WorldWideScience

Sample records for deuterium ion beam

  1. Production of polarized negative deuterium ion beam with dual optical pumping in KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsho, M.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Mori, Y.

    1997-02-01

    To obtain highly nuclear-spin vector polarized negative deuterium ion beam, a dual optically pumped polarized negative deuterium ion source has been developed at KEK. It is possible to select a pure nuclear-spin state with this scheme, and negative deuterium ion beam with 100% nuclear-spin vector polarization can be produced in principle. We have obtained about 70% of nuclear-spin vector polarized negative deuterium ion beam so far. This result may open up a new possibilities for the optically pumped polarized ion source. (author)

  2. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...... enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast...

  3. Progress report on chemical erosion of graphite bombarded by deuterium ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yukun; Wang Mingxu; Wang Zhiwen; Deng Dongsheng

    1999-06-01

    On the study basis of chemical sputtering of graphite bombarded by a deuterium ion beam, the research was carried out with fresh SMF-800 graphite, G3 graphite, SiC and boronized graphite etc. The SMF-800 graphite boronized in situ in HL-1M tokamak with carborane (C 2 B 10 H 12 ) by helium glow discharge was selected as the best one of anti-chemical-erosion. It possesses a releasing rate of CD 4 one order of magnitude lower than that of SMF-800 graphite and a releasing peak temperature shifted to 650 K. By rotating graphite sample with a small angle, a profile of CD 4 releasing from the sample bombarded by a deuterium ion beam of 1.3 μA/3 keV was observed. With a 45 degree incident beam from left side, the releasing CD 4 peak was positioned at 1 degree right side of the sample's normal. The releasing rate of CD 4 at a 5 degree divergence to the normal was decreased 7% approximately, being decreased faster one order than the cosine law

  4. Diffusion, trapping, and isotope exchange of plasma implanted deuterium in ion beam damaged tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Joseph Lincoln

    Tritium accumulation in nuclear fusion reactor materials is a major concern for practical and safe fusion energy. This work examines hydrogen isotope exchange as a tritium removal technique, analyzes the effects of neutron damage using high energy copper ion beams, and introduces a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the concentration of trapped atoms. Tungsten samples were irradiated with high energy (0.5 - 5 MeV) copper ions for controlled levels of damage - 10-3 to 10-1 displacements per atom (dpa) - at room temperature. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma at constant temperature (˜ 380 K) to a high fluence of 1024 ions/m2, where retention is at is maximized (i.e. saturated). By then subsequently exposing these samples to fractions of this fluence with hydrogen plasma, isotope exchange rates were observed. The resulting deuterium still trapped in the tungsten is then measured post mortem. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) gives the depth resolved deuterium retention profile with the 3He(D,p) 4He reaction, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) gives the total amount of deuterium trapped in the tungsten by heating a sample in vacuum up to 1200 K and measuring the evaporated gas molecules with a residual gas analyzer. Isotope exchange data show that hydrogen atoms can displace trapped deuterium atoms efficiently only up to the first few microns, but does not affect the atoms trapped at greater depths. In ion damaged tungsten, measurements showed a significant increase in retention in the damage region proportional to dpa 0.66, which results in a significant spike in total retention, and isotope exchange in damaged samples is still ineffective at depths greater than a few microns. Thus, isotope exchange is not an affective tritium removal technique; however, these experiments have shown that trapping in material defects greatly affects diffusion. These experiments lead to a simplified diffusion model with defect densities as the only free

  5. Compilation of erosion yields of metal-doped carbon materials by deuterium impact from ion beam and low temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balden, M., E-mail: Martin.Balden@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Starke, P. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Adelhelm, C.; Sauter, P.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Fernandez, J.M. Ramos; Escandell, M. Martinez [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, University of Alicante, E-03690 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    The erosion yield by deuterium impact was determined for various doped carbon-based materials. Ion beam bombardment with 30 and 200 eV at elevated temperatures (600-850 K) and low temperature plasma exposure with 30 eV ion energy ({approx}7 x 10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}s) and about 170 times higher thermal atomic deuterium flux at 300 K and 630 K were performed. The total yield of fine-grain graphites doped with 4 at.% Ti and Zr is reduced by a factor of 4 for 30 and 200 eV D impact at elevated temperatures at D fluences above 10{sup 24} m{sup -2} compared to undoped graphite. Extensive carbide particle loss can be excluded up to fluences of {approx}10{sup 25} m{sup -2}.

  6. Deuterium removal from radiation damage in tungsten by isotopic exchange with hydrogen atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; Efimov, V. S.; Gasparyan, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    The tungsten samples were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create radiation-induced defects and then exposed to the deuterium atomic beam. The deuterium removal was studied by isotopic exchange with atomic hydrogen beam. Modification of the deuterium depth profile in self-ion irradiated tungsten under isotopic exchange up to a depth of 6 μm was measured in- situ by nuclear reaction analysis. The total deuterium retention after isotopic exchange was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It is shown that the efficiency of the deuterium removal increases with increasing of the hydrogen incident flux, incident energy and temperature of the tungsten sample.

  7. Incident neutron spectra on the first wall and their application to energetic ion diagnostics in beam-injected deuterium-tritium tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, S.; Matsuura, H.; Uchiyama, D.

    2017-09-01

    A diagnostic method for small non-Maxwellian tails in fuel-ion velocity distribution functions is proposed; this method uses the anisotropy of neutron emissions, and it is based on the numerical analysis of the incident fast neutron spectrum on the first wall of a fusion device. Neutron energy spectra are investigated for each incident position along the first wall and each angle of incidence assuming an ITER-like deuterium-tritium plasma; it is heated by tangential-neutral-beam injection. Evaluating the incident neutron spectra at all wall positions and angles of incidence enables the selective measurement of non-Gaussian components in the neutron emission spectrum for energetic ion diagnostics; in addition, the optimal detector position and orientation can be determined. At the optimal detector position and orientation, the ratio of non-Gaussian components to the Gaussian peak can be two orders of magnitude greater than the ratio in the neutron emission spectrum. This result can improve the accuracy of energetic ion diagnostics in plasmas when small, anisotropic non-Maxwellian tails are formed in fuel ion velocity distribution functions. We focus on the non-Gaussian components greater than 14 MeV, where the effect of the background noise (i.e., slowing-down neutrons by scattering throughout the machine structure) can be ignored.

  8. Deuterium ion irradiation damage and deuterium trapping mechanism in candidate stainless steel material (JPCA2) for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizuka, Norihiro; Kurita, Takaaki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Muroga, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    An improved austenitic stainless steel (JPCA), a candidate material for fusion reactor, is irradiated at room temperature with deuterium ion beams. Desorption spectra of deuterium gas is measured at various increased temperatures and defects formed under irradiation are observed by transmission electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of the thermal release of deuteriums and the characteristics of irradiation-induced defects involved in the process. In the deuterium deportion spectra observed, five release stages are found to exist at 90 deg C, 160 deg C, 220 deg C, 300 deg C and 400 deg C, referred to as Stage I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Stage I is interpreted as representing the release of deuteriums trapped in point defects (presumably vacancies) formed under irradiation. The energy of desorption from the trapping sites is estimated at 0.8 eV. Stage II is concluded to be associated with the release of deuteriums trapped in a certain kind of existing defects. Stage III involves the release of deuteriums that are trapped in dislocations, dislocation loops or dislocated portions of stacking fault tetrahedra. This release occurs significantly in processed materials and other materials irradiated with high energy ion beams that may cause cascade damage. Stage IV is interpreted in terms of thermal decomposition of small deuterium clusters. Stage V is associated with the decomposition of rather large deuterium clusters grown on the {111} plane. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Powerful 160-keV neutral deuterium beam injector for application in fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fumelli, M.; Bayetti, P.; Becherer, R.; Bottiglioni, F.; Desmons, M.; Jequier, F.; Pamela, J.; Raimbault, P.; Valckx, F.P.G.

    1986-07-01

    A 160-keV neutral deuterium beam injector has been developed for plasma heating in JET (Joint European Torus) fusion experiment. This injector has been reliably operated at 5.9-MW extracted deuterium ion beam power (37-A, 160-keV ion beam) and 5-s pulse duration. The neutral beam power was 1.75 MW corresponding to an overall neutral injector power efficiency of 30%. The beam divergence was 0.6/sup 0/. The ion beam was accelerated with a three-grid multiaperture system (aperture diameter phi = 11 mm). The accelerating gap length was 24 mm. The extracted deuterium ion current density amounted to 150 mA/cm/sup 2/. Grid and source body power loadings were acceptable for quasi-steady-state operation.

  10. Powerful 160-keV neutral deuterium beam injector for application in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumelli, M.; Bayetti, P.; Becherer, R.; Bottiglioni, F.; Desmons, M.; Jequier, F.; Pamela, J.; Raimbault, P.; Valckx, F.P.G.

    1986-01-01

    A 160-keV neutral deuterium beam injector has been developed for plasma heating in JET (Joint European Torus) fusion experiment. This injector has been reliably operated at 5.9-MW extracted deuterium ion beam power (37-A, 160-keV ion beam) and 5-s pulse duration. The neutral beam power was 1.75 MW corresponding to an overall neutral injector power efficiency of 30%. The beam divergence was 0.6 0 . The ion beam was accelerated with a three-grid multiaperture system (aperture diameter phi = 11 mm). The accelerating gap length was 24 mm. The extracted deuterium ion current density amounted to 150 mA/cm 2 . Grid and source body power loadings were acceptable for quasi-steady-state operation

  11. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more...... pronounced than that for hydrogen projectiles in the same energy range....

  12. Transport of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions in RF-driven ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutser, R; Wuenderlich, D; Fantz, U

    2010-01-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources are major components of neutral beam injection systems for plasma heating in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER. In order to fulfill the requirements of the ITER neutral beam injection, a high-performance, large-area RF-driven ion source for negative ions is being developed at the MPI fuer Plasmaphysik. Negative hydrogen ions are mainly generated on a converter surface by impinging neutral particles and positive ions under the influence of magnetic fields and the plasma sheath potential. The 3D transport code TrajAn has been applied in order to obtain the total and spatially resolved extraction probabilities for H - and D - ions under identical plasma parameters and the realistic magnetic field topology of the ion source. A comparison of the isotopes shows a lower total extraction probability in the case of deuterium ions, caused by a different transport effect. The transport calculation shows that distortions of the spatial distributions of ion birth and extraction by the magnetic electron suppression field are present for both negative hydrogen and deuterium ions.

  13. Comparison of Deuterium Retention in Tungsten Pre-damaged with Energetic Electrons, Self-ions and Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Gann, V. V.; Zibrov, M. S.; Gasparyan, Yu. M.

    The objective of this work is to compare the deuterium retention in tungsten pre-damaged with electron (e) beam, ions and neutrons. Self-ion irradiation was performed at IPP (Garching) and e-beam irradiation at MEPhI (Moscow). Neutron irradiation was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) by Hatano et al. (2013). After pre-damaging, specimens were exposed to deuterium plasma in well-defined laboratory conditions.

  14. Ion beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    An ion beam analyzer is specified, having an ion source for generating ions of a sample to be analyzed, means for extracting the sample ions, means for focusing the sample ions into a beam, separation means positioned along the ion beam for selectively deflecting species of ions, and means for detecting the selected species of ions. According to the specification, the analyzer further comprises (a) means for disabling at least a portion of the separation means, such that the ion beam from the source remains undeflected; (b) means located along the path of the undeflected ion beam for sensing the sample ions; and (c) enabling means responsive to the sensing means for automatically re-enabling the separation means when the sample ions reach a predetermined intensity level. (author)

  15. Design of a negative ion neutral beam system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easoz, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    A conceptual design of a neutral beam line based on the neutralization of negative deuterium ions is presented. This work is a detailed design of a complete neutral beam line based on using negative ions from a direct extraction source. Anticipating major technological advancements, beam line components have been scaled including the negative ion sources and components for the direct energy recovery of charged beams and high speed cryogenic pumping. With application to the next step in experimental fusion reactors (TNS), the neutral beam injector system that has been designed provides 10 MW of 200 keV neutral deuterium atoms. Several arms are required for plasma ignition

  16. Ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strehl, P.

    1994-04-01

    This report is an introduction to ion beam diagnosis. After a short description of the most important ion beam parameters measurements of the beam current by means of Faraday cups, calorimetry, and beam current transformers and measurements of the beam profile by means of viewing screens, profile grids and scanning devices, and residual gas ionization monitors are described. Finally measurements in the transverse and longitudinal phase space are considered. (HSI)

  17. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  18. Fundamental ion cyclotron resonance heating of JET deuterium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasilnikov, A V; Amosov, V N; Kaschuck, Yu A; Van Eester, D; Lerche, E; Ongena, J; Bonheure, G; Biewer, T; Crombe, K; Ericsson, G; Giacomelli, L; Hellesen, C; Hjalmarsson, A; Esposito, B; Marocco, D; Jachmich, S; Kiptily, V; Leggate, H; Mailloux, J; Kallne, J

    2009-01-01

    Radio frequency heating of majority ions is of prime importance for understanding the basic role of auxiliary heating in the activated D-T phase of ITER. Majority deuterium ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) experiments at the fundamental cyclotron frequency were performed in JET. In spite of the poor antenna coupling at 25 MHz, this heating scheme proved promising when adopted in combination with D neutral beam injection (NBI). The effect of fundamental ICRH of a D population was clearly demonstrated in these experiments: by adding ∼25% of heating power the fusion power was increased up to 30-50%, depending on the type of NBI adopted. At this power level, the ion and electron temperatures increased from T i ∼ 4.0 keV and T e ∼ 4.5 keV (NBI-only phase) to T i ∼ 5.5 keV and T e ∼ 5.2 keV (ICRH + NBI phase), respectively. The increase in the neutron yield was stronger when 80 keV rather than 130 keV deuterons were injected in the plasma. It is shown that the neutron rate, the diamagnetic energy and the electron as well as the ion temperature scale roughly linearly with the applied RF power. A synergistic effect of the combined use of ICRF and NBI heating was observed: (i) the number of neutron counts measured by the neutron camera during the combined ICRF + NBI phases of the discharges exceeded the sum of the individual counts of the NBI-only and ICRF-only phases; (ii) a substantial increase in the number of slowing-down beam ions was detected by the time of flight neutron spectrometer when ICRF power was switched on; (iii) a small D subpopulation with energies slightly above the NBI launch energy was detected by the neutral particle analyzer and γ-ray spectroscopy.

  19. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-12-01

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure the average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.

  20. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  1. Intense neutron source target test facility: a 200 mA dc, deuterium ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, F.M.; Riedel, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    A 200 kV, 200 mA dc, deuterium ion accelerator has been constructed to evaluate high-temperature hydride materials such as scandium and erbium for use as targets in D--T neutron generators. The metal hydride film is deposited on a water-cooled, copper substrate designed to handle power densities of 40 MW/m 2 while maintaining a surface temperature of less than or equal to 450 0 C. The goal of this program is to develop a target for a D--T neutron generator capable of producing 10 13 neutrons/s for use in cancer therapy. The accelerator employs a small duopigatron ion source which is capable of delivering a 200 mA deuterium ion beam that is composed of 60% atomic ions. The ion source is held at positive high voltage and a beam is formed with a single stage accel gap. An extractor electrode is biased negative about 2 kV to suppress secondary electrons and to define the point along the beam axis where the beam is space-charge neutralized by the trapped secondary electrons. The distance from the plasma expansion cup to the target is 0.6 m. Ion beam diameters at the target have been determined from measured infrared radiance profiles of the target due to beam heating. Data are presented on ion beam diameters for several operating conditions and accelerator geometries. D--D neutron output rates of 6 x 10 10 neutrons/s have been measured with a 200 kV, 180 mA beam on erbium and a 180 kV, 160 mA beam on scandium

  2. Ion-beam technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  3. Ion beam studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.H.; Chivers, D.J.; Gard, G.A.; Temple, W.

    1977-04-01

    A description of techniques for the production of intense beams of heavy ions is given. A table of recommended operational procedures for most elements is included. The ionisation of boron is considered in some detail because of its particular importance as a dopant for ion implantation. (author)

  4. Two dimensional simulation of ion beam-plasm interaction | Echi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hybrid plasma simulation is a model in which different components of the plasma are treated differently. In this work the ions are treated as particles while the electrons are treated as a neutralizing background fluid through which electric signals may propagate. Deuterium ion beams incident on the tritium plasma interact ...

  5. Ion Accelerator Merges Several Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, G.

    1984-01-01

    Intense ion beam formed by merging multiple ion beamlets into one concentrated beam. Beamlet holes in graphite screen and focusing grids arranged in hexagonal pattern. Merged beam passes through single hole in each of aluminum accelerator and decelerator grids. Ion extraction efficiency, beam intensity, and focusing improved.

  6. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  7. Reconstruction of negative hydrogen ion beam properties from beamline diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruf, Benjamin

    2014-09-25

    For the experimental fusion reactor ITER, which should show the feasibility of sustaining a fusion plasma with a positive power balance, some technology still has to be developed, amongst others also the plasma heating system. One heating technique is the neutral beam injection (NBI). A beam of fast deuterium atoms is injected into the fusion plasma. By heavy particle collisions the beam particles give their energy to the plasma. A NBI system consists of three major components. First, deuterium ions are generated in a low temperature, low pressure plasma of an ion source. At ITER, the requirements on the beam energy of 1 MeV cause the necessity of negative charged deuterium ions. Secondly, the ions are accelerated within an acceleration system with several grids, where the plasma grid is the first grid. The grids are on different descending high voltage potentials. The source itself is on the highest negative potential. Thirdly, the fast deuterium ions have to be neutralised. This thesis deals with the second step in the mentioned beam system, the ion acceleration and beam formation. The underlying experiments and measurements were carried out at the testbeds BATMAN (BAvarianTest MAchine for Negative ions) and ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Garching (IPP Garching). The main goal of this thesis is to provide a tool which allows the determination of the beam properties. These are beam divergence, stripping losses and beam inhomogeneity. For this purpose a particle trajectory code has been developed from scratch, namely BBC-NI (Bavarian Beam Code for Negative Ions). The code is able to simulate the whole beam and the outcome of several beam diagnostic tools. The data obtained from the code together with the measurements of the beam diagnostic tools should allow the reconstruction of the beam properties. The major beam diagnostic tool, which is used in this thesis, is the beam emission spectroscopy

  8. Ion beam characteristics of a gas filled accelerator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, R.S.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Boers, J.E.; Shope, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas filled tube used to produce a pulsed neutron flux with the D(T, 4 He)n reaction is described. Deuterium and tritium ions generated in a reflex discharge are extracted and accelerated to 100 keV by means of an accelerator electrode onto a deutero-tritide target electrode. The electrodes are designed to focus the ion beam onto the target. Total tube currents consisting of extracted ions, unsuppressed secondary electrons, and ions generated by interactions with the background gas are typically 100mA. Characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. Accelerating voltages greater than 50kV are required to focus the beam through the accelerator aperture for configurations that give beams with the proper energy density at the target. The perveance of the beam is defined. Maximum perveance values are 2 to 10 nanopervs. Tube focussing and neutron production characteristics are described

  9. Ion Beam Extraction by Discrete Ion Focusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus (900) and methods are disclosed for ion beam extraction. In an implementation, the apparatus includes a plasma source (or plasma) (802) and an ion extractor (804). The plasma source is adapted to generate ions and the ion extractor is immersed in the plasma source to extract a fraction...... of the generated ions. The ion extractor is surrounded by a space charge (810) formed at least in part by the extracted ions. The ion extractor includes a biased electrode (806) forming an interface with an insulator (808). The interface is customized to form a strongly curved potential distribution (812......) in the space-charge surrounding the ion extractor. The strongly curved potential distribution focuses the extracted ions towards an opening (814) on a surface of the biased electrode thereby resulting in an ion beam....

  10. Heavy ion beam probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  11. Heavy ion beam probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included

  12. Focused ion beam technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamo, K.

    1993-01-01

    Focussed ion beam (FIB) technology has the advantage of being a maskless process compatible with UHV processing. This makes it attractive for use in in situ processing and has been applied to the fabrication of various mesoscopic structures. The present paper reviews these results whilst putting emphasis on in situ processing by a combined FIB and molecular beam epitaxy system. The typical performance of present FIB systems is also presented. In order to utilize the potential advantages of FIB processing, reduction of damage and improvement of throughput are important, and much effort has been devoted to developing processing techniques which require a reduced dose. The importance of low-energy FIB is discussed. (author)

  13. High harmonic ion cyclotron heating in DIII-D: Beam ion absorption and sawtooth stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Mau, T.K.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    Combined neutral beam injection and fast wave heating at the fourth cyclotron harmonic produce an energetic deuterium beam ion tail in the DIII-D tokamak. When the concentration of thermal hydrogen exceeds ∼ 5%, the beam ion absorption is suppressed in favour of second harmonic hydrogen absorption. As theoretically expected, the beam absorption increases with beam ion gyro-radius; also, central absorption at the fifth harmonic is weaker than central absorption at the fourth harmonic. For central heating at the fourth harmonic, an energetic, perpendicular, beam population forms inside the q = 1 surface. The beam ion tail transiently stabilizes the sawtooth instability but destabilizes toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs). Saturation of the central heating correlates with the onset of the TAEs. Continued expansion of the q = 1 radius eventually precipitates a sawtooth crash; complete magnetic reconnection is observed. (author)

  14. Ion beam assisted film growth

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, T

    2012-01-01

    This volume provides up to date information on the experimental, theoretical and technological aspects of film growth assisted by ion beams.Ion beam assisted film growth is one of the most effective techniques in aiding the growth of high-quality thin solid films in a controlled way. Moreover, ion beams play a dominant role in the reduction of the growth temperature of thin films of high melting point materials. In this way, ion beams make a considerable and complex contribution to film growth. The volume will be essential reading for scientists, engineers and students working in thi

  15. Ion beam generation and focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.A.; Mendel, C.W.; Swain, D.W.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations have shown that efficiently generated and focused ion beams could have significant advantages over electron beams in achieving ignition of inertially-confined thermonuclear fuel. Efficient ion beam generation implies use of a good ion source and suppression of net electron current. Net electron flow can be reduced by allowing electrons to reflex through a highly transparent anode or by use of transverse magnetic fields (either beam self-fields or externally applied fields). Geometric focusing can be achieved if the beam is generated by appropriately shaped electrodes. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate ion beam generation in both reflexing and pinched-flow diodes. Spherically shaped electrodes are used to concentrate a proton beam, and target response to proton deposition is studied

  16. Consequences of trapped beam ions of the analysis of neutron emission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Hone, M.; Jarvis, O.N.; Laundy, B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra have been measured during D o neutral beam heating of deuterium plasmas. The thermonuclear to beam-plasma neutron production ratios are deduced. For a non-radial spectrometer line-of-sight, the trapped beam-ion fraction must be considered. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  17. Spacecraft ion beam noise effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anenberg, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    An estimate of the antenna noise temperature and the uplink signal-to-noise ratio has been made for Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by a spacecraft ion beam; a worst-case situation in which the spacecraft antenna is located in the exit plane of the ion beam and directed at varying angles into the ion beam is assumed. Numerical results of the antenna noise temperature versus antenna pointing angle are given for a typical set of ion beam and antenna pattern parameters. The uplink signal-to-noise ratio due to the ion beam noise alone is given in terms of a critical range in AU at which a typical ranging transmission is received with S/N = 0 db. The effects of the ion beam divergence angle and antenna distance on the ion beam are also presented. Results of the study show typical increases in the antenna noise temperature of about 0.2 K and critical ranges of the order of 3-5 AU. An ion engine thus generally introduces an undetectable level of noise into a spacecraft receiver.

  18. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-07

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  19. Intense nonrelativistic cesium ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl Fus. 21, 529(1981)) is applied to the problem of the cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx.5 cm and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx.10 cm

  20. Intense beams of light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarcat, Noel

    1985-01-01

    Results of experiments performed in order to accelerate intense beams of light and heavier ions are presented. The accelerating diodes are driven by existing pulsed power generators. Optimization of the generator structure is described in chapter I. Nuclear diagnostics of the accelerated light ion beams are presented in chapter II. Chapter III deals with the physics of intense charged particle beams. The models developed are applied to the calculation of the performances of the ion diodes described in the previous chapters. Chapter IV reports preliminary results on a multiply ionized carbon source driven by a 0.1 TW pulsed power generator. (author) [fr

  1. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium

  2. Propagation of light ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Niu, Keishiro.

    1983-01-01

    A method of rotating ion layer is proposed as a possible driver for inertial confinement fusion for the purpose of obtaining more stable ion beam against various micro- and macroinstabilities. The analysis was carried out within the frameworks of Vlasov and fluid models. A rotating ion layer propagating in the Z-direction is considered. The beam is described by a distribution function which satisfies the Vlasov equation. The equilibrium and microstability were studied. The filamentation instability is suppressed by a magnetic field due to the rotation of ion beam. To study the properties of the equilibrium state from the macroscopic standpoint, the equation of continuity of ion beam, the equation of motion and the Maxwell equations are considered. It is shown that the macroinstability is stabilized by the magnetic field in the Z-direction. It was found that the most dangerous instability for the problem of the propagation of ion beam was able to be atabilized by using a rotating ion layer. (Kato, T.)

  3. Charged fusion product analysis as diagnostics in high-energy deuterium beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayetti, P.; Bottiglioni, F.; Martin, G.; Pamela, J.

    1986-01-01

    The detection of protons (3 MeV) and tritons (1 MeV) originating from D--D fusion reactions are presented as a tool for inferring the main features of a powerful deuterium neutral beam. By an energy analysis, beam species content, neutralization, and power transmission efficiencies have been measured. Using a localization detector, a method for measuring beam profiles has been developed

  4. Charged fusion product analysis as diagnostics in high energy deuterium beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayetti, P.; Bottiglioni, F.; Martin, G.; Pamela, J.

    1985-05-01

    The detection of protons (3 MeV) and tritons (1 MeV) originating from D-D fusion reactions are presented as a tool for inferring the main features of a powerful deuterium neutral beam. By an energy analysis, beam species content, neutralisation and power transmission efficiencies have been measured. Using a localisation detector, a method for measuring beam profiles has been developed

  5. Prospects for ion beam fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The promise of pellet fusion by high energy heavy ions has evolved very rapidly, partly because of prior pellet work in the laser and e beam programs and partly because of an inherently good match to the application. ERDA sponsored a summer study in 1976 which has had a significant impact on the direction the ion beam fusion program has evolved. Experimental R and D work has been initiated in three of the U.S. accelerator laboratories. Argonne's development program is described. This development work, if successful, should lead to a great deal of confidence that the concept of pellet fusion by high energy heavy ions is indeed practical.

  6. Ion beams in materials processing and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    This book covers ion beam application in modern materials research, offering the basics of ion beam physics and technology and a detailed account of the physics of ion-solid interactions for ion implantation, ion beam synthesis, sputtering and nano-patterning.

  7. Nuclear micro-beam analysis of deuterium distribution in carbon fibre composites for controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersson, P.; Kreter, A.; Possnert, G.; Rubel, M.

    2010-01-01

    Probes made of carbon fibre composite NB41 were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak and in a simulator of plasma-wall interactions, PISCES. The aim was to assess the deuterium retention and its lateral and depth distribution. The analysis was performed by means of D( 3 He, p) 4 He and 12 C( 3 He, p) 14 N nuclear reactions analysis using a standard (1 mm spot) and micro-beam (20 μm resolution). The measurements have revealed non uniform distribution of deuterium atoms in micro-regions: differences by a factor of 3 between the maximum and minimum deuterium concentrations. The differences were associated with the orientation and type of fibres for samples exposed in PICSES. For surface structure in the erosion zone of samples exposed to a tokamak plasma the micro-regions were more complex. Depth profiling has indicated migration of fuel into the bulk of materials.

  8. Funneling of heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongardt, K.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Sanitz, D.

    1982-01-01

    The funneling of heavy ion beams can be achieved by first bending the beams by septum magnets towards the common axis, and then deflecting them onto the axis by rf-deflector elements with time varying electric field strength. The main properties of these deflection elements are discussed, especially the increase of the transverse emittance. As an example beam envelopes are shown for funneling two 100 mA, 1.7 MEV/N Bisup(+2) beams into one 108 MHz Alvarez accelerator. (orig.)

  9. Production of solid deuterium targets by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csikai, J.; Szegedi, S.; Olah, L.; El-Megrab, A.M.; Molla, N.I.; Rahman, M.M.; Miah, R.U.; Habbani, F.; Shaddad, I.

    1997-01-01

    Solid metal, semiconductor and metallic glass samples were irradiated with deuteron atomic ions between 60 and 180 keV incident energies. Accumulation rates of deuterons in different targets were recorded by the detection of protons and neutrons via the 2 H(d,p) and 2 H(d,n) reactions. A simple analytical expression is given to describe the kinetics of the accumulation. The dependence of the reaction rate on the deuteron energy gives information on the concentration profile in addition to the neutron flux density spectra. A varying distortion of the implanted deuteron profiles by a change in the beam energy were also observed for different targets. (orig.)

  10. In-ESI source hydrogen/deuterium exchange of carbohydrate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2014-03-04

    We present the investigation of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of carbohydrates ions occurring in the electrospray ion source. The shape of the deuterium distribution was observed to be considerably dependent on the temperature of the ion transfer tube and the solvent used. If deuterated alcohol (EtOD or MeOD) or D2O/deuterated alcohol is used as an electrospray solvent, then for high temperatures (>350 °C), intensive back exchange is observed, resulting in ∼30% depth of the deuterium exchange. At low temperatures (exchange is weaker and the depth of the deuterium exchange is ∼70%. In the intermediate temperature region (∼250 °C), the deuterium distribution is unusually wide for methanol and bimodal for ethanol. The addition of 1% formic acid results in low (∼30%) depth of the deuterium exchange for any temperature in the operating region. The bimodal distribution for the ethanol can be possibly explained by the presence of differently folded gas-phase ions of carbohydrates.

  11. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Qing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O2+, BF2+, P+ etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF2+, over 90% of O2+ and P+ have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He+ beam is as high as 440 A/cm2 • Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O2+ ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O2+ ions with the dose of 1015 cm-2. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The

  12. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O 2 + , BF 2 + , P + etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF 2 + , over 90% of O 2 + and P + have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He + beam is as high as 440 A/cm 2 · Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O 2 + ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O 2 + ions with the dose of 10 15 cm -2 . The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P

  13. Ion beam analysis fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nastasi, Michael; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Ion Beam Analysis: Fundamentals and Applications explains the basic characteristics of ion beams as applied to the analysis of materials, as well as ion beam analysis (IBA) of art/archaeological objects. It focuses on the fundamentals and applications of ion beam methods of materials characterization.The book explains how ions interact with solids and describes what information can be gained. It starts by covering the fundamentals of ion beam analysis, including kinematics, ion stopping, Rutherford backscattering, channeling, elastic recoil detection, particle induced x-ray emission, and nucle

  14. Ion Beam Therapy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    At present, seven facilities in Europe treat deep-seated tumors with particle beams, six with proton beams and one with carbon ions. Three of these facilities are in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Dubna, Russia. Other facilities include the TSL Uppsala, Sweden, CPO Orsay, France, and PSI Villigen, Switzerland, all for proton therapy, and GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, which utilizes carbon ions only. But only two of these facilities irradiate with scanned ion beams: the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI), Villigen (protons) and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt. These two facilities are experimental units within physics laboratories and have developed the technique of intensity-modulated beam scanning in order to produce irradiation conforming to a 3-D target. There are three proton centers presently under construction in Munich, Essen and Orsay, and the proton facility at PSI has added a superconducting accelerator connected to an isocentric gantry in order to become independent of the accelerator shared with the physics research program. The excellent clinical results using carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Chiba and GSI have triggered the construction of four new heavy-ion therapy projects (carbon ions and protons), located in Heidelberg, Pavia, Marburg and Kiel. The projects in Heidelberg and Pavia will begin patient treatment in 2009, and the Marburg and Kiel projects will begin in 2010 and 2011, respectively. These centers use different accelerator designs but have the same kind of treatment planning system and use the same approach for the calculation of the biological effectiveness of the carbon ions as developed at GSI [1]. There are many other planned projects in the works. Do not replace the word ''abstract,'' but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your ''Enter'' key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style

  15. High current DC ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubaly, M.R.; de Jong, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Development of high-current cw accelerators such as ZEBRA and FMIT, use of high current dc ion beams in industry for sputtering and material treatment, and scientific applications such as heavy-ion fusion and plasma physics diagnostics have provided the impetus for ion source development programs at many laboratories. At Chalk River, development of efficient plasma generators and reliable extraction columns to provide high quality beams of hydrogen, nitrogen, argon and xenon is underway. DC beams of up to 850 mA (limited by available power supplies) of hydrogen, 200 mA of nitrogen, 155 mA of argon and 100 mA of xenon have been produced with good reliability. DuoPIGatrons, with and without magnetic cusps, are used to generate a high density, reasonably quiescent plasma. Multi-aperture accel-decel columns are used for extraction with shaped apertures and beamlet steering to improve beam quality. This paper describes the performance of these sources and identifies some of the remaining problems. Guidelines for extraction column design, and experience with transporting high current beams are also presented

  16. Radioactive ion beams at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, J.M.; Dombsky, M.; Buchmann, L.; Sprenger, H.; McNeely, P.; Roy, G.

    1992-01-01

    The thick target, on-line isotope separator, TISOL, located at the high intensity, 500 MeV proton cyclotron, TRIUMF, has now been upgraded to a production facility, and can produce mass separated radioisotopic beams for a wide range of elements. Two different types of ion sources, an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) system and a heated surface ion source are presently operational for alkali, alkaline, and gaseous elements. A new class of target materials, zeolites, have been developed to allow the use of beam intensities approaching 5 μA. A summary of the experimental program underway is presented along with planned future upgrades, and recent results on the properties of nuclides far from stability. The role of TISOL in future planned accelerated radioactive beams facilities is also discussed

  17. Studies of negative ions by collision-induced decomposition and hydrogen-deuterium exchange techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, D F; Sethi, S K; Shabanowitz, J

    1980-06-01

    Development of two new techniques for studying the gas phase chemistry of negative ions is reported. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of (M-1)- ions has been accomplished in a newly constructed triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. This instrument was assembled by adding two additional Finnigan quadrupole mass filters to a Finnigan Model 3200 CI mass spectrometer. Generation of (M-1)- ions is accomplished by allowing OH- and sample to react under CI conditions in the ion source. The first quadrupole mass filter, Q1, is then employed to selectively pass the (M-1)- ion into a second quadrupole filter containing argon or neon at 10(-3) torr. On collision with the inert gas the (M-1)- ions dissociate into fragments which are then mass analyzed in the third quadrupole filter, CID spectra of (M-1)- ions from twelve carbonyl compounds are presented in this paper. Ion molecule isotope exchange reactions in the CI ion source can be used to count the number of hydrogen atoms in many different chemical environments. Collisions between sample (M-1)- ions and deuterium-labeled reagent gases (ND3, D2O, EtOD) facilitate incorporation of deuterium into the negative ion if the basicities of the sample and reagent anions are similar. Thus it is possible to selectively incorporate deuterium into many organic samples by controlling the exothermicity of the acid base, ion-molecule chemistry.

  18. Nanostructuring by ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valbusa, U.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.

    2003-01-01

    In metals, the surface curvature dependence of the sputtering yield and the presence of an extra energy barrier whenever diffusing adatoms try to descend step edges, produce a similar surface instability, which builds up regular patterns. By tuning the competition between these two mechanisms, it is possible to create self-organized structures of the size of few nanometers. Height, lateral distance and order of the structures change with the deposition parameters like ion energy, dose, incident angle and substrate temperature. The paper offers an overview of the experiments carried out and foresees possible applications of these results in the area of material science

  19. Materials Science with Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bernas, Harry

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces materials scientists and designers, physicists and chemists to the properties of materials that can be modified by ion irradiation or implantation. These techniques can help design new materials or to test modified properties; novel applications already show that ion-beam techniques are complementary to others, yielding previously unattainable properties. Also, ion-beam interactions modify materials at the nanoscale, avoiding the often detrimental results of lithographic or chemical techniques. Here, the effects are related to better-known quasi-equilibrium thermodynamics, and the consequences to materials are discussed with concepts that are familiar to materials science. Examples addressed concern semiconductor physics, crystal and nanocluster growth, optics, magnetism, and applications to geology and biology.

  20. Negative-ion-based neutral beams for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.; Anderson, O.A.; Chan, C.F.

    1987-10-01

    To maximize the usefulness of an engineering test reactor (e.g., ITER, TIBER), it is highly desirable that it operate under steady-state conditions. The most attractive option for maintaining the circulating current needed in the center of the plasma is the injection of powerful beams of neutral deuterium atoms. The beam simultaneously heats the plasma. At the energies required, in excess of 500 keV, such beams can be made by accelerating D - ions and then removing the electron. Sources are being developed that generate the D - ions in the volume of a specially constructed plasma discharge, without the addition of cesium. These sources must operate with minimum gas flow, to avoid stripping the D - beam, and with minimum electron output. We are designing at LBL highly efficient electrostatic accelerators that combine electric strong-focusing with dc acceleration and offer the possibility of varying the beam energy at constant current while minimizing breakdown. Some form of rf acceleration may also be required. To minimize irradiation of the ion sources and accelerators, the D - beam can be transported through a maze in the neutron shielding. The D - ions can be converted to neutrals in a gas or plasma target, but advances in laser and mirror technology may make possible very efficient photodetachment systems by the time an ETR becomes operational. 9 refs., 4 figs

  1. Ion temperature profiles along a hydrogen diagnostic beam in a TORE SUPRA tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romannikov, A.; Petrov, Yu.; Platts, P.; Khess, V.; Khutter, T.; Farzhon, Zh.; Moro, F.

    2002-01-01

    By means of corpuscular diagnostics one studies temperature of ions along a diagnostic hydrogen beam. Paper presents comparison of temperature of plasma (deuterium) basic ions measures by means of the active corpuscular diagnostics with temperature of C + carbon ions along a beam. One studies behavior peculiarities of T i ion temperature profiles for TORE-SUPRA different modes, such as: formation of plane and even hollow T i profiles for ohmic modes, variation of T i profiles under operation of an ergodic diverter, difference of temperature of basic ions measured by means of the active corpuscular diagnostics from C +5 temperature. Paper offers clear explanation of these peculiarities [ru

  2. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  3. Radioactive Ion Beams and Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Morton, A. C.; Schaffer, P.

    2014-02-01

    Experiments performed at radioactive ion beam facilities shed new light on nuclear physics and nuclear structure, as well as nuclear astrophysics, materials science and medical science. The many existing facilities, as well as the new generation of facilities being built and those proposed for the future, are a testament to the high interest in this rapidly expanding field. The opportunities inherent in radioactive beam facilities have enabled the search for radioisotopes suitable for medical diagnosis or therapy. In this article, an overview of the production techniques and the current status of RIB facilities and proposals will be presented. In addition, accelerator-generated radiopharmaceuticals will be reviewed.

  4. Ion beam modification of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofield, C.J.; Sugden, S.; Ing, J.; Bridwell, L.B.; Wang, Y.Q.

    1993-01-01

    The implantation of polymers has received considerable attention in recent years, primarily to examine doping of conducting polymers and to increase the surface conductivity (by many orders of magnitude) of highly insulating polymers. The interest in these studies was partly motivated by possible applications to microelectronic device fabrication. More recently it has been observed that ion implantation can under some conditions lead to the formation of a hard (e.g. as hard as steel, ca. 3 MPa) and conducting surface layer. This paper will review the ion beam modification of polymers resulting from ion implantation with reference to fundamental ion-solid interactions. This leads us to examine whether or not implantation of polymers is a contradiction in terms. (Author)

  5. Multi-slit triode ion optical system with ballistic beam focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydenko, V., E-mail: V.I.Davydenko@inp.nsk.su; Amirov, V.; Gorbovsky, A.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.; Kapitonov, V.; Mishagin, V.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Karpushov, A. N. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Smirnov, A. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Uhlemann, R. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research-Plasma Physics, Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Multi-slit triode ion-optical systems with spherical electrodes are of interest for formation of intense focused neutral beams for plasma heating. At present, two versions of focusing multi-slit triode ion optical system are developed. The first ion optical system forms the proton beam with 15 keV energy, 140 A current, and 30 ms duration. The second ion optical system is intended for heating neutral beam injector of Tokamak Configuration Variable (TCV). The injector produces focused deuterium neutral beam with 35 keV energy, 1 MW power, and 2 s duration. In the later case, the angular beam divergence of the neutral beam is 20-22 mrad in the direction across the slits of the ion optical system and 12 mrad in the direction along the slits.

  6. A novel method to survey parameters of an ion beam and its interaction with a target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J. D.; Yang, Z.; Li, J.; Wang, X. H.; Wang, T.; Lan, C. H.; Dong, P.; Li, X.; He, J. L.; Zheng, L.; Liu, P.

    2017-09-01

    Beam profile and composition of the pulsed ion beam from a vacuum arc source are valuable information for designing a high-intensity deuterium-tritium neutron generator. Traditional methods are notoriously difficult to obtain the information at the same time. A novel off-line diagnostic method is presented, which can obtain the transverse beam profile with high resolution as well as species of the ions in the beam. The method is using a silicon target with high purity to interact with the ion beam, and then use secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze the interaction zone of the target to get the beam information. More information on beam-target interaction could get simultaneously. Proof-of-principle simulation and experimental works have demonstrated this method is practical.

  7. Ion beam sputter implantation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    By means of ion beam atomizing or sputtering an integrally composed coating, the composition of which continuously changes from 100% of the substrate to 100% of the coating, can be surfaced on a substrate (e.g. molten quartz on plastic lenses). In order to do this in the facility there is directed a primary beam of accelerated noble gas ions on a target from the group of the following materials: SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Corning Glass 7070, Corning Glass 7740 or borosilicate glass. The particles leaving the target are directed on the substrate by means of an acceleration potential of up to 10 KV. There may, however, be coated also metal layers (Ni, Co) on a mylar film resulting in a semireflecting metal film. (RW) [de

  8. Materials research with ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    This report gives a series of helpful programs which are used in materials research with ion beams. In this context algorithms which can substitute table books are dealt with. This is true for the programs DEDX and PRAL; they are used in order to determine the energy loss of ions in solid bodies, their working range and straggling. Furthermore, simulator routines and analyzers are described. The program TRIM simulates the physical phenomena which occur with the penetration of high-energy ions into solid bodies. In this context electronic excitations, phonons and lattice distortions which are caused by the ions are dealt with. For the experimental ion implantation it is interesting to know the final distribution of the simulated ions in the solid body. The program RBS simulates the Rutherford spectrum of ions which are scattered from a solid body which may consist of up to nine elements and up to one hundred layers. The unknown composition of a solid body can be determined in direct comparison with the experimental spectrum. The program NRA determines concentration and penetrative distribution of an impurity by means of the experimental nuclear reaction spectrum of this impurity. All programs are written in FORTRAN 77. (orig./MM) [de

  9. Effect of periodic deuterium ion irradiation on deuterium retention and blistering in Tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of periodic irradiation on Deuterium (D retention and blistering in Tungsten (W was investigated. W samples were exposed to D plasma at a fixed fluence while varying the irradiation cycle number (1-shot, 2-shots and 3-shots. Exposure energy and flux were ∼50eV and ∼1 ×1022 D m−2 s−1, respectively. Sample temperatures were 537K and 643K. At 573K, D retention and blister density decreased with increasing number of irradiation cycle. In contrast at 643K, D retention showed no dependence on number of irradiation cycle. Therefore, sample temperature during irradiation is an important parameter in comparing the results of continuous and periodic irradiation, especially in studies involving extremely-high-flux (>1024 D m−2 s−1 irradiation and fluence dependency of D retention.

  10. Large area ion and plasma beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldorf, J. [IPT Ionen- und Plasmatech. GmbH, Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    In the past a number of ion beam sources utilizing different methods for plasma excitation have been developed. Nevertheless, a widespread use in industrial applications has not happened, since the sources were often not able to fulfill specific demands like: broad homogeneous ion beams, compatibility with reactive gases, low ion energies at high ion current densities or electrical neutrality of the beam. Our contribution wants to demonstrate technical capabilities of rf ion and plasma beam sources, which can overcome the above mentioned disadvantages. The physical principles and features of respective sources are presented. We report on effective low pressure plasma excitation by electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) for the generation of dense homogeneous plasmas and the rf plasma beam extraction method for the generation of broad low energy plasma beams. Some applications like direct plasma beam deposition of a-C:H and ion beam assisted deposition of Al and Cu with tailored thin film properties are discussed. (orig.).

  11. Large area ion and plasma beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldorf, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the past a number of ion beam sources utilizing different methods for plasma excitation have been developed. Nevertheless, a widespread use in industrial applications has not happened, since the sources were often not able to fulfill specific demands like: broad homogeneous ion beams, compatibility with reactive gases, low ion energies at high ion current densities or electrical neutrality of the beam. Our contribution wants to demonstrate technical capabilities of rf ion and plasma beam sources, which can overcome the above mentioned disadvantages. The physical principles and features of respective sources are presented. We report on effective low pressure plasma excitation by electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) for the generation of dense homogeneous plasmas and the rf plasma beam extraction method for the generation of broad low energy plasma beams. Some applications like direct plasma beam deposition of a-C:H and ion beam assisted deposition of Al and Cu with tailored thin film properties are discussed. (orig.)

  12. A fast beam-ion instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupakov, G.V. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The ionization of residual gas by an electron beam in an accelerator generates ions that can resonantly couple to the beam through a wave propagating in the beam-ion system. Results of the study of a beam-ion instability are presented for a multi-bunch train taking into account the decoherence of ion oscillations due to the ion frequency spread and spatial variation of the ion frequency. It is shown that the combination of both effects can substantially reduce the growth rate of the instability. (author)

  13. A polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source for internal target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, D.; Buuren, L.D. van; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A high-brightness hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source is presented. The apparatus, previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium (Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1998) 687; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 3755), was configured as a source for internal target experiments to measure single- and double-polarization observables, with either polarized hydrogen or vector/tensor polarized deuterium. The atomic beam intensity was enhanced by a factor of ∼2.5 by optimizing the Stern-Gerlach focusing system using high tip-field (∼1.5 T) rare-earth permanent magnets, and by increasing the pumping speed in the beam-formation chamber. Fluxes of (5.9±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s were measured in a diameter 12 mmx122 mm compression tube with its entrance at a distance of 27 cm from the last focusing element. The total output flux amounted to (7.6±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s

  14. Retention of ion-implanted deuterium in tungsten pre-irradiated with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, V.Kh.; Ertl, K.; Roth, J.; Schmid, K.

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium (D) ion implantation and retention at room temperature was studied in pure and carbon (C) implanted tungsten single crystals. Pre-implantation with C was done at 40 keV and D implantation at 10 keV with the range confined in the carbon modified layer and at 100 keV with the range exceeding the carbon modified layer. The range distributions were investigated in situ using 1 MeV 3 He ions analysing the energy distributions of α particles from the D( 3 He,p)α reaction while the total amount of retained D was obtained from the p-integral. The range distribution of carbon was obtained from the backscattered 3 He energy distribution. C pre-impantation influences the D retention only if the range of the D ions is confined within the carbon modified surface layer. In this case, D diffusion beyond the ion range distribution does not occur and the retained D amount is smaller than in the pure W crystal. At D energies exceeding the carbon modified layer the retention occurs in the dislocation zone up to 1 μm and the total retained amount is the same for carbon implanted and pure W samples

  15. Neurosurgical applications of ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.; Levy, Richard P.; Phillips, Mark H.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Lyman, John T.

    1989-04-01

    The program at Donner Pavilion has applied nuclear medicine research to the diagnosis and radiosurgical treatment of life-threatening intracranial vascular disorders that affect more than half a million Americans. Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery, using narrow beams of heavy ions, demonstrates superior biological and physical characteristics in brain over X-and γ-rays, viz., improved dose distribution in the Bragg peak and sharp lateral and distal borders and less scattering of the beam. Examination of CNS tissue response and alteration of cerebral blood-flow dynamics related to heavy-ion Bragg peak radiosurgery is carried out using three-dimensional treatment planning and quantitative imaging utilizing cerebral angiography, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cine-CT, xenon X-ray CT and positron emission tomography (PET). Also under examination are the physical properties of narrow heavy-ion beams for improving methods of dose delivery and dose distribution and for establishing clinical RBE/LET and dose-response relationships for human CNS tissues. Based on the evaluation and treatment with stereotactically directed narrow beams of heavy charged particles of over 300 patients, with cerebral angiography, CT scanning and MRI and PET scanning of selected patients, plus extensive clinical and neuroradiological followup, it appears that Stereotactic charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery obliterates intracranial arteriovenous malformations or protects against rebleeding with reduced morbidity and no mortality. Discussion will include the method of evaluation, the clinical research protocol, the Stereotactic neuroradiological preparation, treatment planning, the radiosurgery procedure and the protocol for followup. Emphasis will be placed on the neurological results, including the neuroradiological and clinical response and early and late delayed injury in brain leading to complications (including vasogenic edema

  16. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  17. Influence of ion implanted helium on deuterium trapping in Kh18N10T stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstolutskaya, G.D.; Ruzhitskij, V.V.; Kopanets, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    The results are presented on evolution of distribution profiles and helium and deuterium thermal desorption ion implanted in steel 18Cr10NiTi. Accumulation, trapping, retention and microstructure evolution are studied; effect helium and hydrogen simultaneous implantation on these processes is also studied

  18. Hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten irradiated sequentially with low-energy deuterium and protium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimov, V. K.; Tyburska-Puschel, B.; Hoen, Mhjt; Roth, J.; Hatano, Y.; Isobe, K.; Matsuyama, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten was investigated at various temperatures both after sequential exposure to low-energy deuterium (D) and protium (H) plasmas and after sequential irradiation with low-energy D and H ions. The methods used were thermal desorption spectroscopy, and the D((3)He,

  19. Design of a continuously operated 1-keV deuterium-ion extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    A novel grid structure that is cooled only by radiation and conduction is shown to be capable of continuously extracting 2.5 kA.m -2 of 1-keV positive deuterium ions while dissipating a power loading of 0.4 MW.m -2

  20. Ion beam characteristics of the controlatron/zetatron family of the gas filled neutron tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.S.; Shope, L.A.; O' Neal, M.L.; Boers, J.E.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    A gas filled tube used to produce a neutron flux with the D(T,He/sup 4/)n reaction is described. Deuterium and tritium ions generated in a reflex discharge are extracted and accelerated to 100 keV by means of an accelerator electrode onto a deutero-tritide target electrode. The electrodes are designed to focus the ion beam onto the target. Total tube currents consisting of extracted ions, unsuppressed secondary electrons, and ions generated by interactions with the background gas are typically 100 mA. The characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. Accelerating voltages greater than 50 kV are required to focus the beam through the accelerator aperture for configurations that give beams with the proper energy density onto the target. The perveance of the beam is discussed. Maximum perveance values are 2 to 20 nanopervs. Tube focusing and neutron production characteristics are described.

  1. Production of negatively charged radioactive ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Stracener, D. W.; Stora, T.

    2017-08-01

    Beams of short-lived radioactive nuclei are needed for frontier experimental research in nuclear structure, reactions, and astrophysics. Negatively charged radioactive ion beams have unique advantages and allow for the use of a tandem accelerator for post-acceleration, which can provide the highest beam quality and continuously variable energies. Negative ion beams can be obtained with high intensity and some unique beam purification techniques based on differences in electronegativity and chemical reactivity can be used to provide beams with high purity. This article describes the production of negative radioactive ion beams at the former holifield radioactive ion beam facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the CERN ISOLDE facility with emphasis on the development of the negative ion sources employed at these two facilities. ).

  2. Ion beam processes in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; Narayan, J.; Fathy, D.

    1984-07-01

    Observation of the effects of implants of energetic ions at high dose rates into Si have produced some exciting and interesting results. The mechanism whereby displacement damage produced by ions self-anneals during high dose rate implantation is discussed. It is shown that ion beam annealing (IBA) offers in certain situations unique possibilities for damage annealing. Annealing results of the near surface in Si with a buried oxide layer, formed by high dose implantation, are presented in order to illustrate the advantages offered by IBA. It is also shown that ion irradiation can stimulate the epitaxial recrystallization of amorphous overlayers in Si. The nonequilibrium alloying which results from such epitaxial processes is discussed as well as mechanisms which limit the solid solubility during irradiation. Finally, a dose rate dependency for the production of stable damage by ion irradiation at a constant fluence has been observed. For low fluence implants, the amount of damage is substantially greater in the case of high flux rather than low flux implantation

  3. Impact of beam ions on α-particle measurements by collective Thomson scattering in ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egedal, J.; Bindslev, H.; Budny, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed as a viable diagnostic for characterizing fusion born a-distributions in ITER. However, the velocities of the planned 1 MeV deuterium heating beam ions in 1TER are similar to that of fusion born a-particles and may therefore mask the measureme......Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed as a viable diagnostic for characterizing fusion born a-distributions in ITER. However, the velocities of the planned 1 MeV deuterium heating beam ions in 1TER are similar to that of fusion born a-particles and may therefore mask...... and the alpha-particles are calculated. Our investigations show that the CTS measurements of alpha-particles will not be masked by the presence of the beam ions in H-mode plasmas. In lower density reversed shear plasmas, only a part of the CTS alpha-particle spectrum will be perturbed....

  4. Online hydrogen/deuterium exchange performed in the ion mobility cell of a hybrid mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Kornél; Redeuil, Karine; Rezzi, Serge

    2009-11-15

    The present paper describes the performance of online, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange implemented in the ion mobility cell of a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deuterium oxide and deuterated methanol were utilized to create deuterated vapor that is introduced into the ion mobility region of the mass spectrometer. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange occurs spontaneously in the milliseconds time frame without the need of switching the instrument into ion mobility mode. The exchange was studied in case of low molecular weight molecules and proteins. The observed number of exchanged hydrogens was equal to the number of theoretically exchangeable hydrogens for all low molecular weight compounds. This method needs only minimal instrumental modifications, is simple, cheap, environment friendly, compatible with ultraperformance liquid chromatography, and can be implemented on commercially available instruments. It does not compromise choice of liquid chromatographic solvents and accurate mass or parallel-fragmentation (MS(E)) methods. The performance of this method was compared to that of conventional alternatives where the deuterated solvent is introduced into the cone gas of the instrument. Although the degree of exchange was similar between the two methods, the "cone gas method" requires 10 times higher deuterated solvent volumes (50 muL/min) and offers reduced sensitivity in the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) mode. The presented method is suggested as a standard future element of mass spectrometers to aid online structural characterization of unknowns and to study conformational changes of proteins with hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

  5. Unstable Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves Exited by an Ion Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in a quiescent cesium plasma into which a low‐energy beam of sodium ions was injected. The instability appeared when the beam velocity was above 12 times the ion thermal velocity. The waves propagated along the magnetic field with a velocity somewhat...

  6. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mass analyzed highly charged ion beams of energy ranging from a few keV to a few MeV plays an important role in various aspects of research in modern physics. In this paper a unique low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) set up at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) for providing low and medium energy multiply charged ion ...

  7. Design issues of radioactive ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieuvin, M.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in Radioactive Ion Beams throughout the world. These ions open new domains of research for nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics and atomic physics. Two methods are used for the production of these beams: fragmentation of a primary, high energy heavy ion beam passing through a thin target or nuclei production in a thick target bombarded either by a heavy ion beam, a proton beam or by neutrons. When radioactive species are produced in a thick target, they must be extracted, ionised, separated, identified and finally accelerated. This requires a radioactive ion source, a mass separator and a post accelerator. This paper reviews these two methods, their respective domains and the specific problems related to the control and the accelerator of radioactive ion beams. (author). 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Implantation of D+ ions in niobium and deuterium gas reemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tel'kovskij, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    This is a study of the implanting and reflex gasoisolation of D ions in niobium. It has been discovered that deutrium scope and gasoisolation are defined by several processes. An assumption is made that in ion bombarding conditions the implanting solutions are possible to exist and that deutrium can be replaced on the basis of niobium and hydrid compounds NbxDy. The portion of the particles entrained in the metal in one or another way depends on the ion energy. The dependence of the scope coefficient of n D + ions from the target temperature in the range of 290-1500 K was registered. An increase of the scope coefficient of the ions at high temperature with an increase of the ion energy was discovered

  9. Ion-Induced Emission of Charged Particles from Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, P.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the emission of both positive and negative particles from solid hydrogen and deuterium for normal incidence of H+, H2+, H+3, D2H+, D3+ and He+ ions up to 10 keV. For positive particles the emission coefficient increased with increasing energy of incidence to reach...... a value of 0.08 per atom for 10 keV H+ onto hydrogen. Apparently the positive particles are sputtered ones. The negative particles emitted are predominantly electrons. The emission coefficient per incident atom as a function of the velocity of the incident particle agrees fairly well with results...... published earlier for incidence of hydrogen and deuterium ions. However, systematic differences of up to 10% are now observed between the coefficients for the different types of ions....

  10. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T. [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  11. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-09-01

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1-10 mm3) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 106 and 1.6 × 107 neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  12. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin.

  13. Operation of a 160 keV, 37 A, neutral deuterium beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumelli, M.; Bayetti, P.; Becherer, R.; Bottiglioni, F.; Desmons, M.; Raimbault, P.; Valckx, F.P.G.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental work on this injector was carried out in three consecutive steps : in an initial phase (June 83 - Nov. 83) the injector was operated with hydrogen gas for feasibility tests at 160 keV and for the qualification of the beam optics. There after (Nov. 83-June 84) the whole test bed was moved and rebuilt inside a hot cell, for neutron shielding. Then the injector was operated at full power with a 37 A, 160 keV, 0,1 s deuterium beam. In the last phase, started in July 84 the authors mounted a water cooled plasma grid for long pulse (5 s) experiment. On the middle of September they obtained reliably a 37 A, 160 keV, 5 s perveance matched beam

  14. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  15. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field.......Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field....

  16. Production of hydrogen and deuterium negative ions in an electron cyclotron resonance driven plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Industrial Univ. of Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2001-04-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance source with driven plasma rings for hydrogen isotope ion production is studied. Extracted currents of positive and negative ions depending on gas pressure, microwave power value and extraction voltage are obtained. The study shows that the negative ion yield is an order of magnitude higher than the yield of positive particles when a driven ring is in contact with the surface of the plasma electrode. The production of negative ions of deuterium, D{sup -}, is close to the production of negative ions of light hydrogen isotope, H{sup -}. The comparison of the experimental data with the calculated ones shows that the most probable process of the H{sup -} and D{sup -} ion formation in the electron cyclotron driven plasma is dissociative attachment of electrons to molecules in high Rydberg states. For hydrogen ions and ions of deuterium, the negative current at a microwave power of 200 W through a 3-mm aperture and 8 kV extraction voltage are 4.7 mA and 3.1 mA respectively. (orig.)

  17. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hone, M.A.; Jarvis, O.N.; Loughlin, M.J.; Sadler, G.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs

  18. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hone, M.A.; Jarvis, O.N.; Loughlin, M.J.; Sadler, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S.; Watkins, N. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  19. Beam structure studies of low-energy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, K.; Schneider, J. D.; Geisik, C.; Stevens, R. R.

    1991-05-01

    The ion beam structure at various axial positions along the beam-transport line has been monitored and studied utilizing a fluor screen and a video camera. The fluor material is aluminum oxide that is plasma-jet sprayed onto the surface of an aluminum or a water-cooled copper substrate. The visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false-color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for the on-line viewing by the experimentalist. Digitized video signals are stored for further off-line processing and extracting more information about the beam, such as beam profiles. This inexpensive and effective diagnostic enables the experimentalist to observe the real-time beam response (such as evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position) to parameter changes.

  20. Radiation effects of ion beams on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the radiation effects of ion beams on polymers are reviewed briefly. Our recent work on the radiation effects of ion beams on polystyrene thin films on silicon wafers and time resolved emission studies on polymers are described. (orig.)

  1. Heavy ion beams for inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlove, T.F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-05-01

    The United States' program in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is described in this paper, with emphasis on the studies of the use of intense high energy beams of heavy ions to provide the power and energy needed to initiate thermonuclear burn. Preliminary calculations of the transport of intense ion beams in an electrostatic quadrupole focussing structure are discussed.

  2. Electron cyclotron resonance discharge as a source for hydrogen and deuterium ions production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon Velasco, A.J.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    2004-01-01

    In this report, we describe characteristics of a ring-structure hydrogen plasma heated in electron cyclotron resonance conditions and confined in a mirror magnetic trap and discuss the relative efficiency of secondary electrons and thermo-electrons in negative hydrogen and deuterium ion production. The obtained data and calculations of the balance equations for possible reactions demonstrate that the negative ion production is realized in two stages. First, the hydrogen and deuterium molecules are excited in collisions with the plasma electrons to high-laying Rydberg or vibrational levels in the plasma volume. The second stage leads to the negative ion production through the process of dissociative attachment of low energy electrons. The low energy electrons are originated due to a bombardment of the plasma electrode by ions of one of the driven rings and thermo-emission from heated tungsten filaments. Experiments seem to indicate that the negative ion generation occurs predominantly in the limited volume filled with thermo-electrons. Estimation of the negative ion generation rate shows that the main channel of H - and D - ion production involves the process of high Rydberg state excitation. (authors)

  3. Electron cyclotron resonance discharge as a source for hydrogen and deuterium ions production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon Velasco, A.J. [Universidad de Pamplona, Pamplona (Colombia); Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2004-07-01

    In this report, we describe characteristics of a ring-structure hydrogen plasma heated in electron cyclotron resonance conditions and confined in a mirror magnetic trap and discuss the relative efficiency of secondary electrons and thermo-electrons in negative hydrogen and deuterium ion production. The obtained data and calculations of the balance equations for possible reactions demonstrate that the negative ion production is realized in two stages. First, the hydrogen and deuterium molecules are excited in collisions with the plasma electrons to high-laying Rydberg or vibrational levels in the plasma volume. The second stage leads to the negative ion production through the process of dissociative attachment of low energy electrons. The low energy electrons are originated due to a bombardment of the plasma electrode by ions of one of the driven rings and thermo-emission from heated tungsten filaments. Experiments seem to indicate that the negative ion generation occurs predominantly in the limited volume filled with thermo-electrons. Estimation of the negative ion generation rate shows that the main channel of H{sup -} and D{sup -} ion production involves the process of high Rydberg state excitation. (authors)

  4. Atomic processes in hydrogen and deuterium negative ion discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    A knowledge of the atomic processes active in a hydrogen negative ion discharge and their respective rates is an essential component of the interpretation, modeling, and enhancement of negative ion systems. The generation of the cross sections and rate processes appropriate to this problem has been a principal activity at several laboratories. In this paper is discussed those collision processes that are of major importance for the destruction of the vibrationally excited molecules generated in the discharge, processes that are essential to the valuation of the optimization procedure that is to be discussed in this paper

  5. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 {mu}m patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma.

  6. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 μm patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma

  7. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Mass analyzed highly charged ion beams of energy ranging from a few keV to a few. MeV plays an important role in various aspects of research in modern physics. In this paper a unique low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) set up at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) for providing low and medium energy multiply ...

  8. Intense ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intense beams of light of heavy ions are being studied as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) drivers for high yield and energy. Heavy and light ions have common interests in beam transport, targets, and alternative accelerators. Self-pinched transport is being jointly studied. This article reviews the development of intense ion beams for ICF. Light-ion drivers are highlighted because they are compact, modular, efficient and low cost. Issues facing light ions are: (1) decreasing beam divergence; (2) increasing beam brightness; and (3) demonstrating self-pinched transport. Applied-B ion diodes are favored because of efficiency, beam brightness, perceived scalability, achievable focal intensity, and multistage capability. A light-ion concept addressing these issues uses: (1) an injector divergence of ≤ 24 mrad at 9 MeV; (2) two-stage acceleration to reduce divergence to ≤ 12 mrad at 35 MeV; and (3) self-pinched transport accepting divergences up to 12 mrad. Substantial progress in ion-driven target physics and repetitive ion diode technology is also presented. Z-pinch drivers are being pursued as the shortest pulsed power path to target physics experiments and high-yield fusion. However, light ions remain the pulsed power ICF driver of choice for high-yield fusion energy applications that require driver standoff and repetitive operation. 100 refs

  9. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  10. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  11. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, C.; Breuer, U.; Kreter, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (1026 m−2) and

  12. Constraints on ion beam handling for intersecting beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, T.

    1981-01-01

    The intense synchrotron radiation beams from the NSLS uv or x-ray storage rings still do not compare in monochromatized photon flux with a laser beam, a fact which becomes apparent in considering reaction rates for interaction of photon and ion beams. There are two prototypical interaction geometries, parallel and perpendicular. Calculations should properly be done in the rest frame of the ion beam; however, expected beta values are small, so the lab frame will be employed and aberration and Doppler shift effects neglected

  13. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  14. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  15. Pulsed high current ion beam processing equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Perry, A.

    1995-01-01

    A pulsed high voltage ion source is considered for use in ion beam processing for the surface modification of materials, and deposition of conducting films on different substrates. The source consists of an Arkad'ev-Marx high voltage generator, a vacuum ion diode based on explosive ion emission, and a vacuum chamber as substrate holder. The ion diode allows conducting films to be deposited from metal or allow sources, with ion beam mixing, onto substrates held at a pre-selected temperature. The main variables can be set in the ranges: voltage 100-700 kV, pulse length 0.3 μs, beam current 1-200 A depending on the ion chosen. The applications of this technology are discussed in semiconductor, superconductor and metallizing applications as well as the direction of future development and cost of these devices for commercial application. 14 refs., 6 figs

  16. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  17. Scattering of ion beams from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiland, W.; Taglauer, E.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the scattering of ion beams from surfaces and the physical phenomena which are probably most important for the formation of the final state (charge and excitation) of the secondary particles. The subject is treated under the headings: ion scattering, desorption by ion impact, and neutralization. (U.K.)

  18. Ion temperature anisotropy in high power helium neutral beam fuelling experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, A.C.; Core, W.G.F.; Gerstel, U.C.; Von Hellermann, M.G.; Koenig, R.W.T.; Marcus, F.B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    During helium beam fuelling experiments in JET, distinctive anisotropic features have been observed in the velocity distribution function describing both fast and thermal alpha particle populations. During the initial fuelling phase the central helium ion temperature observed perpendicular to the magnetic field is higher than the central electron temperature, while the central helium ion temperature observed parallel to the magnetic field is lower than or equal to the central electron temperature. In order to verify temperature measurements of both perpendicular and parallel lines of sight, other independent methods of deducing the ion temperature are investigated: deuterium ion temperature, deuterium density, comparison with neutron rates and profiles (influence of a possible metastable population of helium). 6 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm

  20. Ion beam processing of bio-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektessabi, A. M.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of bio-inert (TiO 2+α, Al 2O 3+α) and bio-active (compounds of calcium and phosphorus oxides, hydroxyapatite) were deposited on the most commonly used implant materials such as titanium and stainless steel, using a dual-ion-beam deposition system. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy was carried out for quantitative measurement of the interfacial atomic mixing and the composition of the elements. The experimental results show that by controlling the ion beam energy and current, thin films with very good mechanical properties are obtained as a result of the ion beam mixing within the film and at the interface of the film and substrate.

  1. Design considerations for a negative ion source for dc operation of high-power, multi-megaelectron-volt neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Akerman, M.A.; Becraft, W.R.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Whealton, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    A dc negative hydrogen and/or deuterium ion source is needed to prouce high-power, high-energy neutral beams for alpha diagnostics and current drive applicatiosn in fusion devices. The favorable beam particle energy for such applications extends to 1.5 MeV/amu. Continuous-wave (cw) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators have been proposed to accelerate negative ions effeciently to this energy range. In this paper, the desired beam properties for ion beams injected into cw RFQ accelerators are summariezed. A number of candidate ion sources being developed at Culham, JAERI, LBL, and ORNL may prove useful for these applications. The properties of the Volume Ionization with Transverse Extraction (VITEX) ion sources being developed at ORNL are presented. Scaling such a dc ion source to produce ampere beams is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Ion mobility spectrometry-hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of anions: part 1. Peptides to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  3. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Lili [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  4. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 (micro)m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance

  5. Consideration of beam plasma ion-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Fumimichi; Kusano, Norimasa; Ishida, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental analyses and their comparison were made on the plasma generation and on the beam extraction for the beam plasma ion-source. The operational principle and the structure of the ion-source are explained in the first part. Considerations are given on the electron beam-plasma interaction and the resulting generation of high frequency or microwaves which in turn increases the plasma density. The flow of energy in this system is also explained in the second part. The relation between plasma density and the imaginary part of frequency is given by taking the magnetic flux density, the electron beam energy, and the electron beam current as parameters. The relations between the potential difference between collector and drift tube and the plasma density or the ion-current are also given. Considerations are also given to the change of the plasma density due to the change of the magnetic flux density at drift tube, the change of the electron beam energy, and the change of the electron beam current. The third part deals with the extraction characteristics of the ion beam. The structure of the multiple-aperture electrode and the relation between plasma density and the extracted ion current are explained. (Aoki, K.)

  6. Heavy ion beams from the new Hungarian ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biri, S.; Valek, A.; Ditroi, F.; Koivisto, H.; Arje, J.; Stiebing, K.; Schmidt, L.

    1998-01-01

    The first beams of highly charged ions in Hungary were obtained in fall of 1996. The new 14.5 GHz ECR ion source of ATOMKI produced beams of multiply charged ions with remarkable intensities at first experiments. Since then, numerous further developments were carried out. An external electrondonor electrode drastically increased the plasma density and, consequently, the intensity of highly charged ions. These upgrades concentrated mainly on beams from gaseous elements and were carried out by the ECRIS team of ATOMKI. Another series of experiments - ionising from solids - however, was done in the framework of an international collaboration. The first metal ion beam has been extracted from the ECRIS in November 1997 using the known method of Metal Ions from Volatile Compounds (MIVOC). The possibility to put the MIVOC chamber inside the ion source was also tested and the dosing regulation problem of metal vapours inside the ion source was solved. As a result, beams of more than 10 μA of highly charged Fe and Ni ions were produced. (author)

  7. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  8. Primary beams of an electron beam ion source (EBIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenoir-Zink, E.

    1986-06-01

    Electron guns for the ion sources of the SATURN II facility were tested and compared with models. The guns tested were a gun with 36 mm diameter cathode, 7 mm, 4 mm, 4 mm with insulated Whenelt, and 8 mm. A lanthanium hexaboride cathode is presented. For the primary ion beams, zeolite and plasma sources were realized. In DIONE, which will replace CRYEBIS as ion source in SATURNE, the density of the electron beam compressed within the maximum magnetic field can be evaluated. Results indicate a factor of 3 improvement compared with CRYEBIS. Lithium sources can be used, but gas sources do not produce significant improvements [fr

  9. Applications of focused ion beams in microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, C.; Beale, M.I.J.; Deshmukh, V.G.I.

    1986-04-01

    We present the conclusions of the RSRE programme on the application of focused ion beams in microelectronics and review the literature published in this field. We discuss the design and performance of focused beam implanters and the viability of their application to semiconductor device fabrication. Applications in the areas of lithography, direct implantation and micromachining are discussed in detail. Comparisons are made between the use of focused ion beams and existing techniques for these fabrication processes with a strong emphasis placed on the relative throughputs. We present results on a novel spot size measurement technique and the effect of beam heating on resist. We also present the results of studies into implantation passivation of resist to oxygen plasma attack as basis for a dry development lithography scheme. A novel lithography system employing flood electron exposure from a photocathode which is patterned by a focused ion beam which can also be used to repair mask defects is considered. (author)

  10. Intense pulsed ion beams for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The subject of this review paper is the field of intense pulsed ion beam generation and the potential application of the beams to fusion research. Considerable progress has been made over the past six years. The ion injectors discussed utilize the introduction of electrons into vacuum acceleration gaps in conjunction with high voltage pulsed power technology to achieve high output current. Power levels from injectors exceeding 1000 MW/cm 2 have been obtained for pulse lengths on the order of 10 -7 sec. The first part of the paper treats the physics and technology of intense ion beams. The second part is devoted to applications of intense ion beams in fusion research. A number of potential uses in magnetic confinement systems have been proposed

  11. Accelerated ion beam research at ATOMKI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, A.Z.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the studies on accelerated ion beams at ATOMKI and their technical background, their use from chemical analysis to biological, medical, geological, archaeological applications, their advance from material science to micromachining. (TRA)

  12. Uses of laser optical pumping to produce polarized ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Laser optical pumping can be used to produce polarized alkali atom beams or polarized alkali vapor targets. Polarized alkali atom beams can be converted into polarized alkali ion beams, and polarized alkali vapor targets can be used to produce polarized H - or 3 He - ion beams. In this paper the authors discuss how the polarized alkali atom beams and polarized alkali vapor targets are used to produce polarized ion beams with emphasis on the production of polarized negative ion beams

  13. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  14. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  15. TXRF spectrometry at ion beam excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, V.; Egorov, E.; Afanas'ef, M.

    2017-02-01

    The work presents short discussion of TXRF and PIXE methods peculiarities. Taking into account of these peculiarities we elaborate the experimental scheme for TXRF measurements at ion beam excitation of characteristical fluorescence. The scheme is built on base of the planar X-ray waveguide-resonator with specific design. Features of the new experimental method and possibilities of Sokol-3 ion beam analytical complex were used for the method application in real measurements.

  16. Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-01-01

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable of producing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm2 and with atomic fraction >90 percent was designed and tested with an electrostatic low energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source was incorporated into the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source (ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQ accelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gas target. In this design a 40 mA D+ beam is produced from a 6 mm diameter aperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5 electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into the RFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used to create ∼ 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HV breakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize the field in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguide to the plasma is done by an autotuner. We observed significant improvement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride liner inside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared with PBGUNS simulations

  17. Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-Driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-01-01

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable of producing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm 2 and with atomic fraction > 90% was designed and tested with an electrostatic low energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source was incorporated into the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source (ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQ accelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gas target. In this design a 40 mA D + beam is produced from a 6 mm diameter aperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5 electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into the RFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used to create ∼ 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HV breakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize the field in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguide to the plasma is done by an autotuner. They observed significant improvement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride liner inside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared with PBGUNS simulations

  18. National Centre for Radioactive Ion Beams (NCRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    A dedicated National Centre for RIB (NCRIB) proposed discussed at several forums is presented. The production of (RIB) radioactive ion beams and applications of beams leading to competitive studies in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, condensed matter, bio-science and radioactive isotope production etc. are mentioned

  19. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Strobele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-11-01

    To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10(7) ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy fall off of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a γ-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the γ-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum γ-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed γ-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient

  20. A synchronous beam sweeper for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory provides a wide range of accelerated heavy ions from the periodic table. Frequently, the beam delivery rate of 12 MHz is too fast for the type of experiment on line. Reaction by-products from a target bombardment may have a decay interval much longer than the dead time between beam bunches. To prevent data from being corrupted by incoming ions a beam sweeper was developed which synchronously eliminates selected beam bunches to suit experimental needs. As the SWEEPER is broad band (DC to 6 MHz) beam delivery rates can be instantaneously changed. Ion beam bunches are selectively kicked out by an electrostatic dipole electrode pulsed to 2 kVDC. The system has been used for almost three years with several hundred hours of operating time logged to date. Beam bunch delivery rates of 6 MHz down to 25 kHz have been provided. Since this is a non-resonant system any beam delivery rate from 6 MHz down to zero can be set. In addition, burst modes have been used where beam is supplied in 12 MHz bursts and then shut down for a period of time set by the user. 3 figs

  1. The european programme on negative ion beam development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamela, J.; Hemsworth, R.; Jacquot, C.; Holmes, A.J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The European Programme on Negative Ion Beam development consists presently of three main tasks: (i) the DRAGON experiment starting at Culham, with the objective of accelerating 4 A of D - to 200 keV; (ii) the conceptual study of a 1 MV, 15 A power supply, conducted in european industry under the supervision of Cadarache; (iii) the design study of a 1MV, 4 A, deuterium test bed at Cadarache, conducted by the EURATOM-CEA Association (Cadarache) with support from the EURATOM-UKAEA association (Culham) and the FOM institute (Amsterdam). The conclusions of these three tasks are to be brought together during the first half of 1992, in order to prepare a proposal for a 1 MV, 4 A, deuterium test bed. Other experimental activities are being conducted in european laboratories, either directly related to the main programme (RF source and plasma neutralizer at Culham; discharge pulsing at Dublin and FOM-Amsterdam) or under separate contracts (energy recovery and cesium seeding at Cadarache)

  2. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  3. Experimental studies with radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, D.L.; Sree Krishna Murty, G.; Chandrasekhar Rao, M.V.S.

    1991-01-01

    The sources of information presented are essentially taken from the papers reported at several international seminars and those appeared in the Journal of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Production and usage of radioactive ion beams (RIB) in research have received the attention of scientists all over the world during the past six years. The first radioactive ion beams ( 19 Ne) were produced at Bevalac for the purpose of medical research using a primary beam of energy 800 MeV/a.m.u. (author). 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Ion beam source construction and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torab, S.I.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to improve the performance of a new shape cold cathode Penning ion source to be suitable for some applications. In this work, many trials have been made to reach the optimum dimensions of the new shape of cold Molybdenum cathode Penning ion source with radial extraction. The high output ion beam can be extracted in a direction transverse to the discharge region. The new shape cold cathode Penning ion source consists of Copper cylindrical hollow anode of 40 mm length, 12 mm diameter and has two similar cone ends of 15 mm length, 22 mm upper cone diameter and 12 mm bottom cone diameter. The two movable Molybdenum cathodes are fixed in Perspex insulator and placed symmetrically at two ends of the anode. The Copper emission disc of 2 mm thickness and has central aperture of different diameters is placed at the middle of the anode for ion beam exit. The inner surface of the emission disc is isolated from the anode by Perspex insulator except an area of diameter 5 mm to confine the electrical discharge in this area. A movable Faraday cup is placed at different distances from the emission electrode aperture and used to collect the output ion beam from the ion source. The working gases are admitted to the ion source through a hole in the anode via a needle valve which placed between the gas cylinder and the ion source. The optimum anode- cathode distance, the uncovered area diameter of the emission disc, the central aperture diameter of the emission electrode, the distance between emission electrode and Faraday cup have been determined using Argon gas. The optimum distances of the ion source were found to be equal to 6 mm, 5 mm, 2.5 mm, and 3 cm respectively where stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current at low discharge current can be obtained. The discharge characteristics, ion beam characteristics, and the efficiency of the ion source have been measured at different operating conditions and different gas pressures using

  5. Comprehensive Gas-Phase Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 2. Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Ion Population Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2017-05-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) using D2O reagent and collision cross-section (CCS) measurements are utilized to monitor the ion conformers of the model peptide acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK. The measurements are carried out on a home-built ion mobility instrument coupled to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer containing electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. ETD is utilized to obtain per-residue deuterium uptake data for select ion conformers, and a new algorithm is presented for interpreting the HDX data. Using molecular dynamics (MD) production data and a hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS)-number of effective collisions (NEC) model, hypothetical HDX behavior is attributed to various in-silico candidate (CCS match) structures. The HAS-NEC model is applied to all candidate structures, and non-negative linear regression is employed to determine structure contributions resulting in the best match to deuterium uptake. The accuracy of the HAS-NEC model is tested with the comparison of predicted and experimental isotopic envelopes for several of the observed c-ions. It is proposed that gas-phase HDX can be utilized effectively as a second criterion (after CCS matching) for filtering suitable MD candidate structures. In this study, the second step of structure elucidation, 13 nominal structures were selected (from a pool of 300 candidate structures) and each with a population contribution proposed for these ions.

  6. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation

  7. Cellular radiobiology of heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Roots, R.J.; Yang, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of this research program: relative biological effectiveness and oxygen enhancement ratio of silicon ion beams; heavy ion effects on the cell cycle; the potentiation effect (2 doses of high LET heavy-ion radiations separated by 2 to 3 hours); potentially lethal damage in actively growing cells and plateau growth cells; radiation induced macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry; lethal effects of dual radiation; and the development of a biophysical repair/misrepair model

  8. Light ion beam transport research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshelwood, D.D.; Boller, J.R.; Cooperstein, G.

    1996-01-01

    Transport of light ion beams through low-pressure background gas is under investigation at NRL in support of the light-ion ICF program at Sandia National Laboratories. Scaling experiments and the field solver/orbit code ATHETA have been used to design and construct a focusing, extraction applied-B diode for transport experiments. An active anode source has been developed to provide a high proton fraction in the ion beam and a fast ion turn-on time. A very sensitive Zeeman diagnostic is being developed to determine the net current distribution in the beam/transport system. Both analytical and numerical techniques using several codes are being applied to transport modeling, leading to the capability of full system studies. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 10 refs

  9. Funneling of low energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, W.; Schempp, A.

    1992-01-01

    Funneling two or more beams together is a way of increasing the brightness of ion beams by filling all rf-buckets of an rf-accelerator. Thus higher current transport capability results at higher energies and operating frequencies. It can be used to reduce the cost and complexity of accelerators designed to produce intense beams with high brightness. Results of numerical simulations and funneling experiments are reported, where a setup with a 50-keV proton beam and an rf deflector is investigated to study emittance growth effects in funneling lines. (R.P.) 13 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Negative ion beam extraction in ROBIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Gourab, E-mail: bansal@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit; Soni, Jignesh; Pandya, Kaushal; Parmar, Kanu G.; Pandey, Ravi; Vuppugalla, Mahesh; Prajapati, Bhavesh; Patel, Amee; Mistery, Hiren [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Chakraborty, Arun; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Singh, Mahendrajit J.; Phukan, Arindam; Yadav, Ratnakar K.; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 380025 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A RF based negative hydrogen ion beam test bed has been set up at IPR, India. ► Ion source has been successfully commissioned and three campaigns of plasma production have been carried out. ► Extraction system (35 kV) has been installed and commissioning has been initiated. Negative ion beam extraction is immediate milestone. -- Abstract: The RF based single driver −ve ion source experiment test bed ROBIN (Replica Of BATMAN like source in INDIA) has been set up at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India in a technical collaboration with IPP, Garching, Germany. A hydrogen plasma of density 5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} is expected in driver region of ROBIN by launching 100 kW RF power into the driver by 1 MHz RF generator. The cesiated source is expected to deliver a hydrogen negative ion beam of 10 A at 35 kV with a current density of 35 mA/cm{sup 2} as observed in BATMAN. In first phase operation of the ROBIN ion source, a hydrogen plasma has been successfully generated (without extraction system) by coupling 80 kW RF input power through a matching network with high power factor (cos θ > 0.8) and different plasma parameters have been measured using Langmuir probes and emission spectroscopy. The plasma density of 2.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} has been measured in the extraction region of ROBIN. For negative hydrogen ion beam extraction in second phase operation, extraction system has been assembled and installed with ion source on the vacuum vessel. The source shall be first operated in volume mode for negative ion beam extraction. The commissioning of the source with high voltage power supply has been initiated.

  11. Production of a helium beam in a focused ion beam machine using an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, F.; Grossmann, F.; Ovsyannikov, V. P.; Gierak, J.; Zschornack, G.

    2007-01-01

    Gallium liquid-metal ion sources that have been introduced in the late 1970s have allowed the development of a new class of micro- and nanofabrication tools collectively denominated as focused ion beam (FIB) machines. To investigate the potential of a helium beam in such a FIB instrument the authors have tested a room-temperature electron beam ion trap coupled with a high resolution FIB machine. In this letter they present their first results in target imaging using a helium beam with a resolution that allows to account for a beam diameter in the submicrometer range

  12. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Strašík

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., ^{238}U^{92+} and partially stripped (e.g., ^{238}U^{28+} ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers. Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad–x.

  13. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satpati, B.; Umananda, M.; Kabiraj, D.; Som, T.; Dev, B.N.; Akimoto, K.; Ito, K.; Emoto, T.; Satyam, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ and C 2+ ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed

  14. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatak, J. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Satpati, B. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Umananda, M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Nuclear Science Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Dev, B.N. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Akimoto, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ito, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Emoto, T. [Toyota National College of Technology, 2-1, Toyota, Aichi 471-8525 (Japan); Satyam, P.V. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)]. E-mail: satyam@iopb.res.in

    2006-03-15

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} and C{sup 2+} ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed.

  15. First negative ion beam measurement by the Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment (STRIKE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serianni, G., E-mail: gianluigi.serianni@igi.cnr.it; De Muri, M.; Veltri, P.; Bonomo, F.; Chitarin, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Valente, M. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Franzen, P.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from Rf plasma (SPIDER) test facility is under construction in Padova to optimise the operation of the beam source of ITER neutral beam injectors. The SPIDER beam will be characterised by the instrumented calorimeter STRIKE, whose main components are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon-composite tiles. A small-scale version of the entire system has been employed in the BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions (BATMAN) testbed by arranging two prototype tiles in the vertical direction. The paper presents a description of the mini-STRIKE system and of the data analysis procedures, as well as some results concerning the BATMAN beam under varying operating conditions.

  16. First negative ion beam measurement by the Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment (STRIKE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serianni, G.; De Muri, M.; Muraro, A.; Veltri, P.; Bonomo, F.; Chitarin, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Valente, M.; Franzen, P.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-02-01

    The Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from Rf plasma (SPIDER) test facility is under construction in Padova to optimise the operation of the beam source of ITER neutral beam injectors. The SPIDER beam will be characterised by the instrumented calorimeter STRIKE, whose main components are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon-composite tiles. A small-scale version of the entire system has been employed in the BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions (BATMAN) testbed by arranging two prototype tiles in the vertical direction. The paper presents a description of the mini-STRIKE system and of the data analysis procedures, as well as some results concerning the BATMAN beam under varying operating conditions.

  17. Deuterium-hydrogen isotopic exchange in water molecules adsorbed on Teflon under atomic-molecular hydrogen beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grankin, V.P.; Savinkov, N.A.; Styrov, V.V.; Tyurin, Yu.I.

    1994-01-01

    Processes of deuterium-hydrogen exchange in the course of interaction between hydrogen molecular beam and H+H 2 atomic-molecular beam with adsorbed water molecules from D 2 O, HDO, H 2 O on Teflon have been studied. Desorption of the above molecules into vacuum, as well as their desorption under conditions of molecular and atomic-molecular hydrogen beam effect on Teflon surface have been investigated experimentally. Relative probabilities of hydrogen isotopes desorption from Teflon surface have been defined, relative probabilities and cross sections of diverse reactions of isotopic exchange have been found. 2 refs.; 3 figs

  18. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M{sub 1} lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by {gamma}irradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  19. The quest for crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, U; Bussmann, M; Habs, D

    2002-01-01

    The phase transition of an ion beam into its crystalline state has long been expected to dramatically influence beam dynamics beyond the limitations of standard accelerator physics. Yet, although considerable improvement in beam cooling techniques has been made, strong heating mechanisms inherent to existing high-energy storage rings have prohibited the formation of the crystalline state in these machines up to now. Only recently, laser cooling of low-energy beams in the table-top rf quadrupole storage ring PAaul Laser cooLing Acceleration System (PALLAS) has lead to the experimental realization of crystalline beams. In this article, the quest for crystalline beams as well as their unique properties as experienced in PALLAS will be reviewed.

  20. Filamentation of a converging heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Buchanan, H.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    A major concern in the use of heavy ion beams as igniters in pellet fusion systems is the vulnerability of the beam to the transverse flamentation instability. The undesirable consequence of this mode is the transverse heating of the beam to the extent that convergence on the pellet becomes impossible. This work considers the case of a beam injected into a gas filled reactor vessel, where finite pulse length and propagation distance play an important role in limiting growth. Two geometries are analyzed: a nonconverging case where the radius at injection is nearly equal to the desired radius at the pellet, and a converging case in which the injection radius is large and the beam is pre-focused to converge at the target. It is found that a cold beam will be severely disrupted if the product of the magnetic plasma frequency and the propagation distance is much larger than unity

  1. Operating characteristics of a new ion source for KSTAR neutral beam injection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2014-02-01

    A new positive ion source for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research neutral beam injection (KSTAR NBI-1) system was designed, fabricated, and assembled in 2011. The characteristics of the arc discharge and beam extraction were investigated using hydrogen and helium gas to find the optimum operating parameters of the arc power, filament voltage, gas pressure, extracting voltage, accelerating voltage, and decelerating voltage at the neutral beam test stand at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2012. Based on the optimum operating condition, the new ion source was then conditioned, and performance tests were primarily finished. The accelerator system with enlarged apertures can extract a maximum 65 A ion beam with a beam energy of 100 keV. The arc efficiency and optimum beam perveance, at which the beam divergence is at a minimum, are estimated to be 1.0 A/kW and 2.5 uP, respectively. The beam extraction tests show that the design goal of delivering a 2 MW deuterium neutral beam into the KSTAR Tokamak plasma is achievable.

  2. Ion beam processing of bio-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ektessabi, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Thin films of bio-inert (TiO 2+α , Al 2 O 3+α ) and bio-active (compounds of calcium and phosphorus oxides, hydroxy-apatite) were deposited on the most commonly used implant materials such as titanium and stainless steel, using a dual-ion-beam deposition system. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy was carried out for quantitative measurement of the interfacial atomic mixing and the composition of the elements. The experimental results show that by controlling the ion beam energy and current, thin films with very good mechanical properties are obtained as a result of the ion beam mixing within the film and at the interface of the film and substrate. (orig.)

  3. Ion beam coolers in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    Cooling techniques for low-energy radioactive ion beams are reviewed together with applications on high-precision measurements of ground state properties of exotic nuclei. The emphasis in the presentation is on cooling, bunching and improving the overall characteristics of ion beams by RFQ-driven buffer gas cooling devices. Application of cooled and bunched beams in collinear laser spectroscopy to extract isotope shifts and hyperfine structure are presented with examples on radioactive Ti, Zr and Hf isotopes. The impact of the new-generation coolers on mass measurements of short-lived nuclei is discussed with examples on precision measurements of masses of super-allowed beta emitters. As a new concept, decay spectroscopy of radioactive ions trapped in a cooler Penning trap is presented.

  4. Dynamics of the ion-ion acoustic instability in the thermalization of ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.H.; Horton, W. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies); Leboeuf, J.N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Particle simulation using a nonlinear adiabatic electron response with two streaming ion species and nonlinear theory are used to study the collisionless thermalization of ion beams in a hot electron plasma. The slow beam or subsonic regime is investigated and the criterion for the transition from predominantly light ion to predominantly heavy ion heating is developed. Long-lived ion hole structures a-re observed in the final state.

  5. Ion beam dump for JT-60 NBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, Masaaki; Horiike, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shinzaburo; Morita, Hiroaki; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    1981-10-01

    The design of the active cooling type ion beam dump for JT-60 NBI which receives the total beam power of 5.6 MW for 10 sec continuously is described. It is composed of array of many finned tubes which is made of oxygen free copper with 0.2% silver content. The safety margin against thermal and mechanical troubles is estimated by the heat transfer and the thermal stress calculation. (author)

  6. Ion beam processing of surgical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James M.; Buchanan, Raymond A.; Lee, In-Seop

    1989-02-01

    Ion beam processing has now achieved a secure place in surface treatment of biomaterials. This development is largely a result of the success of the process for wear prevention of orthopedic Ti-alloy in rubbing contact with ultrahigh molecular-weight polyethylene. Basic contributions of the authors in this area, together with other pertinent literature will be reviewed. Research in ion beam processing of biomaterials is turning to other areas. Among these, bioelectronics is considered to be a promising area for further effort. Pertinent experiments on effects of implantation of iridium into titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy on corrosion and charge injection properties are presented.

  7. Ion beam pulse radiolysis system at HIMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitose, N.; Katsumura, Y.; Domae, M.; Ishigure, K. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Murakami, T.

    1997-03-01

    An ion beam pulse radiolysis system has been constructed at HIMAC facility. Ion beam of 24MeV He{sup 2+} with the duration longer than 1 {mu}s is available for irradiation. Three kinds of aqueous solutions, (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}CO, NaHCO{sub 3}, and KSCN, were irradiated and the absorption signals corresponding to (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}CO{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup -}, and (SCN){sub 2}{sup -} respectively were observed. Ghost signals which interfere with the measurement are also discussed. (author)

  8. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  9. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized

  10. Effect of deposited tungsten on deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharapov, V.M.; Gavrilov, L.E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    Usually ion or plasma beam is used for the experiment with beryllium which simulates the interaction of plasma with first wall in fusion devices. However, the use of thermal or subthermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes seems to be useful for that purpose. Recently, the authors have studied the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium. The experimental setup is shown, and is explained. By means of elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique, it was shown that in the exposure to D atoms at 740 K, deuterium is distributed deeply into the bulk, and is accumulated up to higher concentration than the case of the exposure to molecular deuterium. The depth and concentration of deuterium distribution depend on the exposure time, and those data are shown. During the exposure to atomic deuterium, oxide film grew on the side of a sample facing plasma. In order to understand the mechanism of deuterium trapping, the experiment was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). The influence that the tungsten deposit from the heated cathode exerted to the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium was investigated. These results are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Beam divergence and ion current in multiaperture ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.; Penningsfeld, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    Two different measurements of the divergence of high-current ion beams formed in a multiaperture ion source have been made. The current dependence of both measurements shows characteristic differences which are explained as a result of an inhomogeneity of the current density across the emission area. The model of Coupland et al. with a spherical beam geometry in the acceleration gap is reexamined. It is shown that a rigorous application of this model gives a beamlet defocusing in the decel electrode which is stronger by a factor of 1.35 than assumed hitherto. The implications on offset steering are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Ion beams make new blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larousserie, D.

    2006-01-01

    In Russia a cyclotron has been designed and is now operating to make holes in plastic membranes: the impact of the ions produce tiny holes whose diameter is less than half a micrometer. These membranes are used in the fabrication of blood filters that are needed to separate blood corpuscles from plasma for instance. (A.C.)

  13. Treatment planning with ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foss, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Ions have higher linear energy transfer (LET) near the end of their range and lower LET away from the end of their range. Mixing radiations of different LET complicates treatment planning because radiation kills cells in two statistically independent ways. In some cases, cells are killed by a single-particle, which causes a linear decrease in log survival at low dosage. When the linear decrease is subtracted from the log survival curve, the remaining curve has zero slope at zero dosage. This curve is the log survival curve for cells that are killed only by two or more particles. These two mechanisms are statistically independent. To calculate survival, these two kinds of doses must be accumulated separately. The effect of each accumulated dosage must be read from its survival curve, and the logarithms of the two effects added to get the log survival. Treatment plans for doses of protons, He 3 ions, and He 4 ions suggest that these ions will be useful therapeutic modalities

  14. Ion-beam texturing of uniaxially textured Ni films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.J.; Norton, D.P.; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2005-01-01

    The formation of biaxial texture in uniaxially textured Ni thin films via Ar-ion irradiation is reported. The ion-beam irradiation was not simultaneous with deposition. Instead, the ion beam irradiates the uniaxially textured film surface with no impinging deposition flux, which differs from conventional ion-beam-assisted deposition. The uniaxial texture is established via a nonion beam process, with the in-plane texture imposed on the uniaxial film via ion beam bombardment. Within this sequential ion beam texturing method, grain alignment is driven by selective etching and grain overgrowth

  15. JT-60 negative ion beam NBI apparatus. Present state of its construction and initial experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, Masaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1997-02-01

    The NBI (Neutral Beam Injection) apparatus used for negative ion at first in the world, has an aim to actually prove heating and electric current drive with high density plasma at the JT-60 and to constitute physical and technical bases for selection and design of heating apparatus of ITER (International Thermal Nuclear Fusion Experimental Reactor). Construction of 500 KeV negative ion NBI apparatus for the JT-60 started to operate on 1993 was completed at March, 1996. On the way, at a preliminary test on forming and acceleration of the negative ion beam using a portion of this apparatus, 400 KeV and 13.5 A/D of the highest deuterium negative ion beam acceleration in the world was obtained successfully, which gave a bright forecasting of the plasma heating and electric current drive experiment using the negative ion NBI apparatus. After March, 1996, some plans to begin beam incident experiment at the JT-60 using the negative ion NBI apparatus and to execute the heating and electric current drive experiment at the JT-60 under intending increase of beam output are progressed. (G.K.)

  16. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.Q.

    1997-09-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 eμA of O 7+ and 1.15 emA of O 6+ , more than 100 eμA of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar 13+ , Ca 13+ , Fe 13+ , Co 14+ and Kr 18+ , and tens of eμA of heavy ions with charge states to Kr 26+ , Xe 28+ , Au 35+ , Bi 34+ and U 34+ have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 eμA, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe 36+ , Au 46+ , Bi 47+ and U 48+ . An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I ≥ 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams

  17. Profiling hydrogen in materials using ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, J.F.; Wu, C.P.; Williams, P.

    1977-01-01

    Over the last few years many ion beam techniques have been reported for the profiling of hydrogen in materials. Nine of these were evaluated using similar samples of hydrogen ion-implanted into silicon. When possible the samples were analyzed using two or more techniques to confirm the ion-implanted accuracy. The results of this analysis which has produced a consensus profile of H in silicon which is useful as a calibration standard are reported. The analytical techniques used have capabilities ranging from very high depth resolution (approximately 50 A) and high sensitivity (less than 1 ppM) to deep probes for hydrogen which can sample throughout thin sheets

  18. Ex-vacuo nuclear reaction analysis of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.R.; Doyle, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique for performing in-air d( 3 He, p) nuclear reaction analysis of deuterium using external 3 He ion beams ranging in energy from 0.3-2.0 MeV is presented. Variable on-target beam energies for the depth profiling of deuterium are obtained by varying the transmission distance of the external 3 He beam in air. The ex-vacuo nuclear reaction analysis (XNRA) apparatus is described, and unique aspects and limitations of in-air depth profiling of deuterium using the d( 3 He, p) reaction are discussed. Example analyses where XNRA has been used for the multidimensional measurement of deuterium in fusion reactor components are presented in order to illustrate the advantages of XNRA for deuterium. These advantages include nondestructive analysis of large targets, efficient depth profiling via variable air gap energy tuning, and rapid analysis of numerous samples in the absence of vacuum cycling. (orig.)

  19. National Centre for Radioactive Ion Beams (NCRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive Ion (nuclear) Beams have become prolific recently. Nuclear physics and associated subjects have staged a comeback to almost the beginning with the advent of RIB. A dedicated National Centre for RIB (NCRIB) proposed, discussed at several forums and under serious consideration is described

  20. BEARS: Radioactive ion beams at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Guo, F.Q.; Haustein, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    BEARS (Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species) is an initiative to develop a radioactive ion-beam capability at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The aim is to produce isotopes at an existing medical cyclotron and to accelerate them at the 88 inch Cyclotron. To overcome the 300-meter physical separation of these two accelerators, a carrier-gas transport system will be used. At the terminus of the capillary, the carrier gas will be separated and the isotopes will be injected into the 88 inch Cyclotron's Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. The first radioactive beams to be developed will include 20-min 11 C and 70-sec 14 O, produced by (p,n) and (p,α) reactions on low-Z targets. A test program is currently being conducted at the 88 inch Cyclotron to develop the parts of the BEARS system. Preliminary results of these tests lead to projections of initial 11 C beams of up to 2.5 x 10 7 ions/sec and 14 O beams of 3 x 10 5 ions/sec

  1. Treatment Planning for Ion Beam Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, Oliver

    The special aspects of treatment planning for ion beams are outlined in this chapter, starting with positioning and immobilization of the patient, describing imaging and segmentation, definition of treatment parameters, dose calculation and optimization, and, finally, plan assessment, verification, and quality assurance.

  2. Corrected electrostatic lens systems for ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgish, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent work in our laboratory has introduced a new class of electrostatic focus forming element for beams, the ELCO lens. It compares favourably with the electrostatic and magnetic quadrupole elements conventionally used for microbeam formation. The ELCO lens does however have disadvantages associated with apertures and alignment. We have continued with the development of ion beam lenses and have evolved a further class of lens element which eliminates aperture and alignment problems. This new element can be combined like optical lenses into an aberration corrected system. Experimental measurement on the basic lens element has confirmed mathematical analysis of ion trajectories through the element. This mathematical analysis predicts that the basic element can be combined into a corrected lens system for, either: (1) high resolution microprobe formation with intrinsic rastering ability, the spot size limited only by the beam properties; or (2) high quality image formation with large magnification/demagnification ratio and wide angular aperture. (orig.)

  3. High repetition rate intense ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.A.; Glidden, S.C.; Noonan, B.

    1992-01-01

    This final report describes a ≤ 150kV, 40kA, 100ns high repetition rate pulsed power system and intense ion beam source which is now in operation at Cornell University. Operation of the Magnetically-controlled Anode Plasma (MAP) ion diode at > 100Hz (burst mode for up to 10 pulse bursts) provides an initial look at repetition rate limitations of both the ion diode and beam diagnostics. The pulsed power systems are capable of ≥ 1kHz operation (up to 10 pulse bursts), but ion diode operation was limited to ∼100Hz because of diagnostic limitations. By varying MAP diode operating parameters, ion beams can be extracted at a few 10s of keV or at up to 150keV, the corresponding accelerating gap impedance ranging from about 1Ω to about 10Ω. The ability to make hundreds of test pulses per day at an average repetition rate of about 2 pulses per minute permits statistical analysis of diode operation as a function of various parameters. Most diode components have now survived more than 10 4 pulses, and the design and construction of the various pulsed power components of the MAP diode which have enabled us to reach this point are discussed. A high speed data acquisition system and companion analysis software capable of acquiring pulse data at 1ms intervals (in bursts of up to 10 pulses) and processing it in ≤ min is described

  4. Ion beam analysis of metal ion implanted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Chu, J.W.; Johnson, E.P.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation is an established method for altering the surface properties of many materials. While a variety of analytical techniques are available for the characterisation of implanted surfaces, those based on particle accelerators such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) provide some of the most useful and powerful for this purpose. Application of the latter techniques to metal ion implantation research at ANSTO will be described with particular reference to specific examples from recent studies. Where possible, the information obtained from ion beam analysis will be compared with that derived from other techniques such as Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Auger spectroscopies. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Ion-Beam-Excited, Electrostatic, Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  6. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  7. Study on broad beam heavy ion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yumiko; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Hitomi; Nanbu, S.; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2003-01-01

    To achieve the heavy ion radiotherapy more precisely, it is important to know the distribution of the electron density in a human body, which is highly related to the range of charged particles. From a heavy ion CT image, we can directly obtain the 2-D distribution of the electron density in a sample. For this purpose, we have developed a broad beam heavy ion CT system. The electron density was obtained using some kinds of solutions targets. Also the dependence of the spatial resolution on the target size and the kinds of beams was estimated in this work using cylinders targets of 40, 60 and 80 mm in diameter, each of them has a hole of 10 mm in diameter at the center of it. (author)

  8. Ions kinematics in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, D

    2004-06-01

    In this study, I have tried to provide a better understanding of the dynamics of ions inside an electrostatic ion beam trap. The electrostatic ion trap allows to store ions moving between two electrostatic mirrors. Although the trap has been developed already seven years ago, no direct measurement of the transversal velocity distribution of the ions has been performed. Such quantity is central for understanding the conditions under which a beam should be produced (mainly emittance) in order to be trapped by such a device. The data I have obtained during the course of this work are based on an experimental technique which relies on the direct imaging of the particles exiting the trap, as well as on numerical simulations of the ion trajectories inside the trap. I have personally been involved in the hardware development of the imaging system, the data acquisition and analysis of the data as well as il all numerical calculations presented here. These results allow us to obtain, for the first time, experimental information on the transverse phase space of the trap, and contribute to the overall understanding of the ion motion in this system. (author)

  9. Research and development of advanced materials using ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Susumu [Nagasaki Inst. of Applied Science, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A wide range of research and development activities of advanced material synthesis using ion beams will be discussed, including ion beam applications to the state-of-the-art electronics from giant to nano electronics. (author)

  10. Negative ion based neutral beams for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.

    1978-01-01

    Neutral beam systems based on negative ions have been considered because of a high expected power efficiency. Methods for the production, acceleration and neutralization of negative ions will be reviewed and possibilities for an application in neutral beam lines explored

  11. Ion beam heating for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, S.Yu.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The characteristics features of the formation of the spatial distribution of the energy transferred to the plasma from a beam of ions with different initial energies, masses and charges under fast ignition conditions are determined. The motion of the Bragg peak is extended with respect to the spatial distribution of the temperature of the ion-beam-heated medium. The parameters of the ion beams are determined to initiate different regimes of fast ignition of thermonuclear fuel precompressed to a density of 300-500 g/cm 3 - the edge regime, in which the ignition region is formed at the outer boundary of the fuel, and the internal regime, in which the ignition region is formed in central parts of the fuel. The conclusion on the requirements for fast ignition by light and heavy ion beams is presented. It is shown that the edge heating with negative temperature gradient is described by a self-similar solution. Such a temperature distribution is the reason of the fact that the ignited beam energy at the edge heating is larger than the minimal ignition energy by factor 1.65. The temperature Bragg peak may be produced by ion beam heating in the reactor scale targets with pR-parameter larger than 3-4 g/cm 2 . In particular, for central ignition of the targets with pR-parameters in the range of 4-8 g/cm 2 the ion beam energy should be, respectively, from 5 to 7 times larger than the minimal ignition energy. The work by S.Ye. Gus'kov, D.V. Il'in, and V.E. Sherman was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation under the program 'Development of the Scientific Potential of High Education for 2009-2010' (project no. 2.1.1/1505) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no. 08-02-01394 a ). The work by J. Limpouch and O. Klimo was supported by the Czech Ministry of Education (project no. LC528, MSM6840770022).

  12. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop`s program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants.

  13. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop's program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants

  14. Intensive Ion Beam In Storage Rings With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Kamerdjiev, V; Maier, R; Meshkov, I; Noda, K; Prasuhn, D; Sibuya, S; Sidorin, A; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Syresin, E M; Uesugi, T

    2004-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) and an ion beam at HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) are presented. Intensity of the ion beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described.

  15. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography is an attractive alternative for submicron patterning because it may provide high throughput; it uses demagnification to gain advantages in reticle fabrication, inspection, and lifetime; and it enjoys the precise deposition characteristics of ions which cause essentially no collateral damage. This lithographic option involves extracting low-mass ions (e.g., He + ) from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto a resist-coated wafer. While the advantages of this technology have been demonstrated experimentally by the work of IMS (Austria), many difficulties still impede extension of the technology to the high-volume production of microelectronic devices. We report a computational study of a lithography system designed to address problem areas in field size, telecentricity, and chromatic and geometric aberration. We present a novel ion-column-design approach and conceptual ion-source and column designs which address these issues. We find that image-projection ion-beam technology should in principle meet high-volume-production requirements. The technical success of our present relatively compact-column design requires that a glow-discharge-based ion source (or equivalent cold source) be developed and that moderate further improvement in geometric aberration levels be obtained. Our system requires that image predistortion be employed during reticle fabrication to overcome distortion due to residual image nonlinearity and space-charge forces. This constitutes a software data preparation step, as do correcting for distortions in electron lithography columns and performing proximity-effect corrections. Areas needing further fundamental work are identified

  16. Development of a beam ion velocity detector for the heavy ion beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fimognari, P. J.; Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    In an axisymmetric plasma, the conservation of canonical angular momentum constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) trajectories such that measurement of the toroidal velocity component of secondary ions provides a localized determination of the poloidal flux at the volume where they originated. We have developed a prototype detector which is designed to determine the beam angle in one dimension through the detection of ion current landing on two parallel planes of detecting elements. A set of apertures creates a pattern of ion current on wires in the first plane and solid metal plates behind them; the relative amounts detected by the wires and plates determine the angle which beam ions enter the detector, which is used to infer the toroidal velocity component. The design evolved from a series of simulations within which we modeled ion beam velocity changes due to equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic fields, along with the ion beam profile and velocity dispersion, and studied how these and characteristics such as the size, cross section, and spacing of the detector elements affect performance.

  17. MEV Energy Electrostatic Accelerator Ion Beam Emittance Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    I.G. Ignat’ev; M.I. Zakharets; S.V. Kolinko; D.P. Shulha

    2014-01-01

    The testing equipment was designed, manufactured and tried out permitting measurements of total current, current profile and emittance of an ion beam extracted from the ion beam. MeV energy electrostatic accelerator ion H + beam emittance measurement results are presented.

  18. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  19. NSUF Ion Beam Investment Options Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Brenden John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The workshop that generated this data was convened to develop a set of recommendations (a priority list) for possible funding in the area of US domestic ion beam irradiation capabilities for nuclear energy-focused RD&D. The results of this workshop were intended for use by the Department of Energy - Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) for consideration of support for these facilities. The workshop considered, as part of the initial potential future support discussions, input submitted through the Office of Nuclear Energy Request for Information (RFI) (DE-SOL-0008318, April 13, 2015), but welcomed discussion (and presentation) of other options, whether specific or general in scope. Input from users, including DOE-NE program interests and needs for ion irradiation RD&D were also included. Participants were selected from various sources: RFI respondents, NEUP/NEET infrastructure applicants, universities with known expertise in nuclear engineering and materials science and other developed sources. During the three days from March 22-24, 2016, the workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory Meeting Center in the Energy Innovation Laboratory at 775 University Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83401. Thirty-one members of the ion beam community attended the workshop, including 15 ion beam facilities, six representatives of Office of Nuclear Energy R&D programs, an industry representative from EPRI and the chairs of the NSUF User’s Organization and the NSUF Scientific Review Board. Another four ion beam users were in attendance acting as advisors to the process, but did not participate in the options assessment. Three members of the sponsoring agency, the Office of Science and Technology Innovation (NE-4) also attended the workshop.

  20. Unique biophysical studies with diatomic deuterium beams. [Survival studies with V79 Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrig, N.; Bird, R.P.; Colvett, R.D.; Rossi, H.H.; Marino, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    By irradiating cells attached to thin Mylar foils with diatomic deuteron beams, the role of interaction distance in radiobiology can be investigated in a unique manner. The molecule breaks up into two separate ions which diverge from each other because of the multiple scattering process in the foil and in the cellular material. A distribution of separation distances results whose characteristic separation depends on the Mylar foil thickness. An experimental facility to use diatomic beams is described. Cell survival results for V79 Chinese hamster cells synchronized in late S phase show that damage does result from tracks separated by as much as 250 nm. However, damage also results from interaction at nanometer dimensions.

  1. Funneling of low energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, W.; Schempp, A.

    1992-01-01

    Funneling is a way of increasing the brightness of ion beams by filling all buckets of a rf-accelerator and using the higher current transport capability at higher energies. Funnel systems have been proposed, e.g. for HIIF type drivers and spallation neutron sources. Results of numerical simulations and funneling experiments at Frankfurt are reported, where a setup with a 50 keV proton beam and a rf deflector is investigated to study especially emittance growth effects in funneling lines. (Author) 9 figs., tab., 13 refs

  2. Ion beam irradiation effects on aromatic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukushima, Satoshi; Ueno, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    We studied the optical and thermal properties of aromatic polymer films which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H + , H 2 + and He + ions. The examined aromatic polymers were polyetherether ketone(PEEK), polyetherimide(PEI), polyether sulfon(PES), polysulfon(PSF), and polyphenylene sulfide(PPS). The optical densities at 300nm of PES and PSF greatly increased after the irradiation. The optical densities at 400nm of all the examined polymer lineally increased with the irradiation dose. The PEEK film which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H + was not deformed above melting point. This demonstrates that cross-linking occurs in PEEK films by ion beam irradiation. As for the effects, depending on the mass of the irradiated ions, it was found that the ions with a high mass induced larger effects on the aromatic polymers for the same absorption energy. (author)

  3. Surface generation of negative hydrogen ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bommel, P.J.M. van.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on negative hydrogen ion sources at the ampere level. Formation of H - ions occurs when positive hydrogen ions capture two electrons at metal surfaces. The negative ionization probability of hydrogen at metal surfaces increases strongly with decreasing work function of the surface. The converters used in this study are covered with cesium. Usually there are 'surface plasma sources' in which the hydrogen source plasma interacts with a converter. In this thesis the author concentrates upon investigating a new concept that has converters outside the plasma. In this approach a positive hydrogen ion beam is extracted from the plasma and is subsequently reflected from a low work function converter surface. (Auth.)

  4. Neutralization principles for the Extraction and Transport of Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Riege, H

    2000-01-01

    The strict application of conventional extraction techniques of ion beams from a plasma source is characterized by a natural intensity limit determined by space charge.The extracted current may be enhanced far beyond this limit by neutralizing the space charge of the extracted ions in the first extraction gap of the source with electrons injected from the opposite side. The transverse and longitudinal emittances of a neutralized ion beam, hence its brightness, are preserved. Results of beam compensation experiments, which have been carried out with a laser ion source, are resumed for proposing a general scheme of neutralizing ion sources and their adjacent low-energy beam transport channels with electron beams. Many technical applications of high-mass ion beam neutralization technology may be identified: the enhancement of ion source output for injection into high-intensity, low-and high-energy accelerators, or ion thrusters in space technology, for the neutral beams needed for plasma heating of magnetic conf...

  5. Secondary Electron Emission from Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium Resulting from Incidence of keV Electrons and Hydrogen Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1977-01-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient δ was measured for solid hydrogen and deuterium resulting from the normal incidence of 0.5–3‐keV electrons and 4–10‐keV H+, H2+, H3+, and D3+ ions. The SEE coefficients for solid hydrogen are 60–70% of those for solid deuterium, and the coefficients....... The losses to molecular states will be largest for hydrogen, so that the SEE coefficients are smallest for solid hydrogen, as was observed. For the incidence of ions, the values of δ for the different molecular ions agree when the number of secondary electrons per incident atom is plotted versus the velocity...... or the stopping power of the incident particles. Measurements were also made for oblique incidence of H+ ions on solid deuterium for angles of incidence up to 75°. A correction could be made for the emission of secondary ions by also measuring the current calorimetrically. At largest energies, the angular...

  6. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  7. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  8. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuto, H., E-mail: ryuto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Musumeci, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania 95123 (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania 95123 (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  9. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  10. Production of microbunched beams of very highly charged ions with an electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckli, M.P.

    1998-01-01

    Electron beam ion sources produce very highly charged ions most efficiently in a batch mode as the confinement time can be directly optimized for the production of the desired charge state. If, after confinement, the voltage of the ion-confining downstream dam is lowered rapidly, all ions escape and form an ion beam pulse with a length of a few tens of μs. Raising the main trap voltage while maintaining a constant dam voltage in a open-quotes spill-over expulsionclose quotes reduces the energy spread of the expelled ions. The longer time periods of open-quotes slow-,close quotes open-quotes leaky batch mode-,close quotes and open-quotes direct current (dc) batch mode-close quotes expulsions allow for increasing the ion beam duty cycle. Combining the rapid expulsion with one of the latter methods allows for the expulsion of the ions of a single batch in many small microbunches with variable intervals, maintaining the low energy spread and the increased duty cycle of slow expulsions. Combining the open-quotes microbunchingclose quotes with open-quotes dc batch mode productionclose quotes and a multitrap operation will eventually allow for the production of equally intense ion bunches over a wide range of frequencies without any deadtime, and with minimal compromise on the most efficient production parameters. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  11. Ion beam therapy fundamentals, technology, clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book provides a detailed, up-to-date account of the basics, the technology, and the clinical use of ion beams for radiation therapy. Theoretical background, technical components, and patient treatment schemes are delineated by the leading experts that helped to develop this field from a research niche to its current highly sophisticated and powerful clinical treatment level used to the benefit of cancer patients worldwide. Rather than being a side-by-side collection of articles, this book consists of related chapters. It is a common achievement by 76 experts from around the world. Their expertise reflects the diversity of the field with radiation therapy, medical and accelerator physics, radiobiology, computer science, engineering, and health economics. The book addresses a similarly broad audience ranging from professionals that need to know more about this novel treatment modality or consider to enter the field of ion beam therapy as a researcher. However, it is also written for the interested public an...

  12. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange of multiply-protonated cytochrome c ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, T.D.; Guan, Ziqiang; O'Connor, P.B.

    1995-01-01

    Low resolution measurements show gaseous multiply-protonated cytochrome c ions undergo hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange with pseudo first-order kinetics at three distinct exchange levels, suggesting the co-existence of gaseous protein conformations. Although exchange levels first increase with increasing charge values, they decrease at the highest charge values, consistent with solution-phase behavior of cytochrome c, where the native structure unfolds with decreasing pH until folding into a compact A-state at lowest pH. High resolution measurements indicate the presence of at least six H/D exchange levels. Infrared (IR) laser heating and fast collisions via quadrupolar excitation (QE) increase H/D exchange levels (unfolding) while charge-stripping ions to lower charge values can increase or decrease H/D exchange levels (unfolding or folding). Wolynes has suggested studying proteins in vacuo could play an important role in delineating the contributions various forces play in the protein folding process, provided appropriate comparisons can be made between gas-phase and solution-phase structures

  13. Heavy ion beam excitation of rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribitzki, G.; Ulrich, A.; Busch, B.; Kroetz, W.; Miller, R.; Wieser, J.

    1991-01-01

    The emission of light from rare gas targets at pressures of more than 100 Pa excited by a pulsed heavy ion beam has been studied. The absolute intensity of several spectral lines has been measured as a function of time at different target gas pressures. Population densities, excitation cross sections, and rate constants for collisional quenching were determined from the line intensities and the lifetimes of the excited states. (orig.)

  14. Calorimetry of ion beam damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roorda, S.; Kajrys, G.; Graham, J.

    1994-01-01

    Annealing of ion-beam damage in crystalline Si has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Si discs of 100 μm thickness have been bombarded with 3.4 MeV protons. Scanning calorimetry reveals a sharp peak riding on a broad background signal. From infrared absorption, this peak is tentatively identified as heat release associated with divacancy annihilation. (orig.)

  15. Simulations of multistage intense ion beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, S.A.; Poukey, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic theory for magnetically insulated, multistage acceleration of high intensity ion beams, where the diamagnetic effect due to electron flow is important, has been presented by Slutz and Desjarlais. The theory predicts the existence of two limiting voltages called V 1 (W) and V 2 (W), which are both functions of the injection energy qW of ions entering the accelerating gap. As the voltage approaches V 1 (W), unlimited beam-current density can penetrate the gap without the formation of a virtual anode because the dynamic gap goes to zero. Unlimited beam current density can penetrate an accelerating gap above V 2 (W), although a virtual anode is formed. It was found that the behavior of these limiting voltages is strongly dependent on the electron density profile. The authors have investigated the behavior of these limiting voltages numerically using the 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAGIC. Results of these simulations are consistent with the superinsulated analytic results. This is not surprising, since the ignored coordinate eliminates instabilities known to be important from studies of single stage magnetically insulated ion diodes. To investigate the effect of these instabilities the authors have simulated the problem with the 3-D PIC code QUICKSILVER, which indicates behavior that is consistent with the saturated model

  16. Ion accumulation and space charge neutralization in intensive electron beams for ion sources and electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkov, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS), Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT) and electron beams for electron cooling application have the beam parameters in the same ranges of magnitudes. EBIS and EBIT produce and accumulate ions in the beam due to electron impact ionization. The cooling electron beam accumulates positive ions from the residual gas in the accelerator chamber during the cooling cycle. The space charge neutralization of cooling beam is also used to reduce the electron energy spread and enhance the cooling ability. The advanced results of experimental investigations and theoretical models of the EBIS electron beams are applied to analyze the problem of beam neutralization in the electron cooling techniques. The report presents the analysis of the most important processes connected with ion production, accumulation and losses in the intensive electron beams of ion sources and electron cooling systems for proton and ion colliders. The inelastic and elastic collision processes of charged particles in the electron beams are considered. The inelastic processes such as ionization, charge exchange and recombination change the charge states of ions and neutral atoms in the beam. The elastic Coulomb collisions change the energy of particles and cause the energy redistribution among components in the electron-ion beams. The characteristic times and specific features of ionization, beam neutralization, ion heating and loss in the ion sources and electron cooling beams are determined. The dependence of negative potential in the beam cross section on neutralization factor is studied. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E. [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  18. Laboratory of ion beam applications at ATOMKI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borbely-Kiss, I.; Huszank, R.; Kertesz, Zs.; Kiss, A.Z.; Koltay, E.; Rajta, I.; Simon, A.; Szabo, Gy.; Szikszai, Z.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Uzonyi, I.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. The Laboratory of Ion Beam Applications of ATOMKI is devoted to applications of atomic and nuclear physics in the fields of environmental research, biomedicine, geology, materials and surface science (including ion beam induced damage investigations and proton beam lithography) and cultural heritage research. We perform our work in the frame of various projects and collaborations: EU, IAEA, R and D, OTKA, etc. Our laboratory provides service for external (national and international) and internal users and contributes to higher education, as well. The Laboratory is based on the home-made 5 MV Van de Graaff (VdG) electrostatic accelerator of the institute. The accelerator was put into operation in 1971 and in the beginning it supplied ion beams exclusively for nuclear physics. A few years later with the measurements of K-shell ionization cross sections the door became open also for basic atomic physics. In parallel with this basic study, the application of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for the elemental analysis of biological (hair, erythrocyte and blood plasma) samples and atmospheric aerosols also started. The first paper on PIXE, a methodological one, was published in 1978. The experience gained on these applications and later on archaeology led to the construction of complex PIXE chambers, which were sold, together with the corresponding know-how, to institutions in China, Portugal, Bangladesh, Jordan, North Korea, Singapore, Cuba and Mexico through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the evaluation of PIXE spectra the laboratory has been continuously developing its own computer programme package. The first version of this continuous development was published in 1988. In the meantime a second IBA analysis method, the proton induced gamma ray emission (PIGE), was introduced in the laboratory and was applied simultaneously with PIXE. Application of deuteron induced gamma ray emission (DIGE) started more than a decade later. A

  19. Transport of ion beams by magnetic fields on the beam edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1975-01-01

    The transport of low energy ion beams (less than 10 keV) by magnetic fields on the edge of the beam is analyzed. Calculations indicate that beams with low transverse temperature can be transported. (U.S.)

  20. Mutation induction of orchids by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affrida Abu Hassan; Zaiton Ahmad; Sakinah Ariffin; Oono, Yutaka; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono; Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Mutation induction using ionizing radiation provides an effective alternative means for improvement of orchids. In this study, ion beams were used because they have much higher linear energy transfer (LET) than X-rays or gamma rays, and subsequently lead to higher mutation frequency and broad mutation spectrum. The proto corm-like bodies (PLBs) of three orchid species (Dendrobium crumenatum, Dendrobium mirbellianum) were irradiated at various doses with 320 MeV 12 C 6+ ions accelerated by Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron at JAEAs Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA). The optimum irradiation condition and the effect of irradiation on each species were studied, particularly on flower colour and morphology, flowering habit and insect resistance. Dose effects on plantlet regeneration for each species were also obtained. Some morphological changes were observed in flowers of Dendrobium crumenatum, whilst one insect resistant mutant was obtained in Dendrobium mirbellianum. (author)

  1. Helicon wave-generated plasmas for negative ion beams for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, Ivo; Agnello, Riccardo; Fantz, U.; Howling, Alan; Jacquier, Remy; Marini, Claudio; Plyushchev, Gennady; Guittienne, Philippe; Simonin, Alain

    2017-10-01

    In the next generation of fusion reactors, such as DEMO, neutral beam injectors (NBIs) of high energy (0.8-1 MeV) deuterium atoms with high wall-plug efficiency (>50%) will be required to reach burning plasma conditions and to provide a significant amount of current drive. The present NBI system for DEMO assumes that 50 MW is delivered to the plasma by 3 NBIs. In the Siphore NBI concept, negative deuterium ions are extracted from a long, thin ion source 3 m high and 15 cm wide, accelerated and subsequently photo-neutralized. This requires the development of a new generation of negative ion sources. At the Swiss Plasma Center, a novel radio frequency helicon plasma source, based on a resonant network antenna source delivering up to 10 kW at 13.56 MHz, has been developed and is presently under study on the Resonant Antenna Ion Device (RAID). RAID is a linear device (1.9 m total length, 0.4 m diameter) and is equipped with an extensive set of diagnostics for full plasma characterization. In this work, the principles of operation of resonant antennas as helicon sources are introduced. We present absolute spectroscopy, Langmuir probe, and interferometry measurements on helicon plasmas. We characterize the performance of the source in terms of hydrogen/deuterium dissociation and negative ion production as a function of the input power. Furthermore, first results with the helicon birdcage antenna installed on the Cybele negative ion source at CEA-IRFM are presented, as a first step towards the validation of the Siphore concept.

  2. Helicon wave-generated plasmas for negative ion beams for fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furno Ivo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the next generation of fusion reactors, such as DEMO, neutral beam injectors (NBIs of high energy (0.8-1 MeV deuterium atoms with high wall-plug efficiency (>50% will be required to reach burning plasma conditions and to provide a significant amount of current drive. The present NBI system for DEMO assumes that 50 MW is delivered to the plasma by 3 NBIs. In the Siphore NBI concept, negative deuterium ions are extracted from a long, thin ion source 3 m high and 15 cm wide, accelerated and subsequently photo-neutralized. This requires the development of a new generation of negative ion sources. At the Swiss Plasma Center, a novel radio frequency helicon plasma source, based on a resonant network antenna source delivering up to 10 kW at 13.56 MHz, has been developed and is presently under study on the Resonant Antenna Ion Device (RAID. RAID is a linear device (1.9 m total length, 0.4 m diameter and is equipped with an extensive set of diagnostics for full plasma characterization. In this work, the principles of operation of resonant antennas as helicon sources are introduced. We present absolute spectroscopy, Langmuir probe, and interferometry measurements on helicon plasmas. We characterize the performance of the source in terms of hydrogen/deuterium dissociation and negative ion production as a function of the input power. Furthermore, first results with the helicon birdcage antenna installed on the Cybele negative ion source at CEA-IRFM are presented, as a first step towards the validation of the Siphore concept.

  3. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Nigel Oswald [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ~17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ~200 g/cm3 and ~20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ~350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  4. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Anne Taylor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia’s in situ ion irradiation TEM (I3TEM offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs: zirconium alloys and LiAlO2.

  5. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Caitlin; Bufford, Daniel; Muntifering, Brittany; Senor, David; Steckbeck, Mackenzie; Davis, Justin; Doyle, Barney; Buller, Daniel; Hattar, Khalid

    2017-09-29

    Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia’s in situ ion irradiation TEM (I3TEM) offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs): zirconium alloys and LiAlO2.

  6. Development of ion/proton beam equipment for industrial uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ho; Lee, J. H.; Cho, Y. S.; Joo, P. K.; Kang, S. S.; Song, W. S.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. H.; Chang, G. H.; Bang, S. W.

    1999-12-01

    KAERI has possessed design and fabrication technologies of various ion sources including Duoplasmatron and DuoPiGatron developed by R and D projects of the long-term nuclear technology development program. In order to industrialize ion beam equipments utilizing these ion sources, a technology transfer project for a technology transfer project for a domestic firm has been performed. Under this project, engineers of the firm have been trained through classroom lectures of ion beam principles and OJT, an ion/proton beam equipment (DEMO equipment) has been designed, assembled and commissioned jointly with the engineers. Quality of the ion sources has been quantified, and technologies for ion beam equipment construction, functional test and application research have been developed. The DEMO equipment, which consists of an ion source, power supplies, vacuum, cooling and target systems, has been fabricated and tested to secure stability and reliability for industrial uses. Various characteristic tests including high voltage insulation, beam extraction, beam current measuring, etc. have been performed. This DEMO can be utilized for ion sources development as well as ion beam process development for various industrial products. Engineers of the firm have been trained for the industrialization of ion beam equipment and joined in beam application technology development to create industrial needs of beam equipment. (author)

  7. Spin polarized solid target as a prospective tool for radioactive ion beam physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Spin polarized probes are used in a wide range of experiments in nuclear physics including the determination of spin structure functions and tests of fundamental symmetries. At low energies, light stable polarized beams have been used for spectroscopic purposes. We propose to extend these types of experiments to nuclei far from stability by using radioactive ion beams (RIBs) and polarized targets. Towards this goal we intend to develop a solid polarized proton and/or deuterium target in the thickness range between 20 μm and 100 μm based on a scintillating (active) polymeric foil. Such a target would be a useful tool in the determination of excitation functions in resonant reactions, in studies of one-nucleon transfer reactions using RIBs as well as in probing the matter density of atomic nuclei. If scintillating, it could also help remove the background associated with the scattering of the radioactive beam.

  8. Spin polarized solid target as a prospective tool for radioactive ion beam physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrego-Blanco, J.P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Brandt, B. van den [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bunyatova, E.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Head P.O. Box 79, 101000 Moscow (Russian Federation); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States)]. E-mail: uribarri@mail.phy.ornl.gov; Hautle, P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Konter, J.A. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2005-12-15

    Spin polarized probes are used in a wide range of experiments in nuclear physics including the determination of spin structure functions and tests of fundamental symmetries. At low energies, light stable polarized beams have been used for spectroscopic purposes. We propose to extend these types of experiments to nuclei far from stability by using radioactive ion beams (RIBs) and polarized targets. Towards this goal we intend to develop a solid polarized proton and/or deuterium target in the thickness range between 20 {mu}m and 100 {mu}m based on a scintillating (active) polymeric foil. Such a target would be a useful tool in the determination of excitation functions in resonant reactions, in studies of one-nucleon transfer reactions using RIBs as well as in probing the matter density of atomic nuclei. If scintillating, it could also help remove the background associated with the scattering of the radioactive beam.

  9. Focused ion beam milling of carbon fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huson, Mickey G.; Church, Jeffrey S.; Hillbrick, Linda K.; Woodhead, Andrea L.; Sridhar, Manoj; Van De Meene, Allison M.L.

    2015-01-01

    A focused ion beam has been used to mill both individual carbon fibres as well as fibres in an epoxy composite, with a view to preparing flat surfaces for nano-indentation. The milled surfaces have been assessed for damage using scanning probe microscopy nano-indentation and Raman micro-probe analysis, revealing that FIB milling damages the carbon fibre surface and covers surrounding areas with debris of disordered carbon. The debris is detected as far as 100 μm from the milling site. The energy of milling as well as the orientation of the beam was varied and shown to have an effect when assessed by Raman spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Focused ion beam (FIB) milling was used to mill flat surfaces on carbon fibres. • Raman spectroscopy showed amorphous carbon was generated during FIB milling. • The amorphous debris is detected as far as 100 μm from the milling site. • This surface degradation was confirmed by nano-indentation experiments.

  10. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  11. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  12. Performance with lead ions of the LHC beam dump system

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R; Jensen, L; Lefèvre, T; Weterings, W

    2007-01-01

    The LHC beam dump system must function safely with 208Pb82+ions. The differences with respect to the LHC proton beams are briefly recalled, and the possible areas for performance concerns discussed, in particular the various beam intercepting devices and the beam instrumentation. Energy deposition simulation results for the most critical elements are presented, and the conclusions drawn for the lead ion operation. The expected performance of the beam instrumentation systems are reviewed in the context of the damage potential of the ion beam and the required functionality of the various safety and post-operational analysis requirements.

  13. Recent radioactive ion beam program at RIKEN and related topics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    525–533. Recent radioactive ion beam program at RIKEN and related topics. AKIRA OZAWA. RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198, Japan. Abstract. Recent experimental programs at RIKEN concerning RI beams are reviewed. RIKEN has the ring cyclotron (RRC) with high intense heavy-ion beams and large ...

  14. Radioactive ion beams for solid state research

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, J G

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive isotopes are widely used in many research fields. In some applications they are used as tracers after diffusion or after activation in the material itself through nuclear reactions. For research in solid state physics, the ion implantation technique is the most flexible and convenient method to introduce the radioactive isotopes in the materials to be studied, since it allows the control of the ion dose, the implantation depth and the isotopic purity. The on-line coupling of isotope separators to particle accelerators, as is the case of the ISOLDE facility at CERN, allows the obtention of a wide range of high purity short lived isotopes. Currently, the most stringent limitation for some applications is the low acceleration energy of 60 keV of the ISOLDE beam. In this communication a short review of the current applications of the radioactive beams for research in solid state physics at ISOLDE is done. The development of a post-accelerator facility for MeV radioactive ions is introduced and the adv...

  15. Comparison of deuterium retention for ion-irradiated and neutron-irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Kobayashi, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji; Shimada, Masashi; Calderoni, Pattrick; Oda, Takuji; Hara, Masanori; Hatano, Yuji; Watanabe, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of D retentions for Fe 2+ irradiated tungsten with the damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D 2 TDS spectra for Fe 2+ irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 K and 550 K although that for neutron irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and addition desorption stage was found around 750 K. The desorption rate of major desorption stage at 550 K increased as the number of dpa by Fe 2+ irradiation increased. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450 K was only found for the damaged samples, indicating that the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe 2+ irradiation and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono vacancy leading to the lower activation energy, where the dislocation loop and vacancy was produced. The third one was only found for the neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by void or vacancy cluster and the diffusion effect is also contributed due to high FWHM of TDS spectrum. It can be said that the D 2 TDS spectra for Fe 2+ -irradiated tungsten could not represent that for neutron-irradiated one, showing that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten has a difference from that for ion-irradiated one. (author)

  16. Plasma-Immersion Formation of High-Intensity Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchikov, A. I.; Anan'in, P. S.; Dektyarev, S. V.; Sivin, D. O.; Shevelev, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    For the first time, the possibility of forming high-intensity beams of low-energy metal and gas ions is demonstrated experimentally. The use of a hybrid system for ion-beam formation including plasmaimmersion extraction and ion acceleration and their subsequent ballistic focusing in an equipotential space with neutralization of the space charge of the beam made possible the pulse-periodic formation of titanium and nitrogen ion beams with an ion-current density of more than 1 A/cm2 and a pulsed power density of 2.6 kW/cm2.

  17. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nummela, S; Dendooven, P; Heikkinen, P; Huikari, J; Nieminen, A; Jokinen, A; Rinta-Antila, S; Rubchenya, V.; Aysto, J

    2002-01-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q = +2-->q = +1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler,

  18. A radioactive ion beam facility using photofission

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1999-01-01

    Use of a high-power electron linac as the driver accelerator for a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is proposed. An electron beam of 30 MeV and 100 kW can produce nearly 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 fissions/s from an optimized sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U target and about 60% of this from a natural uranium target. An electron beam can be readily transmitted through a thin window at the exit of the accelerator vacuum system and transported a short distance through air to a water-cooled Bremsstrahlung-production target. The Bremsstrahlung radiation can, in turn, be transported through air to the isotope-production target. This separates the accelerator vacuum system, the Bremsstrahlung target and the isotope-production target, reducing remote handling problems. The electron beam can be scanned over a large target area to reduce the power density on both the Bremsstrahlung and isotope-production targets. These features address one of the most pressing technological challenges of a high-power RIB facility, namely the production o...

  19. Deflagration wave formed by ion beam, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Keishiro; Abe, Takashi; Tamba, Moritake.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is given for the structure of the deflagration wave which is formed in a target bombarded by an ion beam. Stationary deflagration and/or detonation waves are formed at the surface of the target in a case in which the reaction energy of direct fusion and/or the beam energy deposited in the target are less than a critical value. On the other hand, no solution for stationary wave exists, if the energy deposited in the wave exceeds a critical value. In the latter case, the time-dependent fundamental equations reduce approximately to a self-similar type of equations. Numerical integrations are carried out for this type of differential equations, and an example of self-similar deflagration wave numerically obtained is plotted in the figures. (author)

  20. Performance of a dual-process PVD/PS tungsten coating structure under deuterium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunmyung; Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Sung Hwan [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae-Min [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Changheui, E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • D{sup +} irradiation performance of a dual-process PVD/PS W coating was evaluated. • Low-energy plasmas exposure of 100 eV D{sup +} with 1.17 × 10{sup 21} D/s{sup −1} m{sup 2} flux was applied. • After D ion irradiation, flakes were observed on the surface of the simple PS coating. • While, sub-μm size protrusions were observed for dual-process PVD/PS W coating. • Height of D spike in depth profile was lower for dual-process PVD/PS W coating. - Abstract: A dual-process coating structure was developed on a graphite substrate to improve the performance of the coating structure under anticipated operating condition of fusion devices. A thin multilayer W/Mo coating (6 μm) was deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method with a variation of Mo interlayer thickness on plasma spray (PS) W coating (160 μm) of a graphite substrate panel. The dual-process PVD/PS W coatings then were exposed to 3.08 × 10{sup 24} D m{sup −2} of 100 eV D ions with a flux of 1.71 × 10{sup 21} D m{sup −2} s{sup −1} in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) chamber. After irradiation, surface morphology and D depth profiles of the dual-process coating were analyzed and compared to those of the simple PS W coating. Both changes in surface morphology and D retention were strongly dependent on the microstructure of surface coating. Meanwhile, the existence of Mo interlayer seemed to have no significant effect on the retention of deuterium.

  1. Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  2. Focused Ion Beam Fabrication of Microelectronic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Focused Ion Beams and Applications, Portland, OR Dec. 1990. 28. Y.L. Wang, H. Temkin , L.R. Harriott, R.A. Logan, and T. Tanban-Ek. Appi. Phys. Lett. 571864...been used.(2 8 ,3 0) In addition, in-situ measurement of adsorption rates and deposition rates can be readily obtained by using a quartz crystal...not well understood at the present time. Possible rate limiting steps in this process " .. are adsorption of molecules, decomposition of molecules, and

  3. Electron temperature effects for an ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uramoto, Joshin.

    1979-05-01

    A hydrogen high temperature plasma up to 200 eV is produced by acceleration of electrons in a hot hollow cathode discharge and is used as an ion beam source. Then, two characteristics are observed: A rate of the atomic ion (H + ) number increases above 70%. A perveance of the ion beam increases above 30 times compared with that of a cold plasma, while a floating potential of an ion acceleration electrode approaches an ion acceleration potential (- 500 V) according as an increment of the electron temperature. Moreover, a neutralized ion beam can be produced by only the negative floating electrode without an external power supply. (author)

  4. Probing surface magnetism with ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, H.

    2007-01-01

    Ion beams can be used to probe magnetic properties of surfaces by a variety of different methods. Important features of these methods are related to trajectories of atomic projectiles scattered from the surface of a solid target and to the electronic interaction mechanisms in the surface region. Both items provide under specific conditions a high sensitivity for the detection of magnetic properties in the region at the topmost layer of surface atoms. This holds in particular for scattering under planar surface channeling conditions, where under grazing impact atoms or ions are reflected specularly from the surface without penetration into the subsurface region. Two different types of methods are employed based on the detection of the spin polarization of emitted or captured electrons and on spin blocking effects for capture into atomic terms. These techniques allow one to probe the long range and short range magnetic order in the surface region

  5. Preliminary results of spatially resolved ECR ion beam profile investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panitzsch, L.; Stalder, M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.

    2012-01-01

    The profile of an ion beam produced in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) can vary greatly depending on the source settings and the ion-optical tuning. Strongly focussed ion beams form circular structures (hollow beams) as predicted by simulations and observed in experiments. Each of the rings is predicted to be dominated by ions with same or at least similar m/q-ratios due to ion-optical effects. To check this we performed a series of preliminary investigations to test the required tuning capabilities of our ion source. This includes beam focussing (A) and beam steering (B) using a 3D-movable extraction. Having tuned the source to deliver a beam of strongly focussed ions of different ion species and having steered this beam to match the transmittance area of the sector magnet we also recorded the ion charge state distribution of the strongly focussed beam profile at different, spatially limited positions (C). The preliminary results will be introduced within this paper: it appears that our 3D-movable extraction is very efficient to steer and to focus the beam strongly. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  6. Important atomic physics issues for ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-01-01

    This paper suggests several current atomic physics questions important to ion beam fusion. Among the topics discussed are beam transport, beam-target interaction, and reactor design. The major part of the report is discussion concerning areas of research necessary to better understand beam-target interactions

  7. Recent radioactive ion beam program at RIKEN and related topics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent experimental programs at RIKEN concerning RI beams are reviewed. RIKEN has the ring cyclotron (RRC) with high intense heavy-ion beams and large acceptance fragment separator, RIPS. The complex can provide high intense RI-beams. By using the high intense RI-beams, a variety of experiments have been ...

  8. Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange in a traveling wave ion guide for the examination of protein conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kasper D; Pringle, Steven D; Murphy, James P; Fadgen, Keith E; Brown, Jeff; Engen, John R

    2009-12-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that solution-phase conformations of small globular proteins and large molecular protein assemblies can be preserved for milliseconds after electrospray ionization. Thus, the study of proteins in the gas phase on this time scale is highly desirable. Here we demonstrate that a traveling wave ion guide (TWIG) of a Synapt mass spectrometer offers a highly suitable environment for rapid and efficient gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX). Gaseous ND(3) was introduced into either the source TWIG or the TWIG located just after the ion mobility cell, such that ions underwent HDX as they passed through the ND(3) on the way to the time-of-flight analyzer. The extent of deuterium labeling could be controlled by varying the quantity of ND(3) or the speed of the traveling wave. The gas-phase HDX of model peptides corresponded to labeling of primarily fast exchanging sites due to the short labeling times (ranging from 0.1 to 10 ms). In addition to peptides, gas-phase HDX of ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and apomyoglobin were examined. We conclude that HDX of protein ions in a TWIG is highly sensitive to protein conformation, enables the detection of conformers present on submilliseconds time scales, and can readily be combined with ion mobility spectrometry.

  9. Proceedings of national seminar on physics with radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.; Shyam, R.

    1991-01-01

    This volume containing the proceedings of the national seminar on physics with radioactive ion beams gives a broad overview of the developments taking place in the area of nuclear physics and accelerator physics with special emphasis on the utilization of radioactive ion beams for various studies. Topics covered include studies on nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics and the wide ranging applications of radioactive ion beams in these and other areas of nuclear sciences. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 μm) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm 2 ) of these short-pulsed (≤ 1 μs) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10 10 K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology

  11. Ion spectroscopy for improvement of the physical beam model for therapy planning in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arico, Giulia

    2016-11-23

    Helium and carbon ions enable a more conformal dose distribution, narrower penumbra and higher relative biological effectiveness than photon and proton radiotherapy. However, they may undergo nuclear fragmentation in the patient tissues and the arising secondary fragments affect the delivered biological dose distributions. Currently there is a lack of data regarding ion nuclear fragmentation. One reason is the large size (up to some meters) of the experimental setups required for the investigations. In this thesis a new method is presented, which makes use of versatile pixelated semiconductor detectors (Timepix). This method is based on tracking of single particles and pattern recognition of their signals in the detectors. Measurements were performed at the HIT facility. The mixed radiation field arising from 430 MeV/u carbon ion beams and 221 MeV/u helium ion beams in water and in PMMA targets was investigated. The amounts of primary (carbon or helium) ions detected behind targets with the same water equivalent thickness (WET) were found to be in agreement within the statistical uncertainties. However, more fragments (differences up to 20% in case of H) and narrower lateral particle distributions were measured behind the PMMA than the water targets. The spectra of ions behind tissue surrogates and corresponding water targets with the same WET were analysed. The results obtained with adipose and inner bone surrogates and with the equivalent water phantoms were found to be consistent within the uncertainties. Significant differences in the results were observed in the case of lung and cortical bone surrogates when compared to the water phantoms. The experimental results were compared to FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations. This comparison could contribute to enhance the ion interaction models currently implemented for {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He ion beams.

  12. Recent US advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev, E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2007-01-01

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport, and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by >50X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. We are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy

  13. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  14. Sequential deuterium exchange reactions of protonated benzenes with D2O in the gas phase by ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiser, B.S.; Woodin, R.L.; Beauchamp, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported results on a novel deuterium exchange reaction, observed using ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectroscopy. In apparent contrast to previously reported results sequential reactions of protonated aromatic compounds with D 2 O in the gas phase occur which lead to various degrees of ring deuteration. For example, reactions in a mixture of benzene and D 2 O produce C 6 H 6 D + , which in further reaction with D 2 O undergoes rapid stepwise exchange of H for D. From the data summarized for the halo and alkyl substituted benzenes it is apparent that deuterium exchange varies significantly for different structural isomers. Thus while o- and p-difluorobenzene exchange all hydrogens rapidly, the meta isomer slowly exchanges only a single hydrogen. Species such as the benzoyl cation, radical cations, and C 7 H 7 + derived from toluene and cycloheptatriene do not undergo exchange. It appears that ring protonation is a necessary condition for exchange to occur

  15. Development of Emittance Analysis Software for Ion Beam Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, M.J.; Liu, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a figure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally, a high-quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profiles, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fitting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplified, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate

  16. Prototype ion source for JT-60 neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, M.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype ion source for JT-60 neutral beam injectors has been fabricated and tested. Here, we review the construction of the prototype ion source and report the experimental results about the source characteristics that has been obtained at this time. The prototype ion source is now installed at the prototype unit of JT-60 neutral beam injection units and the demonstration of the performances of the ion source and the prototype unit has just started

  17. New method of beam bunching in free-ion lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessonov, E.G. [Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effective ion beam bunching method is suggested. This method is based on a selective interaction of line spectrum laser light (e.g. axial mode structure light) with non-fully stripped ion beam cooled in a storage rings, arranging the ion beam in layers in radial direction of an energy-longitudinal coordinate plane and following rotation of the beam at the right angle after switching on the RF cavity or undulator grouper/buncher. Laser cooling of the ion beam can be used at this position after switching off the resonator to decrease the energy spread caused by accelerating field of the resonator. A relativistic multilayer ion mirror will be produced this way. Both monochromatic laser beams and intermediate monochromaticity and bandwidth light sources of spontaneous incoherent radiation can be used for production of hard and high power electromagnetic radiation by reflection from this mirror. The reflectivity of the mirror is rather high because of the cross-section of the backward Rayleigh scattering of photon light by non-fully stripped relativistic ions ({approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) is much greater ({approximately} 10{divided_by}15 orders) then Thompson one ({approximately} r{sub e}{sup 2}). This position is valid even in the case of non-monochromatic laser light ({Delta}{omega}/{omega} {approximately} 10{sup -4}). Ion cooling both in longitudinal plane and three-dimensional radiation ion cooling had been proposed based on this observation. The using of these cooling techniques will permit to store high current and low emittance relativistic ion beams in storage rings. The bunched ion beam can be used in ordinary Free-Ion Lasers as well. After bunching the ion beam can be extracted from the storage ring in this case. Storage rings with zero momentum compaction function will permit to keep bunching of the ion beam for a long time.

  18. Castellated tiles as the beam-facing components for the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo, S; Cervaro, V; Dalla Palma, M; Delogu, R; De Muri, M; Fasolo, D; Franchin, L; Pasqualotto, R; Pimazzoni, A; Rizzolo, A; Tollin, M; Zampieri, L; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations and experimental tests carried out to assess the feasibility and suitability of graphite castellated tiles as beam-facing component in the diagnostic calorimeter of the negative ion source SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from Radio frequency plasma). The results indicate that this concept could be a reliable, although less performing, alternative for the present design based on carbon fiber composite tiles, as it provides thermal measurements on the required spatial scale.

  19. Molecular characterization of microbial mutations induced by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ichida@riken.jp; Matsuyama, Tomoki [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoriko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koba, Takato [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    A positive selection system for gene disruption using a sucrose-sensitive transgenic rhizobium was established and used for the molecular characterization of mutations induced by ion beam irradiations. Single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions were found to occur in the sucrose sensitivity gene, sacB, when the reporter line was irradiated with highly accelerated carbon and iron ion beams. In all of the insertion lines, fragments of essentially the same sequence and of approximately 1188 bp in size were identified in the sacB regions. In the deletion lines, iron ions showed a tendency to induce larger deletions than carbon ions, suggesting that higher LET beams cause larger deletions. We found also that ion beams, particularly 'heavier' ion beams, can produce single gene disruptions and may present an effective alternative to transgenic approaches.

  20. Broad beam ion source operation with four common gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, S.; Sites, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A Kaufman-type broad beam ion source, used for sputtering and etching purposes, has been operated with Ar, Kr, O2 and N2 gas inputs over a wide range of beam energies (200-1200 eV) and gas flow rates (1-10 sccm). The maximum ion beam current density for each gas saturates at about 2.5 mA/sq cm as gas flow is increased. The discharge threshold voltage necessary to produce a beam and the beam efficiency (beam current/molecular current), however, varied considerably. Kr had the lowest threshold and highest efficiency, Ar next, then N2 and O2. The ion beam current varied only weakly with beam energy for low gas flow rates, but showed a factor of two increase when the gas flow was higher.

  1. Implosion of multilayered cylindrical targets driven by intense heavy ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2002-11-01

    An analytical model for the implosion of a multilayered cylindrical target driven by an intense heavy ion beam has been developed. The target is composed of a cylinder of frozen hydrogen or deuterium, which is enclosed in a thick shell of solid lead. This target has been designed for future high-energy-density matter experiments to be carried out at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The model describes the implosion dynamics including the motion of the incident shock and the first reflected shock and allows for calculation of the physical conditions of the hydrogen at stagnation. The model predicts that the conditions of the compressed hydrogen are not sensitive to significant variations in target and beam parameters. These predictions are confirmed by one-dimensional numerical simulations and thus allow for a robust target design.

  2. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  3. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and ion-beam analysis systems for functional materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Naramoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental systems for molecular beam epitaxial growth and ion beam analysis have been designed and constructed for the research of inorganic functional materials such as thin films and superlattices. (author)

  4. PIXE and ion beam analysis in forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Melanie; Warmenhoven, John; Chrislopher, Matt; Kirkby, Karen; Palitsin, Vladimir; Grime, Geoff; Jeynes, Chris; Jones, Brian; Wenn, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Full text: University of Surrey has, for the past four years, collaborated with police institutions from across Europe and the rest of the world lo scope potential applications of ion beam analysis (IBA) in forensic science. In doing this we have consulted practitioners across a range of forensic disciplines, and critically compared IBA with conventional characterisation techniques to investigate the areas in which IBA can add evidential value. In this talk, the results of this feasibility study will be presented, showing the types of sample for which IBA shows considerable promise. We will show how a combination of PIXE with other IBA techniques (EBS, PIGE, MeV-SIMS) can be used to give unprecedented characterisation of forensic samples and comment on the significance of these results for forensic casework. We will also show cases where IBA not appear to add any significant improvement over conventional techniques. (author)

  5. The emittance of high current heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, N.R.; Devaney, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantation is the main application for high current heavy ion beams. Transfer ratio is defined as the ratio of the total ion current leaving the ion source to the current delivered to the endstation. This ratio is monitored and logged and its importance is explained. It is also affected by other factors, such as the isotopic and molecular composition of the total ion beam. The transfer ratio reveals the fraction of ions which are intercepted by parts of the beamline system. The effects of these ions are discussed in two categories: processing purity and reliability. In discussing the emittance of ribbon beams, the two orthogonal planes are usually considered separately. Longitudinal emittance is determined by slot length and by plasma ion temperature. It has already been revealed that the longitudinal divergence of the beams from BF3 is perhaps double that of the beam from arsenic vapour or argon, at the same total perveance from the ion source. This poses the question: why is the ion temperature higher for BF3 than for As or Ar? The transverse emittance is in practical terms dominated by the divergence. It is the most fruitful area for improvement in most real-world systems. There is an intrinsic divergence arising from initial ion energies within the plasma, and there is emittance growth that can occur as a result of aberration in the beam extraction optics. (N.K.)

  6. Application of ECR ion source beams in atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of intense, high charge state ion beams from ECR ion sources has had significant impact not only on the upgrading of cyclotron and synchrotron facilities, but also on multicharged ion collision research, as evidenced by the increasing number of ECR source facilities used at least on a part time basis for atomic physics research. In this paper one such facility, located at the ORNL ECR source, and dedicated full time to the study of multicharged ion collisions, is described. Examples of applications of ECR ion source beams are given, based on multicharged ion collision physics studies performed at Oak Ridge over the last few years. 21 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Generation of an intense ion beam by a pinched relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilad, P.; Zinamon, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The pinched electron beam of a pulsed electron accelerator is used to generate an intense beam of ions. A foil anode and vacuum drift tube are used. The space charge field of the pinched beam in the tube accelerates ions from the foil anode. Ion currents of 10 kA at a density of 5kA/cm 2 with pulse length of 50 ns are obtained using a 5 kJ, 450 kV, 3 Ω diode. (author)

  8. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This annual report summarizes the results of research carried out in 1986 within the framework of the program 'High Energy Density in Matter Produced by Heavy Ion Beams' which is funded by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology. Its initial motivation and its ultimate goal is the question whether inertial confinement can be achieved by intense beams of heavy ions. (orig./HSI)

  9. Wave Propagation in an Ion Beam-Plasma System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T. D.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1979-01-01

    The spatial evolution of a velocity- or density-modulated ion beam is calculated for stable and unstable ion beam plasma systems, using the linearized Vlasov-Poisson equations. The propagation properties are found to be strongly dependent on the form of modulation. In the case of velocity...

  10. Effect of ion beam irradiation on metal particle doped polymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the surface roughness increases after ion beam irradiation. Keywords. Composite materials; ion beam irradiation; dielectric properties; X-ray diffraction. 1. Introduction. Various metal fillers were incorporated in polymers to pro- duce novel functionalized composites, which have found extensive applications, such as ...

  11. Focused Ion Beam Nano-structuring for Applications in Photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, F.; de Ridder, R.M.; Pollnau, Markus

    2010-01-01

    To date, nano- and micro-structuring has commonly been implemented by a combination of specifically optimized processes of electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching, thus limiting the range of materials that can be structured to only a few. In this talk we will introduce focused ion beam

  12. Analysis of Beam-Beam Kink Instability in a Linac-Ring Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Lebedev; J. Bisognano; R. Li; B. Yunn

    2001-01-01

    A linac-ring collision scheme was considered in recent proposals of electron-gold colliders (eRHIC) and polarized-electron light-ion colliders (EPIC). The advantages of using an energy-recovered linac for the electron beam is that it avoids the limitation of beam-beam tune shift inherent in a storage ring, pertains good beam quality and easy manipulation of polarization. However, the interaction of the ion beam in the storage ring with the electron beam from the linac acts analogously to a transverse impedance, and can induce unstable behavior of the ion beam similar to the strong head-tail instability. In this paper, this beam-beam kink instability with head-tail effect is analyzed using the linearized Vlasov equation, and the threshold of transverse mode coupling instability is obtained

  13. Manufacturing of the full size prototype of the ion source for the ITER neutral beam injector – The SPIDER beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavei, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.pavei@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Boilson, Deirdre [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Bonicelli, Tullio [Fusion for Energy, C/Joseph Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Boury, Jacques [Thales Electron Devices, Velizy Villacoublay (France); Bush, Michael [Galvano-T GmbH, T, Raiffeisenstraße 8, 51570 Windeck (Germany); Ceracchi, Andrea; Faso, Diego [CECOM S.r.l., Via Tiburtina – Guidonia Montecelio, Roma (Italy); Graceffa, Joseph [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Heinemann, Bernd [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Hemsworth, Ronald [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lievin, Christophe [Thales Electron Devices, Velizy Villacoublay (France); Marcuzzi, Diego [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Masiello, Antonio [Fusion for Energy, C/Joseph Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Sczepaniak, Bernd [Galvano-T GmbH, T, Raiffeisenstraße 8, 51570 Windeck (Germany); Singh, Mahendrajit [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Toigo, Vanni; Zaccaria, Pierluigi [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Negative ion sources are key components of neutral beam injectors for nuclear fusion. • The SPIDER experiment aims to optimize the negative ion source of MITICA and HNB. • The SPIDER Beam Source manufacturing is currently on-going. • Manufacturing and assembling technological issues encountered are presented. - Abstract: In ITER, each heating neutral beam injector (HNB) will deliver about 16.5 MW heating power by accelerating a 40 A deuterium negative ion beam up to the energy of 1 MeV. The ions are generated inside a caesiated negative ion source, where the injected H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} is ionized by a radio frequency electromagnetic field. The SPIDER test bed, currently being manufactured, is going to be the ion source test facility for the full size ion source of the HNBs and of the diagnostic neutral beam injector of ITER. The SPIDER beam source comprises an ion source with 8 radio-frequency drivers and a three-grid system, providing an overall acceleration up to energies of about 100 keV [1]. SPIDER represents a substantial step forward between the half ITER size ion source, which is currently being tested at the ELISE test bed in IPP-Garching, and the negative ion sources to be used on ITER, in terms of layout, dimensions and operating parameters. The SPIDER beam source will be housed inside a vacuum vessel which will be equipped with a beam dump and a graphite diagnostic calorimeter. The manufacturing design of the main parts of the SPIDER beam source has been completed and many of the tests on the prototypes have been successfully passed. The most complex parts, from the manufacturing point of view, of the ion source and the accelerator, developed by galvanic deposition of copper are being manufactured. The manufacturing phase will be completed within 2015, when the assembly of the device will start at the PRIMA site, in Padova (I). The paper describes the status of the procurement, the adaptations operated on the design of the beam

  14. Experiments on Ion Beam Space-Charge Neutralization with Pulsed Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Herleb, U

    1998-01-01

    Space-charge neutralization of heavy ion beams with electron beam pulses generated by electron guns incorporating ferroelectric cathodes has been experimentally investigated. Several experiments are described, the results of which prove that the intensity of selected ion beam parts with defined charge states generated in a laser ion source can be increased by an order of magnitude. For elevated charge states the intensity amplification is more significant than for low charge states. A charge enhancement factor of four has been achieved by neutralization with pulsed electron beams for Al7+ ions generated from an aluminium target.

  15. Status of radioactive ion beams at the HRIBF

    CERN Document Server

    Stracener, D W

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) are produced using the isotope separation on-line technique and are subsequently accelerated up to a few MeV per nucleon for use in nuclear physics experiments. The first RIB experiments at the HRIBF were completed at the end of 1998 using sup 1 sup 7 F beams. Since then other proton-rich ion beams have been developed and a large number of neutron-rich ion beams are now available. The neutron-rich radioactive nuclei are produced via proton-induced fission of uranium in a low-density matrix of uranium carbide. Recently developed RIBs include sup 2 sup 5 Al from a silicon carbide target and isobarically pure beams of neutron-rich Ge, Sn, Br and I isotopes from a uranium carbide target.

  16. Can one crystallize a heavy ion beam?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.

    1990-05-01

    We study the possibility of obtaining liquid or crystalline ordered structures in a cooled heavy ion beam in a storage ring. First the structure of very cold ions confined in a cylindrically symmetric static potential is explored by means of molecular dynamics calculations. Liquid like structures are obtained for the ratio of average Coulomb to thermal energies and Γ ≅ 10 and crystalline structures like strings, zigzags, helices, tetrehedra, intertwined helices, polygons, etc. emerge for Γ > 25. For larger densities, the particles arrange in cylindrical shells and form equilateral triangles on their surfaces arranged in hexagons which are characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb solids. The molecular dynamics results are compared to results of energy minimization of these structures or of geometrical models. Realistic molecular dynamics calculations in the lattice of the Experimental Storage Ring at GSI Darmstadt including the effects of the bending, focussing and defocussing magnets, of the free sections and of the electron cooler revealed that such structures at higher densities are easily destroyed by heating through shearing forces. Therefore the dynamics of the simple Coulomb string is explored in more detail. The potential energy for large amplitude longitudinal and transverse vibrations is calculated and the dispersion relations and response functions in the harmonic limit are given and possible excitation mechanisms are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange of Dinucleotides and 5′-Monophosphate Dinucleotides in a Quadrupole Ion Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated dinucleotides (dAA, dAG, dGA, dGG) and their 5′-monophosphate analogs (5′-dAA, 5′-dAG, 5′-dGA, 5′-dGG) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Significant differences in the rates and extents of exchange were found when the 5′-hydroxyl group of the dinucleotides was replaced by a phosphate functionality. Extensive and nucleobase-dependent exchange occurred for the deprotonated 5′-monophospha...

  18. Electromagnetic ion beam instability upstream of the earth's bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.; Gosling, J.T.; Forslund, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    The linear theory of the electromagnetic ion beam instability for arbitrary angles of propagation has been studied. The parameters considered in the theory are typical of the solar wind upstream of the earth's bow shock when a 'reflected' proton beam is present. Maximum growth occurs for propagation parallel to the ambient field B, but this instability also displays significant growth at wave-vectors oblique to B, Oblique, unstable modes seem to be the likely source of the compressive magnetic fluctuations recently observed in conjunction with 'diffuse' ion population. An energetic ion beam does not directly give rise to linear growth of either ion acoustic or whistler mode instabilities

  19. Underling modification in ion beam induced Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, S.; Chini, T.K.; Sanyal, M.K.; Grenzer, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface (amorphous-crystalline interface) structure of keV ion beam modified Si(001) wafers was studied for the first time using non-destructive technique and compared with that of the top one. Ion-beam modifications of the Si samples were done using state-of-art high-current ion implanter facility at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics by changing energy, dose and angle of incidence of the Ar + ion beam. To bring out the underlying modification depth-resolved x-ray grazing incidence diffraction has been carried out using synchrotron radiation facility, while the structure of the top surface was studied through atomic force microscopy

  20. Heavy ion particle beam interaction with a hot ionized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei-Cas, R.; Bardy, J.; Beuve, M.A.; Laget, J.P.; Menier, A.; Renaud, M.

    1983-03-01

    The present status of the experimental facility consisting of a heavy ion beam travelling through a laser created plasma target is described. Some aspects such as laser-tandem coupling, beam performances, constraints on the plasma parameter ranges, plasma and beam diagnostics are analyzed

  1. Particularities of ion-implanted deuterium distribution in stainless steel X18H10T

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstolutskaya, G D; Ruzhitskij, I E

    2001-01-01

    Features of distribution of the deuterium implanted with energy of 6 keV in 18Cr10NiTi steel to doses in the range of 2.10 sup 1 sup 7...2.10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 2 have been investigated. Data on the trapping retention, depth distribution and thermo-activated release of the deuterium in the irradiation temperature range of 300...600 K and post implantation annealing in the range 300...600 K and post implantation annealing in the range 300...1500 K were obtained.

  2. Ion beam probe diagnostic system for the LITE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stufflebeam, J.H.; Jennings, W.C.; Hickok, R.L.

    1974-11-01

    The problem of defocusing of the ion beam by the strong gradients in the magnetic field was discussed. It was shown this can be overcome by a linear field lens to shape the initial beam, or by proper selection of the size and position of the secondary ion detector. The results of the preliminary beam alignment were presented and the favorable comparison of the scaling formula and computer simulation was evident

  3. Beam dynamics calculations for the acceleration of different ions in a heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitinghoff, H.; Parisi, G.; Sauer, A.; Pabst, M.

    1996-01-01

    Heavy ion linear accelerators are well suited as driver in heavy ion inertial fusion facilities. In present scenarios the acceleration of different ion species or the simultaneous acceleration of different isotopes in the same linac are discussed. Beam dynamics calculations have been performed to check the beam behaviour and the conditions for such a kind of operation in RFQ and DTL. (author)

  4. The effect of high energy ion beam analysis on D trapping in W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, T. J.; Davis, J. W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Haasz, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    High energy ion beam analyses (IBA) are invaluable for measuring concentration depth profiles of light elements in solid materials, and important in the study of fusion fuel retention in tokamaks. Polycrystalline W specimens were implanted at 300 and 500 K, 5–10 × 1023 D m‑2 fluence, with deuterium-only and simultaneous D-3%He ion beams. Selected specimens were analysed by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and/or nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). All specimens were measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The D TDS spectra show an extra peak at 900–1000 K following ERDA and/or NRA measurements. The peak height appears to correlate with the amount of D initially trapped beyond the calculated IBA probe beam peak damage depth. Similar to pre-implantation damage scenarios, the IBA probe beam creates empty high energy traps which later retrap D atoms during TDS heating, which is supported by modelling experimental results using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program.

  5. Space-charge compensation of highly charged ion beam from laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrashev, S.A.; Collier, J.; Sherwood, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of matching an ion beam delivered by a high-intensity ion source with an accelerator is considered. The experimental results of highly charged ion beam transport with space-charge compensation by electrons are presented. A tungsten thermionic cathode is used as a source of electrons for beam compensation. An increase of ion beam current density by a factor of 25 is obtained as a result of space-charge compensation at a distance of 3 m from the extraction system. The process of ion beam space-charge compensation, requirements for a source of electrons, and the influence of recombination losses in a space-charge-compensated ion beam are discussed. (author)

  6. Production and Characterization of Ion Beams from Magnetically Insulated Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Jesse Martin

    1982-03-01

    The operation of magnetically insulated diodes and the characteristics of the resulting ion beams have been investigated using two pulsed power generators, LYNX at the 10('9)W power level, and Neptune at the 10('11)W power level. LYNX is a small magnetically insulated diode driven directly by a Marx bank. By changing the material used as the surface flashover ion source, the majority ion species generated by the diode could be chosen. Ion beams produced so far by this device are: protons, lithium, boron, carbon, sodium, strontium, and barium. Typical beam parameters for the ion beams are peak energies of 300 keV, current densities of 40-60 A/cm('2,) and pulse durations of 300 -400 nsec. The ion beam uniformity, divergence, and reproducibility were shown to be a function of the surface flashover source geometry. Finally, the LYNX ion beam was also used to anneal silicon crystals and other materials science experiments. The diode used on the Neptune generator was designed to study virtual cathode formation in a high power magnetically insulated diode. The physical cathode was replaced by electrons that ExB drift on the applied magnetic field lines. It was found that the best electrode configuration is one in which the electrons are required to only undergo the Hall drift to form the cathode. The divergence of the ion beam was examined with time-dependent and time -integrated shadowbox diagnostics. It was found that the intrinsic divergence of the ion beam does not have a strong directional dependence. However, the beam suffers a time -dependent aiming error in the plane of the ion beam acceleration and the Hall drift, which is attributed to the dynamics of the virtual cathode electrons. Low time-integrated divergence of the ion beam was attributed to the portion of the ion beam that was carbon (typically 50%). Analysis and discussion of the results is presented on the anode plasma formation and heating process, the virtual cathode flow in the Neptune diode, and the

  7. Effect of ion beam energy on density, roughness & uniformity of Co film deposited using ion beam sputtering system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Rajnish; Rai, Sanjay; Lodha, G. S.

    2012-06-01

    Cobalt (Co) films were prepared, using ion beam sputtering technique. Films were prepared by varying beam voltage from 700 to 1100 V at room temperature. The influence of ion beam energy on the density, surface roughness and thickness uniformity of Co film was investigated. X-ray reflectivity study shows that surface roughness of film decreases with increasing beam energy and lowest surface roughness of 1.3 Å was achieved for 1000 V beam voltage at 4 cm3/min Ar gas flow. The density of the film was 93% of bulk density of Co. These ultra low roughness films are very promising for studying the magnetic properties of Co films.

  8. Online Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry (HDX-IM-MS): a Systematic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryar, Adam; Groves, Kate; Quaglia, Milena

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is an important tool for measuring and monitoring protein structure. A bottom-up approach to HDX-MS provides peptide level deuterium uptake values and a more refined localization of deuterium incorporation compared with global HDX-MS measurements. The degree of localization provided by HDX-MS is proportional to the number of peptides that can be identified and monitored across an exchange experiment. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been shown to improve MS-based peptide analysis of biological samples through increased separation capacity. The integration of IMS within HDX-MS workflows has been commercialized but presently its adoption has not been widespread. The potential benefits of IMS, therefore, have not yet been fully explored. We herein describe a comprehensive evaluation of traveling wave ion mobility integrated within an online-HDX-MS system and present the first reported example of UDMSE acquisition for HDX analysis. Instrument settings required for optimal peptide identifications are described and the effects of detector saturation due to peak compression are discussed. A model system is utilized to confirm the comparability of HDX-IM-MS and HDX-MS uptake values prior to an evaluation of the benefits of IMS at increasing sample complexity. Interestingly, MS and IM-MS acquisitions were found to identify distinct populations of peptides that were unique to the respective methods, a property that can be utilized to increase the spatial resolution of HDX-MS experiments by >60%. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Dynamics of heavy ion beams during longitudinal compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lee, E.P.; Brandon, S.; Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    Heavy ion beams with initially uniform line charge density can be compressed longitudinally by an order of magnitude in such a way that the compressed beam has uniform line charge density and velocity-tilt profiles. There are no envelope mismatch oscillations during compression. Although the transverse temperature varies along the beam and also varies with time, no substantial longitudinal and transverse emittance growth has been observed. Scaling laws for beam radius and transport system parameters are given

  10. Modeling space charge in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    A new analytic model is presented which accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson's equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models

  11. Dielectronic recombination measurements using the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    We have used the Electron Beam Ion Trap at LLNL to study dielectronic recombination in highly charged ions. Our technique is unique because we observe the x-rays from dielectronic recombination at the same time we see x-rays from all other electron-ion interactions. We have recently taken high-resolution, state-selective data that resolves individual resonances

  12. Structural and electrical properties of swift heavy ion beam irradiated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis of swift heavy ion induced metal silicide is a new advancement in materials science research. We have investigated the mixing at Co/Si interface by swift heavy ion beam induced irradiation in the electronic stopping power regime. Irradiations were undertaken at room temperature using 120 MeV Au ions at the ...

  13. Ion beam notcher using a laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray Tomlin

    2001-07-20

    The FNAL LINAC will soon be asked to produce beam at 7.5 Hz. FNAL LINAC extraction involves sweeping the H-minus beam over a Lambertson magnet. The higher repetition rates are expected to activate the Lambertson magnet. A pulsed laser has been installed to make a notch in the beam so that beam will not sweep over the magnet.

  14. Broad ion beam serial section tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarski, B; Gholinia, A; Mingard, K; Gee, M; Thompson, G E; Withers, P J

    2017-01-01

    Here we examine the potential of serial Broad Ion Beam (BIB) Ar + ion polishing as an advanced serial section tomography (SST) technique for destructive 3D material characterisation for collecting data from volumes with lateral dimensions significantly greater than 100µm and potentially over millimetre sized areas. Further, the associated low level of damage introduced makes BIB milling very well suited to 3D EBSD acquisition with very high indexing rates. Block face serial sectioning data registration schemes usually assume that the data comprises a series of parallel, planar slices. We quantify the variations in slice thickness and parallelity which can arise when using BIB systems comparing Gatan PECS and Ilion BIB systems for large volume serial sectioning and 3D-EBSD data acquisition. As a test case we obtain 3D morphologies and grain orientations for both phases of a WC-11%wt. Co hardmetal. In our case we have carried out the data acquisition through the manual transfer of the sample between SEM and BIB which is a very slow process (1-2 slice per day), however forthcoming automated procedures will markedly speed up the process. We show that irrespective of the sectioning method raw large area 2D-EBSD maps are affected by distortions and artefacts which affect 3D-EBSD such that quantitative analyses and visualisation can give misleading and erroneous results. Addressing and correcting these issues will offer real benefits when large area (millimetre sized) automated serial section BIBS is developed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Important atomic physics issues for ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, Roger.

    1986-01-01

    The nearly endless variety of interesting and challenging problems makes physics research enjoyable. Most of us would choose to be physicists even if physics had no practical applications. However, physics does have practical applications. This workshop deals with one of those applications, namely ion beam fusion. Not all interesting and challenging atomic physics questions are important for ion beam fusion. This paper suggests some questions that may be important for ion beam fusion. It also suggests some criteria for determining if a question is only interesting, or both interesting and important. Importance is time dependent and, because of some restrictions on the flow of information, also country dependent. In the early days of ion beam fusion, it was important to determine if ion beam fusion made sense. Approximate answers and bounds on various parameters were required. Accurate, detailed answers were not needed. Because of the efforts of many people attending this workshop, we now know that ion beam fusion does make some sense. We must still determine if ion beam fusion truly makes good sense. If it does make good sense, we must determine how to make it work. Accurate detailed answers are becoming increasingly important. (author)

  16. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K + beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  17. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  18. Beam optics study of a negative ion source for neutral beam injection application at ASIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jiang-Long; Liang, Li-Zhen [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Jiang, Cai-Chao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate school, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Xie, Ya-Hong, E-mail: xieyh@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, Chun-Dong; Li, Jun; Gu, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Qian [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Jing-Yong; Wu, Ming-Shan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate school, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2017-04-15

    In order to study the generation and extraction of negative ions for neutral beam injection application, a negative ion source is being designed and constructed at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). Through a four electrode grids system inside the accelerator, a negative ion beam will be extracted and accelerated up to −60 kV on a reduced scale extraction area of 12 × 50 cm{sup 2} (the area of PG apertures is 185 cm{sup 2}). The beam optics is a key issue for the accelerator design, and greatly determine the source experimental performance in term of beam current, heat load on the grid, beam divergence, and so on. In this paper, the trajectories of electrons and negative ions were simulated in the electrode grids of the negative ion source. The filter capability of electron deflection magnet on the co-extracted electrons is evaluated and confirmed. The negative ion beam optics was designed according to the calculated results of beam divergence and beam radius along the beamlet in different acceleration voltages. The deflection effect of the electron deflection magnet on the negative ion beam was investigated in the single beamlet case and multi-beamlets case.

  19. Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam diode using gas puff plasma gun as ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Higashiyama, M.; Takata, S.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2006-01-01

    A magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun has been developed in order to generate a high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam for the implantation process of semiconductors and the surface modification of materials. The nitrogen plasma produced by the plasma gun is injected into the acceleration gap of the diode with the external magnetic field system. The ion diode is operated at diode voltage approx. =200 kV, diode current approx. =2 kA and pulse duration approx. =150 ns. A new acceleration gap configuration for focusing ion beam has been designed in order to enhance the ion current density. The experimental results show that the ion current density is enhanced by a factor of 2 and the ion beam has the ion current density of 27 A/cm 2 . In addition, the coaxial type Marx generator with voltage 200 kV and current 15 kA has been developed and installed in the focus type ion diode. The ion beam of ion current density approx. =54 A/cm 2 is obtained. To produce metallic ion beams, an ion source by aluminum wire discharge has been developed and the aluminum plasma of ion current density ∼70 A/cm 2 is measured. (author)

  20. Simulations of Beam Injection and Extraction into Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cavenago, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Charge breeding, consistiting of injecting singly charged ion into ECRIS(Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources) to extract an highly charged ion beam, is a promising technique for rare or radioactive ion beam. Efficiency and extracted beam temperature are dominated by the strong collisional diffusion of charged ion inside source. A computer code, named BEAM2ECR, written to simulate details of the injection, ionization, collision and extraction processes is described.* A model of injection plasma sheath and of source fringe field were recently added. Neutral injection is also supported, for comparison with other techniques, like gas feeding or metal vapor injection. Results, clearly favouring near axis injection for most cases are described. Code is written in C-language and possibility of concurrent execution over a Linux cluster was recently added.

  1. Ion source for ion beam deposition employing a novel electrode assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. V.; Kanarov, V.; Yevtukhov, R.; Hegde, H.; Druz, B.; Yakovlevitch, D.; Cheesman, W.; Mirkov, V.

    2000-02-01

    A rf inductively coupled ion source employing a novel electrode assembly for focusing a broad ion beam on a relatively small target area was developed. The primary application of this ion source is the deposition of thin films used in the fabrication of magnetic sensors and optical devices. The ion optics consists of a three-electrode set of multiaperture concave dished grids with a beam extraction diameter of 150 mm. Also described is a variation in the design providing a beam extraction diameter of 120 mm. Grid hole diameters and grid spacing were optimized for low beamlet divergence and low grid impingement currents. The radius of curvature of the grids was optimized to obtain an optimally focused ion beam at the target location. A novel grid fabrication and mounting design was employed which overcomes typical limitations of such grid assemblies, particularly in terms of maintaining optimum beam focusing conditions after multiple cycles of operation. Ion beam generation with argon and xenon gases in energy ranges from 0.3 to 2.0 keV was characterized. For operation with argon gas, beam currents greater than 0.5 A were obtained with a beam energy of 800 eV. At optimal beam formation conditions, beam profiles at distances about equal to the radius of curvature were found to be close to Gaussian, with 99.9% of the beam current located within a 150 mm target diameter. Repeatability of the beam profile over long periods of operation is also reported.

  2. In-vessel tritium inventory in ITER evaluated by deuterium retention in carbon dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Yoshida, H.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamauchi, Y.; Akiba, M.; Suzuki, S.

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate the in-vessel tritium inventory in carbon dust in ITER, deuterium gas absorption and deuterium ion irradiation experiments were conducted for a carbon dust prepared by using electron beam evaporation of graphite. The amount of deuterium retained after the deuterium gas absorption was very low, with an atomic ratio of D/C=10 -3 . The amount of deuterium retained after the deuterium ion irradiation was very similar to that for graphite. The deuterium concentration becomes close to zero if the wall temperature in the divertor wall region is higher than 1000 K. Co-deposited carbon dust was prepared by using a deuterium arc discharge apparatus with carbon electrodes at different gas pressure and substrate temperature. The co-deposited carbon dust had the largest deuterium concentration. In ITER conditions with a gas pressure of 1 Pa and wall temperature of 573 K, the deuterium concentration becomes approximately D/C=0.2. In DT discharges, the tritium concentration becomes T/C=0.1. This value is presumed to be the highest concentration in carbon dust in ITER. The present result shows that the accumulation speed of the in-vessel tritium inventory is lower than that predicted so far. (author)

  3. In-vessel tritium inventory in ITER evaluated by deuterium retention of carbon dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Yoshida, H.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamauchi, Y.; Akiba, Masato; Suzuki, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate in-vessel tritium inventory of carbon dust, deuterium gas absorption and deuterium ion irradiation experiments were conducted for a carbon dust prepared by using electron beam evaporation for graphite. The retained amount of deuterium after the deuterium gas absorption was very low, D/C=10 -3 in the atomic ratio. The retained amount of deuterium after the deuterium ion irradiation was very similar with that for graphite. The deuterium concentration becomes close to zero if the wall temperature at divertor wall region is higher than 1000 K. Co-deposited carbon dust was prepared by using a deuterium arc discharge apparatus with carbon electrodes at different gas pressure and substrate temperature. The co-deposited carbon dust had a largest deuterium concentration. In the ITER condition with gas pressure of 1 Pa and wall temperature of 573 K, the deuterium concentration in the atomic ratio becomes approximately D/C=0.2. In DT discharge, the tritium concentration in the atomic ratio becomes T/C=0.1. This value is presumed to be a highest concentration of carbon dust in ITER. The present result shows that the accumulation speed of in-vessel tritium inventory is lower than that predicted so far. (author)

  4. Neutralisation and transport of negative ion beams: physics and diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serianni, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Aprile, D.; Baltador, C.; Barbisan, M.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; Delogu, R.; Fellin, F.; Fonnesu, N.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pimazzoni, A.; Sartori, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Veltri, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zaupa, M.

    2017-04-01

    Neutral beam injection is one of the most important methods of plasma heating in thermonuclear fusion experiments, allowing the attainment of fusion conditions as well as driving the plasma current. Neutral beams are generally produced by electrostatically accelerating ions, which are neutralised before injection into the magnetised plasma. At the particle energy required for the most advanced thermonuclear devices and particularly for ITER, neutralisation of positive ions is very inefficient so that negative ions are used. The present paper is devoted to the description of the phenomena occurring when a high-power multi-ampere negative ion beam travels from the beam source towards the plasma. Simulation of the trajectory of the beam and of its features requires various numerical codes, which must take into account all relevant phenomena. The leitmotiv is represented by the interaction of the beam with the background gas. The main outcome is the partial neutralisation of the beam particles, but ionisation of the background gas also occurs, with several physical and technological consequences. Diagnostic methods capable of investigating the beam properties and of assessing the relevance of the various phenomena will be discussed. Examples will be given regarding the measurements collected in the small flexible NIO1 source and regarding the expected results of the prototype of the neutral beam injectors for ITER. The tight connection between measurements and simulations in view of the operation of the beam is highlighted.

  5. Basic aspects of ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.

    1985-07-01

    Irradiation of solids with energetic particles results in the reorganization of constituent target atoms, i.e., ion beam mixing (IM). At low temperatures, IM is characterized by prompt (10 -10 s) diffusion processes which are localized in the vicinity of the displacement cascade. Mixing at low temperatures can cause the system to depart far from the equilibrium state. At elevated temperatures, the diffusion of radiation-induced defects extends the mixing to longer times and greater distances. These delayed IM processes tend to return the system toward equilibrium. Recent experimental progress has led to a qualitative understanding of the fundamental aspects of IM in both temperature regimes. This has been achieved through systematic measurements of the influences of temperature, dose, dose-rate, cascade energy density, and chemical interactions on IM. The results of these experiments will be reviewed and compared to IM models based on collisional, thermal spike, and radiation-enhanced diffusion processes. The relation of IM to other fundamental radiation damage effects will also be discussed. 75 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Ion beam characterisation of nanometre structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Leif.

    1995-08-01

    Ion beam analysis methods have been applied to the study of technologically important issues in III-V nanometre structure science. In the first application, the incorporation of hydrogen in GaAs during electron cyclotron resonance etching was studied using the 1 H( 15 N,αγ) 12 C reaction analysis method. The major part of the work was carried out using mass and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry (RS). RS was used to study reactions of thin metal films InP reactions. The metals investigated include Cr, Ti, Ni, Pd and Pt and the reactions as a function of temperature were studied to elucidate suitable compounds for contacts and metallization. Using 127 I in the 0.5A to 0.7A MeV region as the projectile, the depth profiles for the different elements were obtained. Complementary measurements with X-ray diffraction to obtain chemical phase information as well as scanning electron microscopy to study the surface morphology were also carried out. 59 refs, 15 figs

  7. Edge effect correction using ion beam figuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Xie, Xuhui; Li, Furen; Zhou, Lin

    2017-11-10

    The edge effect is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues for fabricating large primary mirrors, as it can greatly reduce the key performance of the optical system. Ion beam figuring (IBF) has the advantage of no edge effect, so we can use it to remove high points on the edge and improve surface accuracy. The edge local correction method (ELCM) of IBF processes only the surface edge zone, and is very different from the current full caliber figuring method (FCFM). Therefore, it is necessary to study the ELCM of IBF. In this paper, the key factors of ELCM are analyzed, such as dwell time algorithm, edge data extension methods, and the outward dimension of the starting figuring point. At the same time, the distinctions between ELCM and FCFM are compared. Finally, a 142 mm diameter fused silica mirror is fabricated to verify the validity of the theoretical of ELCM. The experimental results indicate that the figuring precision and efficiency can be obviously improved by ELCM.

  8. Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange of dinucleotides and 5'-monophosphate dinucleotides in a quadrupole ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-10-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated dinucleotides (dAA, dAG, dGA, dGG) and their 5'-monophosphate analogs (5'-dAA, 5'-dAG, 5'-dGA, 5'-dGG) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Significant differences in the rates and extents of exchange were found when the 5'-hydroxyl group of the dinucleotides was replaced by a phosphate functionality. Extensive and nucleobase-dependent exchange occurred for the deprotonated 5'-monophosphate dinucleotides, whereas the dinucleotides all exhibited essentially the same limited exchange. Results for the isomeric 5'-monophosphates, 5'-dAG and 5'-dGA, were remarkably different, indicating that the H/D exchange reaction was sequence dependent. An elaborate array of computations was performed to investigate the gas-phase structures of the ions individually and also as participants in ion-molecule complexes with D2O. Integration of the experimental and theoretical results supports a relay exchange mechanism and suggests that the exchange behavior depends highly on the identity and sequence of the nucleobases as well as their ability to interact with the deprotonation site. Finally, a shuttling mechanism is proposed to possibly account for the bimodal H/D exchange behavior observed for deprotonated 5'P-dGA. In this case, hydrogen bonding between the nucleobases in concert with interaction from the deuterating agent creates an ion-molecule complex in which hydrogen and deuterium atoms may be shuttled amongst the hydrogen-bonded participants.

  9. Electron beam ion sources for student education at universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Erik [DREEBIT GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Zschornack, Guenter [TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Ion beams have become essential tools used in many fields of fundamental research as well as industrial applications. Thus, it is important for todays physics students to understand the basics of ion beam creation, transportation as well as ion-surface interactions. We present results from laboratory training courses using table-top sized electron beam ion sources of the Dresden EBIT type which is able to produce a large spectrum of ions with low or high charge states. The initial ion beam is guided through several ion optical elements like Einzel lenses and deflectors, is separated by the charge-to-mass ratio of its components with a Wien-Filter or dipole analyzing magnet and is detected in a Faraday Cup. A specific assembly for laboratory training as used at the Technische Universitaet Dresden and the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, is introduced. In typical experiments, students analyze the charge-to-mass ratio spectrum from a Dresden EBIT measured using a Wien Filter. The composition of the extracted ion beam can be manipulated by the gas pressure or the ionisation time. In a wider context, the atomic physics processes occurring especially during the production of highly charged ions also appear in nuclear fusion facilities as well as in many astrophysical phenomena, for example supernovas. Such aspects can be discussed in order to help students connect to modern research carried out at large international facilities.

  10. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, S.; Dendooven, P.; Heikkinen, P.; Huikari, J.; Nieminen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rubchenya, V.; Äystö, J.

    2002-04-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q=+2→ q=+1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler. The performance of the Wien filter has been tested off-line with a discharge ion source as well as on-line with a radioactive beam. The electron capture process of cooled q=+2 ions has been investigated in a radiofrequency quadrupole ion cooler with varying partial pressures of nitrogen. Also, the superasymmetric fission production yields of 68< A<78 nuclei have been deduced.

  11. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nummela, S. E-mail: saara.nummela@phys.jyu.fi; Dendooven, P.; Heikkinen, P.; Huikari, J.; Nieminen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rubchenya, V.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q=+2{yields}q=+1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler. The performance of the Wien filter has been tested off-line with a discharge ion source as well as on-line with a radioactive beam. The electron capture process of cooled q=+2 ions has been investigated in a radiofrequency quadrupole ion cooler with varying partial pressures of nitrogen. Also, the superasymmetric fission production yields of 68

  12. Radioactive ion beams at the Bevalac: Greatly enhanced fragment separation for high energy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.

    1990-09-01

    Radioactive beams are routinely produced at the Bevalac by the fragmentation process. High energy beams (energies ∼ 800 MeV/u) produce fragments with nearly the original beam momentum, forming a radioactive ion beam. A new beamline is being constructed which will provide resolution for ions approaching the mass 100 region, compared to the present mass 20 capability, by strongly increasing the dispersion and also increasing the beam size for easier tuning and more effective collimation. In addition, the angular acceptance has been more than doubled. Details of the design will be presented. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Characterization of Negative Deuterium Ion Distributions in a Gridded Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Eric C.

    This work extends the recent (2008) UW-Madison discovery of a substantial current of negative deuterium ions produced in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion device. Investigation was carried out both through empirical measurement and computational modeling. Measurements of the negative ion current were performed with a compact Faraday cup mounted on motion stages to produce radial and azimuthal spatial profiles of the negative ion current density in an IEC device. The azimuthal profiles represent the first spatially resolved measurements of the shape of a 'plasma jet' produced by perturbations in the electrostatic potential at the cathode of the IEC device. Further, these measurements confirm the existence of these jets at low pressure when they are not observable by light emission. This work demonstrates that the magnitude of the negative ion current and the profile of the plasma jet are dependent on the potential and current supplied to the IEC device cathode. A comparison of the production of negative ions by a single reaction versus a chain of reactions was carried out by deriving the analog to the mean free path for a sequence of reactions. This analysis can be adapted to a variety of applications if it is useful to know the length scale of a chain of reactions occurs in. The capability to simulate the production and propagation of negative ion current was added to the UW-IEC modeling program, Volterra Integral Code for Transport in Electrostatic Reactors (VICTER). This 1D code predicts the negative ion energy spectrum at all radii in the IEC device. Comparing trends in measurements and VICTER simulations was utilized to validate elements of the VICTER code. VICTER was further utilized to understand the relative importance of the reactions that produce negative ions in an IEC device and illustrate how the energy spectrum evolves as negative ions travel through the IEC device.

  15. Two-stage acceleration of an ion beam for high power ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshihiro

    1979-07-01

    In research and development of a high power ion source for the JT-60 neutral beam injector, beam optics in the two-stage acceleration system has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. A computer code for cylindrically symmetric ion beam was developed for the simulation. By making use of this code, behaviour of the two-stage ion beam optics was clarified. The calculation results agreed well with the experimental ones. Experimentally, the gradient grid current and the grid heat loading proved to depend largely on the beam optics. The beam focusing by aperture displacement was investigated in thin lens approximation. The results obtained contributed to design and development of a high power ion source for the JT-60 neutral beam injector. (author)

  16. Determination of the meniscus shape of a negative ion beam from an experimentally obtained beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, M.; Kojima, A.; Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Aprile, D.; Baltador, C.; Barbisan, M.; Delogu, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Marconato, N.; Nishikiori, R.; Pimazzoni, A.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Tobari, H.; Umeda, N.; Veltri, P.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshida, M.; Antoni, V.; Kashiwagi, M.

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the physics mechanism of a negative ion extraction in negative ion sources, an emission surface of the negative ions around an aperture at a plasma grid, so-called a meniscus, has been analyzed by an inverse calculation of the negative ion trajectory in a two dimensional beam analysis code. In this method, the meniscus is defined as the final position of the negative ion trajectories which are inversely calculated from the measured beam profile to the plasma grid. In a case of the volume-produced negative ions, the calculated meniscus by the inverse calculation was similar to that obtained in conventional beam simulation codes for positive ion extractions such as BEAMORBT and SLACCAD. The negative ion current density was uniform along the meniscus. This indicates that the negative ions produced in the plasma are transported to the plasma grid uniformly as considered in the transportation of the positive ions. However, in a surface production case of negative ions, where the negative ions are generated near the plasma grid with lower work function by seeding cesium, the current density in the peripheral region of the meniscus close to the plasma grid surface was estimated to be 2 times larger than the center region, which suggested that the extraction process of the surface-produced negative ions was much different with that for the positive ions. Because this non-uniform profile of the current density made the meniscus shape strongly concave, the beam extracted from the peripheral region could have a large divergence angle, which might be one of origins of so-called beam halo. This is the first results of the determination of the meniscus based on the experiment, which is useful to improve the prediction of the meniscus shape and heat loads based on the beam trajectories including beam halo.

  17. Pragmatic development of a laser ion source for intense highly-charged ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Shinji; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Mochizuki, Tetsuro; Nakagawa, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Recently, applications of high-charge-state (including fully stripped) heavy-ion beams have been attracting interest in both physics and industry. To enhance their usefulness, more intense beams are required. Cancer therapy using carbon ions is a particularly promising heavy-ion beam application. Due to advances in laser technology, the laser ion source (LIS) has become one of the most popular sources for generating highly charged and intense heavy-ion beams. The project to develop a high-intensity LIS was started on June 2009. In our project, whose ultimate goal is to apply a heavy-ion accelerator for cancer therapy, we have almost completed designing the LIS, and manufacturing will commence soon. We intend to measure the source performance by performing plasma and beam tests up until the end of March 2011. We will report the outline and a progress of the project. (author)

  18. Multiple-charge beam dynamics in an ion linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N . Ostroumov

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available An advanced facility for the production of nuclei far from stability could be based on a high-power driver accelerator providing ion beams over the full mass range from protons to uranium. A beam power of several hundred kilowatts is highly desirable for this application. At present, however, the beam power available for the heavier ions would be limited by ion source capabilities. A simple and cost-effective method to enhance the available beam current would be to accelerate multiple charge states through a superconducting ion linac. This paper presents results of numerical simulation of multiple charge state beams through a 1.3 GeV ion linac, the design of which is based on current state-of-the-art superconducting elements. The dynamics of multiple charge state beams are detailed, including the effects of possible errors in rf field parameters and misalignments of transverse focusing elements. The results indicate that operation with multiple charge state beams is not only feasible but straightforward and can increase the beam current by a factor of 3 or more.

  19. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2018-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate ( in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract.

  20. Gaseous anion chemistry. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange in mono- and dialcohol alkoxide ions: ionization reactions in dialcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J.R.; Agosta, W.C.; Field, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    The subject of this work is H-D exchange in certain gaseous anions using D 2 as the exchanging agent. The anions involved are produced from ethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, 1,4-butanediol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. Spectra and postulated ionization reactions for these mono- and dialcohols are given. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange occurs in the (M - 1) - and (2M - 1) - ions of ethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, and 1,4-butanediol. The amount of exchange occurring is 3-8 times greater in (2M - 1) - than in (M - 1) - . The amount of H-D exchange occurring in ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol is small or zero in the (2M - 1) - ions and in the (M - 1) - ion for 1-butanol [the only (M - 1) - ion which could be examined experimentally]. The amount of exchange occurring in the (2M - 1) - and (M - 1) - ions from ethylene glycol is not affected by the total pressure or composition of the reaction mixture in the ionization chamber of the mass spectrometer. A novel hydrogen-bridging mechanism is suggested to account for the observed exchange occurring in the dialcohols

  1. Transient effects during erosion of WN by deuterium ions studied with the quartz crystal microbalance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Bernhard M., E-mail: berger@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Fusion@ÖAW, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Stadlmayr, Reinhard [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Fusion@ÖAW, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Meisl, Gerd [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Čekada, Miha [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumayr, Friedrich, E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Fusion@ÖAW, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-09-01

    Transient effects during erosion of polycrystalline tungsten-nitride (WN) films by mono-energetic deuterium projectiles are studied using a quartz crystal microbalance technique. The evolution of the mass removal rate of a 360 nm thin WN film under 500 eV/D and 1000 eV/D bombardment is investigated at a temperature of 465 K in situ and in real-time as a function of the deuterium fluence. The measurements are performed at a typical flux of 10{sup 18} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}. A strong dependency of the observed mass change rate on the deuterium fluence is found. The mass loss is initially higher than for pure tungsten (W) and drops with fluence, finally reaching the same steady state value as for pure W sputtering. Steady state surface conditions are obtained at a fluence of about 0.2 × 10{sup 23} D/m{sup 2} for 500 eV/D and 0.6 × 10{sup 23} D/m{sup 2} for 1000 eV/D. SDTrimSP simulations indicate a preferential removal of N and a corresponding W enrichment of the surface.

  2. Ion beam modification of solids ion-solid interaction and radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Wesch, Werner

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the method of ion beam modification of solids in realization, theory and applications in a comprehensive way. It provides a review of the physical basics of ion-solid interaction and on ion-beam induced structural modifications of solids. Ion beams are widely used to modify the physical properties of materials. A complete theory of ion stopping in matter and the calculation of the energy loss due to nuclear and electronic interactions are presented including the effect of ion channeling. To explain structural modifications due to high electronic excitations, different concepts are presented with special emphasis on the thermal spike model. Furthermore, general concepts of damage evolution as a function of ion mass, ion fluence, ion flux and temperature are described in detail and their limits and applicability are discussed. The effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on structural modifications of solids such as damage formation, phase transitions and amorphization is reviewed for ins...

  3. ERDA with an external helium ion micro-beam: Advantages and potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, T.; Castaing, J.; Dran, J.-C.; Moignard, B.; Pivin, J.-C.; Prasad, G.V.R.; Salomon, J.; Walter, P.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary ERDA experiments at atmospheric pressure have been performed with our external microprobe set-up currently used for the analysis of museum objects by PIXE, RBS and NRA. The objective was to check the feasibility of hydrogen (and deuterium) profiling with an external beam of 3-MeV helium ions. The standard scattering geometry (incident beam at 15 deg. with respect to sample surface and emerging protons or deuterons at 15 deg. in the forward direction) was kept, but the thin foil absorber was replaced by helium gas filling the space between the beam spot and the detector over a distance of about 84 mm. Several standards prepared by ion implantation, with well known H or D depth profiles, were first analysed, which indicated that the analytical capability was as good as under vacuum. A striking feature is the much lower surface peak than under vacuum, a fact that enhances the sensitivity for H analysis near the surface. The same type of measurement was then performed on different materials to show the usefulness of the technique. As a first example, we have checked that the incorporation of H or D into sapphire crystals during mechanical polishing is below the detection limit. Another example is the measurement of the H content in emeralds which can be used as an additional compositional criterion for determining the provenance of emeralds set in museum jewels. The advantages and limitations of our set-up are discussed and several possible applications in the field of cultural heritage are described

  4. The confinement of dilute populations of beam ions in the national spherical torus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Miah, M.; Darrow, D.; Le Blanc, B.; Medley, S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Cecil, F.E.

    2003-01-01

    Short ∼3 ms pulses of 80 keV deuterium neutrals are injected at three different tangency radii into the national spherical torus experiment. The confinement is studied as a function of tangency radius, plasma current (between 0.4 and 1.0 MA), and toroidal field (between 2.5 and 5.0 kG). The jump in neutron emission during the pulse is used to infer prompt losses of beam ions. In the absence of MHD, the neutron data show the expected dependences on beam angle and plasma current; the average jump in the neutron signal is 88±39% of the expected jump. The decay of the neutron and neutral particle signals following the blip are compared to the expected classical deceleration to detect losses on a 10 ms timescale. The temporal evolution of these signals are consistent with Coulomb scattering rates, implying an effective beam-ion confinement time > or ∼ 100 ms. The confinement is insensitive to the toroidal field despite large values of ρ∇B/B < or ∼(0.25), so any effects of non-conservation of the adiabatic invariant μ are smaller than the experimental error. (author)

  5. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-03-16

    treatment volume compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers

  6. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-01-01

    compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers between 6 and 18, at

  7. Ion beam microanalysis of human hair follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Telek, A.; Biro, T.; Debrecen Univ.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Hair follicle (HF) is an appendage organ of the skin which is of importance to the survival of mammals and still maintains significance for the human race - not just biologically, but also through cosmetic and commercial considerations. However data on the composition of hair follicles are scarce and mostly limited to the hair shaft. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, no data are available concerning the distribution of elements in human hair follicle with various growth and cycling phases. In this study [1] we provided detailed quantitative elemental distribution of organ-cultured hair follicle in anagen and catagen growth phases using ion microscopy in order to reach a better understanding of the function, development, and cyclic activity of the hair follicle. The microprobe analysis was carried out at the scanning ion microprobe facilities at the ATOMKI Debrecen, and at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia, using combined STIM and PIXE ion beam analytical techniques. Human anagen hair follicles were isolated from skin obtained from females undergoing face-lift surgery. Cultured anagen HFs were treated by either vehicle or by 10 μM capsaicin for 5 days. Elemental distributions and absolute concentrations were determined along 5 capsaicin treated (catagen), and 4 control (anagen) hair follicles. The investigated length varied between 1.5 and 2 mm. Average elemental concentration values of the whole sample and the different morphological parts were also determined. Concentrations for most of the elements were found to be the same in the corresponding parts of the anagen and the catagen hair follicles. However, significant differences were observed in the Ca concentration between the anagen and catagen HFs. With respect to the distribution of Ca, in anagen (control) HFs, the following concentrations were measured (given in μg/g dry weight): dermal papilla, ∼500; matrix of the bulb, 1000-1500; outer/ inner

  8. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y., E-mail: yjma@ciae.ac.cn; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  9. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W.

    2014-02-01

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org, p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30-300 keV/1 pA-10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  10. Molecular beam study of the mechanism of catalyzed hydrogen--deuterium exchange on platinum single crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasek, S.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The hydrogen--deuterium exchange reaction was studied by molecular beam scattering on low and high Miller index crystal faces of platinum in the surface temperature range of 300--1300degreeK. Under the condition of the experiments which put strict limitation on the residence time of the detected molecules, the reaction product, HD, was readily detectable from the high Miller index, stepped surfaces (integrated reaction probability, defined as total desorbed HD flux divided by D 2 flux, is approx.10/sup -1/) while HD formation was below the limit of detectability on the Pt(111) low Miller index surface (reaction probability 2 beam pressure and half-order in H 2 background pressure. The absence of beam kinetic energy dependence of the rate indicates that the molecular adsorption does not require activation energy. The surface is able to store a sufficiently large concentration of atoms which react with the molecules by a two-branch mechanism. The rate constants for this two-branch mechanism were determined under conditions of constant H atom coverage, reducing the bimolecular reaction to a pseudo-first-order reaction. At lower temperatures ( 1 = (2plus-or-minus1) times10 5 exp(-4.5plus-or-minus0.5 kcal/RT) sec/sup -1/. The rate determining step appears to be the diffusion of the D 2 molecule on the surface to a step site where HD is formed via a three-center (atom--molecule) reaction, or via a two-center (atom--atom) reaction subsequent to D 2 dissociation at the step. At higher temperatures (>600degreeK) the reaction between an adsorbed H atom and an incident D 2 gas molecule competes with the low temperature branch. The rate constant for this branch is k 2 = (1plus-or-minus2) times10 2 exp(-0.6plus-or-minus0.3 kcal/RT) sec/sup -1/

  11. Ion collective acceleration and high current beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomenskij, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of investigation of high-current beam (HCB) transport in vacuum channels with dielectric walls (VCDW) are presented. It is shown, that HCB transport can be realized not only in rectilinear dielectric channels, but also in curvili also in curvilitear oges. In particular, it proved to be possible to bend the beam with parameters 50 kA, 400 keV by 90 deg. A problem of negative ion intense beam production is considered. It is shown, that in magnetic insulation diodes hydrogen ion currents of about several kA are obtained at current densities 10 A/cm 2 . Results of collective ion acceleration in VCDW are given. Two regions with different physical mechanisms of ion acceleration should be distinguished. In the first region (''plasma''), corresponding to HCB motion in VCDW ion generation and their acceleration in quasipotential field of HCB up to the energy of the order of electrons or less takes place. In the second region (''beam''), corresponding to joint motion of ''extracted'' ions and HCB electrons, ion acceleration takes place in the fields of waves, which can be excited due to the mechanism of two-beam instability type. Considerable contribution can also be made by stochastic mechanism of ion acceleration

  12. Use of energetic ion beams in materials synthesis and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    A brief review of the use energetic ion beams and related techniques for the synthesis, processing, and characterization of materials is presented. Selected opportunity areas are emphasized with examples, and references are provided for more extensive coverage. (author)

  13. Nanoscale insights into ion-beam cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a unique and comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art understanding of the molecular and nano-scale processes that play significant roles in ion-beam cancer therapy. It covers experimental design and methodology, and reviews the theoretical understanding of the processes involved. It offers the reader an opportunity to learn from a coherent approach about the physics, chemistry and biology relevant to ion-beam cancer therapy, a growing field of important medical application worldwide. The book describes phenomena occurring on different time and energy scales relevant to the radiation damage of biological targets and ion-beam cancer therapy from the molecular (nano) scale up to the macroscopic level. It illustrates how ion-beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal tissue whilst maximizing cell-killing within the tumour, offering a significant development in cancer therapy. The full potential ...

  14. Modeling and computer simulation of ion beam synthesis of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, M.

    1999-11-01

    The following topics were dealt with: ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters, kinetic three dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method, Ostwald ripening, redistribution of implanted impurities, buried layer formation, comparisation to experimental results.

  15. Current neutralization in ballistic transport of light ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, R.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Ottinger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Intense light ion beams are being considered as drivers to ignite fusion targets in the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). Ballistic transport of these beams from the diode to the target is possible only if the beam current is almost completely neutralized by plasma currents. This paper summarizes related work on relativistic electron beam and heavy ion beam propagation and describes a simple simulation model (DYNAPROP) which has been modified to treat light ion beam propagation. DYNAPROP uses an envelope equation to treat beam dynamics and uses rate equations to describe plasma and conductivity generation. The model has been applied both to the high current, 30 MeV Li +3 beams for LMF as well as low current, 1.2 MeV proton beams which are currently being studied on GAMBLE B at the Naval Research Laboratory. The predicted ratio of net currents to beam current is ∼0.1--0.2 for the GAMBLE experiment and ∼0.01 for LMF. The implications of these results for LMF and the GAMBLE experiments art discussed in some detail. The simple resistive model in DYNAPROP has well-known limitations in the 1 torr regime which arise primarily from the neglect of plasma electron transport. Alternative methods for treating the plasma response are discussed

  16. Dynamics of Plasma-Surface Interactions using In-situ Ion Beam Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal was to develop an innovative experimental facility that would allow for the measurement of real-time response of a material surface to plasma bombardment by employing in-situ high-energy ion beam analysis. This facility was successfully developed and deployed at U. Wisconsin-Madison and was named DIONISOS (Dynamics of IONic Implantation and Sputtering on Surfaces). There were several major highlights to the DIONISOS research which we will briefly highlight below. The full technical details of the DIONISOS development, deployment and research results are contained in the Appendices which contain several peer-reviewed publications and a PhD thesis devoted to DIONISOS. The DIONISOS results on deuterium retention in molybdenum were chosen as an invited talk at the 2008 International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Toledo, Spain.

  17. Advanced characterization of materials using swift ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabacniks, Manfredo H.

    2011-01-01

    Swift ion beams are powerful non destructive tools for material analysis especially thin films. In spite of their high energy, usually several MeV/u, little energy is deposited by the ion on the sample. Energetic ions also use to stop far away (or outside) the inspected volume, hence producing negligible damage to the sample. Ion beam methods provide quantitative trace element analysis of any atomic element (and some isotopes) in a sample and are able to yield elemental depth profiles with spatial resolution of the order of 10mm. Relying on nuclear properties of the atoms, these methods are insensitive to the chemical environment of the element, consequently not limited by matrix effects. Ion beam methods are multielemental, can handle insulating materials, are quick (an analysis usually takes less than 15 minutes), and need little (if any) sample preparation. Ion beams are also sensitive to surface roughness and sample porosity and can be used to quickly inspect these properties in a sample. The Laboratory for Ion Beam Analysis of the University of Sao Paulo, LAMFI, is a multi-user facility dedicated to provide Ion Beam Methods like PIXE, RBS, FRS and NRA techniques for the analysis of materials and thin films. Operating since 1994, LAMFI is being used mostly by many researchers from within and outside USP, most of them non specialists in ion beam methods, but in need of ion beam analysis to carry out their research. At LAMFI, during the last 9 years, more than 50% of the accelerator time was dedicated to analysis, usually PIXE or RBS. 21% was down time and about 14% of the time was used for the development of ion beam methods which includes the use of RBS for roughness characterization exploring the shading of the beam by structures on the surface and by modeling the RBS spectrum as the product of a normalized RBS spectrum and a height density distribution function of the surface. Single element thick target PIXE analysis is being developed to obtain the thin

  18. Beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration in drifting intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, K.F.; Hintze, W.

    1976-01-01

    Collective ion acceleration at the injection of a relativistic electron beam into a low-pressure gas or a plasma is discussed and its strong dependence on the beam-front dynamics is shown. A simple one-dimensional model taking explicitly into account the motion and ionizing action of the ions in the beam-front region is developed for the calculation of the beam drift velocity. The obtained pressure dependence is in good agreement with experimental data. The energy distribution is shown of the ions accelerated in the moving potential well of the space charge region. Scaling laws for the beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration are derived. (J.U.)

  19. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  20. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.H., E-mail: zhangxiaohu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yuan, Y.J.; Yin, X.J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Du, H.; Li, Z.S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K.D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H.W.; Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-06-11

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  1. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yin, X. J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Du, H.; Li, Z. S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K. D.; Zhao, H. W.; Xia, J. W.

    2017-06-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  2. Ribbon Ion Beam with Controlled Directionality and Local Reactive Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biloiu, Costel; Gilchrist, Glen; Kontos, Alex; Basame, Solomon; Rockwell, Tyler; Campbell, Chris; Daniels, Kevin; Allen, Ernest; Wallace, Jay; Ballou, Jon; Hertel, Richard; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Liang, Shurong; Singh, Vikram

    2016-09-01

    A plasma processing technology designed for etch of 3D semiconductor structures is presented. The technology is characterized by controllable ion directionality and local reactive chemistry and it is based on proprietary Applied Materials - Varian Semiconductor Equipment ribbon ion beam architecture. It uses a combination of inert gas ion beam and injection of reactive chemical species at the Point-of-Use (PoU), i.e., at the wafer surface. The ion source uses an inductively coupled plasma source and a diode-type extraction optics. A beam shaping electrode allows extraction of two symmetrical ribbon-like beamlets. The ion beam has in situ controllable ion angular distribution in both mean angle and angular spread. The beam has a uniform distribution of beam current and angles over a waist exceeding 300 mm, allowing full wafer processing in one pass. Chemical compounds are delivered at PoU through linear shower heads. The reactive chemical compound delivered in this fashion maintains its molecular integrity. This result in protection of the trench side walls from deposition of etch residue and facilitates formation of volatile byproducts. The technology was used successfully for mitigation of Magnetic Tunel Junction etch residue. Other applications were this technology differentiate from present technologies are contact liner etch, Co recess, and 1D hole elongation.

  3. Frequency threshold for ion beam formation in expanding RF plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Harvey, Zane; Biloiu, Ioana; Hansen, Alex; Hardin, Robert; Przybysz, William; Scime, Earl

    2008-11-01

    We observe a threshold frequency for ion beam formation in expanding, low pressure, argon helicon plasma. Mutually consistent measurements of ion beam energy and density relative to the background ion density obtained with a retarding field energy analyzer and laser induced fluorescence indicate that a stable ion beam of 15 eV appears for source frequencies above 11.5 MHz. Reducing the frequency increases the upstream beam amplitude. Downstream of the expansion region, a clear ion beam is seen only for the higher frequencies. At lower frequencies, large electrostatic instabilities appear and an ion beam is not observed. The upstream plasma density increases sharply at the same threshold frequency that leads to the appearance of a stable double layer. The observations are consistent with the theoretical prediction that downstream electrons accelerated into the source by the double layer lead to increased ionization, thus balancing the higher loss rates upstream [1]. 1. M. A. Lieberman, C. Charles and R. W. Boswell, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 (2006) 3294-3304

  4. Beam optics optimization of a negative-ion sputter source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A negative-ion sputter source has been studied in order to increase the beam intensity delivered by the Vivitron tandem injector. The aim was to characterize the influence on the beam intensity of some factors related to the configuration of the source such as the shape of the target holder, the target surface topography and ...

  5. Structuring of silicon with low energy focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The defect production in silicon induced by focused ion beam irradiation as a function of energy and projectile mass has been investigated and compared to the measured sputter yield. The aim was to find optimal beam parameters for the structuring of semiconductors with a minimum amount of defects produced per removed atom. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  6. Therapy tumor with the heavy ions beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Bingrong; Wei Zengquan; Li Wenjian

    2002-01-01

    As physical characteristic of heavy ions Bragg peak, therapy tumor with heavy ions is becoming advanced technology. So, many countries have developed the technology and used to treat tumor, the societal and economic effects are beneficial to people. The authors show the development, present situation and information of research in world of advanced radiotherapy with heavy ions

  7. Evaporative cooling of highly charged ions in EBIT [Electron Beam Ion Trap]: An experimental realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.; Levine, M.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Marrs, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Both the total number and trapping lifetime of near-neon-like gold ions held in an electron beam ion trap have been greatly increased by a process of 'evaporative cooling'. A continuous flow of low-charge-state ions into the trap cools the high-charge-state ions in the trap. Preliminary experimental results using titanium ions as a coolant are presented. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Emittance growth due to space charge compensation and beam intensity instabilities in negative ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Valerio-Lizarraga

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The need to extract the maximum beam intensity with low transversal emittance often comes with the drawback of operating the ion source to limits where beam current instabilities arise, such fluctuations can change the beam properties producing a mismatch in the following sections of the machine. The space charge compensation (SCC generated by the beam particles colliding with the residual gas reaches a steady state after a build-up time. This paper shows how once in the steady state, the beam ends with a transversal emittance value bigger than the case without compensation. In addition, we study how the beam intensity variation can disturb the SCC dynamics and its impact on the beam properties. The results presented in this work come from 3-D simulations using tracking codes taking into account the secondary ions to estimate the degree of the emittance growth due to space charge and SCC.

  9. Emittance growth due to space charge compensation and beam intensity instabilities in negative ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    The need to extract the maximum beam intensity with low transversal emittance often comes with the drawback of operating the ion source to limits where beam current instabilities arise, such fluctuations can change the beam properties producing a mismatch in the following sections of the machine. The space charge compensation (SCC) generated by the beam particles colliding with the residual gas reaches a steady state after a build-up time. This paper shows how once in the steady state, the beam ends with a transversal emittance value bigger than the case without compensation. In addition, we study how the beam intensity variation can disturb the SCC dynamics and its impact on the beam properties. The results presented in this work come from 3-D simulations using tracking codes taking into account the secondary ions to estimate the degree of the emittance growth due to space charge and SCC.

  10. A cooler for intense low-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsov, V.L.; Habs, D.

    2002-01-01

    A new efficient cooling technique for intense low-energy ion beams is explored. The primary ions are directly injected through a converging-diverging nozzle into a cold expanding supersonic He carrier gas jet. There they adopt the temperature and overall velocity of the gas jet, creating an e - He + plasma in the slowing down process. In the RF-funnel that is placed on axis in the immediate vicinity of the nozzle exit plane the He + ions and electrons penetrate into the funnel walls and the He + ions have neutralized, while the desired more heavy ions are confined and focused inside the funnel. After reducing the plasma to a small level in the funnel the ion beam is further purified and compressed passing through a RFQ channel. Finally, the cooled low-emittance ion beam is extracted into high vacuum conditions through the skimmer placed behind the RFQ channel. The operation of the new ion beam cooling technique has been studied by means of numerical simulations. The results of calculations are presented

  11. Advanced surface polishing using gas cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Z.; Hassanein, A.; Norem, J.; Swenson, D. R.

    2007-08-01

    The gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) treatment can be an important treatment for mitigation of the Q-slope in superconducting cavities. The existing surface smoothening methods were analyzed and a new surface polishing method was proposed based on employing extra-large gas cluster ions (X-GCIB).

  12. Effects of ion beam irradiation on semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiyama, Isamu; Hirao, Toshio; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Energetic heavy-ion irradiation apparatus has been developed for single-event effects (SEE) testing. We have applied three irradiation methods such as a scattered-ion irradiation method, a recoiled-atom irradiation method, and a direct-beam irradiation method to perform SEE testing efficiently. (author)

  13. A cooler for intense low-energy ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Varentsov, V L

    2002-01-01

    A new efficient cooling technique for intense low-energy ion beams is explored. The primary ions are directly injected through a converging-diverging nozzle into a cold expanding supersonic He carrier gas jet. There they adopt the temperature and overall velocity of the gas jet, creating an e sup - He sup + plasma in the slowing down process. In the RF-funnel that is placed on axis in the immediate vicinity of the nozzle exit plane the He sup + ions and electrons penetrate into the funnel walls and the He sup + ions have neutralized, while the desired more heavy ions are confined and focused inside the funnel. After reducing the plasma to a small level in the funnel the ion beam is further purified and compressed passing through a RFQ channel. Finally, the cooled low-emittance ion beam is extracted into high vacuum conditions through the skimmer placed behind the RFQ channel. The operation of the new ion beam cooling technique has been studied by means of numerical simulations. The results of calculations are...

  14. Beam optics optimization of a negative-ion sputter source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    795–804. Beam optics optimization of a negative-ion sputter source. F OSSWALD£ and R REBMEISTER. Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, UMR 7500 CNRS-IN2P3/ULP, BP 28,. 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2, France. £Email: francis.osswald@ires.in2p3.fr. Abstract. A negative-ion sputter source has been studied in order ...

  15. Atomic physics measurements in an electron beam ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M. H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J. R.; Knapp, D. A.; Osterheld, S.; Schneider, M. B.; Scofield, J. H.; Levine, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    An electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged ions (q≥70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of transition energies and electron excitation cross sections for x-ray line emission are summarized.

  16. AFM surface morphology investigation of ion beam modified polyimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švorčík, V.; Arenholz, E.; Rybka, V.; Hnatowicz, V.

    1997-03-01

    Polyimide Upilex R was irradiated with 90 keV N + ions to the fluences of 1 × 10 14-2 × 10 17 cm -2. The surface morphology and the structure of the ion beam modified PI were examined using atomic force microscopy and X-ray difraction. Sheet resistance as a function of the ion fluence and the sample temperature was measured by standard two point technique. Significant changes of the surface morphology and production of graphitic phase in the sample surface layer modified by the ion irradiation were observed. Strong decrease of the sheet resistance (by 11 orders of magnitude) in the ion beam modified samples is connected with progressive carbonization and graphitization of the degraded polymer. Electrical charge transport is mediated by variable-range hopping mechanism. Drastic structural changes initiated by the ion irradiation to high fluences are similar to those observed in polymer pyrolysis.

  17. Ion collection efficiency of ionization chambers in electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.; Cecatti, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    When ionization chambers are used in pulsed radiation beams the high-density of ions produced per pulse permits ion recombination, demanding the use of a correction factor. An experimental technique using the charge collected at two different voltages permits the calculation of the ion collection efficiency. The ion collection efficiency of some common ionization chambers in pulsed electron beams were studied as a function of electron energy, dose rate and depth. Accelerators with magnetic scanning system, in which the instantaneous dose rate is much greater than the average dose rate, present a smaller collection efficiency than accelerators with scattering foil. The results lead to the introduction of a correction factor for ion recombination that is the reciprocal of the ion collection efficiency. It is also suggested a simple technique to connect an external variable DC power supply in a Baldwin Farmer dosemeter. (Author) [pt

  18. Technical Aspects of Delivering Simultaneous Dual and Triple Ion Beams to a Target at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toader, O.; Naab, F.; Uberseder, E.; Kubley, T.; Taller, S.; Was, G.

    The Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (MIBL) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, plays a significant role in supporting the mission of the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Energy. MIBL is a charter laboratory of the NSUF (National Scientific User Facility - US DoE) and hosts users worldwide. The laboratory has evolved from a single accelerator laboratory to a highly versatile facility with three accelerators (3 MV Tandem, a 400 kV Ion Implanter and a 1.7 MV Tandem), seven beam lines and five target chambers that together, provide unique capabilities to capture the extreme environment experienced by materials in reactor systems. This capability now includes simultaneous multiple (dual, triple) ion irradiations, an irradiation accelerated corrosion cell, and soon, in-situ dual beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for the study of radiation damage coupled with injection of transmutation elements. The two beam lines that will connect to the 300 kV FEI Tecnai G2 F30 microscope are expected to be operational by the end of 2017. Multiple simultaneous ion beam experiments involving light and heavy ions are already in progress. This paper will outline the current equipment and will focus on the new capability of running dual and triple ion beam experiments.

  19. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombin, M., E-mail: matteo.brombin@igi.cnr.it; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Schiesko, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors’ holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  20. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, M.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-11-01

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors' holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  1. Microstructure and deuterium retention after ion irradiation of W–Lu2O3 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jin–Shan; Luo, Lai–Ma; Xu, Qiu; Zan, Xiang; Zhu, Xiao–Yong; Wu, Yu–Cheng

    2017-01-01

    W–3Lu 2 O 3 composites were prepared by mechanical milling and spark plasma sintering. The obtained composites were subjected to He + irradiation experiments. The irradiated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and measurement of Vickers hardness. Thermal desorption spectroscopy analysis was performed to analyze the samples at different damage levels after Fe 2+ and D + irradiation. Results showed varied degrees of He + damage under different energies. Fuzz structures were observed on the surface of the material after irradiation. TEM results indicated that the existence of these fuzz structures was related to the formation of He bubbles. Amorphous, polycrystalline, and γ-W phases formed in areas where He bubbles existed. The measured Vickers hardness proved that radiation hardening occurred after irradiation. After Fe 2+ irradiation at different damage levels, the total retained deuterium amount of W–3Lu 2 O 3 and pure W differed, and the impact of Fe 2+ radiation for deuterium retention on pure tungsten was greater.

  2. Beam splitting to improve target life in neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    In a neutron generator in which a tritium-titanium target is bombarded by a deuterium ion beam, the target half-life is increased by separating the beam with a weak magnetic field to provide three separate beams of atomic, diatomic, and triatomic deuterium ions which all strike the target at different adjacent locations. Beam separation in this manner eliminates the problem of one type ion impairing the neutron generating efficiency of other type ions, thereby effecting more efficient utilization of the target material

  3. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschornack, G., E-mail: g.zschornack@hzdr.de [Department of Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, 01328 Dresden (Germany); König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A. [DREEBIT GmbH, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  4. Understanding the ion beam in EUV mask blank production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Patrick; Jindal, Vibhu; Weaver, Alfred; Teora, Pat; Sporre, John; Ruzic, David; Goodwin, Frank

    2012-03-01

    One of the major technical hurdles to be overcome before EUV lithography can enter high volume manufacturing is the amount of defects in EUV mask blanks, many of which occur during the EUV reflector deposition process. The technology currently used to deposit this reflector is ion beam sputter deposition. Understanding the properties of the ion beam and the nature of the plasma in the deposition chamber is therefore critical to understanding defect production mechanisms and subsequently eliminating them. In this work, we have studied how the source parameters influence ion beam divergence, its footprint on the target, and the amount of beam that misses the target and hits the shielding. By optimizing the source parameters, we can modulate certain target- and shield-specific defect types. We have compared our data with models of source performance and found general agreement, enabling the theory to be fine-tuned based on the results of the measurements. Models are being developed to better describe actual source performance. We have also investigated the plasma conditions the ion beam creates in the tool, which is crucial to understanding the transport of defects from their source to the mask. A well characterized ion beam and plasma will lead to process and tool changes that will ultimately reduce defect levels in EUV mask blanks.

  5. Direct deposition of gold on silicon with focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Irradiation with ions at very low energies (below 500 eV) no longer induces a removal of substrate material, but the ions are directly deposited on the surface. In this way, gold has been deposited on silicon with focused ion beam exposure and the properties of the film have been investigated with atomic force microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  6. LET effects of high energy ion beam irradiation on polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Shu; Kanzaki, Kenichi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Yoshida, Yoichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Sugimoto, Masaki; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Shibata, Hiromi

    1997-03-01

    Thin films of poly(di-n-hexylsilane) were irradiated with 2-20 MeV H{sup +} and He{sup +} ion beams. The beams caused heterogeneous reactions of crosslinking and main chain scission in the films. The relative efficiency of the crosslinking was drastically changed in comparison with that of main chain scission. The anomalous change in the molecular weight distribution was analyzed with increasing irradiation fluence, and the ion beam induced reaction radius; track radius was determined for the radiation sources by the function of molecular weight dispersion. Obtained values were 59{+-}15 A and 14{+-}6 A for 2 MeV He{sup +} and 20 MeV H{sup +} ion beams respectively. (author)

  7. Final project report for NEET pulsed ion beam project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-11

    The major goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploited a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. This project had the following four major objectives: (i) the demonstration of the pulsed ion beam method for a prototypical nuclear ceramic material, SiC; (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of defect generation rate effects; (iii) the measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics and thermally activated defect-interaction processes by pulsed ion beam techniques; and (iv) the demonstration of alternative characterization techniques to study defect dynamics. As we describe below, all these objectives have been met.

  8. Laser cooling and ion beam diagnosis of relativistic ions in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, S.

    1990-08-01

    Particle accelerator and storage ring technology has reached an advanced state, so that different heavy ion storage rings are coming into operation by now, capable of storing even fully stripped ions up to U 92+ . The main purpose of these machines are the accumulation of ions and the ability of improving the beam quality, that is the phase space density of the stored beams. This beam cooling is done successfully by the well established stochastic and electron cooling techniques. A new cooling method, the laser cooling, is taken over from atomic beam and ion trap experiments, where it has yielded extremely low temperatures of atomic samples. As a canditate at storage rings 7 Li + ions are stored in the Heidelberg TSR at 13.3 MeV. The ion beam properties of the metastable fraction like momentum spread, storage time and the influence of residual gas scattering are investigated by colinear laser spectroscopy in the experimental section of the TSR. An optical pumping experiment using two dye laser systems yields information about ion kinematics and velocity mixing processes in the ring. Lifetimes in the order of 100 ms for velocity classes marked in this way show that laser cooling can be applied to the stored 7 Li + beam. In an experimental situation of two strong counterpropagating laser beams, both tuned near resonance, a dramatic reduction of the ion beam momentum spread is observed. With a special geometrical control of laser and ion beam the longitudinal beam temperature is reduced from 260 K to at least 3 K with very high collection efficiency. (orig./HSI) [de

  9. Accelerator complex for a radioactive ion beam facility at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the superconducting heavy ion linac ATLAS is an ideal post-accelerator for radioactive beams, plans are being developed for expansion of the facility with the addition of a driver accelerator, a production target/ion source combination, and a low q/m pre-accelerator for radioactive ions. A working group including staff from the ANL Physics Division and current ATLAS users are preparing a radioactive beam facility proposal. The present paper reviews the specifications of the accelerators required for the facility

  10. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions....... Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track-structure based alanine...

  11. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  12. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few μm. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials

  13. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few {mu}m. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials. 86 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs.

  14. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. A large ion beam device for laboratory solar wind studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulibarri, Zach; Han, Jia; Horányi, Mihály; Munsat, Tobin; Wang, Xu; Whittall-Scherfee, Guy; Yeo, Li Hsia

    2017-11-01

    The Colorado Solar Wind Experiment is a new device constructed at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust at the University of Colorado. A large cross-sectional Kaufman ion source is used to create steady state plasma flow to model the solar wind in an experimental vacuum chamber. The plasma beam has a diameter of 12 cm at the source, ion energies of up to 1 keV, and ion flows of up to 0.1 mA/cm2. Chamber pressure can be reduced to 4 × 10-5 Torr under operating conditions to suppress ion-neutral collisions and create a monoenergetic ion beam. The beam profile has been characterized by a Langmuir probe and an ion energy analyzer mounted on a two-dimensional translation stage. The beam profile meets the requirements for planned experiments that will study solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies, the charging and dynamics of dust in the solar wind, plasma wakes and refilling, and the wakes of topographic features such as craters or boulders. This article describes the technical details of the device, initial operation and beam characterization, and the planned experiments.

  16. Application of ion beams for polymeric carbon based biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, A. L.

    2001-07-01

    Ion beams have been shown to be quite suitable for the modification and analysis of carbon based biomaterials. Glassy polymeric carbon (GPC), made from cured phenolic resins, has a high chemical inertness that makes it useful as a biomaterial in medicine for drug delivery systems and for the manufacture of heart valves and other prosthetic devices. Low and high-energy ion beams have been used, with both partially and fully cured phenolic resins, to enhance biological cell/tissue growth on, and to increase tissue adhesion to GPC surfaces. Samples bombarded with energetic ion beams in the keV to MeV range exhibited increased surface roughness, measured using optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Ion beams were also used to perform nuclear reaction analyses of GPC encapsulated drugs for use in internal drug delivery systems. The results from the high energy bombardment were more dramatic and are shown in this paper. The interaction of energetic ions has demonstrated the useful application of ion beams to enhance the properties of carbon-based biomaterials.

  17. Study of ion beam induced depolymerization using positron annihilation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, O. E-mail: opuglisi@dipchi.unict.it; Fragala, M.E.; Lynn, K.G.; Petkov, M.; Weber, M.; Somoza, A.; Dupasquier, A.; Quasso, F

    2001-04-01

    Ion beam induced depolymerization of polymers is a special class of ion beam induced chemical reaction which gives rise to catastrophic 'unzipping' of macromolecules with production of large amounts of the monomer, of the order of many hundreds monomer molecules per each macromolecule. The possible modification of the density at microscopic level prompted us to undertake a study of this effect utilizing positron annihilation techniques in Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) before and after bombardment with He{sup +} 300 keV ions at 200 deg. C. Preliminary results shown here indicate that before bombardment there is a reproducible dependence of nano-hole distribution on the sample history. Moreover at 200 deg. C we do not detect formation of new cavities as a consequence of the strong depolymerization that occurs under the ion beam. The possible correlation of these findings with transport properties of PMMA at temperature higher than the glass transition temperature will be discussed.

  18. Longitudinal dynamics of laser-cooled fast ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidemüller, M.; Eike, B.; Eisenbarth, U.

    1999-01-01

    We present recent results of our experiments on laser cooling of fast stored ion beams at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring. The longitudinal motion of the ions is directly cooled by the light pressure force, whereas efficient transverse cooling is obtained indirectly by longitudinal-transverse co......We present recent results of our experiments on laser cooling of fast stored ion beams at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring. The longitudinal motion of the ions is directly cooled by the light pressure force, whereas efficient transverse cooling is obtained indirectly by longitudinal....... When applying laser cooling in square-well buckets over long time intervals, hard Coulomb collisions suddenly disappear and the longitudinal temperature drops by about a factor of three. The observed longitudinal behaviour of the beam shows strong resemblance with the transition to an Coulomb...

  19. Operation of TFTR neutral beams with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Stevenson, T.N.; Wright, K.E.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Newman, R.A.; O'Connor, T.E.; Oldaker, M.E.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1991-07-01

    High Z neutral atoms have been injected into TFTR plasmas in an attempt to enhance plasma confinement through modification of the edge electric field. TFTR ion sources have extracted 9 A of 62 keV Ne + for up to 0.2 s during injection into deuterium plasmas, and for 0.5 s during conditioning pulses. Approximately 400 kW of Ne 0 have been injected from each of two ion sources. Operation was at full bending magnet current, with the Ne + barely contained on the ion dump. Beamline design modifications to permit operation up to 120 keV with krypton or xenon are described. Such ions are too massive to be deflected up to the ion dump. The plan, therefore, is to armor those components receiving these ions. Even with this armor, modest increases in the bending magnet current capability are necessary to safely reach 120 kV with Kr or Xe. Information relevant to heavy ion operation was also acquired when several ion sources were inadvertently operated with water contamination. Spectroscopic analysis of certain pathological pulses indicate that up to 6% of the extracted ions were water. After dissociation in the neutralizer, water yields oxygen ions which, as with Ne, Kr, and Xe, are under-deflected by the magnet. Damage to a calorimeter scraper, due to the focal properties of the magnet, has resulted. A magnified power density of 6 KW/cm 2 for 2 s, from ∼ 90 kW of O + , is the suspected cause. 11 refs., 4 figs

  20. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  1. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  2. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  3. Special design issues. Ion beam driver-reaction chamber interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Peterson, R.R.; Kessler, G.

    1995-01-01

    Design issues of the interface between ion beam drivers and the reaction chamber for heavy ion beam and light ion beam inertial fusion drivers are discussed. The interface must provide for radiation protection of final focusing magnets, pumping of evaporated material and non-condensable gas that enter the beam ports, thermal insulation, heat removal, a.o.. Beam ports and focal magnets must be protected by neutronically thick shielding between the beam path and the magnet conductor. The required thickness of the shielding determines the minimum spacing between individual beams in a cluster of beams. The cone angle of this cluster can affect target performance. The beamlines are subjected to evaporated material, debris, and rapidly moving droplets. The reaction chambers used here are HYLIFE-II for indirect, HIBALL-II for direct drive. The light ion beam interface is based on the LIBRA and LIBRA-LiTE studies. In the case of HYLIFE-II, liquid jets must be demonstrated with a thickness of 0.5 m and with an edge that comes to within 10 mm of the beam edges to protect the ports. Design of compact focal arrays with enough shielding to give magnets an adequate lifetime must be achieved. As shielding is added the size of the beam array will grow and the target will drop. For HIBALL neutron shielding of the focal magnets provides an adequate lifetime. Replaceable special INPORT units will have to be developed in the region of the beam ports. For light ions transport issues have led to structures being placed close enough to the target that they experience a higher neutron damage rate and must be replaced once or twice a year, which would require remote maintenance. Light ion concepts could greatly benefit from a self-pinched transport scheme, though the details are unclear and the effect on availability is uncertain. Light and heavy ions have similar problems in keeping the gas in the drivers at a low density. Both will require active means to preserve this low density, while

  4. Improving depth resolutions in positron beam spectroscopy by concurrent ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Marco; Dalla, Ayham; Ibrahim, Alaa M.; Anwand, Wolfgang; Wagner, Andreas; Böttger, Roman; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard

    2018-05-01

    The depth resolution of mono-energetic positron annihilation spectroscopy using a positron beam is shown to improve by concurrently removing the sample surface layer during positron beam spectroscopy. During ion-beam sputtering with argon ions, Doppler-broadening spectroscopy is performed with energies ranging from 3 keV to 5 keV allowing for high-resolution defect studies just below the sputtered surface. With this technique, significantly improved depth resolutions could be obtained even at larger depths when compared to standard positron beam experiments which suffer from extended positron implantation profiles at higher positron energies. Our results show that it is possible to investigate layered structures with a thickness of about 4 microns with significantly improved depth resolution. We demonstrated that a purposely generated ion-beam induced defect profile in a silicon sample could be resolved employing the new technique. A depth resolution of less than 100 nm could be reached.

  5. Near spherical illumination of ion-beam and laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is developed for reducing energy-deposition asymmetry in spherical targets driven directly by ion or laser beams. This work is part of a strategy for achieving illumination symmetry in such targets, which is proposed as an alternative to those in the literature. This strategy allows an axially symmetric placement of beamlets, which would be convenient for some driven or reactor scenarios. It also allows the use of beam currents or energy fluxes and beam transverse profiles to help reduce deposition asymmetry with fewer beamlets. In the ideal limit of thin deposition layers and controlled beam profiles, at most six beamlets are needed for target symmetry

  6. SPIDER beam dump as diagnostic of the particle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaupa, M., E-mail: matteo.zaupa@igi.cnr.it; Sartori, E. [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, Padova 35122 (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Dalla Palma, M.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The beam power produced by the negative ion source for the production of ion of deuterium extracted from RF plasma is mainly absorbed by the beam dump component which has been designed also for measuring the temperatures on the dumping panels for beam diagnostics. A finite element code has been developed to characterize, by thermo-hydraulic analysis, the sensitivity of the beam dump to the different beam parameters. The results prove the capability of diagnosing the beam divergence and the horizontal misalignment, while the entity of the halo fraction appears hardly detectable without considering the other foreseen diagnostics like tomography and beam emission spectroscopy.

  7. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrbacher, Andreas; Continetti, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative approach to increase the throughput of mass spectrometric analyses using a multiple-ion-beam mass spectrometer is described. Two sample spots were applied onto a laser desorption/ionization target and each spot was simultaneously irradiated by a beam of quadrupled Nd:YLF laser radiation (261.75 nm) to produce ions by laser-desorption ionization. Acceleration of the ions in an electric field created parallel ion beams that were focused by two parallel einzel lens systems. After a flight path of 2.34 m, the ions were detected with a microchannel plate-phosphor screen assembly coupled with a charge coupled device camera that showed two resolved ion beams. Time-of-flight mass spectra were also obtained with this detector. Experiments were performed using both metal atom cations (Ti + and Cr + ) produced by laser desorption/ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins (myoglobin and lysozyme), created by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization using an excess of nicotinic acid as matrix

  8. Multiple-ion-beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbacher, Andreas; Continetti, Robert E.

    2001-08-01

    An innovative approach to increase the throughput of mass spectrometric analyses using a multiple-ion-beam mass spectrometer is described. Two sample spots were applied onto a laser desorption/ionization target and each spot was simultaneously irradiated by a beam of quadrupled Nd:YLF laser radiation (261.75 nm) to produce ions by laser-desorption ionization. Acceleration of the ions in an electric field created parallel ion beams that were focused by two parallel einzel lens systems. After a flight path of 2.34 m, the ions were detected with a microchannel plate-phosphor screen assembly coupled with a charge coupled device camera that showed two resolved ion beams. Time-of-flight mass spectra were also obtained with this detector. Experiments were performed using both metal atom cations (Ti+ and Cr+) produced by laser desorption/ionization and the molecular ions of two different proteins (myoglobin and lysozyme), created by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization using an excess of nicotinic acid as matrix.

  9. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-01-01

    Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs

  10. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  11. Beam structure and transverse emittance studies of high-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadatmand, K.; Johnson, K.F.; Schneider, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    A visual diagnostic technique has been developed to monitor and study ion beam structure shape and size along a transport line. In this technique, a commercially available fluorescent screen is utilized in conjunction with a video camera. This visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false-color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for on-line viewing. Digitized information is stored for further off-line processing (e.g., extraction of beam profiles). An optional wire grid placed upstream of the fluor screen adds the capability of transverse emittance (or angular spread) measurement to this technique. This diagnostic allows real-time observation of the beam response to parameter changes (e.g., evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position). 3 refs., 5 figs

  12. Beam structure and transverse emittance studies of high-energy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Schneider, J. D.

    1991-05-01

    A visual diagnostic technique was developed to monitor and study ion beam structure shape and size along a transport line. In this technique, a commercially available fluorescent screen is utilized in conjunction with a video camera. This visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for on-line viewing. Digitized information is stored for further off-line processing (e.g., extraction of beam profiles). An optional wire grid placed upstream of the fluor screen adds the capability of transverse emittance (or angular spread) measurement to this technique. This diagnostic allows real time observation of the beam response to parameter changes (e.g., evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position).

  13. Beam dynamics design studies of a superconducting radioactive ion beam postaccelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Jones, R M

    2011-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN proposes a superconducting upgrade to increase the energy range and quality of the radioactive ion beams produced at ISOLDE, which are currently postaccelerated by the normal conducting radioactive ion beam experiment linac. The specification and design choices for the HIE-ISOLDE linac are outlined along with a comprehensive beam dynamics study undertaken to understand and mitigate the sources of beam emittance dilution. The dominant cause of transverse emittance growth was attributed to the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions through the phase dependence of the rf defocusing force in the accelerating cavities. A parametric resonance induced by the coupling was observed and its excitation surveyed as a function of transverse phase advance using numerical simulations and analytic models to understand and avoid the regions of transverse beam instability. Other sources of emittance growth were studied and where necessary ameliorated, including the beam steering...

  14. The Heidelberg CSR: Stored Ion Beams in a Cryogenic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Fadil, H.; Welsch, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Diehl, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Weber, T.; Mallinger, V.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rappaport, M.; Urbain, X.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    A cryogenic electrostatic ion storage ring CSR is under development at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Cooling of the ultrahigh vacuum chamber is envisaged to lead to extremely low pressures as demonstrated by cryogenic ion traps. The ring will apply electron cooling with electron beams of a few eV up to 200 eV. Through long storage times of 1000 s as well as through the low wall temperature, internal cooling of infrared-active molecular ions to their rotational ground state will be possible and their collisions with merged collinear beams of electrons and neutral atoms can be detected with high energy resolution. In addition storage of slow highly charged ions is foreseen. Using a fixed in-ring gas target and a reaction microscope, collisions of the stored ions at a speed of the order of the atomic unit can be kinematically reconstructed. The layout and the cryogenic concept are introduced

  15. Intense Ion Beams for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimbucher, Lynn; Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K + ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of

  16. Modification of mechanical properties by ion-beam mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, J.-P.; Mayer, J. W.; Nastasi, M.; Stone, D.

    1987-05-01

    We have been investigating the application of ion-beam mixing of multilayer films on metal substrates to improve wear resistance and friction. With ion-beam mixed multilayers, the surface composition can be chosen independently of the substrate and adhesion can be obtained by a slight mixing at the multilayer/substrate interface. As a final state, the material has a modified surface which is an essential part of the substrate but tailored to provide the desired properties. As a result of ion-beam mixing, one can obtain a variety of microstructures ranging from amorphous to extended solid solutions to stable crystalline phases. Multilayer, Pd-Al, Fe-Ti, and Pd-Ti samples are prepared where each individual sublayer is a wedge so that as a result of ion beam mixing, a homogenous composition is formed throughout the thickness but the composition varies in the lateral direction from Ti-rich to Pd- or Fe-rich. The structure depends on composition. For example, in Fe-Ti a pure amorphous phase is obtained in a narrow composition range around FeTi and in Pd-Ti the microstructure is amorphous over a broad composition range. Wear and friction measurements of Fe-Ti layers on AISI 304 stainless steel show that both ion beam mixing and composition are important for improved tribology.

  17. On- and off-line monitoring of ion beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Katia

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam therapy is an emerging modality for high precision radiation treatment of cancer. In comparison to conventional radiation sources (photons, electrons), ion beams feature major dosimetric advantages due to their finite range with a localized dose deposition maximum, the Bragg peak, which can be selectively adjusted in depth. However, due to several sources of treatment uncertainties, full exploitation of these dosimetric advantages in clinical practice would require the possibility to visualize the stopping position of the ions in vivo, ideally in real-time. To this aim, different imaging methods have been proposed and investigated, either pre-clinically or even clinically, based on the detection of prompt or delayed radiation following nuclear interaction of the beam with the irradiated tissue. However, the chosen or ad-hoc developed instrumentation has often relied on technologies originally conceived for different applications, thus compromising on the achievable performances for the sake of cost-effectiveness. This contribution will review major examples of used instrumentation and related performances, identifying the most promising detector developments for next generation devices especially dedicated to on-line monitoring of ion beam treatment. Moreover, it will propose an original combination of different techniques in a hybrid detection scheme, aiming to make the most of complementary imaging methods and open new perspectives of image guidance for improved precision of ion beam therapy.

  18. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  19. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This Annual Report summarizes research activities carried out in 1988 in the framework of the government-funded program 'High Energy Density in Matter produced by Heavy Ion Beams'. It addresses fundamental problems of the generation of heavy ion beams and the investigation of hot dense plasmas produced by these beams. Its initial motivation and its long-term goal is the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion by intense heavy ion beams. Two outstanding events deserve to be mentioned explicity, the Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Conference held in Darmstadt and organized by GSI end of June and the first heavy ion beam injected into the new SIS facility in November. The former event attracted more than hundred scientists for three days to the 4th Conference in this field. This symposium showed the impressive progress since the last conference in Washington two years ago. In particular the first beams in MBE-4 at LBL and results of beam plasma interaction experiments at GSI open new directions for future investigations. The ideas for non-Lionvillean injection into storage rings presented by Carlo Rubbia will bring the discussion of driver scenarios into a new stage. The latter event is a milestone for both machine and target experiments. It characterizes the beginning of the commissioning phase for the new SIS/ESR facility which will be ready for experiments at the end of this year. The commissioning of SIS is on schedule and first experiments can start at the beginning of 1990. A status report of the accelerator project is included. Theoretical activities were continued as in previous years, many of them providing guide lines for future experiments, in particular for the radiation transport aspects and for beam-plasma interaction. (orig.)

  20. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahng, Jungbae [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob, E-mail: bslee@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-San, E-mail: eskim1@korea.ac.kr [Department of Accelerator Science, Korea University Sejong Campus, Sejong 339-770 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  1. Chemical effects of heavy ion beams on organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Namba, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    Effects of ion beam irradiation on α-alanine, adipic acid and polydimethylsiloxane were examined. Stable radicals were generated in the radiolysis of solids of α-alanine and adipic acid by γ-ray, 220 MeV C ions, 350 MeV Ne ions and 175 MeV Ar ions. The G-value decreases in this order. The G-value for adipic acid decreases more than that for α-alanine. The decreases in the G-value are ascribed to high local dose in the ion tracks. Effective G-value of the radicals for γ-irradiations decreases at high doses. The local dose in the ion tracks exceeds those doses, and the G-values for the ion irradiation are hence smaller than the G-value for γ-irradiations. The difference in the dependence of the G-values for α-alanine and adipic acid on the ion beams is due to difference in the dose-yield relationship for radical formation. The high local dose in the ion tracks exceeds the gelation dose of some of polymers. Formation of gel strings of polydimethylsiloxanes generated in heavy ion tracks was observed by atomic force microscopy

  2. Production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhao, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Li, X. X.; Jin, T.; Xie, D. Z.; Lu, W.; Cao, Y.; Shang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an all-superconducting-magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged ion beams to meet the requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, an aluminum chamber has been installed inside a 1.5 mm thick Ta liner used for the reduction of x-ray irradiation at the high voltage insulator. With double-frequency (18+14.5 GHz) heating and at maximum total microwave power of 2.0 kW, SECRAL has successfully produced quite a few very highly charged Xe ion beams, such as 10 e μA of Xe 37+ , 1 e μA of Xe 43+ , and 0.16 e μA of Ne-like Xe 44+ . To further explore the capability of the SECRAL in the production of highly charged heavy metal ion beams, a first test run on bismuth has been carried out recently. The main goal is to produce an intense Bi 31+ beam for HIRFL accelerator and to have a feel how well the SECRAL can do in the production of very highly charged Bi beams. During the test, though at microwave power less than 3 kW, more than 150 e μA of Bi 31+ , 22 e μA of Bi 41+ , and 1.5 e μA of Bi 50+ have been produced. All of these results have again demonstrated the great capability of the SECRAL source. This article will present the detailed results and brief discussions to the production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL.

  3. Ion beam modification of metals: Compositional and microstructural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, Gary S.

    Ion implantation has become a highly developed tool for modifying the structure and properties of metals and alloys. In addition to direct implantation, a variety of other ion beam techniques such as ion beam mixing, ion beam assisted deposition and plasma source ion implantation have been used increasingly in recent years. The modifications constitute compositional and microstructural changes in the surface of the metal. This leads to alterations in physical properties (transport, optical, corrosion, oxidation), as well as mechanical properties (strength, hardness, wear resistance, fatigue resistance). The compositional changes brought about by ion bombardment are classified into recoil implantation, cascade mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, Gibbsian adsorption and sputtering which combine to produce an often complicated compositional variation within the implanted layer and often, well beyond. Microstructurally, the phases present are often altered from what is expected from equilibrium thermodynamics giving rise to order-disorder transformations, metastable (crystalline, amorphous or quasicrystalline) phase formation and growth, as well as densification, grain growth, formation of a preferred texture and the formation of a high density dislocation network. All these effects need to be understood before one can determine the effect of ion bombardment on the physical and mechanical properties of metals. This paper reviews the literature in terms of the compositional and microstructural changes induced by ion bombardment, whether by direct implantation, ion beam mixing or other forms of ion irradiation. The topics are introduced as well as reviewed, making this a more pedogogical approach as opposed to one which treats only recent developments. The aim is to provide the tools needed to understand the consequent changes in physical and mechanical properties.

  4. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Barth

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36  μs duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum. The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH_{3} beam, cracked (and stripped in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 100  μs pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  5. Investigation of ion capture in an electron beam ion trap charge-breeder for rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittimanapun, Kritsada

    Charge breeding of rare isotope ions has become an important ingredient for providing reaccelerated rare isotope beams for science. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), a reaccelerator, ReA, has been built that employs an advanced Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) as a charge breeder. ReA will provide rare-isotope beams with energies of a few hundred keV/u up to tens of MeV/u to enable the study of properties of rare isotopes via low energy Coulomb excitation and transfer reactions, and to investigate nuclear reactions important for nuclear astrophysics. ReA consists of an EBIT charge breeder, a charge-over-mass selector, a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder features a high-current electron gun, a long trap structure, and a hybrid superconducting magnet to reach both high acceptance for injected low-charge ions as well as high-electron beam current densities for fast charge breeding. In this work, continuous ion injection and capture in the EBIT have been investigated with a dedicated Monte-Carlo simulation code and in experimental studies. The Monte-Carlo code NEBIT considers the electron-impact ionization cross sections, space charge due to the electron beam current, ion dynamics, electric field from electrodes, and magnetic field from the superconducting magnet. Experiments were performed to study the capture efficiency as a function of injected ion beam current, electron beam current, trap size, and trap potential depth. The charge state evolution of trapped ions was studied, providing information about the effective current density of the electron beam inside the EBIT. An attempt was made to measure the effective space-charge potential of the electron beam by studying the dynamics of a beam injected and reflected inside the trap.

  6. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated.

  7. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated

  8. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Electron beams with substantial net currents have been routinely propagated in the self-pinched mode for the past two decades. However, as the physics of gas breakdown and beam neutralization is different for ion beams, previous predictions indicated insufficient net current for pinching so that ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) was assumed impossible. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations using the IPROP code have suggested that ion SPT is possible. These results have prompted initial experiments to investigate SPT of ion beams. A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV, 3-cm-radius proton beam, generated on the Gamble II pulsed-power accelerator at NRL, has been injected into helium in the 30- to 250-mTorr regime to study this phenomenon. Evidence of self-pinched ion beam transport was observed in the 35- to 80-mTorr SPT pressure window predicted by IPROP. Measured signals from a time- and space-resolved scattered proton diagnostic and a time-integrated Li(Cu) nuclear activation diagnostic, both of which measure protons striking a 10-cm diameter target 50 cm into the transport region, are significantly larger in this pressure window than expected for ballistic transport. These results are consistent with significant self-magnetic fields and self-pinching of the ion beam. On the other hand, time-integrated signals from these same two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below the SPT window. Interferometric electron line-density measurements, acquired during beam injection into the helium gas, show insignificant ionization below 35 mTorr, a rapidly rising ionization fraction with pressure in the SPT window, and a plateau in ionization fraction at about 2% for pressures above 80 mTorr. These and other results are consistent with the physical picture for SPT. IPROP simulations, which closely model the Gamble II experimental conditions, produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The advantages of SPT for

  9. Radioactive ion beam facilities in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The past two decades have seen extraordinarily rapid development of radioactive beam physics throughout the world and in particular in Europe. The important scientific advances have stemmed from a large number of facilities. Previously existing stable beam machines have been adapted to produce rare isotope beams and dedicated facilities have come on-line. This talk gives an overview of the present European installations highlighting their complementary nature. The European roadmap calls for the construction of two next generation facilities: FAIR making use of projectile fragmentation and EURISOL based on the ISOL technique. The future FAIR facility will be described and the path towards EURISOL presented in the light of the construction of 'intermediate' generation facilities SPIRAL2, HIE ISOLDE and SPES and results from the ongoing EURISOL Design Study.

  10. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-08-25

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He{sup +} and mixed p, H{sup 2+}, H{sup 3+} beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was

  11. Investigations on transport and storage of high ion beam intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ninad Shrikrishna

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the intense low energy ion beam transport was investigated. Especially, the beam transport in toroidal magnetic field configurations was discussed, as it may allow the accumulation of high intensive beams in the future. One of the specific tasks is to design an injection system that can be used for the proposed low energy accumulator ring. A simulation code (TBT) was written to describe the particle motion in curved segments. Particle in Cell techniques were utilized to simulate a multi particle dynamics. A possibility of reading an external data file was made available so that a measured distribution can be used to compare simulation results with measured ones. A second order cloud in cell method was used to calculate charge density and in turn to solve Poisson's equation. Further simulations were performed to study the self field effects on beam transport. Experiments were performed to compare the simulation results and gain practical experience. The preparatory experiments consisted of building and characterization of the ion source in a first step. Along with the momentum spectrometer and emittance scanner the beam properties were studied. Low mass ion beams He + and mixed p, H 2+ , H 3+ beams were analyzed. In the second stage, beams were transported through a solenoid and the phase space distribution was measured as a function of the magnetic field for different beam energies. The phase-space as distributions measured in a first stage were simulated backward and then again forward transported through the solenoid. The simulated results were then compared with the measured distribution. The LINTRA transport program was used. The phase-space distribution was further simulated for transport experiments in a toroidal magnetic field. The transport program that was used to simulate the beam in the toroid was also used to design the injection system. The injection system with its special field configurations was designed to perform

  12. Ion source developments for stable and radioactive ion beams at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, R; Lecesne, N; Jardin, P; Gaubert, G; Huguet, Y; Pacquet, J Y; Villari, A C C; Lecler, D; Been, T

    1999-01-01

    Since now many years, the Ganil ion source team has in charge to develop ion sources with three main purposes. The first one concerns the radioactive ion production that implies high efficiency ion sources as the amount of created exotic atoms is very low (between 10 to 108 particle per second). The second one deals with high intensities of stable metallic ion beams for the injectors of the accelerator while the last one tries to increase the intensities of very high charge state ion beams for atomic physic. Concerning radioactive ion production, the recent results obtained, in collaboration with the ISN Grenoble group, with the 1+/n+ method drove us to develop a new concept of ecr ion source for monocharged ion production. The results of the first tests of this source will be given. This new idea for the construction of ecr ion source can be applied to multicharged ion production. Concerning the high charge state ion beam production, a new source called SUPERSHYPIE has been built that allow to increase by a ...

  13. Design problems of a continuous injector of many amperes of MeV deuterium neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1976-10-01

    A continuous injector of many amperes of MeV deuterium neutrals will require high currents of negative deuterium ions to be generated, accelerated and stripped of electrons by methods that are not fully developed. Each of these processes as briefly described in this report, introduce constraints upon the ion optics, beam line pumping, and high voltage stand-off that must be mutually resolved. Although the design of such an injector represents a difficult task, there is no fundamental reason that very high current beams cannot be handled

  14. Electron Accelerators for Radioactive Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia Merminga

    2007-10-10

    The summary of this paper is that to optimize the design of an electron drive, one must: (a) specify carefully the user requirements--beam energy, beam power, duty factor, and longitudinal and transverse emittance; (b) evaluate different machine options including capital cost, 10-year operating cost and delivery time. The author is convinced elegant solutions are available with existing technology. There are several design options and technology choices. Decisions will depend on system optimization, in-house infrastructure and expertise (e.g. cryogenics, SRF, lasers), synergy with other programs.

  15. Ion beam mixing in Ag-Pd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatt, J.L.; Averback, R.S.; Peak, D.

    1989-01-01

    Ion beam mixing during 750 keV Kr + irradiation at 80 K was measured on a series of Ag-Pd alloys using Au marker atoms. The mixing in pure Ag was the greatest and it decreased monotonically with increasing Pd content, being a factor of 10 higher in pure Ag than in pure Pd. This large difference in mixing cannot be explained by the difference in cohesion energy between Ag and Pd in the thermodynamic model of ion beam mixing proposed by Johnson et al. [W. L. Johnson, Y. T. Cheng, M. Van Rossum, and M-A. Nicolet, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 7/8, 657 (1985)]. An alternative model based on local melting in the cascade is shown to account for the ion beam mixing results in Ag and Pd

  16. Longitudinal dynamics of laser-cooled fast ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidemüller, M.; Eike, B.; Eisenbarth, U.

    1999-01-01

    -transverse coupling mechanisms. Laser cooling in novel bunch forms consisting of square-well buckets leads to longitudinally space-charge dominated beams. The observed longitudinal ion density distributions can be well described by a self-consistent mean-field model based on a thermodynamic Debye-Huckel approach......We present recent results of our experiments on laser cooling of fast stored ion beams at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring. The longitudinal motion of the ions is directly cooled by the light pressure force, whereas efficient transverse cooling is obtained indirectly by longitudinal....... When applying laser cooling in square-well buckets over long time intervals, hard Coulomb collisions suddenly disappear and the longitudinal temperature drops by about a factor of three. The observed longitudinal behaviour of the beam shows strong resemblance with the transition to an Coulomb...

  17. RF plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon S.; Logan, B. Grant

    2003-01-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being used as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus the ion beam to a small spot size. A radio frequency (RF) plasma source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The goal is to operate the source at pressures ∼ 10 -5 Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10 -4 -10 -1 Torr and electron densities in the range of 10 8 -10 11 cm -3 . Recently, pulsed operation of the source has enabled operation at pressures in the 10 -6 Torr range with densities of 10 11 cm -3 . Near 100% ionization has been achieved. The source has been integrated with the NTX facility and experiments have begun

  18. Use of molecular ion beams from a tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibis, A.; Goldring, G.; Hass, M.; Kaim, R.; Plesser, I.; Vager, Z.

    1981-01-01

    A large variety of positive molecular ion beams can be produced by gaseous charge exchange in the terminal of a tandem accelerator. After acceleration the molecules are usually dissociated by passage through a thin foil. Measurements of the break-up products provide a way to study both the structure of incident ions and the effects of electronic potentials on the internuclear interaction inside the foil. Beam intensities of a few picoamperes are quite adequate for these measurements, and the relatively high energy obtained by use of a tandem accelerator has the advantage of minimizing multiple scattering effects in the foil. The main difficulty in using the molecular beams lies in the large magnetic rigidity of singly-charged heavy molecular ions

  19. Numerical simulation of crystalline ion beams in storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Meshkov, I N; Katayama, T; Sidorin, A; Smirnov, A Yu; Syresin, E M; Trubnikov, G; Tsutsui, H

    2004-01-01

    The use of crystalline ion beams can increase luminosity in the collider and in experiments with targets for investigation of rare radioactive isotopes. The ordered state of circulating ion beams was observed at several storage rings: NAP-M (Proceedings of the Fourth All Union Conference on Charged Particle Accelerators, Vol. 2, Nauka, Moscow, 1975 (in Russian); Part. Accel. 7 (1976) 197; At. Energy 40 (1976) 49; Preprint CERN/PS/AA 79-41, Geneva, 1979) (Novosibirsk), ESR (Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 3803) and SIS (Proceedings of EPAC'2000, 2000) (Darmstadt), CRYRING (Proceedings of PAC'2001, 2001) (Stockholm) and PALLAS (Proceedings of the Conference on Applications of Accelerators in Research and Industry, AIP Conference Proceedings, p. 576, in preparation) (Munchen). New criteria of the beam orderliness are derived and verified with a new program code. Molecular dynamics technique is inserted in BETACOOL program (Proceedings of Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Bad Honnef, Germany, 2001) and used for numeric...

  20. Pierce instability in neutralized inertial confinement fusion ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, D.S.; Cary, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The stability of a charge and current neutralized electron-ion beam propagating between two planar boundaries is investigated. For equipotential boundaries the beam is, as originally shown by Pierce, electrostatically unstable for electron current densities above a certain limiting value. If, however, the electric field at the upstream boundary is required to vanish, there is no instability. An intermediate case, in which the two boundaries are electrically connected with a finite conductivity plasma, corresponds to the proposed use of neutralized light and heavy ion beams for inertial confinement fusion drivers. Results indicate such beams can propagate either stably or with zero-frequency Pierce instability growth rates which are probably insignificant. lectric currents; boundary conditions; current density; electric fields; plasma;

  1. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piriz, A.R., E-mail: Roberto.Piriz@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω.

  2. Hydrodynamics of layer structured targets impinged by intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, J.; Barrero, A.

    1989-01-01

    To minimize the energy loss in the corona outflow, a layer structured spherical hollow shell has been proposed to be used as target in inertial confinement fusion. For ion beam drivers, the major part of the beam energy is absorbed in the middle layer, which is called either absorber or pusher. The outer layer, called tamper, slows down the outward expansion of the absorbed low density region. The materials of the tamper and pusher are usually in the inner layer. The knowledge of the hydrodynamics of the interaction of an intense beam with a structured target is then an essential point in order to achieve break-even conditions in ion-beam fusion. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  3. Ion mass and energy selective hyperthermal ion-beam assisted deposition setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, J. W.; Schumacher, P.; Mensing, M.; Rauschenbach, S.; Cermak, I.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2017-06-01

    For the synthesis of high-quality thin films, ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is a frequently used technique providing precise control over several substantial film properties. IBAD typically relies on the use of a broad-beam ion source. Such ion sources suffer from the limitation that they deliver a blend of ions with different ion masses, each of them possessing a certain distribution of kinetic energy. In this paper, a compact experimental setup is presented that enables the separate control of ion mass and ion kinetic energy in the region of hyperthermal energies (few 1 eV - few 100 eV). This ion energy region is of increasing interest not only for ion-assisted film growth but also for the wide field of preparative mass spectrometry. The setup consists of a constricted glow-discharge plasma beam source and a tailor-made, compact quadrupole system equipped with entry and exit ion optics. It is demonstrated that the separation of monoatomic and polyatomic nitrogen ions (N+ and N2+) is accomplished. For both ion species, the kinetic energy is shown to be selectable in the region of hyperthermal energies. At the sample position, ion current densities are found to be in the order of 1 μA/cm2 and the full width at half maximum of the ion beam profile is in the order of 10 mm. Thus, the requirements for homogeneous deposition processes in sufficiently short periods of time are fulfilled. Finally, employing the described setup, for the first time in practice epitaxial GaN films were deposited. This opens up the opportunity to fundamentally study the influence of the simultaneous irradiation with hyperthermal ions on the thin film growth in IBAD processes and to increase the flexibility of the technique.

  4. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  5. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  6. Production of hypernuclei in relativistic ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, H.; Sano, M.; Wakai, M.; Zofka, J.

    1988-05-01

    The hypernuclear formation in collisions of relativistic beams of 4 He, 7 Li, 12 C and 19 F with target of 12 C is calculated at energies used in the recent Dubna experiment. The hyperfragments optimal for observation are pointed out and the secondary (π + K + ) formation is evaluated and found to be nonnegligible. (author)

  7. Review of ion beam therapy: Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-06-01

    First therapy efforts at the Bevalac using neon ions took place in the 70's and 80's. Promising results led to construction of HIMAC in Chiba Japan, and more recently to therapy trials at GSI. Both these facilities are now treating patients with carbon beams. Advances in both accelerator technology and beam delivery have taken place at these two centers. Plans are well along for new facilities in Europe and Japan.

  8. TECHNOLOGIES FOR DELIVERY OF PROTON AND ION BEAMS FOR RADIOTHERAPY

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, H; Alonso, J; Mackay, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  9. Generation of High Quality Laser Accelerated Ion Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Nishihara, K.; Tajima, T.; Pegoraro, F.; Khoroshkov, V. S.; Mima, K.; Daido, H.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Nagai, K.; Sakabe, S.

    2002-01-01

    In order to achieve a high quality, i. e. monoergetic, intense ion beam, we propose the use of a double layer target. The first layer, at the target front, consists of high-Z atoms, while the second (rear) layer is a thin coating of low-Z atoms. The high quality proton beams from the double layer target, irradiated by an ultra-intense laser pulse, are demonstrated with three dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations.

  10. Amorphization of metals by ion implantation and ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Heera, V.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic systems can be formed either by high-fluence ion implantation of glassforming species or by irradiation of layered metal systems with inert gas ions. Both techniques and experimental examples are presented. Empirical rules are discussed which predict whether a given system can be transformed into an amorphous phase. Influence of temperature, implantation dose and pre-existing crystalline metal composition on amorphization is considered. Examples are given of the implantation induced amorphous structure, recrystallization and formation of quasicrystalline structures. (author)

  11. Evaluation of beam divergence of a negative hydrogen ion beam using Doppler shift spectroscopy diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, A. J.; Bharathi, P.; Pandya, K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bhuyan, M.; Yadav, R. K.; Tyagi, H.; Gahlaut, A.; Chakraborty, A.

    2018-01-01

    The Doppler Shift Spectroscopy (DSS) diagnostic is in the conceptual stage to estimate beam divergence, stripping losses, and beam uniformity of the 100 keV hydrogen Diagnostics Neutral Beam of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. This DSS diagnostic is used to measure the above-mentioned parameters with an error of less than 10%. To aid the design calculations and to establish a methodology for estimation of the beam divergence, DSS measurements were carried out on the existing prototype ion source RF Operated Beam Source in India for Negative ion Research. Emissions of the fast-excited neutrals that are generated from the extracted negative ions were collected in the target tank, and the line broadening of these emissions were used for estimating beam divergence. The observed broadening is a convolution of broadenings due to beam divergence, collection optics, voltage ripple, beam focusing, and instrumental broadening. Hence, for estimating the beam divergence from the observed line broadening, a systematic line profile analysis was performed. To minimize the error in the divergence measurements, a study on error propagation in the beam divergence measurements was carried out and the error was estimated. The measurements of beam divergence were done at a constant RF power of 50 kW and a source pressure of 0.6 Pa by varying the extraction voltage from 4 kV to10 kV and the acceleration voltage from 10 kV to 15 kV. These measurements were then compared with the calorimetric divergence, and the results seemed to agree within 10%. A minimum beam divergence of ˜3° was obtained when the source was operated at an extraction voltage of ˜5 kV and at a ˜10 kV acceleration voltage, i.e., at a total applied voltage of 15 kV. This is in agreement with the values reported in experiments carried out on similar sources elsewhere.

  12. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y., E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education, 200433 Shanghai (China); Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-15

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup −10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup −4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  13. Ion beam modification of surfaces for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommerfeld, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Human life expectancy increased significantly within the last century. Hence, medical care must ever be improved. Optimizing artificial replacements such as hip joints or stents etc. is of special interest. For this purpose, new materials are constantly developed or known ones modified. This work focused on the possibility to change the chemistry and topography of biomedically relevant materials such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) by means of ion beam irradiation. Mass-separated ion beam deposition was used in order to synthesize DLC layers with a high sp 3 content (> 70%), a sufficiently smooth surface (RMS<1 nm) and a manageable film thickness (50 nm). The chemistry of the DLC layers was changed by ion beam doping with different ion species (Ag,Ti) and concentrations. Additionally, the surface topography of silicon and titanium dioxide was altered by ion beam irradiation under non-perpendicular angle of incidence. The created periodic wave structures (so-called ripples) were characterized and their dependency on the ion energy was investigated. Moreover, ripples on silicon were covered with a thin DLC layer in order to create DLC ripples. The biocompatibility of all samples was investigated by adsorption experiments. For this purpose, human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) was used due to its ambiphilic character, which allows the protein to assume different conformations on materials with different hydrophilicities. Moreover, HPF is a crucial factor in the blood coagulation process. This work comes to the conclusion that the interaction of both, the surface chemistry and topography, has a strong influence on the adsorption behavior of HPF and thus the biocompatibility of a material. Both factors can be specifically tuned by means of ion beam irradiation.

  14. Ion beam irradiation of ceramics at fusion relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Ceramic materials are required at a variety of locations in proposed fusion reactors where significant ionizing and displacive fields may be present. Energetic ion beams are a useful tool for probing the effects of irradiation on the structure and electrical properties of ceramics over a wide range of experimental conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using ion beams to provide information on anticipated ceramic radiation effects in a fusion reactor environment are discussed. In this paper particular emphasis is placed on microstructural changes and how the high helium generation rates associated with DT fusion neutrons affect cavity swelling

  15. The SPES Radioactive-Ion Beam Facility of INFN

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.; Calabretta, L.

    2015-11-01

    A new radioactive-ion beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using a UCx direct target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam will be provided by a high-current cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions will be produced by proton-induced fission on a uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes will be re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107-109 pps. The aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high-intensity radioactive-ion beams of neutron-rich nuclei for nuclear physics research, as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radioisotope production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  16. The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility of INFN

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-02-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 40 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  17. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  18. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. P. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Z. C.; Lei, M. K., E-mail: surfeng@dlut.edu.cn [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Pushkarev, A. I. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Laboratory of Beam and Plasma Technology, High Technologies Physics Institute, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200–300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  19. Mini biased collimated faraday cups for measurement of intense pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaoping; Shi Lei; Zhang Jiasheng; Qiu Aici

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of principle of a biased Faraday cup for measuring ion beams density and the main reasons related to the measuring accuracy were presented. An array of mini biased collimated Faraday cups was manufactured for the measurement of ion beam density of a compact 200 keV high power ion beam source. In the experiments the maximum density of ion beam was in the center of the beam, and it was about 170 A/cm 2

  20. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the 'seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs

  1. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Fleury Frenette, K.; Jamar, C.

    2017-11-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms . Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC . Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 ≠m was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  2. Techniques to produce and accelerate radioactive ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Penescu, Liviu Constantin; Lettry, Jacques; Cata-Danil, Gheorghe

    The production and acceleration of the Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) continues the long line of nuclear investigations started in the XIXth century by Pierre and Marie Curie, Henri Becquerel and Ernest Rutherford. The contemporary applications of the RIBs span a wide range of physics fields: nuclear and atomic physics, solid-state physics, life sciences and material science. ISOLDE is a world-leading Isotope mass-Separation On-Line (ISOL) facility hosted at CERN in Geneva for more than 40 years, offering the largest variety of radioactive ion beams with, until now, more than 1000 isotopes of more than 72 elements (with Z ranging from 2 to 88), with half-lives down to milliseconds and intensities up to 1011 ions/s. The post acceleration of the full variety of beams allows reaching final energies between 0.8 and 3.0 MeV/u. This thesis describes the development of a new series of FEBIAD (“Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge”) ion sources at CERN-ISOLDE. The VADIS (“Versatile Arc Discharge Ion Source�...

  3. Measurements of beam-ion confinement during tangential beam-driven instabilities in PBX [Princeton Beta Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Kaita, R.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaye, S.

    1987-01-01

    During tangential injection of neutral beams into low density tokamak plasmas with β > 1% in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), instabilities are observed that degrade the confinement of beam ions. Neutron, charge-exchange, and diamagnetic loop measurements are examined in order to identify the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the beam-ion transport. The data suggest a resonant interaction between the instabilities and the parallel energetic beam ions. Evidence for some nonresonant transport also exists

  4. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  5. Development of a nuclear data base for relativistic ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, L.W.; Wong, M.; Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The primary limitation on the development of heavy ion beam transport methods is the lack of an accurate nuclear data base. Because of the large number of ion/target combinations, the complexity of the reaction products, and the broad range of energies required, it is unlikely that the data base will ever be compiled from experiments alone. For the last 15 years, relativistic heavy-ion accelerators have been available, but the experimental data base remains inadequate. However, theoretical models of heavy-ion reactions are being derived to provide cross section data for beam transport problems. A concurrent experimental program to provide sufficient experimental data to validate the model is also in progress. Model development and experimental results for model validation are discussed. The need for additional nuclear fragmentation data is identified

  6. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for

  7. In situ electrostatic characterisation of ion beams in the region of ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, Alexander; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2018-02-01

    In situ and ex situ techniques have been used to measure directional ion beams created by a sharp axial potential drop in low pressure expanding plasmas. Although Retarding Field Energy Analysers (RFEAs) are the most convenient technique to measure the ion velocities and plasma potentials along with the plasma density, they are bulky and are contained in a grounded shield that may perturb the electric potential profile of the expanding plasma. In principle, ex situ techniques produce a more reliable measurement and Laser Induced Fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) has previously been used to characterise the spatial velocity profile of ion beams in the same region of acceleration for a range of pressures. Here, satisfactory agreement between the ion velocity profiles measured by LIF and RFEA techniques has allowed the RFEA method to be confidently used to probe the ion beam characteristics in the regions of high gradients in plasma density and DC electric fields which have previously proven difficult.

  8. Deuterium retention in tungsten after heavy ion damage and hydrogen isotope exchange in PISCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. L.; Wang, Y. Q.; Dittmar, T.; Doerner, R. P.; Tynan, G. R.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of H isotope exchange and radiation damage on the retention of D in W was examined in the PISCES linear plasma device. W samples were treated with D plasma at low sample temperatures (473 K), with a fluence of 1026 ions/m2 and ion energies of 150 eV. Each sample was then exposed to varying doses of H plasma with similar sample temperature and plasma conditions to fluences ranging from 0 to 1026 ions/m2, to examine the effectiveness of isotope exchange as a means of tritium removal. The D(3He, p)4He nuclear reaction was used to measure D concentration profiles up to a depth of 7.7 μm. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was used to determine the D retained throughout the bulk of the sample. Isotope exchange allows for a unique study of atomic migration by separately examining the diffusion of implanted atoms from those bombarding the surface. D atoms are exchanged out of traps as a result of H plasma bombardment and diffuse until either falling into another trap or reaching the surface to recombine and escape. Radiation damage at levels of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 displacements per atom (dpa) was carried out before plasma exposure on some samples with 2 MeV Cu ions as a surrogate for damage caused by fusion neutrons. The Cu ion damage was compared to damage induced by 6 MeV W ions to see if there is an effect of Cu contamination on retention. We saw little difference in Cu versus W ion damage at low dpa, but at 1 dpa, where Cu content reached 65 appm, contamination seems to be significant. Retention measurements showed that ion damage has little effectiveness on isotope removal at these sample temperatures; however, there is evidence to suggest that the trapping mechanisms in W change as damage is increased.

  9. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes' efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs.

  10. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes' efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs

  11. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1990-12-31

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes` efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs.

  12. Mass Analyses of Cluster Ion Beams by Wien Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Katsuki; Be, Suck Hee

    1980-06-01

    Distributions of mass of cluster ion beams were investigated by using a Wien filter with permanent magnets, which is 200 mm in length. Resolving powers of the Wien filter in the mass range of 103 to 106 a.m.u. were estimated. The Wien filter is useful for studies of clusters having 102-104 molecules/cluster. Argon cluster beams were ionized up to about ten charges when ionizing current was 15 mA. There were two different mass groups in hydrogen cluster beams produced, even at gas temperature of 77.3 K.

  13. Ion-beam-driven plasma described by rate equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Ionization distributions and radiation spectra of a dense plasma driven by intense ion beams are studied by solving stationary rate equations. Expressions for the rate coefficients are derived. Optically thin plasmas of hydrogen and carbon are considered neglecting hydrodynamic motion. Results on level populations versus temperature, on power balance and equilibrium states, and also on emission spectra are given. In particular, the transition from beam-determined plasma states to thermal equilibrium states is discussed. Beam parameters are chosen close to those in experiments now being planned. (author).

  14. Improved beam-energy calibration technique for heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, A.M.J.; Garcia, A.; Gil, Salvador

    1989-01-01

    A simple technique for beam energy calibration of heavy-ion accelerators is presented. A thin hydrogenous target was bombarded with 12 C and 19 F, and the energies of the protons knocked out, elastically were measured at several angles using two detectors placed at equal angles on opposite sides of the beam. The use of these two detectors cancels the largest errors due to uncertainties in the angle and position at which the beam hits the target. An application of this energy calibration method to an electrostatic accelerator is described and the calibration constant of the analyzing magnet was obtained with an estimated error of 0.4 (Author) [es

  15. Digital pulse processor for ion beam microprobe imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogovac, M.; Jaksic, M.; Wegrzynek, D.; Markowicz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Capabilities of spectroscopic ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques that are available in ion microprobe facilities can be greatly improved by the use of digital pulse processing. We report here development of a digital multi parameter data acquisition system suitable for IBA imaging applications. Input signals from charge sensitive preamplifier are conditioned by using a simple circuit and digitized with fast ADCs. The digitally converted signals are processed in real time using FPGA. Implementation of several components of the system is presented.

  16. Overview of the Livermore electron beam ion trap project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Behar, E.; Boyce, K.R.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gendreau, K.C.; Graf, A.; Gu, M.-F.; Harris, C.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kelley, R.L.; Lepson, J.K.; May, M.J.; Neill, P.A.; Pinnington, E.H.; Porter, F.S.; Smith, A.J.; Stahle, C.K.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Tillotson, A.; Thorn, D.B.; Traebert, E.; Wargelin, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Livermore electron beam ion trap facility has recently been moved to a new location within LLNL, and new instrumentation was added, including a 32-pixel microcalorimeter. The move was accompanied by a shift of focus toward in situ measurements of highly charged ions, which continue with increased vigor. Overviews of the facility, which includes EBIT-I and SuperEBIT, and the research projects are given, including results from optical spectroscopy, QED, and X-ray line excitation measurements

  17. A study of the ion-beam process technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Toshihiko

    1990-01-01

    This paper concerns the ion-beam technology for fabrication of semiconductor devices. The purpose of the present work is to find out useful irradiation effects of ion beams and to develop them into fabrication-process technologies. In particular, the advantage of the focused ion beam (FIB) is pursued to be utilized in fabrication of fine structures; the mask for the x-ray lithography is selected as a test target for this purpose. The mechanism of each irradiation effect is also investigated in detail to give the basis of the process developed. This paper consists of seven chapters. The first one gives an overview of the present work. Chapter 2 deals with ion-bombardment effect on the internal stress of deposited metals. The subject of Chapter 3 is the enhancement effect of chemical etching rate by ion bombardment. This chapter also discusses pattern replicability of the synchrotron-radiation x-ray lithography using the exposure results of the x-ray masks fabricated with the Al 2 O 3 resist and the stress compensation technique discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 4 is devoted to the atomic intermixing effect caused by ion bombardment. The purpose of the latter half of this chapter is to demonstrate that this mixing effect has a high spatial resolution and deserves to be used as a definition process of fine structures by the FIB. Chapter 5 describes a unique effect of the ion beam: solid phase epitaxy of amorphous Si induced by bombardment at elevated temperatures. Chapter 6 demonstrates that maskless ion implantation using the FIB is a very efficient and productive technique for fabrication of small Hall sensors with sub-micron feature sizes. Finally, Chapter 7 summarizes the conclusions obtained in this work. (J.P.N.) 270 refs

  18. Theory of Nanocluster Size Distributions from Ion Beam Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C.W.; Yi, D.O.; Sharp, I.D.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-06-13

    Ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters is studied via both kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the self-consistent mean-field solution to a set of coupled rate equations. Both approaches predict the existence of a steady state shape for the cluster size distribution that depends only on a characteristic length determined by the ratio of the effective diffusion coefficient to the ion flux. The average cluster size in the steady state regime is determined by the implanted species/matrix interface energy.

  19. Waferscale Electrostatic Quadrupole Array for Multiple Ion Beam Manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vinayakumar, K. B.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Ji, Q.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Ardanuc, S.; Lal, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report on the first through-wafer silicon-based Electrostatic Quadrupole Array (ESQA) to focus high energy ion beams. This device is a key enabler for a wafer based accelerator architecture that lends itself to orders-of-magnitude reduction in cost, volume and weight of charged particle accelerators. ESQs are a key building block in developing compact Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator (MEQALAC) [1]. In a MEQALAC electrostatic forces are used to focus ions, and elec...

  20. Production of an {sup 15}O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Akram, E-mail: mohammadi.akram@qst.go.jp; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-21

    In advanced ion therapy, the {sup 15}O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an {sup 15}O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable {sup 16}O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors’ group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of {sup 15}O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of {sup 15}O fragments. The highest production rate of {sup 15}O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the {sup 15}O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is

  1. Production of an 15O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Akram; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-01

    In advanced ion therapy, the 15O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an 15O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable 16O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors' group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of 15O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of 15O fragments. The highest production rate of 15O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the 15O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is sufficiently high. In-beam PET imaging was also

  2. Controlling hydrogen scrambling in multiply charged protein ions during collisional activation: implications for top-down hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS utilizing collisional activation in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzalimov, Rinat R; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2010-02-01

    Hydrogen exchange in solution combined with ion fragmentation in the gas phase followed by MS detection emerged in recent years as a powerful tool to study higher order protein structure and dynamics. However, a certain type of ion chemistry in the gas phase, namely, internal rearrangement of labile hydrogen atoms (the so-called hydrogen scrambling), is often cited as a factor limiting the utility of this experimental technique. Although several studies have been carried out to elucidate the roles played by various factors in the occurrence and the extent of hydrogen scrambling, there is still no consensus as to what experimental protocol should be followed to avoid or minimize it. In this study we employ fragmentation of mass-selected subpopulations of protein ions to assess the extent of internal proton mobility prior to dissociation. A unique advantage of tandem MS is that it not only provides a means to map the deuterium content of protein ions whose overall levels of isotope incorporation can be precisely defined by controlling the mass selection window, but also correlates this spatial isotope distribution with such global characteristic as the protein ion charge state. Hydrogen scrambling does not occur when the charge state of the precursor protein ions selected for fragmentation is high. Fragment ions derived from both N- and C-terminal parts of the protein are equally unaffected by scrambling. However, spatial distribution of deuterium atoms obtained by fragmenting low-charge-density protein ions is consistent with a very high degree of scrambling prior to the dissociation events. The extent of hydrogen scrambling is also high when multistage fragmentation is used to probe deuterium incorporation locally. Taken together, the experimental results provide a coherent picture of intramolecular processes occurring prior to the dissociation event and provide guidance for the design of experiments whose outcome is unaffected by hydrogen scrambling.

  3. Conceptual design of heavy ion beam compression using a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion beams are a useful tool for conducting high energy density physics (HEDP experiments. Target heating can be enhanced by beam compression, because a shorter pulse diminishes hydrodynamic expansion during irradiation. A conceptual design is introduced to compress ∼100  MeV/u to ∼GeV/u heavy ion beams using a wedge. By deflecting the beam with a time-varying field and placing a tailor-made wedge amid its path downstream, each transverse slice passes through matter of different thickness. The resulting energy loss creates a head-to-tail velocity gradient, and the wedge shape can be designed by using stopping power models to give maximum compression at the target. The compression ratio at the target was found to vary linearly with (head-to-tail centroid offset/spot radius at the wedge. The latter should be approximately 10 to attain tenfold compression. The decline in beam quality due to projectile ionization, energy straggling, fragmentation, and scattering is shown to be acceptable for well-chosen wedge materials. A test experiment is proposed to verify the compression scheme and to study the beam-wedge interaction and its associated beam dynamics, which will facilitate further efforts towards a HEDP facility.

  4. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-29

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  5. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-01

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  6. Electron and ion beam transport to fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.; Baker, L.; Miller, P.A.; Mix, L.P.; Olsen, J.N.; Poukey, J.W.; Wright, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    ICF reactors have been proposed which incorporate a gas-filled chamber to reduce x-ray and debris loading of the first wall. Focused beams of either electrons or ions must be transported efficiently for 2-4 m to a centrally located fusion target. Laser-initiated current-carrying plasma discharge channels provide the guiding magnetic field and the charge- and current-neutralizing medium required for beam propagation. Computational studies of plasma channel formation in air using a 1-D MHD model with multigroup radiation diffusion have provided a good comparison with the expansions velocity and time dependent refractivity profile determined by holographic interferometry. Trajectory calculations have identified a beam expansion mechanism which combines with the usual ohmic dissipation to reduce somewhat the transported beam fluence for electrons. Additional trajectory calculations have been performed for both electrons and light ions to predict the limits on the particle current density which can be delivered to a central target by overlapping the many independently-generated beams. Critical features of the use of plasma channels for transport and overlap of charged particle beams are being tested experimentally with up to twelve electron beams from the Proto II accelerator

  7. Induction of surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene with proton ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, I. S.; Kim, H. R.; Choi, Y. J.; Park, H. S. [Seoul National Univ. of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of the death in the USA and developed countries. More than 570,000 artery bypass graft surgeries per USA are performed each year, though percutaneous devices have abounded in extreme cases. Based on the surgery follow-ups, large diameter expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (>5 mm) are clinically employed with good results but its clinical applications in smaller vessels is still problematic due to thrombosis and neointima formation. Achievement of high patency grafts has been to some extent achieved by numerous methods of surface modification techniques, but its results are less than its initial hopes. As examples, endothelial cells coated on the luminal surface of ePTFE has demonstrated limited success after recirculation. Surface modifications of PTFE film with either argon ion beam or UV light from Xe-excimer lamp were reported to increase its interaction with vascular endothelial cell. Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)[PLGA] is also very important in tissue engineering, in where induction of its initial high cellular adhesion and spreading is a critical step for development of tissue engineering medical products. We previously reported tissue engineering of the hybrid ePTFE scaffold by seeding smooth muscle cells and subsequently evaluation of its tissue regeneration behaviors and stabilities with circulation of pulsatile flow. To improve its tissue engineering more quickly, we here performed surface modification of ePTFE and porous PLGA scaffold and evaluated its subsequent chemical and biological properties after treating its surface with low energy ion beams. The porous ePTFE was prepared in a round shape (diameter = 1 cm) and dried after organic solvent extraction for ion beam treatment. Another porous PLGA layers (d = 1 cm, t = 1 cm with approximately 92% porosity) were fabricated and treated its surface by irradiating low energy either nitrogen or argon ion beams (1 keV, 1x1015 ions

  8. Induction of surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene with proton ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, I. S.; Kim, H. R.; Choi, Y. J.; Park, H. S.

    2007-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of the death in the USA and developed countries. More than 570,000 artery bypass graft surgeries per USA are performed each year, though percutaneous devices have abounded in extreme cases. Based on the surgery follow-ups, large diameter expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (>5 mm) are clinically employed with good results but its clinical applications in smaller vessels is still problematic due to thrombosis and neointima formation. Achievement of high patency grafts has been to some extent achieved by numerous methods of surface modification techniques, but its results are less than its initial hopes. As examples, endothelial cells coated on the luminal surface of ePTFE has demonstrated limited success after recirculation. Surface modifications of PTFE film with either argon ion beam or UV light from Xe-excimer lamp were reported to increase its interaction with vascular endothelial cell. Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)[PLGA] is also very important in tissue engineering, in where induction of its initial high cellular adhesion and spreading is a critical step for development of tissue engineering medical products. We previously reported tissue engineering of the hybrid ePTFE scaffold by seeding smooth muscle cells and subsequently evaluation of its tissue regeneration behaviors and stabilities with circulation of pulsatile flow. To improve its tissue engineering more quickly, we here performed surface modification of ePTFE and porous PLGA scaffold and evaluated its subsequent chemical and biological properties after treating its surface with low energy ion beams. The porous ePTFE was prepared in a round shape (diameter = 1 cm) and dried after organic solvent extraction for ion beam treatment. Another porous PLGA layers (d = 1 cm, t = 1 cm with approximately 92% porosity) were fabricated and treated its surface by irradiating low energy either nitrogen or argon ion beams (1 keV, 1x1015 ions

  9. Dose reporting in ion beam therapy. Proceedings of a meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    Following the pioneering work in Berkeley, USA, ion beam therapy for cancer treatment is at present offered in Chiba and Hyogo in Japan, and Darmstadt in Germany. Other facilities are coming close to completion or are at various stages of planning in Europe and Japan. In all these facilities, carbon ions have been selected as the ions of choice, at least in the first phase. Taking into account this fast development, the complicated technical and radiobiological research issues involved, and the hope it raises for some types of cancer patients, the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiation Units and measurements (ICRU) jointly sponsored a technical meeting held in Vienna, 23-24 June 2004. That first meeting was orientated mainly towards radiobiology: the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions versus photons, and related issues. One of the main differences between ion beam therapy and other modern radiotherapy techniques (such as proton beam therapy or intensity modulated radiation therapy) is related to radiobiology and in particular the increased RBE of carbon ions compared to both protons and photons (i.e., high linear energy transfer (LET) versus low LET radiation). Another important issue for international agencies and commissions, such as the IAEA and the ICRU, is a worldwide agreement and harmonisation for reporting the treatments. In order to evaluate the merits of ion beam therapy, it is essential that the treatments be reported in a similar/comparable way in all centres so that the clinical reports and protocols can be understood and interpreted without ambiguity by the radiation therapy community in general. For the last few decades, the ICRU has published several reports containing recommendations on how to report external photon beam or electron beam therapy, and brachytherapy. A report on proton beam therapy, jointly prepared by the ICRU and the IAEA, is now completed and is being published in the ICRU series. In line with this

  10. Spectroscopic investigations on ion beam irradiated polycarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, O.; Chipara, M. E-mail: mchipara@unlserve.unl.edu; Enge, W.; Compagnini, G.; Reyes-Romero, J. E-mail: vetr@caracas.c-com.net; Bacmeister, U.; Chipara, M.D

    2000-05-02

    Luminescence investigations on polycarbonate irradiated with accelerated uranium ions are reported. The dependence of luminescence spectra on the penetration length, deposited energy and dose and track radius is investigated. The luminescence spectrum has been assigned to phenyls. It is suggested that most phenyls are located within the latent track. The experimental results are in good agreement with data obtained by electron spin resonance spectroscopy.

  11. Cavity-enhanced photoionization of an ultracold rubidium beam for application in focused ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Haaf, G.; Wouters, S. H. W.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.

    2017-11-01

    A two-step photoionization strategy of an ultracold rubidium beam for application in a focused ion beam instrument is analyzed and implemented. In this strategy the atomic beam is partly selected with an aperture after which the transmitted atoms are ionized in the overlap of a tightly cylindrically focused excitation laser beam and an ionization laser beam whose power is enhanced in a build-up cavity. The advantage of this strategy, as compared to without the use of a build-up cavity, is that higher ionization degrees can be reached at higher currents. Optical Bloch equations including the photoionization process are used to calculate what ionization degree and ionization position distribution can be reached. Furthermore, the ionization strategy is tested on an ultracold beam of 85Rb atoms. The beam current is measured as a function of the excitation and ionization laser beam intensity and the selection aperture size. Although details are different, the global trends of the measurements agree well with the calculation. With a selection aperture diameter of 52 μ m , a current of (170 ±4 ) pA is measured, which according to calculations is 63% of the current equivalent of the transmitted atomic flux. Taking into account the ionization degree the ion beam peak reduced brightness is estimated at 1 ×107 A/(m2sr eV ).

  12. Development of a simple, low cost, indirect ion beam fluence measurement system for ion implanters, accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, K.; Balaji, S.; Saravanan, K.; Navas, J.; David, C.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2018-02-01

    We developed a simple, low cost user-friendly automated indirect ion beam fluence measurement system for ion irradiation and analysis experiments requiring indirect beam fluence measurements unperturbed by sample conditions like low temperature, high temperature, sample biasing as well as in regular ion implantation experiments in the ion implanters and electrostatic accelerators with continuous beam. The system, which uses simple, low cost, off-the-shelf components/systems and two distinct layers of in-house built softwarenot only eliminates the need for costly data acquisition systems but also overcomes difficulties in using properietry software. The hardware of the system is centered around a personal computer, a PIC16F887 based embedded system, a Faraday cup drive cum monitor circuit, a pair of Faraday Cups and a beam current integrator and the in-house developed software include C based microcontroller firmware and LABVIEW based virtual instrument automation software. The automatic fluence measurement involves two important phases, a current sampling phase lasting over 20-30 seconds during which the ion beam current is continuously measured by intercepting the ion beam and the averaged beam current value is computed. A subsequent charge computation phase lasting 700-900 seconds is executed making the ion beam to irradiate the samples and the incremental fluence received by the sampleis estimated usingthe latest averaged beam current value from the ion beam current sampling phase. The cycle of current sampling-charge computation is repeated till the required fluence is reached. Besides simplicity and cost-effectiveness, other important advantages of the developed system include easy reconfiguration of the system to suit customisation of experiments, scalability, easy debug and maintenance of the hardware/software, ability to work as a standalone system. The system was tested with different set of samples and ion fluences and the results were verified using

  13. Study on ion beam for development of micro devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, Ranjini

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, increasing demand for micro devices has necessitated improvements in the miniaturization techniques. Focused ion beam (FIB) system is one of the tools that is widely used in micro machining. Conventional FIB that is based on Liquid Metal Ion Source (LMIS-FIB) suffers from several limitations. This thesis, describes the design and development of an FIB system based on plasma ion sources that overcomes all the limitations of the LMIS-FIB systems and creates features in the range of 2-30 micron at two orders of higher speeds. This system is first of its kind developed in India and it is one of the two systems developed in the world successfully. In this thesis, details of design and development of high current and highly stable ion source, plasma diagnostics, low aberration and high demagnification ion beam focusing column, micron size ion beam diagnostics and demonstration of high speed micro milling of several materials including tough materials like, Molybdenum and Tungsten Carbide etc are described

  14. A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy based on deuterium-tritium neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Guido; Abrahantes, Arian

    2004-01-01

    A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy using deuterium-tritium accelerator based neutrons source is developed. Calculations based on a simple geometry model for the radiation transport are initially performed to estimate the assembly materials and their linear dimensions. Afterward, the assembly geometry is produced, optimized and verified. In order to perform these calculations the general-purpose MCNP code is used. Irradiation time and therapeutic gain are utilized as beam assessment parameters. Metallic uranium and manganese are successfully tested for fast-to-epithermal neutron moderation. In the present beam-shaping assembly proposal, the therapeutic gain is improved by 23% and the accelerator current required for a fixed irradiation period is reduced by six times compared to previous proposals based on the same D-T reaction

  15. A high-flux low-energy hydrogen ion beam using an end-Hall ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhoven, J. van; Sligte, E. te; Janssen, J.P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Most ion sources that produce high-flux hydrogen ion beams perform best in the high energy range (keV). Alternatively, some plasma sources produce very-lowenergy ions (<< 10 eV). However, in an intermediate energy range of 10-200 eV, no hydrogen ion sources were found that produce high-flux beams.

  16. Improvement of extracted ion beam from cold cathode Penning ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Samah I.; El-Khabeary, H.; Helal, A. G.

    2018-03-01

    A direct current cold cathode Penning ion source is operated at the optimum parameters and pressure equal to 7×10-4 mmHg using argon gas. It consists of a copper cylindrical hollow anode and two movable molybdenum discs cathodes are placed symmetrically at two ends of the anode. Argon ion beam is extracted from the ion source by using extractor of different aperture diameter equal to 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4 and 4.5 mm respectively. The extractor is placed at different distances from the ion exit aperture equal to 5, 10, 15 and 20 mm respectively. It is found that at extractor aperture diameter equal to 3.5 mm, ion exit aperture - extractor distance equal to 10 mm and extraction potential applied on the extractor is equal to -500 V, the optimum extracted ion beam current equal to 543 μA can be obtained. A comparison for Penning ion source without and with the extractor is made at the same optimum operating parameters, it is found that the extracted ion beam current from Penning ion source with the extractor increases about twice its initial value of Penning ion source without the extractor.

  17. Liquid metal alloy ion sources—An alternative for focussed ion beam technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, Lothar; Mazarov, Paul; Bruchhaus, Lars; Gierak, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Today, Focused Ion Beam (FIB) processing is nearly exclusively based on gallium Liquid Metal Ion Sources (LMIS). But, many applications in the μm- or nm range could benefit from ion species other than gallium: local ion implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam synthesis, or Focused Ion Beam Lithography (IBL). Therefore, Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Sources (LMAIS) represent a promising alternative to expand the remarkable application fields for FIB. Especially, the IBL process shows potential advantages over, e.g., electron beam or other lithography techniques: direct, resistless, and three-dimensional patterning, enabling a simultaneous in-situ process control by cross-sectioning and inspection. Taking additionally into account that the used ion species influences significantly the physical and chemical nature of the resulting nanostructures—in particular, the electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanic properties leading to a large potential application area which can be tuned by choosing a well suited LMAIS. Nearly half of the elements of the periodic table are recently available in the FIB technology as a result of continuous research in this area during the last forty years. Key features of a LMAIS are long life-time, high brightness, and stable ion current. Recent developments could make these sources feasible for nano patterning issues as an alternative technology more in research than in industry. The authors will review existing LMAIS, LMIS other than Ga, and binary and ternary alloys. These physical properties as well as the fabrication technology and prospective domains for modern FIB applications will similarly be reviewed. Other emerging ion sources will be also presented and their performances discussed.

  18. Portable test bench for the studies concerning ion sources and ion beam extraction and focusing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero Lopez, F.

    1961-01-01

    A portable test bench is described, which was designed to check ion sources, ion beam extraction and focusing systems before its use in a 600 KeV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator. The vacuum possibilities of the system are specially analyzed in connection with its particular use. The whole can be considered as a portable accelerator of low energy (50 keV). (Author)

  19. Spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions with Electron Beam Ion Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru; Murakami, Izumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra is investigated of electron energies from 490 to 1440 eV. Previously unreported lines are presented in the EUV range, and some of them are identified by comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations. (author)

  20. EUV spectrum of highly charged tungsten ions in electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, H.A.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Nakamura, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra was investigated for electron energy from 540 to 1370 eV. Previously unreported lines were presented in the EUV range, and comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations identified them. (author)

  1. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The extraction of the positive ions from the plasma is done by polarizing the source at a positive potential with respect to ground and pulling ... electrostatic quadrupoles, Faraday cups etc. are controlled via the serial ports. Field point modules are used for AD and DA conversions. The software is written in LabView for easy.

  2. Ion beam analysis with monolayer depth resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstanjen, H. D.

    1998-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the analysis of surfaces and near-surface layers with monolayer depth resolution by means of high resolution Rutherford backscattering (HRBS) and elastic recoil detection (HERDA) of ions with an energy of a few MeV, in combination with an electrostatic spectrometer. With this instrument, which has recently been set up at the 6 MV Pelletron accelerator of the Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung in Stuttgart, depth resolutions of 0.1 nm are obtained in HRBS and 0.3 nm in HERDA experiments. This paper gives a short outline of the design and performance of the spectrometer followed by various examples of applications. These comprise examples showing the analyzing power of the instrument, the analysis of an X-ray mirror by HRBS, the study of the initial oxidation of surfaces of aluminum single crystals by HERDA and recent results concerning charge exchange in ion backscattering.

  3. Targets for laser and ion beam drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    At the two previous heavy ion fusion symposia, researchers from Livermore presented their best estimates of target energy gain. The results presented at Tokyo differed significantly from those presented at Darmstadt. The Livermore estimates were again revised for this symposium. The new estimates are given in an accompanying paper by Lindl et al. and in additional detail in this paper. The new estimates are similar to the results presented at Darmstadt. The implications of the new results are discussed

  4. Theory of nanocluster size distributions from ion beam synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C W; Yi, D O; Sharp, I D; Shin, S J; Liao, C Y; Guzman, J; Ager, J W; Haller, E E; Chrzan, D C

    2009-04-10

    Ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters is studied via both kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the self-consistent mean-field solution to a set of coupled rate equations. Both approaches predict the existence of a steady-state shape for the cluster-size distribution that depends only on a characteristic length determined by the effective diffusion coefficient, the ion solubility, and the volumetric ion flux. The average cluster size in the steady-state regime is determined by the implanted species or matrix interface energy.

  5. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Xie, D. Z.; Hitz, D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24-28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of 40Ar+ and 129Xe26+ have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24 +18 GHz ) heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  6. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  7. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Okamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.

    2012-01-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  8. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  9. A two-beam radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for funnelling of ion beams at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firjahn-Andersch, A.; Schempp, A.; Madlung, J.; Staschok, C.

    1996-01-01

    In a heavy ion inertial fusion river the strongest current limitations are space charge forces in the low energy part of the linac. For this reason the required high current and small emittance ion beam will be reached by several funnelling stages where two identically bunched ion beams are combined into a single beam with twice the frequency, current and brightness. For the first funnelling stage a new two-beam radio-frequency quadrupolecould be used where two beams are bunched and accelerated in a single RF cavity. The RF structure development and the experimental set-up for beam funnelling with He + will be presented. (orig.)

  10. Algorithm for ion beam figuring of low-gradient mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Changjun; Li, Shengyi; Xie, Xuhui

    2009-07-20

    Ion beam figuring technology for low-gradient mirrors is discussed. Ion beam figuring is a noncontact machining technique in which a beam of high-energy ions is directed toward a target workpiece to remove material in a predetermined and controlled fashion. Owing to this noncontact mode of material removal, problems associated with tool wear and edge effects, which are common in conventional contact polishing processes, are avoided. Based on the Bayesian principle, an iterative dwell time algorithm for planar mirrors is deduced from the computer-controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) principle. With the properties of the removal function, the shaping process of low-gradient mirrors can be approximated by the linear model for planar mirrors. With these discussions, the error surface figuring technology for low-gradient mirrors with a linear path is set up. With the near-Gaussian property of the removal function, the figuring process with a spiral path can be described by the conventional linear CCOS principle, and a Bayesian-based iterative algorithm can be used to deconvolute the dwell time. Moreover, the selection criterion of the spiral parameter is given. Ion beam figuring technology with a spiral scan path based on these methods can be used to figure mirrors with non-axis-symmetrical errors. Experiments on SiC chemical vapor deposition planar and Zerodur paraboloid samples are made, and the final surface errors are all below 1/100 lambda.

  11. Spin observables in reactions with radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo U, A.; Urrego B, J.P. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with exotic nuclei will provide important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms. We are currently engaged in exploring the use of polarization observables with radioactive ion beams and in the development of a polarized proton cryogenic target. (Author)

  12. The radioactive ion beam project at VECC, Kolkata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A project to build an ISOL-post accelerator type of radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility has been undertaken at VECC, Kolkata. The funding for the first phase of the project was approved in August 1997. This phase will be the R&D phase and will be completed by December 2003. The present status of development of the ...

  13. Structural and electrical properties of swift heavy ion beam irradiated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    at the Co/Si interface for investigation of ion beam mixing at various doses: 8 × 1012, 5 × 1013 and 1 × 1014 cm–2. Formation of different phases of cobalt silicide is identified by the grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. (GIXRD) technique, which shows enhancement of intermixing and silicide formation as a result of irradiation ...

  14. National negative-ion-based neutral-beam development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.; Pyle, R.V.

    1983-08-01

    The plan covers facilities required, program milestones, and decision points. It includes identification of applications, experiments, theoretical research areas, development of specific technologies and reactor development and demonstration facilities required to bring about the successful application of negative-ion-based neutral beams. Particular emphasis is placed on those activities leading to use on existing plasma confinement experiments or their upgrades

  15. Negative-ion-beam generation with the ORNL SITEX source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.; Kim, J.

    1982-05-01

    Parametric studies were made on a hot cathode reflex discharge H - Surface Ionization source with Transverse Extraction (SITEX) in both the pure hydrogen and the mixed hydrogen-cesium mode. Extraction current density, beam current, gas efficiency, extracted electron-to-H - current ratio, heavy negative ion impurities, optics, and long pulse operation were investigated as a function of time, arc voltage, arc current, converter voltage, H 2 gas flow, cesium feed rate, and plasma generator geometries. Initial results of the research were an extracted H - beam current density of 56 mA/cm 2 at 23 mA for 5 s pulses and, gas efficiency of 3%, theta/sub perpendicular/ (1/e) approx. 2 +- 1 0 , theta/sub parallel/ (1/e) approx. 1 +- 1 0 , at a beam energy of 25 keV. Negative heavy ion beam impurities were reduced to - ions are produced prinicpally by positive ion surface conversion using elemental cesium fractional monolayer coverage on a molybdenum converter substrate, which is biased negatively with respect to the anode

  16. Coulomb collisional relaxation process of ion beams in magnetized plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Y.

    2010-01-01

    An orbit following code is developed to calculate ion beam trajectories in magnetized plasmas. The equation of motion (the Newton's equation) is solved including the Lorentz force term and Coulomb collisional relaxation term. Furthermore, a new algorithm is introduced by applying perturbation method regarding the collision term as a small term. The reduction of computation time is suggested.

  17. Simulation of electron cloud effects to heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Fatih; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2011-07-01

    Electron cloud (EC) driven instability can cause beam loss, emittance growth, trajectory change and wake fields. Mentioned crucial effects of EC motivated researchers to understand the EC build up mechanism and the effects of EC to the beam. This motivation also induced the progress of developing new simulation codes. EC simulations can roughly be divided into two classes such as, softwares whose goals are to simulate the build up of the EC during the passage of a bunch train and the codes which model the interaction of a bunch with an EC. The aim of this study is to simulate the effects of electron cloud (EC) on the dynamics of heavy ion beams which are used in heavy ion synchrotron (SIS-18) at GSI. To do this, a 3-D and self-consistent simulation program based on particle in cell (PIC) method is used. In the PIC cycle, accurate solution of the Maxwell equations is obtained by employing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. As a model, we assumed a perfectly conducting beam pipe which was uniformly (or randomly) loaded with the electrons. Then as parallel with the realistic cases in SIS-18, a single bunch consisting of U{sup +73} ions was extracted which could propagate in this pipe. Due to EC-ion bunch interaction, electrons gained energy and their displacements were observed. Electric and magnetic field components and EC charge density were calculated, numerically.

  18. Damage production in silicon carbide by dual ion beams irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Yanwen; Han, Dong; Zhao, Yunbiao; Zhao, Ziqiang; Zhang, Ming

    2018-02-01

    Lattice damage and evolution in single crystalline 6H-SiC under Si + He successively dual ion beams irradiation is studied by using Raman spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and nano-indentation tests. Single Si and He ion irradiations are also performed for the comparison. The results of Raman spectra reveal that the damage level increases with the fluence. A normal strain profile along the ion path is generated due to ion irradiation induced dilation of lattices, contributing mainly by interstitial related defects. Moreover, Si and He ion implantation produced different types of defects. The damage and chemical bonding states are significantly changed after He atoms implanted in Si pre-irradiated samples. Si + He dual ion irradiations increase the damage level further, resulting in changes of the damage states because of complex defects interactions. The nano-hardness of irradiated SiC is combined results of hardening effects of some kinds of defects and the breakdown of covalent-bonds. The mechanical properties present significant differences between single Si, He and Si + He successively dual ion beam irradiations, due to defects evolution during the irradiation process.

  19. Ultralow energy ion beam surface modification of low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Martyn J; Bradley, James W; van den Berg, Jaap A; Armour, David G; Stevens, Gary C

    2005-12-01

    Ultralow energy Ar+ and O+ ion beam irradiation of low density polyethylene has been carried out under controlled dose and monoenergetic conditions. XPS of Ar+-treated surfaces exposed to ambient atmosphere show that the bombardment of 50 eV Ar+ ions at a total dose of 10(16) cm(-2) gives rise to very reactive surfaces with oxygen incorporation at about 50% of the species present in the upper surface layer. Using pure O+ beam irradiation, comparatively low O incorporation is achieved without exposure to atmosphere (approximately 13% O in the upper surface). However, if the surface is activated by Ar+ pretreatment, then large oxygen contents can be achieved under subsequent O+ irradiation (up to 48% O). The results show that for very low energy (20 eV) oxygen ions there is a dose threshold of about 5 x 10(15) cm(-2) before surface oxygen incorporation is observed. It appears that, for both Ar+ and O+ ions in this regime, the degree of surface modification is only very weakly dependent on the ion energy. The results suggest that in the nonequilibrium plasma treatment of polymers, where the ion flux is typically 10(18) m(-2) s(-1), low energy ions (<50 eV) may be responsible for surface chemical modification.

  20. Evaluation of pulsed ion beam produced in plasmas focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, R.; Ito, H.; Masugata, K.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of ion beams produced in a Mather-type plasma focus device have been studied. When a capacitor bank of 41.6 μF was charged to 30 kV, the discharge current reached a peak current of 450 kA, and after the current dip, an ion current density of 8 kA/cm 2 with a pulse width of 60 ns was obtained 110 mm downstream from the top of the anode on the axis. Ion beam was found to be emitted with very large spread of emission angle up to ±80deg. To evaluate the dependence of ion energy spectrum on the emission angle, we arrayed the incident angle resolved energy spectrometers simultaneously at different angular positions on a circumference of 110 mm in radius, centered at the focus. From the evaluation, we found that the ion energy was distributed from 0.1 MeV to 2 MeV and that ions with small emission angle have higher energy and wide spread of incidence angle. In addition, the ion energy and spread of incidence angle decrease with increasing emission angle. (author)