhanced phosphorylation with subsequent activation ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPK's following DON (1.68 nmol) treatment, (v) overexpression of c-jun, c-fos proteins, upregulation of Bax along with downregulation of Bcl-2 proteins, (vi) increase in cytochrome-c, caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase levels leads to apoptosis. Pretreatment of superoxide dismutase, mannitol and ethanol to HaCaT cells resulted in significant reduction in ROS levels and apoptosis indicating the role of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals in DON induced apoptosis as an early event and skin tumor initiation as a late event.

  6. Effects of type and amount of dietary fat on mouse skin tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, H H; Locniskar, M F; Bechtel, D; Fischer, S M

    1994-01-01

    In a previous study (Cancer Res 51, 907, 1991) in which we found an inverse relationship between quantity of dietary corn oil and saturated fat, in a constant 15% fat diet, on the tumor promotion stage of skin carcinogenesis, it was not clear whether one or both types of fat played a modulatory role. The purpose of the present study therefore was to compare the effect of 1) increasing corn oil in corn oil-only diets and 2) increasing saturated fat, with a constant level of 5% corn oil, on tumor promotion. In the first study, the effects of five levels of dietary corn oil (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%) on the incidence and rat of papilloma and carcinoma development were determined in female Sencar mice fed these diets one week after initiation with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and three weeks before the start of promotion with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. A papilloma incidence of 100% was reached first in the 5% corn oil group, at 10 weeks, followed by the 10% group at 13 weeks and the 15% and 20% group at 16 weeks. The highest corn oil group achieved a 90% incidence. There were marked differences in latency of carcinoma development among the diet groups. At Week 29, the cumulative carcinoma incidence was 56% and 32%, respectively, in the 5% and 10% corn oil groups, whereas the incidence in the two highest corn oil (20% and 25%) groups was only 8% and 4%, respectively. In the second study, the effects of diets containing 5% corn oil and increasing levels of coconut oil (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) on the incidence and rat of papilloma and carcinoma development were determined, as described above. No significant difference in latency or incidence of papillomas or carcinomas was noted among these saturated fat diet groups. It thus appears that higher levels of dietary corn oil are associated with a reduced cancer incidence in this model system.

  7. Effect of genistein on mouse blastocyst development in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-hsiung CHAN; Hsiang-yu LU; Nion-heng SHIAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cytotoxic effects of genistein, an isoflavone compound, on early postimplantation embryonic development in vitro. Methods: Mouse blastocysts were incubated in medium with or without genistein (25 or 50 μmol/L) or daidzein (50 μmol/L) for 24 h. Cell proliferation and growth was investigated by dual differential staining, apoptosis was analyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and apoptotic or necrotic cells were visualized by Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Implantation and postimplantation development of embryos were measured by in vitro development analysis. Results: TUNEL staining and Annexin-V/PI staining. showed that genistein dose-dependently increased apoptosis in mouse blastocysts, while daidzein, another soy isoflavone, had no such effect. The pretreatment of the blastocysts with genistein caused fewer cells than the control group and this effect was primary in the inner cell mass. The genistein-pretreated blastocysts showed normal levels of implantation on culture dishes in vitro, but significantly fewer genistein-pretreated embryos reached the later stages of embryonic development versus the controls, with many of the former embryos dying at relatively early stages of development. In addition, genistein treatment de-creased the development of morulas into blastocysts, and dietary genistein was found to induce cell apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation in an animal assay model of embryogenesis. Conclusions: Our results collectively indicate that genistein treatment of mouse blastocysts induces apoptosis, decreases cell numbers, retards early postimplantation blastocyst development, and increases early-stage blastocyst death in vitro, while dietary genistein appears to negatively affect mouse embryonic development in vivo by inducing cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. These novel findings provide important new insights into the effect of genistein

  8. Effect of vehicles and penetration enhancers on the in vitro percutaneous absorption of tenoxicam through hairless mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Hye Sun; Chun, In Koo

    2002-04-02

    The effects of vehicles and penetration enhancers on the in vitro permeation of tenoxicam from saturated solutions through dorsal hairless mouse skin were investigated. Various types of vehicles, including ester-, alcohol-, and ether-types and their mixtures, were used as vehicles, and then a series of fatty acids and amines were employed as enhancers, respectively. Even though the fluxes of tenoxicam from saturated pure vehicles were generally low (0.1-1.1 microg/cm2 per h), the skin permeability of tenoxicam was significantly increased by the combination of diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) and propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML) or propylene glycol monocaprylate (PGMC); the highest fluxes were achieved at 40% of DGME in both of the two cosolvents. The marked synergistic enhancement was also obtained by using propylene glycol (PG)-oleyl alcohol (OAl) cosolvent. The greatest flux was attained by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids at 3% concentration to PG. But saturated fatty acids failed to show a significant enhancing effect. The enhancement factors with the addition of oleic acid (OA) or linoleic acid (LOA) to PG were 348 and 238, respectively. Tromethamine (TM) showed an enhancing effect by the increased solubility; however, triethanolamine (TEA) did not show a significant enhancing effect. Rather, it decreased the fluxes of tenoxicam when added to PG with fatty acids. The above results indicate that the combinations of lipophilic vehicles like OA, LOA or OAl and hydrophilic vehicles like PG can be used for enhancing the skin permeation of tenoxicam.

  9. A role for estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) in collagen biosynthesis in mouse skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Margaret; Znoyko, Sergey; Stawski, Lukasz; Ghatnekar, Angela; Gilkeson, Gary; Trojanowska, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal regulation of the dermal collagenous extracellular matrix plays a key role in maintaining proper tissue homeostasis, however the factors and pathways involved in this process are not fully defined. This study investigated the role of estrogen receptors (ERs) in the regulation of collagen biosynthesis in mice lacking ERα or ERβ. Collagen content was significantly increased in the skin of ΕRα-/- mice as measured by acetic acid extraction and the hydroxyproline assay and correlated with the decreased levels of MMP-15 and elevated collagen production by ΕRα-/- fibroblasts. In contrast, collagen content was decreased in the skin of ERβ-/- mice despite markedly increased collagen production by ERβ-/- fibroblasts. However, expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-8 and -15 was significantly elevated suggesting increased degradation of dermal collagen. Furthermore, ERβ-/- mice were characterized by significantly reduced levels of small leucine proteoglycans (SLRPs), lumican and decorin, leading to the defects in collagen fibrillogenesis and possibly less stable collagen fibrils. ERα-/- mice also exhibited fibrils with irregular structure and size, which correlated with increased levels of lumican and decorin. Together, these results demonstrate distinct functions of estrogen receptors in the regulation of collagen biosynthesis in mouse skin in vivo. PMID:22895361

  10. Distribution of amelotin in mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuguang; Wang, Wanchun; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Juanjuan; Li, Dongliang; Wei, Yahong; Han, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    Amelotin is expressed and secreted by ameloblasts in tooth development, but amelotin distribution during enamel development is not clear. In this report, we first investigated amelotin expression in developing teeth by immunohistochemistry. Amelotin was detected in the enamel matrix at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. Amelotin was also observed at Tomes' processes on the apical ends of secretory ameloblasts. We then compared amelotin gene expression with those of amelogenin, enamelin, and ameloblastin in the mandibles of postnatal mice by RT-PCR. The expression of amelotin was detected as early as in postnatal day 0 mandibles and amelotin was coexpressed with amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin during tooth development. These data strongly suggest that amelotin is an enamel matrix protein expressed at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Design of a Biomimetic Skin for an Octopus-Inspired Robot - Part Ⅱ: Development of the Skin Artefact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinping Hou,; Richard H. C. Bonser; George Jeronimidis

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop skin aetefact for an octopus-inspired robot arm, which is designed to be able to elongate 60% of its original length, silicone rubber and knitted nylon sheet were selected to manufacture an artificial skin, due to their higher elastic strain and high flexibility. Tensile and scissors cutting tests were conducted to characterise the matrix and reinforcing materials and the skin artefact. Material properties of the individual and the composite materials were compared with the measured properties of real octopus skin presented in Part Ⅰ. The Young's modulus of the skin should be below 20 MPa and the elastic strain range should be over 60%. The fracture toughness should be at least 0.9 kJ·m-2. Tubes made of the skin artefact filled with liquid were tested to study volume change under deformation. Finite element analysis model was developed to simulate the material and arm structure under tensile loading. Results show that the skin artefact developed has similar mechanical properties as the real octopus skin and satisfies all the design specifications of the OCTOPUS robot.

  12. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the ba

  13. Aquaporin expression patterns in the developing mouse salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Helga S; Ruus, Ann-Kristin; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about the presence of the various membrane-located water channels, aquaporins (AQP), during the prenatal and postnatal development of the mouse submandibular salivary gland (SMG). To learn more about AQPs in the developing aspect of salivary glands, we investigated trends in the expression patterns of several AQPs using the embryonic, early postnatal, and young adult mouse SMGs as models. We have chosen AQPs previously found in salivary glands in other animals. Transcripts of AQPs 1, 3, 4, 5, and 8 were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified. Aquaporin proteins 1, 3, 4, and 5, but not AQP protein 8, were detected and quantified using western blotting. The various AQPs showed distinct transcript and protein-expression patterns. The change in trends may indicate that the importance of the various AQPs varies throughout the developmental stages in the mouse SMG. Their presence might be related to cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, transepithelial transport, osmosensing, or cell volume regulation; all roles that in the literature are linked to the various AQPs. Overall, this study demonstrates that AQP presentation varies and has a specific expression pattern during the development of mouse SMG. This feature may be important for glandular anatomical and physiological development.

  14. Subplate in the developing cortex of mouse and human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Zhi; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Oeschger, Franziska M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The subplate is a largely transient zone containing precocious neurons involved in several key steps of cortical development. The majority of subplate neurons form a compact layer in mouse, but are dispersed throughout a much larger zone in the human. In rodent, subplate neurons are amon...

  15. The atlas of mouse development eHistology resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth; Moss, Julie; Burton, Nick; Roochun, Yogmatee; Armit, Chris; Richardson, Lorna; Baldock, Richard

    2015-06-01

    The Atlas of Mouse Development by Professor Mathew Kaufman is an essential text for understanding mouse developmental anatomy. This definitive and authoritative atlas is still in production and is essential for any biologist working with the mouse embryo, although the last revision dates back to 1994. Here, we announce the eHistology online resource that provides free access to high-resolution colour images digitized from the original histological sections (www.emouseatlas.org/emap/eHistology/index.php) used by Kaufman for the Atlas. The images are provided with the original annotations and plate numbering of the paper atlas and enable viewing the material to cellular resolution. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Species identification of skins and development of sheep wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    and skin production, fresh approaches are needed, including new methods. This thesis investigates archaeological and historical skin garments and textiles using an interdisciplinary approach that combines biomolecular methods, archaeology and textile research. The aims of this thesis are first...... to the development of a sheep wool that could be used for textile production in the Danish LN II or EBA I (2000-1500 BC). Changes of the wool seem to again take place in the Roman Iron Age (AD 1-400). The genetic analysis of DNA from wool textiles and sheep bones aimed at extracting the entire mitogenome and nuclear...... PCR is still a valuable tool for species identification. For samples from degrading enviroments, such as the Danish bogs, Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing was proven to be a reliable method for species identification. Moreover, MS-based peptide sequencing provided information of the age...

  17. Cell surface carbohydrate changes during embryonic and fetal skin development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Holbrook, K; Clausen, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to four type 2 chain carbohydrate antigens were used for immunohistochemical studies of embryonic and fetal skin. The antibodies detected N-acetyllactosamine and 3 fucosyl substitutes of this, blood group antigen H, Lex, and Ley. Periderm consistently stained for N...... expressed at the early stages of development, but may later be modified either by sialylation or fucosylation into blood group H or Lex, or by Ley substances, respectively. The orderly and well-defined changes observed during skin differentiation are in agreement with other studies, which have demonstrated...... and granular cells in the epithelium. Lex stained both basal cells and intermediate cells positively, until keratinization around week 20 EGA. Ley is never expressed on basal cells. It is weakly expressed by intermediate cells from week 14 EGA. Our study demonstrates that N-acetyllactosamine is maximally...

  18. Genomic analysis of mouse retinal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Blackshaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate retina is comprised of seven major cell types that are generated in overlapping but well-defined intervals. To identify genes that might regulate retinal development, gene expression in the developing retina was profiled at multiple time points using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE. The expression patterns of 1,051 genes that showed developmentally dynamic expression by SAGE were investigated using in situ hybridization. A molecular atlas of gene expression in the developing and mature retina was thereby constructed, along with a taxonomic classification of developmental gene expression patterns. Genes were identified that label both temporal and spatial subsets of mitotic progenitor cells. For each developing and mature major retinal cell type, genes selectively expressed in that cell type were identified. The gene expression profiles of retinal Müller glia and mitotic progenitor cells were found to be highly similar, suggesting that Müller glia might serve to produce multiple retinal cell types under the right conditions. In addition, multiple transcripts that were evolutionarily conserved that did not appear to encode open reading frames of more than 100 amino acids in length ("noncoding RNAs" were found to be dynamically and specifically expressed in developing and mature retinal cell types. Finally, many photoreceptor-enriched genes that mapped to chromosomal intervals containing retinal disease genes were identified. These data serve as a starting point for functional investigations of the roles of these genes in retinal development and physiology.

  19. Protection against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-caused inflammation in SENCAR mouse ear skin by polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, S K; Agarwal, R; Ekker, S; Wood, G S; Mukhtar, H

    1993-03-01

    Earlier studies conducted in our laboratory have shown that a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) possesses anti-skin tumor initiating and anti-skin tumor promoting activity in the two-stage skin tumorigenesis protocol in SENCAR mouse. We have also shown that topical application of GTP inhibits tumor promoter-caused induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity in SENCAR mice in a dose-dependent manner, and that its oral feeding in drinking water to SKH-1 hairless mice enhances antioxidant and phase II enzyme activity in liver, lung, small bowel and skin. In this study, we show that single or multiple applications of GTP on SENCAR mouse ear prior to or after the application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) afford significant protection (P protection against TPA-induced hyperplasia in the ear skin. The percentage protection by GTP both in terms of epidermal thickness and vertical cell layers was 75 and 90% respectively (P protective effect of GTP against TPA-caused infiltration of neutrophils in the ear skin of SENCAR mouse, by determining a naturally occurring constituent of neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, as a quantitative marker of tissue neutrophil content. Prior application of GTP resulted in significant protection against TPA-caused infiltration of neutrophils (P < 0.005). These results suggest that GTP possesses potential as a cancer chemopreventive agent against stage I tumor promotion.

  20. In-vivo and label-free imaging of cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin by using second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eung Jang; Kim, Boram; Ahn, Hong-Gyu; Park, Seung-Han; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Sangyoup

    2015-02-01

    A video-rate multimodal microscope, which can obtain second- and third- harmonic generation (SHG and THG) images simultaneously, is developed for investigating cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin. By utilizing in-vivo video-rate epi-detected SHG and THG microscopy, we successfully demonstrate that combined images of subcutaneous cellular components and peripheral nerve fibers, together with the collagen fiber, in the mouse ear pinna can be obtained without employing fluorescent probes. We also show that the flow of red blood cells and the diameter change of arteriole-like blood vessels can be visualized with femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1036 nm. In particular, the epi-THG contrast images of the blood-vessel walls display clearly the difference between the arteriole-like and the venule capillary-like blood-vessel types. We should emphasize that our newly-developed microscope system has a unique feature in that it can produce simultaneous in-vivo label-free SHG and THG images in contrast to the conventional confocal and two-photon microscopes.

  1. Skin cancer development in mice exposed chronically to immunosuppressive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daynes, R A; Harris, C C; Connor, R J; Eichwald, E J

    1979-04-01

    Inbred female C3Hf/HeN, murine mammary tumor virus-negative mice exposed to either UV light or benzo[a]pyrene (BP), were subjected to four different chronic immunosuppressive regimens to determine their effect on skin cancer development. The immunosuppressive agents were cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cortisone, and heterologous antilymphocyte globulin. Because of an unexpectedly high morbidity and mortality of mice exposed to chronic immunosuppressive measures, the dosages were kept at a level that permitted them to survive but did not prolong allogeneic skin graft survival and lower antibody titers, nor did this level diminish proliferative responses of lymphocytes to mitogens or allogeneic lymphocytes. Nevertheless, the latency periods (time interval between beginning of medication and appearance of skin tumors) of tumors in mice exposed to immunosuppressant measures were significantly shortened in several groups of mice exposed to UV and subjected to cyclophosphamide, cortisone, or antilymphocyte globulin and mice exposed to BP and subjected to cortisone acetate. In 3 groups, spindle cell tumors (fibrosarcomas) shifted to squamous cell carcinomas. A suppressed immune function would not be regarded as the mechanism for the observed responses because immunosuppression was not detected in the experimental mice.

  2. Entactin: ultrastructural localization of an ubiquitous basement membrane glycoprotein in mouse skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horiguchi, Y; Fine, J D; Ljubimov, A V;

    1989-01-01

    Entactin is a recently described sulfated glycoprotein component of mouse endodermal cell-derived extracellular matrix and is present in a number of basement membranes. It has been ultrastructurally localized to both lamina densa and adjacent epithelial cell membranes in rodent kidney. In the pre...

  3. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanivan, Sara; Meves, Alexander; Behrendt, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    SILAC technology in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) can be successfully used to measure phosphoproteomes in vivo. Here, Zanivan, Mann, and colleagues have applied SILAC-based MS to investigate phosphoproteomic changes during skin carcinogenesis, using the DMBA/TPA two-stag...

  4. Stabilization of influenza vaccine enhances protection by microneedle delivery in the mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Shi Quan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simple and effective vaccine administration is particularly important for annually recommended influenza vaccination. We hypothesized that vaccine delivery to the skin using a patch containing vaccine-coated microneedles could be an attractive approach to improve influenza vaccination compliance and efficacy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Solid microneedle arrays coated with inactivated influenza vaccine were prepared for simple vaccine delivery to the skin. However, the stability of the influenza vaccine, as measured by hemagglutination activity, was found to be significantly damaged during microneedle coating. The addition of trehalose to the microneedle coating formulation retained hemagglutination activity, indicating stabilization of the coated influenza vaccine. For both intramuscular and microneedle skin immunization, delivery of un-stabilized vaccine yielded weaker protective immune responses including viral neutralizing antibodies, protective efficacies, and recall immune responses to influenza virus. Immunization using un-stabilized vaccine also shifted the pattern of antibody isotypes compared to the stabilized vaccine. Importantly, a single microneedle-based vaccination using stabilized influenza vaccine was found to be superior to intramuscular immunization in controlling virus replication as well as in inducing rapid recall immune responses post challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The functional integrity of hemagglutinin is associated with inducing improved protective immunity against influenza. Simple microneedle influenza vaccination in the skin produced superior protection compared to conventional intramuscular immunization. This approach is likely to be applicable to other vaccines too.

  5. A role for NF-κB activity in skin hyperplasia and the development of keratoacanthomata in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Poligone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have implicated NF-κB signaling in both cutaneous development and oncogenesis. However, these studies have been limited in part by the lethality that results from extreme over- or under-expression of NF-κB in available mouse models. Even cre-driven tissue specific expression of transgenes, or targeted deletion of NF-κB can cause cell death. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate a novel mouse model of enhanced NF-κB activity in the skin. METHODS: A knock-in homologous recombination technique was utilized to develop a mouse model (referred to as PD mice with increased NF-κB activity. RESULTS: The data show that increased NF-κB activity leads to hyperproliferation and dysplasia of the mouse epidermis. Chemical carcinogenesis in the context of enhanced NF-κB activity promotes the development of keratoacanthomata. CONCLUSION: Our findings support an important role for NF-κB in keratinocyte dysplasia. We have found that enhanced NF-κB activity renders keratinocytes susceptible to hyperproliferation and keratoacanthoma (KA development but is not sufficient for transformation and SCC development. We therefore propose that NF-κB activation in the absence of additional oncogenic events can promote TNF-dependent, actinic keratosis-like dysplasia and TNF-independent, KAs upon chemical carcinogensis. These studies suggest that resolution of KA cannot occur when NF-κB activation is constitutively enforced.

  6. Monitoring changes in the scattering properties of mouse skin with optical coherence tomography during an in vivo glucose tolerance test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, M.; Tausta, S.; Myllylä, R.; Vainio, S.

    2007-05-01

    A non-invasive glucose monitoring technique would make evaluation of blood glucose values easier and more convenient. This would help diabetic patients to control their blood glucose values more regularly. A few years ago optical coherence tomography (OCT) was proposed as a non-invasive sensor for monitoring changes in blood glucose concentration. The method is based on monitoring glucose-induced changes in the scattering properties of the target. This article describes how OCT was used to monitor changes in the scattering properties of mouse skin during an in vivo glucose tolerance test. The results show that OCT has the potential to register glucose-induced changes in the optical properties of the sample. However, a commercial OCT device with a probe designed for imaging is not very suitable for non-invasive monitoring of glucose-induced changes in scattering. The problems confronted in this study, possibly originating from the small size of the animals, are discussed in the article.

  7. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Guy S; Banks, Robert W

    2016-04-05

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given.

  8. Relative biological effectiveness of carbon ions for tumor control, acute skin damage and late radiation-induced fibrosis in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Horsman, Michael Robert; Alsner, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to compare the biological effectiveness of carbon ions relative to x-rays between tumor control, acute skin reaction and late RIF of CDF1 mice. Material and methods. CDF1 mice with a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma implanted subcutaneously on the foot of t...

  9. Selective inhibition of JNK with a peptide inhibitor attenuates pain hypersensitivity and tumor growth in a mouse skin cancer pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong-Jing; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Zeng, Qing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Decosterd, Isabelle; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2009-09-01

    Cancer pain significantly affects the quality of cancer patients, and current treatments for this pain are limited. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in tumor growth and neuropathic pain sensitization. We investigated the role of JNK in cancer pain and tumor growth in a skin cancer pain model. Injection of luciferase-transfected B16-Fluc melanoma cells into a hindpaw of mouse induced robust tumor growth, as indicated by increase in paw volume and fluorescence intensity. Pain hypersensitivity in this model developed rapidly (Tumor growth was associated with JNK activation in tumor mass, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and spinal cord and a peripheral neuropathy, such as loss of nerve fibers in the hindpaw skin and induction of ATF-3 expression in DRG neurons. Repeated systemic injections of D-JNKI-1 (6 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective and cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of JNK, produced an accumulative inhibition of mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. A bolus spinal injection of D-JNKI-1 also inhibited mechanical allodynia. Further, JNK inhibition suppressed tumor growth in vivo and melanoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, repeated injections of morphine (5 mg/kg), a commonly used analgesic for terminal cancer, produced analgesic tolerance after 1 day and did not inhibit tumor growth. Our data reveal a marked peripheral neuropathy in this skin cancer model and important roles of the JNK pathway in cancer pain development and tumor growth. JNK inhibitors such as D-JNKI-1 may be used to treat cancer pain.

  10. Autofluorescence imaging device for real-time detection and tracking of pathogenic bacteria in a mouse skin wound model: preclinical feasibility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichao Charlie; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J.; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Xu, Lizhen; Chen, Yonghong; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection significantly impedes wound healing. Clinical diagnosis of wound infections is subjective and suboptimal, in part because bacteria are invisible to the naked eye during clinical examination. Moreover, bacterial infection can be present in asymptomatic patients, leading to missed opportunities for diagnosis and treatment. We developed a prototype handheld autofluorescence (AF) imaging device (Portable Real-time Optical Detection, Identification and Guidance for Intervention-PRODIGI) to noninvasively visualize and measure bacterial load in wounds in real time. We conducted preclinical pilot studies in an established nude mouse skin wound model inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. We tested the feasibility of longitudinal AF imaging for in vivo visualization of bacterial load in skin wounds, validated by bioluminescence imaging. We showed that bacteria (S. aureus), occult to standard examination, can be visualized in wounds using PRODIGI. We also detected quantitative changes in wound bacterial load over time based on the antibiotic treatment and the correlation of bacterial AF intensity with bacterial load. AF imaging of wounds offers a safe, noninvasive method for visualizing the presence, location, and extent of bacteria as well as measuring relative changes in bacterial load in wounds in real time.

  11. The effect of ginkgo biloba extract on radiosensitivity of mouse skin and jejunal crypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Ha, Sung Whan [Seoul National Univ. Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract(GBE) is known to increase the peripheral blood circulation. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of GBE on the acute normal tissue radiation reaction. C3H mice were divided into two groups, radiation alone and two doses GBE plus radiation, for both acute skin reaction and jejunal crypt assay. GBE was given i.p. one hour before irradiation with priming dose given one day earlier. Thirty to Fifty Gy for acute skin reaction and 11 to 14 Gy for jejunal crypt were irradiated to right hind leg and whole body, respectively. Radiation doses(RD{sub 50}) for peak skin score of 2.0 were 44.2Gy(40.6-48.2Gy) for radiation alone and 44.4Gy(41.6-47.4Gy) for two doses GBE plus radiation, showing no effect of GBE on acute radiation skin damage. The numbers of regenerating jejunal crypts per circumference were also almost the same for each radiation dose level(p=0.57-0.94), and the mean lethal doses(D{sub o}) were 1.80Gy(1.57-2.09Gy) for radiation alone and 1.88Gy(1.65-2.18Gy) for two doses GBE plus radiation, indicating no effect of GBE on jejunal crypt cell survival after radiation. GBE doesn't increase acute normal tissue radiation reaction in this model system. As GBE was verified to enhance radiation effect on tumor, high therapeutic gain is expected when GBE is combined with radiation therapy.

  12. Enhancement of NMRI Mouse Embryo Development In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedini, F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the systematic studies used in the development of human embryo culture media have been done first on mouse embryos. The general use of NMRI outbred mice is a model for toxicology, teratology and pharmacology. NMRI mouse embryo exhibit the two-cell block in vitro. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of four kinds of culture media on the development of zygotes (NMRI after embryo vitrification. One-cell mouse embryos were obtained from NMRI mice after superovulation and mating with adult male NMRI mice. And then randomly divided into 4 groups for culture in four different cultures media including: M16 (A, DMEM/Ham, F-12 (B, DMEM/Ham's F-12 co-culture with Vero cells(C and DMEM/Ham's F-12 co-culture with MEF cells (D. Afterward all of the embryos were vitrified in EFS40 solution and collected. Results of our study revealed, more blastocysts significantly were developed with co-culture with MEF cells in DMEM/Ham's F-12 medium. More research needed to understand the effect of other components of culture medium, and co-culture on NMRI embryo development.

  13. Hemin inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 expression through nuclear factor-kappa B activation and ornithine decarboxylase expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hee; Lee, Chang Ki [Department of Oral Biology, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Oral Cancer Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Young Sun [Department of Applied Life Science and Brain Korea 21 Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang-Kyun [Department of Oral Biology, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Applied Life Science and Brain Korea 21 Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Won-Yoon [Department of Oral Biology, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Applied Life Science and Brain Korea 21 Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: wychung@yuhs.ac

    2008-07-03

    Inflammation induced by various stimuli has been found to be associated with increased risk for most types of human cancer. Inflammation facilitates the initiation of normal cells, as well as the growth of initiated cells and their progression to malignancy through production of proinflammatory cytokines and diverse reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. These also activate the signaling molecules that are involved in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Our previous studies have demonstrated that hemin inhibited 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced bacterial mutagenesis and oxidative DNA damage, reduced the level of DNA-DMBA adduct and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorobl-13-acetate (TPA)-induced tumor formation in DMBA-initiated ICR mouse skin, and inhibited myeloperoxidase and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation in TPA-treated mouse skin. In the present study, to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the chemopreventive activity of hemin, its effect on the expression of ODC and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulating these proteins were explored in mouse skin with TPA-induced inflammation. Topically applied hemin inhibited ear edema and epidermal thickness in mice treated with TPA. Pretreatment with hemin reduced the expression of ODC and COX-2, and also reduced NF-{kappa}B activation in TPA-stimulated mouse skin. In addition, hemin suppressed the TPA-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 MAPK in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, hemin inhibited TPA-induced COX-2 expression by altering NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway via ERK and p38 MAPK, as well as TPA-induced ODC expression in mouse skin. Thereby, hemin may be an attractive candidate for a chemopreventive agent.

  14. T-cell-expressed proprotein convertase FURIN inhibits DMBA/TPA-induced skin cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähätupa, Maria; Aittomäki, Saara; Martinez Cordova, Zuzet; May, Ulrike; Prince, Stuart; Uusitalo-Järvinen, Hannele; Pesu, Marko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proprotein convertases (PCSK) have a critical role in the body homeostasis as enzymes responsible for processing precursor proteins into their mature forms. FURIN, the first characterized member of the mammalian PCSK family, is overexpressed in multiple malignancies and the inhibition of its activity has been considered potential cancer treatment. FURIN has also an important function in the adaptive immunity, since its deficiency in T cells causes an impaired peripheral immune tolerance and accelerates immune responses. We addressed whether deleting FURIN from the immune cells would strengthen anticancer responses by subjecting mouse strains lacking FURIN from either T cells or macrophages and granulocytes to the DMBA/TPA two-stage skin carcinogenesis protocol. Unexpectedly, deficiency of FURIN in T cells resulted in enhanced and accelerated development of tumors, whereas FURIN deletion in macrophages and granulocytes had no effect. The epidermises of T-cell-specific FURIN deficient mice were significantly thicker with more proliferating Ki67+ cells. In contrast, there were no differences in the numbers of the T cells. The flow cytometric analyses of T-cell populations in skin draining lymph nodes showed that FURIN T-cell KO mice have an inherent upregulation of early activation marker CD69 as well as more CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ positive T regulatory cells. In the early phase of tumor promotion, T cells from the T-cell-specific FURIN knockout animals produced more interferon gamma, whereas at later stage the production of Th2- and Th17-type cytokines was more prominent than in wild-type controls. In conclusion, while PCSK inhibitors are promising therapeutics in cancer treatment, our results show that inhibiting FURIN specifically in T cells may promote squamous skin cancer development.

  15. Effect of glycyrrhizin on pseudomonal skin infections in human-mouse chimeras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Yoshida

    Full Text Available In our previous studies, peripheral blood lineage(-CD34(+CD31(+ cells (CD31(+ IMC appearing in severely burned patients have been characterized as inhibitor cells for the production of β-defensins (HBDs by human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK. In this study, the effect of glycyrrhizin on pseudomonal skin infections was studied in a chimera model of thermal injury. Two different chimera models were utilized. Patient chimeras were created in murine antimicrobial peptide-depleted NOD-SCID IL-2rγ(null mice that were grafted with unburned skin tissues of severely burned patients and inoculated with the same patient peripheral blood CD31(+ IMC. Patient chimera substitutes were created in the same mice that were grafted with NHEK and inoculated with experimentally induced CD31(+ IMC. In the results, both groups of chimeras treated with glycyrrhizin resisted a 20 LD50 dose of P. aeruginosa skin infection, while all chimeras in both groups treated with saline died within 3 days of the infection. Human antimicrobial peptides were detected from the grafted site tissues of both groups of chimeras treated with glycyrrhizin, while the peptides were not detected in the same area tissues of controls. HBD-1 was produced by keratinocytes in transwell-cultures performed with CD31(+ IMC and glycyrrhizin. Also, inhibitors (IL-10 and CCL2 of HBD-1 production by keratinocytes were not detected in cultures of patient CD31(+ IMC treated with glycyrrhizin. These results indicate that sepsis stemming from pseudomonal grafted site infections in a chimera model of burn injury is controllable by glycyrrhizin. Impaired antimicrobial peptide production at the infection site of severely burned patients may be restored after treatment with glycyrrhizin.

  16. Skin Whitening Cosmetics: Feedback and Challenges in the Development of Natural Skin Lighteners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Burger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the public’s growing interest in skin whitening, lightening ingredients only used under dermatological supervision until recently, are more and more frequently incorporated into cosmetic formulas. The active agents that lighten skin tone are either natural or synthetic substances, and may act at various levels of melanogenesis. They are used to treat various skin pigmentation disorders or simply to obtain a lighter skin tone as whiter skin may be synonymous of wealth, health, youth, and/or beauty in different cultures. However, recent studies demonstrated the adverse effects of some of these ingredients, leading to their interdiction or restricted use under the European Directive and several other international regulations. After an overview of skin whitening practices and the associated risks, this article provides insight into the mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and the biological assays available to attest the lightening activity of individual ingredients. The legislation dealing with the use of skin lighteners is then discussed. As traditional depigmenting agents such as hydroquinone and corticosteroids are of safety concern, the potential of natural extracts has been investigated more and more; finally, a synthesis of three years of research in our laboratory for such plant extracts will be given.

  17. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlupp, P; Weber, M; Schmidts, T; Geiger, K; Runkel, F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and reproducible method for a high throughput of skin samples with impaired skin barrier was developed and verified by skin permeation studies (25 h) of caffeine, sorbic acid and testosterone compared to healthy (untreated) and tape-stripped skin. Skin barrier disruption was controlled by TEWL measurement. Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies.

  18. Targeted deletion of Crif1 in mouse epidermis impairs skin homeostasis and hair morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Min; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Young; Im, Myung; Lee, Young; Seo, Young-Joon; Shong, Minho; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok

    2017-01-01

    The epidermis, which consists mainly of keratinocytes, acts as a physical barrier to infections by regulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Hair follicles undergo continuous cycling to produce new one. Therefore, optimum supply of energy from the mitochondria is essential for maintaining skin homeostasis and hair growth. CRIF1 is a mitochondrial protein that regulates mitoribosome-mediated synthesis and insertion of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation polypeptides into the mitochondrial membrane in mammals. Recent studies reveal that conditional knockout (cKO) of Crif1 in specific tissues of mice induced mitochondrial dysfunction. To determine whether the mitochondrial function of keratinocytes affects skin homeostasis and hair morphogenesis, we generated epidermis-specific Crif1 cKO mice. Deletion of Crif1 in epidermis resulted in impaired mitochondrial function and Crif1 cKO mice died within a week. Keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation were markedly inhibited in Crif1 cKO mice. Furthermore, hair follicle morphogenesis of Crif1 cKO mice was disrupted by down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These results demonstrate that mitochondrial function in keratinocytes is essential for maintaining epidermal homeostasis and hair follicle morphogenesis. PMID:28317864

  19. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-06

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance.

  20. Dual effects of fluoxetine on mouse early embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Woon [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, Changwon 630-723 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Changyong [National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Cheonan 330-801 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Jin [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Ik [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sook-Young [Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul 135-081 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young-Woo; Han, Sunkyu; Tak, Hyun-Min; Han, Jaehee [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis, in mammalian cells. Little is known about the role of fluoxetine in early embryonic development. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of fluoxetine during mouse early embryonic development. Late two-cell stage embryos (2-cells) were cultured in the presence of various concentrations of fluoxetine (1 to 50 μM) for different durations. When late 2-cells were incubated with 5 μM fluoxetine for 6 h, the percentage that developed into blastocysts increased compared to the control value. However, late 2-cells exposed to fluoxetine (5 μM) over 24 h showed a reduction in blastocyst formation. The addition of fluoxetine (5 μM) together with KN93 or KN62 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors) failed to increase blastocyst formation. Fluoxetine treatment inhibited TREK-1 and TREK-2, members of the two-pore domain K{sup +} channel family expressed in mouse embryos, activities, indicating that fluoxetine-induced membrane depolarization in late 2-cells might have resulted from TREK inhibition. In addition, long-term exposure to fluoxetine altered the TREK mRNA expression levels. Furthermore, injection of siRNA targeting TREKs significantly decreased blastocyst formation by ∼ 30% compared to injection of scrambled siRNA. Long-term exposure of fluoxetine had no effect on blastocyst formation of TREK deficient embryos. These results indicate that low-dose and short-term exposures of late 2-cells to fluoxetine probably increase blastocyst formation through activation of CaMKII-dependent signal transduction pathways, whereas long-term exposure decreases mouse early embryonic development through inhibition of TREK channel gating. Highlights: ► Short-term exposure of 2-cells to fluoxetine enhances mouse blastocyst formation. ► The enhancive effect of fluoxetine is resulted from Ca

  1. Solar-UV-signature mutation prefers TCG to CCG: extrapolative consideration from UVA1-induced mutation spectra in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Kumagai, Jun; Ono, Tetsuya; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-08-01

    UVA1 exerts its genotoxicity on mammalian skin by producing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DNA and preferentially inducing solar-UV-signature mutations, C → T base substitution mutations at methylated CpG-associated dipyrimidine (Py-mCpG) sites, as demonstrated previously using a 364 nm laser as a UVA1 source and lacZ-transgenic mice that utilize the transgene as a mutational reporter. In the present study, we confirmed that a broadband UVA1 source induced the same mutation profiles in mouse epidermis as the UVA1 laser, generalizing the previous result from a single 364 nm to a wider wavelength range of UVA1 (340-400 nm). Combined with our previous data on the mutation spectra induced in mouse epidermis by UVB, UVA2 and solar UVR, we proved that the solar-UV-signature mutation is commonly observed in the wavelength range from UVB to UVA, and found that UVA1 induces this mutation more preferentially than the other shorter wavelength ranges. This finding indicates that the solar-UV-signature mutation-causing CPDs, which are known to prefer Py-mCpG sites, could be produced with the energy provided by the longer wavelength region of UVR, suggesting a photochemical reaction through the excitation of pyrimidine bases to energy states that can be accomplished by absorption of even low-energy UVR. On the other hand, the lower proportions of solar-UV-signature mutations observed in the mutation spectra for UVB and solar UVR indicate that the direct photochemical reaction through excited singlet state of pyrimidine bases, which can be accomplished only by high-energy UVR, is also involved in the mutation induction at those shorter wavelengths of UVR. We also found that the solar-UV signature prefers 5'-TCG-3' to 5'-CCG-3' as mutational target sites, consistent with the fact that UVA induces CPDs selectively at thymine-containing dipyrimidine sites and that solar UVR induces them preferably at Py-mCpG sites. However, the mutation spectrum in human p53 gene from non

  2. Assessment of reinforced poly(ethylene glycol) chitosan hydrogels as dressings in a mouse skin wound defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Szu-Hsien [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Ching-Ting [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China); Epithelial Biology Laboratory/Transgenic Mice Core-Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chih-Hao [Department of Orthopedics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan (China); National Taiwan University College of Medicine, No. 1, Jen-Ai Road, Taipei City 10018, Taiwan (China); Lai, Yi-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Fung [Animal Medicine Center, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Jen-Ai Road, Taipei City 10018, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Ching-Nan [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China); Chou, Hung-Chia [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chih-Kuang, E-mail: ckwang@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, No. 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Kuo-Haung, E-mail: khhsieh@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01

    Wound dressings of chitosan are biocompatible, biodegradable, antibacterial and hemostatic biomaterials. However, applications for chitosan are limited due to its poor mechanical properties. Here, we conducted an in vivo mouse angiogenesis study on reinforced poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-chitosan (RPC) hydrogels. RPC hydrogels were formed by cross-linking chitosan with PEGs of different molecular weights at various PEG to chitosan ratios in our previous paper. These dressings can keep the wound moist, had good gas exchange capacity, and was capable of absorbing or removing the wound exudate. We examined the ability of these RPC hydrogels and neat chitosan to heal small cuts and full-thickness skin defects on the backs of male Balb/c mice. Histological examination revealed that chitosan suppressed the infiltration of inflammatory cells and accelerated fibroblast proliferation, while PEG enhanced epithelial migration. The RPC hydrogels promoted wound healing in the small cuts and full layer wounds. The optimal RPC hydrogel had a swelling ratio of 100% and a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of about 2000 g/m{sup 2}/day. In addition, they possess good mechanical property and appropriate degradation rates. Thus, the optimal RPC hydrogel formulation functioned effectively as a wound dressing and promoted wound healing. Highlights: ► Mouse angiogenesis study on reinforced poly(ethylene glycol)-chitosan (RPC) ► Water vapor transmission rate of about 2000 g/m{sup 2}/day is characteristic of RPC. ► RPC suppressed inflammatory cells and accelerated fibroblast proliferation. ► RPC composed of 1000-RP10C90 can be used as a biomaterial for wound dressing.

  3. Development and Production of a Leishmania Skin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    manufacturing process of Leishmania tropica Skin Test Antigen (LtSTA) was made during this contract period to increase the yield and robustness of the...interest group. 15. SUBJECT TERMS LtSTA = Leishmania tropica Skin Test Antigen 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT... tropica Skin Test Antigen (LtSTA), is a sterile injectable microfluidized lysate of Leishmania tropica (WR#1063:C1A) promastigotes. The product is heat

  4. Skin vaccination against cervical cancer associated human papillomavirus with a novel micro-projection array in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J Corbett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Better delivery systems are needed for routinely used vaccines, to improve vaccine uptake. Many vaccines contain alum or alum based adjuvants. Here we investigate a novel dry-coated densely-packed micro-projection array skin patch (Nanopatch™ as an alternate delivery system to intramuscular injection for delivering an alum adjuvanted human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine (Gardasil® commonly used as a prophylactic vaccine against cervical cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Micro-projection arrays dry-coated with vaccine material (Gardasil® delivered to C57BL/6 mouse ear skin released vaccine within 5 minutes. To assess vaccine immunogenicity, doses of corresponding to HPV-16 component of the vaccine between 0.43 ± 0.084 ng and 300 ± 120 ng (mean ± SD were administered to mice at day 0 and day 14. A dose of 55 ± 6.0 ng delivered intracutaneously by micro-projection array was sufficient to produce a maximal virus neutralizing serum antibody response at day 28 post vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titres were sustained out to 16 weeks post vaccination, and, for comparable doses of vaccine, somewhat higher titres were observed with intracutaneous patch delivery than with intramuscular delivery with the needle and syringe at this time point. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Use of dry micro-projection arrays (Nanopatch™ has the potential to overcome the need for a vaccine cold chain for common vaccines currently delivered by needle and syringe, and to reduce risk of needle-stick injury and vaccine avoidance due to the fear of the needle especially among children.

  5. Topical calcitriol prior to photodynamic therapy enhances treatment efficacy in non-melanoma skin cancer mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollakanti, Kishore; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.

    2015-03-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common form of human cancer worldwide, and their incidence is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), mediated by topically applied aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and subsequent exposure to light (either a laser or a noncoherent source), is being increasingly used for the treatment of dermatological disorders, including BCC and SCC. However, therapeutic responses of NMSCs to ALA-PDT are currently not superior to standard therapies, although the latter have undesirable side effects including scarring. In this study, we report that preconditioning of skin tumors with calcitriol (active form of Vitamin D; Vit D) prior to ALA-PDT, significantly improves the treatment outcome. In BCC and UVB-induced SCC mouse models, we identified an increase in tumor-specific accumulation of ALA induced photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX, PpIX) due to Vit D preconditioning, of up to 6- fold in vivo. In addition, increased expression of differentiation (145 fold, p < 0.02) and proliferation (42 fold, p <0.005) markers were identified in BCC tumors, all leading to increased tumor destruction (18.3 fold, p < 0.03) with the combination approach, as compared to ALA-PDT alone. Histomorphological changes identified using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and results of TUNEL staining, together documented a beneficial effect of Vit D pretreatment upon tumor cell death. We conclude that this new combination approach with Vit D and ALA-PDT has great potential to achieve complete remission of NMSC tumors, with excellent cosmetic results and an overall beneficial impact upon patient care.

  6. Anti-Skin-Aging Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate by Regulating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Pathway on Aging Mouse Model Induced by D-Galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiming; Li, Yifan; Zhu, Qiangqiang; Li, Tong; Lu, Hao; Wei, Nan; Huang, Yewei; Shi, Ruoyu; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Xuanjun; Sheng, Jun

    2017-03-23

    Epigallocatechin gallate(EGCG) is a monomer separated from tea catechins, as an well-known antioxidant, which helps fight wrinkles and rejuvenate skin cells. In this study, we investigated the anti-aging effect of EGCG, and to clarify underlying mechanism of skin aging in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse model. Forty-five male mice were divided into 5 groups and treated with different dose of EGCG, Vitamin C (VitC) to mice as a positive control. All groups except vehicle were established aging model induced by D-galactose (200mg/kg/day) that was subcutaneously injected to mice for 8 weeks. Two weeks after injection of D-galactose, EGCG and Vit C groups were simultaneously administered once a day by subcutaneously inject after 5hours for injecting D-galactose. The results show that EGCG can be absorbed by the skin. Overall, the conditions of the skin of EGCG-treatment groups were improved, the whole structure of skin were better than control groups, and the levels of oxidative stress and the expression of relate with EGFR proteins were significantly higher than control group after EGCG treatment. All these findings suggest that EGCG can resist skin senility effectively. And the EGFR with relate of downstream proteins are implicated in the skin aging.

  7. Riboflavin as adjuvant with cisplatin: study in mouse skin cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin used in treatment of solid tumor induces oxidative stress which leads to hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. New strategies are therefore needed to combat toxicity and optimize its therapeutic potential. Riboflavin (VitaminB2) under photoillumination works as an anti proliferative agent and induces apoptosis. These properties of riboflavin have been exploited to mitigate cisplatin induced toxicities. 9,10-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene /12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate  were used to induce skin tumor in Swiss albino mice. The tumor induced mice were treated with cisplatin, riboflavin as well as their combination under photo illumination. In comparison to tumor control group the cisplatin and riboflavin treated groups showed a compromised level of antioxidant enzymes, functional markers and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. However these parameters tended towards normal in the combination treated group. The results from histopathology indicate that apoptosis was favored mode of cell death and that necrosis was reduced in combination treated groups. Our findings indicate that combination of cisplatin with riboflavin under photo illumination synergizes its anti cancer activity towards cancer cells and attenuates the cisplatin induced toxicities.

  8. A computational clonal analysis of the developing mouse limb bud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Marcon

    Full Text Available A comprehensive spatio-temporal description of the tissue movements underlying organogenesis would be an extremely useful resource to developmental biology. Clonal analysis and fate mappings are popular experiments to study tissue movement during morphogenesis. Such experiments allow cell populations to be labeled at an early stage of development and to follow their spatial evolution over time. However, disentangling the cumulative effects of the multiple events responsible for the expansion of the labeled cell population is not always straightforward. To overcome this problem, we develop a novel computational method that combines accurate quantification of 2D limb bud morphologies and growth modeling to analyze mouse clonal data of early limb development. Firstly, we explore various tissue movements that match experimental limb bud shape changes. Secondly, by comparing computational clones with newly generated mouse clonal data we are able to choose and characterize the tissue movement map that better matches experimental data. Our computational analysis produces for the first time a two dimensional model of limb growth based on experimental data that can be used to better characterize limb tissue movement in space and time. The model shows that the distribution and shapes of clones can be described as a combination of anisotropic growth with isotropic cell mixing, without the need for lineage compartmentalization along the AP and PD axis. Lastly, we show that this comprehensive description can be used to reassess spatio-temporal gene regulations taking tissue movement into account and to investigate PD patterning hypothesis.

  9. MFng is dispensable for mouse pancreas development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Per; Bergqvist, Ingela; Norlin, Stefan; Edlund, Helena

    2009-04-01

    Notch signaling regulates pancreatic cell differentiation, and mutations of various Notch signaling components result in perturbed pancreas development. Members of the Fringe family of beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases, Manic Fringe (MFng), Lunatic Fringe (LFng), and Radical Fringe (RFng), modulate Notch signaling, and MFng has been suggested to regulate pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation. We have characterized the expression of the three mouse Fringe genes in the developing mouse pancreas between embryonic days 9 and 14 and show that the expression of MFng colocalized with the proendocrine transcription factor Ngn3. In contrast, the expression of LFng colocalized with the exocrine marker Ptf1a, whereas RFng was not expressed. Moreover, we show that expression of MFng is lost in Ngn3 mutant mice, providing evidence that MFng is genetically downstream of Ngn3. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses of MFng by the generation of mice that overexpress MFng in early pancreatic progenitor cells and mice with a targeted deletion of MFng provide, however, evidence that MFng is dispensable for pancreas development and function, since no pancreatic defects in these mice were observed.

  10. Assessment of reinforced poly(ethylene glycol) chitosan hydrogels as dressings in a mouse skin wound defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Hsien; Tsao, Ching-Ting; Chang, Chih-Hao; Lai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ming-Fung; Chuang, Ching-Nan; Chou, Hung-Chia; Wang, Chih-Kuang; Hsieh, Kuo-Haung

    2013-07-01

    Wound dressings of chitosan are biocompatible, biodegradable, antibacterial and hemostatic biomaterials. However, applications for chitosan are limited due to its poor mechanical properties. Here, we conducted an in vivo mouse angiogenesis study on reinforced poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-chitosan (RPC) hydrogels. RPC hydrogels were formed by cross-linking chitosan with PEGs of different molecular weights at various PEG to chitosan ratios in our previous paper. These dressings can keep the wound moist, had good gas exchange capacity, and was capable of absorbing or removing the wound exudate. We examined the ability of these RPC hydrogels and neat chitosan to heal small cuts and full-thickness skin defects on the backs of male Balb/c mice. Histological examination revealed that chitosan suppressed the infiltration of inflammatory cells and accelerated fibroblast proliferation, while PEG enhanced epithelial migration. The RPC hydrogels promoted wound healing in the small cuts and full layer wounds. The optimal RPC hydrogel had a swelling ratio of 100% and a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of about 2000 g/m(2)/day. In addition, they possess good mechanical property and appropriate degradation rates. Thus, the optimal RPC hydrogel formulation functioned effectively as a wound dressing and promoted wound healing.

  11. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Asmari AK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman K Al Asmari, Abdul Quaiyoom Khan Research Centre, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo antitumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone. Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 µg, 35 µg, and 52.5 µg per animal were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. Keywords: Leiurus quinquestriatus, skin cancer, apoptosis, immunosuppression

  12. Investigation of skin cancer treatment efficiency by raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, D. W. [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    From the successful perform of the molecular structures of various kinds of human skin cancer. We can predict the types of cancer when a small abnormal change change occurs on skin by raman spectrum. When we applied the cancer causing chemicals, bezopyrene, to nude mouse, it did not develop to cancer. But we had radiated UV light after developed to skin cancer in a few days. We can deduce the development of human skin cancer from the result of nude mouse skin cancer, because the two skin are structurally very similar to each other. From the results of own research we could conform the UV light is essential for the development of skin cancer. The results of own research can be directly apply to early detection and proper treatment of skin cancer in hospital. 32 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  13. Development of an in vitro dendritic cell-based test for skin sensitizer identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bruno Miguel; Rosa, Susana Carvalho; Martins, João Demétrio; Silva, Ana; Gonçalo, Margarida; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Cruz, Maria Teresa

    2013-03-18

    The sensitizing potential of chemicals is currently assessed using animal models. However, ethical and economic concerns and the recent European legislative framework triggered intensive research efforts in the development and validation of alternative methods. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an in vitro predictive test based on the analysis and integration of gene expression and intracellular signaling profiles of chemical-exposed skin-derived dendritic cells. Cells were treated with four known sensitizers and two nonsensitizers, and the effects on the expression of 20 candidate genes and the activation of MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and NF-κB signaling pathways were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Genes Trxr1, Hmox1, Nqo1, and Cxcl10 and the p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways were identified as good predictor variables and used to construct a dichotomous classifier. For validation of the model, 12 new chemicals were then analyzed in a blind assay, and from these, 11 were correctly classified. Considering the total of 18 compounds tested here, 17 were correctly classified, representing a concordance of 94%, with a sensitivity of 92% (12 of 13 sensitizers identified) and a specificity of 100% (5 of 5 nonsensitizers identified). Additionally, we tested the ability of our model to discriminate sensitizers from nonallergenic but immunogenic compounds such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was correctly classified as a nonsensitizer. Overall, our results indicate that the analysis of proposed gene and signaling pathway signatures in a mouse fetal skin-derived dendritic cell line represents a valuable model to be integrated in a future in vitro test platform.

  14. Antioxidant activity, lipophilicity and extractability of polyphenols from pig skin - development of analytical methods for skin permeation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Olesya V; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute; Hasenkopf, Katrin; Eisner, Peter; Kerscher, Martina

    2013-11-01

    Permeation of polyphenols through the stratum corneum barrier is a precondition for the protective action of polyphenols against oxidative skin damage. Prior to in vitro skin permeation experiments, we developed a method for the quantification of polyphenols in pig skin, including organic solvent extraction and HPLC analysis. Catechine hydrate, epigallocatechin gallate, trans-resveratrol, quercetin, rutin and protocatechuic acid were chosen for this study as representatives of phenolics with different lipophilicity and molecular weight. The antioxidative activities of polyphenols as well as their octanol-water partition coefficients at different pH values were determined. Extraction of polyphenols from pig skin was optimized by variation of solvent composition, homogenization intensity and time, as well as partial exclusion of oxygen during extraction. The highest recovery rates could be reached by extraction with the methanol-water mixture (90:10, v/v), containing 0.2 g/L l-ascorbic acid, after the cryo-milling for 4 min. Recoveries of 72% for total phenolics, 96% for quercetin and protocatechuic acid, 90% for rutin and 74% for trans-resveratrol, were achieved. These extraction parameters will be selected for the polyphenol extraction from pig skin for further in vitro drug permeation studies.

  15. Investigation on the effect of developed product and new food for radiation-induced skin damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Chun; Bae, Chun Sik; Kim, Se Ra; Lee, Hae Jun; Bang, Dae Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Kim, Joong Sun; Ki, Sun Ah; Song, Myung Seop [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    In vivo evaluation of the developed pilot product on the skin protection against UV irradiation and screening of new candidate materials. Project Results are Establishment of experimental methods for 3 morphological indices of UV-induced skin damages -Establishment of experimental methods for whitening effect evaluation -Evaluation of HemoHIM administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 1 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 2 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 3 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the anti-wrinkle effects in the skin -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tissue (epidermal thickening, dermal cellularity, dermal cyst) -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tumor development

  16. Phototumorigenesis studies of 5-methoxypsoralen in bergamot oil: evaluation and modification of risk of human use in an albino mouse skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A R; Walker, S L; Kinley, J S; Plastow, S R; Averbeck, D; Morlière, P; Dubertret, L

    1990-11-01

    The skin of the female hairless albino mouse (Skh 1) was used to study the enhancement of solar simulated radiation (SSR) tumorigenesis by 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) in model perfumes that contain bergamot oil. This work was done in association with yeast mutagenicity studies and human skin phototoxicity studies. Analyses of time-to-onset of tumour observation with 5-MOP at 0, 5, 15 and 50 ppm show a highly significant 5-MOP dose effect and the data indicate that 5-MOP has phototumorigenic potential even at 5 ppm. The addition of 0.5% UVB and 0.5% UVA sunscreens significantly reduces the tumorigenicity associated with the vehicle (i.e. 5-MOP at 0 ppm) and 5-MOP at all concentrations. Pairwise comparisons of 5-MOP (at 5 or 15 ppm) plus sunscreens with vehicle plus sunscreens show that the sunscreens afford total protection at the lower 5-MOP concentrations. Additional studies show that a 5-6 h delay between 5-MOP application and SSR exposure defers the time-to-onset of tumours as does intermittent 5-MOP and SSR treatment. A comparison of 5-MOP at 50 ppm in bergamot oil with 5-MOP at 50 ppm prepared from pure 5-MOP crystals shows identical results, indicating that the active phototumorigenic agent in bergamot oil is 5-MOP and not other related compounds, which may be present at greater concentrations. Analyses of tumour histology at death show, in general, similar patterns of malignancy for all groups. Thus although it is possible to delay tumorigenesis by various strategies, the tumours that eventually develop are just as likely to be malignant, if not more so, when compared with non-delayed groups.

  17. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  18. Undergraduate Laboratory Module on Skin Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, James J.; Andrews, Samantha N.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    To introduce students to an application of chemical engineering directly related to human health, we developed an experiment for the unit operations laboratory at Georgia Tech examining diffusion across cadaver skin in the context of transdermal drug delivery. In this laboratory module, students prepare mouse skin samples, set up diffusion cells…

  19. Development of a skin phantom of the epidermis and evaluation by using fluorescence techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Thorsten; Beer, Sebastian; Maeder, Ulf; Burg, Jan M.; Schlupp, Peggy; Schmidts, Thomas; Runkel, Frank; Fiebich, Martin

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a skin phantom that resembles the epidermis including the lipid matrix of the stratum corneum and the dermis. The main intent was to achieve optical properties similar to skin tissue. Therefore, two compartments of the skin, dermis and epidermis, were examined regarding their optical properties. Based on these results, the skin phantom was designed using relevant skin components. The scattering coefficient was measured by using Reflectance-based Confocal Microscopy (RCM) and the fluorescence spectrum was detected via confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). Prospective, the skin phantom can be used to incorporate various fluorescing chemicals, such as fluorescent dyes and fluorescent-labeled drugs to perform calibration measurements in wide-field and laser-scanning microscopes to provide a basis for the quantification of skin penetration studies.

  20. Elastase 2 is expressed in human and mouse epidermis and impairs skin barrier function in Netherton syndrome through filaggrin and lipid misprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnart, Chrystelle; Deraison, Céline; Lacroix, Matthieu; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Besson, Céline; Robin, Aurélie; Briot, Anaïs; Gonthier, Marie; Lamant, Laurence; Dubus, Pierre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-03-01

    The human epidermis serves 2 crucial barrier functions: it protects against water loss and prevents penetration of infectious agents and allergens. The physiology of the epidermis is maintained by a balance of protease and antiprotease activities, as illustrated by the rare genetic skin disease Netherton syndrome (NS), in which impaired inhibition of serine proteases causes severe skin erythema and scaling. Here, utilizing mass spectrometry, we have identified elastase 2 (ELA2), which we believe to be a new epidermal protease that is specifically expressed in the most differentiated layer of living human and mouse epidermis. ELA2 localized to keratohyalin granules, where it was found to directly participate in (pro-)filaggrin processing. Consistent with the observation that ELA2 was hyperactive in skin from NS patients, transgenic mice overexpressing ELA2 in the granular layer of the epidermis displayed abnormal (pro-)filaggrin processing and impaired lipid lamellae structure, which are both observed in NS patients. These anomalies led to dehydration, implicating ELA2 in the skin barrier defect seen in NS patients. Thus, our work identifies ELA2 as a major new epidermal protease involved in essential pathways for skin barrier function. These results highlight the importance of the control of epidermal protease activity in skin homeostasis and designate ELA2 as a major protease driving the pathogenesis of NS.

  1. Stepwise development of MAIT cells in mouse and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells display two evolutionarily conserved features: an invariant T cell receptor (TCRalpha (iTCRalpha chain and restriction by the nonpolymorphic class Ib major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule, MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1. MR1 expression on thymus epithelial cells is not necessary for MAIT cell development but their accumulation in the gut requires MR1 expressing B cells and commensal flora. MAIT cell development is poorly known, as these cells have not been found in the thymus so far. Herein, complementary human and mouse experiments using an anti-humanValpha7.2 antibody and MAIT cell-specific iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic mice in different genetic backgrounds show that MAIT cell development is a stepwise process, with an intra-thymic selection followed by peripheral expansion. Mouse MAIT cells are selected in an MR1-dependent manner both in fetal thymic organ culture and in double iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic RAG knockout mice. In the latter mice, MAIT cells do not expand in the periphery unless B cells are added back by adoptive transfer, showing that B cells are not required for the initial thymic selection step but for the peripheral accumulation. In humans, contrary to natural killer T (NKT cells, MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype in the thymus as well as in cord blood where they are in low numbers. After birth, MAIT cells acquire a memory phenotype and expand dramatically, up to 1%-4% of blood T cells. Finally, in contrast with NKT cells, human MAIT cell development is independent of the molecular adaptor SAP. Interestingly, mouse MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype and do not express the ZBTB16 transcription factor, which, in contrast, is expressed by NKT cells and the memory human MAIT cells found in the periphery after birth. In conclusion, MAIT cells are selected by MR1 in the thymus on a non-B non-T hematopoietic cell, and acquire a memory phenotype and expand in the

  2. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Comprehensive progress report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1978. [Mouse skin, rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1978-02-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the same carcinogens.

  3. Keratinocyte-specific stat3 heterozygosity impairs development of skin tumors in human papillomavirus 8 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrea, Marco; Rittà, Massimo; Landini, Manuela M; Borgogna, Cinzia; Mondini, Michele; Kern, Florian; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Baccarini, Manuela; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Smola, Sigrun; Pfister, Herbert; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2010-10-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the genus β are thought to play a role in human skin cancers, but this has been difficult to establish using epidemiologic approaches. To gain insight into the transforming activities of β-HPV, transgenic mouse models have been generated that develop skin tumors. Recent evidence suggests a central role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) as a transcriptional node for cancer cell-autonomous initiation of a tumor-promoting gene signature associated with cell proliferation, cell survival, and angiogenesis. Moreover, high levels of phospho-Stat3 have been detected in tumors arising in HPV8-CER transgenic mice. In this study, we investigate the in vivo role of Stat3 in HPV8-induced skin carcinogenesis by combining our established experimental model of HPV8-induced skin cancer with epidermis-restricted Stat3 ablation. Stat3 heterozygous epidermis was less prone to tumorigenesis than wild-type epidermis. Three of the 23 (13%) Stat3(+/-):HPV8 animals developed tumors within 12 weeks of life, whereas 54.3% of Stat3(+/+):HPV8 mice already exhibited tumors in the same observation period (median age for tumor appearance, 10 weeks). The few tumors that arose in the Stat3(+/-):HPV8 mice were benign and never progressed to a more malignant phenotype. Collectively, these results offer direct evidence of a critical role for Stat3 in HPV8-driven epithelial carcinogenesis. Our findings imply that targeting Stat3 activity in keratinocytes may be a viable strategy to prevent and treat HPV-induced skin cancer.

  4. Murine Asb-17 expression during mouse testis development and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kye-Seong; Kim, Myung-Sun; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2004-05-01

    In this study we isolated a murine mAsb-17 from mouse testis by RT-PCR using primers designed based on the sequences from the GenBank database. The sequence analysis showed that mAsb-17 encodes a 295 amino acid polypeptide with a molecular weight of approximately 34 kDa containing two ankyrin repeats and one SOCS box. The amino acid sequence of mASB-17 showed 87.5%, 98.3% and 92.9% identity with that of human, rat and dog, respectively. Interestingly, northern blot analysis showed that mAsb-17 was expressed only in the testis. The expression analysis by RT-PCR for mAsb-17 in mouse indicates that mAsb-17 is expressed from the fourth week after birth to adult, with the highest expression in round spermatids. Both northern blot and RT-PCR analyses suggest that mASB-17 may play essential roles in testis development and spermatogenesis.

  5. Gene expression and dental enamel structure in developing mouse incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehic, Amer; Risnes, Steinar; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Khuu, Cuong; Osmundsen, Harald

    2010-04-01

    At the mouse incisor tip the initially differentiated ameloblasts produce a thin, prism-free enamel, while further apically, in the immediate adjacent segment, the enamel thickness increases and the four-layered enamel of mouse incisor is formed. Comparative gene-expression profiling was carried out on RNA isolated from these two segments of incisor tooth germs at embryonic day (E)17.5 and at postnatal days (P)0, 1, 2, and 10 using microarrays to measure messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) species present in the segments. Validation of expression data was achieved using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Bioinformatic data suggested enhanced cellular apoptosis in the incisal tip segment, which, together with diminished expression of the Amelx and Enam genes, may contribute to the production of the thin enamel seen in this tooth segment. For genes exhibiting higher levels of expression in the adjacent segment where complex enamel is being formed, bioinformatic analysis suggested significant associations with cellular functions involving the actin cytoskeleton, cellular development, morphology, and movement. This is suggested to reflect that ameloblasts with Tomes' process are being organized in transverse rows, facilitating the transverse movement that results in prism decussation in the inner enamel of the adjacent segment. Bioinformatic analysis of miRNA expression data lends support to these suggestions.

  6. Postoperative gluteal skin damage associated with latent development of gluteal muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yukari; Ikeuchi, Takashi; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Matsugi, Kiyotomo; Minami, Shunsuke; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Zaima, Masazumi; Ishitoya, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Chikako; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Junichiro; Kitoh, Koichi; Oshiro, Osamu; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Utani, Atsushi; Hattori, Noboru

    2016-05-01

    Preceding this study, we observed two cases of concurrent postoperative gluteal skin and muscle damage with extremely high serum creatine kinase (CK) levels, both of which were unrelated to pressure-induced tissue injury. However, postoperative gluteal skin damage accompanied by gluteal muscle damage has not been previously reported and the association between gluteal skin damage, gluteal muscle damage and pressure-induced tissue injury has not previously been investigated. Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the postoperative incidence of gluteal skin damage associated with gluteal muscle damage and assess associations with postoperative serum CK levels and pressure-induced tissue injury. We prospectively evaluated postoperative incidence of gluteal skin damage and measured serum CK levels in 929 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal, urological or gynecological surgery at our hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis was performed in 67 patients who consented. As a result, two of 929 patients developed postoperative gluteal skin damage accompanied by gluteal muscle damage. Gluteal muscle damage without gluteal skin damage was observed in 23 of the 67 patients who underwent MRI, and volumes of damaged gluteal muscle and postoperative serum CK levels were positively correlated. Both gluteal skin and muscle damage were distinguishable from pressure-induced tissue injury. Based on the results of this study, we could confirm the occurrence of postoperative gluteal skin damage, distinct from pressure sores, accompanied by gluteal muscle damage. We also revealed latent development of postoperative gluteal muscle damage, distinguishable from compression-induced tissue injury, without accompanying gluteal skin damage.

  7. Development of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis after Leishmania Skin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Paulo R.; Carvalho, Augusto M.; Machado, Gustavo U.; Dantas, Marina L.; Arruda, Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-year-old female with a previous history of a cutaneous ulcer suspicious of leishmaniasis 20 years ago presented with a new complaint of a depressed papular lesion 8 × 7 mm in the right lower extremity. The lesion was of 10-day duration. Because early cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) lesions may have a non-ulcerated appearance, a Leishmania skin test (LST) was performed on the forearm with a strong positive result (38 × 32 mm). After 8 days, the lesion in the leg, which was diagnosed as folliculitis, completely healed. However, a typical CL ulcer (26 × 24 mm) developed at the LST site. Histopathology of the new lesion did not identifiy parasites, but the findings were consistent with a diagnosis of CL. Further analysis identified amastigotes by immunohistochemical stain. Mononuclear cells harvested from the patient were stimulated with Leishmania antigen and showed high levels of production of both tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ): 2,943 pg/mL and 2,313 pg/mL, respectively. After 40 days of treatment with antimony and pentoxifylline, the ulcer resolved. The development of CL at the LST site suggests a strong Th1 immune response, and it is an in vivo documentation of the role of the host immune response in the pathology of CL. It teaches us that LST should be cautiously, if at all, used in patients with self-healing CL ulcers. PMID:22162702

  8. Development of cutaneous leishmaniasis after leishmania skin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Paulo R; Carvalho, Augusto M; Machado, Gustavo U; Dantas, Marina L; Arruda, Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-year-old female with a previous history of a cutaneous ulcer suspicious of leishmaniasis 20 years ago presented with a new complaint of a depressed papular lesion 8 × 7 mm in the right lower extremity. The lesion was of 10-day duration. Because early cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) lesions may have a non-ulcerated appearance, a Leishmania skin test (LST) was performed on the forearm with a strong positive result (38 × 32 mm). After 8 days, the lesion in the leg, which was diagnosed as folliculitis, completely healed. However, a typical CL ulcer (26 × 24 mm) developed at the LST site. Histopathology of the new lesion did not identifiy parasites, but the findings were consistent with a diagnosis of CL. Further analysis identified amastigotes by immunohistochemical stain. Mononuclear cells harvested from the patient were stimulated with Leishmania antigen and showed high levels of production of both tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ): 2,943 pg/mL and 2,313 pg/mL, respectively. After 40 days of treatment with antimony and pentoxifylline, the ulcer resolved. The development of CL at the LST site suggests a strong Th1 immune response, and it is an in vivo documentation of the role of the host immune response in the pathology of CL. It teaches us that LST should be cautiously, if at all, used in patients with self-healing CL ulcers.

  9. Expression of aquaporin isoforms during human and mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felszeghy, S; Módis, L; Németh, P; Nagy, G; Zelles, T; Agre, P; Laurikkala, J; Fejerskov, O; Thesleff, I; Nielsen, S

    2004-04-01

    Previously, we described the development of hyaluronan (HA) deposition in human tooth germ tissues that are consistent with water transport in different stages of tooth development. The aquaporins (AQP) constitute a family of membrane water channels that are expressed in many organs. However, there are no data available about the expression pattern of aquaporin water channels in dental structures. In the present study we have characterised the expression of six different aquaporin isoforms (AQP1-5, AQP-9) in developing human and mouse tooth germs by immunohistochemistry using isoform specific antibodies. In the "bell stage" AQP1 was expressed in endothelial cells of small vessels whereas no other structures of the tooth primordial were labeled. AQP2, AQP3 and AQP9 immunoreactivity was not observed in tooth germs, whereas strong AQP4 and AQP5 expression was observed in dental lamina, inner enamel epithelium, stratum intermedium, stellate reticulum and the outer enamel epithelium. Oral epithelium also exhibited AQP4 and AQP5 immunolabeling. During development of the matrices of the dental hard tissues AQP4 and AQP5 immunostaining was observed in the odontoblasts and their processes, as well as in the secretory ameloblast and their apical processes. Immunolabeling controls were negative. In conclusion, AQP4 and AQP5 are expressed in tooth germ tissues in early development in cells that previously have been shown to express HA and/or CD44, indicating that AQP water channels may play a role for ECM hydration during tooth development.

  10. Chemical Characterization and Toxicologic Evaluation of Airborne Mixtures. Tumorigenicity Studies of Diesel Fuel-2, Red Smoke Dye and Violet Smoke Dyes in the SENCAR Mouse Skin Tumorigenesis Bioassay System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Humans , Animals and Mouse Skin . . . . . .0 10 Table 3 Diesel Fuel-2 Protocols ......... . . . .. 13 Table 4 Colored Smoke Dye Protocols...34Aflatoxin and trichothecene toxins: skin tumor induction and synergistic acute toxicity in white mice. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 52: 113-116. Nesnow, S

  11. Development and coupling analysis of active skin antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinzhu; Huang, Jin; He, Qingqang; Tang, Baofu; Song, Liwei

    2017-02-01

    An active skin antenna is a multifunctional composite structure that can provide load-bearing structure and steerable beam pointing functions, and is usually installed in the structural surface of aircraft, warships, and armored vehicles. This paper presents an innovative design of the active skin antenna, which consists of a package layer, control and signal processing layer, and RF (radio frequency) layer. The RF layer is fabricated by low temperature co-fired ceramics, with 64 microstrip antenna elements, tile transmitting and receiving modules, microchannel heat sinks, and feeding networks integrated into a functional block 2.8 mm thick. In this paper, a full-sized prototype of an active skin antenna was designed, fabricated, and tested. Moreover, a coupling analysis method was presented to evaluate the mechanical and electromagnetic performance of the active skin antenna subjected to aerodynamic loads. A deformed experimental system was built to validate the effectiveness of the coupling analysis method, which was also implemented to evaluate the performance of the active skin antenna when subjected to aerodynamic pressure. The fabricated specimen demonstrated structural configuration feasibility, and superior environmental load resistance.

  12. Identification of an mtDNA mutation hot spot in UV-induced mouse skin tumors producing altered cellular biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandova, Jana; Eshaghian, Alex; Shi, Mingjian; Li, Meiling; King, Lloyd E; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role of mtDNA alterations in the development of cancer, as mtDNA point mutations are found at high frequency in a variety of human tumors. To determine the biological effects of mtDNA mutations in UV-induced skin tumors, hairless mice were irradiated to produce tumors, and the tumor mtDNAs were screened for single-nucleotide changes using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE), followed by direct sequencing. A mutation hot spot (9821insA) in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA arginine (mt-Tr) locus (tRNA(Arg)) was discovered in approximately one-third of premalignant and malignant skin tumors. To determine the functional relevance of this particular mutation in vitro, cybrid cell lines containing different mt-Tr (tRNA(Arg)) alleles were generated. The resulting cybrid cell lines contained the same nuclear genotype and differed only in their mtDNAs. The biochemical analysis of the cybrids revealed that the mutant haplotype is associated with diminished levels of complex I protein (CI), resulting in lower levels of baseline oxygen consumption and lower cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. We hypothesize that this specific mtDNA mutation alters cellular biochemistry, supporting the development of keratinocyte neoplasia.

  13. Development of A Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; questions of the cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology.A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1-5% (it is not a null mutation. Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer.Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention.

  14. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in skin cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Taichiro; Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Uemura, Munehiro; Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Norio; Asato, Ryo; Hattori, Yukari; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Minato, Nagahiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Most skin cancers develop as the result of UV light-induced DNA damage; however, a substantial number of cases appear to occur independently of UV damage. A causal link between UV-independent skin cancers and chronic inflammation has been suspected, although the precise mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Here, we have proposed that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, encoded by AICDA) links chronic inflammation and skin cancer. We demonstrated that Tg mice expressing AID in the skin spontaneously developed skin squamous cell carcinoma with Hras and Trp53 mutations. Furthermore, genetic deletion of Aicda reduced tumor incidence in a murine model of chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. AID was expressed in human primary keratinocytes in an inflammatory stimulus-dependent manner and was detectable in human skin cancers. Together, the results of this study indicate that inflammation-induced AID expression promotes skin cancer development independently of UV damage and suggest AID as a potential target for skin cancer therapeutics.

  15. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for monitoring CDK4/cyclin D kinase activity in melanoma cell extracts, mouse xenografts and skin biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; González-Vera, Juan A; Henri, Pauline; Meunier, Laurent; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Morris, May C

    2016-11-15

    Melanoma constitutes the most aggressive form of skin cancer, which further metastasizes into a deadly form of cancer. The p16(INK4a)-Cyclin D-CDK4/6-pRb pathway is dysregulated in 90% of melanomas. CDK4/Cyclin D kinase hyperactivation, associated with mutation of CDK4, amplification of Cyclin D or loss of p16(INK4a) leads to increased risk of developing melanoma. This kinase therefore constitutes a key biomarker in melanoma and an emerging pharmacological target, however there are no tools enabling direct detection or quantification of its activity. Here we report on the design and application of a fluorescent peptide biosensor to quantify CDK4 activity in melanoma cell extracts, skin biopsies and melanoma xenografts. This biosensor provides sensitive means of comparing CDK4 activity between different melanoma cell lines and further responds to CDK4 downregulation by siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors. By affording means of monitoring CDK4 hyperactivity consequent to cancer-associated molecular alterations in upstream signaling pathways that converge upon this kinase, this biosensor offers an alternative to immunological identification of melanoma-specific biomarkers, thereby constituting an attractive tool for diagnostic purposes, providing complementary functional information to histological analysis, of particular utility for detection of melanoma onset in precancerous lesions. This is indeed the first fluorescent peptide biosensor which has been successfully implemented to monitor kinase activity in skin samples and melanoma tumour xenografts. Moreover by enabling to monitor response to CDK4 inhibitors, this biosensor constitutes an attractive companion assay to identify compounds of therapeutic relevance for melanoma.

  16. Interaction of cambial dermal cells (fibroblasts) and epidermis in morphofunctional area of mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavisheva, T M; Shcherbakov, S D; Golubeva, I S; Sharafutdinov, G Z

    2007-11-01

    Epidermis and dermis form an integral morphofunctional area, where cambial cells proliferate and their first-division daughter cells differentiate. An important feature of this area is different rates of the development of daughter cells (fibroblasts) in the dermis and epidermis, which is greater in the epidermis. This asymmetry results in the prevalence of first epidermal daughter cells and, hence, their effect on cambial cells, and then of stromal daughter cells and their effects on cambial cells. The regulator factors of epidermal daughter cells promote unblocking of the major polarity axis of cambial (mother) cell, while stromal cells (fibroblasts) induce their polarization along the major axis and the onset of mitosis. In the dermis and epidermis, division of cambial cells is asymmetric; a prominent role in the formation of mother and daughter cells is given to the basal membrane as an elastic support. Mother and daughter cells form ring-like structures generating electric field that can promote differentiation of the daughter cells.

  17. Comparative Study of Transcriptome Profiles of Mouse Livers and Skins Infected by Fork-Tailed or Non-Fork-Tailed Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum is a worldwide spread pathogen which penetrates host skin and then induces several diseases in infected host, such as fibrosis, formation of granulomas, hepatocirrhosis, and hepatomegaly. In present study, for the first time, transcriptomic profiles of mouse livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were analyzed by using RNA-seq. The present findings demonstrated that transcriptomic landscapes of livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were different. S. japonicum has great influence on hepatic metabolic processes. Fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria upregulated hepatic metabolic processes, while non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria downregulated hepatic metabolic processes. For the metabolism process or the metabolism enzyme expressional change, the pharmacokinetics of host could be changed during S. japonicum infection, regardless the biotypes of S. japonicum cercariae. The changes of infected skins focused on upregulation of immune response. During the S. japonicum skin infection period, fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection induced stronger immune response comparing with that immune response triggered by non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria. The transcription factor enrichment analysis showed that Irf7, Stat1 and Stat2 could play important roles in gene regulation during fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection.

  18. Distribution of syndecan-1 protein in developing mouse teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eFilatova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndecan-1 is a cell surface proteoglycan involved in the regulation of various biological processes such as proliferation, migration, condensation and differentiation of cells, intercellular communication and morphogenesis. The extracellular domain of syndecan-1 can bind to extracellular matrix components and signalling molecules, while its intracellular domain interacts with cytoskeletal proteins, thus allowing the transfer of information about extracellular environment changes into the cell that consequently affect cellular behaviour. Although previous studies have shown syndecan-1 expression during precise stages of tooth development, there is no equivalent study regrouping the expression patterns of syndecan-1 during all stages of odontogenesis. Here we examined the distribution of syndecan-1 protein in embryonic and postnatal developing mouse molars and incisors. Syndecan-1 distribution in mesenchymal tissues such as dental papilla and dental follicle was correlated with proliferating events and its expression was often linked to stem cell niche territories. Syndecan-1 was also expressed in mesenchymal cells that will differentiate into the dentin producing odontoblasts, but not in differentiated functional odontoblasts. In the epithelium, syndecan-1 was detected in all cell layers, by the exception of differentiated ameloblasts that form the enamel. Furthermore, syndecan-1 was expressed in osteoblast precursors and osteoclasts of the alveolar bone that surrounds the developing tooth germs. Taken together these results show the dynamic nature of syndecan-1 expression during odontogenesis and suggest its implication in various processes of tooth development and homeostasis.

  19. Expression patterns of protein kinase D 3 during mouse development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Sylke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PKD family of serine/threonine kinases comprises a single member in Drosophila (dPKD, two isoforms in C. elegans (DKF-1 and 2 and three members, PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3 in mammals. PKD1 and PKD2 have been the focus of most studies up to date, which implicate these enzymes in very diverse cellular functions, including Golgi organization and plasma membrane directed transport, immune responses, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Concerning PKD3, a role in the formation of vesicular transport carriers at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and in basal glucose transport has been inferred from in vitro studies. So far, however, the physiological functions of the kinase during development remain unknown. Results We have examined the expression pattern of PKD3 during the development of mouse embryos by immunohistochemistry. Using a PKD3 specific antibody we demonstrate that the kinase is differentially expressed during organogenesis. In the developing heart a strong PKD3 expression is constantly detected from E10 to E16.5. From E12.5 on PKD3 is increasingly expressed in neuronal as well as in the supporting connective tissue and in skeletal muscles. Conclusion The data presented support an important role for PKD3 during development of these tissues.

  20. Asymptomatic skin sensitization to birch predicts later development of birch pollen allergy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Poulsen, Lars K; Malling, Hans-Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The skin prick test is the allergologic test of choice, but asymptomatic skin sensitization to aeroallergens is common. However, no data in the literature describe the clinical phenotype of asymptomatic sensitized adults. OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this investigation were to provide...... provocation test result was 100% negatively predictive. Nasal provocation testing possessed no additional prognostic information. No changes in clinical phenotype were seen in nonatopic or birch-allergic subjects. CONCLUSION: Asymptomatic skin sensitization is a risk factor for later allergy development....... At risk is any subject with target organ sensitivity, an elevated specific IgE level, and/or a skin prick test weal diameter of >4 mm....

  1. Development and Experimental Study of Phantoms for Mapping Skin Chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silapetere, A.; Spigulis, J.; Saknite, I.

    2014-06-01

    Skin chromophore phantoms are widely used for better understanding of the light interaction with tissue and for calibration of skin diagnostic imaging techniques. In this work, different phantoms were examined and compared in order to find biologically equivalent substances that are the most promising for this purpose. For mimicking the skin medium and layered structure, a fibrin matrix with epidermal and dermal cell inclusion was used. Synthesized bilirubin, red blood cells and nigrosin were taken as absorbers. For spectral analysis of the developed phantoms a computer-aided multispectral imaging system Nuance 2.4 (Cambridge Research & Instrumentation, Inc., USA) was used. In this study, skin phantoms were created using such substances as bilirubin, melanin, haemoglobin and nigrosin Mūsdienās multispektrālās attēlošanas iekārtas izmanto ādas parametru un fizioloģisko procesu aprakstīšanai gan pētniecības, gan diagnostikas nolūkiem. Iekārtu darbības uzlabošanai ir nepieciešams labāk saprast gaismas mijiedarbību ar audiem, kā arī veikt šo iekārtu kalibrēšanu ar ādas maketu. Redzamā un tuvā infrasarkanā optiskā diapazona spektroskopijā ir svarīgi ādas maketi, kas simulē audu slāņaino struktūru un ķīmiskās īpašības, kā arī maketi, kas ir bioloģiski līdzvērtīgi. Šajā pētījumā tika izveidots ādas makets no bioloģiskām un ķīmiski sintezētām struktūrām. Ādas maketa izveidei tika izmantota fibrīna matrica ar dermālo un epidermālo šūnu piejaukumu, lai imitētu ādas slāņaino struktūru. Fibrīna matrica tiek veidota no 0,47 ml asins plazmas, 0,4 ml fizioloģiskā šķīduma, 0,8 μl treneksāmskābes un 89,4 μl kalcija glukanāta. Izveidoto matricu ievieto šūnu inkubatorā, lai tā polimerizētos. Nākošais slānis tiek veidots ar dermālo šūnu piejaukumu (180-270 šūnas), un pēdējais fibrīna matriksa slānis tiek veidots ar epidermālo šūnu piejaukumu (270 šūnas) un šūnu aug

  2. Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of cartilage development in mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sicong; Xue, Wenqian; Sun, Qiqi; Li, Xuesong; Huang, Jiandong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2017-02-01

    Kinesin-1 is a kind of motor protein responsible for intracellular transportation and has been studied in a variety of tissues. However, its roles in cartilage development are not clear. In this study, a kinesin-1 heavy chain (Kif5b) knockout mouse model is used to study the functions of kinesin-1 in the cartilage development. We developed a multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) to investigate the morphological and biomedical characteristics of fresh tibial cartilage from normal and mutant mice at different developmental stages. The combined forward and backward SHG imaging resolved the fine structure of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. Meanwhile, the chondrocyte morphology in different zones of cartilage was visualized by label-free SRS and TPEF images. The results show that the fibrillar collagen in the superficial zone of cartilage in postnatal day 10 and 15 (P10 and P15) knockout mice was significantly less than that of control mice. Moreover, we observed distorted morphology and disorganization of columnar arrangement of chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage of mutant mice. This study reveals the significant roles of kinesin-1 in collagen formation and chondrocyte morphogenesis.

  3. Assessment of edema volume in skin upon injury in a mouse ear model with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wan

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurement of edema volume is essential for the investigation of tissue response and recovery following a traumatic injury. The measurements must be noninvasive and repetitive over time so as to monitor tissue response throughout the healing process. Such techniques are particularly necessary for the evaluation of therapeutics that are currently in development to suppress or prevent edema formation. In this study, we propose to use optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique to image and quantify edema in a mouse ear model where the injury is induced by a superficial-thickness burn. Extraction of edema volume is achieved by an attenuation compensation algorithm performed on the three-dimensional OCT images, followed by two segmentation procedures. In addition to edema volume, the segmentation method also enables accurate thickness mapping of edematous tissue, which is an important characteristic of the external symptoms of edema. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method for noninvasively measuring absolute edema volume. PMID:27282161

  4. Nrl-Cre transgenic mouse mediates loxP recombination in developing rod photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightman, Diana S; Razafsky, David; Potter, Chloe; Hodzic, Didier; Chen, Shiming

    2016-03-01

    The developing mouse retina is a tractable model for studying neurogenesis and differentiation. Although transgenic Cre mouse lines exist to mediate conditional genetic manipulations in developing mouse retinas, none of them act specifically in early developing rods. For conditional genetic manipulations of developing retinas, a Nrl-Cre mouse line in which the Nrl promoter drives expression of Cre in rod precursors was created. The results showed that Nrl-Cre expression was specific to the retina where it drives rod-specific recombination with a temporal pattern similar to endogenous Nrl expression during retinal development. This Nrl-Cre transgene does not negatively impact retinal structure and function. Taken together, the data suggested that the Nrl-Cre mouse line was a valuable tool to drive Cre-mediated recombination specifically in developing rods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Molecular Network Associated with MITF in Skin Melanoma Development and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yajima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various environmental and genetic factors affect the development and progression of skin cancers including melanoma. Melanoma development is initially triggered by environmental factors including ultraviolet (UV light, and then genetic/epigenetic alterations occur in skin melanocytes. These first triggers alter the conditions of numerous genes and proteins, and they induce and/or reduce gene expression and activate and/or repress protein stability and activity, resulting in melanoma progression. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF is a master regulator gene of melanocyte development and differentiation and is also associated with melanoma development and progression. To find better approaches to molecular-based therapies for patients, understanding MITF function in skin melanoma development and progression is important. Here, we review the molecular networks associated with MITF in skin melanoma development and progression.

  6. An MRI-based atlas and database of the developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Nelson; Mori, Susumu; Yamamoto, Akira; Jiang, Hangyi; Ye, Xin; Xu, Xin; Richards, Linda J; Nathans, Jeremy; Miller, Michael I; Toga, Arthur W; Sidman, Richard L; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2011-01-01

    The advent of mammalian gene engineering and genetically modified mouse models has led to renewed interest in developing resources for referencing and quantitative analysis of mouse brain anatomy. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative characterization of anatomical phenotypes in the developing mouse brain. As an anatomical reference for neuroscience research using mouse models, this paper presents DTI based atlases of ex vivo C57BL/6 mouse brains at several developmental stages. The atlas complements existing histology and MRI-based atlases by providing users access to three-dimensional, high-resolution images of the developing mouse brain, with distinct tissue contrasts and segmentations of major gray matter and white matter structures. The usefulness of the atlas and database was demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the development of major gray matter and white matter structures. Population average images of the mouse brain at several postnatal stages were created using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping and their anatomical variations were quantitatively characterized. The atlas and database enhance our ability to examine the neuroanatomy in normal or genetically engineered mouse strains and mouse models of neurological diseases.

  7. An MRI-based Atlas and Database of the Developing Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Nelson; Mori, Susumu; Yamamoto, Akira; Jiang, Hangyi; Ye, Xin; Xu, Xin; Richards, Linda J.; Nathans, Jeremy; Miller, Michael I.; W.Toga, Arthur; Sidman, Richard L.; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2010-01-01

    The advent of mammalian gene engineering and genetically modified mouse models has led to renewed interest in developing resources for referencing and quantitative analysis of mouse brain anatomy. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative characterization of anatomical phenotypes in the developing mouse brain. As an anatomical reference for neuroscience research using mouse models, this paper presents DTI based atlases of ex vivo C57BL/6 mouse brains at several developmental stages. The atlas complements existing histology and MRI-based atlases by providing users access to three-dimensional, high-resolution images of the developing mouse brain, with distinct tissue contrasts and segmentations of major gray matter and white matter structures. The usefulness of the atlas and database was demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the development of major gray matter and white matter structures. Population average images of the mouse brain at several postnatal stages were created using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping and their anatomical variations were quantitatively characterized. The atlas and database enhance our ability to examine the neuroanatomy in normal or genetically engineered mouse strains and mouse models of neurological diseases. PMID:20656042

  8. Advanced Development of Leishmania Topical Skin Test Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    followed to assess the effectiveness of the cleaning and sanitization procedures. The filling, capping and assembly of final containers occurred in Class...disappeared after several days in both subjects. Topical steroid cream was administered to one subject to promote resolution. 2.5.2 Phase II Dose...al. (3) studied the effects of repeat skin tests in healthy volunteers residing in a leishmaniasis non-endemic area. The Leishmnaia antigen used in

  9. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril maleate) accelerates recovery of mouse skin from UVB-induced wrinkles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura-Hachiya, Yuko; Arai, Koji Y.; Ozeki, Rieko; Kikuta, Ayako; Nishiyama, Toshio, E-mail: toshio_n@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) increases in UVB-irradiated skin. •Administration of an ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced skin wrinkle. •ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced epidermal hypertrophy. •ACE inhibitor improved transepidermal water loss in the UVB-irradiated skin. -- Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II signaling regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling, as well as blood pressure, while in skin, angiotensin II signaling is involved in wound healing, inflammation, and pathological scar formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II is also involved in photoaging of skin. In this study, we examined the effect of enalapril maleate, an ACE inhibitor, on recovery of wrinkled skin of hairless mice exposed to long-term UVB irradiation. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that expression of ACE, angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in the skin was increased after UVB irradiation (3 times/week at increasing intensities for 8 weeks). Administration of enalapril maleate (5 times/week for 6 weeks, starting 1 week after 10-week irradiation) accelerated recovery from UVB-induced wrinkles, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal barrier dysfunction, as compared with the vehicle control. Our results indicate that ACE and angiotensin II activity are involved in skin photoaging, and suggest that ACE inhibitor such as enalapril maleate may have potential for improvement of photoaged skin.

  10. Combination chemoprevention with diclofenac, calcipotriol and difluoromethylornithine inhibits development of non-melanoma skin cancer in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: With increasing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), focus on chemoprevention of this disease is growing. The aim of this study was to evaluate topical combination therapies as chemoprevention of UV radiation-induced tumors in a mouse model.......Background/Aim: With increasing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), focus on chemoprevention of this disease is growing. The aim of this study was to evaluate topical combination therapies as chemoprevention of UV radiation-induced tumors in a mouse model....

  11. Antibacterial activity and therapeutic efficacy of Fl-PRPRPL-5, a cationic amphiphilic polyproline helix, in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangamani S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shankar Thangamani,1 Manish Nepal,2 Jean Chmielewski,2 Mohamed N Seleem11Department of Comparative Pathobiology, Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN, USA; 2Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: The antibacterial activities and therapeutic efficacy of the cationic, unnatural proline-rich peptide Fl-PRPRPL-5 were evaluated against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse model of skin infection. Fl-PRPRPL-5 showed potent activity against all clinical isolates of S. aureus tested, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA, respectively. Fl-PRPRPL-5 was also superior in clearing established in vitro biofilms of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, compared with the established antimicrobials mupirocin and vancomycin. Additionally, topical treatment of an MRSA-infected wound with Fl-PRPRPL-5 enhanced wound closure and significantly reduced bacterial load. Finally, 0.5% Fl-PRPRPL-5 significantly reduced the levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β in wounds induced by MRSA skin infection. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest the potential application of Fl-PRPRPL-5 in the treatment of staphylococcal skin infections.Keywords: antimicrobial peptides, Staphylococcus aureus, biofilms, anti-inflammatory, skin infection

  12. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid from Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata Mitigates 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of Tumor Promotion Cascade in Mouse Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakilur Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is a phenolic antioxidant found in the leaves and twigs of the evergreen desert shrub, Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC Coville (creosote bush. It has a long history of traditional medicinal use by the Native Americans and Mexicans. The modulatory effects of topically applied NDGA was studied on acute inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in mouse skin induced by stage I tumor promoting agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA. Double TPA treatment adversely altered many of the marker responses of stage I skin tumor promotion cascade. Pretreatment of NDGA in TPA-treated mice mitigated cutaneous lipid peroxidation and inhibited production of hydrogen peroxide. NDGA treatment also restored reduced glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Elevated activities of myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase and skin edema formation in TPA-treated mice were also lowered by NDGA indicating a restrained inflammatory response. Furthermore, results of histological study demonstrated inhibitory effect of NDGA on cellular inflammatory responses. This study provides a direct evidence of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of NDGA against TPA-induced cutaneous inflammation and oxidative stress corroborating its chemopreventive potential against skin cancer.

  13. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid from Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Mitigates 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of Tumor Promotion Cascade in Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shakilur; Ansari, Rizwan Ahmed; Rehman, Hasibur; Parvez, Suhel; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2011-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a phenolic antioxidant found in the leaves and twigs of the evergreen desert shrub, Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC) Coville (creosote bush). It has a long history of traditional medicinal use by the Native Americans and Mexicans. The modulatory effects of topically applied NDGA was studied on acute inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in mouse skin induced by stage I tumor promoting agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Double TPA treatment adversely altered many of the marker responses of stage I skin tumor promotion cascade. Pretreatment of NDGA in TPA-treated mice mitigated cutaneous lipid peroxidation and inhibited production of hydrogen peroxide. NDGA treatment also restored reduced glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Elevated activities of myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase and skin edema formation in TPA-treated mice were also lowered by NDGA indicating a restrained inflammatory response. Furthermore, results of histological study demonstrated inhibitory effect of NDGA on cellular inflammatory responses. This study provides a direct evidence of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of NDGA against TPA-induced cutaneous inflammation and oxidative stress corroborating its chemopreventive potential against skin cancer.

  14. Regulators of Collagen Fibrillogenesis during Molar Development in the Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Zvackova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of mammalian teeth and surrounding tissues includes time–space changes in the extracellular matrix composition and organization. This requires complex control mechanisms to regulate its synthesis and remodeling. Fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACITs and a group of small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs are involved in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. Recently, collagen type XII and collagen type XIV, members of the FACITs family, were found in the peridental mesenchyme contributing to alveolar bone formation. This study was designed to follow temporospatial expression of collagen types XIIa and XIVa in mouse first molar and adjacent tissues from embryonic day 13, when the alveolar bone becomes morphologically apparent around the molar tooth bud, until postnatal day 22, as the posteruption stage. The patterns of decorin, biglycan, and fibromodulin, all members of the SLRPs family and interacting with collagens XIIa and XIVa, were investigated simultaneously. The situation in the tooth was related to what happens in the alveolar bone, and both were compared to the periodontal ligament. The investigation provided a complex localization of the five antigens in soft tissues, the dental pulp, and periodontal ligaments; in the mineralized tissues, predentin/dentin and alveolar bone; and junction between soft and hard tissues. The results illustrated developmentally regulated and tissue-specific changes in the balance of the two FACITs and three SLRPs.

  15. The effects of naris occlusion on mouse nasal turbinate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, David M; Craven, Brent A; Seeger, Johannes; Weiler, Elke

    2014-06-15

    Unilateral naris occlusion, a standard method for causing odor deprivation, also alters airflow on both sides of the nasal cavity. We reasoned that manipulating airflow by occlusion could affect nasal turbinate development given the ubiquitous role of environmental stimuli in ontogenesis. To test this hypothesis, newborn mice received unilateral occlusion or sham surgery and were allowed to reach adulthood. Morphological measurements were then made of paraffin sections of the whole nasal cavity. Occlusion significantly affected the size, shape and position of turbinates. In particular, the nasoturbinate, the focus of our quantitative analysis, had a more delicate appearance on the occluded side relative to the open side. Occlusion also caused an increase in the width of the dorsal meatus within the non-occluded and occluded nasal fossae, compared with controls, and the position of most turbinates was altered. These results suggest that a mechanical stimulus from respiratory airflow is necessary for the normal morphological development of turbinates. To explore this idea, we estimated the mechanical forces on turbinates caused by airflow during normal respiration that would be absent as a result of occlusion. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were used to construct a three-dimensional model of the mouse nasal cavity that provided the input for a computational fluid dynamics simulation of nasal airflow. The simulation revealed maximum shear stress values for the walls of turbinates in the 1 Pa range, a magnitude that causes remodeling in other biological tissues. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that nasal turbinates develop partly under the control of respiratory mechanical forces.

  16. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways.

  17. Development of radiolabelled compound using reactor produced RI - Development of Ho-166 skin patch for treatment of skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Bae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea); Ryu, Jei Man [Dong Wha Pharm. Ind. Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    A radioactive patch which can be treat the skin cancer by direct irradiation was prepared by blending Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, 5H{sub 2}O and polyurethane(PU) and then irradiating with neutron in the nuclear reactor. The blend formation of the film was fonfirmed by FT-IR. Degree of the distribution of holmium and solvent in remaining in the film was determined. Physical properties of the film by thermal analysis, mechanical measurement and surface analysis were characterized, respectively. To evaluate efficacy of the patch, it was applied to the tumor surface of the hairlessmous. Until 6 weeks of the patch treatment 7 mice with skin tumor were cured totally (7/13). And the other nuclear except for holmium was in patch was not detected. Furthermore, the patch was stable at room temperature, 40 deg C and 60 deg C. (author). 17 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Order the free Anyone Can ... rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? Although ...

  19. Development of hair coat and skin glands in fetal porcine integument.

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, W.; Görgen, S

    1986-01-01

    The prenatal development of the hair coat and skin glands was studied in skin samples of ten body regions of porcine fetuses (German Landrace) ranging between 40 and 114 days (birth) of gestation (15-1000 g body weight), using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. During the development of hair follicles, central and lateral primary hair follicles as well as secondary hair follicles can be distinguished. Initiation of primary hair follicles begins at 40-41 days of gestational age...

  20. Development of a dielectric equivalent gel for better impedance matching for human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Takahiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Furukawa, Shigeo; Tamura, Mitsuru; Yoshitome, Eiji; Obata, Takayuki; Shinkai, Hiroshi; Tanada, Shuji; Murata, Hajime; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    2003-04-01

    It would be useful to develop a tissue equivalent gel to improve the uniformity of the electromagnetic field in the human body, and for making a tissue equivalent dielectric human phantom. In this study, solid type, water based gelatin-honey gels were developed which have the electrical characteristics of skin tissue. It was demonstrated that a stable and homogeneous gel, with a relative dielectric constant epsilon ' chosen from desired ranges found in skin, can be made for 200-400 MHz.

  1. Development of a squamous cell carcinoma mouse model for immunotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominski, Devon D; Rafferty, Patricia; Brosnan, Kerry; Volk, Amy; Walker, Mindi; Capaldi, Dorie; Emmell, Eva; Johnson, Kjell; Weinstock, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An important component of safety assessment of new pharmaceuticals is evaluation of their potential to increase the risk of developing cancer in humans. The traditional 2-year rodent bioassay often is not feasible or scientifically applicable for evaluation of biotherapeutics. Additionally, it has poor predictive value for non-genotoxic immunosuppressive compounds. Thus, there is a need for alternative testing strategies. A novel 3-stage tumor model in syngeneic C3H/HeN mice was evaluated here to study the effects of immunosuppressive drugs on tumor promotion and progression in vivo. The model employed a skin squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC VII) due to the increased prevalence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in humans associated with immunosuppression after transplants. Local invasion, colonization and tumor progression were evaluated. The validation set of immunosuppressive drugs included: Cyclosporin (CSA), cyclophosphamide (CTX), azathioprine, etanercept, abatacept and prednisone. Local invasion was evaluated by histological assessment as well as fluorescence trafficking from Qdot(®)-labeled tumor cells from the site of inoculation to the draining lymph node. Colonization was evaluated by lung colony counts following intravenous inoculation. Tumor progression was assessed by morphometric analysis of lesion area, angiogenesis and growth fraction of established metastatic neoplasia. Immunosuppressive drugs in the validation set yielded mixed results, including decreased progression. The methods and results described herein using an in vivo syngeneic mouse tumor model can provide insight about the assessment of immunosuppressive drugs in carcinogenicity risk assessment.

  2. Development of a Skin Burn Predictive Model adapted to Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneck-Museux, N.; Scheer, E.; Perez, L.; Agay, D.; Autrique, L.

    2016-12-01

    Laser technology is increasingly used, and it is crucial for both safety and medical reasons that the impact of laser irradiation on human skin can be accurately predicted. This study is mainly focused on laser-skin interactions and potential lesions (burns). A mathematical model dedicated to heat transfers in skin exposed to infrared laser radiations has been developed. The model is validated by studying heat transfers in human skin and simultaneously performing experimentations an animal model (pig). For all experimental tests, pig's skin surface temperature is recorded. Three laser wavelengths have been tested: 808 nm, 1940 nm and 10 600 nm. The first is a diode laser producing radiation absorbed deep within the skin. The second wavelength has a more superficial effect. For the third wavelength, skin is an opaque material. The validity of the developed models is verified by comparison with experimental results (in vivo tests) and the results of previous studies reported in the literature. The comparison shows that the models accurately predict the burn degree caused by laser radiation over a wide range of conditions. The results show that the important parameter for burn prediction is the extinction coefficient. For the 1940 nm wavelength especially, significant differences between modeling results and literature have been observed, mainly due to this coefficient's value. This new model can be used as a predictive tool in order to estimate the amount of injury induced by several types (couple power-time) of laser aggressions on the arm, the face and on the palm of the hand.

  3. Development, validation and testing of a skin sampling method for assessment of metal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Behnaz; Midander, Klara; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli

    2017-07-01

    Nickel, cobalt and chromium are frequent skin sensitizers. Skin exposure results in eczema in sensitized individuals, the risk being related to the skin dose. To develop a self-sampling method for quantification of skin exposure to metals, to validate the method, and to assess its feasibility. Defined metal doses (0.01-5 µg) were applied to the fingers of 5 participants. Skin areas (2 cm(2) ) were sampled with 1% HNO3 , either as 0.1 ml on a swab, or as 0.5 ml on a wipe. Furthermore, 17 participants performed self-sampling by swab after 2 h of leisure activity. Samples were extracted in 1% HNO3 and analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The sampling efficiency by swab was 46%, as compared with 93% for acid wipe sampling, for all tested doses. Most metal from the skin dose was detected in the first swab (33-43%). Despite lower sampling efficiency by swab, skin doses of metals following 2 h of leisure activity without hand washing were quantified in all participants, and ranged from 0.0016 to 0.15 µg/cm(2) , from 0.00014 to -0.0020 µg/cm(2) and from 0.00048 to -0.027 µg/cm(2) for nickel, cobalt, and chromium, respectively. The results indicate a future potential of skin sampling by swab to detect and monitor metals on skin by self-sampling. This will contribute to better knowledge of metal skin exposure among dermatitis patients, workers, and the general population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... infections (ABSSSI), impetigo, and minor cutaneous abscesses. FDA's thinking in this area has evolved in... investigators in the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of ABSSSI, impetigo, and...

  5. Development of neural precursor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xuan; LI Hai-di; Li Shu-nong; XU Hai-wei; XU Ling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the serum-free culture conditions for differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells)into neural precursor cells (NPC) and compare the effects of human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) as the feeder layer of ES with that of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF)in vitro. Methods: Mouse ES cells were cultured in or not in feeder layer cells medium containing or not leukemia inhibitory factor to suppress their differentiation. Immunocytochemical method was used to identify NPC by detecting nestin antigen and alkaline phosphatase. Results: The ES cells cultured in HEF were positive to alkaline phosphatase. Serum-free medium allowed the differentiation of ES cells into NPC. Conclusion:HEF could replace MEF and keep the undifferentiated condition of ES cells with more benefits. NPC of high purity could be cultured from ES cells by serum-free culture method.

  6. Inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin ornithine decarboxylase and protein kinase C by polyphenolics from grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomser, J; Singletary, K; Meline, B

    2000-06-15

    Ornithine decarboxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines, which are believed to play an essential role in diverse biological processes including cell proliferation and differentiation. We have previously reported [J. Bomser, K. Singletary, M. Wallig, M. Smith, Inhibition of TPA-induced tumor promotion in CD-1 mouse epidermis by a polyphenolic fraction from grape seeds, Cancer Letters 135 (1999) 151-157] that pre-application of a grape polyphenolic fraction (GPF) to mouse skin epidermis inhibits 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity, as well as 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated, TPA-promoted mouse skin tumorigenesis. The present studies were designed to further characterize the effect of time and dose of application of GPF on TPA-induced ODC activity and protein expression, and on protein kinase C activity in mouse skin epidermis. In addition, the effect of GPF on ODC kinetics in vitro was examined. Application of 5, 10, and 20 mg of GPF 20 min prior to treatment with TPA resulted in a significant decrease in epidermal ODC activity of 54, 53, 90%, respectively, compared with controls. Yet, ODC protein levels (Western blot) in the 10 and 20 mg GPF groups were significantly increased by 1.8 and 1.9-fold, respectively, compared with controls. A similar response was observed with the ODC inhibitor 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), which served as a positive control. Application of grape polyphenolics (20 mg) at 60 and 30 min prior to treatment with TPA inhibited ODC activity by 62 and 68%, respectively, compared with controls (Pgrape polyphenolics (20 mg) at 60, 120 and 240 min after treatment with TPA resulted in no significant changes in ODC activity. A similar increase in epidermal ODC protein was observed in these GPF-treated animals, similar to that observed when GPF application preceded TPA. When applied to mouse skin prior to TPA, GPF was associated with a decrease in

  7. Revisiting mouse peritoneal macrophages: heterogeneity, development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dos Anjos Cassado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue macrophages play a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and also contribute to inflammatory and reparatory responses during pathogenic infection and tissue injury. The high heterogeneity of these macrophages is consistent with their adaptation to distinct tissue environments and specialization to develop niche-specific functions. Although peritoneal macrophages are one of best-studied macrophage populations, only recently it was demonstrated the co-existence of two subsets in mouse PerC, which exhibit distinct phenotypes, functions and origins. These macrophage subsets have been classified according to their morphology as LPMs (large peritoneal macrophages and SPMs (small peritoneal macrophages. LPMs, the most abundant subset under steady-state conditions, express high levels of F4/80 and low levels of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. LPMs appear to be originated from embriogenic precursors, and their maintenance in PerC is regulated by expression of specific transcription factors and tissue-derived signals. Conversely, SPMs, a minor subset in unstimulated PerC, have a F4/80lowMHC-IIhigh phenotype and are generated from bone-marrow-derived myeloid precursors. In response to infectious or inflammatory stimuli, the cellular composition of PerC is dramatically altered, where LPMs disappear and SPMs become the prevalent population together with their precursor, the inflammatory monocyte. SPMs appear to be the major source of inflammatory mediators in PerC during infection whereas LPMs contribute for gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT-independent and retinoic acid-dependent IgA production by peritoneal B-1 cells. In the last years, considerable efforts have been made to broaden our understanding of LPM and SPM origin, transcriptional regulation and functional profile. This review addresses these issues, focusing on the impact of tissue-derived signals and external stimulation in the complex

  8. Keratinocyte p38δ loss inhibits Ras-induced tumor formation, while systemic p38δ loss enhances skin inflammation in the early phase of chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Alexi; Koppel, Aaron C; Anders, Joanna; Cataisson, Christophe; Yuspa, Stuart H; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Efimova, Tatiana

    2016-05-01

    p38δ expression and/or activity are increased in human cutaneous malignancies, including invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and head and neck SCC, but the role of p38δ in cutaneous carcinogenesis has not been well-defined. We have reported that mice with germline loss of p38δ exhibited a reduced susceptibility to skin tumor development compared with wild-type mice in the two-stage 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) chemical skin carcinogenesis model. Here, we report that p38δ gene ablation inhibited the growth of tumors generated from v-ras(Ha) -transformed keratinocytes in skin orthografts to nude mice, indicating that keratinocyte-intrinsic p38δ is required for Ras-induced tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of v-ras(Ha) -transformed p38δ-null keratinocytes revealed transcriptional changes associated with cellular responses linked to tumor suppression, such as reduced proliferation and increased differentiation, cell adhesion, and cell communications. Notably, a short-term DMBA/TPA challenge, modeling the initial stages of chemical skin carcinogenesis treatment, elicited an enhanced inflammation in p38δ-null skin compared with skin of wild-type mice, as assessed by measuring the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and TNFα. Additionally, p38δ-null skin and p38δ-null keratinocytes exhibited increased p38α activation and signaling in response to acute inflammatory challenges, suggesting a role for p38α in stimulating the elevated inflammatory response in p38δ-null skin during the initial phases of the DMBA/TPA treatment compared with similarly treated p38δ(+/+) skin. Altogether, our results indicate that p38δ signaling regulates skin carcinogenesis not only by keratinocyte cell-autonomous mechanisms, but also by influencing the interaction between between the epithelial compartment of the developing skin tumor and its stromal microenvironment.

  9. The Milwaukee Inventory for the Dimensions of Adult Skin Picking (MIDAS): initial development and psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Michael R; Flessner, Christopher A; Conelea, Christine A; Woods, Douglas W

    2009-03-01

    This article describes the development and initial psychometric properties of the Milwaukee Inventory for the Dimensions of Adult Skin picking (MIDAS), a measure designed to assess "automatic" and "focused" skin picking. Data were collected from 92 participants who completed an anonymous internet-based survey. Results of an exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution. Factors 1 ("focused" picking scale) and 2 ("automatic" picking scale) each consisted of 6 items, and preliminary data demonstrated adequate internal consistency, good construct validity, and good discriminant validity. The MIDAS provides researchers with a reliable and valid assessment of "automatic" and "focused" skin picking.

  10. Resolution of overlapping skin auto-fluorescence for development of non-invasive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Zheng; Lin, Li-Wu; Chen, Chuen-Yau; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Skin auto-fluorescence spectra can provide useful biological information, but the obtained spectrum is overlapped and is difficult to distinguish each contributed component. We applied the genetic algorithm to decompose the overlapping spectrum. First, we simulate the overlapping spectral to confirm our feasible algorithm. The skin auto-fluorescence spectra were obtained from the normal human skin with 337 nm excitation light source. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotid (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are accurately decomposed and demonstrated. The developed algorithm can be widely applied to achieve qualitative and quantitative analysis for overlapping spectra.

  11. Development and Validation of a Tokamak Skin Effect Transformer model

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, J A; Coda, S; Felici, F; Garrido, I

    2012-01-01

    A control oriented, lumped parameter model for the tokamak transformer including the slow flux penetration in the plasma (skin effect transformer model) is presented. The model does not require detailed or explicit information about plasma profiles or geometry. Instead, this information is lumped in system variables, parameters and inputs. The model has an exact mathematical structure built from energy and flux conservation theorems, predicting the evolution and non linear interaction of the plasma current and internal inductance as functions of the primary coil currents, plasma resistance, non-inductive current drive and the loop voltage at a specific location inside the plasma (equilibrium loop voltage). Loop voltage profile in the plasma is substituted by a three-point discretization, and ordinary differential equations are used to predict the equilibrium loop voltage as function of the boundary and resistive loop voltages. This provides a model for equilibrium loop voltage evolution, which is reminiscent ...

  12. A micromechanical comparison of human and porcine skin before and after preservation by freezing for medical device development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranamukhaarachchi, S. A.; Lehnert, S.; Ranamukhaarachchi, S. L.; Sprenger, L.; Schneider, T.; Mansoor, I.; Rai, K.; Häfeli, U. O.; Stoeber, B.

    2016-08-01

    Collecting human skin samples for medical research, including developing microneedle-based medical devices, is challenging and time-consuming. Researchers rely on human skin substitutes and skin preservation techniques, such as freezing, to overcome the lack of skin availability. Porcine skin is considered the best substitute to human skin, but their mechanical resemblance has not been fully validated. We provide a direct mechanical comparison between human and porcine skin samples using a conventional mechano-analytical technique (microindentation) and a medical application (microneedle insertion), at 35% and 100% relative humidity. Human and porcine skin samples were tested immediately after surgical excision from subjects, and after one freeze-thaw cycle at ‑80 °C to assess the impact of freezing on their mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of fresh human and porcine skin (especially of the stratum corneum) were found to be different for bulk measurements using microindentation; and both types of skin were mechanically affected by freezing. Localized in-plane mechanical properties of skin during microneedle insertion appeared to be more comparable between human and porcine skin samples than their bulk out-of-plane mechanical properties. The results from this study serve as a reference for future mechanical tests conducted with frozen human skin and/or porcine skin as a human skin substitute.

  13. Periostin in Skin Tissue Skin-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, periostin—a matricellular protein—has been highlighted for its pivotal functions in the skin. Analysis of periostin null mice has revealed that periostin contributes to collagen fibrillogenesis, collagen cross-linking, and the formation of ECM meshwork via interactions with other ECM components. Periostin expression is enhanced by mechanical stress or skin injury; this is indicative of the physiologically protective functions of periostin, which promotes wound repair by acting on keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Along with its physiological functions, periostin plays pathogenic roles in skin fibrosis and chronic allergic inflammation. In systemic sclerosis (SSc patients, periostin levels reflect the severity of skin fibrosis. Periostin null mice have shown reduced skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced SSc mouse model, indicating a key role of periostin in fibrosis. Moreover, in atopic dermatitis (AD, attenuated AD phenotype has been observed in periostin null mice in a house dust mite extract-induced AD mouse model. Th2 cytokine-induced periostin acts on keratinocytes to produce inflammatory cytokines that further enhance the Th2 response, thereby sustaining and amplifying chronic allergic inflammation. Thus, periostin is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of AD and other inflammation-related disorders affecting the skin. Understanding the dynamic actions of periostin would be key to dissecting pathogenesis of skin-related diseases and to developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Development and validation of a tokamak skin effect transformer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, J. A.; Moret, J.-M.; Coda, S.; Felici, F.; Garrido, I.

    2012-02-01

    A lumped parameter, state space model for a tokamak transformer including the slow flux penetration in the plasma (skin effect transformer model) is presented. The model does not require detailed or explicit information about plasma profiles or geometry. Instead, this information is lumped in system variables, parameters and inputs. The model has an exact mathematical structure built from energy and flux conservation theorems, predicting the evolution and non-linear interaction of plasma current and internal inductance as functions of the primary coil currents, plasma resistance, non-inductive current drive and the loop voltage at a specific location inside the plasma (equilibrium loop voltage). Loop voltage profile in the plasma is substituted by a three-point discretization, and ordinary differential equations are used to predict the equilibrium loop voltage as a function of the boundary and resistive loop voltages. This provides a model for equilibrium loop voltage evolution, which is reminiscent of the skin effect. The order and parameters of this differential equation are determined empirically using system identification techniques. Fast plasma current modulation experiments with random binary signals have been conducted in the TCV tokamak to generate the required data for the analysis. Plasma current was modulated under ohmic conditions between 200 and 300 kA with 30 ms rise time, several times faster than its time constant L/R ≈ 200 ms. A second-order linear differential equation for equilibrium loop voltage is sufficient to describe the plasma current and internal inductance modulation with 70% and 38% fit parameters, respectively. The model explains the most salient features of the plasma current transients, such as the inverse correlation between plasma current ramp rates and internal inductance changes, without requiring detailed or explicit information about resistivity profiles. This proves that a lumped parameter modelling approach can be used to

  15. Combination chemoprevention with diclofenac, calcipotriol and difluoromethylornithine inhibits development of non-melanoma skin cancer in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: With increasing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), focus on chemoprevention of this disease is growing. The aim of this study was to evaluate topical combination therapies as chemoprevention of UV radiation-induced tumors in a mouse model....

  16. Hesperidin methyl chalcone inhibits oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Renata M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Steffen, Vinicius S; Caviglione, Carla V; Vignoli, Josiane A; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rubia

    2015-07-01

    Hesperidin methyl chalcone (HMC) is a safe flavonoid used to treat chronic venous diseases, but its effects and mechanisms on UVB irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative stress have never been described in vivo. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of systemic administration of HMC in skin oxidative stress and inflammation induced by UVB irradiation. To induce skin damage, hairless mice were exposed to an acute UVB irradiation dose of 4.14 J/cm(2), and the dorsal skin samples were collected to evaluate oxidative stress and inflammatory response. The intraperitoneal treatment with HMC at the dose of 300 mg/kg inhibited UVB irradiation-induced skin edema, neutrophil recruitment, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity. HMC also protected the skin from UVB irradiation-induced oxidative stress by maintaining ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS) scavenging ability and antioxidant levels (reduced glutathione and catalase). Corroborating, HMC inhibited UVB irradiation-induced superoxide anion generation and gp91phox (NADPH oxidase subunit) mRNA expression. Furthermore, the antioxidant effect of HMC resulted in lower production of inflammatory mediators, including lipid hydroperoxides and a wide range of cytokines. Taken together, these results unveil a novel applicability of HMC in the treatment of UVB irradiation-induced skin inflammation and oxidative stress.

  17. ZNF 197L is dispensable in mouse development | Tang | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... We used gene trap method to identify mice gene of unknown function and to establish their mouse line. Here, we found one ... The insertion of trap vector into the first intron of this gene resulted in mutation.

  18. Antibacterial activity and therapeutic efficacy of Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5, a cationic amphiphilic polyproline helix, in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangamani, Shankar; Nepal, Manish; Chmielewski, Jean; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activities and therapeutic efficacy of the cationic, unnatural proline-rich peptide Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 were evaluated against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse model of skin infection. Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 showed potent activity against all clinical isolates of S. aureus tested, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA, respectively). Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 was also superior in clearing established in vitro biofilms of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, compared with the established antimicrobials mupirocin and vancomycin. Additionally, topical treatment of an MRSA-infected wound with Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 enhanced wound closure and significantly reduced bacterial load. Finally, 0.5% Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 significantly reduced the levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in wounds induced by MRSA skin infection. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest the potential application of Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 in the treatment of staphylococcal skin infections.

  19. Antibacterial activity and therapeutic efficacy of Fl-PRPRPL-5, a cationic amphiphilic polyproline helix, in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangamani, Shankar; Nepal, Manish; Chmielewski, Jean; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activities and therapeutic efficacy of the cationic, unnatural proline-rich peptide Fl-PRPRPL-5 were evaluated against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse model of skin infection. Fl-PRPRPL-5 showed potent activity against all clinical isolates of S. aureus tested, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA, respectively). Fl-PRPRPL-5 was also superior in clearing established in vitro biofilms of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, compared with the established antimicrobials mupirocin and vancomycin. Additionally, topical treatment of an MRSA-infected wound with Fl-PRPRPL-5 enhanced wound closure and significantly reduced bacterial load. Finally, 0.5% Fl-PRPRPL-5 significantly reduced the levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in wounds induced by MRSA skin infection. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest the potential application of Fl-PRPRPL-5 in the treatment of staphylococcal skin infections. PMID:26543355

  20. In Vivo Spectrum of UVC-induced Mutation in Mouse Skin Epidermis May Reflect the Cytosine Deamination Propensity of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Although ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has a genotoxicity for inducing skin cancers, the skin may tolerate UVC component because the epidermal layer prevents this short wavelength range from passing through. Here, UVC genotoxicity for mouse skin was evaluated in terms of DNA damage formation and mutagenicity. UVC induced UVR photolesions and mutations remarkably in the epidermis but poorly in the dermis, confirming the barrier ability of the epidermis against shorter UVR wavelengths. Moreover, the epidermis itself responded to UVC mutagenicity with mutation induction suppression, which suppressed the mutant frequencies to a remarkably low, constant level regardless of UVC dose. The mutation spectrum observed in UVC-exposed epidermis showed a predominance of UV-signature mutation, which occurred frequently in 5'-TCG-3', 5'-TCA-3' and 5'-CCA-3' contexts. Especially, for the former two contexts, the mutations recurred at several sites with more remarkable recurrences at the 5'-TCG-3' sites. Comparison of the UVC mutation spectrum with those observed in longer UVR wavelength ranges led us to a mechanism that explains why the sequence context preference of UV-signature mutation changes according to the wavelength, which is based on the difference in the mCpG preference of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation among UVR ranges and the sequence context-dependent cytosine deamination propensity of CPD.

  1. Tumor initiating activities of various derivatives of benz(a)anthracene and 7, 12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T.J.; Gleason, G.L.; DiGiovanni, J.; Berry, D.L.; Juchau, M.R.; Harvey, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Current information indicates that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) exert their toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic activities after they have been metabolically activated by target cells to reactive epoxides. The results obtained from IN VIVO and IN VITRO binding, mutagenicity, metabolism, and carcinogenicity studies have led to the conclusion that BP-7, 8-diol is a proximate carcinogenic metabolite of BP, and the BP-diol-epoxide is an ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of BP. Recent results concerning the strong carcinogenicity of BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha..,10..cap alpha..-epoxide in newborn mice and in mouse skin strongly indicate that it is the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of BP. Since diol-epoxides may be responsible for the carcinogenicity of PAH other than BP, diols and diol-epoxides as well as other derivatives of PAH were tested for skin tumor-initiation in a two-stage system of tumorigenesis. In addition, since activation of methylated PAH may involve the side-chain methyl group, the skin tumor-initiating activity of various side-chain derivatives of methylated PA were determined. In this report, the skin tumor initiation of various derivatives of a nonmethylated PAH, BA as well as a methylated PAH, DMBA are compared. The data suggest that bay region diol-epoxides may be important in BA and DMBA carcinogenicity in mice which is supportive of the theory proposed by Jerina and co-workers which predicts that diol-epoxides in the bay region are the major determinants of PAH carcinogenicity.

  2. Anti-aging effect of adipose-derived stem cells in a mouse model of skin aging induced by D-galactose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchang Zhang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Glycation products accumulate during aging of slowly renewing tissue, including skin, and are suggested as an important mechanism underlying the skin aging process. Adipose-derived cells are widely used in the clinic to treat ischemic diseases and enhance wound healing. Interestingly, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs are also effective in anti-aging therapy, although the mechanism underlying their effects remains unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine the anti-aging effect of ASCs in a D-galactose-induced aging animal model and to clarify the underlying mechanism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six-week-old nude mice were subcutaneously injected with D-gal daily for 8 weeks. Two weeks after completion of treatment, mice were randomized to receive subcutaneous injections of 106 green fluorescent protein (GFP-expressing ASCs, aminoguanidine (AG or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. Control mice received no treatment. We examined tissue histology and determined the activity of senescence-associated molecular markers such as superoxide dismutase (SOD and malondialdehyde (MDA. RESULTS: Transplanted ASCs were detectable for 14 days and their GFP signal disappeared at day 28 after injection. ASCs inhibited advanced glycation end product (AGE levels in our animal model as well as increased the SOD level and decreased the MDA level, all of which act to reverse the aging phenotype in a similar way to AG, an inhibitor of AGE formation. Furthermore, ASCs released angiogenic factors in vivo such as vascular endothelial growth factor, suggesting a skin trophic effect. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that ASCs may contribute to the regeneration of skin during aging. In addition, the data shows that ASCs provide a functional benefit by glycation suppression, antioxidation, and trophic effects in a mouse model of aging.

  3. Tinkering with cusp patterning : Developmental Genetic Mechanisms in Mouse Molar Development

    OpenAIRE

    Harjunmaa, Enni

    2012-01-01

    Teeth display considerable morphological variability, which mammals have been able to use to their advantage. Consequently, mammal teeth provide a bountiful research subject that combines information on development, functional proper-ties, and thanks to their durable substance, evolutionary history. This thesis work is focused on the patterning of cusps, the peaks that form the shape of the tooth crown, in the mouse. Mouse tooth development has been studied extensively and offers a wide ...

  4. Vascular development and hemodynamic force in the mouse yolk sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica D Garcia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Vascular remodeling of the mouse embryonic yolk sac is a highly dynamic process dependent on multiple genetic signaling pathways as well as biomechanical factors regulating proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. During this early developmental window, the initial primitive vascular network of the yolk sac undergoes a dynamic remodeling process concurrent with the onset of blood flow, in which endothelial cells establish a branched, hierarchical structure of large vessels and smaller capillary beds. In this review, we will describe the molecular and biomechanical regulators which guide vascular remodeling in the mouse embryonic yolk sac, as well as live imaging methods for characterizing endothelial cell and hemodynamic function in cultured embryos.

  5. Development of effective skin cancer treatment and prevention in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, W Clark; Lambert, Muriel W

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, recessively transmitted genetic disease characterized by increasingly marked dyspigmentation and xerosis (dryness) of sun-exposed tissues, especially skin. Skin cancers characteristically develop in sun-exposed sites at very much earlier ages than in the general population; these are often multiple and hundreds or even thousands may develop. Eight complementation groups have been identified. Seven groups, XP-A…G, are associated with defective genes encoding proteins involved in the nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) pathway that recognizes and excises mutagenic changes induced in DNA by sunlight; the eighth group, XP-V, is associated with defective translesion synthesis (TLS) bypassing such alterations. The dyspigmentation, xerosis and eventually carcinogenesis in XP patients appear to be due to their cells' failure to respond properly to these mutagenic DNA alterations, leading to mutations in skin cells. A subset of cases, especially those in some complementation groups, may develop neurological degeneration, which may be severe. However, in most XP patients, in the past the multiple skin cancers have led to death at an early age due to either metastases or sepsis. Using either topical 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod, we have developed a protocol that effectively prevents most skin cancer development in XP patients. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  6. The effects of Origanum hypericifolium essential oil application and ultraviolet B irradiation on mouse skin: An ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ili, Pinar

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to UV radiation can cause histopathological and ultrastructural changes in the skin. Origanum hypericifolium, an endemic Turkish plant,essential oil is mainly composed of monoterpenes. The effects of undiluted O. hypericifolium oil on the ultrastructural characteristics of the UVB-irradiated dorsal skin of mice were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The BALB/c mice were shaved of dorsal hair and randomly housed into 4 groups: 1: control; 2: UVB-irradiated; 3: oil applied; and 4: oil applied and UVB-irradiated. The oil was applied topically to the dorsal skins of the mice on alternate days for 1week prior to UVB exposure. The skins were irradiated for a total dose of 3.5J/cm(2). The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, semithin sections were stained with toluidine blue and ultrathin sections were contrasted with uranyl acetate/lead citrate. There were histopathological changes such as parakeratosis and squamous hyperplasia in the epidermal cell layers (Groups 3 and 4). There were also ultrastructural changes including lacunae formations throughout the stratum corneum layer (Groups 2, 3, and 4), enlargement of intercellular spaces (Groups 2 and 3), reduced desmosomes, narrow and elongated interdigitations, shortened, relatively indistinct and electron dense intermediate keratin filament bundles (Group 3). There were various sizes of cytoplasmic and perinucleolar vacuoles (Groups 3 and 4) and apoptotic bodies phagocytized by keratinocytes (Group 4). I conclude that undiluted oil has side-effects and the potential to inflict injury to the skin. The oil does not ameliorate the negative effects of UVB on epidermal skin cells.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits UVB-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2 and NOX-4 in HR-1 hairless mouse skin by blocking MSK1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafizur Rahman

    Full Text Available Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB radiation induces inflammation and photocarcinogenesis in mammalian skin. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, a representative ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of DHA on UVB-induced inflammation in mouse skin. Our study revealed that topical application of DHA prior to UVB irradiation attenuated the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and NAD(PH:oxidase-4 (NOX-4 in hairless mouse skin. DHA pretreatment also attenuated UVB-induced DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB through the inhibition of phosphorylation of IκB kinase-α/β, phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. In addition, UVB-induced phosphorylation of p65 at the serine 276 residue was significantly inhibited by topical application of DHA. Irradiation with UVB induced phosphorylation of mitogen and stress-activated kinase-1 (MSK1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase, and all these events were attenuated by pretreatment with DHA. Blocking ERK and p38 MAP kinase signaling by U0126 and SB203580, respectively, diminished MSK1 phosphorylation in UVB-irradiated mouse skin. Pretreatment with H-89, a pharmacological inhibitor of MSK1, abrogated UVB-induced activation of NF-κB and the expression of COX-2 and NOX-4 in mouse skin. In conclusion, topically applied DHA inhibits the UVB-induced activation of NF-κB and the expression of COX-2 and NOX-4 by blocking the phosphorylation of MSK1, a kinase downstream of ERK and p38 MAP kinase, in hairless mouse skin.

  8. Development and validation of a bedside risk score for MRSA among patients hospitalized with complicated skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilberberg Marya D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a frequent cause of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI. Patients with MRSA require different empiric treatment than those with non-MRSA infections, yet no accurate tools exist to aid in stratifying the risk for a MRSA cSSSI. We sought to develop a simple bedside decision rule to tailor empiric coverage more accurately. Methods We conducted a large multicenter (N=62 hospitals retrospective cohort study in a US-based database between April 2005 and March 2009. All adult initial admissions with ICD-9-CM codes specific to cSSSI were included. Patients admitted with MRSA vs. non-MRSA were compared with regard to baseline demographic, clinical and hospital characteristics. We developed and validated a model to predict the risk of MRSA, and compared its performance via sensitivity, specificity and other classification statistics to the healthcare-associated (HCA infection risk factors. Results Of the 7,183 patients with cSSSI, 2,387 (33.2% had MRSA. Factors discriminating MRSA from non-MRSA were age, African-American race, no evidence of diabetes mellitus, cancer or renal dysfunction, and prior history of cardiac dysrhythmia. The score ranging from 0 to 8 points exhibited a consistent dose–response relationship. A MRSA score of 5 or higher was superior to the HCA classification in all characteristics, while that of 4 or higher was superior on all metrics except specificity. Conclusions MRSA is present in 1/3 of all hospitalized cSSSI. A simple bedside risk score can help discriminate the risk for MRSA vs. other pathogens with improved accuracy compared to the HCA definition.

  9. Development and perceived utility and impact of a skin care Internet intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Hilgart

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers (PrUs in people with spinal cord injury (SCI are a common, mostly preventable, skin complication with serious health consequences. This paper presents the development, theoretical bases, and perceived usefulness and effectiveness data for iSHIFTup.org, a skin care Internet intervention to prevent pressure ulcers in adults with SCI. Participants (n = 7 were, on average, 36 years old (SD = 10.09, tetraplegic (71%, paraplegic (29%, and caucasian (86%, with an average time since injury of 10.43 years (SD = 9.64 years. During the six weeks of program access, participants' usage of the program was tracked and analyzed. Participants subsequently completed measures focused on usability, likeability, and usefulness (the Internet Evaluation and Utility Questionnaire; IEUQ, and on their perceptions of the impact of the program on targeted behaviors (using the Internet Impact and Effectiveness Questionnaire; IIEQ. Participants generally reported positive experiences using iSHIFTup, indicating it to be useful, effective, easy to use, and understandable. All participants reported that iSHIFTup helped them to manage their skin care, improved their skin care routine, and supported healthy skin care activities. A majority of users indicated that they were able to implement program recommendations, and all users believed the Internet was a good method for delivering pressure ulcer prevention programs. This is the first paper to focus on a skin care Internet intervention for adults with SCI.

  10. Roughness threshold for cell attachment and proliferation on plasma micro-nanotextured polymeric surfaces: the case of primary human skin fibroblasts and mouse immortalized 3T3 fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourkoula, A.; Constantoudis, V.; Kontziampasis, D.; Petrou, P. S.; Kakabakos, S. E.; Tserepi, A.; Gogolides, E.

    2016-08-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) surfaces have been micro-nanotextured in oxygen plasmas with increasing ion energy, leading to micro-nanotopography characterized by increased root mean square roughness, correlation length and fractal dimension. Primary human skin fibroblasts and mouse immortalized 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured on these surfaces and the number of adhering cells, their proliferation rate and morphology (cytoplasm and nucleus area) were evaluated as a function of roughness height, correlation length, and fractal dimension. A roughness threshold behavior was observed for both types of cells leading to dramatic cell number decrease above this threshold, which is almost similar for the two types of cells, despite their differences in size and stiffness. The results are discussed based on two theoretical models, which are reconciled and unified when the elastic moduli and the size of the cells are taken into account.

  11. Tissue Myeloid Progenitors Differentiate into Pericytes through TGF-β Signaling in Developing Skin Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Yamazaki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mural cells (pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells are essential for the regulation of vascular networks and maintenance of vascular integrity, but their origins are diverse in different tissues and not known in the organs that arise from the ectoderm, such as skin. Here, we show that tissue-localized myeloid progenitors contribute to pericyte development in embryonic skin vasculature. A series of in vivo fate-mapping experiments indicates that tissue myeloid progenitors differentiate into pericytes. Furthermore, depletion of tissue myeloid cells and their progenitors in PU.1 (also known as Spi1 mutants results in defective pericyte development. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS-isolated myeloid cells and their progenitors from embryonic skin differentiate into pericytes in culture. At the molecular level, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β induces pericyte differentiation in culture. Furthermore, type 2 TGF-β receptor (Tgfbr2 mutants exhibit deficient pericyte development in skin vasculature. Combined, these data suggest that pericytes differentiate from tissue myeloid progenitors in the skin vasculature through TGF-β signaling.

  12. Dynamics of muscle fibre growth during postnatal mouse development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnocchi Viola F

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal growth in mouse is rapid, with total skeletal muscle mass increasing several-fold in the first few weeks. Muscle growth can be achieved by either an increase in muscle fibre number or an increase in the size of individual myofibres, or a combination of both. Where myofibre hypertrophy during growth requires the addition of new myonuclei, these are supplied by muscle satellite cells, the resident stem cells of skeletal muscle. Results Here, we report on the dynamics of postnatal myofibre growth in the mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle, which is essentially composed of fast type II fibres in adult. We found that there was no net gain in myofibre number in the EDL between P7 and P56 (adulthood. However, myofibre cross-sectional area increased by 7.6-fold, and length by 1.9-fold between these ages, resulting in an increase in total myofibre volume of 14.1-fold: showing the extent of myofibre hypertrophy during the postnatal period. To determine how the number of myonuclei changes during this period of intense muscle fibre hypertrophy, we used two complementary mouse models: 3F-nlacZ-E mice express nlacZ only in myonuclei, while Myf5nlacZ/+ mice have β-galactosidase activity in satellite cells. There was a ~5-fold increase in myonuclear number per myofibre between P3 and P21. Thus myofibre hypertrophy is initially accompanied by a significant addition of myonuclei. Despite this, the estimated myonuclear domain still doubled between P7 and P21 to 9.2 × 103 μm3. There was no further addition of myonuclei from P21, but myofibre volume continued to increase, resulting in an estimated ~3-fold expansion of the myonuclear domain to 26.5 × 103 μm3 by P56. We also used our two mouse models to determine the number of satellite cells per myofibre during postnatal growth. Satellite cell number in EDL was initially ~14 satellite cells per myofibre at P7, but then fell to reach the adult level of ~5 by P21. Conclusions

  13. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Skin Impedance Measurements for Acupuncture Research: Development of a Continuous Recording System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha P. Colbert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin impedance at acupuncture points (APs has been used as a diagnostic/therapeutic aid for more than 50 years. Currently, researchers are evaluating the electrophysiologic properties of APs as a possible means of understanding acupuncture's mechanism. To comprehensively assess the diagnostic, therapeutic and mechanistic implications of acupuncture point skin impedance, a device capable of reliably recording impedances from 100 kΩ to 50 MΩ at multiple APs over extended time periods is needed. This article describes design considerations, development and testing of a single channel skin impedance system (hardware, control software and customized electrodes. The system was tested for accuracy against known resistors and capacitors. Two electrodes (the AMI and the ORI were compared for reliability of recording over 30 min. Two APs (LU 9 and PC 6 and a nearby non-AP site were measured simultaneously in four individuals for 60 min. Our measurement system performed accurately (within 5% against known resistors (580 kΩ–10 MΩ and capacitors (10 nF–150 nF. Both the AMI electrode and the modified ORI electrode recorded skin impedance reliably on the volar surface of the forearm (r = 0.87 and r = 0.79, respectively. In four of four volunteers tested, skin impedance at LU 9 was less than at the nearby non-AP site. In three of four volunteers skin impedance was less at PC 6 than at the nearby non-AP site. We conclude that our system is a suitable device upon which we can develop a fully automated multi-channel device capable of recording skin impedance at multiple APs simultaneously over 24 h.

  15. Skin Impedance Measurements for Acupuncture Research: Development of a Continuous Recording System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jinkook; Larsen, Adrian; Edinger, Tracy; Gregory, William L.; Thong, Tran

    2008-01-01

    Skin impedance at acupuncture points (APs) has been used as a diagnostic/therapeutic aid for more than 50 years. Currently, researchers are evaluating the electrophysiologic properties of APs as a possible means of understanding acupuncture's mechanism. To comprehensively assess the diagnostic, therapeutic and mechanistic implications of acupuncture point skin impedance, a device capable of reliably recording impedances from 100 kΩ to 50 MΩ at multiple APs over extended time periods is needed. This article describes design considerations, development and testing of a single channel skin impedance system (hardware, control software and customized electrodes). The system was tested for accuracy against known resistors and capacitors. Two electrodes (the AMI and the ORI) were compared for reliability of recording over 30 min. Two APs (LU 9 and PC 6) and a nearby non-AP site were measured simultaneously in four individuals for 60 min. Our measurement system performed accurately (within 5%) against known resistors (580 kΩ–10 MΩ) and capacitors (10 nF–150 nF). Both the AMI electrode and the modified ORI electrode recorded skin impedance reliably on the volar surface of the forearm (r = 0.87 and r = 0.79, respectively). In four of four volunteers tested, skin impedance at LU 9 was less than at the nearby non-AP site. In three of four volunteers skin impedance was less at PC 6 than at the nearby non-AP site. We conclude that our system is a suitable device upon which we can develop a fully automated multi-channel device capable of recording skin impedance at multiple APs simultaneously over 24 h. PMID:18955218

  16. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study th...

  17. Antibacterial Evaluation of Synthetic Thiazole Compounds In Vitro and In Vivo in a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Skin Infection Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Haroon; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including strains resistant to current antibiotics, has contributed to an increase in the number of skin infections reported in humans in recent years. New therapeutic options are needed to counter this public health challenge. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential of thiazole compounds synthesized by our research group to be used topically to treat MRSA skin and wound infections. The broth microdilution method confirmed that the lead thiazole compound and four analogues are capable of inhibiting MRSA growth at concentrations as low as 1.3 μg/mL. Additionally, three compounds exhibited a synergistic relationship when combined with the topical antibiotic mupirocin against MRSA in vitro via the checkerboard assay. Thus the thiazole compounds have potential to be used alone or in combination with mupirocin against MRSA. When tested against human keratinocytes, four derivatives of the lead compound demonstrated an improved toxicity profile (were found to be non-toxic up to a concentration of 20 μg/mL). Utilizing a murine skin infection model, we confirmed that the lead compound and three analogues exhibited potent antimicrobial activity in vivo, with similar capability as the antibiotic mupirocin, as they reduced the burden of MRSA present in skin wounds by more than 90%. Taken altogether, the present study provides important evidence that these thiazole compounds warrant further investigation for development as novel topical antimicrobials to treat MRSA skin infections.

  18. MicroRNA-21a-5p Functions on the Regulation of Melanogenesis by Targeting Sox5 in Mouse Skin Melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengchao; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Fan, Ruiwen; Chen, Tianzhi; Dong, Changsheng

    2016-06-24

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating almost all biological processes. miRNAs bind to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs by sequence matching. In a previous study, we demonstrated that miR-21 was differently expressed in alpaca skin with different hair color. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for miR-21 to regulate the coat color are not yet completely understood. In this study, we transfected miR-21a-5p into mouse melanocytes and demonstrated its function on melanogenesis of miR-21a-5p by targeting Sox5, which inhibits melanogenesis in mouse melanocytes. The results suggested that miR-21a-5p targeted Sox5 gene based on the binding site in 3' UTR of Sox5 and overexpression of miR-21a-5p significantly down-regulated Sox5 mRNA and protein expression. Meanwhile, mRNA and protein expression of microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) and Tyrosinase (TYR) were up-regulated, which subsequently make the melanin production in melanocytes increased. The results suggest that miR-21a-5p regulates melanogenesis via MITF by targeting Sox5.

  19. Retinoic acid promotes the proliferation of primordial germ cell-like cells differentiated from mouse skin-derived stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Wang, Jun-Jie; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Ge, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Rui; Li, Lan; Li, Bo; Shen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) have the potential to differentiate into gametes and are a potential resource for research and clinical applications. Sufficient amount of primordial germ cells (PGCs) is an important requirement for successful differentiation of SDSCs into gametes in vitro. Retinoic acid (RA), a vitamin A-derived small lipophilic molecule, promotes the growth of PGCs in vivo; however, the role of RA on the proliferation of PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) derived from SDSCs remains unknown. In this study, SDSCs were induced to differentiate into the embryoid body and cocultured with mouse fibroblasts to form PGCLCs. The proliferation of PGCLCs with the presence of various concentrations of RA was investigated in vitro. Immunofluorescence labeling showed that the 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine-positive ratio of PGCLCs was increased after the cells were treated with 5-μM RA, and flow cytometry results showed that the number of cells in the S phase was increased significantly. The messenger RNA expression levels of cell cycle-related genes, CCND1 and CDK2, were also increased. Furthermore, RA effectively promoted the external proliferation of endogenous PGCs when 11.5-days postcoitum fetal mouse genital ridges were cultured in vitro. In conclusion, 5-μM RA promoted the proliferation of SDSCs-derived PGCLCs and endogenous PGCs. Our study will provide a valuable model system for studying the differentiation of stem cells into gametes in vitro.

  20. MicroRNA-21a-5p Functions on the Regulation of Melanogenesis by Targeting Sox5 in Mouse Skin Melanocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengchao Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in regulating almost all biological processes. miRNAs bind to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR of mRNAs by sequence matching. In a previous study, we demonstrated that miR-21 was differently expressed in alpaca skin with different hair color. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for miR-21 to regulate the coat color are not yet completely understood. In this study, we transfected miR-21a-5p into mouse melanocytes and demonstrated its function on melanogenesis of miR-21a-5p by targeting Sox5, which inhibits melanogenesis in mouse melanocytes. The results suggested that miR-21a-5p targeted Sox5 gene based on the binding site in 3′ UTR of Sox5 and overexpression of miR-21a-5p significantly down-regulated Sox5 mRNA and protein expression. Meanwhile, mRNA and protein expression of microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF and Tyrosinase (TYR were up-regulated, which subsequently make the melanin production in melanocytes increased. The results suggest that miR-21a-5p regulates melanogenesis via MITF by targeting Sox5.

  1. Combinatorial chemopreventive effect of butyric acid, nicotinamide and calcium glucarate against the 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene induced mouse skin tumorigenesis attained by enhancing the induction of intrinsic apoptotic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Prakash; Sahay, Satya; Pandey, Manuraj; Qadri, Syed S Y H; Gupta, Krishna P

    2015-01-25

    We explored the basis of the combinatorial chemopreventive effect of butyric acid (BA), nicotinamide (NA) and calcium glucarate (CAG) on mouse skin exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). We studied the effects of topical application of DMBA in the presence or absence of BA, NA and CAG on the regulators of apoptosis. DMBA treatment suppressed Bax, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cyt c, Apaf1, caspase-9, -3 mediated apoptosis. Downregulation of p21 and upregulation of Bcl-2, mut p53 were also observed in only DMBA treated mice. Simultaneous application of BA, NA and CAG induced a mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, characterized by a rise in the Bax, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cyt c, upregulation of Apaf1 with down-stream activation of caspase-9, -3. Furthermore treatment with BA, NA and CAG demonstrated an upregulation of p21 and downregulation of Bcl-2, mut p53. But this effect was enhanced in the presence of all the three compounds together in combination. Chemoprevention by a combination of BA, NA and CAG by inducing the apoptosis, the natural cell death, suggest the importance of the potential combinational strategies capable of preventing skin tumor development.

  2. IKKβ-Mediated Resistance to Skin Cancer Development Is Ink4a/Arf-Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Angustias; Bravo, Ana; Suarez-Cabrera, Cristian; Alameda, Josefa P; Casanova, M Llanos; Lorz, Corina; Segrelles, Carmen; Segovia, José C; Paramio, Jesús M; Navarro, Manuel; Ramirez, Angel

    2017-09-01

    IKKβ (encoded by IKBKB) is a protein kinase that regulates the activity of numerous proteins important in several signaling pathways, such as the NF-κB pathway. IKKβ exerts a protumorigenic role in several animal models of lung, hepatic, intestinal, and oral cancer. In addition, genomic and proteomic studies of human tumors also indicate that IKBKB gene is amplified or overexpressed in multiple tumor types. Here, the relevance of IKKβ in skin cancer was determined by performing carcinogenesis studies in animal models overexpressing IKKβ in the basal skin layer. IKKβ overexpression resulted in a striking resistance to skin cancer development and an increased expression of several tumor suppressor proteins, such as p53, p16, and p19. Mechanistically, this skin tumor-protective role of IKKβ is independent of p53, but dependent on the activity of the Ink4a/Arf locus. Interestingly, in the absence of p16 and p19, IKKβ-increased expression favors the appearance of cutaneous spindle cell-like squamous cell carcinomas, which are highly aggressive tumors. These results reveal that IKKβ activity prevents skin tumor development, and shed light on the complex nature of IKKβ effects on cancer progression, as IKKβ can both promote and prevent carcinogenesis depending on the cell type or molecular context.Implications: The ability of IKKβ to promote or prevent carcinogenesis suggests the need for further evaluation when targeting this protein. Mol Cancer Res; 15(9); 1255-64. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Predicting the Development of Tuberculosis with the Tuberculin Skin Test and QuantiFERON Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altet, Neus; Dominguez, José; Souza-Galvão, Maria-Luiza de; Jiménez-Fuentes, M Ángeles; Milà, Célia; Solsona, Jordi; Soriano-Arandés, Antonio; Latorre, Irene; Lara, Elisa; Cantos, Adela; Ferrer, María Dolores; Orcau, Àngels; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Caylà, Joan

    2015-05-01

    The identification of patients with latent tuberculosis infection, who are at higher risk to develop active disease, is an important component of disease control. We aim to compare the usefulness of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube assay and the tuberculin skin test to predict the development of active tuberculosis during follow-up, using positive and negative predictive values, positive likelihood ratios, and stratified level of risk. The study included contacts of tuberculosis cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2009. All contacts included were from the first circle of exposure. Tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON test were performed and a chest radiograph was obtained during the contact's study. A total of 1,335 contacts were followed up for 4 years: a smear-positive index case was identified for 937 contacts, of whom 15 developed active tuberculosis and had initially presented with positive tuberculin skin test/QuantiFERON results, a normal chest radiograph, and no symptoms. The positive predictive value was 4% for QuantiFERON and 2% for the tuberculin skin test (when ≥5 mm). The probability of developing active disease was 2.36 times higher with a positive QuantiFERON, and 1.3 times higher with a positive tuberculin skin test. The positive predictive value was 17%, and the positive likelihood ratio was 7.53 for untreated contacts with a positive QuantiFERON. Stratifying according to initial QuantiFERON results showed a 6.36 times higher risk of developing active tuberculosis for patients with a QuantiFERON result greater than or equal to 10 IU/ml. Among bacillus Calmette-Guérin-vaccinated patients, a tuberculin skin test induration greater than or equal to 15 mm correlated better with a positive QuantiFERON. QuantiFERON results were more accurate than tuberculin skin test results in predicting tuberculosis. Although all contacts with QuantiFERON-positive results are at risk of developing tuberculosis, those with a tuberculin skin test induration greater than

  4. Development of mouse hepatocyte lines permissive for hepatitis C virus (HCV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Hassan Aly

    Full Text Available The lack of a suitable small animal model for the analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has hampered elucidation of the HCV life cycle and the development of both protective and therapeutic strategies against HCV infection. Human and mouse harbor a comparable system for antiviral type I interferon (IFN induction and amplification, which regulates viral infection and replication. Using hepatocytes from knockout (ko mice, we determined the critical step of the IFN-inducing/amplification pathways regulating HCV replication in mouse. The results infer that interferon-beta promoter stimulator (IPS-1 or interferon A receptor (IFNAR were a crucial barrier to HCV replication in mouse hepatocytes. Although both IFNARko and IPS-1ko hepatocytes showed a reduced induction of type I interferons in response to viral infection, only IPS-1-/- cells circumvented cell death from HCV cytopathic effect and significantly improved J6JFH1 replication, suggesting IPS-1 to be a key player regulating HCV replication in mouse hepatocytes. We then established mouse hepatocyte lines lacking IPS-1 or IFNAR through immortalization with SV40T antigen. Expression of human (hCD81 on these hepatocyte lines rendered both lines HCVcc-permissive. We also found that the chimeric J6JFH1 construct, having the structure region from J6 isolate enhanced HCV replication in mouse hepatocytes rather than the full length original JFH1 construct, a new finding that suggests the possible role of the HCV structural region in HCV replication. This is the first report on the entry and replication of HCV infectious particles in mouse hepatocytes. These mouse hepatocyte lines will facilitate establishing a mouse HCV infection model with multifarious applications.

  5. An EPR method for estimating activity of antioxidants in mouse skin using an anthralin-derived radical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Sayo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Utsumi, Hideo

    2010-03-01

    Inhibitory effects of intravenously or orally administered antioxidants on the anthralin-derived radical generated in skin (mainly in the epidermis) of living mice by ultraviolet-A (UVA) irradiation were estimated. Anthralin was applied to the dorsal skin of living mice and the mice were then exposed to UVA. The EPR signal intensity in skin tissue strips obtained from mice after anthralin-UVA treatment was measured by an X-band EPR spectrometer. Several common antioxidants such as ascorbate, glutathione and Trolox (a vitamin E analogue) intravenously administered to mice reduced anthralin-derived radical generation. Trolox showed the most prolonged and powerful effect. Intravenous injection of a clinically used cerebral neuroprotective drug, Edarabone (Radicut), also showed depletion for the anthralin-derived radical. Oral administration of a commercialized nutritional supplement (a cocktail of 17 herbals and vitamins) also attenuated the anthralin-derived radical. The anthralin-UVA treatment model for antioxidant activity in the epidermis is a potentially feasible method to estimate activity of antioxidants in the body.

  6. The role of macrophages in skin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez, Diana A; Lacher, Richard K; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Colegio, Oscar R

    2017-04-01

    The skin and its appendages comprise the largest and fastest growing organ in the body. It performs multiple tasks and maintains homeostatic control, including the regulation of body temperature and protection from desiccation and from pathogen invasion. The skin can perform its functions with the assistance of different immune cell populations. Monocyte-derived cells are imperative for the completion of these tasks. The comprehensive role of macrophages and Langerhans cells in establishing and maintaining skin homeostasis remains incompletely defined. However, over the past decade, innovations in mouse genetics have allowed for advancements in the field. In this review, we explore different homeostatic roles of macrophages and Langerhans cells, including wound repair, follicle regeneration, salt balance, and cancer regression and progression in the skin. The understanding of the precise functions of myeloid-derived cells in the skin under basal conditions can help develop specific therapies that aid in skin and hair follicle regeneration and cutaneous cancer prevention.

  7. Fibronectin distribution during the development of fetal rat skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibson, W T; Couchman, J R; Weaver, A C

    1983-01-01

    revealed fibronectin on the surface of many of these cells and in association with the surrounding fine collagen fibrils. At the dermal-epidermal junction, both follicular and interfollicular, fibronectin was localized mainly in the plasma membrane and lamina lucida regions of the basement membrane......, and there was also staining associated with the underlying fine collagen fibrils. These observations are further evidence for the proposed role of fibronectin as a mediator of the cell-matrix interactions which are of importance for tissue development and maintenance....

  8. Development of volatile compounds during storage of different skin care products at various conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, A. F.; Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Hyldig, Grethe

    Many skin care products contain various lipids to care and soften the skin. These lipids are either saturated or unsaturated. In the case of even small amounts of unsaturated lipids, these are at risk of oxidizing when exposed to heat, light or other conditions with a pro-oxidative effect. When s...... chromatography-mass spectrometry and peroxide value, and compared to samples stored at 2°C in the dark. In addition, sensory analyses were carried out to assess the off-odours developed in the samples....

  9. Development and validation of HPLC method for imiquimod determination in skin penetration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Daniel; Martins, Carolina Azenha; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra

    2008-12-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive analytical procedure for the measurement of imiquimod in skin samples after in vitro penetration studies has been developed and validated. In vitro penetration studies were carried out in Franz diffusion cells with porcine skin. Tape stripping technique was used to separate the stratum corneum (SC) from the viable epidermis and dermis. Imiquimod was extracted from skin samples using a 7:3 (v/v) methanol:acetate buffer (100 mM, pH 4.0) solution and ultrasonication. Imiquimod was analyzed by HPLC using C(8) column and UV detection at 242 nm. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile:acetate buffer (pH 4.0, 100 mM):diethylamine (30:69.85:0.15, v/v) with flow rate 1 mL/min. Imiquimod eluted at 4.1 min and the running time was limited to 6.0 min. The procedure was linear across the following concentration ranges: 100-2500 ng/mL for both SC and tape-stripped skin and 20-800 ng/mL for receptor solution. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision values were lower than 20% at the limit of quantitation. The recovery values ranged from 80 to 100%. The method is adequate to assay imiquimod from skin samples, enabling the determination of the cutaneous penetration profile of imiquimod by in vitro studies.

  10. The development of race‐based perceptual categorization: skin color dominates early category judgments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Stepanova, Elena V.; Dotsch, Ron; Todorov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Prior research on the development of race‐based categorization has concluded that children understand the perceptual basis of race categories from as early as age 4 (e.g. Aboud, ). However, such work has rarely separated the influence of skin color from other physiognomic features considered by adul

  11. The Development of White-Asian Categorization : Contributions from Skin Color and Other Physiognomic Cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Dotsch, Ron; Clark, Amelia R; Stepanova, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial

  12. The development of White-Asian categorization: Contributions from skin color and other physiognomic cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Y.; Dotsch, R.; Clark, A.R.; Stepanova, E.V.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial

  13. Effects of Cosmetic Formulations Containing Hydroxyacids on Sun-Exposed Skin: Current Applications and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Kornhauser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes recent data on the effects of various skin formulations containing hydroxyacids (HAs and related products on sun-exposed skin. The most frequently used classes of these products, such as α- and β-hydroxyacids, polyhydroxy acids, and bionic acids, are reviewed, and their application in cosmetic formulations is described. Special emphasis is devoted to the safety evaluation of these formulations, particularly on the effects of their prolonged use on sun-exposed skin. We also discuss the important contribution of cosmetic vehicles in these types of studies. Data on the effects of HAs on melanogenesis and tanning are also included. Up-to-date methods and techniques used in those explorations, as well as selected future developments in the cosmetic area, are presented.

  14. Skin-resident antigen-presenting cells: Instruction manual for vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M. Fehres

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The induction of antigen-specific effector T cells is driven by proper antigen presentation and co-stimulation by dendritic cells (DCs. For this reason strategies have been developed to instruct DCs for the induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Since DCs are localized, amongst other locations, in peripheral tissues such as the skin, new vaccines are aiming at targeting antigens to DCs in situ. Optimal skin-DC targeting in combination with adequate adjuvant delivery facilitates DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes and enhances antigen cross-presentation and T cell priming. In this review we describe what DC subsets populate the human skin, as well as current vaccination strategies based on targeting strategies and alternative administration for the induction of robust long-lived anti-cancer effector T cells.

  15. Mutation spectrum in sunlight-exposed mouse skin epidermis: small but appreciable contribution of oxidative stress-mediated mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, Hironobu [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: ikehata@mail.tains.tohoku.ac.jp; Nakamura, Shingo [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Department of Radiobiology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Asamura, Takaaki [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2004-11-22

    We studied the mutations induced in skin by sunlight using transgenic Muta{sup TM} mice. Noon sunlight during summer at Sendai, Japan induced mutations efficiently in both epidermis and dermis. The mutant frequency (MF) in epidermis reached nearly 0.5% during the first 40 min irradiation but became saturated at this level with the appearance of skin inflammation after further irradiation. At the equivalent inflammatory dose, sunlight was twice as genotoxic as 313 nm-peak UVB. The 81 mutations detected in 80 lacZ transgene mutants isolated from the sunlight-exposed epidermis were dominated by C {yields} T transitions (89%), occurring exclusively at dipyrimidine sites, and also included a CC {yields} TT tandem substitution. Thus, the sunlight-induced mutation spectrum is highly UV-specific, quite similar to that induced by UVB but significantly different from that induced by UVA. Although oxidative damage-related C {yields} A transversions were detected only in five mutants (6%), their frequency was elevated to at least 15 times the background level, suggesting that the contribution of UVA-mediated oxidative stress is comparatively small but considerable. An analysis of bases adjacent to the mutated cytosines revealed that the sunlight-induced mutations prefer 5'-TC-3' dipyrimidine sites to 5'-CC-3' and 5'-CT-3'. The distribution of the frequent C {yields} T transition sites in the transgene was well associated with the CpG motif, which is known to be completely methylated in the gene, and quite similar to that induced by UVB rather than that by UVA. Thus, the UVB component contributes to the sunlight-induced mutations in the mammalian skin much more than the UVA component, whose influence through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mutagenesis is still appreciable.

  16. Apoptosis is an early event during phthalocyanine photodynamic therapy-induced ablation of chemically induced squamous papillomas in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, R; Korman, N J; Mohan, R R; Feyes, D K; Jawed, S; Zaim, M T; Mukhtar, H

    1996-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising new modality to treat malignant neoplasms including superficial skin cancers. In our search for an ideal photosensitizer for PDT, Pc 4, a silicon phthalocyanine, has shown promising results both in in vitro assays and in implanted tumors. In this study we assessed the efficacy of Pc 4 PDT in the ablation of murine skin tumors; and the evidence for apoptosis during tumor ablation was also obtained. The Pc 4 was administered through tail vein injection to SENCAR mice bearing chemically induced squamous papillomas, and 24 h later the lesions were illuminated with an argon ion-pumped dye laser tuned at 675 nm for a total light dose of 135 J/cm2. Within 72-96 h, almost complete tumor shrinkage occurred; no tumor regrowth was observed up to 90 days post-PDT. As evident by nucleosome-size DNA fragmentation, appearance of apoptotic bodies in hematoxylin and eosin staining and direct immunoperoxidase detection of digoxigenin-labeled genomic DNA in sections, apoptosis was clearly evident 6 h post-PDT at which time tumor shrinkage was less than 30%. The apoptotic bodies, as evident by the condensation of chromatin material around the periphery of the nucleus and increased vacuolization of the cytoplasm, were also observed in electron microscopic studies of the tumor tissues following Pc 4 PDT. The extent of apoptosis was greater at 15 h than at 6 and 10 h post-PDT. Taken together, our results clearly show that Pc 4 may be an effective photosensitizer for PDT of nonmelanoma skin cancer, and that apoptosis is an early event during this process.

  17. Photoprotective Potential of Penta-O-Galloyl-β-DGlucose by Targeting NF-κB and MAPK Signaling in UVB Radiation-Induced Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Choi, Mi Sun; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Song-Hee; Noh, Kum Hee; Kwon, Sunho; Jeong, Ae Jin; Lee, Haeri; Yi, Eun Hee; Park, Jung Youl; Lee, Jintae; Joo, Eun Young; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2015-11-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet radiation can cause skin damage with various pathological changes including inflammation. In the present study, we identified the skin-protective activity of 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (pentagalloyl glucose, PGG) in ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced human dermal fibroblasts and mouse skin. PGG exhibited antioxidant activity with regard to intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as well as ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) scavenging. Furthermore, PGG exhibited anti-inflammatory activity, inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, resulting in inhibition of the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. Topical application of PGG followed by chronic exposure to UVB radiation in the dorsal skin of hairless mice resulted in a significant decrease in the progression of inflammatory skin damages, leading to inhibited activation of NF-κB signaling and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. The present study demonstrated that PGG protected from skin damage induced by UVB radiation, and thus, may be a potential candidate for the prevention of environmental stimuli-induced inflammatory skin damage.

  18. Evidence for sequential appearance of cartilage matrix proteins in developing mouse limbs and in cultures of mouse mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, A; Heinegard, D; Solursh, M

    1987-01-01

    The initiation of synthesis and the accumulation of four cartilage matrix proteins (type II collagen and three noncollagenous proteins, one of Mr 148, one of Mr 59, and an oligometric protein of Mr above 500 with 100-kDa subunits, respectively) were studied in developing mouse limbs and in cultures of limb bud mesenchyme by means of immunolocalization. On day 13 of gestation, type II collagen was observed throughout the entire humerus, whereas the 148-kDa protein was localized only in the central portion. Neither the 100-kDa-subunit protein nor the 59-kDa protein could be demonstrated in the humerus at that stage. On day 14 1/2, type II collagen and the 148-kDa protein were codistributed throughout the humerus. The 100-kDa-subunit protein was detectable in the periphery of the humerus, whereas little 59-kDa protein could yet be demonstrated. On day 18, all four proteins being studied could be detected immunologically in the developing mouse humerus. They differed in immunolocalization. Type Ii collagen, the 148-kDa protein, and the 100-kDa-subunit protein were codistributed throughout the distal and proximal parts of the cartilage. However, the 148-kDa protein could no longer be detected immunochemically in the outermost part of the cartilage in the proximal shoulder joint. The 148-kDa protein codistributed with type II collagen and the 100-kDa-subunit protein in the distal cartilaginous region, where joint development was less advanced. On the other hand, the 59-kDa protein was not demonstrated directly within the hyaline cartilaginous structures, but surrounded the entire structure. This protein was also present in the same part of the proximal joint region as that in which the 148-kDa protein was not detected. To develop an in vitro model for studies of skeletogenesis, mesenchymal cells prepared from mouse limb buds were cultured as micromass cultures at high initial cell density to favor chondrogenesis. On day 3 of culture, type II collagen was the only protein

  19. The excimer lamp induces cutaneous nerve degeneration and reduces scratching in a dry-skin mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Atsuko; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Kaneda, Kazuyuki; Ko, Kyi C; Matsuda, Hironori; Kimura, Utako; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal hyperinnervation, which is thought to underlie intractable pruritus, has been observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules has been reported to regulate epidermal hyperinnervation. Previously, we showed that the excimer lamp has antihyperinnervative effects in nonpruritic dry-skin model mice, although epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules was unchanged. Therefore, we investigated the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation and its mechanism of action. A single irradiation of AD model mice significantly inhibited itch-related behavior 1 day later, following improvement in the dermatitis score. In addition, irradiation of nerve fibers formed by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons increased bleb formation and decreased nerve fiber expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, suggesting degenerative changes in these fibers. We also analyzed whether attaching a cutoff excimer filter (COF) to the lamp, thus decreasing cytotoxic wavelengths, altered hyperinnervation and the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), a DNA damage marker, in dry-skin model mice. Irradiation with COF decreased CPD production in keratinocytes, as well as having an antihyperinnervative effect, indicating that the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation with COF are due to induction of epidermal nerve degeneration and reduced DNA damage.

  20. Immunohistochemical localization of TGF-B1 during morphogenetic movements of the developing mouse palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J M; Robinson, R A; Solursh, M

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-B1) may play an important role in developmentally active tissues in which it is found in high concentrations. We localized TGF-B1 in the developing fetal mouse palate immunohistochemically using a polyclonal antibody. Mouse fetal palates at 12-17 days (inclusive) of gestation were examined and specific focal concentrations of TGF-B1 identified regions undergoing active morphogenesis. The association of TGF-B1 with aggregates of mesenchymal cells in the palate and chondroblasts, rhabdomyocytes, and epithelia of the craniofacial complex strongly implicates its role in proliferation and differentiation in the developing mouse palate. We believe these findings have important bearing on the normal development of the palate as well as cleft anomalies.

  1. Mechanical Stretch on Human Skin Equivalents Increases the Epidermal Thickness and Develops the Basement Membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Tokuyama

    Full Text Available All previous reports concerning the effect of stretch on cultured skin cells dealt with experiments on epidermal keratinocytes or dermal fibroblasts alone. The aim of the present study was to develop a system that allows application of stretch stimuli to human skin equivalents (HSEs, prepared by coculturing of these two types of cells. In addition, this study aimed to analyze the effect of a stretch on keratinization of the epidermis and on the basement membrane. HSEs were prepared in a gutter-like structure created with a porous silicone sheet in a silicone chamber. After 5-day stimulation with stretching, HSEs were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically. Stretch-stimulated HSEs had a thicker epidermal layer and expressed significantly greater levels of laminin 5 and collagen IV/VII in the basal layer compared with HSEs not subjected to stretch stimulation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the structure of the basement membrane was more developed in HSEs subjected to stretching. Our model may be relevant for extrapolating the effect of a stretch on the skin in a state similar to an in vivo system. This experimental system may be useful for analysis of the effects of stretch stimuli on skin properties and wound healing and is also expected to be applicable to an in vitro model of a hypertrophic scar in the future.

  2. miR-206-3p在小鼠皮肤中的表达及其作用%Expression and distribution of miR-206-3p in mouse skin and its potential roles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆原; 周红; 李文艳; 李耀武

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and distribution of miR-206-3p and its target gene Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) in mouse skin and the potential roles during the development of skin.Methods The full-thickness back skins of BALB/c mice on the 13.5 dpc (day post coition),15.5 dpc,17.5 dpc,1 dpp (day post partum),4 dpp and 16 weeks were collected respectively.The expression levels of miR-206-3p and BdnfmRNA were measured by real time RT-PCR,and BDNF protein was detected by western blot.The distributions of miR-206-3p and BDNF in tissue were profiled by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) respectively.Results The expression level of miR-206-3p increased gradually until 17.5 dpc and subsequently receded to the similar level of the 13.5 dpc during adult stage.The expression of BDNF protein exhibited in the opposite manner of miR-206-3p but BdnfmRNA remained stable from the 17.5 dpc until adult stage.ISH results showed that the distribution of miR-206-3p was gradually regionalized during the development of skin in the postnatal days and mainly located in the suprabasal layer and periphery of hair follicles,which was adjacent to the regions of BDNF expression at the same stage in a nonoverlapping manner.Conclusion The miR-206-3p may be involved in neurodevelopment of mouse skin through the post-transcriptional regulation of Bdnf.%目的 对小鼠皮肤中miR-206-3p及其靶基因脑源性神经营养因子(Bdnf)进行表达与定位检测,以探讨其在皮肤发育过程中的可能作用.方法 手术剪取13.5 dpc(交配后天数)、15.5 dpc、17.5 dpc胎鼠,1 dpp(出生后天数)、4 dpp乳鼠及16周龄雄鼠的背部全层皮肤,用实时荧光定量RT-PCR检测miR-206-3p与Bdnf mRNA的表达水平,western blot检测BDNF蛋白质表达水平,原位杂交与免疫组化分别检测miR-206-3p与BDNF的组织定位.结果 皮肤中miR-206-3p在胚胎期持续升高,到17.5 dpc后逐渐降低,于成年鼠时回复至13.5 dpc时

  3. Potent immunity to low doses of influenza vaccine by probabilistic guided micro-targeted skin delivery in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germain J P Fernando

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over 14 million people die each year from infectious diseases despite extensive vaccine use [1]. The needle and syringe--first invented in 1853--is still the primary delivery device, injecting liquid vaccine into muscle. Vaccines could be far more effective if they were precisely delivered into the narrow layer just beneath the skin surface that contains a much higher density of potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs essential to generate a protective immune response. We hypothesized that successful vaccination could be achieved this way with far lower antigen doses than required by the needle and syringe. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To meet this objective, using a probability-based theoretical analysis for targeting skin APCs, we designed the Nanopatch, which contains an array of densely packed projections (21025/cm(2 invisible to the human eye (110 microm in length, tapering to tips with a sharpness of <1000 nm, that are dry-coated with vaccine and applied to the skin for two minutes. Here we show that the Nanopatches deliver a seasonal influenza vaccine (Fluvax 2008 to directly contact thousands of APCs, in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction. By physically targeting vaccine directly to these cells we induced protective levels of functional antibody responses in mice and also protection against an influenza virus challenge that are comparable to the vaccine delivered intramuscularly with the needle and syringe--but with less than 1/100(th of the delivered antigen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results represent a marked improvement--an order of magnitude greater than reported by others--for injected doses administered by other delivery methods, without reliance on an added adjuvant, and with only a single vaccination. This study provides a proven mathematical/engineering delivery device template for extension into human studies--and we speculate that successful translation of these findings into humans could

  4. Potent Immunity to Low Doses of Influenza Vaccine by Probabilistic Guided Micro-Targeted Skin Delivery in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Crichton, Michael L.; Fairmaid, Emily J.; Roberts, Michael S.; Frazer, Ian H.; Brown, Lorena E.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Over 14 million people die each year from infectious diseases despite extensive vaccine use [1]. The needle and syringe—first invented in 1853—is still the primary delivery device, injecting liquid vaccine into muscle. Vaccines could be far more effective if they were precisely delivered into the narrow layer just beneath the skin surface that contains a much higher density of potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) essential to generate a protective immune response. We hypothesized that successful vaccination could be achieved this way with far lower antigen doses than required by the needle and syringe. Methodology/Principal Findings To meet this objective, using a probability-based theoretical analysis for targeting skin APCs, we designed the Nanopatch™, which contains an array of densely packed projections (21025/cm2) invisible to the human eye (110 µm in length, tapering to tips with a sharpness of <1000 nm), that are dry-coated with vaccine and applied to the skin for two minutes. Here we show that the Nanopatches deliver a seasonal influenza vaccine (Fluvax® 2008) to directly contact thousands of APCs, in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction. By physically targeting vaccine directly to these cells we induced protective levels of functional antibody responses in mice and also protection against an influenza virus challenge that are comparable to the vaccine delivered intramuscularly with the needle and syringe—but with less than 1/100th of the delivered antigen. Conclusions/Significance Our results represent a marked improvement—an order of magnitude greater than reported by others—for injected doses administered by other delivery methods, without reliance on an added adjuvant, and with only a single vaccination. This study provides a proven mathematical/engineering delivery device template for extension into human studies—and we speculate that successful translation of these findings into humans could uniquely assist with

  5. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ...

  6. The heparan sulphate deficient Hspg2 exon 3 null mouse displays reduced deposition of TGF-β1 in skin compared to C57BL/6 wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Cindy; Smith, Susan M; Melrose, James

    2016-06-01

    This was an observational study where we examined the role of perlecan HS on the deposition of TGF-β1 in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mouse skin. Despite its obvious importance in skin repair and tissue homeostasis no definitive studies have immunolocalised TGF-β1 in skin in WT or Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mice. Vertical parasagittal murine dorsal skin from 3, 6 and 12 week old C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mice were fixed in neutral buffered formalin, paraffin embedded and 4 μm sections stained with Mayers haematoxylin and eosin (H & E). TGF-β1 was immunolocalised using a rabbit polyclonal antibody, heat retrieval and the Envision NovaRED detection system. Immunolocalisation of TGF-β1 differed markedly in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mouse skin, ablation of exon 3 of Hspg2 resulted in a very severe reduction in the deposition of TGF-β1 in skin 3-12 weeks postnatally. The reduced deposition of TGF-β1 observed in the present study would be expected to impact detrimentally on the remodelling and healing capacity of skin in mutant mice compounding on the poor wound-healing properties already reported for perlecan exon 3 null mice due to an inability to signal with FGF-2 and promote angiogenic repair processes. TGF-β1 also has cell mediated effects in tissue homeostasis and matrix stabilisation a reduction in TGF-β1 deposition would therefore be expected to detrimentally impact on skin homeostasis in the perlecan mutant mice.

  7. Characterization of progenitor domains in the developing mouse thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vue, Tou Yia; Aaker, Joshua; Taniguchi, Aya; Kazemzadeh, Christina; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Martin, Donna M; Martin, James F; Treier, Mathias; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2007-11-01

    To understand the molecular basis of the specification of thalamic nuclei, we analyzed the expression patterns of various transcription factors and defined progenitor cell populations in the embryonic mouse thalamus. We show that the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig3 is expressed in the entire thalamic ventricular zone and the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI). Next, we define two distinct progenitor domains within the thalamus, which we name pTH-R and pTH-C, located caudal to the ZLI. pTH-R is immediately caudal to the ZLI and expresses Nkx2.2, Mash1, and Olig3. pTH-C is caudal to pTH-R and expresses Ngn1, Ngn2, and Olig3. Short-term lineage analysis of Olig3-, Mash1-, Ngn1-, and Ngn2-expressing progenitor cells as well as tracing the Pitx2 cell lineage suggests that pTH-C is the only major source of thalamic nuclei containing neurons that project to the cerebral cortex, whereas pTH-R and ZLI are likely to produce distinct postmitotic populations outside of the cortex-projecting part of the thalamus. To determine if pTH-C is composed of subdomains, we characterized expression of the homeodomain protein Dbx1 and the bHLH protein Olig2. We show that Dbx1 is expressed in caudodorsal-high to rostroventral-low gradient within pTH-C. Analysis of heterozygous Dbx1(nlslacZ) knockin mice demonstrated that Dbx1-expressing progenitors preferentially give rise to caudodorsal thalamic nuclei. Olig2 is expressed in an opposite gradient within pTH-C to that of Dbx1. These results establish the molecular heterogeneity within the progenitor cells of the thalamus, and suggest that such heterogeneity contributes to the specification of thalamic nuclei.

  8. Collection of superovulated mouse oocytes continuously by surgery and their development after activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Min-kang; Zhang Tian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish a new way to collect superovulated oocytes or zygotes repeatedly from an individual mouse. Methods: Superovulations were induced by injection PMSG and hCG in Kunming strain mice. The ampullaes of oviduct of all anaesthetised mouse were put in a specially designed "U" sink and released. The second and third times of PMSG injection were made on the sixth day and eleventh day after the first superovulation injection. The capacity of development was examined by in vitro culture of parthenogenesis activation oocytes. Results: Development to blastocyst stage was not significantly different between the first and second time collection. The percentage of blastocyst stage in CD and Sr++ treatment was significantly higher (P<0.05) than the oocytes treated in CB and Sr++. Conclusion: This method enables us to collect oocytes or zygotes repeatedly from one individual mouse in an interval as short as 5 days and without influence on the quality of oocytes.

  9. Zebrafish as a Model Organism for the Development of Drugs for Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Bootorabi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer, which includes melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma, represents the most common type of cutaneous malignancy worldwide, and its incidence is expected to rise in the near future. This condition derives from acquired genetic dysregulation of signaling pathways involved in the proliferation and apoptosis of skin cells. The development of animal models has allowed a better understanding of these pathomechanisms, with the possibility of carrying out toxicological screening and drug development. In particular, the zebrafish (Danio rerio has been established as one of the most important model organisms for cancer research. This model is particularly suitable for live cell imaging and high-throughput drug screening in a large-scale fashion. Thanks to the recent advances in genome editing, such as the clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 methodologies, the mechanisms associated with cancer development and progression, as well as drug resistance can be investigated and comprehended. With these unique tools, the zebrafish represents a powerful platform for skin cancer research in the development of target therapies. Here, we will review the advantages of using the zebrafish model for drug discovery and toxicological and phenotypical screening. We will focus in detail on the most recent progress in the field of zebrafish model generation for the study of melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, including cancer cell injection and transgenic animal development. Moreover, we will report the latest compounds and small molecules under investigation in melanoma zebrafish models.

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as skin carcinogens: comparison of benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene and three environmental mixtures in the FVB/N mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddens, Lisbeth K; Larkin, Andrew; Krueger, Sharon K; Bradfield, Christopher A; Waters, Katrina M; Tilton, Susan C; Pereira, Cliff B; Löhr, Christiane V; Arlt, Volker M; Phillips, David H; Williams, David E; Baird, William M

    2012-11-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), was compared to dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) and combinations of three environmental PAH mixtures (coal tar, diesel particulate and cigarette smoke condensate) using a two stage, FVB/N mouse skin tumor model. DBC (4nmol) was most potent, reaching 100% tumor incidence with a shorter latency to tumor formation, less than 20 weeks of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) promotion compared to all other treatments. Multiplicity was 4 times greater than BaP (400 nmol). Both PAHs produced primarily papillomas followed by squamous cell carcinoma and carcinoma in situ. Diesel particulate extract (1 mg SRM 1650b; mix 1) did not differ from toluene controls and failed to elicit a carcinogenic response. Addition of coal tar extract (1 mg SRM 1597a; mix 2) produced a response similar to BaP. Further addition of 2 mg of cigarette smoke condensate (mix 3) did not alter the response with mix 2. PAH-DNA adducts measured in epidermis 12 h post initiation and analyzed by ³²P post-labeling, did not correlate with tumor incidence. PAH-dependent alteration in transcriptome of skin 12 h post initiation was assessed by microarray. Principal component analysis (sum of all treatments) of the 922 significantly altered genes (p<0.05), showed DBC and BaP to cluster distinct from PAH mixtures and each other. BaP and mixtures up-regulated phase 1 and phase 2 metabolizing enzymes while DBC did not. The carcinogenicity with DBC and two of the mixtures was much greater than would be predicted based on published Relative Potency Factors (RPFs).

  11. DNA methylation in mouse embryonic stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Tom; Gilbert, Nick; Ramsahoye, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian development is associated with considerable changes in global DNA methylation levels at times of genomic reprogramming. Normal DNA methylation is essential for development but, despite considerable advances in our understanding of the DNA methyltransferases, the reason that development fails when DNA methylation is deficient remains unclear. Furthermore, although much is known about the enzymes that cause DNA methylation, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms or significance of active demethylation in early development. In this review, we discuss the roles of the various DNA methyltransferases and their likely functions in development.

  12. Estimation of skin phototypes with optical parameters: an experimental study using newly developed fibre optic detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, F; Kapoustina, V; Kron, A; Fink, A; Rädle, M

    2013-02-01

    In an experimental study (October 2010 Mannheim Germany) with 99 Caucasian volunteers, the skin colour (L*, a*, b*) and the reflectance spectra of human skin were compared to the Fitzpatrick's sun-reactive skin photo types (SPT). For this purpose, the skin colour and the reflectance spectra of human skin were determined using non-invasive method with a newly developed fibre optic detection device. The device, based on reflectance spectroscopy, was designed and optimized using a commercial optical analysis Software. By means of the measured spectra of scattered light, the colour values and the absorption spectra of the skin were calculated. Neither any of the L*, a*, b* colour values nor any of the parameters of the absorbance spectra can be used alone to assess the skin type properly. Therefore, an ordinal logistic regression analysis was performed, using the statistical computing software r, to correlate the skin types with the measured optical parameters. It turned out that the detection device combined with the extended statistical analysis gives a better estimate of skin type in respect of the measured optical parameters than a procedure with only L*, a*, b* colour values. Even with the extended methodology, the procedure gives only a rough estimation of the skin type.

  13. Development and validation of a new method for measuring friction between skin and nonwoven materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottenden, A M; Wong, W K; Cottenden, D J; Farbrot, A

    2008-07-01

    A new method for measuring the coefficient of friction between nonwoven materials and the curved surface of the volar forearm has been developed and validated. The method was used to measure the coefficient of static friction for three different nonwoven materials on the normal (dry) and over-hydrated volar forearms of five female volunteers (ages 18-44). The method proved simple to run and had good repeatability: the coefficient of variation (standard deviation expressed as a percentage of the mean) for triplets of repeat measurements was usually (80 per cent of the time) less than 10 per cent. Measurements involving the geometrically simpler configuration of pulling a weighted fabric sample horizontally across a quasi-planar area of volar forearm skin proved experimentally more difficult and had poorer repeatability. However, correlations between values of coefficient of static friction derived using the two methods were good (R = 0.81 for normal (dry) skin, and 0.91 for over-hydrated skin). Measurements of the coefficient of static friction for the three nonwovens for normal (dry) and for over-hydrated skin varied in the ranges of about 0.3-0.5 and 0.9-1.3, respectively. In agreement with Amontons' law, coefficients of friction were invariant with normal pressure over the entire experimental range (0.1-8.2 kPa).

  14. The development of race-based perceptual categorization: skin color dominates early category judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Stepanova, Elena V; Dotsch, Ron; Todorov, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Prior research on the development of race-based categorization has concluded that children understand the perceptual basis of race categories from as early as age 4 (e.g. Aboud, 1988). However, such work has rarely separated the influence of skin color from other physiognomic features considered by adults to be diagnostic of race categories. In two studies focusing on Black-White race categorization judgments in children between the ages of 4 and 9, as well as in adults, we find that categorization decisions in early childhood are determined almost entirely by attention to skin color, with attention to other physiognomic features exerting only a small influence on judgments as late as middle childhood. We further find that when skin color cues are largely eliminated from the stimuli, adults readily shift almost entirely to focus on other physiognomic features. However, 6- and 8-year-old children show only a limited ability to shift attention to facial physiognomy and so perform poorly on the task. These results demonstrate that attention to 'race' in younger children is better conceptualized as attention to skin color, inviting a reinterpretation of past work focusing on children's race-related cognition.

  15. Risk of skin cancer development in 672 patients affected by actinic keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dika, Emi; Fanti, Pier A; Misciali, Cosimo; Vaccari, Sabina; Crisman, Giuliana; Barisani, Alessia; Baraldi, Carlotta; Ribero, Simone; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2016-12-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are the most common type of keratinocytic lesions worldwide. The skin areas affected by the so-called "field cancerization" harbor mutagenetic risks for the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively investigated the histopathological reports and clinical charts of 672 patients affected by multiple AKs, presenting at least 5 years of follow-up. The frequency of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC, namely SCC and basal cell carcinoma [BCC]) and malignant melanomas (MMs) in patients affected by multiple AKs were analyzed. More than 40% of patients with a previous diagnosis of multiple AKs developed an NMSC (SCC or BCC), or an MM, during a follow-up period of 5 to 11 years. The risk of developing another skin malignancy appeared to be higher in the age range between 61 and 80 years. The relative risk of developing a BCC and/or an MM in patients with a previous AK diagnosis was found to be 4.52. The presence of multiple AKs and "field cancerization" seems to be associated with a high risk not only of NMSC such as SCC and BCC, but also of MM. An adequate follow-up is required in these groups of patients.

  16. Application of concentrated deep sea water inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bak Jong-Phil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mineral water from deep-sea bedrock, formed over thousands of years, is rich in minerals such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe and others. Our present study was to investigate the preventive effects of natural deep-sea water on developing atopic dermatitis (AD. Methods We elicited AD by application of DNCB (2,4-dinitro-chlorobezene in Nc/Nga mouse dorsal skin. Deep Sea water (DSW was filtered and concentrated by a nanofiltration process and reverse osmosis. We applied concentrated DSW (CDSW to lesions five times per week for six weeks, followed by evaluation. 1% pimecrolimus ointment was used as positive control. The severity of skin lesions was assessed macroscopically and histologically. Levels of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in the serum were detected by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ spleen lymphocytes were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Results DNCB-treated mice showed atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions. Treatment of mice with CDSW reduced the severity of symptoms in the skin lesions, including edema, erythema, dryness, itching, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL. Histological analyses demonstrated that epidermal thickness and infiltration of inflammatory cells were decreased after CDSW treatment. Given these interesting observations, we further evaluated the effect of CDSW on immune responses in this AD model. Treatment AD mice with CDSW inhibited up-regulation of IgE, histamine, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum. Also, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in spleen lymphocyte was down-regulated after treatment with CDSW. Finally, cytokines, especially IL-4 and IL-10 which are important for Th2 cell development, were reduced. Conclusions Our data suggests that topical application of CDSW could be useful in preventing the development of atopic dermatitis.

  17. Berry skin development in Norton grape: Distinct patterns of transcriptional regulation and flavonoid biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex and dynamic changes during grape berry development have been studied in Vitis vinifera, but little is known about these processes in other Vitis species. The grape variety 'Norton', with a major portion of its genome derived from Vitis aestivalis, maintains high levels of malic acid and phenolic acids in the ripening berries in comparison with V. vinifera varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon. Furthermore, Norton berries develop a remarkably high level of resistance to most fungal pathogens while Cabernet Sauvignon berries remain susceptible to those pathogens. The distinct characteristics of Norton and Cabernet Sauvignon merit a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulation and metabolite pathways. Results A microarray study was conducted on transcriptome changes of Norton berry skin during the period of 37 to 127 days after bloom, which represents berry developmental phases from herbaceous growth to full ripeness. Samples of six berry developmental stages were collected. Analysis of the microarray data revealed that a total of 3,352 probe sets exhibited significant differences at transcript levels, with two-fold changes between at least two developmental stages. Expression profiles of defense-related genes showed a dynamic modulation of nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR resistance genes and pathogenesis-related (PR genes during berry development. Transcript levels of PR-1 in Norton berry skin clearly increased during the ripening phase. As in other grapevines, genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway were up-regulated in Norton as the berry developed. The most noticeable was the steady increase of transcript levels of stilbene synthase genes. Transcriptional patterns of six MYB transcription factors and eleven structural genes of the flavonoid pathway and profiles of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs during berry skin development were analyzed comparatively in Norton and Cabernet

  18. Development and evaluation of an emulsion containing lycopene for combating acceleration of skin aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Caramori Cefali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene, a carotenoid and potent antioxidant is found in large quantities in tomatoes. Lycopene combats diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and different types of cancer, including prostate cancer. However, its topical use in emulsion form for the combat of skin aging is under-explored. The aim of the present study was to develop an emulsion containing lycopene extracted from salad tomatoes and evaluate its cytotoxicity, stability, rheological behavior, antioxidant activity and phytocosmetic permeation. The developed cosmetic comprised an oil phase made up of shea derivatives and was evaluated in terms of its physiochemical stability, spreadability, thermal analysis, rheological behavior, microbiological quality, cytotoxicity, antioxidant activity, cutaneous permeation and retention. The results demonstrate that this phytocosmetic is stable, exhibits satisfactory rheological behavior for a topical formula and is a promising product for combating skin aging.

  19. Penetration enhancement in mouse skin and lipolysis in adipocytes by TAT-GKH, a new cosmetic ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Man; Chang, Min Youl; Park, Sun Gyoo; Kang, Nae Gyu; Song, Young Sook; Lee, Young Hwa; Yoo, Young Chang; Cho, Wan Goo; Choi, Soo Young; Kang, She Hoon

    2003-01-01

    Since the basic domain of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein was reported to possess the ability to traverse biological membranes efficiently, various therapeutic proteins have been attached to TAT for the purpose of therapy. In this study, the tripeptide GKH (glycine-lysine-histidine) derived from parathyroid hormone (PTH), known as lipolytic peptide, was attached to 9-poly lysine (TAT) to be used as a cosmetic ingredient in slimming products. TAT-GKH at 10(-5) M induced approximately 37.6% and 41.5% maximal lipolytic effects in cultured 3T3-L1 differentiated adipocytes and in epididymal adipocytes isolated from rats, respectively, compared with basal lipolysis. The lipolytic effect of GKH was not changed by TAT-GKH fusion. In cytotoxicity tests, there was no cytotoxicity in any dose concentration of TAT-GKH. We confirmed that TAT-GKH induced lipolytic activity by GKH without cytotoxicity and with the possibility of its use as a safe cosmetic ingredient. TAT-GKH elevated penetration into excised hairless mice skin 36 times more efficiently than GKH. TAT-GKH can be used as a cosmetic ingredient in slimming products, with both penetration enhancement and lipolytic effect without cytotoxicity.

  20. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-04-26

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs.

  1. Development of the Nonobese Diabetic Mouse and Contribution of Animal Models for Understanding Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 1974, the discovery of a mouse and a rat that spontaneously developed hyperglycemia led to the development of 2 autoimmune diabetes models: nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse and Bio-Breeding rat. These models have contributed to our understanding of autoimmune diabetes, provided tools to dissect autoimmune islet damage, and facilitated development of early detection, prevention, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. The genetic characterization, monoclonal antibodies, and congenic strains have made NOD mice especially useful. Although the establishment of the inbred NOD mouse strain was documented by Makino et al (Jikken Dobutsu. 1980;29:1–13), this review will focus on the not-as-well-known history leading to the discovery of a glycosuric female mouse by Yoshihiro Tochino. This discovery was spearheaded by years of effort by Japanese scientists from different disciplines and dedicated animal care personnel and by the support of the Shionogi Pharmaceutical Company, Osaka, Japan. The history is based on the early literature, mostly written in Japanese, and personal communications especially with Dr Tochino, who was involved in diabetes animal model development and who contributed to the release of NOD mice to the international scientific community. This article also reviews the scientific contributions made by the Bio-Breeding rat to autoimmune diabetes. PMID:28291161

  2. Three-dimensional imaging of the developing mouse female reproductive organs with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Behringer, Richard R.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Infertility is a known major health concern and is estimated to impact ~15% of couples in the U.S. The majority of failed pregnancies occur before or during implantation of the fertilized embryo into the uterus. Understanding the mechanisms regulating development by studying mouse reproductive organs could significantly contribute to an improved understanding of normal development of reproductive organs and developmental causes of infertility in humans. Towards this goal, we report a three-dimensional (3D) imaging study of the developing mouse reproductive organs (ovary, oviduct, and uterus) using optical coherence tomography (OCT). In our study, OCT was used for 3D imaging of reproductive organs without exogenous contrast agents and provides micro-scale spatial resolution. Experiments were conducted in vitro on mouse reproductive organs ranging from the embryonic day 14.5 to adult stages. Structural features of the ovary, oviduct, and uterus are presented. Additionally, a comparison with traditional histological analysis is illustrated. These results provide a basis for a wide range of infertility studies in mouse models. Through integration with traditional genetic and molecular biology approaches, this imaging method can improve understanding of ovary, oviduct, and uterus development and function, serving to further contribute to our understanding of fertility and infertility.

  3. A microfluidic system supports single mouse embryo culture leading to full-term development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteves, Telma Cristina; Rossem, van Fleur; Nordhoff, Verena; Schlatt, Stefan; Boiani, Michele; Le Gac, Séverine

    2013-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the feasibility of application of a microfluidic system for in vitro culture of pre-implantation mouse embryos, with subsequent development to full-term upon embryo transfer. Specifically, embryos cultured in groups in nL volume chambers achieve pre-implantation develo

  4. Development, characterization, and skin delivery studies of related ultradeformable vesicles: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenso, Andreia; Raposo, Sara; Batista, Cátia; Cardoso, Pedro; Mendes, Tiago; Praça, Fabíola Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Simões, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Ultradeformable vesicles (UDV) have recently become a promising tool for the development of improved and innovative dermal and transdermal therapies. The aim of this work was to study three related UDV: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes for the incorporation of actives of distinct polarities, namely, vitamin E and caffeine, and to evaluate the effect of the carrier on skin permeation and penetration. These actives were incorporated in UDV formulations further characterized for vesicles imaging by transmission electron microscopy; mean vesicle size and polydispersity index by photon correlation spectroscopy; zeta potential by laser-Doppler anemometry; deformability by pressure-driven transport; and incorporation efficiency (IE) after actives quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography. Topical delivery studies were performed in order to compare UDV formulations regarding the release, skin permeation, and penetration profiles. All UDV formulations showed size values within the expected range, except transethosomes prepared by "transfersomal method", for which size was smaller than 100 nm in contrast to that obtained for vesicles prepared by "ethosomal method". Zeta potential was negative and higher for formulations containing sodium cholate. The IE was much higher for vitamin E- than caffeine-loaded UDV as expected. For flux measurements, the following order was obtained: transethosomes (TE) > ethosomes (E) ≥ transfersomes (T). This result was consistent with the release and skin penetration profiles for Vitamin E-loaded UDV. However, the releasing results were totally the opposite for caffeine-loaded UDV, which might be explained by the solubility and thermodynamic activity of this active in each formulation instead of the UDV deformability attending to the higher non-incorporated fraction of caffeine. Anyway, a high skin penetration and permeation for all caffeine-loaded UDV were obtained. Transethosomes were more deformable than ethosomes

  5. The kinetics and distribution of different macrophage populations in the developing rat skin

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in host defense and homeostasis. In contrast to adulthood, far less is known about macrophage populations in fetuses and neonates. Macrophages were evaluated in the developing rat skin at different anatomical sites (head, anterior dorsal, posterior dorsal, and abdomen) of F344 rats obtained on gestational days 18 and 20, on neonatal days 1-21, and at adult weeks 5-15. The numbers of macrophages in the epidermis, dermis or perifollicular...

  6. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  7. Aquaporin 11 in the developing mouse submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Helga S; Ruus, Ann-Kristin; Schreurs, Olav; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2010-02-01

    Several aquaporins (AQPs) have been detected in mature and embryonic mammalian salivary glands (AQP1 and AQP3-AQP8). However, AQP11 has, to our knowledge, never before been described in salivary glands, but is known to be important in, for example, kidney development in mice. We therefore thought it relevant to investigate if AQP11 was present during salivary organogenesis. The submandibular salivary gland (SMG) from CD1 mice was studied during prenatal development and early postnatal development, and also in young adult male and female mice. The expression trend of the AQP11 transcript was detected using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the temporal-spatial pattern was observed using in situ hybridization. The AQP11 transcript was first detected at embryonic day 13.5 and showed a more or less constitutive expression trend during the prenatal and early postnatal SMG development. Spatial studies demonstrated that the AQP11 transcript was present in the developing and mature duct structures at all stages studied. In the end pieces, the AQP11 transcript was reduced during glandular development. Our results point to an important role for AQP11 during salivary gland development.

  8. Psychosensorial assessment of skin damage caused by a sliding on artificial turf: the development and validation of a skin damage area and severity index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnde, W. van den; Peppelman, M.; Olde Weghuis, M.; Erp, P.E.J. van

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Injury prevention is an important reason for the development of performance standards in football. Currently, there is no objective method available to classify sliding induced skin injuries, which includes the perceived sliding friendliness of football pitches. The purpose of this study

  9. Erucin Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Properties in Murine Macrophages and Mouse Skin: Possible Mediation through the Inhibition of NFκB Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Won Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Erucin, an isothiocyanate, is a hydrolysis product of glucoerucin found in arugula and has recently been reported to have anti-cancer properties in various cancer cells. In this study, we assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of erucin and the underlying mechanisms, using lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated mouse skin. In RAW 264.7 cells, erucin (2.5, 5 μmol/L inhibited LPS-induced production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. Erucin inhibited LPS-induced degradation of the inhibitor of κBα and translocation of p65 to the nucleus and, subsequently, reduced LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB DNA binding activities, as well as the transcriptional activity of NFκB, leading to the decreased expression of NFκB-target genes, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase (COX-2, as well as transcriptional activity of iNOS and COX-2. In mice, erucin (100, 300 nmoles treatment significantly inhibited phorbol ester-induced formation of ear edema and expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that erucin exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory enzymes and cytokines, which may be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of NFκB signaling.

  10. Erucin exerts anti-inflammatory properties in murine macrophages and mouse skin: possible mediation through the inhibition of NFκB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han Jin; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2013-10-15

    Erucin, an isothiocyanate, is a hydrolysis product of glucoerucin found in arugula and has recently been reported to have anti-cancer properties in various cancer cells. In this study, we assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of erucin and the underlying mechanisms, using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated mouse skin. In RAW 264.7 cells, erucin (2.5, 5 μmol/L) inhibited LPS-induced production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. Erucin inhibited LPS-induced degradation of the inhibitor of κBα and translocation of p65 to the nucleus and, subsequently, reduced LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) DNA binding activities, as well as the transcriptional activity of NFκB, leading to the decreased expression of NFκB-target genes, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, as well as transcriptional activity of iNOS and COX-2. In mice, erucin (100, 300 nmoles) treatment significantly inhibited phorbol ester-induced formation of ear edema and expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that erucin exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory enzymes and cytokines, which may be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of NFκB signaling.

  11. Transport behavior of hairless mouse skin during constant current DC iontophoresis, part 2: iontophoresis of nonionic molecules with cotransport of polystyrene sulfonate oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Mark R; Li, S Kevin; Higuchi, William I

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize changes that occur in the iontophoretic transport of nonionic probe permeants in hairless mouse skin epidermal membrane from the anode to cathode when polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) oligomers are cotransported from the cathode to anode. The experiments were conducted with trace levels of the nonionic probe permeants: urea, mannitol, and raffinose. In order to systematically assess changes that occur as a result of having PSS in the cathodal chamber, the steady-state transport parameters of the membrane and the experimental permeability coefficients of the probe permeants were determined and compared with results obtained from earlier baseline experiments where both the cathodal and anodal chamber media were phosphate buffered saline. In addition, the physicochemical properties of the PSS solutions were determined including the solution viscosity and conductance as well as the mobilities of individual PSS oligomers. The effective pore radii of the transport pathways were calculated using a theoretical expression based on simultaneous diffusion and electroosmosis. Compared with the baseline results, the calculated radii were found to have increased up to around twofold and the iontophoretic fluxes of the probe permeants increased by as much sixfold.

  12. The selective PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan inhibits neurogenic vasodilation and edema formation in the mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banki, E; Hajna, Zs; Kemeny, A; Botz, B; Nagy, P; Bolcskei, K; Toth, G; Reglodi, D; Helyes, Zs

    2014-10-01

    We have earlier shown that PACAP-38 decreases neurogenic inflammation. However, there were no data on its receptorial mechanism and the involvement of its PAC1 and VPAC1/2 receptors (PAC1R, VPAC1/2R) in this inhibitory effect. Neurogenic inflammation in the mouse ear was induced by topical application of the Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptor activator mustard oil (MO). Consequent neurogenic edema, vasodilation and plasma leakage were assessed by measuring ear thickness with engineer's micrometer, detecting tissue perfusion by laser Doppler scanning and Evans blue or indocyanine green extravasation by intravital videomicroscopy or fluorescence imaging, respectively. Myeloperoxidase activity, an indicator of neutrophil infiltration, was measured from the ear homogenates with spectrophotometry. The selective PAC1R agonist maxadilan, the VPAC1/2R agonist vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or the vehicle were administered i.p. 15 min before MO. Substance P (SP) concentration of the ear was assessed by radioimmunoassay. Maxadilan significantly diminished MO-induced neurogenic edema, increase of vascular permeability and vasodilation. These inhibitory effects of maxadilan may be partially due to the decreased substance P (SP) levels. In contrast, inhibitory effect of VIP on ear swelling was moderate, without any effect on MO-induced plasma leakage or SP release, however, activation of VPAC1/2R inhibited the increased microcirculation caused by the early arteriolar vasodilation. Neither the PAC1R, nor the VPAC1/2R agonist influenced the MO-evoked increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity. These results clearly show that PAC1R activation inhibits acute neurogenic arterial vasodilation and plasma protein leakage from the venules, while VPAC1/2R stimulation is only involved in the attenuation of vasodilation.

  13. Dietary lipid varying in corn and coconut oil influences protein kinase C in phorbol ester-treated mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouat, M F; Locniskar, M F

    1998-01-01

    An earlier study indicated that increased levels of corn oil in the diet resulted in decreased tumor yield after promotion by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in Sencar mouse epidermis (J Leyton, ML Lee, M Locniskar, MA Belury, TJ Slaga, et al. Cancer Res 51, 907-915, 1991). In the present study we investigated whether corn oil diets could alter the subcellular distribution and activity of protein kinase C (PKC), which is part of an important signaling pathway in carcinogenesis. We used three 15% (wt/wt) fat semipurified diets containing three ratios of corn oil to coconut oil: 1.0%:14.0% (Diet L), 7.9%:7.1% (Diet M), and 15.0%:0.0% (Diet H). The translocation to the membrane fraction of epidermal PKC by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate was decreased as the corn oil content of the diet was increased, and this correlates with the decrease in tumor yield. The translocation to the membrane fraction of specific isoforms of PKC was affected by increased dietary corn oil: the largest decreases were in cytosolic PKC-alpha and -beta, and the smallest change was in PKC-epsilon. The other isoforms, PKC-delta and -zeta, were unaffected. The major constituent of corn oil is linoleic acid, which did not affect the binding of phorbol ester to PKC, which suggests that inhibition of such binding was not responsible for the effects of increased dietary corn oil. Products of linoleic acid metabolism, i.e., arachidonic acid and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, also did not affect the binding of phorbol ester to PKC. Thus the results of these studies suggest that the subcellular distributions of PKC and its isoforms can be modulated by dietary lipids.

  14. Establishment of Mouse Model of Skin Ischemia%小鼠皮肤局部缺血模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄谢梅; 邢伟; 黄宏; 郝进; 徐祥

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish the model of acute skin ischemia in Kun Ming mice. Methods Forty female kun Ming mice were divided into A and B two groups randomly,20 in each group . Group A U-shaped peninsular incision,which is 1. 5 cm in width and 3. 3 cm in length, as deep as full thickness, was created on the back of A-group kun Ming mice. Group B U-shaped peninsular incision, which is 1. 5 cm in width and 2. 5 cm in length, as deep as full thickness, was created on the back of the other female kun Ming mice. Before suturing flaps back in place,a 2-mm-wild medical rubber sheet was inserted to separate the flap edges. Then the flaps were observed and the blood flow of flaps were measured by The full-field laser perfusion imager (FLPI; Moor Instruments Ltd). Results 50% of the longer flaps had approximately (37. 20 ± 4. 83) % necrosis on the second postoperative day . All of the longer flaps developed a considerable amount of distal necrosis rate on the third postoperative day,which was increase with time. The smaller flaps displayed cyanosis and edema on the first postoperative day. The area of cyanosis and edema accounted for (77. 46 ± 4. 51) % , and was followed by a progressive decrease over the course of 5 d. Cyanosis , edema completely dissipated until the seventh day. There was a significant decrease in the flap blood flow on the first day after operation ( p <0. 05 ). There was no distinctly significance until the seventh day. Conclusion We have Successfully established a Kun Ming mouse model of skin ischemia,which provided the possibility to investigate the mechanism and strategy of microvascular regeneration.%目的 研究建立稳定的昆明小鼠皮肤局部缺血模型.方法 取40只雌性昆明小鼠,随机分为A/B两组,每组20只.分别在小鼠背部建立深达皮下筋膜层的U型皮瓣.A组为3.3×1.5 cm皮瓣组,B组为2.5×1.5 em皮瓣组.皮瓣游离缘垫以医用橡胶,缝合切口,造成皮肤缺血模型,术后观察皮瓣发绀水肿及

  15. Mouse Prkar1a haploinsufficiency leads to an increase in tumors in the Trp53+/− or Rb1+/− backgrounds and chemically induced skin papillomas by dysregulation of the cell cycle and Wnt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Madson Q.; Muchow, Michael; Boikos, Sosipatros; Bauer, Andrew J.; Griffin, Kurt J.; Tsang, Kit Man; Cheadle, Chris; Watkins, Tonya; Wen, Feng; Starost, Matthew F.; Bossis, Ioannis; Nesterova, Maria; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2010-01-01

    PRKAR1A inactivation leads to dysregulated cAMP signaling and Carney complex (CNC) in humans, a syndrome associated with skin, endocrine and other tumors. The CNC phenotype is not easily explained by the ubiquitous cAMP signaling defect; furthermore, Prkar1a+/− mice did not develop skin and other CNC tumors. To identify whether a Prkar1a defect is truly a generic but weak tumorigenic signal that depends on tissue-specific or other factors, we investigated Prkar1a+/− mice when bred within the Rb1+/− or Trp53+/− backgrounds, or treated with a two-step skin carcinogenesis protocol. Prkar1a+/− Trp53+/− mice developed more sarcomas than Trp53+/− mice (P < 0.05) and Prkar1a+/− Rb1+/− mice grew more (and larger) pituitary and thyroid tumors than Rb1+/− mice. All mice with double heterozygosity had significantly reduced life-spans compared with their single-heterozygous counterparts. Prkar1a+/− mice also developed more papillomas than wild-type animals. A whole-genome transcriptome profiling of tumors produced by all three models identified Wnt signaling as the main pathway activated by abnormal cAMP signaling, along with cell cycle abnormalities; all changes were confirmed by qRT–PCR array and immunohistochemistry. siRNA down-regulation of Ctnnb1, E2f1 or Cdk4 inhibited proliferation of human adrenal cells bearing a PRKAR1A-inactivating mutation and Prkar1a+/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts and arrested both cell lines at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. In conclusion, Prkar1a haploinsufficiency is a relatively weak tumorigenic signal that can act synergistically with other tumor suppressor gene defects or chemicals to induce tumors, mostly through Wnt-signaling activation and cell cycle dysregulation, consistent with studies in human neoplasms carrying PRKAR1A defects. PMID:20080939

  16. Development of the cerebellar cortex in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangshu Cheng; Jin Du; Dongming Yu; Qiying Jiang; Yanqiu Hu; Lei Wang; Mingshan Li; Jinbo Deng

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the central nervous system of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behavior. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis events. The formation of the layered structure in the developing cerebellum remains unclear. The present study investigated the development of the cerebellar cortex. The results demonstrate that the primordium of the cerebellum comprises the ependymal, mantle, and marginal layers at embryonic day 12 (E12). Subsequently, the laminated cerebellar cortex undergoes cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and at about postnatal day 0 (P0), the cerebellar cortex presents an external granular layer, a molecular layer, a Purkinje layer, and an internal granular layer. The external granular layer is thickest at P6/7 and disappears at P20. From P0 to P30, the internal granular cells and the Purkinje cells gradually differentiate and develop until maturity. Apoptotic neurons are evident in the layered structure in the developing cerebellar cortex. The external granular layer disappears gradually because of cell migration and apoptosis. The cells of the other layers primarily undergo differentiation, development, and apoptosis.

  17. BMP4 signaling mediates Zeb family in developing mouse tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong-Oh; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Kyoung-Won; Nakagawa, Eizo; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Sung-Won; Jung, Han-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Tooth morphogenesis is regulated by sequential and reciprocal interaction between oral epithelium and neural-crest-derived ectomesenchyme. The interaction is controlled by various signal molecules such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and Wnt. Zeb family is known as a transcription factor, which is essential for neural development and neural-crest-derived tissues, whereas the role of the Zeb family in tooth development remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the expression profiles of Zeb1 and Zeb2 during craniofacial development focusing on mesenchyme of palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ from E12.5 to E16.5. In addition, we examined the interaction between Zeb family and BMP4 during tooth development. Both Zeb1 and Zeb2 were expressed at mesenchyme of the palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ throughout the stages. In the case of tooth germ at the cap stage, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 was lost in epithelium-separated dental mesenchyme. However, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 in the dental mesenchyme was recovered by Bmp4 signaling via BMP4-soaked bead and tissue recombination. Our results suggest that Zeb1 and Zeb2, which were mediated by BMP4, play an important role in neural-crest-derived craniofacial organ morphogenesis, such as tooth development.

  18. Follicle-stimulating hormone accelerates mouse oocyte development in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeestere, Isabelle; Streiff, Agathe K; Suzuki, João; Al-Khabouri, Shaima; Mahrous, Enas; Tan, Seang Lin; Clarke, Hugh J

    2012-07-01

    During folliculogenesis, oocytes grow and acquire developmental competence in a mutually dependent relationship with their adjacent somatic cells. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays an essential and well-established role in the differentiation of somatic follicular cells, but its function in the development of the oocyte has still not been elucidated. We report here that oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice, which cannot produce FSH, grow at the same rate and reach the same size as those of wild-type mice. Consistent with this observation, the granulosa cells of Fshb(-/-) mice express the normal quantity of mRNA encoding Kit ligand, which has been implicated in oocyte growth. Oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice also accumulate normal quantities of cyclin B1 and CDK1 proteins and mitochondrial DNA. Moreover, they acquire the ability to complete meiotic maturation in vitro and undergo transition from non-surrounded nucleolus to surrounded nucleolus. However, these events of late oocyte development are significantly delayed. Following in vitro maturation and fertilization, only a small number of embryos derived from oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice reach the blastocyst stage. Administration of equine chorionic gonadotropin, which provides FSH activity, 48 h before in vitro maturation increases the number of blastocysts obtained subsequently. These results indicate that FSH is not absolutely required for oocyte development in vivo but that this process occurs more rapidly in its presence. We suggest that FSH may coordinate the development of the germline and somatic compartments of the follicle, ensuring that ovulation releases a developmentally competent egg.

  19. Genetic and epigenetic control of early mouse development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    A decade after cloning the sheep Dolly, the induction of pluripotency by transcription factors has further revolutionized the possibilities of reprogramming a cell's identity, with exciting prospects for personalized medicine. Establishing totipotency during natural reproduction remains, however,...... extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This may underlie the efficient acquisition of totipotency during subsequent preimplantation development....

  20. The effect of multifunctional polymer-based gels on wound healing in full thickness bacteria-contaminated mouse skin wound models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Cecelia C; Whaley, Diana; Babu, Ranjith; Zhang, Jianying; Krishna, Priya; Beckman, Eric; Pasculle, A William; Wells, Alan

    2007-09-01

    We determined whether a two-part space-conforming polyethylene glycol/dopa polymer-based gel promoted healing of contaminated wounds in mice. This silver-catalysed gel was previously developed to be broadly microbiocidal in vitro while being biocompatible with human wound cell functioning. Full-thickness wounds were created on the backs of mice. The wounds were inoculated with 10(4) CFU of each of four common skin wound contaminants, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and Clostridium perfringens. The wounds were then treated with our multifunctional polymer-based gel, the commercially available NewSkin product, or left to heal untreated. The untreated wounds were overtly infected, and presented detectable bacterial loads over the entire 21-day healing period, while the gel and NewSkin groups presented significantly smaller rises in bacterial levels and were cleared of detectable colonies by the third week, with the gel group clearing the bacteria earlier. While all three groups healed their wounds, the polymer-based gel-treated group demonstrated significantly earlier re-epithelialization and dermal maturation (Phealing wound. These preclinical studies show that the anti-microbial polymer gel not only supports but also accelerates healing of bacterially contaminated wounds.

  1. Anti-tumor-promoting activity of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seeds in the mouse skin two-stage initiation-promotion protocol and identification of procyanidin B5-3'-gallate as the most effective antioxidant constituent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Wang, J; Chen, Y; Agarwal, R

    1999-09-01

    Procyanidins present in grape seeds are known to exert anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic and anti-allergic activities, prevent skin aging, scavenge oxygen free radicals and inhibit UV radiation-induced peroxidation activity. Since most of these events are associated with the tumor promotion stage of carcinogenesis, these studies suggest that grape seed polyphenols and the procyanidins present therein could be anticarcinogenic and/or anti-tumor-promoting agents. Therefore, we assessed the anti-tumor-promoting effect of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seeds (GSP) employing the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-promoted SENCAR mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocol as a model system. Following tumor initiation with DMBA, topical application of GSP at doses of 0.5 and 1.5 mg/mouse/application to the dorsal initiated mouse skin resulted in a highly significant inhibition of TPA tumor promotion. The observed anti-tumor-promoting effects of GSP were dose dependent and were evident in terms of a reduction in tumor incidence (35 and 60% inhibition), tumor multiplicity (61 and 83% inhibition) and tumor volume (67 and 87% inhibition) at both 0.5 and 1.5 mg GSP, respectively. Based on these results, we directed our efforts to separate and identify the individual polyphenols present in GSP and assess their antioxidant activity in terms of inhibition of epidermal lipid peroxidation. Employing HPLC followed by comparison with authentic standards for retention times in HPLC profiles, physiochemical properties and spectral analysis, nine individual polyphenols were identified as catechin, epicatechin, procyanidins B1-B5 and C1 and procyanidin B5-3'-gallate. Five of these individual polyphenols with evident structural differences, namely catechin, procyanidin B2, procyanidin B5, procyanidin C1 and procyanidin B5-3'-gallate, were assessed for antioxidant activity. All of them significantly inhibited

  2. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Issa, Radwan, E-mail: rabuissa@umich.edu

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Conditional knockout of Rac1 using Nkx2.5 Cre line is lethal at E13.5. • The myocardium of the mutant is thin and disorganized. • The phenotype is not due to cardiomyocyte low proliferation or apoptosis. • The phenotype is due to specific defect in cardiomyocyte adhesion. - Abstract: Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell–cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  3. Further development of the EpiDerm 3D reconstructed human skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Greg C; Aardema, Marilyn J; Hu, Ting; Barnett, Brenda; Kaluzhny, Yulia; Klausner, Mitchell; Karetsky, Viktor; Dahl, Erica L; Curren, Rodger D

    2009-03-17

    The upcoming ban on testing of cosmetics in animals by the European Union's 7th Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive will require genotoxicity safety assessments of cosmetics ingredients and final formulations to be based primarily on in vitro genotoxicity tests. The current in vitro test battery produces an unacceptably high rate of false positives, and used by itself would effectively prevent the use and development of many ingredients that are actually safe for human use. To address the need for an in vitro test that is more predictive of genotoxicity in vivo, we have developed an in vitro micronucleus assay using a three-dimensional human reconstructed skin model (EpiDerm) that more closely mimics the normal dermal exposure route of chemicals. We have refined this model and assessed its ability to predict genotoxicity of a battery of chemicals that have been previously classified as genotoxins or non-genotoxins based on in vivo rodent skin tests. Our reconstructed skin micronucleus assay correctly identified 7 genotoxins and 5 non-genotoxins, demonstrating its potential to have a higher predictive value than currently available in vitro genotoxicity tests, and its utility as part of a comprehensive in vitro genotoxicity testing strategy.

  4. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  5. Development of a tactile sensing system using piezoelectric robot skin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. K.; Hwang, H. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Since service robots perform their functions in close proximity to humans, they are much more likely than other types of robot to come into contact with humans. This means that safety regarding robot-human interaction is of particular concern and requires investigation. Existing tactile sensing methods are very effective at detecting external dangerous loadings; however, until now, they have been very expensive. Recently, a new type of self-sensing tactile technology for service robots has been introduced, which harnesses the piezoelectric effect of several robot skin materials. In these kinds of system, relatively cheap materials are used as sensors themselves. In this research, a robot system with a self-sensing tactile technology was developed using piezoelectric robot skin materials. The test results indicate that this type of system is appropriate for application to service robots.

  6. [Development of skin moisture and body fat measurement system for mobile application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Naihan; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Congzheng; Dong, Zhongfei

    2014-03-01

    Integrating physiological parameters measurement into mobile devices is a development tendency of mobile healthcare. Measurement methods for skin moisture and body fat content are studied in this paper. Electrodes are designed for easy integration into mobile devices, and can be embedded in the cover of the mobile phone. Experiments were conducted to obtain a fast and easy measurement method. The results of evaluation show that the measurement system can achieve the same accuracy as commercial products (with correlation above 0.9 and root mean squared error below 4%) in skin moisture and body fat content measurement. Measurement of local-area body fat content showed a nearly linear positive correlation between local-area body fat content and local-area body impedance.

  7. Hoxc13 Expression Pattern in Cashmere Goat Skin During Hair Follicle Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jiang-hong; ZHANG Wen-guang; LI Jin-quan; YIN Jun; ZHANG Yan-jun

    2009-01-01

    Hoxc13 has an important role in controlling hair formation.In this study,we examine the Hoxc13 RNA expression pattern of skin during embryo development.The result indicated that changes of the Hoxc13 gene expression and thickness of skin have a similar trend during hair follicle morphogenesis.In interpreting these results,we investigated whether the regulation motifs is in Hoxc13 intron,which is a 5.4 kb fragment.To blast with other mammals,we found a very conservative region in all mammal animals and two regions in livestock,such as cow,sheep,horse,dog,and so on,which are not in other Hox genes.We have examined putative pre-miRNA in this region,providing an entry point for elucidating currently unknown mechanisms that are required for regulating quantitative levels of Hoxc13 gene expression.

  8. Hes1 is required for appropriate morphogenesis and differentiation during mouse thyroid gland development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Carre

    Full Text Available Notch signalling plays an important role in endocrine development, through its target gene Hes1. Hes1, a bHLH transcriptional repressor, influences progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Recently, Hes1 was shown to be expressed in the thyroid and regulate expression of the sodium iodide symporter (Nis. To investigate the role of Hes1 for thyroid development, we studied thyroid morphology and function in mice lacking Hes1. During normal mouse thyroid development, Hes1 was detected from E9.5 onwards in the median anlage, and at E11.5 in the ultimobranchial bodies. Hes1(-/- mouse embryos had a significantly lower number of Nkx2-1-positive progenitor cells (p<0.05 at E9.5 and at E11.5. Moreover, Hes1(-/- mouse embryos showed a significantly smaller total thyroid surface area (-40 to -60% compared to wild type mice at all study time points (E9.5-E16.5. In both Hes1(-/- and wild type mouse embryos, most Nkx2-1-positive thyroid cells expressed the cell cycle inhibitor p57 at E9.5 in correlation with low proliferation index. In Hes1(-/- mouse embryos, fusion of the median anlage with the ultimobranchial bodies was delayed by 3 days (E16.5 vs. E13.5 in wild type mice. After fusion of thyroid anlages, hypoplastic Hes1(-/- thyroids revealed a significantly decreased labelling area for T4 (-78% and calcitonin (-65% normalized to Nkx2-1 positive cells. Decreased T4-synthesis might be due to reduced Nis labelling area (-69%. These findings suggest a dual role of Hes1 during thyroid development: first, control of the number of both thyrocyte and C-cell progenitors, via a p57-independent mechanism; second, adequate differentiation and endocrine function of thyrocytes and C-cells.

  9. Perceptions of Risk of Developing Skin Cancer for Diverse Audiences: Enhancing Relevance of Sun Protection to Reduce the Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, June K; Friedewald, John; Gordon, Elisa J

    2016-03-01

    Sixty-five percent of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Perceptions of risk of developing skin cancer, amelioration of this risk with sun protection, and having choices among sun protection strategies may enhance sun protection use by KTRS, who are at greater risk than the general population. Thirty KTRs stratified among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanic/Latinos evaluated three versions of the interactive, web-based, electronic sun protection program and suggested refinements. The sequence of content presentation prepared the participant to accept the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of the message. Beginning with informing participants that using sun protection reduces the chance of developing skin cancer made the information credible to KTRs. Showing skin cancer on all skin types and patient testimonials enhanced participants' awareness of their susceptibility to develop skin cancer and primed patients to receive their personal risk of developing skin cancer. Coupling presentation of knowledge about the benefits of sun protection in reducing the risk of developing skin cancer with the personal risk of getting the disease was essential to KTRs believing that they could influence their health outcome.

  10. Carcinogenicity of the environmental pollutants cyclopenteno-(cd)pyrene and cyclopentano(cd)pyrene in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalieri, E.; Rogan, E.; Toth, B.; Munhall, A.

    1981-01-01

    Cyclopenteno(cd)pyrene (CPEP) is a widespread environmental pollutant. This hydrocarbon and its 3,4-dihydro derivative, cyclopentano(cd)pyrene (CPAP), were tested on skin in a two-stage initiation-promotion experiment in CD-1 mice and by repeated application in Swiss mice. The biological effect of CPEP and CPAP was compared to that of benzo(a)-pyrene (BP). Nine-week-old female CD-1 mice in groups of 30 were treated every other day over a 20-day period at mini-dose levels of 0.18, 0.06 and 0.02 mumol of CPEP or CPAP in acetone. One group was treated with BP at the low mini-dose level. Initiation was followed by twice weekly application of tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate for 40 weeks. In the second experiments, nine-week-old female Swiss mice in groups of 30 were treated at dose levels of 1.8, 0.6 and 0.2 mumol CPEP or CPAP in acetone twice weekly for 30 weeks. One group was treated with BP at the low dose. CPAP was virtually inactive in both studies. In the initiation-promotion experiment CPEP was inactive at the low dose level, whereas BP exhibited significant tumorigenicity. At the medium and high doses CPEP showed weak, but statistically insignificant, tumorigenic activity. Repeated application of CPEP at the high, medium and low doses resulted in tumor incidences of 23, 37 and 57%, respectively. This reverse dose-response may be due to the relatively high cytotoxicity of CPEP, BP, which was compared to CPEP at the low dose, elicited tumors in 100% of the mice. Most of the CPEP-induced neoplasms were malignant and some metastasized to lungs and lymph nodes. The inactivity of CPAP suggests the carcinogenicity of CPEP is probably due to formation of the ultimate metabolite CPEP 3,4-oxide. In view of the abundance of CPEP in environmental and occupational pollutants, its moderately potent carcinogenicity may represent a potential health hazard.

  11. Relevance of LIF and EGF on Mouse Preimplantation Embryo Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Amiri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recent evidence suggests that Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF, a member ofinterleukin-6 family, has biological actions on preimplantation embryo development. Alsoit is established that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF, a strong mitosis-promoting agent,improves the preimplantation embryo development by increasing the cell metabolism andproliferation. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of these factors,alone and in combination together, on preimplantation and development of the embryo.Materials and Methods: Six to eight weeks old NMRI mice were super ovulated by injectionof 10IU PMSG and 10IU hCG, then the mated mice were killed 46 hours later. Theiroviducts were flushed, two-cell embryos collected and divided randomly to the four groupsas following: Control, treatment 1 (LIF, treatment 2 (EGF, treatment 3 (LIF+EGF. In eachgroup, the embryos were cultured in an incubator at 37°C with 5% CO2 and 90% humidityfor 72hrs. The state of embryo development was evaluated in 24,36,48,60 and 72hrsfollowing the embryos cultures. By the end of the cultures, cell apoptosis was studiedby the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferas-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNELtechnique.Results: Significant difference was detected in the rate of hatching in the LIF and LIF+EGFgroups. This difference was also seen in the rate of blastocyst formation after 36hrs(p<0.05 and in the average of the total cell number (p<0.05 after 72hrs. In comparison tothe apoptotic index, there was no significant difference between the control and treatmentgroups.Conclusion: The findings in this study show a beneficial effect of LIF and EGF on theblastocyst formation, hatching and its total cell numbers in vitro.

  12. Immunologic glycosphingolipidomics and NKT cell development in mouse thymus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yunsen; Thapa, Prakash; Hawke, David

    2009-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are a hybrid cell type of Natural Killer cells and T cells, whose development is dependent on thymic positive selection mediated by double positive thymocytes through their recognition of natural ligands presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, non-MHC, MHC-like antigen presenting...... for identifying additional ligands for NKT cells. Our results also provide early insights into cellular lipidomics studies, with a specific focus on the important immunological functions of glycosphingolipids....

  13. Involvement of insulin in early development of mouse one-cell stage embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that growth factors and hormones play important roles in cell prolif-eration and differentiation during early embryonic development. In the present study, we examined the expression and localization of insulin in the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos by quantitative ELISA, RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. In the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage em-bryos, expression of insulin was uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. We also examined the expres-sion, activity and localization of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and p70S6K. The expression of mTOR and p70S6K was not significantly different at the cell cycle of mouse one-cell stage embryos. mTOR and S6K were distributed evenly in the cytoplasm at G1, G2 and M phase phase, but at S phase, the distribution of mTOR and S6K was around the pronucleus. At different phases, the activity of mTOR fluctuated. We also used the PI3K specific inhibitor-Wortmannin to investigate the cleavage rate of eggs. The result showed that the rate obviously decreased. When the mTOR specific inhibitor Rapa-mycin was used, the first mitotic division of the mouse one-cell stage embryo was delayed. These re-sults suggested that insulin was expressed both in mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos, and may play functional roles in regulation of mouse early embryogenesis by activating the signal pathway of PI3K/PKB/mTOR/S6K.

  14. Involvement of insulin in early development of mouse one-cell stase embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU BingZhi; YU DaHai; ZHANG Zhe; DENG Xin; XU XiaoYan; FENG Chen; LI YanXiao; CUI Cheng; SU WenHui; ZHAO HongMei

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that growth factors and hormones play important roles in cell prolif-eration and differentiation during early embryonic development. In the present study, we examined the expression and localization of insulin in the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos by quantitative ELISA, RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. In the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage em-bryos, expression of insulin was uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. We also examined the expres-sion, activity and localization of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and p70S6K. The expression of mTOR and p70S6K was not significantly different at the cell cycle of mouse one-cell stage embryos. mTOR and S6K were distributed evenly in the cytoplasm at G1, G2 and M phase phase, but at S phase, the distribution of mTOR and S6K was around the pronucleus. At different phases, the activity of mTOR fluctuated. We also used the PI3K specific inhibitor-Wortmannin to investigate the cleavage rate of eggs. The result showed that the rate obviously decreased. When the mTOR specific inhibitor Rapa-mycin was used, the first mitotic division of the mouse one-cell stage embryo was delayed. These re-suits suggested that insulin was expressed both in mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos, and may play functional roles in regulation of mouse early embryogenesis by activating the signal pathway of PI3K/PKB/mTOR/S6K.

  15. Modulatory Effects of Mild Carbon Monoxide Exposure in the Developing Mouse Cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ivan A; Acuna, Dora; Edmond, John

    2017-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is well known as a highly toxic poison at high concentrations, yet in physiologic amounts it is an endogenous biological messenger in organs such as the internal ear and brain. In this study we tested the hypothesis that chronic very mild CO exposure at concentrations 25-ppm increases the expression of oxidative stress protecting enzymes within the cellular milieu of the developing inner ear (cochlea) of the normal CD-1 mouse. In addition we tested also the hypothesis that CO can decrease the pre-existing condition of oxidative stress in the mouse model for the human medical condition systemic lupus erythematosus by increasing two protective enzymes heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2). CD-1 and MRL/lpr mice were exposed to mild CO concentrations (25 ppm in air) from prenatal only and prenatal followed by early postnatal day 5 to postnatal day 20. The expression of cell markers specific for oxidative stress, and related neural/endothelial markers were investigated at the level of the gene products by immunohistochemistry, proteomics and mRNA expression (quantitative real time-PCR). We found that in the CD-1 and MRL/lpr mouse cochlea SOD-2 and HO-1 were upregulated. In this mouse model of autoimmune disease defense mechanism are attenuated, thus mild CO exposure is beneficial. Several genes (mRNA) and proteins detected by proteomics involved in cellular protection were upregulated in the CO exposed CD-1 mouse and the MRL/lpr mouse.

  16. Detrimental effects of microgravity on mouse preimplantation development in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Wakayama

    Full Text Available Sustaining life beyond Earth either on space stations or on other planets will require a clear understanding of how the space environment affects key phases of mammalian reproduction. However, because of the difficulty of doing such experiments in mammals, most studies of reproduction in space have been carried out with other taxa, such as sea urchins, fish, amphibians or birds. Here, we studied the possibility of mammalian fertilization and preimplantation development under microgravity (microG conditions using a three-dimensional (3D clinostat, which faithfully simulates 10(-3 G using 3D rotation. Fertilization occurred normally in vitro under microG. However, although we obtained 75 healthy offspring from microG-fertilized and -cultured embryos after transfer to recipient females, the birth rate was lower than among the 1G controls. Immunostaining demonstrated that in vitro culture under microG caused slower development and fewer trophectoderm cells than in 1G controls but did not affect polarization of the blastocyst. These results suggest for the first time that fertilization can occur normally under microG environment in a mammal, but normal preimplantation embryo development might require 1G.

  17. Live imaging of mitosis in the developing mouse embryonic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Silver, Debra L

    2014-06-04

    Although of short duration, mitosis is a complex and dynamic multi-step process fundamental for development of organs including the brain. In the developing cerebral cortex, abnormal mitosis of neural progenitors can cause defects in brain size and function. Hence, there is a critical need for tools to understand the mechanisms of neural progenitor mitosis. Cortical development in rodents is an outstanding model for studying this process. Neural progenitor mitosis is commonly examined in fixed brain sections. This protocol will describe in detail an approach for live imaging of mitosis in ex vivo embryonic brain slices. We will describe the critical steps for this procedure, which include: brain extraction, brain embedding, vibratome sectioning of brain slices, staining and culturing of slices, and time-lapse imaging. We will then demonstrate and describe in detail how to perform post-acquisition analysis of mitosis. We include representative results from this assay using the vital dye Syto11, transgenic mice (histone H2B-EGFP and centrin-EGFP), and in utero electroporation (mCherry-α-tubulin). We will discuss how this procedure can be best optimized and how it can be modified for study of genetic regulation of mitosis. Live imaging of mitosis in brain slices is a flexible approach to assess the impact of age, anatomy, and genetic perturbation in a controlled environment, and to generate a large amount of data with high temporal and spatial resolution. Hence this protocol will complement existing tools for analysis of neural progenitor mitosis.

  18. Slit and robo expression in the developing mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James M; Thompson, Felisa Y; Brooks, Sherry K; Shannon, John M; Akeson, Ann L

    2004-06-01

    Mammalian lung development is mediated through complex interactions between foregut endoderm and surrounding mesenchyme. As airway branching progresses, the mesenchyme undergoes dramatic remodeling and differentiation. Little is understood about the mechanisms that direct mesenchymal organization during lung development. A screen for candidate genes mediating this process identified Slit, a ligand for the Roundabout (Robo) receptor previously associated with guidance of axonal projections during central nervous system development. Here, we demonstrate by in situ hybridization that two Slit genes (Slit-2 and Slit-3) and two Robo genes (Robo-1 and Robo-2) are expressed in fetal lung mesenchyme. Slit-2 and Robo-1 expression is present throughout mesenchyme at midgestation and is not detectable by newborn day 1. Slit-3 and Robo-2 expression is restricted to specific, complementary subsets of mesenchyme. Robo-2 is expressed in mesenchymal cells immediately adjacent to large airways, whereas Slit-3 expression predominates in mesenchyme remote from airway epithelium. The temporal and spatial distribution of Slit and Robo mRNAs indicate that these genes may direct the functional organization and differentiation of fetal lung mesenchyme.

  19. Development of layer 1 neurons in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Yao, Xing-Hua; Fu, Yinghui; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2014-10-01

    Layer 1 of the neocortex harbors a unique group of neurons that play crucial roles in synaptic integration and information processing. Although extensive studies have characterized the properties of layer 1 neurons in the mature neocortex, it remains unclear how these neurons progressively acquire their distinct morphological, neurochemical, and physiological traits. In this study, we systematically examined the dynamic development of Cajal-Retzius cells and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons in layer 1 during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Cajal-Retzius cells underwent morphological degeneration after birth and gradually disappeared from layer 1. The majority of GABAergic interneurons showed clear expression of at least 1 of the 6 distinct neurochemical markers, including Reelin, GABA-A receptor subunit delta (GABAARδ), neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calretinin, and somatostatin from postnatal day 8. Furthermore, according to firing pattern, layer 1 interneurons can be divided into 2 groups: late-spiking (LS) and burst-spiking (BS) neurons. LS neurons preferentially expressed GABAARδ, whereas BS neurons preferentially expressed VIP. Interestingly, both LS and BS neurons exhibited a rapid electrophysiological and morphological development during the first postnatal week. Our results provide new insights into the molecular, morphological, and functional developments of the neurons in layer 1 of the neocortex.

  20. Spatiotemporal Analysis of a Glycolytic Activity Gradient Linked to Mouse Embryo Mesoderm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Vinay; Prior, Nicole; Snaebjornsson, Marteinn T; Kuehne, Andreas; Sonnen, Katharina F; Kress, Jana; Stein, Frank; Schultz, Carsten; Sauer, Uwe; Aulehla, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    How metabolism is rewired during embryonic development is still largely unknown, as it remains a major technical challenge to resolve metabolic activities or metabolite levels with spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we investigated metabolic changes during development of organogenesis-stage mouse embryos, focusing on the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). We measured glycolytic labeling kinetics from (13)C-glucose tracing experiments and detected elevated glycolysis in the posterior, more undifferentiated PSM. We found evidence that the spatial metabolic differences are functionally relevant during PSM development. To enable real-time quantification of a glycolytic metabolite with spatiotemporal resolution, we generated a pyruvate FRET-sensor reporter mouse line. We revealed dynamic changes in cytosolic pyruvate levels as cells transit toward a more anterior PSM state. Combined, our approach identifies a gradient of glycolytic activity across the PSM, and we provide evidence that these spatiotemporal metabolic changes are intrinsically linked to PSM development and differentiation.

  1. Effective PCR-based detection of Naegleria fowleri from cultured sample and PAM-developed mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, Mi Yeoun; Lee, Won-Ja; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2015-10-01

    Increasing numbers of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) cases due to Naegleria fowleri are becoming a serious issue in subtropical and tropical countries as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). To establish a rapid and effective diagnostic tool, a PCR-based detection technique was developed based on previous PCR methods. Four kinds of primer pairs, Nfa1, Nae3, Nf-ITS, and Naegl, were employed in the cultured amoebic trophozoites and a mouse with PAM experimentally developed by N. fowleri inoculation (PAM-mouse). For the extraction of genomic DNA from N. fowleri trophozoites (1×10(6)), simple boiling with 10μl of PBS (pH 7.4) at 100°C for 30min was found to be the most rapid and efficient procedure, allowing amplification of 2.5×10(2) trophozoites using the Nfa-1 primer. The primers Nfa1 and Nae3 amplified only N. fowleri DNA, whereas the ITS primer detected N. fowleri and N. gruberi DNA. Using the PAM-mouse brain tissue, the Nfa1 primer was able to amplify the N. fowleri DNA 4 days post infection with 1ng/μl of genomic DNA being detectable. Using the PAM-mouse CSF, amplification of the N. fowleri DNA with the Nae3 primer was possible 5 days post infection showing a better performance than the Nfa1 primer at day 6.

  2. Photodynamic therapy using a novel irradiation source, LED lamp, is similarly effective to photodynamic therapy using diode laser or metal-halide lamp on DMBA- and TPA-induced mouse skin papillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakajima, Susumu; Ogasawara, Koji; Asano, Ryuji; Nakae, Yoshinori; Sakata, Isao; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is useful for superficial skin tumors such as actinic keratosis and Bowen disease. Although PDT is non-surgical and easily-performed treatment modality, irradiation apparatus is large and expensive. Using 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 12-ο-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin papilloma model, we compared the efficacy of TONS501- and ALA-PDT with a LED lamp, a diode laser lamp or a metal-halide lamp on the skin tumor regression. TONS501-PDT using 660 nm LED lamp showed anti-tumor effect at 1 day following the irradiation and the maximal anti-tumor effect was observed at 3 days following the irradiation. There was no significant difference in the anti-tumor effects among TONS501-PDT using LED, TONS501-PDT using diode laser, and 5-aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride (ALA)-PDT using metal-halide lamp. Potent anti-tumor effect on DMBA- and TPA-induced mouse skin papilloma was observed by TONS501-PDT using 660 nm LED, which might be more useful for clinical applications.

  3. Expression of dynamin II in odontoblast during mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Baik-Dong; Park, Jin-Ju; Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Duk; Lim, Do-Seon; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Cho, Yong-Ick; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2011-08-01

    Odontoblasts secrete a collagen-based matrix and release numerous membrane-bound matrix vesicles, which are involved in dentin formation during tooth development. Dynamin II is a GTPase protein that contributes a variety of vesicular budding events, such as endocytotic membrane fission, caveolae internalization and protein trafficking in the Golgi apparatus. However, the expression and function of dynamin II in odontoblasts has not been reported. Therefore, this study examined the expression and possible role of dynamin II in odontoblasts during tooth development and mineralization. The levels of mRNA and protein expression in MDPC23 cells were significantly high at the early stages of differentiation and then decreased gradually thereafter. Immunohistochemistry showed that dynamin II was not expressed near the region of the odontoblasts at embryonic day 17 (E17) and E21. However, dynamin II was expressed strongly in the odontoblast layer at postnatal day 1 (PN1) and decreased gradually at PN3 and PN5. In addition, at PN15 in the functional stage, the dynamin II protein was also expressed in the odontoblast process as well as adjacent to the nuclear region. In conclusion, dynamin II may be involved in the transport of vesicles containing collageneous and non-collageneous proteins for dentin formation in odontoblast, suggesting that it is a good nanomolecule as a candidate to regulate the secretion of collagen on the bone and other nano material.

  4. Germline Chd8 haploinsufficiency alters brain development in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompers, Andrea L; Su-Feher, Linda; Ellegood, Jacob; Copping, Nycole A; Riyadh, M Asrafuzzaman; Stradleigh, Tyler W; Pride, Michael C; Schaffler, Melanie D; Wade, A Ayanna; Catta-Preta, Rinaldo; Zdilar, Iva; Louis, Shreya; Kaushik, Gaurav; Mannion, Brandon J; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal, Veena; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A; Dickel, Diane E; Lerch, Jason P; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S; Silverman, Jill L; Nord, Alex S

    2017-08-01

    The chromatin remodeling gene CHD8 represents a central node in neurodevelopmental gene networks implicated in autism. We examined the impact of germline heterozygous frameshift Chd8 mutation on neurodevelopment in mice. Chd8(+/del5) mice displayed normal social interactions with no repetitive behaviors but exhibited cognitive impairment correlated with increased regional brain volume, validating that phenotypes of Chd8(+/del5) mice overlap pathology reported in humans with CHD8 mutations. We applied network analysis to characterize neurodevelopmental gene expression, revealing widespread transcriptional changes in Chd8(+/del5) mice across pathways disrupted in neurodevelopmental disorders, including neurogenesis, synaptic processes and neuroimmune signaling. We identified a co-expression module with peak expression in early brain development featuring dysregulation of RNA processing, chromatin remodeling and cell-cycle genes enriched for promoter binding by Chd8, and we validated increased neuronal proliferation and developmental splicing perturbation in Chd8(+/del5) mice. This integrative analysis offers an initial picture of the consequences of Chd8 haploinsufficiency for brain development.

  5. Effect of Clenbuterol Hydrochloride on the in vitro Development of Mouse Embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of clenbuterol hydrochloride on the in vitro devel-opment of both 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryos.Methods The cultural systems of both 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryo were used todetermine the effect of clenbuterol hydrochloride at doses of 1 ng/mL, 3 ng/mL, and10 ng/mL on developmental rates of mouse embryos.Results When 1-cell embryos cultured with 1 ng/mL of clenbuterol hydrochloride,developmental rates from the 4-cell stage to blastocyst stage were significantly lowerthan those in the control group (P< 0. 05), but on dosages of 3 ng/mL and 10ng/mL,the inhibiting effects on embryo development were significantly increased (P< 0. 01).When 2-cell embryos cultured with 1 ng/mL of clenbuterol hydrochloride, obvious dif-ferences in developmental rates were not found between the 2-cell embryo group and thecontrol (P> 0. 05). However, at levels of 3 ng/mL and 10 ng/mL, significant de-crease of developmental rates in 2-cell embryos was observed from the 4-cell and fromthe 8-cell stage, respectively (P< 0. 05). Embryos cultured with clenbuterol hydrochlo-ride appeared to have more granules, fragments and degeneration than those in thecontrol.Conclusion Clenbuterol hydrochloride has a toxic effect on the mouse embryos, and theeffect is in a dose-dependent. 1-cell mouse embryos cultured with clenbuterolhydrochloride could be easily inhibited at 2-cell stage, but the effect of clenbuterolhydrochloride on development of the late 2-cell embryos would be reduced.

  6. Development and application of edible skin coatings to improve the quality of kinnow during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Din

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop and investigate the effect of application of indigenous skin coating materials for kinnow fruit, which surely would have superior effect on shelf stability and an attractive alternate for inedible coatings. Economical and underutilized sources were explored for this purpose. Eight different formulations were developed to check their suitability through various physico-chemical analyses. It was concluded that edible coating prepared from corn starch, stearic acid, jojoba oil and monoglycerides (T8 was observed best in terms of physico-chemical properties of fruits and significantly increased the shelf life.

  7. Echocardiographic Assessment of Embryonic and Fetal Mouse Heart Development: A Focus on Haemodynamics and Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Hahurij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Heart development is a complex process, and abnormal development may result in congenital heart disease (CHD. Currently, studies on animal models mainly focus on cardiac morphology and the availability of hemodynamic data, especially of the right heart half, is limited. Here we aimed to assess the morphological and hemodynamic parameters of normal developing mouse embryos/fetuses by using a high-frequency ultrasound system. Methods. A timed breeding program was initiated with a WT mouse line (Swiss/129Sv background. All recordings were performed transabdominally, in isoflurane sedated pregnant mice, in hearts of sequential developmental stages: 12.5, 14.5, and 17.5 days after conception (n=105. Results. Along development the heart rate increased significantly from 125 ± 9.5 to 219 ± 8.3 beats per minute. Reliable flow measurements could be performed across the developing mitral and tricuspid valves and outflow tract. M-mode measurements could be obtained of all cardiac compartments. An overall increase of cardiac systolic and diastolic function with embryonic/fetal development was observed. Conclusion. High-frequency echocardiography is a promising and useful imaging modality for structural and hemodynamic analysis of embryonic/fetal mouse hearts.

  8. Local homogeneity of cell cycle length in developing mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the amount of variation in the length of the cell cycle for cells in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) of the developing cortex of mice on embryonic day 14. Our measurements were made in three cortical regions (i.e., the neocortex, archicortex, and periarchicortex) using three different methods: the cumulative labeling method (CLM), the percent labeled mitoses (PLM) method, and a comparison of the time needed for the PLM to ascend from 0 to 100% with the time needed for the PLM to descend from 100 to 0%. These 3 different techniques provide different perspectives on the cytokinetic parameters. Theoretically, CLM gives an estimate for a maximum value of the total length of the cell cycle (TC), whereas PLM gives an estimate of a minimum value of TC. The difference between these two estimates indicates that the range for TC is +/-1% of the mean TC for periarchicortex, +/-7% for neocortex, and +/-8% for archicortex. This was confirmed by a lengthening of the PLM descent time in comparison with its ascent time. The sharpness of the transitions and the flatness of the plateau of the PLM curves indicate that 99% of the proliferating cells are within this narrow estimated range for TC; hence, only approximately 1% deviate outside of a relatively restricted range from the average TC of the population. In the context of the possible existence within the cortical PVE of two populations with markedly dissimilar cell cycle kinetics from the mean, one such population must comprise approximately 99% of the total population, and the other, if it exists, is only approximately 1% of the total. This seems to be true for all three cortical regions. The narrow range of TC indicates a homogeneity in the cell cycle length for proliferating cells in three different cortical regions, despite the fact that progenitor cells of different lineages may be present. It further predicts the existence of almost synchronous interkinetic nuclear movements of the

  9. Increase in rate of force development with skin cooling during isometric knee extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimose, Ryota; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Tadano, Chigaya; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Yona, Masae; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Muro, Masuo

    2014-12-01

    Rate of force development (RFD) plays an important role when performing rapid and forceful movements. Cold-induced afferent input with transient skin cooling (SC) can modulate neural drive. However, the relationship between RFD and SC is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether SC increases RFD during isometric knee extension. Fifteen young healthy men (25 ± 8 yrs old) contracted their quadriceps muscle as fast and forcefully as possible with or without SC. Skin cooling was administered to the front of the thigh. Torque and electromyographic activity were measured simultaneously. Peak torque was not affected by SC. Skin cooling induced a significant increase in RFD at the phase 0-30 and 0-50 ms. The root mean square of the electromyography of vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis at the phases 0-30-50-100 ms increased significantly or tended to increase with SC. These results suggest that SC may increase neural drive and improve RFD in the very early phases of contraction.

  10. Properties of mouse retinal ganglion cell dendritic growth during postnatal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The property of dendritic growth dynamics during development is a subject of intense interest.Here,we investigated the dendritic motility of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during different developmental stages,using ex vivo mouse retina explant culture,Semliki Forest Virus transfection and time-lapse observations.The results illustrated that during development,the dendritic motility underwent a change from rapid growth to a relatively stable state,i.e.,at P0 (day of birth),RGC dendrites were in a highly active state,whereas at postnatal 13 (P13) they were more stable,and at P3 and P8,the RGCs were in an intermediate state.At any given developmental stage,RGCs of different types displayed the same dendritic growth rate and extent.Since the mouse is the most popular mammalian model for genetic manipulation,this study provided a methodological foundation for further exploring the regulatory mechanisms of dendritic development.

  11. Patient experiences with oily skin: The qualitative development of content for two new patient reported outcome questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draelos Zoe

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To develop the content for two new patient reported outcome (PRO measures to: a assess the severity of symptoms; and b the impact of facial skin oiliness on emotional wellbeing using qualitative data from face to face, and internet focus groups in Germany and the US. Methods Using input from initial treatment satisfaction focus groups (n = 42, a review of relevant literature and expert clinicians (n = 3, a discussion guide was developed to guide qualitative inquiry using Internet focus groups (IFGs. IFGs were conducted with German (n = 26 and US (n = 28 sufferers of oily skin. Questionnaire items were generated using coded transcript data from the focus groups. Cognitive debriefing was conducted online with 42 participants and face to face with an additional five participants to assess the comprehension of the items. Results There were equal numbers of male and female participants; mean age was 35.4 (SD 9.3 years. On average, participants had had oily skin for 15.2 years, and 74% (n = 40 reported having mild-moderate acne. Participants reported using visual, tactile and sensory (feel without touching their face methods to evaluate the severity of facial oiliness. Oily facial skin had both an emotional and social impact, and was associated with feelings of unattractiveness, self-consciousness, embarrassment, irritation and frustration. Items were generated for a measure of oily skin severity (Oily Skin Self-Assessment Scale and a measure of the impact of oily skin on emotional well-being (Oily Skin Impact Scale. Cognitive debriefing resulted in minor changes to the draft items and confirmed their face and content validity. Conclusion The research provides insight into the experience of having oily skin and illustrates significant difficulties associated with the condition. Item content was developed for early versions of two PRO measures of the symptoms and emotional impact of oily facial skin. The psychometric validation of

  12. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Schlupp, P.; M. Weber; T. Schmidts; Geiger, K.; Runkel, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and re...

  13. Development of a quantitative assessment method of pigmentary skin disease using ultraviolet optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Onseok; Park, Sunup; Kim, Jaeyoung; Oh, Chilhwan

    2017-05-21

    The visual scoring method has been used as a subjective evaluation of pigmentary skin disorders. Severity of pigmentary skin disease, especially melasma, is evaluated using a visual scoring method, the MASI (melasma area severity index). This study differentiates between epidermal and dermal pigmented disease. The study was undertaken to determine methods to quantitatively measure the severity of pigmentary skin disorders under ultraviolet illumination. The optical imaging system consists of illumination (white LED, UV-A lamp) and image acquisition (DSLR camera, air cooling CMOS CCD camera). Each camera is equipped with a polarizing filter to remove glare. To analyze images of visible and UV light, images are divided into frontal, cheek, and chin regions of melasma patients. Each image must undergo image processing. To reduce the curvature error in facial contours, a gradient mask is used. The new method of segmentation of front and lateral facial images is more objective for face-area-measurement than the MASI score. Image analysis of darkness and homogeneity is adequate to quantify the conventional MASI score. Under visible light, active lesion margins appear in both epidermal and dermal melanin, whereas melanin is found in the epidermis under UV light. This study objectively analyzes severity of melasma and attempts to develop new methods of image analysis with ultraviolet optical imaging equipment. Based on the results of this study, our optical imaging system could be used as a valuable tool to assess the severity of pigmentary skin disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Use of Curcuma longa in cosmetics: extraction of curcuminoid pigments, development of formulations, and in vitro skin permeation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Mara Silva Gonçalves

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma longais a ginger family aromatic herb (Zingiberaceae whose rhizomes contain curcuminoid pigments, including curcumin, a compound known for its anti-inflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to obtain curcuminoid-rich extracts, develop topical formulations thereof, and assess the stability and skin permeation of these formulations. Curcuma longa extracts were obtained and used to develop formulations. Skin permeation studies were conducted in a modified Franz diffusion cell system, and skin retention of curcuminoid pigments was quantified in pig ear membrane. Prepared urea-containing gel-cream formulations were unstable, whereas all others had satisfactory stability and pseudoplastic rheological behavior. The amount of curcuminoid pigments recovered from the receptor solution was negligible. The skin concentration of curcuminoid pigments retained was positive (>20 µg/g of skin, mostly in the stratum corneum, considering the low skin permeability of curcumin. We conclude that development of topical formulations containing curcumin or Curcuma longaextract is feasible, as long as adjuvants are added to improve preservation and durability. The formulations developed in this study enabled penetration of curcumin limited to the superficial layers of the skin and then possibly without a risk of systemic action, thus permitting local use as a topical anti-inflammatory.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as skin carcinogens: Comparison of benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene and three environmental mixtures in the FVB/N mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Larkin, Andrew [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Krueger, Sharon K. [Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); The Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Bradfield, Christopher A. [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C. [Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pereira, Cliff B. [Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); Deptartment of Statistics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Löhr, Christiane V. [Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Arlt, Volker M.; Phillips, David H. [Analytical and Environmental Sciences Division, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, King' s College London, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Williams, David E., E-mail: david.williams@oregonstate.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University (United States); The Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University (United States); Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); and others

    2012-11-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), was compared to dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) and combinations of three environmental PAH mixtures (coal tar, diesel particulate and cigarette smoke condensate) using a two stage, FVB/N mouse skin tumor model. DBC (4 nmol) was most potent, reaching 100% tumor incidence with a shorter latency to tumor formation, less than 20 weeks of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) promotion compared to all other treatments. Multiplicity was 4 times greater than BaP (400 nmol). Both PAHs produced primarily papillomas followed by squamous cell carcinoma and carcinoma in situ. Diesel particulate extract (1 mg SRM 1650b; mix 1) did not differ from toluene controls and failed to elicit a carcinogenic response. Addition of coal tar extract (1 mg SRM 1597a; mix 2) produced a response similar to BaP. Further addition of 2 mg of cigarette smoke condensate (mix 3) did not alter the response with mix 2. PAH-DNA adducts measured in epidermis 12 h post initiation and analyzed by {sup 32}P post‐labeling, did not correlate with tumor incidence. PAH‐dependent alteration in transcriptome of skin 12 h post initiation was assessed by microarray. Principal component analysis (sum of all treatments) of the 922 significantly altered genes (p < 0.05), showed DBC and BaP to cluster distinct from PAH mixtures and each other. BaP and mixtures up-regulated phase 1 and phase 2 metabolizing enzymes while DBC did not. The carcinogenicity with DBC and two of the mixtures was much greater than would be predicted based on published Relative Potency Factors (RPFs). -- Highlights: ► Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), 3 PAH mixtures, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were compared. ► DBC and 2 PAH mixtures were more potent than Relative Potency Factor estimates. ► Transcriptome profiles 12 hours post initiation were analyzed by microarray. ► Principle components analysis of alterations revealed treatment-based clustering. ► DBC gave a unique

  16. Effect of PMSG/hCG Superovulation on Mouse Embryonic Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bao-jiang; XUE Hong-yan; CHEN Li-ping; DAI Yan-feng; GUO Ji-tong; LI Xi-he

    2013-01-01

    Kunming mouse strain is widely used in China, and the superovulation was administrated with 10 IU PMSG combined with 10 IU hCG. In this study, the effects of the exogenous gonadotropins on superovulation of Kunming mice and embryo quality derived from the superovulated mice were assessed. Female mice at 6-8-wk old were superovulated with 0, 5, 7.5 and 10 IU PMSG/hCG and mated with male mice. The embryos were retrieved at 2.5 d post coitum. No statistic difference was observed for the number of 2-cell embryos collected per mouse between control and 5 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group, but the number significantly increased for 7.5 and 10 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group (P0.05). This indicated that exogenous gonadotropins have no effects on development of Kunming mouse embryos. The quality of blastocyst was assessed by labelling with Hoechst and propidium iodide for inner cell mass and trophectoderm cells, the result showed that ICM/TE ratio significantly decreased for 10 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group compared with control, 5 and 7.5 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group (P<0.05). This suggested that the embryo quality of Kunming mouse has been affected by high dose of gonadotropins.

  17. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  18. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction.

  19. Development and validation of a simple and rapid liquid chromatography method for the determination of genistein in skin permeation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione-Silva, Lorena; Rocha, Kamilla Amaral David; de Oliveira, Lidiane Correia; Taveira, Stephânia Fleury; Lima, Eliana Martins

    2012-01-01

    Genistein (GEN) has potential advantages for topical skin delivery, but no literature data are available for its quantitation in different skin layers, such as the stratum corneum (SC). Therefore, a simple, rapid, selective and sensitive bioanalytical method was developed and validated for GEN quantitation in porcine skin samples following in vitro permeation studies. GEN was assayed by HPLC with UV-Vis detection (270 nm) using 0.5% acetic acid in water-n-propanol-acetonitrile (50 : 2 : 48, v/v/v) as mobile phase (flow-rate of 1.0 mL/min). Specificity was demonstrated since endogenous skin components did not interfere with GEN peak. Standard analytical curve was linear over the concentration range (0.1-60 µg/mL) and the lower limit of quantitation was determined for different skin layers (100 ng/mL). GEN recovery from skin layers ranged from 95.57 to 97.57%. Permeation studies were carried out using an automated vertical diffusion cell apparatus. No fluctuation on the amount of GEN retained in the SC was observed over time, but increasing amounts of the drug were found in deeper layers of the skin. The method was reliable and reproducible for the quantitation GEN in skin samples enabling the determination of the cutaneous penetration profile of this drug in permeation experiments.

  20. Cytochrome P450 1b1 in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced skin carcinogenesis: Tumorigenicity of individual PAHs and coal-tar extract, DNA adduction and expression of select genes in the Cyp1b1 knockout mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddens, Lisbeth K. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Bunde, Kristi L. [College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Harper, Tod A. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); McQuistan, Tammie J. [Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Löhr, Christiane V. [Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Bramer, Lisa M. [Applied Statistics and Computational Modeling, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Waters, Katrina M. [Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Tilton, Susan C. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Krueger, Sharon K. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Superfund Research Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); and others

    2015-09-01

    FVB/N mice wild-type, heterozygous or null for Cyp 1b1 were used in a two-stage skin tumor study comparing PAH, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), and coal tar extract (CTE, SRM 1597a). Following 20 weeks of promotion with TPA the Cyp 1b1 null mice, initiated with DBC, exhibited reductions in incidence, multiplicity, and progression. None of these effects were observed with BaP or CTE. The mechanism of Cyp 1b1-dependent alteration of DBC skin carcinogenesis was further investigated by determining expression of select genes in skin from DBC-treated mice 2, 4 and 8 h post-initiation. A significant reduction in levels of Cyp 1a1, Nqo1 at 8 h and Akr 1c14 mRNA was observed in Cyp 1b1 null (but not wt or het) mice, whereas no impact was observed in Gst a1, Nqo 1 at 2 and 4 h or Akr 1c19 at any time point. Cyp 1b1 mRNA was not elevated by DBC. The major covalent DNA adducts, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-(±)-11,12-dihydrodiol-cis and trans-13,14-epoxide-deoxyadenosine (DBCDE-dA) were quantified by UHPLC-MS/MS 8 h post-initiation. Loss of Cyp1 b1 expression reduced DBCDE-dA adducts in the skin but not to a statistically significant degree. The ratio of cis- to trans-DBCDE-dA adducts was higher in the skin than other target tissues such as the spleen, lung and liver (oral dosing). These results document that Cyp 1b1 plays a significant role in bioactivation and carcinogenesis of DBC in a two-stage mouse skin tumor model and that loss of Cyp 1b1 has little impact on tumor response with BaP or CTE as initiators. - Highlights: • Cyp1b1 null mice exhibit lower skin cancer sensitivity to DBC but not BaP or CTE. • Cyp1b1 expression impacts expression of other PAH metabolizing enzymes. • cis/trans-DBCDE-dA ratio significantly higher in the skin than the spleen, lung or liver • Potency of DBC and CTE in mouse skin is higher than predicted by RPFs.

  1. New developments in the management of severe skin and deep skin structure infections – focus on tedizolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durkin MJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Durkin,1 G Ralph Corey2,3 1Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, USA; 3Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, is approved for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs. Tedizolid offers several potential advantages over current ABSSSI treatment options. First, tedizolid has a prolonged half-life, which allows for once-daily dosing. Second, tedizolid has broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive organisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and enterococci. Third, tedizolid, available in both intravenous and oral formulations, has high oral bioavailability, allowing for easy oral step-down therapy. Fourth, in patients who have been prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tedizolid may have fewer drug interactions than linezolid. Finally, tedizolid may have fewer or comparatively delayed onset side effects than linezolid, including thrombocytopenia and nausea. This review covers the microbiology, pharmacology, mode of action, and pharmacokinetics of tedizolid as well as patient-focused perspectives such as quality of life, patient satisfaction/acceptability, adherence, and uptake and provides expert opinion on the current use of tedizolid for ABSSSIs and potential future therapeutic applications. Keywords: cellulitis, new antibiotics, oxazolidinones, infectious diseases, MRSA

  2. Computational analysis of the spatial distribution of mitotic spindle angles in mouse developing airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nan; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2013-02-01

    Investigating the spatial information of cellular processes in tissues during mouse embryo development is one of the major technical challenges in development biology. Many imaging methods are still limited to the volumes of tissue due to tissue opacity, light scattering and the availability of advanced imaging tools. For analyzing the mitotic spindle angle distribution in developing mouse airway epithelium, we determined spindle angles in mitotic epithelial cells on serial sections of whole airway of mouse embryonic lungs. We then developed a computational image analysis to obtain spindle angle distribution in three dimensional airway reconstructed from the data obtained from all serial sections. From this study, we were able to understand how mitotic spindle angles are distributed in a whole airway tube. This analysis provides a potentially fast, simple and inexpensive alternative method to quantitatively analyze cellular process at subcellular resolution. Furthermore, this analysis is not limited to the size of tissues, which allows to obtain three dimensional and high resolution information of cellular processes in cell populations deeper inside intact organs.

  3. VPS35 regulates developing mouse hippocampal neuronal morphogenesis by promoting retrograde trafficking of BACE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lei Wang

    2012-10-01

    VPS35, a major component of the retromer, plays an important role in the selective endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Dysfunction of retromer is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, but its function in developing mouse brain remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence for VPS35 promoting dendritic growth and maturation, and axonal protein transport in developing mouse hippocampal neurons. Embryonic hippocampal CA1 neurons suppressing Vps35 expression by in utero electroporation of its micro RNAs displayed shortened apical dendrites, reduced dendritic spines, and swollen commissural axons in the neonatal stage, those deficits reflecting a defective protein transport/trafficking in developing mouse neurons. Further mechanistic studies showed that Vps35 depletion in neurons resulted in an impaired retrograde trafficking of BACE1 (β1-secretase and altered BACE1 distribution. Suppression of BACE1 expression in CA1 neurons partially rescued both dendritic and axonal deficits induced by Vps35-deficiency. These results thus demonstrate that BACE1 acts as a critical cargo of retromer in vitro and in vivo, and suggest that VPS35 plays an essential role in regulating apical dendritic maturation and in preventing axonal spheroid formation in developing hippocampal neurons.

  4. Expression of Slit and Robo genes in the developing mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medioni, Caroline; Bertrand, Nicolas; Mesbah, Karim; Hudry, Bruno; Dupays, Laurent; Wolstein, Orit; Washkowitz, Andrew J; Papaioannou, Virginia E; Mohun, Timothy J; Harvey, Richard P; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2010-12-01

    Development of the mammalian heart is mediated by complex interactions between myocardial, endocardial, and neural crest-derived cells. Studies in Drosophila have shown that the Slit-Robo signaling pathway controls cardiac cell shape changes and lumen formation of the heart tube. Here, we demonstrate by in situ hybridization that multiple Slit ligands and Robo receptors are expressed in the developing mouse heart. Slit3 is the predominant ligand transcribed in the early mouse heart and is expressed in the ventral wall of the linear heart tube and subsequently in chamber but not in atrioventricular canal myocardium. Furthermore, we identify that the homeobox gene Nkx2-5 is required for early ventral restriction of Slit3 and that the T-box transcription factor Tbx2 mediates repression of Slit3 in nonchamber myocardium. Our results suggest that patterned Slit-Robo signaling may contribute to the control of oriented cell growth during chamber morphogenesis of the mammalian heart.

  5. Development, characterization, and skin delivery studies of related ultradeformable vesicles: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascenso A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Andreia Ascenso,1 Sara Raposo,1 Cátia Batista,2 Pedro Cardoso,2 Tiago Mendes,2 Fabíola Garcia Praça,3 Maria Vitória Lopes Badra Bentley,3 Sandra Simões1 1Instituto de Investigação do Medicamento (iMed.ULisboa, 2Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal; 3Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Monte Alegre, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Ultradeformable vesicles (UDV have recently become a promising tool for the development of improved and innovative dermal and transdermal therapies. The aim of this work was to study three related UDV: transfersomes, ethosomes, and transethosomes for the incorporation of actives of distinct polarities, namely, vitamin E and caffeine, and to evaluate the effect of the carrier on skin permeation and penetration. These actives were incorporated in UDV formulations further characterized for vesicles imaging by transmission electron microscopy; mean vesicle size and polydispersity index by photon correlation spectroscopy; zeta potential by laser-Doppler anemometry; deformability by pressure-driven transport; and incorporation efficiency (IE after actives quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography. Topical delivery studies were performed in order to compare UDV formulations regarding the release, skin permeation, and penetration profiles. All UDV formulations showed size values within the expected range, except transethosomes prepared by “transfersomal method”, for which size was smaller than 100 nm in contrast to that obtained for vesicles prepared by “ethosomal method”. Zeta potential was negative and higher for formulations containing sodium cholate. The IE was much higher for vitamin E- than caffeine-loaded UDV as expected. For flux measurements, the following order was obtained: transethosomes (TE > ethosomes (E ≥ transfersomes (T. This result was consistent with the release and skin penetration

  6. Development of terminal hair following skin lesion treatments with an intense pulsed light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachos, Spiros P; Kontoes, Paraskevas P

    2002-01-01

    Laser and other light sources have been used to treat vascular and pigmented skin lesions and to remove tattoos and unwanted hair, with varying degrees of success and various side effects. It has not yet been reported that hair growth can occur as a side effect of such treatments. In this paper two cases are presented, one port wine stain and one tattoo, that were each treated several times with an intense pulsed light source (IPLS) for removal. Terminal hair, not present before treatment, partially developed in treated areas of both lesions. Local inflammatory reactions are believed to trigger such outcomes.

  7. Developing Novel Automated Apparatus for Studying Battery of Social Behaviors in Mutant Mouse Models for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    S.S., et al., Development of a mouse test for repetitive , restricted behaviors : relevance to autism . Behav Brain Res, 2008. 188(1): p. 178-94. 6...for autism spectrum disorders -in search of biomarkers Q3. Behav. Brain. Res. (2012). 30. Karvat, G. & Kimchi, T. Systematic autistic-like behavioral ...12 4 Introduction Genetic analyses to determine a specific heritable factor underlying susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASD

  8. The morphology and intrinsic excitability of developing mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Qu

    Full Text Available The retinal ganglion cells (RGCs have diverse morphology and physiology. Although some studies show that correlations between morphological properties and physiological properties exist in cat RGCs, these properties are much less distinct and their correlations are unknown in mouse RGCs. In this study, using three-dimensional digital neuron reconstruction, we systematically analyzed twelve morphological parameters of mouse RGCs as they developed in the first four postnatal weeks. The development of these parameters fell into three different patterns and suggested that contact from bipolar cells and eye opening might play important roles in RGC morphological development. Although there has been a general impression that the morphological parameters are not independent, such as RGCs with larger dendritic fields usually have longer but sparser dendrites, there was not systematic study and statistical analysis proving it. We used Pearson's correlation coefficients to determine the relationship among these morphological parameters and demonstrated that many morphological parameters showed high statistical correlation. In the same cells we also measured seven physiological parameters using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, focusing on intrinsic excitability. We previously reported the increase in intrinsic excitability in mouse RGCs during early postnatal development. Here we showed that strong correlations also existed among many physiological parameters that measure the intrinsic excitability. However, Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed very limited correlation across morphological and physiological parameters. In addition, principle component analysis failed to separate RGCs into clusters using combined morphological and physiological parameters. Therefore, despite strong correlations within the morphological parameters and within the physiological parameters, postnatal mouse RGCs had only limited correlation between morphology and

  9. Biomechanical Skin Property Evaluation for Wounds Treated With Synthetic and Biosynthetic Wound Dressings and a Newly Developed Collagen Matrix During Healing of Superficial Skin Defects in a Rat Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Manuel; Engelke, Anne-Sophie; Tolzmann, Dascha Sophie; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Rothenberger, Jens

    2016-09-01

    There is a high prevalence of superficial wounds such as partial-thickness burns. Treatment of these wounds frequently includes temporary application of wound dressings. The aim of this study was to compare a newly developed collagen matrix with commonly used temporary skin dressings for treatment of partial-thickness skin defects. Through a skin dermatome, 42 standardized superficial skin defects were generated on the back of 28 adult male Lewis rats. The wounds were treated with a synthetic wound dressing (Suprathel, Polymedics Innovations Inc, Woodstock, GA) (n = 14), a biosynthetic skin dressing (Biobrane, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) (n = 14), or a newly developed bovine collagen matrix, Collagen Cell Carrier (Viscofan BioEngineering, Weinheim, Germany) (n = 14). Biomechanical properties of the skin were determined and compared every 10 days over a 3-month period of using the Cutometer MPA 580 (Courage + Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Cologne, Germany). As opposed to healthy skin, statistically significant differences were detected between days 10 and 30, and between days 60 and 80, for calculated elasticity (Ue), firmness of skin (R0), and overall elasticity (R8). After 3 months, no statistically significant differences in skin elasticity were detected between the different wound dressings. The presented results give an opportunity to compare the wound dressings used for treatment with respect to skin elasticity and reveal the potential of the bovine collagen matrix in the treatment of superficial skin defects; therefore the results facilitate further evaluation of collagen matrix in surgical applications and regenerative medicine.

  10. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  11. Regulation of embryonic size in early mouse development in vitro culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Kawai, Ikuma; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Mammals self-regulate their body size throughout development. In the uterus, embryos are properly regulated to be a specific size at birth. Previously, size and cell number in aggregated embryos, which were made from two or more morulae, and half embryos, which were halved at the 2-cell stage, have been analysed in vivo in preimplantation and post-implantation development in mice. Here, we examined whether or not the mouse embryo has the capacity to self-regulate growth using an in vitro culture system. To elucidate embryonic histology, cells were counted in aggregated or half embryos in comparison with control embryos. Both double- and triple-aggregated embryos contained more cells than did control embryos during all culture periods, and the relative growth ratios showed no growth inhibition in an in vitro culture system. Meanwhile, half embryos contained fewer cells than control embryos, but the number grew throughout the culture period. Our data suggest that the growth of aggregated embryos is not affected and continues in an in vitro culture system. On the other hand, the growth of half embryos accelerates and continues in an in vitro culture system. This situation, in turn, implied that post-implantation mouse embryos might have some potential to regulate their own growth and size as seen by using an in vitro culture system without uterus factors. In conclusion, our results indicated that embryos have some ways in which to regulate their own size in mouse early development.

  12. Functional studies of signaling pathways in peri-implantation development of the mouse embryo by RNAi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Graham

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of gene function in the mouse have relied mainly on gene targeting via homologous recombination. However, this approach is difficult to apply in specific windows of time, and to simultaneously knock-down multiple genes. Here we report an efficient method for dsRNA-mediated gene silencing in late cleavage-stage mouse embryos that permits examination of phenotypes at post-implantation stages. Results We show that introduction of Bmp4 dsRNA into intact blastocysts by electroporation recapitulates the genetic Bmp4 null phenotype at gastrulation. It also reveals a novel role for Bmp4 in the regulation the anterior visceral endoderm specific gene expression and its positioning. We also show that RNAi can be used to simultaneously target several genes. When applied to the three murine isoforms of Dishevelled, it leads to earlier defects than previously observed in double knock-outs. These include severe delays in post-implantation development and defects in the anterior midline and neural folds at headfold stages. Conclusion Our results indicate that the BMP4 signalling pathway contributes to the development of the anterior visceral endoderm, and reveal an early functional redundancy between the products of the murine Dishevelled genes. The proposed approach constitutes a powerful tool to screen the functions of genes that govern the development of the mouse embryo.

  13. Dietary proanthocyanidins inhibit UV radiation-induced skin tumor development through functional activation of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of skin cancer is equivalent to the incidence of malignancies in all other organs combined. The main risk factor for this disease is overexposure of the skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. UV irradiation induces inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and suppression of the immune system in the skin, which together contribute to carcinogenesis. The use of dietary phytochemicals shows great promise as a complementary and alternative strategy for skin cancer prevention. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been tested extensively for their anti-skin cancer effect using in vivo animal models. Supplementation of an AIN76A control diet with GSPs (0.2 and 0.5%, w/w) significantly inhibits UV radiation-induced skin tumor development as well as malignant transformation of papillomas to carcinoma in mice. The inhibition of UVB-induced skin tumor development by GSPs is mediated through interrelated mechanisms of action including: (i) inhibition of inflammation, (ii) rapid repair of damaged DNA, and (iii) stimulation of immune system. Additionally, the chemopreventive effects of GSPs involve DNA repair-dependent functional activation of antigen-presenting cells and stimulation of CD8(+) effector T cells. These effects of GSPs could be useful in attenuation of the adverse effects of UV radiation and may have health benefits in humans. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Skin autofluorescence : A tool to identify type 2 diabetic patients at risk for developing microvascular complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, E.sther G.; Lutgers, Helen L.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Graaff, R.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Smit, Andries J.; Gans, Reinold; Bilo, Henk J.

    OBJECTIVE - Skin auto fluorescence is a noninvasive measure of the level of tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products, representing cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress. Recent studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as

  15. Skin autofluorescence : A tool to identify type 2 diabetic patients at risk for developing microvascular complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, E.sther G.; Lutgers, Helen L.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Graaff, R.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Smit, Andries J.; Gans, Reinold; Bilo, Henk J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Skin auto fluorescence is a noninvasive measure of the level of tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products, representing cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress. Recent studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as wel

  16. Asymptomatic skin sensitization to birch predicts later development of birch pollen allergy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodtger, Uffe; Poulsen, Lars K.; Malling, Hans-Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    The skin prick test is the allergologic test of choice, but asymptomatic skin sensitization to aeroallergens is common. However, no data in the literature describe the clinical phenotype of asymptomatic sensitized adults....

  17. Development and Characterization of VEGF165-Chitosan Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Skin Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojiang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced skin injury, which remains a serious concern in radiation therapy, is currently believed to be the result of vascular endothelial cell injury and apoptosis. Here, we established a model of acute radiation-induced skin injury and compared the effect of different vascular growth factors on skin healing by observing the changes of microcirculation and cell apoptosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was more effective at inhibiting apoptosis and preventing injury progression than other factors. A new strategy for improving the bioavailability of vascular growth factors was developed by loading VEGF with chitosan nanoparticles. The VEGF-chitosan nanoparticles showed a protective effect on vascular endothelial cells, improved the local microcirculation, and delayed the development of radioactive skin damage.

  18. Early B lymphocyte development: Similarities and differences in human and mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michiko; Ichii; Kenji; Oritani; Yuzuru; Kanakura

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells through a series of distinct stages. Early B cell development proceeds in bone marrow until immature B cells migrate out to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as a spleen and lymph nodes, after completion of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain rearrangement. Although the information about the regulation by numerous factors, including signaling molecules, transcription factors, epigenetic changes and the microenvironment, could provide the clinical application, our knowledge on human B lymphopoiesis is limited. However, with great methodological advances, significant progress for understanding B lymphopoiesis both in human and mouse has been made. In this review, we summarize the experimental models for studies about human adult B lymphopoiesis, and the role of microenvironment and signaling molecules, such as cytokines, transforming growth factor-β superfamily, Wnt family and Notch family, with point-by-point comparison between human and mouse.

  19. Expression analysis of the entire MMP and TIMP gene families during mouse tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Robert K; Sampieri, Clara L; Pennington, Caroline J; Gill, Sean E; Schultz, Gilbert A; Edwards, Dylan R

    2004-04-09

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs) cleave many extracellular proteins, including matrix, growth factors, and receptors. We profiled the RNA levels of every MMP, several ADAMs, and inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs and RECK) in numerous mouse tissues during development and in the uterus during pregnancy. Observations include: most secreted MMPs are expressed at low to undetectable levels in tissues, whereas membrane-bound MMPs, ADAMs and inhibitors are abundant; almost every proteinase and inhibitor is present in the uterus or placenta at some time during gestation; the mouse collagenases mColA and mColB are found exclusively in the uterus and testis; and each tissue has its unique signature of proteinase and inhibitor expression.

  20. Development of a touch-screen-based paradigm for assessing working memory in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Chuljung; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2015-03-01

    Assessing the working memory of the rodent by using a touch-screen system has several advantages (e.g., allowing highly accurate data collection and flexibility in memory task design). However, there is currently no available testing paradigm utilizing touch-screen systems that can assess working memory in the mouse. In this study, we developed a touch-screen testing paradigm in which mice were trained to choose a location that is matched to a sample location after a time delay. Consistent with previous studies, this study showed that mice could not only learn the rule in the delayed matched to position (DMTP), but also could retain a transitory memory of the sample position during delay. This indicates that a touch-screen system can provide a DMTP testing platform to assess working memory in the mouse.

  1. Development of Biopolymer Composite Films Using a Microfluidization Technique for Carboxymethylcellulose and Apple Skin Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inyoung Choi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymer films based on apple skin powder (ASP and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC were developed with the addition of apple skin extract (ASE and tartaric acid (TA. ASP/CMC composite films were prepared by mixing CMC with ASP solution using a microfluidization technique to reduce particle size. Then, various concentrations of ASE and TA were incorporated into the film solution as an antioxidant and an antimicrobial agent, respectively. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, optical, mechanical, water barrier, and solubility properties of the developed films were then evaluated to determine the effects of ASE and TA on physicochemical properties. The films were also analyzed for antioxidant effect on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and antimicrobial activities against Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, and Shigella flexneri. From the results, the ASP/CMC film containing ASE and TA was revealed to enhance the mechanical, water barrier, and solubility properties. Moreover, it showed the additional antioxidant and antimicrobial properties for application as an active packaging film.

  2. A transposon-based analysis of gene mutations related to skin cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Rita M; Dupuy, Adam J; Bravo, Ana; Casanova, M Llanos; Alameda, Josefa P; Page, Angustias; Sánchez-Viera, Miguel; Ramírez, Angel; Navarro, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most frequent type of cancer in humans. NMSC includes several types of malignancies with different clinical outcomes, the most frequent being basal and squamous cell carcinomas. We have used the Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system to identify somatic mutations associated with NMSC. Transgenic mice bearing multiple copies of a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon T2Onc2 and expressing the SB11 transposase under the transcriptional control of regulatory elements from the keratin K5 promoter were treated with TPA, either in wild-type or Ha-ras mutated backgrounds. After several weeks of treatment, mice with transposition developed more malignant tumors with decreased latency compared with control mice. Transposon/transposase animals also developed basal cell carcinomas. Genetic analysis of the transposon integration sites in the tumors identified several genes recurrently mutated in different tumor samples, which may represent novel candidate cancer genes. We observed alterations in the expression levels of some of these genes in human tumors. Our results show that inactivating mutations in Notch1 and Nsd1, among others, may have an important role in skin carcinogenesis.

  3. Basophils and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Granata, Francescopaolo; Marone, Gianni

    2014-05-01

    Since their discovery in 1879, basophils have been viewed as circulating blood granulocytes with limited immune function. New research tools for their functional analysis in vivo have revealed previously unrecognized roles for basophils in several skin disorders. Human basophils infiltrate different skin lesions and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diseases ranging from chronic idiopathic urticaria to systemic lupus erythematosus. In mouse models, basophils participate in IgE-mediated chronic allergic inflammation of the skin and have a protective role in tick infestation. In this review, we discuss critical advances in our understanding of basophil biology and their roles in the pathophysiology of skin disorders.

  4. Loss of all 3 Extended Synaptotagmins does not affect normal mouse development, viability or fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Michel G; Moss, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The extended synaptotagmins, E-Syt1, 2 and 3, are multiple C2 domain membrane proteins that are tethered to the endoplasmic reticulum and interact in a calcium dependent manner with plasma membrane phospholipids to form endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junctions. These junctions have been implicated in the exchange of phospholipids between the 2 organelles. The E-Syts have further been implicated in receptor signaling and endocytosis and can interact directly with fibroblast growth factor and other cell surface receptors. Despite these multiple functions, the search for a requirement in vivo has been elusive. Most recently, we found that the genes for E-Syt2 and 3 could be inactivated without effect on mouse development, viability, fertility or morphology. We have now created insertion and deletion mutations in the last of the mouse E-Syt genes. We show that E-Syt1 is specifically expressed throughout the embryonic skeleton during the early stages of chrondrogenesis in a pattern quite distinct from that of E-Syt2 or 3. Despite this, E-Syt1 is also not required for mouse development and propagation. We further show that even the combined inactivation of all 3 E-Syt genes has no effect on mouse viability or fertility in the laboratory. However, this inactivation induces an enhancement in the expression of the genes encoding Orp5/8, Orai1, STIM1 and TMEM110, endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junction proteins that potentially could compensate for E-Syt loss. Given the multiple functions suggested for the E-Syts and their evolutionary conservation, our unexpected findings suggest that they may only provide a survival advantage under specific conditions that have as yet to be identified.

  5. Fat in the skin: Triacylglycerol metabolism in keratinocytes and its role in the development of neutral lipid storage disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Keratinocyte differentiation is essential for skin development and the formation of the skin permeability barrier. This process involves an orchestrated remodeling of lipids. The cleavage of precursor lipids from lamellar bodies by β-glucocerebrosidase, sphingomyelinase, phospholipases and sterol sulfatase generates ceramides, non-esterified fatty acids and cholesterol for the lipid-containing extracellular matrix, the lamellar membranes in the stratum corneum. The importance of triacylglycer...

  6. The Effect of Maternal Thyroid Disorders (Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism During Pregnancy and Lactation on Skin Development in Wistar Rat Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Amerion

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Previous studies have shown that thyroid hormones are necessary for normal development of many organs and because of the importance of skin as the largest and the most important organ in human body protection in spite of external environment, the study of thyroid hormones effects on skin development is considerable. In this survey we have tried to study the effects of maternal hypothyroidism on skin development in fetus during pregnancy and lactation by immunohistochemistry technique.   Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into 4 groups, hypothyroids, hyperthyroids, hypothyroids are treated with levothyroxin and a control group. The rat mothers were exposed to PTU with 50 mg/lit dosage and levothyroxin with 1 mg/lit dosage and PTU and levothyroxin simultaneously and with the same dosage respectively in hypothyroid, hyperthyroid and treated hypothyroids with levothyroxin groups. After 14 days, blood sample was taken from mothers, and if thyroid hormones level had change well, mating was allowed. After pregnancy and delivery, 1th day dorsal skin (as the sample for pregnancy assay and 10th day skin (as for lactation assay was used for immunohystochemical and morphometric studies. Results: In this study it was observed that maternal hypothyroidism during pregnancy and lactation causes significant increase in laminin expression, in most areas of skin, and maternal hyperthyroidism during pregnancy and lactation causes significant decrease in laminin expression. Also significant decrease was observed in hair follicles number and epidermis thickness in hypothyroidism groups. Conclusion: This study showed maternal hypothyroidism causes significant decrease in epidermis thickness and hair follicles number and it causes less hair in fetus. Also maternal hypothyroidism causes large changes in laminin expression in different parts of skin. At the same time,maternal hyperthyroidism causes opposite results. In fact, thyroid hormones

  7. T cells fail to develop in the human skin-cell explants system; an inconvenient truth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlocht Joris

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is very successful in eradicating haematological tumours, but the long post-transplant T-lymphopenic phase is responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates. Clark et al. have described a skin-explant system capable of producing host-tolerant donor-HSC derived T-cells. Because this T-cell production platform has the potential to replenish the T-cell levels following transplantation, we set out to validate the skin-explant system. Results Following the published procedures, while using the same commercial components, it was impossible to reproduce the skin-explant conditions required for HSC differentiation towards mature T-cells. The keratinocyte maturation procedure resulted in fragile cells with minimum expression of delta-like ligand (DLL. In most experiments the generated cells failed to adhere to carriers or were quickly outcompeted by fibroblasts. Consequently it was not possible to reproduce cell-culture conditions required for HSC differentiation into functional T-cells. Using cell-lines over-expressing DLL, we showed that the antibodies used by Clark et al. were unable to detect native DLL, but instead stained 7AAD+ cells. Therefore, it is unlikely that the observed T-lineage commitment from HSC is mediated by DLL expressed on keratinocytes. In addition, we did confirm expression of the Notch-ligand Jagged-1 by keratinocytes. Conclusions Currently, and unfortunately, it remains difficult to explain the development or growth of T-cells described by Clark et al., but for the fate of patients suffering from lymphopenia it is essential to both reproduce and understand how these co-cultures really "work". Fortunately, alternative procedures to speed-up T-cell reconstitution are being established and validated and may become available for patients in the near future.

  8. Microemulsion system for topical delivery of thai mango seed kernel extract: development, physicochemical characterisation and ex vivo skin permeation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanpolchareanchai, Jiraporn; Padois, Karine; Falson, Françoise; Bavovada, Rapepol; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan

    2014-10-24

    A microemulsion system containing Thai mango seed kernel extract (MSKE, cultivar "Fahlun") was developed and characterised for the purpose of topical skin delivery. The MSKE-loaded microemulsions were prepared by using the spontaneous emulsification method. Isopropyl myristate (IPM) was selected as the oil phase. A polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate and sorbitan monododecanoate (1:1, w/w) system was used as the surfactant phase; an aqueous mixture of different cosurfactants (absolute ethanol, 96.3% v/v ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1,2-propanediol) at a weight ratio of 1:1 was used as the aqueous phase. Among the cosurfactants studied, the 1-propanol aqueous mixture had the largest microemulsion region (48.93%) in the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Microemulsions containing 1% MSKE demonstrated good physicochemical stability during a six-month study period at 25 ± 2 °C/60% ± 5% RH. The ex vivo skin permeation study demonstrated that the microemulsions exhibited a potent skin enhancement effect allowing MSKE to penetrate skin layers up to 60-fold higher compared with the control. Neither skin irritation nor skin corrosion was observed in ex vivo studies. The present study revealed that IPM-based microemulsion systems may be promising carriers to enhance skin penetration and delivering MSKE for topical treatment.

  9. Microemulsion System for Topical Delivery of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract: Development, Physicochemical Characterisation and Ex Vivo Skin Permeation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraporn Leanpolchareanchai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A microemulsion system containing Thai mango seed kernel extract (MSKE, cultivar “Fahlun” was developed and characterised for the purpose of topical skin delivery. The MSKE-loaded microemulsions were prepared by using the spontaneous emulsification method. Isopropyl myristate (IPM was selected as the oil phase. A polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate and sorbitan monododecanoate (1:1, w/w system was used as the surfactant phase; an aqueous mixture of different cosurfactants (absolute ethanol, 96.3% v/v ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol or 1,2-propanediol at a weight ratio of 1:1 was used as the aqueous phase. Among the cosurfactants studied, the 1-propanol aqueous mixture had the largest microemulsion region (48.93% in the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Microemulsions containing 1% MSKE demonstrated good physicochemical stability during a six-month study period at 25 ± 2 °C/60% ± 5% RH. The ex vivo skin permeation study demonstrated that the microemulsions exhibited a potent skin enhancement effect allowing MSKE to penetrate skin layers up to 60-fold higher compared with the control. Neither skin irritation nor skin corrosion was observed in ex vivo studies. The present study revealed that IPM-based microemulsion systems may be promising carriers to enhance skin penetration and delivering MSKE for topical treatment.

  10. Development and Function of the Mouse Vestibular System in the Absence of Gravity Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this research was that the absence of gravity perception, such as would occur in space, would affect the development and function of the vestibular and central nervous systems. Further, we postulated that these effects would be more significant at specific stages of post-natal development of the animal. We also proposed the use of molecular genetic approaches that would provide important information as to the hierarchy of gene function during the development and subsequent function of the vestibular system. The tilted (tlt) mutant mouse has been characterized as lacking the ability to provide sensory input to the gravity receptors. The tlt/tlt mutant mice were a particularly attractive model for the study of vestibular function since the primary defect was limited to the receptor part of the vestibular system, and there were no detectable abnormal phenotypes in other organ systems. The goal of the proposed studies was to assess immediate and delayed effects of the lack of gravity perception on the vestibular system. Particular attention was paid to characterizing primarily affected periods of vestibular morphogenesis, and to identifying downstream genetic pathways that are altered in the CNS of the tlt/tlt mutant mouse. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the postnatal morphogenesis of the CNS in the tlt mutant mouse, using detailed morphometric analysis of isolated vestibular ganglia and brain tissue at different stages of postnatal development and assessment of apoptotic cell death; (2) to examine the expression of selected genes implicated by mutational analysis to be important in vestibular development or function by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry in the mutant mice; and (3) to identify other genes involved in vestibular development and function, using differential cloning strategies to isolate genes whose expression is changed in the mutant versus normal vestibular system.

  11. BCL11B regulates epithelial proliferation and asymmetric development of the mouse mandibular incisor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Kyrylkova

    Full Text Available Mouse incisors grow continuously throughout life with enamel deposition uniquely on the outer, or labial, side of the tooth. Asymmetric enamel deposition is due to the presence of enamel-secreting ameloblasts exclusively within the labial epithelium of the incisor. We have previously shown that mice lacking the transcription factor BCL11B/CTIP2 (BCL11B hereafter exhibit severely disrupted ameloblast formation in the developing incisor. We now report that BCL11B is a key factor controlling epithelial proliferation and overall developmental asymmetry of the mouse incisor: BCL11B is necessary for proliferation of the labial epithelium and development of the epithelial stem cell niche, which gives rise to ameloblasts; conversely, BCL11B suppresses epithelial proliferation, and development of stem cells and ameloblasts on the inner, or lingual, side of the incisor. This bidirectional action of BCL11B in the incisor epithelia appears responsible for the asymmetry of ameloblast localization in developing incisor. Underlying these spatio-specific functions of BCL11B in incisor development is the regulation of a large gene network comprised of genes encoding several members of the FGF and TGFβ superfamilies, Sprouty proteins, and Sonic hedgehog. Our data integrate BCL11B into these pathways during incisor development and reveal the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypes of both Bcl11b(-/- and Sprouty mutant mice.

  12. Molecular Diversity of Midbrain Development in Mouse, Human, and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Manno, Gioele; Gyllborg, Daniel; Codeluppi, Simone; Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Salto, Carmen; Zeisel, Amit; Borm, Lars E; Stott, Simon R W; Toledo, Enrique M; Villaescusa, J Carlos; Lönnerberg, Peter; Ryge, Jesper; Barker, Roger A; Arenas, Ernest; Linnarsson, Sten

    2016-10-06

    Understanding human embryonic ventral midbrain is of major interest for Parkinson's disease. However, the cell types, their gene expression dynamics, and their relationship to commonly used rodent models remain to be defined. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing to examine ventral midbrain development in human and mouse. We found 25 molecularly defined human cell types, including five subtypes of radial glia-like cells and four progenitors. In the mouse, two mature fetal dopaminergic neuron subtypes diversified into five adult classes during postnatal development. Cell types and gene expression were generally conserved across species, but with clear differences in cell proliferation, developmental timing, and dopaminergic neuron development. Additionally, we developed a method to quantitatively assess the fidelity of dopaminergic neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells, at a single-cell level. Thus, our study provides insight into the molecular programs controlling human midbrain development and provides a foundation for the development of cell replacement therapies.

  13. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xu; Chengqi Xin; Qiang Lin; Feng Ding; Wei Gong; Yuanyuan Zhou; Jun Yu; Peng Cui; Songnian Hu

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of reg-ulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regula-tion. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence;Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal develop-ment. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  14. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fransén-Pettersson

    Full Text Available Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

  15. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohtsuka

    Full Text Available Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  16. Connectome and Maturation Profiles of the Developing Mouse Brain Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura; Parker, Drew; Ghanbari, Yasser; Smith, Alex; Hua, Kegang; Mori, Susumu; Abel, Ted; Davatzikos, Christos; Verma, Ragini

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive effort to establish a structural mouse connectome using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging coupled with connectivity analysis tools. This work lays the foundation for imaging-based structural connectomics of the mouse brain, potentially facilitating a whole-brain network analysis to quantify brain changes in connectivity during development, as well as deviations from it related to genetic effects. A connectomic trajectory of maturation during postnatal ages 2-80 days is presented in the C57BL/6J mouse strain, using a whole-brain connectivity analysis, followed by investigations based on local and global network features. The global network measures of density, global efficiency, and modularity demonstrated a nonlinear relationship with age. The regional network metrics, namely degree and local efficiency, displayed a differential change in the major subcortical structures such as the thalamus and hippocampus, and cortical regions such as visual and motor cortex. Finally, the connectomes were used to derive an index of "brain connectivity index," which demonstrated a high correlation (r = 0.95) with the chronological age, indicating that brain connectivity is a good marker of normal age progression, hence valuable in detecting subtle deviations from normality caused by genetic, environmental, or pharmacological manipulations.

  17. Gpr177/mouse Wntless is essential for Wnt-mediated craniofacial and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiang; Ivy Yu, Hsiao-Man; Maruyama, Takamitsu; Mirando, Anthony J; Hsu, Wei

    2011-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Gpr177, the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wls/Evi/Srt, is required for establishment of the anterior-posterior axis. The Gpr177 null phenotype is highly reminiscent to the loss of Wnt3, the earliest abnormality among all Wnt knockouts in mice. The expression of Gpr177 in various cell types and tissues lead us to hypothesize that reciprocal regulation of Wnt and Gpr177 is essential for the Wnt-dependent developmental and pathogenic processes. Here, we create a new mouse strain permitting conditional inactivation of Gpr177. The loss of Gpr177 in the Wnt1-expressing cells causes mid/hindbrain and craniofacial defects which are far more severe than the Wnt1 knockout, but resemble the double knockout of Wnt1 and Wnt3a as well as β-catenin deletion in the Wnt1-expressing cells. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Gpr177 in Wnt1-mediated development of the mouse embryo, suggesting an overlapping function of Wnt family members in the Wnt1-expressing cells.

  18. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Nishikawa-Torikai, Satomi; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  19. Development and validation of a skin fibroblast biomarker profile for schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianthi Logotheti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiles of non-neural tissues through microarray technology could be used in schizophrenia studies, adding more information to the results from similar studies on postmortem brain tissue. The ultimate goal of such studies is to develop accessible biomarkers. Supervised machine learning methodologies were used, in order to examine if the gene expression from skin fibroblast cells could be exploited for the classification of schizophrenic subjects. A dataset of skin fibroblasts gene expression of schizophrenia patients was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus database. After applying statistical criteria, we concluded to genes that present a differential expression between the schizophrenic patients and the healthy controls. Based on those genes, functional profiling was performed with the BioInfoMiner web tool. After the statistical analysis, 63 genes were identified as differentially expressed. The functional profiling revealed interesting terms and pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathways, as well as immune-related mechanisms. A subset of 16 differentially expressed genes from fibroblast gene expression profiling that occurred after Support Vector Machines Recursive Feature Elimination could efficiently separate schizophrenic from healthy controls subjects. These findings suggest that through the analysis of fibroblast based gene expression signature and with the application of machine learning methodologies we might conclude to a diagnostic classification model in schizophrenia.

  20. Developing handheld real time multispectral imager to clinically detect erythema in darkly pigmented skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Yi, Dingrong; Wang, Fengtao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Fuhan

    2010-02-01

    Pressure ulcers have been identified as a public health concern by the US government through the Healthy People 2010 initiative and the National Quality Forum (NQF). Currently, no tools are available to assist clinicians in erythema, i.e. the early stage pressure ulcer detection. The results from our previous research (supported by NIH grant) indicate that erythema in different skin tones can be identified using a set of wavelengths 540, 577, 650 and 970nm. This paper will report our recent work which is developing a handheld, point-of-care, clinicallyviable and affordable, real time multispectral imager to detect erythema in persons with darkly pigmented skin. Instead of using traditional filters, e.g. filter wheels, generalized Lyot filter, electrical tunable filter or the methods of dispersing light, e.g. optic-acoustic crystal, a novel custom filter mosaic has been successfully designed and fabricated using lithography and vacuum multi layer film technologies. The filter has been integrated with CMOS and CCD sensors. The filter incorporates four or more different wavelengths within the visual to nearinfrared range each having a narrow bandwidth of 30nm or less. Single wavelength area is chosen as 20.8μx 20.8μ. The filter can be deposited on regular optical glass as substrate or directly on a CMOS and CCD imaging sensor. This design permits a multi-spectral image to be acquired in a single exposure, thereby providing overwhelming convenience in multi spectral imaging acquisition.

  1. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. Yet, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a ten year period. In 2009–2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions si...

  2. Diversity of human and mouse homeobox gene expression in development and adult tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunwell, Thomas L; Holland, Peter W H

    2016-11-03

    Homeobox genes encode a diverse set of transcription factors implicated in a vast range of biological processes including, but not limited to, embryonic cell fate specification and patterning. Although numerous studies report expression of particular sets of homeobox genes, a systematic analysis of the tissue specificity of homeobox genes is lacking. Here we analyse publicly-available transcriptome data from human and mouse developmental stages, and adult human tissues, to identify groups of homeobox genes with similar expression patterns. We calculate expression profiles for 242 human and 278 mouse homeobox loci across a combination of 59 human and 12 mouse adult tissues, early and late developmental stages. This revealed 20 human homeobox genes with widespread expression, primarily from the TALE, CERS and ZF classes. Most homeobox genes, however, have greater tissue-specificity, allowing us to compile homeobox gene expression lists for neural tissues, immune tissues, reproductive and developmental samples, and for numerous organ systems. In mouse development, we propose four distinct phases of homeobox gene expression: oocyte to zygote; 2-cell; 4-cell to blastocyst; early to mid post-implantation. The final phase change is marked by expression of ANTP class genes. We also use these data to compare expression specificity between evolutionarily-based gene classes, revealing that ANTP, PRD, LIM and POU homeobox gene classes have highest tissue specificity while HNF, TALE, CUT and CERS are most widely expressed. The homeobox genes comprise a large superclass and their expression patterns are correspondingly diverse, although in a broad sense related to an evolutionarily-based classification. The ubiquitous expression of some genes suggests roles in general cellular processes; in contrast, most human homeobox genes have greater tissue specificity and we compile useful homeobox datasets for particular tissues, organs and developmental stages. The identification of a

  3. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Petrashevskaya, Natalia; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/- mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2-4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6-14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS.

  4. Rapidly Developed Multiple Face and Neck Skin Cancers in a Patient with Sjögren’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Lean San; Lai, Ji-Ching; Lian, Je Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Skin cancer Symptoms: Skin Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic, systemic disorder of an autoimmune nature, and its primary etiopathogenetic events are not known. Previous studies have found elevated incidence of malignancies in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome. However, there are few reports regarding the association of Sjögren’s syndrome with skin cancers, especially with multiple skin cancers developed within a short time. Case Report: We reported an unusual case of a patient with primary Sjögren’s syndrome who suffered from rapidly developed facial and neck skin cancers within two years. Conclusions: Sjögren’s syndrome associated with skin cancer is rare. Our case report suggests that Sjögren’s syndrome patients require continuous follow-up with conventional cancer examination, including skin biopsy for suspected skin lesions. PMID:28373638

  5. SkinEthic Laboratories, a company devoted to develop and produce in vitro alternative methods to animal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brugerolle, Anne

    2007-01-01

    SkinEthic Laboratories is a France-based biotechnology company recognised as the world leader in tissue engineering. SkinEthic is devoted to develop and produce reliable and robust in vitro alternative methods to animal use in cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. SkinEthic models provide relevant tools for efficacy and safety screening tests in order to support an integrated decision-making during research and development phases. Some screening tests are referenced and validated as alternatives to animal use (Episkin), others are in the process of validation under ECVAM and OECD guidelines. SkinEthic laboratories provide a unique and joined experience of more than 20 years from Episkin SNC and SkinEthic SA. Their unique cell culture process allows in vitro reconstructed human tissues with well characterized histology, functionality and ultrastructure features to be mass produced. Our product line includes skin models: a reconstructed human epidermis with a collagen layer, Episkin, reconstructed human epidermis without or with melanocytes (with a tanning degree from phototype II to VI) and a reconstructed human epithelium, i.e. cornea, and other mucosa, i.e. oral, gingival, oesophageal and vaginal. Our philosophy is based on 3 main commitments: to support our customers by providing robust and reliable models, to ensure training and education in using validated protocols, allowing a large array of raw materials, active ingredients and finished products in solid, liquid, powder, cream or gel form to be screened, and, to provide a dedicated service to our partners.

  6. The mouse anterior chamber angle and trabecular meshwork develop without cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabaleta Adriana

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The iridocorneal angle forms in the mammalian eye from undifferentiated mesenchyme between the root of the iris and cornea. A major component is the trabecular meshwork, consisting of extracellular matrix organized into a network of beams, covered in trabecular endothelial cells. Between the beams, channels lead to Schlemm's canal for the drainage of aqueous humor from the eye into the blood stream. Abnormal development of the iridocorneal angle that interferes with ocular fluid drainage can lead to glaucoma in humans. Little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying angle development. There are two main hypotheses. The first proposes that morphogenesis involves mainly cell differentiation, matrix deposition and assembly of the originally continuous mesenchymal mass into beams, channels and Schlemm's canal. The second, based primarily on rat studies, proposes that cell death and macrophages play an important role in forming channels and beams. Mice provide a potentially useful model to understand the origin and development of angle structures and how defective development leads to glaucoma. Few studies have assessed the normal structure and development of the mouse angle. We used light and electron microscopy and a cell death assay to define the sequence of events underlying formation of the angle structures in mice. Results The mouse angle structures and developmental sequence are similar to those in humans. Cell death was not detectable during the period of trabecular channel and beam formation. Conclusions These results support morphogenic mechanisms involving organization of cellular and extracellular matrix components without cell death or atrophy.

  7. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  8. Eosinophil-derived leukotriene C4 signals via type 2 cysteinyl leukotriene receptor to promote skin fibrosis in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoshi, Michiko K; He, Rui; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; ElKhal, Abdallah; Kawamoto, Seiji; Lewis, Christopher N; Austen, K Frank; Geha, Raif S

    2012-03-27

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) skin lesions exhibit epidermal and dermal thickening, eosinophil infiltration, and increased levels of the cysteinyl leukotriene (cys-LT) leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)). Epicutaneous sensitization with ovalbumin of WT mice but not ΔdblGATA mice, the latter of which lack eosinophils, caused skin thickening, collagen deposition, and increased mRNA expression of the cys-LT generating enzyme LTC(4) synthase (LTC(4)S). Skin thickening and collagen deposition were significantly reduced in ovalbumin-sensitized skin of LTC(4)S-deficient and type 2 cys-LT receptor (CysLT(2)R)-deficient mice but not type 1 cys-LT receptor (CysLT(1)R)-deficient mice. Adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived eosinophils from WT but not LTC(4)S-deficient mice restored skin thickening and collagen deposition in epicutaneous-sensitized skin of ΔdblGATA recipients. LTC(4) stimulation caused increased collagen synthesis by human skin fibroblasts, which was blocked by CysLT(2)R antagonism but not CysLT(1)R antagonism. Furthermore, LTC(4) stimulated skin fibroblasts to secrete factors that elicit keratinocyte proliferation. These findings establish a role for eosinophil-derived cys-LTs and the CysLT(2)R in the hyperkeratosis and fibrosis of allergic skin inflammation. Strategies that block eosinophil infiltration, cys-LT production, or the CysLT(2)R might be useful in the treatment of AD.

  9. Analysis of Presenilin 1 and 2 interacting proteins in mouse cerebral cortex during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    In our previous report, we showed that Presenilin (PS)1 and 2 have differential expression profile from early embryonic stages till adulthood in mouse cerebral cortex, suggesting that both of these proteins are crucial for brain development. Genetic manipulation studies have also shown the involvement of PS1 in brain development, but PS2 remains largely unexplored. In order to understand how PS1 and 2 mediate developmental functions, we have investigated the interaction of PS1 and 2 with proteins of mouse cerebral cortex during development. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) combined with MALDI-MS/MS analysis revealed 12 interacting partners of PS1 and 11 partners of PS2. The interacting proteins were different for PS1 and 2, and involved in cell division, glycolysis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. Densitometric analysis of protein bands visualized after SDS-PAGE separation of Co-IP proteins revealed variation in their amount and degree of interaction during different developmental stages of mice. Further, immunoblot based validation of PS1 interacting protein Notch-1 showed maximum interaction at embryonic day (E) 12.5, decline at E18.5, upregulation from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P20 and thereafter reduction at P45 and 20 weeks. In-silico analysis of PS and its interacting proteins indicated conformation based interaction through common type of secondary structures having alpha helical, extended beta strand and random coil, and CK2, PKC phosphorylation and myristoylation motifs. Taken together, our study showed that PS1 and PS2 interact to varying extent with different proteins of mouse cerebral cortex and suggests their interaction based on specific conformation and involvement in diverse functions essential for the brain development.

  10. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy, 59,257,530 (adolescence and 72,729,636 (adulthood reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  11. Adolescent mouse takes on an active transcriptomic expression during postnatal cerebral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axonrepulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon. repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. © 2014 .

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  14. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and micro-computed tomography combined atlas of developing and adult mouse brains for stereotaxic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M; Zhang, J; Miller, M I; Sidman, R L; Mori, S

    2009-09-15

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: postnatal day (P) 7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140-P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo magnetic resonance imaging adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Micro-Computed Tomography Combined Atlas of Developing and Adult Mouse Brains for Stereotaxic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Zhang, Jiangyang; Miller, Michael I.; Sidman, Richard L.; Mori, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: P7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140–P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo MRI adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains. PMID:19490934

  17. Role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis:learning from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Su; Min Jin; Lin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays essential roles in bone development and diseases. Missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs in humans can cause various congenital bone diseases, including chondrodysplasia syndromes, craniosynostosis syndromes and syndromes with dysregulated phosphate metabolism. FGF/FGFR signaling is also an important pathway involved in the maintenance of adult bone homeostasis. Multiple kinds of mouse models, mimicking human skeleton diseases caused by missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs, have been established by knock-in/out and transgenic technologies. These genetically modified mice provide good models for studying the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeleton development and homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the