WorldWideScience

Sample records for deuterium fusion rocket

  1. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm -1 , which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs

  2. Characterization of a deuterium-deuterium plasma fusion neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R. F.; Pienaar, J.; Hogenbirk, E.; Masson, D.; Nolte, R.; Zimbal, A.; Röttger, S.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Bruno, G.

    2018-01-01

    We characterize the neutron output of a deuterium-deuterium plasma fusion neutron generator, model 35-DD-W-S, manufactured by NSD/Gradel-Fusion. The measured energy spectrum is found to be dominated by neutron peaks at 2.2 MeV and 2.7 MeV. A detailed GEANT4 simulation accurately reproduces the measured energy spectrum and confirms our understanding of the fusion process in this generator. Additionally, a contribution of 14 . 1 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium fusion is found at a level of 3 . 5%, from tritium produced in previous deuterium-deuterium reactions. We have measured both the absolute neutron flux as well as its relative variation on the operational parameters of the generator. We find the flux to be proportional to voltage V 3 . 32 ± 0 . 14 and current I 0 . 97 ± 0 . 01. Further, we have measured the angular dependence of the neutron emission with respect to the polar angle. We conclude that it is well described by isotropic production of neutrons within the cathode field cage.

  3. Effect of Coulomb screening on deuterium-deuterium fusion cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shunjin

    1991-01-01

    The popular Gamow formula for the deuterium-deuterium fusion cross-section is generalized to take into account the Coulomb screening effect. The generalized formula has been used to discuss the fusion process occurring in the metal medium

  4. Design study of laser fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Shoyama, Hidetoshi; Kanda, Yukinori

    1991-01-01

    A design study was made on a rocket powered by laser fusion. Dependence of its flight performance on target gain, driver repetition rate and fuel composition was analyzed to obtain optimal design parameters of the laser fusion rocket. The results indicate that the laser fusion rocket fueled with DT or D 3 He has the potential advantages over other propulsion systems such as fission rocket for interplanetary travel. (author)

  5. Electrochemically induced nuclear fusion of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorne, J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper cold fusion of deuterium by electrolysis of heavy water onto a palladium (or titanium) cathode is reported. Contrary to the assumption of Fleishmann and Pons that electrochemically compressed D + exists inside the palladium cathode, the observations of Jones et al. can be partially explained by the simultaneous presence of deuteride D - and the highly mobile positive deuterium ion D + . The opposite charges reduce the intranuclear distance and enhance the tunneling fusion rate. Furthermore, alloying of lithium with palladium can stabilize a negatively charged deuteride ion due to the salinelike character of lithium deuteride. The enormous pressure (or fugacity), achieved by the applied electrochemical potential (10 30 atm), is a virtual pressure that would have existed in equilibrium with palladium deuteride (PdD x ). It is speculated that nuclear fusion occurs at the surface, and the PdD x serves as a reservoir for the supply of deuteride ions

  6. Cold versus hot fusion deuterium branching ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, H.; Bass, R.

    1995-01-01

    A major source of misunderstanding of the nature of cold nuclear fusion has been the expectation that the deuterium branching ratios occurring within a palladium lattice would be consistent with the gas-plasma branching ratios. This misunderstanding has led to the concept of the dead graduate student, the 1989's feverish but fruitless search for neutron emissions from cold fusion reactors, and the follow-on condemnation of the new science of cold fusion. The experimental facts are that in a properly loaded palladium lattice, the deuterium fusion produces neutrons at little above background, a greatly less-than-expected production of tritium (the tritium desert), and substantially more helium-4 than is observed in hot plasma physics. The experimental evidence is now compelling (800 reports of success from 30 countries) that cold nuclear fusion is a reality, that the branching ratios are unexpected, and that a new science is struggling to be recognized. Commercialization of some types of cold fusion devices has already begun

  7. Catalyzed deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium fusion blankets for high temperature process heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.M.H.; Salimi, B.

    1982-01-01

    Tritiumless blanket designs, associated with a catalyzed deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion cycle and using a single high temperature solid pebble or falling bed zone, for process heat production, are proposed. Neutronics and photonics calculations, using the Monte Carlo method, show that an about 90% heat deposition fraction is possible in the high temperature zone, compared to a 30 to 40% fraction if a deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion cycle is used with separate breeding and heat deposition zones. Such a design is intended primarily for synthetic fuels manufacture through hydrogen production using high temperature water electrolysis. A system analysis involving plant energy balances and accounting for the different fusion energy partitions into neutrons and charged particles showed that plasma amplification factors in the range of 2 are needed. In terms of maximization of process heat and electricity production, and the maximization of the ratio of high temperature process heat to electricity, the catalyzed D-D system outperforms the D-T one by about 20%. The concept is thought competitive to the lithium boiler concept for such applications, with the added potential advantages of lower tritium inventories in the plasma, reduced lithium pumping (in the case of magnetic confinement) and safety problems, less radiation damage at the first wall, and minimized risks of radioactive product contamination by tritium

  8. The electromagnetic rocket gun impact fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    A macroparticle accelerator to be used as an impact fusion driver is discussed and which can accelerate a small projectile to --200 km/sec over a distance of a few 100 meters. The driver which we have named electromagnetic rocket gun, accelerates a small rocket-like projectile by a travelling magnetic wave. The rocket propellant not only serves as a sink to absorb the heat produced in the projectile by resistive energy losses, but at the same time is also the source of additional thrust through the heating of the propellant to high temperatures by the travelling magnetic wave. The total thrust on the projectile is the sum of the magnetic and recoil forces. In comparison to a rocket, the efficiency is here much larger, with the momentum transferred to the gun barrel of the gun rather than to a tenuous jet. (author)

  9. Deuterium behavior in first-wall materials for nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, E.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-wall interactions play an important part while choosing materials for the first wall in future fusion reactors. Moreover, the use of tritium as a fuel will impose safety limits regarding the total amount present in the tokamak. Previous analyses of first-wall samples exposed to fusion plasma highlighted an in-bulk migration of deuterium (as an analog to tritium) in carbon materials. Despite its limited value, this retention is problematic: contrary to co-deposited layers, it seems very unlikely to recover easily the deuterium retained in such a way. Because of the difficult access to in situ samples, most published studies on the subject were carried out using post-mortem sample analysis. In order to access to the dynamic of the phenomenon and come apart potential element redistribution during storage, we set up a bench intended for simultaneous low-energy ion implantation, reproducing the deuterium interaction with first-wall materials, and high-energy micro beam analysis. Nuclear reaction analysis performed at the micrometric scale (μNRA) allows to characterize deuterium repartition profiles in situ. This analysis technique was confirmed to be non-perturbative of the mechanisms studied. We observed on the experimental data set that the material surface (0-1 μm) display a high and nearly constant deuterium content, with a uniform distribution. On the contrary, in-bulk deuterium (1-11 μm) localizes in preferential trapping sites related to the material microstructure. In-bulk deuterium inventory seems to increase with the incident fluence, in spite of the wide data scattering attributed to the structure variation of studied areas. Deuterium saturation at the surface as well as in-depth migration are instantaneous; in-vacuum storage leads to a small deuterium global desorption. Observations made via μNRA were coupled with results from other characterization techniques. X-ray μtomography allowed to identify porosities as the preferential trapping sites

  10. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  11. Deuterium ion irradiation damage and deuterium trapping mechanism in candidate stainless steel material (JPCA2) for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizuka, Norihiro; Kurita, Takaaki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Muroga, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    An improved austenitic stainless steel (JPCA), a candidate material for fusion reactor, is irradiated at room temperature with deuterium ion beams. Desorption spectra of deuterium gas is measured at various increased temperatures and defects formed under irradiation are observed by transmission electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of the thermal release of deuteriums and the characteristics of irradiation-induced defects involved in the process. In the deuterium deportion spectra observed, five release stages are found to exist at 90 deg C, 160 deg C, 220 deg C, 300 deg C and 400 deg C, referred to as Stage I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Stage I is interpreted as representing the release of deuteriums trapped in point defects (presumably vacancies) formed under irradiation. The energy of desorption from the trapping sites is estimated at 0.8 eV. Stage II is concluded to be associated with the release of deuteriums trapped in a certain kind of existing defects. Stage III involves the release of deuteriums that are trapped in dislocations, dislocation loops or dislocated portions of stacking fault tetrahedra. This release occurs significantly in processed materials and other materials irradiated with high energy ion beams that may cause cascade damage. Stage IV is interpreted in terms of thermal decomposition of small deuterium clusters. Stage V is associated with the decomposition of rather large deuterium clusters grown on the {111} plane. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to ∼9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS ∼6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored

  13. Some experiments on cold fusion by deuterium hydrogen gas infusion in titanium metal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestnik Filho, J.; Geraldo, L.P.; Pugliese, R.; Saxena, R.N.; Morato, S.P.; Fulfaro, R.

    1990-05-01

    New results on cold fusion are reported where three different experimental situations have been tried: a) deuterium gas loaded titanium; b) deuterium gas loaded Ti 0.8 Zr 0.2 CrMn alloy and c) titanium and the Ti 0.8 Zr 0.2 CrMn alloy loaded with a mixture of deuterium and hydrogen gases. With these experiments, new thermodynamical non equilibrium conditions were achieved and the possibility of cold fusion between protons and deuterons was also tested. Three independent neutron detectors and one NaI(Tl) were utilized. Despite some large values reported in the literature for the fusion rate, an upper limit of only 8 x 10 -24 fusions/sper deuterium pair or per deuterium-hydrogen pair was determined within the attained accuracy. (author) [pt

  14. Reactor prospects of muon-catalyzed fusion of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that the number of fusion events catalyzed by a single muon is orders of magnitude greater for deuterium and tritium concentrated in a transition metal than in gaseous form and that the recent observation of 2.5-MeV neutrons from a D 2 O electrolytic cell with palladium and titanium cathodes can thereby be interpreted in terms of cosmic muon-catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fusion. This suggests a new fusion reactor reactor consisting of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metal fuel elements in a fusion core that surrounds an accelerator-produced muon source. The feasibility of net energy production in such a reactor is established in terms of requirements on the number of fusion events catalyzed per muon. The technological implications for a power reactor based on this concept are examined. The potential of such a concept as a neutron source for materials testing and tritium and plutonium production is briefly discussed

  15. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...... enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast...

  16. Deuterium-tritium fuel self-sufficiency in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Vold, E.L.; Gung, C.Y.; Youssef, M.Z.; Shin, K.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions necessary to achieve deuterium-tritium fuel self-sufficiency in fusion reactors are derived through extensive modeling and calculations of the required and achievable tritium breeding ratios as functions of the many reactor parameters and candidate design concepts. It is found that the excess margin in the breeding potential is not sufficient to cover all present uncertainties. Thus, the goal of attaining fuel self-sufficiency significantly restricts the allowable parameter space and design concepts. For example, the required breeding ratio can be reduced by (A) attaining high tritium fractional burnup, >5%, in the plasma, (B) achieving very high reliability, >99%, and very short times, <1 day, to fix failures in the tritium processing system, and (C) ensuring that nonradioactive decay losses from all subsystems are extremely low, e.g., <0.1% for the plasma exhaust processing system. The uncertainties due to nuclear data and calculational methods are found to be significant, but they are substantially smaller than those due to uncertainties in system definition

  17. Numerical studies of deuterium-tritium ignition in impact-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubrin, R.M.; Ribe, F.L.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical one-dimensional solution of the Euler equations for an imploding spherical tungsten shell with internal deuterium-tritium gas is applied to study impact-fusion dynamics with parameters of fusion reactor relevance. Thermal conduction and radiative energy loss by the plasma are taken into account, as is heating by fusion generated alpha particles. A variety of target sizes and impact velocities are examined, and scaling laws for fusion yields are deduced which define possible parameters for conceptual commercial impact-fusion power reactors. It is found that shell energies and velocities of about 30 MJ and 110 km/s would be satisfactory. A commercial impact-fusion reactor based on such parameters is discussed

  18. Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Jaeger, E.F.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Kwon, S.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Laughlin, M.J.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D.E.; Marchlik, M.; Marmar, E.S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mastrocola, V.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.P.; Majeski, R.; Mauel, M.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Milora, S.L.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Pavlov, Y.I.; Pearson, G.; Perkins, F.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pitcher, S.; Popovichev, S.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert TM system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of ∼10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed

  19. Efficient source for the production of ultradense deuterium D(-1) for laser-induced fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Patrik U.; Loenn, Benny; Holmlid, Leif

    2011-01-01

    A novel source which simplifies the study of ultradense deuterium D(-1) is now described. This means one step further toward deuterium fusion energy production. The source uses internal gas feed and D(-1) can now be studied without time-of-flight spectral overlap from the related dense phase D(1). The main aim here is to understand the material production parameters, and thus a relatively weak laser with focused intensity ≤10 12 W cm -2 is employed for analyzing the D(-1) material. The properties of the D(-1) material at the source are studied as a function of laser focus position outside the emitter, deuterium gas feed, laser pulse repetition frequency and laser power, and temperature of the source. These parameters influence the D(-1) cluster size, the ionization mode, and the laser fragmentation patterns.

  20. Efficient source for the production of ultradense deuterium D(-1) for laser-induced fusion (ICF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Patrik U.; Lönn, Benny; Holmlid, Leif

    2011-01-01

    A novel source which simplifies the study of ultradense deuterium D(-1) is now described. This means one step further toward deuterium fusion energy production. The source uses internal gas feed and D(-1) can now be studied without time-of-flight spectral overlap from the related dense phase D(1). The main aim here is to understand the material production parameters, and thus a relatively weak laser with focused intensity ≤1012 W cm-2 is employed for analyzing the D(-1) material. The properties of the D(-1) material at the source are studied as a function of laser focus position outside the emitter, deuterium gas feed, laser pulse repetition frequency and laser power, and temperature of the source. These parameters influence the D(-1) cluster size, the ionization mode, and the laser fragmentation patterns.

  1. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G.

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet trademark system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of ∼ 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed

  2. Determination of deuterium in metal by vacuum fusion-mass spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yukio; Akiyama, Shigeo; Ochiai, Ken-ichi; Asakura, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Ken-ichi

    1976-01-01

    A specimen of deuterium-enriched Zircaloy was prepared to study a method for the determination of deuterium in metal. The measuring apparatus consists of vacuum fusion section (10 -5 -10 -4 Torr), gas extracting and collecting section, the section of introducing both standard D 2 and HD gases into a gas holder, and mass spectrometric analysis section. The deuterium in Zircaloy can be extracted by 100% for 5 min. at 1600 0 C. The main components of the extracted gas are H 2 , D 2 , HD, CO, H 2 O and N 2 . Deuterium is determined by the calculation from the determinations of D 2 and HD. The amounts of D 2 and HD gases in the specimen were obtained from the calibration curve prepared and the spectrum intensity of D 2 + and HD + resulted from specimen analysis. As a result of the analysis of D 2 -enriched Zircaloy, it has been found that the precision of the determination is within the coefficient variation of about 3% for the extracted D 2 gas amount of 10 -3 -10 -2 ml (STP), including the deuterium segregation in the specimen, and the determination limit was 1 x 10 -5 ml (STP). (Kobatake, H.)

  3. Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy: The Fusion Driven Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony; Kirtley, David; Pihl, Christopher; Pfaff, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The future of manned space exploration and development of space depends critically on the creation of a dramatically more proficient propulsion architecture for in-space transportation. A very persuasive reason for investigating the applicability of nuclear power in rockets is the vast energy density gain of nuclear fuel when compared to chemical combustion energy. Current nuclear fusion efforts have focused on the generation of electric grid power and are wholly inappropriate for space transportation as the application of a reactor based fusion-electric system creates a colossal mass and heat rejection problem for space application.

  4. Effect of laser spot size on fusion neutron yield in laser–deuterium cluster interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guanglong; Lu Haiyang; Wang Cheng; Liu Jiansheng; Li Ruxin; Ni Guoquan; Xu Zhizhan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the laser spot size on the neutron yield of table-top nuclear fusion from explosions of a femtosecond intense laser pulse heated deuterium clusters is investigated by using a simplified model, in which the cluster size distribution and the energy attenuation of the laser as it propagates through the cluster jet are taken into account. It has been found that there exists a proper laser spot size for the maximum fusion neutron yield for a given laser pulse and a specific deuterium gas cluster jet. The proper spot size, which is dependent on the laser parameters and the cluster jet parameters, has been calculated and compared with the available experimental data. A reasonable agreement between the calculated results and the published experimental results is found

  5. Experimental Determination of the Possible Deuterium - Deuterium Fusion Reaction Originated in a Single Cavitation Bubble Luminescence System Using CDCL3 and D2 O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaglia, Mario; Florido, Pablo; Mayer, Roberto; Bonetto, Fabian

    2003-01-01

    We focus this work on the measurement of the possible Deuterium - Deuterium reaction in a SCBL (Single Cavitation Bubble Luminescence) system.We measure the possible reaction at the bubble generation time and at the bubble collapse time. We use a Nd:YAG laser and CDCl 3 and D 2 O as a medium to generate the bubble. Since CDCl 3 accommodation coefficient is best than that of D 2 O, it is expected a greater collapse force than using D 2 O.To benefit the bubble collapse violence, we diminish the temperature of the liquids.To avoid false neutron detection, we developed a measuring system with high background reject using the characteristic experiment times.No neutrons attributable to Deuterium - Deuterium fusion reaction were measured

  6. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.

    1994-03-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 10 17 m -3 without the appearance of either disruptive MHD events or detectable changes in Alfven wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits

  7. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  8. The First Decommissioning of a Fusion Reactor Fueled by Deuterium-Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Charles A.; Perry, Erik; Rule, Keith; Williams, Michael; Parsells, Robert; Viola, Michael; Chrzanowski, James

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University (PPPL) was the first fusion reactor fueled by a mixture of deuterium and tritium (D-T) to be decommissioned in the world. The decommissioning was performed over a period of three years and was completed safely, on schedule, and under budget. Provided is an overview of the project and detail of various factors which led to the success of the project. Discussion will cover management of the project, engineering planning before the project started and during the field work as it was being performed, training of workers in the field, the novel adaptation of tools from other industry, and the development of an innovative process for the use of diamond wire to segment the activated/contaminated vacuum vessel. The success of the TFTR decommissioning provides a viable model for the decommissioning of D-T burning fusion devices in the future

  9. Energetics of semi-catalyzed-deuterium, light-water-moderated, fusion-fission toroidal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Towner, H.H.; Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.

    1978-07-01

    The semi-catalyzed-deuterium Light-Water Hybrid Reactor (LWHR) comprises a lithium-free light-water-moderated blanket with U 3 Si fuel driven by a deuterium-based fusion-neutron source, with complete burn-up of the tritium but almost no burn-up of the helium-3 reaction product. A one-dimensional model for a neutral-beam-driven tokamak plasma is used to determine the operating modes under which the fusion energy multiplication Q/sub p/ can be equal to or greater than 0.5. Thermonuclear, beam-target, and energetic-ion reactions are taken into account. The most feasible operating conditions for Q/sub p/ approximately 0.5 are tau/sub E/ = 2 to 4 x 10 14 cm -3 s, = 10 to 20 keV, and E/sub beam/ = 500 to 1000 keV, with approximately 40% of the fusion energy produced by beam-target reactions. Illustrative parameters of LWHRs are compared with those of an ignited D-T reactor

  10. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Holmlid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0 give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u−1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles HN(0 of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D2 gas (at <1 mbar pressure is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  11. Numerical simulation by a random particle method of Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions in a plasma*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Fréderique

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and we justify a Monte-Carlo algorithm which solves a spatially homogeneous kinetic equation of Boltzmann type that models the fusion reaction between a deuterium ion and a tritium ion, and giving an α particle and a neutron. The proposed algorithm is validated with the use of explicit solutions of the kinetic model obtained by replacing the fusion cross-section by a Maxwellian cross section. On propose et on justifie un algorithme de type Monte-Carlo permettant de résoudre un modèle cinétique homogène en espace de type Boltzmann modélisant la réaction de fusion entre un ion deutérium et un ion tritium, et donnant une particule α et un neutron. L’algorithme proposé est par ailleurs validé via des solutions explicites du modèle cinétique obtenues en remplaçant la section efficace de fusion par une section efficace maxwellienne.

  12. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Concept for a high performance MHD airbreathing-IEC fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froning, H.D. Jr.; Miley, G.H.; Nadler, J.; Shaban, Y.; Momota, H.; Burton, E.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Single-State-to-Orbit (SSTO) vehicle propellant can be reduced by Magnets-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) processes that minimize airbreathing propulsion losses and propellant consumption during atmospheric flight, and additional reduction in SSTO propellant is enabled by Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion, whose more energetic reactions reduce rocket propellant needs. MHD airbreathing propulsion during an SSTO vehicle's initial atmospheric flight phase and IEC fusion propulsion during its final exo-atmospheric flight phase is therefore being explored. Accomplished work is not yet sufficient for claiming such a vehicle's feasibility. But takeoff and propellant mass for an MHD airbreathing and IEC fusion vehicle could be as much as 25 and 40 percent less than one with ordinary airbreathing and IEC fusion; and as much as 50 and 70 percent less than SSTO takeoff and propellant mass with MHD airbreathing and chemical rocket propulsion

  14. Concept for a high performance MHD airbreathing-IEC fusion rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, H. D.; Miley, G. H.; Nadler, J.; Shaban, Y.; Momota, H.; Burton, E.

    2001-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that Single-State-to-Orbit (SSTO) vehicle propellant can be reduced by Magnets-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) processes that minimize airbreathing propulsion losses and propellant consumption during atmospheric flight, and additional reduction in SSTO propellant is enabled by Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion, whose more energetic reactions reduce rocket propellant needs. MHD airbreathing propulsion during an SSTO vehicle's initial atmospheric flight phase and IEC fusion propulsion during its final exo-atmospheric flight phase is therefore being explored. Accomplished work is not yet sufficient for claiming such a vehicle's feasibility. But takeoff and propellant mass for an MHD airbreathing and IEC fusion vehicle could be as much as 25 and 40 percent less than one with ordinary airbreathing and IEC fusion; and as much as 50 and 70 percent less than SSTO takeoff and propellant mass with MHD airbreathing and chemical rocket propulsion. .

  15. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l i ). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q a ∼ 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l i plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q 0 > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions

  16. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Boehly, T R; Kress, J D; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ∼20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  17. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600 (United States); Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  18. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results

  19. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  20. Fusion Neutronic Source deuterium endash tritium neutron spectrum measurements using natural diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasilnikov, A.V.; Kaneko, J.; Isobe, M.; Maekawa, F.; Nishitani, T.

    1997-01-01

    Two natural diamond detectors (NDDs) operating at room temperature were used for Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) deuterium endash tritium (DT) neutron spectra measurements at different points around the tritium target and for different deuteron beam energies. Energy resolution of both NDDs were measured, with values 1.95% and 2.8%. Due to the higher energy resolution of one of the two NDDs studied it was possible to measure the shape of the DT neutron energy distribution and its broadening due to deuteron scattering inside the target. The influence of pulse pileup on the energy resolution of the combined system (NDD+electronics) at count rates up to 3.8x10 5 counts/s was investigated. A 3.58% energy resolution for the spectrometric system based on NDD and a 0.25 μs shaping time amplifier has been measured at a count rate of 5.7x10 5 counts/s. It is shown that special development of a fast pulse signal processor is necessary for NDD based spectrometry at count rates of approximately 10 6 counts/s. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Design of deuterium and tritium pellet injector systems for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysor, R.B.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Three pellet injector designs developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are planned for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to reach the goal of a tritium pellet injector by 1988. These are the Repeating Pneumatic Injector (RPI), the Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI) and the Tritium Pellet Injector (TPI). Each of the pellet injector designs have similar performance characteristics in that they deliver up to 4-mm-dia pellets at velocities up to 1500 m/s with a dsign goal to 2000 m/s. Similar techniques are utilized to freeze and extrude the pellet material. The injector systems incorporate three gun concepts which differ in the number of gun barrels and the method of forming and chambering the pellets. The RPI, a single barrel repeating design, has been operational on TFTR since April 1985. Fabrication and assembly are essentially complete for DPI, and TPI is presently on hold after completing about 80% of the design. The TFTR pellet injector program is described, and each of the injector systems is described briefly. Design details are discussed in other papers at this symposium

  2. Combining MHD Airbreathing and Fusion Rocket Propulsion for Earth-to-Orbit Flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froning, H. D. Jr; Yang, Yang; Momota, H.; Burton, E.; Miley, G. H.; Luo, Nie

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Single-State-to-Orbit (SSTO) vehicle propellant can be reduced by Magnets-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) processes that minimize airbreathing propulsion losses and propellant consumption during atmospheric flight. Similarly additional reduction in SSTO propellant is enabled by Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion, whose more energetic reactions reduce rocket propellant needs. MHD airbreathing propulsion during an SSTO vehicle's initial atmospheric flight phase and IEC fusion propulsion during its final exo-atmospheric flight phase is therefore being explored. Accomplished work is not yet sufficient for claiming such a vehicle's feasibility. But takeoff and propellant mass for an MHD airbreathing and IEC fusion vehicle could be as much as 25 and 40 percent less than one with ordinary airbreathing and IEC fusion; and as much as 50 and 70 percent less than SSTO takeoff and propellant mass with MHD airbreathing and chemical rocket propulsion. Thus this unusual combined cycle engine shows great promise for performance gains beyond contemporary combined-cycle airbreathing engines

  3. Nuclear micro-beam analysis of deuterium distribution in carbon fibre composites for controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersson, P.; Kreter, A.; Possnert, G.; Rubel, M.

    2010-01-01

    Probes made of carbon fibre composite NB41 were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak and in a simulator of plasma-wall interactions, PISCES. The aim was to assess the deuterium retention and its lateral and depth distribution. The analysis was performed by means of D( 3 He, p) 4 He and 12 C( 3 He, p) 14 N nuclear reactions analysis using a standard (1 mm spot) and micro-beam (20 μm resolution). The measurements have revealed non uniform distribution of deuterium atoms in micro-regions: differences by a factor of 3 between the maximum and minimum deuterium concentrations. The differences were associated with the orientation and type of fibres for samples exposed in PICSES. For surface structure in the erosion zone of samples exposed to a tokamak plasma the micro-regions were more complex. Depth profiling has indicated migration of fuel into the bulk of materials.

  4. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  5. Experimental demonstration of ion extraction from magnetic thrust chamber for laser fusion rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Naoya; Yamamoto, Naoji; Morita, Taichi; Edamoto, Masafumi; Nakashima, Hideki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Mori, Yoshitaka; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2018-05-01

    A magnetic thrust chamber is an important system of a laser fusion rocket, in which the plasma kinetic energy is converted into vehicle thrust by a magnetic field. To investigate the plasma extraction from the system, the ions in a plasma are diagnosed outside the system by charge collectors. The results clearly show that the ion extraction does not strongly depend on the magnetic field strength when the energy ratio of magnetic field to plasma is greater than 4.3, and the magnetic field pushes back the plasma to generate a thrust, as previously suggested by numerical simulation and experiments.

  6. Analysis of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of laser fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Yoshimi, Naofumi; Nakama, Yuji; Muranaka, Takanobu; Mayumi, Takao; Nakashima, Hideki

    1997-01-01

    A magnetic nozzle concept in a laser fusion rocket is suitable for controlling the fusion plasma flow and it has an advantage that thermalization with wall structures in a thrust chamber can be avoided. Rayleigh-Taylor instability would occur at the surface of expanding plasma and it would lead to the degradation of thrust efficiency, due to diffusion of the plasma through ambient decelerating magnetic field. A 3D hybrid particle-in-cell code has been developed to analyze the plasma instability in the magnetic nozzle. The resultant linear growth rate γ of the instability is found to be 2.96 x 10 6 and it is in good agreement with the theoretical value from conventional Rayleigh Taylor instability. (author)

  7. Determination of deuterium concentrations in JET plasmas from fusion reaction rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Balet, B.; Cordey, J.G.; Morgan, P.D.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van; Conroy, S.; Elevant, T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of deuterium in the central regions of JET plasmas, expressed as a fraction of the electron concentration (n d /n e ), has been determined using four different methods involving neutron detection. These measurements are found to be consistent and agree within experimental errors with values deduced from Z eff measurements using visible bremsstrahlung radiation. (author) 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Fusion Energy-Production from a Deuterium-Tritium Plasma in the Jet Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebut, P. H.; Gibson, A.; Huguet, M.; Adams, J. M.; Alper, B.; Altmann, H.; Andersen, A.; Andrew, P.; Angelone, M.; Aliarshad, S.; Baigger, P.; Bailey, W.; Balet, B.; Barabaschi, P.; Barker, P.; Barnsley, R.; Baronian, M.; Bartlett, D. V.; Baylor, L.; Bell, A. C.; Benali, G.; Bertoldi, P.; Bertolini, E.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bickley, A. J.; Binder, D.; Bindslev, H.; Bonicelli, T.; Booth, S. J.; Bosia, G.; Botman, M.; Boucher, D.; Boucquey, P.; Breger, P.; Brelen, H.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brooks, D.; Brown, A.; Brown, T.; Brusati, M.; Bryan, S.; Brzozowski, J.; Buchse, R.; Budd, T.; Bures, M.; Businaro, T.; Butcher, P.; Buttgereit, H.; Caldwellnichols, C.; Campbell, D. J.; Card, P.; Celentano, G.; Challis, C. D.; Chankin, A. V.; Cherubini, A.; Chiron, D.; Christiansen, J.; Chuilon, P.; Claesen, R.; Clement, S.; Clipsham, E.; Coad, J. P.; Coffey, I. H.; Colton, A.; Comiskey, M.; Conroy, S.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, D.; Cooper, S.; Cordey, J. G.; Core, W.; Corrigan, G.; Corti, S.; Costley, A. E.; Cottrell, G.; Cox, M.; Cripwell, P.; Dacosta, O.; Davies, J.; Davies, N.; de Blank, H.; De Esch, H.; Dekock, L.; Deksnis, E.; Delvart, F.; Dennehinnov, G. B.; Deschamps, G.; Dickson, W. J.; Dietz, K. J.; Dmitrenko, S. L.; Dmitrieva, M.; Dobbing, J.; Doglio, A.; Dolgetta, N.; Dorling, S. E.; Doyle, P. G.; Duchs, D. F.; Duquenoy, H.; Edwards, A.; Ehrenberg, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Elevant, T.; Erents, S.K.; Eriksson, L. G.; Fajemirokun, H.; Falter, H.; Freiling, J.; Freville, F.; Froger, C.; Froissard, P.; Fullard, K.; Gadeberg, M.; Galetsas, A.; Gallagher, T.; Gambier, D.; Garribba, M.; Gaze, P.; Giannella, R.; Gill, R. D.; Girard, A.; Gondhalekar, A.; Goodall, D.; Gormezano, C.; Gottardi, N. A.; Gowers, C.; Green, B. J.; Grievson, B.; Haange, R.; Haigh, A.; Hancock, C. J.; Harbour, P. J.; Hartrampf, T.; Hawkes, N. C.; Haynes, P.; Hemmerich, J. L.; Hender, T.; Hoekzema, J.; Holland, D.; Hone, M.; Horton, L.; How, J.; Huart, M.; Hughes, I.; Hughes, T. P.; Hugon, M.; Huo, Y.; Ida, K.; Ingram, B.; Irving, M.; Jacquinot, J.; Jaeckel, H.; Jaeger, J. F.; Janeschitz, G.; Jankovicz, Z.; Jarvis, O. N.; Jensen, F.; Jones, E. M.; Jones, H. D.; Jones, Lpdf; Jones, S.; Jones, T. T. C.; Junger, J. F.; Junique, F.; Kaye, A.; Keen, B. E.; Keilhacker, M.; Kelly, G. J.; Kerner, W.; Khudoleev, A.; Konig, R.; Konstantellos, A.; Kovanen, M.; Kramer, G.; Kupschus, P.; Lasser, R.; Last, J. R.; Laundy, B.; Laurotaroni, L.; Laveyry, M.; Lawson, K.; Lennholm, M.; Lingertat, J.; Litunovski, R. N.; Loarte, A.; Lobel, R.; Lomas, P.; Loughlin, M.; Lowry, C.; Lupo, J.; Maas, A. C.; Machuzak, J.; Macklin, B.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C. F.; Magyar, G.; Mandl, W.; Marchese, V.; Marcon, G.; Marcus, F.; Mart, J.; Martin, D.; Martin, E.; Martinsolis, R.; Massmann, P.; Matthews, G.; McBryan, H.; McCracken, G.; McKivitt, J.; Meriguet, P.; Miele, P.; Miller, A.; Mills, J.; Mills, S. F.; Millward, P.; Milverton, P.; Minardi, E.; Mohanti, R.; Mondino, P. L.; Montgomery, D.; Montvai, A.; Morgan, P.; Morsi, H.; Muir, D.; Murphy, G.; Myrnas, R.; Nave, F.; Newbert, G.; Newman, M.; Nielsen, P.; Noll, P.; Obert, W.; Obrien, D.; Orchard, J.; Orourke, J.; Ostrom, R.; Ottaviani, M.; Pain, M.; Paoletti, F.; Papastergiou, S.; Parsons, W.; Pasini, D.; Patel, D.; Peacock, A.; Peacock, N.; Pearce, R. J. M.; Pearson, D.; Peng, J. F.; Desilva, R. P.; Perinic, G.; Perry, C.; Petrov, M.; Pick, M. A.; Plancoulaine, J.; Poffe, J. P.; Pohlchen, R.; Porcelli, F.; Porte, L.; Prentice, R.; Puppin, S.; Putvinskii, S.; Radford, G.; Raimondi, T.; Deandrade, M. C. R.; Reichle, R.; Reid, J.; Richards, S.; Righi, E.; Rimini, F.; Robinson, D.; Rolfe, A.; Ross, R. T.; Rossi, L.; Russ, R.; Rutter, P.; Sack, H. C.; Sadler, G.; Saibene, G.; Salanave, J. L.; Sanazzaro, G.; Santagiustina, A.; Sartori, R.; Sborchia, C.; Schild, P.; Schmid, M.; Schmidt, G.; Schunke, B.; Scott, S. M.; Serio, L.; Sibley, A.; Simonini, R.; Sips, A.C.C.; Smeulders, P.; Smith, R.; Stagg, R.; Stamp, M.; Stangeby, P.; Stankiewicz, R.; Start, D. F.; Steed, C. A.; Stork, D.; Stott, P.E.; Stubberfield, P.; Summers, D.; Summers, H.; Svensson, L.; Tagle, J. A.; Talbot, M.; Tanga, A.; Taroni, A.; Terella, C.; Terrington, A.; Tesini, A.; Thomas, P. R.; Thompson, E.; Thomsen, K.; Tibone, F.; Tiscornia, A.; Trevalion, P.; Tubbing, B.; Vanbelle, P.; Vanderbeken, H.; Vlases, G.; von Hellermann, M.; Wade, T.; Walker, C.; Walton, R.; Ward, D.; Watkins, M. L.; Watkins, N.; Watson, M. J.; Weber, S.; Wesson, J.; Wijnands, T. J.; Wilks, J.; Wilson, D.; Winkel, T.; Wolf, R.; Wong, D.; Woodward, C.; Wu, Y.; Wykes, M.; Young, D.; Young, I. D.; Zannelli, L.; Zolfaghari, A.; Zwingmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes a series of experiments in the Joint European Torus (JET), culminating in the first tokamak discharges in deuterium-tritium fuelled mixtures. The experiments were undertaken within limits imposed by restrictions on vessel activation and tritium usage. The objectives were: (i) to

  9. Correction factor to determine total hydrogen+deuterium concentration obtained by inert gas fusion-thermal conductivity detection (IGF- TCD) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.; Sesha Sayi, Y.; Shankaran, P.S.; Chhapru, G.C; Yadav, C.S.; Venugopal, V.

    2004-01-01

    The limitation of commercially available dedicated equipment based on Inert Gas Fusion- Thermal Conductivity Detection (IGF - TCD) for the determination of hydrogen+deuterium is described. For a given molar concentration, deuterium is underestimated vis a vis hydrogen because of lower thermal conductivity and not considering its molecular weight in calculations. An empirical correction factor based on the differences between the thermal conductivities of hydrogen, deuterium and the carrier gas argon, and the mole fraction of deuterium in the sample has been derived to correct the observed hydrogen+deuterium concentration. The corrected results obtained by IGF - TCD technique have been validated by determining hydrogen and deuterium contents in a few samples using an independent method based on hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometry (HVE-QMS). Knowledge of mole fraction of deuterium (XD) is necessary to effect the correction. The correction becomes insignificant at low X D values (XD < 0.2) as the precision in the IGF measurements is comparable with the extent of correction. (author)

  10. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  11. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  12. Deuterium high pressure target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevozchikov, V.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Vinogradov, Yu.I.

    2001-01-01

    The design of the deuterium high-pressure target is presented. The target having volume of 76 cm 3 serves to provide the experimental research of muon catalyzed fusion reactions in ultra-pure deuterium in the temperature range 80-800 K under pressures of up to 150 MPa. The operation of the main systems of the target is described: generation and purification of deuterium gas, refrigeration, heating, evacuation, automated control system and data collection system

  13. Safety and environmental aspects of deuterium--tritium fusion power plants: work shop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    In September of 1977 a workshop was held on the safety and environmental aspects of fusion power plants to consider potential safety and environmental problems of fusion power plants and to reveal solutions or methods of solving those problems. The objective was to promote incorporation of safety and environmental protection into reactor design, thereby reducing the expense and delay of backfitting safety systems after reactor designs are complete. A dialogue was established between fusion reactor designers and safety and environmental researchers. Four topics, each with several subdivisions, were selected for discussion: radiation exposure, accidents, environmental effects, and plant safety. For each topic, discussion focused on the significance of the problem, and adequacy of current technology to solve the problem, design solutions available and research needed to solve the problem

  14. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low...... sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the incoming electrons, thus prolongs the pellet life-time. As a result, the deep penetration of the pellet...

  15. Some remarks on sticking fraction calculations in muon-catalyzed deuterium-tritium fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Ciftci, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    The sticking coefficient in muon catalyzed dt fusion is an important parameter affecting feasibility for practical applications. This paper discusses a procedure, developed for an accurate calculation of this parameter, and show that a well-defined limit produces precisely the often-criticized heuristic sudden approximation. Why this should be is discussed in some detail from a very different, possibly surprising, point of view

  16. Cold fusion reaction ignition at cavitation effect on deuterium-containing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, A.G.; Deryagin, B.V.; Klyuev, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A possibility to induce 'cold' nuclear fusion reactions in the process of ultrasound cavitation in heavy water is studied. Nonstationary neutron emission is detected under cavitation in D 2 O on titanium vibrator which has the tracks of cavitation erosion (the vibrator ran in D 2 O to 20 hours). Maximum excess over background (12σ) was recorded under cavitation impact on the suspension of LaNi 5 D x dispersed particle in D 2 O

  17. Determination of the Tritium Concentration in Deuterium-Tritium Fusion Plasmas from the Jet TTE Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatu Johnson, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of methods for tritium concentration determination for JET fusion plasmas. The usefulness of MPR data in this context is investigated. It is shown that results from MPR spectral analysis can simplify the calculations for neutral beam heated plasmas and that it is essential for calculations for radio frequency heated plasmas. The described methods are applied to pulses from the Trace Tritium Experiment (TTE), staged at JET in October 2003. Results from simple, time resolved analysis using MPR and other public JET data are presented and the assumptions made in the calculations are discussed. The results agree with expectations but would be even more interesting if spatial variations were taken into account

  18. Determination of the Tritium Concentration in Deuterium-Tritium Fusion Plasmas from the Jet TTE Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatu Johnson, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of methods for tritium concentration determination for JET fusion plasmas. The usefulness of MPR data in this context is investigated. It is shown that results from MPR spectral analysis can simplify the calculations for neutral beam heated plasmas and that it is essential for calculations for radio frequency heated plasmas. The described methods are applied to pulses from the Trace Tritium Experiment (TTE), staged at JET in October 2003. Results from simple, time resolved analysis using MPR and other public JET data are presented and the assumptions made in the calculations are discussed. The results agree with expectations but would be even more interesting if spatial variations were taken into account.

  19. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ∼34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry

  20. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions

  1. Hydrogen and deuterium transport and inventory parameters through W and W-alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamati, G.; Serra, E.; Wu, C. H.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this work is to measure the hydrogen/deuterium transport and inventory parameters in relevant structural and/or armour materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor such as W and W-alloys. The W-alloys: W, W + 1% La 2O 3 and W + 5% Re have been investigated. The materials were supplied from the Metallwerk Plansee GmbH (Austria). Measurements were conducted using a time-dependent permeation method over the temperature range 673-873 K with hydrogen and deuterium pressures in the range 10-100 kPa (100-1000 mbar). The samples were also characterized using optical microscopy, SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in order to investigate the composition, microstructure and morphology of the surfaces and cross-sections through the samples.

  2. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He and D(T,n){sup 4}He occur, as the primary fusion products {sup 3}He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm{sup 2}), the secondary D-{sup 3}He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  3. Kinetic formulae for muon-catalyzed fusion of hydrogen isotopes and their application to the description of the data for pure deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gula, A.

    1987-01-01

    The data on the time distributions of muon-catalyzed fusion (μCF) events in pure deuterium targets published before 1987 are analysed using the kinetic formalism developed by the author and collaborators in a series of papers. The formalism enables one to describe these time distributions in an arbitrary mixture of hydrogen isotopes with strict inclusion of registration efficiency and dead time. The kinetic formulae for such distributions can be readily obtained using a prescription based on the theory of signal-flow graphs even for very complicated kinetic situations, thus, allowing one to avoid the simplifying assumptions which have been usually made in earlier analyses. Practically all important processes forming the muon-catalysis chain can be strictly taken into account in the approximation of constant transition rates. Consecutive μCF cycles can be described separately, which provides a useful tool in data analysis. The developed formalism is applied to the existing data for pure deuterium. First cycle-by-cycle time distributions reported for room temperature by the Gatchina group are analysed. 93 refs., 14 figs. (author)

  4. Cryosorption pumping of deuterium by MS-5A at temperatures above 4.2 K for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.; Watson, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    An Excalibur CVR-1106 cryosorption pump was fitted with a special cooling system to permit measurement of deuterium pumping speeds at temperatures between 6 and 20 0 K. Pumping speeds were found to be a function of feed rate, loading prior to each run, loading during runs, and thermal treatment between runs. At feed rates -4 Torr-l s -1 cm -2 , speeds were near 1 l s -1 cm -2 initially and declined monotonically with loading. At high feed rates, speeds reached a higher maximum (approx. 3 l s -1 cm -2 ) but also generally declined with loading; however, after 50 to 100 Torr l had accumulated, the pump underwent a spontaneous transition which effected a return to the original (high) pumping speed. This transition was accompanied by pressure spikes in the test chamber and temperature spikes in the sieve panel. Initial speeds for each consecutive run equaled the final speed for the preceding run if the pump was maintained at operating temperature; however, if it was warmed to 77 0 K and recooled, a restoration to the maximum speed was observed at the beginning of the next run

  5. Neutron spectroscopy measurements of 14 MeV neutrons at unprecedented energy resolution and implications for deuterium-tritium fusion plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, D.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Angelone, M.; Batistoni, P.; Cufar, A.; Ghani, Z.; Jednorog, S.; Klix, A.; Laszynska, E.; Loreti, S.; Pillon, M.; Popovichev, S.; Roberts, N.; Thomas, D.; Contributors, JET

    2018-04-01

    An accurate calibration of the JET neutron diagnostics with a 14 MeV neutron generator was performed in the first half of 2017 in order to provide a reliable measurement of the fusion power during the next JET deuterium-tritium (DT) campaign. In order to meet the target accuracy, the chosen neutron generator has been fully characterized at the Neutron Metrology Laboratory of the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, United Kingdom. The present paper describes the measurements of the neutron energy spectra obtained using a high-resolution single-crystal diamond detector (SCD). The measurements, together with a new neutron source routine ‘ad hoc’ developed for the MCNP code, allowed the complex features of the neutron energy spectra resulting from the mixed D/T beam ions interacting with the T/D target nuclei to be resolved for the first time. From the spectral analysis a quantitative estimation of the beam ion composition has been made. The unprecedented intrinsic energy resolution (<1% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 14 MeV) of diamond detectors opens up new prospects for diagnosing DT plasmas, such as, for instance, the possibility to study non-classical slowing down of the beam ions by neutron spectroscopy on ITER.

  6. A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

    2003-01-01

    The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time

  7. Theoretical Framework for Anomalous Heat Without High-Energy Particles from Deuteron Fusion in Deuterium-Transition Metal Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott R. Chubb; Talbot A. Chubb

    2000-01-01

    In cold fusion, two conflicting intuitive pictures have caused confusion. A local picture, involving particle-particle interaction, has been dominant for most physicists. However, we suggest that a second, nonlocal, 'counter-intuitive' picture is more appropriate because it places greater emphasis on the behavior of matter distributions and their interaction with the associated environment. This picture is relevant in solids because when charged particles possess large DeBroglie wavelengths, they frequently interact coherently, in a wavelike fashion, in which momentum is conserved globally but not locally. These wavelike effects can become important in periodically ordered solids since they may lead to large momentum transfer from an isolated location to many locations at once. The local picture fails to incorporate these kinds of effects. How hydrogen (H) nuclei can become delocalized is illustrated by anomalies in the diffusivity and vibrational behavior of H in transition metals. Also, it is well-known that in many-body systems, discontinuities in the local momentum (wave function cusps) can explain how near-perfect overlap between charged particles can occur at close separation (which may explain how the Coulomb barrier can be circumvented). We explore implications of these effects on cold fusion

  8. Temperature dependence of liquid lithium film formation and deuterium retention on hot W samples studied by LID-QMS. Implications for future fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, A.; Sepetys, A.; González, M.; Tabarés, F. L.

    2018-04-01

    Liquid metal (LM) divertor concepts explore an alternative solution to the challenging power/particle exhaust issues in future magnetic fusion reactors. Among them, lithium (Li) is the most promising material. Its use has shown important advantages in terms of improved H-mode plasma confinement and heat handling capabilities. In such scenario, a possible combination of tungsten (W) on the first wall and liquid Li on the divertor could be an acceptable solution, but several issues related to material compatibility remain open. In particular, the co-deposition of Li and hydrogen isotopes on W components could increase the associated tritium retention and represent a safety risk, especially if these co-deposits can uncontrollably grow in remote/plasma shadowed zones of the first wall. In this work, the retention of Li and deuterium (D) on tungsten at different surface temperature (200 °C-400 °C) has been studied by exposing W samples to Li evaporation under several D2 gaseous environments. Deuterium retention in the W-Li films has been quantified by using laser induced desorption-mass spectrometry (LID-QMS). Additional techniques as thermal desorption spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, profilemetry and flame atomic emission spectroscopy were implemented to corroborate the retention results and for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of the films. The results showed a negligible (below LID sensibility) D uptake at T surface  =  225 °C, when the W-Li layer is exposed to simultaneous Li evaporation and D2 gas exposition (0.67 Pa). Pre-lithiated samples were also exposed to higher D2 pressures (133.3 Pa) at different temperatures (200 °C-400 °C). A non-linear drastic reduction in the D retention with increasing temperatures was found on the W-Li films, presenting a D/Li atomic ratio at 400 °C lower than 0.1 at.% on a thin film of  ≈100 nm thick. These results bode well (in terms of tritium inventory) for the potential

  9. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs

  10. Deuterium pellet injector gun design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunsford, R.V.; Wysor, R.B.; Bryan, W.E.; Shipley, W.D.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Fisher, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI), an eight-pellet pneumatic injector, is being designed and fabricated for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It will accelerate eight pellets, 4 by 4 mm maximum, to greater than 1500 m/s. It utilizes a unique pellet-forming mechanism, a cooled pellet storage wheel, and improved propellant gas scavenging

  11. Fusion power from lunar resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Schmitt, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the moon contains an enormous energy source in 3 He deposited by the solar wind. Fusion of only 100 kg of 3 He with deuterium in thermonuclear fusion power plants can produce > 1000 MW (electric) of electrical energy, and the lunar resource base is estimated at 1 x 10 9 kg of 3 He. This fuel can supply >1000 yr of terrestrial electrical energy demand. The methods for extracting this fuel and the other solar wind volatiles are described. Alternate uses of D- 3 He fusion in direct thrust rockets will enable more ambitious deep-space missions to be conducted. The capability of extracting hydrogen, water, nitrogen, and other carbon-containing molecules will open up the moon to a much greater level of human settlement than previously thought

  12. Nuclear processes in deuterium/natural hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelensky, V.F.

    2013-01-01

    The survey presents the analysis of the phenomena taking place in deuterium - metal and natural hydrogen - metal systems under cold fusion experimental conditions. The cold fusion experiments have shown that the generation of heat and helium in the deuterium-metal system without emission of energetic gamma-quanta is the result of occurrence of a chain of chemical, physical and nuclear processes observed in the system, culminating in both the fusion of deuterium nuclei and the formation of a virtual, electron-modified excited 4He nucleus. The excitation energy of the helium nucleus is transferred to the matrix through emission of conversion electrons, and that, under appropriate conditions, provides a persistent synthesis of deuterium. The processes occurring in the deuterium/natural hydrogen - metal systems have come to be known as chemonuclear DD- and HD-fusion. The mechanism of stimulation of weak interaction reactions under chemonuclear deuterium fusion conditions by means of strong interaction reactions has been proposed. The results of numerous experiments discussed in the survey bear witness to the validity of chemonuclear fusion. From the facts discussed it is concluded that the chemonuclear deuterium fusion scenario as presented in this paper may serve as a basis for expansion of deeper research and development of this ecologically clean energy source. It is shown that the natural hydrogen-based system, containing 0.015% of deuterium, also has good prospects as an energy source. The chemonuclear fusion processes do not require going beyond the scope of traditional physics for their explanation

  13. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  14. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D 2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  15. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D{sub 2} molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  16. Process and device for decontamination of the waste gas of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritium and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Glugla, M.

    1987-01-01

    The invention concerns a process and a device for the decontamination of the wate gases of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritum and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form, in which the waste gas is taken over an oxidation catalyst and then over a hot metal bed, tritium and/or deuterium is released from its compounds, separated from the waste gas and is returned to the fuel circuit. The process is intended to prevent losses of tritum and/or deuterium by permeation and the high loading of the hot metal getter materials, as occurs in the previously known corresponding process, and to avoid the formation of nitrogen oxides. This is achieved by: a) The catalytic oxidation reaction being carried out at a temperature of 200 0 C to 300 0 C. b) The gas mixture then being brought into contact with a hot metal bed at 200 0 C to 300 0 C to remove the remaining O 2 and for the selective conversion of the proportion of water into the hydrogen isotope. c) The gas mixture being brought into contact with a diaphragm made of palladium or a palladium-silver alloy at 400 0 C to 450 0 C to decompose the ammonia, all the released hydrogen isotope being passed through the diaphragm, separated from the remaining waste gas flow and removed. (orig.) [de

  17. Wildcat: A commercial deuterium-deuterium tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K.; Baker, C.C.; Barry, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    WILDCAT is a conceptual design of a catalyzed deuterium-deuterium tokamak commercial fusion reactor. WILDCAT utilizes the beneficial features of no tritium breeding, while not extrapolating unnecessarily from existing deuterium-tritium (D-T) designs. The reactor is larger and has higher magnetic fields and plasma pressures than typical D-T devices. It is more costly, but eliminates problems associated with tritium breeding and has tritium inventories and throughputs approximately two orders of magnitude less than typical D-T reactors. There are both a steady-state version with Alfven-wave current drive and a pulsed version. Extensive comparison with D-T devices has been made, and cost and safety analyses have been included. All of the major reactor systems have been worked out to a level of detail appropriate to a complete conceptual design

  18. Deuterium and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasaru, G.; Ursu, D.; Mihaila, A.; Szentgyorgyi, P.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography on deuterium and heavy water contains 3763 references (1932-1974) from 43 sources of information. An author index and a subject index are given. The latter contains a list of 136 subjects, arranged in 13 main topics: abundance of deuterium , catalysts, catalytic exchange, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, deuterium and heavy water analysis, deuterium and heavy water properties, deuterium and heavy water separation, exchange reactions, general review, heavy water as moderator, isotope effects, synthesis of deuterium compounds

  19. Fusion Canada issue 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Fusion Canada's publication of the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is the CFFTP Industrial Impact Study, CCFM/TdeV Update:helium pumping, research funds, and deuterium in beryllium - high temperature behaviour. 3 figs

  20. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, J.; Buchholtz, B.; Ward, P.; Freuh, J.; Jensen, E.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium. Helium can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system

  1. Burn performance of deuterium-tritium, deuterium-deuterium, and catalyzed deuterium ICF targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Blue, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Illinois hydrodynamic burn code, AFBURN, has been used to model the performance of homogeneous D-T, D 2 , and catalyzed deuterium ICF targets. Yields and gains are compared for power-producing targets. AFBURN is a one-dimensional, two-temperature, single-fluid hydrodynamic code with non-local fusion product energy deposition. The initial conditions for AFBURN are uniformly compressed targets with central hot spots. AFBURN predicts that maximum D 2 target gains are obtained for target rhoR and spark rhoR about seven times larger than the target and spark rhoR for maximum D-T target gains, that the maximum D 2 target gain is approximately one third of the maximum D-T target gain, and that the corresponding yields are approximately equal. By recycling tritium and 3 He from previous targets, D 2 target performance can be improved by about 10%. (author)

  2. Hydrogen and deuterium transport and inventory parameters in a Cu-0.65Cr-0.08Zr alloy for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, E.; Perujo, A.

    1998-01-01

    A time dependent permeation method has been used to measure the transport and inventory parameters of hydrogen and deuterium in the precipitation hardened (PH) Cu-0.65 wt% Cr-0.08 wt% Zr alloy (ELBRODUR HF). The measurements cover the temperature range from 553 to 773 K using a hydrogen or deuterium pressure in the range 1-100 kPa. The permeabilities, diffusivities and Sieverts' constant values for ELBRODUR obtained in this work were about 2 time higher, 2 times lower and between 3 and 10 time higher respectively to that of Cu (F. Reiter et al., 1993) in the temperature range studied. Using the measured diffusivities and Sieverts' constant values for H 2 and D 2 and a quantum-mechanical model, an extrapolation for tritium is also presented. (orig.)

  3. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  4. Effect of deposited tungsten on deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharapov, V.M.; Gavrilov, L.E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    Usually ion or plasma beam is used for the experiment with beryllium which simulates the interaction of plasma with first wall in fusion devices. However, the use of thermal or subthermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes seems to be useful for that purpose. Recently, the authors have studied the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium. The experimental setup is shown, and is explained. By means of elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique, it was shown that in the exposure to D atoms at 740 K, deuterium is distributed deeply into the bulk, and is accumulated up to higher concentration than the case of the exposure to molecular deuterium. The depth and concentration of deuterium distribution depend on the exposure time, and those data are shown. During the exposure to atomic deuterium, oxide film grew on the side of a sample facing plasma. In order to understand the mechanism of deuterium trapping, the experiment was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). The influence that the tungsten deposit from the heated cathode exerted to the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium was investigated. These results are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Deuterium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Deuterium-containing molecules are separated and enriched by exposing commercially available ethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,2-dichloroethane or propylene to the radiation of tuned infrared lasers to selectively decompose these compounds into enriched molecular products containing deuterium atoms. The deuterium containing molecules can be easily separated from the starting material by absorption, distillation or other simple chemical separation techniques and methods. After evaporation such deuterium containing molecules can be burned to form water with an enriched deuterium content or pyrolyzed to form hydrogen gas with an enriched deuterium content. (author)

  6. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ∼20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles

  7. The fusion of dt{mu}, tt{mu} and dd{mu} molecules in three-layer arrangement including deuterium degrader and moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheisari, R. [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    Muon dynamics and forced chemical confinement fusion in three-layer arrangement consisting of the H/T, D{sub 2} (the degrader and moderator) and D/T fusion layers are investigated with a new kinetic model. Point kinematic equations are numerically solved to calculate the numbers of dt{mu}, tt{mu} and dd{mu} chain reactions. We show that the {mu}-cycling coefficient X{sub c} approximately equals 156, at optimal condition. Our model and results are in contradiction with beliefs of Mahdavi and Zanganeh. Our model is confirmed by recent experiment where was performed for the hydrogen mixture. (author)

  8. On a possibility of cold fusion in deuterium-saturated YBa2Cu3O7-x ceramics in superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, A.G.; Sakov, D.M.; Toporov, Yu.P.; Gromov, V.V.; Deryagin, B.V.

    1991-01-01

    A possibility to generate neutrons by deuterated YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x ceramics in superconducting (T c ) and normal (T>T c ) states is studied. The presented data points to a relationship between the processes of cold nuclear fusion and high-temperature superconductivity in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x pellets deuterated at T c (77< T<90 K)

  9. Rocket Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  10. Back decay of muonic molecular resonances and the measured value of dμd - formation rate in muon-catalyzed fusion in deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gula, A.; Adamczak, A.; Bubak, M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the experimental values of dμd formation rate, obtained without taking into account the decay of the μ-molecular resonance compound [(dμd) + dee] * back to the formation channel dμ+D 2 , are underestimated.The correction depends on the rate of this resonance back decay and the rates of processes leading to fusion in dμd. For their current estimates the correction significantly exceeds the experimental error of the uncorrected dμd formation rate λ m obs = 2.76 ± 0.08 μs -1 reported recently. It is argued that back decay may lead to variation of λ m obs with target density which may provide useful information on the parameters of muon-catalyzed fusion. 18 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  11. Comprehensive sets of 124Xe(n ,γ )125Xe and 124Xe(n ,2 n )123Xe cross-section data for assessment of inertial-confinement deuterium-tritium fusion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhike, Megha; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Ludin, N.; Tornow, W.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the neutron radiative-capture cross section of 124Xe have been performed for the first time for neutron energies above 100 keV. In addition, data for the 124Xe(n ,2 n )123Xe reaction cross section have been obtained from threshold to 14.8 MeV to cover the entire energy range of interest, while previous data existed only at around 14 MeV. The results of these measurements provide the basis for an alternative and sensitive diagnostic tool for investigating properties of the inertial confinement fusion plasma in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules at the National Ignition Facility located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Here, areal density ρ R (density × radius) of the fuel, burn asymmetry, and fuel-ablator mix are of special interest. The 124Xe(n ,γ )125Xe reaction probes the down-scattered neutrons, while the 124Xe(n ,2 n )123Xe reaction provides a measure of the 14 MeV direct neutrons.

  12. Rocket science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upson Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Expanding across the Solar System will require more than a simple blast off, a range of promising new propulsion technologies are being investigated by ex- NASA shuttle astronaut Chang Diaz. He is developing an alternative to chemical rockets, called VASIMR -Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasm Rocket. In 2012 Ad Astra plans to test a prototype, using solar power rather than nuclear, on the International Space Station. Development of this rocket for human space travel is discussed. The nuclear reactor's heat would be converted into electricity in an electric rocket such as VASIMR, and at the peak of nuclear rocket research thrust levels of almost one million newtons were reached.

  13. Deuterium-depleted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Ion; Steflea, Dumitru; Saros-Rogobete, Irina; Titescu, Gheorghe; Tamaian, Radu

    2001-01-01

    Deuterium-depleted water represents water that has an isotopic content smaller than 145 ppm D/(D+H) which is the natural isotopic content of water. Deuterium depleted water is produced by vacuum distillation in columns equipped with structured packing made from phosphor bronze or stainless steel. Deuterium-depleted water, the production technique and structured packing are patents of National Institute of Research - Development for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies at Rm. Valcea. Researches made in the last few years showed the deuterium-depleted water is a biological active product that could have many applications in medicine and agriculture. (authors)

  14. Fine target of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Diaz, J.; Granados Gonzalez, C. E.; Gutierrez Bernal, R.

    1959-01-01

    A fine target of deuterium on a tantalum plate by the absorption method is obtained. In order to obtain the de gasification temperature an induction generator of high frequency is used and the deuterium pass is regulated by means of a palladium valve. Two vacuum measures are available, one to measure the high vacuum in the de gasification process of the tantalum plate and the other, for low vacuum, to measure the deuterium inlet in the installation and the deuterium pressure change in the installation after the absorption in the tantalum plate. A target of 48 μ gr/cm 2 thick is obtained. (Author) 1 refs

  15. Inertial thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watteau, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The principles of deuterium tritium (DT) magnetic or inertial thermonuclear fusion are given. Even if results would be better with heavy ions beams, most of the results on fusion are obtained with laser beams. Technical and theoretical aspects of the laser fusion are presented with an extrapolation to the future fusion reactor. (A.B.). 34 refs., 17 figs

  16. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  17. Ex-vacuo nuclear reaction analysis of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.R.; Doyle, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique for performing in-air d( 3 He, p) nuclear reaction analysis of deuterium using external 3 He ion beams ranging in energy from 0.3-2.0 MeV is presented. Variable on-target beam energies for the depth profiling of deuterium are obtained by varying the transmission distance of the external 3 He beam in air. The ex-vacuo nuclear reaction analysis (XNRA) apparatus is described, and unique aspects and limitations of in-air depth profiling of deuterium using the d( 3 He, p) reaction are discussed. Example analyses where XNRA has been used for the multidimensional measurement of deuterium in fusion reactor components are presented in order to illustrate the advantages of XNRA for deuterium. These advantages include nondestructive analysis of large targets, efficient depth profiling via variable air gap energy tuning, and rapid analysis of numerous samples in the absence of vacuum cycling. (orig.)

  18. Viscosity and attenuation of sound wave in high density deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuko; Ariyasu, Tomio

    1985-01-01

    The penetration of low frequency sound wave into the fuel deuterium is discussed as for laser fusion. The sound velocity and the attenuation constant due to viscosity are calculated for high density (n = 10 24 -- 10 27 cm -3 , T = 10 -1 -- 10 4 eV) deuterium. The shear viscosity of free electron gas and the bulk viscosity due to ion-ion interaction mainly contribute to the attenuation of sound wave. The sound wave of the frequency below 10 10 Hz can easily penetrate through the compressed fuel deuterium of diameter 1 -- 10 3 μm. (author)

  19. Prospects for alternative Fusion Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glancy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The author has worked on three different magnetic confinement concepts for alternate fusion fueled reactors: tokamaks; tanden mirrors, and reversed field pinches. The focus of this article is on prospects for alternate fusion fuels as the author sees them relative to the other choices: increased numbers of coal plants, fission reactors, renewables, and D-T fusion. Discussion is limited on the consideration of alternate fusion fuels to the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fuel cycle. Reasons for seeking an alternate energy source are cost, a more secure fuel supply, environmental impact and safety. The technical risks associated with development of fusion are examined briefly

  20. Fusion Canada issue 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Darlington`s Tritium Removal Facility, work at universities on Deuterium Diffusivity in Beryllium, Fusion Studies, confinement research and the operation of divertors at Tokamak de Varennes. 5 figs.

  1. Fusion Canada issue 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Darlington's Tritium Removal Facility, work at universities on Deuterium Diffusivity in Beryllium, Fusion Studies, confinement research and the operation of divertors at Tokamak de Varennes. 5 figs

  2. Nuclear rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarram, M.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear energy has found many applications in space projects. This article deals with these applications. The first application is the use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity in space and the second main application is the use of nuclear energy for propulsion purposes in space flight. The main objective is to develop a 75000 pound thrust flight engine call NERVA by heating liquid hydrogen, in a nuclear reactor, from 420F to 4000 0 F. The paper describes in detail the salient features of the NERVA rocket as well as its comparison with the conventional chemical rockets. It is shown that a nuclear rocket using liquid hydrogen as medium is at least 85% more efficient as compared with the chemical rockets such as those used for the APOLLO moon flight

  3. Nuclear rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarram, M [Teheran Univ. (Iran). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology

    1972-02-01

    Nuclear energy has found many applications in space projects. This article deals with these applications. The first application is the use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity in space and the second main application is the use of nuclear energy for propulsion purposes in space flight. The main objective is to develop a 75000 pound thrust flight engine called NERVA by heating liquid hydrogen in a nuclear reactor. The paper describes in detail the salient features of the NERVA rocket as well as its comparison with the conventional chemical rockets. It is shown that a nuclear rocket using liquid hydrogen as medium is at least 85% more efficient as compared with the chemical rockets such as those used for the APOLLO moon flight.

  4. Direct depth distribution measurement of deuterium in bulk tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Taylor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding tritium retention and permeation in plasma-facing components is critical for fusion safety and fuel cycle control. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES is shown to be an effective tool to reveal the depth profile of deuterium in tungsten. Results confirm the detection of deuterium. A ∼46 μm depth profile revealed that the deuterium content decreased precipitously in the first 7 μm, and detectable amounts were observed to depths in excess of 20 μm. The large probing depth of GD-OES (up to 100s of μm enables studies not previously accessible to the more conventional techniques for investigating deuterium retention. Of particular applicability is the use of GD-OES to measure the depth profile for experiments where high deuterium concentration in the bulk material is expected: deuterium retention in neutron irradiated materials, and ultra-high deuterium fluences in burning plasma environment.

  5. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium

  6. Evidence of emission of neutrons from a titanium-deuterium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninno, A. de; Frattolillo, A.; Lollobattista, G.; Martinis, L.; Martone, M.; Mori, L.; Podda, S.; Scaramuzzi, F.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of deuterium gas with titanium has produced a flow of neutrons in two experiments reported here. This seems to show that it is not necessary to use electrolysis in order to obtain a low-temperature fusion reaction between deuterium nuclei. The experiment confirms also that nonequilibrium conditions are necessary in order to produce such a phenomenon

  7. Rocket observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) sounding rocket experiments were carried out during the periods of August to September, 1982, January to February and August to September, 1983 and January to February, 1984 with sounding rockets. Among 9 rockets, 3 were K-9M, 1 was S-210, 3 were S-310 and 2 were S-520. Two scientific satellites were launched on February 20, 1983 for solar physics and on February 14, 1984 for X-ray astronomy. These satellites were named as TENMA and OHZORA and designated as 1983-011A and 1984-015A, respectively. Their initial orbital elements are also described. A payload recovery was successfully carried out by S-520-6 rocket as a part of MINIX (Microwave Ionosphere Non-linear Interaction Experiment) which is a scientific study of nonlinear plasma phenomena in conjunction with the environmental assessment study for the future SPS project. Near IR observation of the background sky shows a more intense flux than expected possibly coming from some extragalactic origin and this may be related to the evolution of the universe. US-Japan cooperative program of Tether Experiment was done on board US rocket.

  8. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues

  9. Fusion technology: The Iter fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    Plans for the Iter international fusion experiment, in which the European Union, Japan, Canada, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, and the USA cooperate, were begun in 1985, and construction work started in early 1994. These activities serve for the preparation of the design and construction documents for a research reactor in which a stable fusion plasma is to be generated. This is to be the basis for the construction of a fusion reactor for electricity generation. Preparatory work was performed in the Tokamak experiments with JET and TFTR. The fusion power of 1.5 GW will be attained, thus enabling Iter to keep a deuterium-tritium plasma burning. (orig.) [de

  10. Neutrino disintegration of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, S.; Haxton, W.; Henley, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the rate of both neutral- and charged-current neutrino and antineutrino disintegration of deuterium. These rates are of interest for solar 8 B and hep ( 3 He + p) spectra and supernovae neutrinos, and are relevant for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO)

  11. Deuterium in atmospheric cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontikis, M.C.

    Interest of the study concerning the deuterium content variation (HDO) in the atmospheric water. Standards and measurement methods. Molecule HDO cycle in the atmospheric water. Application to the study of hail-generating cumulus-nimbus and of the mantle of snow [fr

  12. Air-Powered Rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Charley; Raynovic, Jim

    This document describes methods for designing and building two types of rockets--rockets from paper and rockets from bottles. Devices used for measuring the heights that the rockets obtain are also discussed. (KHR)

  13. Deuterium labeled cannabinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driessen, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Complex reactions involving ring opening, ring closure and rearrangements hamper complete understanding of the fragmentation processes in the mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of cannabinoids. Specifically labelled compounds are very powerful tools for obtaining more insight into fragmentation mechanisms and ion structures and therefore the synthesis of specifically deuterated cannabinoids was undertaken. For this, it was necessary to investigate the preparation of cannabinoids, appropriately functionalized for specific introduction of deuterium atom labels. The results of mass spectrometry with these labelled cannabinoids are described. (Auth.)

  14. Predicting big bang deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, N.; Scherrer, R.J.; Steigman, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, T.P. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    We present new upper and lower bounds to the primordial abundances of deuterium and {sup 3}He based on observational data from the solar system and the interstellar medium. Independent of any model for the primordial production of the elements we find (at the 95{percent} C.L.): 1.5{times}10{sup {minus}5}{le}(D/H){sub {ital P}}{le}10.0{times}10{sup {minus}5} and ({sup 3}He/H){sub {ital P}}{le}2.6{times}10{sup {minus}5}. When combined with the predictions of standard big bang nucleosynthesis, these constraints lead to a 95{percent} C.L. bound on the primordial abundance deuterium: (D/H){sub best}=(3.5{sup +2.7}{sub {minus}1.8}){times}10{sup {minus}5}. Measurements of deuterium absorption in the spectra of high-redshift QSOs will directly test this prediction. The implications of this prediction for the primordial abundances of {sup 4}He and {sup 7}Li are discussed, as well as those for the universal density of baryons. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  15. Method for nondestructive fuel assay of laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Fries, R. Jay

    1976-01-01

    A method for nondestructively determining the deuterium and tritium content of laser fusion targets by counting the x rays produced by the interaction of tritium beta particles with the walls of the microballoons used to contain the deuterium and tritium gas mixture under high pressure. The x rays provide a direct measure of the tritium content and a means for calculating the deuterium content using the initial known D-T ratio and the known deuterium and tritium diffusion rates.

  16. Method for nondestructive fuel assay of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for nondestructively determining the deuterium and tritium content of laser fusion targets by counting the x rays produced by the interaction of tritium beta particles with the walls of the microballoons used to contain the deuterium and tritium gas mixture under high pressure. The x rays provide a direct measure of the tritium content and a means for calculating the deuterium content using the initial known D-T ratio and the known deuterium and tritium diffusion rates

  17. Achievement of solid-state plasma fusion ('Cold-Fusion')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arata, Yoshiaki; Zhang, Yue-Chang

    1995-01-01

    Using a 'QMS' (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer), the authors detected a significantly large amount (10 20 -10 21 [cm -3 ]) of helium ( 2 4 He), which was concluded to have been produced by a deuterium nuclear reaction within a host solid. These results were found to be fully repeatable and supported the authors' proposition that solid state plasma fusion ('Cold Fusion') can be generated in energetic deuterium Strongly Coupled Plasma ('SC-plasma'). This fusion reaction is thought to be sustained by localized 'Latticequake' in a solid-state media with the deuterium density equivalent to that of the host solid. While exploring this basic proposition, the characteristic differences when compared with ultra high temperature-state plasma fusion ('Hot Fusion') are clarified. In general, the most essential reaction product in both types of the deuterium plasma fusion is considered to be helium, irrespective of the 'well-known and/or unknown reactions', which is stored within the solid-state medium in abundance as a 'Residual Product', but which generally can not enter into nor be released from host-solid at a room temperature. Even measuring instruments with relatively poor sensitivity should be able to easily detect such residual helium. An absence of residual helium means that no nuclear fusion reaction has occurred, whereas its presence provides crucial evidence that nuclear fusion has, in fact, occurred in the solid. (author)

  18. Transport of recycled deuterium to the plasma core in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stotler, D.P.; Strachan, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    The authors report a study of the fueling of the plasma core by recycling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). They have analyzed discharges fueled by deuterium recycled from the limiter and tritium-only neutral beam injection. In these plasmas, the DT neutron rate provides a measure of the deuterium influx into the core plasma. They find a reduced influx with plasmas using lithium pellet conditioning and with plasmas of reduced major (and minor) radius. Modeling with the DEGAS neutrals code shows that the dependence on radius can be related to the penetration of neutrals through the scrape-off layer

  19. Deuterium/hydrogen isotope exchange on beryllium and beryllium nitride; Deuterium/Wasserstoff-Isotopenaustausch an Beryllium und Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollase, Petra; Eichler, Michael; Koeppen, Martin; Dittmar, Timo; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the fusion experiments JET and ITER, the first wall is made up of beryllium. The use of nitrogen is discussed for radiative cooling in the divertor. This can react with the surface of the first wall to form beryllium nitride (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}). The hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, which react in the fusion reaction to helium and a neutron, are used as fuel. Since the magnetic confinement of the plasma is not perfect, deuterium and tritium ions are also found on the beryllium wall and can accumulate there. This should be avoided due to the radioactivity of tritium. Therefore the isotope exchange with deuterium is investigated to regenerate the first wall. We investigate the isotopic exchange of deuterium and protium in order to have not to work with radioactive tritium. The ion bombardment is simulated with an ion source. With voltages up to a maximum of 5 kV, deuterium and protic hydrogen ions are implanted in polycrystalline Be and Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}. The samples are then analyzed in situ using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Subsequently, samples prepared under the same conditions are characterized ex-situ by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). [German] In den Fusionsexperimenten JET und ITER besteht die erste Wand im Hauptraum aus Beryllium (Be). Zur Strahlungskuehlung im Divertor wird der Einsatz von Stickstoff diskutiert. Dieser kann mit der Oberflaeche der ersten Wand zu Berylliumnitrid (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}) reagieren. Als Brennstoff werden die Wasserstoffisotope Deuterium und Tritium eingesetzt, die in der Fusionsreaktion zu Helium und einem Neutron reagieren. Da der magnetische Einschluss des Plasmas nicht perfekt ist, treffen auch Deuterium- und Tritiumionen auf die Berylliumwand auf und koennen sich dort anreichern. Das soll aufgrund der Radioaktivitaet von Tritium unbedingt vermieden werden. Daher wird zur Regenerierung der ersten Wand der Isotopenaustausch mit Deuterium untersucht. Wir

  20. Producing deuterium-enriched products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method of producing an enriched deuterium product from a gaseous feed stream of mixed hydrogen and deuterium, comprises: (a) combining the feed stream with gaseous bromine to form a mixture of the feed stream and bromine and exposing the mixture to an electrical discharge effective to form deuterium bromide and hydrogen bromide with a ratio of D/H greater than the ratio of D/H in the feed stream; and (b) separating at least a portion of the hydrogen bromide and deuterium bromide from the mixture. (author)

  1. Rocket Tablet,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-12

    not accustomed to Chinese food, he ran off directly to the home of the Mayor of Beijing and requested two Western cuisine cooks from a hotel. At the...played out by our Chinese sons and daughters of ancient times. The famous Han dynasty general Li Guang was quickly cured of disease and led an army...Union) of China. This place was about to become the birthplace of the Chinese people’s first rocket baby. Section One In this eternal wasteland called

  2. Plasma nuclear fusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Shunpei; Miyanaga, Shoji; Wakaizumi, Kazuhiro; Takemura, Yasuhiko.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear fusion reactions are attained by plasma gas phase reactions using magnetic fields and microwaves, and the degree of the reactions is controlled. That is, deuterium (D 2 ) is introduced into a plasma container by utilizing the resonance of microwaves capable of generating plasmas at high density higher by more than 10 - 10 3 times as compared with the high frequency and magnetic fields, and an electric energy is applied to convert gaseous D 2 into plasmas and nuclear fusion is conducted. Further, the deuterium ions in the plasmas are attracted to a surface of a material causing nuclear fusion under a negatively biased electric field from the outside (typically represented by Pd or Ti). Then, deuterium nuclei (d) or deuterium ions collide to the surface of the cathode on the side of palladium to conduct nuclear reaction at the surface or the inside (vicinity) thereof. However, a DC bias is applied as an external bias with the side of the palladium being negative. The cold nuclear fusion was demonstrated by placing a neutron counter in the vicinity of the container and confirming neutrons generated there. (I.S.)

  3. Photodisintegration of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, K.Y.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goko, S.

    2004-01-01

    Photodisintegration cross sections were measured for deuterium with Laser Compton scattering γ beams at E γ = 2.3 - 4.6 MeV. The present data made it possible to experimentally evaluate R(E) = N a συ for the p(n, γ)D reaction with 6% uncertainty in the energy region to big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The result confirms the past theoretical evaluation and the recent calculation based on the effective field theory. The reaction rate for the p(n, γ)D reaction is presented for the BBN in the precision era. (author)

  4. Perspectives of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, V.O.

    1984-01-01

    New and practically inexhaustible sources of energy must be developed for the period when oil, coal and uranium will become scarce and expensive. Nuclear fusion holds great promise as one of these practically inexhaustible energy sources. Based on the deuteriumtritium reaction with tritium obtained from naturally occuring lithium, which is also widely available in Europe, the accessible energy resources in the world are 3.10 12 to 3.10 16 toe; based on the deuterium-deuterium reaction, the deuterium content of the oceans corresponds to 10 20 toe. It is presently envisaged that in order to establish fusion as a large-scale energy source, three major thresholds must be reached: - Scientific feasibility, - Technical feasibility, i.e. the proof that the basic technical problems of the fusion reactor can be solved. - Commercial feasibility, i.e. proof that fusion power reactors can be built on an industrial scale, can be operated reliably and produce usable energy at prices competitive with other energy sources. From the above it is clear that the route to commercial fusion will be long and costly and involve the solution of extremely difficult technical problems. In view of the many steps which have to be taken, it appears unlikely that commercial fusion power will be in general use within the next 50 years and by that time world-wide expenditure on research, development and demonstration may well have exceeded 100 Bio ECU. (author)

  5. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this contribution the author the phenomenom of so-called cold fusion, inspired by the memorable lecture of Moshe Gai on his own search for this effect. Thus much of what follows was presented by Dr. Gai; the rest is from independent reading. What is referred to as cold fusion is of course the observation of possible products of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion within deuterium-loaded (dentended) electrodes. The debate over the two vanguard cold fusion experiments has raged under far more public attention than usually accorded new scientific phenomena. The clamor commenced with the press conference of M. Fleishmann and S. Pons on March 23, 1989 and the nearly simultaneous wide circulation of a preprint of S. Jones and collaborators. The majority of work attempting to confirm these observations has at the time of this writing yet to appear in published form, but contributions to conferences and electronic mail over computer networks were certainly filled with preliminary results. To keep what follows to a reasonable length the author limit this discussion to the searches for neutron (suggested by ref. 2) or for excessive heat production (suggested by ref. 1), following a synopsis of the hypotheses of cold fusion

  6. UEDGE Simulations for Power and Particle Flow Analysis of FRC Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fred; Evans, Eugene S.; McGreivy, Nick; Kaptanoglu, Alan; Izacard, Olivier; Cohen, Samuel A.

    2017-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is under consideration for use in a direct fusion drive (DFD) rocket propulsion system for future space missions. To achieve a rocket configuration, the FRC is embedded within an asymmetric magnetic mirror, in which one end is closed and contains a gas box, and the other end is open and incorporates a magnetic nozzle. Neutral deuterium is injected into the gas box, and flows through the scrape-off layer (SOL) around the core plasma and out the magnetic nozzle, both cooling the core and serving as propellant. Previous studies have examined a range of operating conditions for the SOL of a DFD using UEDGE, a 2D fluid code; discrepancies on the order of 5% were found during the analysis of overall power balance. This work extends the analysis of the previously-studied SOL geometry by updating boundary conditions and conducting a detailed study of power and particle flows within the simulation with the goals of modeling electrical power generation instead of thrust and achieving higher specific impulse. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 and Princeton Environmental Institute.

  7. Deuterium trapping at vacancy clusters in electron/neutron-irradiated tungsten studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, T.; Ami, K.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y.; Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Hatano, Y.

    2018-02-01

    Deuterium trapping at irradiation-induced defects in tungsten, a candidate material for plasma facing components in fusion reactors, was revealed by positron annihilation spectroscopy. Pure tungsten was electron-irradiated (8.5 MeV at ∼373 K and to a dose of ∼1 × 10-3 dpa) or neutron-irradiated (at 573 K to a dose of ∼0.3 dpa), followed by post-irradiation annealing at 573 K for 100 h in deuterium gas of ∼0.1 MPa. In both cases of electron- or neutron-irradiation, vacancy clusters were found by positron lifetime measurements. In addition, positron annihilation with deuterium electrons was demonstrated by coincidence Doppler broadening measurements, directly indicating deuterium trapping at vacancy-type defects. This is expected to cause significant increase in deuterium retention in irradiated-tungsten.

  8. Point design for deuterium-deuterium compact reversed-field pinch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.; Dobrott, D.R.; Gurol, H.; Schnack, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    A deuterium-deuterium (D-D) reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactor may be made comparable in size and cost to a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reactor at the expense of high-thermal heat load to the first wall. This heat load is the result of the larger percentage of fusion power in charged particles in the D-D reaction as compared to the D-T reaction. The heat load may be reduced by increasing the reactor size and hence the cost. In addition to this ''degraded'' design, the size may be kept small by means of a higher heat load wall, or by means of a toroidal divertor, in which case most of the heat load seen by the wall is in the form of radiation. Point designs are developed for these approaches and cost studies are performed and compared with a D-T reactor. The results indicate that the cost of electricity of a D-D RFP reactor is about20% higher than a D-T RFP reactor. This increased cost could be offset by the inherent safety features of the D-D fuel cycle

  9. Spin polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glyde, H.R.; Hernadi, S.I.

    1986-01-01

    Several ground state properties of (electron) spin-polarized deuterium (D) such as the energy, single quasiparticle energies and lifetimes, Landau parameters and sound velocities are evaluated. The calculations begin with the Kolos-Wolneiwicz potential and use the Galitskii-FeynmanHartree-Fock (GFHF) approximation. The deuteron nucleas has spin I = 1, and spin states I/sub z/ = 1,0,-1. We explore D 1 , D 2 and D 3 in which, respectively, one spin state only is populated, two states are equally populated, and three states are equally populated. We find the GFHF describes D 1 well, but D 2 and D 3 less well. The Landau parameters, F/sub L/, are small compared to liquid 3 He and very small for doubly polarized D 1 (i.e. the F/sub L/ decrease with nuclear polarization)

  10. Evidence for neutron production in deuterium gas with a pyroelectric crystal without tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, W.; Shafroth, S. M.; Brownridge, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    We present evidence for the production of 2 H(d,n) 3 He neutrons in gaseous deuterium by using a pyroelectric crystal as positive ion accelerator. In contrast to previous studies, neutrons were generated without a tip attached to the crystal and without using a solid deuterated target. The deuterium gas provided both the projectile and target nuclei. On the average, 1 neutron/s was obtained in our ''hot fusion'' experimental setup. No neutrons were detected when a tip was used

  11. The laser thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, J.; Dautray, R.; Decroisette, M.; Watteau, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Principle of the thermonuclear fusion by inertial confinement: required characteristics of the deuterium-tritium plasma and of the high power lasers to be used Development of high power lasers: active media used; amplifiers; frequency conversion; beam quality; pulse conditioning; existing large systems. The laser-matter interaction: collision and collective interaction of the laser radiation with matter; transport of the absorbed energy; heating and compression of deuterium-tritium; diagnoses and their comparison with the numerical simulation of the experiment; performances. Conclusions: difficulties to overcome; megajoule lasers; other energy source: particles beams [fr

  12. Direct Fusion Drive for a Human Mars Orbital Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paluszek, Michael [Princeton Satellite Systems; Pajer, Gary [Princeton Satellite Systems; Razin, Yosef [Princeton Satellite Systems; Slonaker, James [Princeton Satellite Systems; Cohen, Samuel [PPPL; Feder, Russ [PPPL; Griffin, Kevin [Princeton University; Walsh, Matthew [Princeton University

    2014-08-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) is a nuclear fusion engine that produces both thrust and electric power. It employs a field reversed configuration with an odd-parity rotating magnetic field heating system to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. The engine uses deuterium and helium-3 as fuel and additional deuterium that is heated in the scrape-off layer for thrust augmentation. In this way variable exhaust velocity and thrust is obtained.

  13. Deuterium transport and trapping in polycrystalline tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Trybus, C.L.; Sellers, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that deuterium permeation studies for polycrystalline tungsten foil have been conducted to provide data for estimating tritium transport and trapping in tungsten-clad divertors proposed for advanced fusion-reactor concepts. Based on a detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural characterization of the specimen material and on analyses of permeation data measured at temperatures ranging form 610 to 823 K for unannealed and annealed tungsten foil (25 μm thick), the authors note the following key results: deuterium transport in tungsten foil is dominated by extensive trapping that varies inversely with prior anneal temperatures of the foil material, the reduction in the trapped fraction correlates with a corresponding elimination of a high density of dislocations in cell-wall structures introduced during the foil fabrication process, trapping behavior in these foils can be modelled using trap energies between 1.3 eV and 1.5 eV and trap densities ranging from 1 x 10 -5 atom fraction

  14. Fusion Power measurement at ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertalot, L.; Barnsley, R.; Krasilnikov, V.; Stott, P.; Suarez, A.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear fusion research aims to provide energy for the future in a sustainable way and the ITER project scope is to demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear fusion energy. ITER is a nuclear experimental reactor based on a large scale fusion plasma (tokamak type) device generating Deuterium - Tritium (DT) fusion reactions with emission of 14 MeV neutrons producing up to 700 MW fusion power. The measurement of fusion power, i.e. total neutron emissivity, will play an important role for achieving ITER goals, in particular the fusion gain factor Q related to the reactor performance. Particular attention is given also to the development of the neutron calibration strategy whose main scope is to achieve the required accuracy of 10% for the measurement of fusion power. Neutron Flux Monitors located in diagnostic ports and inside the vacuum vessel will measure ITER total neutron emissivity, expected to range from 1014 n/s in Deuterium - Deuterium (DD) plasmas up to almost 10{sup 21} n/s in DT plasmas. The neutron detection systems as well all other ITER diagnostics have to withstand high nuclear radiation and electromagnetic fields as well ultrahigh vacuum and thermal loads. (authors)

  15. Deuterium inventory in tungsten after plasma exposure. A microstructural survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manhard, Armin

    2012-09-01

    Tungsten is a promising material for armouring the plasma-facing wall of future nuclear fusion experiments and power plants. It has a very high melting point, good thermal conductivity and is highly resistant against physical sputtering by energetic particles from the plasma. It also has a very low solubility for hydrogen isotopes. This is important both for safety and also for economic reasons, in particular with regard to the radioactive fusion fuel tritium. Due to this low solubility, the retention of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten materials after exposure to a plasma is dominated by the trapping of hydrogen isotopes at tungsten lattice defects. Therefore, a strong dependence of the hydrogen isotope retention on the microstructure of the tungsten is to be expected. This work describes a survey study of tungsten with different microstructures exposed to deuterium plasmas under a wide range of different plasma exposure conditions. The isotope deuterium was used because its natural abundance is much smaller than that of hydrogen (i.e., 1 H). This allows detecting even very small amounts retained in the tungsten practically without background signal. Furthermore, the use of deuterium allows utilising the nuclear reaction 2 D( 3 He,p) 4 He for depth-resolved quantification of the deuterium inventory up to depths of several microns. In order to standardise the specimens as far as possible, they were all cut from the same initial material from a single manufacturing batch. After a chemo-mechanical polishing procedure, which produces a well-defined surface, the specimens were annealed at either of four different temperatures in order to modify the grain structure and the dislocation density. These were then characterised by scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were subsequently exposed in a fully characterised deuterium plasma source at different specimen temperatures, ion energies and deuterium fluences. In addition

  16. Catalyzed deuterium fueled tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Catalyzed deuterium fuel presents several advantages relative to D-T. These are, freedom from tritium breeding, high charged particle power fraction and lowered neutron energy deposition in the blanket. Higher temperature operation, lower power densities and increased confinement are simultaneously required. However, the present study has developed designs which have capitalized upon the advantages of catalyzed deuterium to overcome the difficulties associated with the fuel while obtaining high efficiency

  17. Phenomenological nuclear reaction description in deuterium-saturated palladium and synthesized structure in dense deuterium gas under γ-quanta irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, A.Yu.; Wisniewski, R.

    2012-01-01

    The observed phenomena on the changes of chemical compositions in our previous reports allowed us to develop a phenomenological nuclear fusion-fission model with taking into consideration the elastic and inelastic scattering of photoprotons and photoneutrons, heating of surrounding deuterium nuclei, following D-D fusion reactions and fission of middle-mass nuclei by 'hot' protons, deuterons and various-energy neutrons. Such chain processes could produce the necessary number of neutrons, 'hot' deuterons for explanation of the observed experimental results. The developed approach can be a basis for creation of deuterated nuclear fission reactors (DNFR) with high-density deuterium gas and so-called deuterated metals. Also, the developed approach can be used for the study of nuclear reactions in high-density deuterium or tritium gases and deuterated metals

  18. Fusion fuel blanket technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-05-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of a fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium is converted into useful product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. As fusion research turns from present short-pulse physics experiments to long-burn engineering tests in the 1990's, energy removal and tritium production capabilities become important. This technology will involve new materials, conditions and processes with applications both to fusion and beyond. In this paper, we introduce features of proposed blanket designs and update and status of international research. In focusing on the Canadian blanket technology program, we discuss the aqueous lithium salt blanket concept, and the in-reactor tritium recovery test program

  19. Deuterium exchange between hydrofluorocarbons and amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, W.B.; Bigeleisen, J.; Tuccio, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The invention consists of a process for obtaining a compound enriched in deuterium which comprises the known method of exposing a gaseous hydrofluorocarbon to infrared laser radiation of a predetermined frequency to selectively cause a chemical reaction involving hydrofluorocarbon molecules containing deuterium without substantially affecting hydrofluorocarbon molecules not containing deuterium, thereby producing, as reaction products, a compound enriched in deuterium and hydrofluorocarbon depleted in deuterium; combined with a new method, which comprises enriching the deuterium content of the depleted hydrofluorocarbon by contacting the depleted hydrofluorocarbon with an alkali metal amide and an amine having a concentration of deuterium at least that which will yield an increase in deuterium concentration of the hydrofluorocarbon upon equilibration, whereby the amine becomes depleted in deuterium

  20. Increased efficiency of mammalian somatic cell hybrid production under microgravity conditions during ballistic rocket flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, R.; Gessner, P.; Zimmermann, U.; Neil, G. A.; Urnovitz, H. B.

    1989-01-01

    The electrofusion of hybridoma cell lines under short-duration microgravity during a flight of the TEXUS 18 Black Brand ballistic sounding rocket at Kiruna, Sweden is reported. The fusion partners, growth medium, cell fusion medium, cell fusion, cell viability in the fusion medium, and postfusion cell culture are described, and the rocket, cell fusion chamber, apparatus, and module are examined. The experimental timeline, the effects of fusion medium and incubation time on cell viability and hybrid yields, and the effect of microgravity on hybrid yields are considered.

  1. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  2. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  3. Deuterium trapping in liquid lithium irradiated by deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.; Moshkunov, K.; Vizgalov, I.; Gasparyan, Yu.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid lithium was irradiated by deuterium plasma to a low fluence of 10 22 –10 23 D/m 2 , cooled down to room temperature, and then slowly heated. The temperature and release rate were measured during heating. Two plateaus on the temperature–time dependence were observed at 180 °C and 660 °C. The first one corresponds to melting of Li and the second one – either to melting or to decomposition of solid LiD. Features of deuterium release in TDS were interpreted in terms of decomposition of lithium deuterides formed during plasma irradiation

  4. Temperature derivatives for fusion reactivity of D-D and D-T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makaruk, Hanna Ewa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-29

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction rates are observable using leakage gamma flux. A direct measurement of γ-rays with equipment that exhibits fast temporal response could be used to infer temperature, if the detector signal is amenable for taking the logarithmic time-derivative, alpha. We consider the temperature dependence for fusion cross section reactivity.

  5. Deuterium retention in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Conn, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of deuterium retention in samples of lithium exposed in the liquid state to deuterium plasma are reported. Retention was measured as a function of plasma ion dose in the range 6x10 19 -4x10 22 D atoms and exposure temperature between 523 and 673 K using thermal desorption spectrometry. The results are consistent with the full uptake of all deuterium ions incident on the liquid metal surface and are found to be independent of the temperature of the liquid lithium over the range explored. Full uptake, consistent with very low recycling, continues until the sample is volumetrically converted to lithium deuteride. This occurs for exposure temperatures where the gas pressure during exposure was both below and slightly above the corresponding decomposition pressure for LiD in Li. (author)

  6. Spin exchange in polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przewoski, B. von; Meyer, H.O.; Balewski, J.; Doskow, J.; Ibald, R.; Pollock, R.E.; Rinckel, T.; Wellinghausen, A.; Whitaker, T.J.; Daehnick, W.W.; Haeberli, W.; Schwartz, B.; Wise, T.; Lorentz, B.; Rathmann, F.; Pancella, P.V.; Saha, Swapan K.; Thoerngren-Engblom, P.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the vector and tensor polarization of an atomic deuterium target as a function of the target density. The polarized deuterium was produced in an atomic beam source and injected into a storage cell. For this experiment, the atomic beam source was operated without rf transitions, in order to avoid complications from the unknown efficiency of these transitions. In this mode, the atomic beam is vector and tensor polarized and both polarizations can be measured simultaneously. We used a 1.2-cm-diam and 27-cm-long storage cell, which yielded an average target density between 3 and 9x10 11 at/cm 3 . We find that the tensor polarization decreases with increasing target density while the vector polarization remains constant. The data are in quantitative agreement with the calculated effect of spin exchange between deuterium atoms at low field

  7. Canadian contributions to the safety and environmental aspects of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, R.; Wong, K.

    1987-05-01

    Since next-step fusion devices will be fuelled with mixtures of tritium and deuterium, the knowledge base and tritium handling experience associated with the operation of CANDU reactors is viewed as relevant to the development of safe fusion technology. Fusion safety issues will be compared with fission safety experience, after which specific Canadian activities in support of fusion safety will be overviewed. In addition, recommendations for appropriate fusion safety criteria will be summarized. 18 refs

  8. Liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougon, M.; Marquet, M.; Prugne, P.

    1961-01-01

    A description is given of 1) Atmospheric pressure target: liquid hydrogen, 400 mm thickness; thermal insulation: styrofoam; the hydrogen vapors are used to improve the target cooling; Mylar windows. 2) Vacuum target: 12 liter content: hydrogen or deuterium; liquid thickness 400 mm; thermal insulation is afforded by a vacuum vessel and a liquid nitrogen shield. Recovery and liquefaction of deuterium vapors are managed in the vacuum vessel which holds the target. The target emptying system is designed for operating in a few minutes. (author) [fr

  9. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan; Xu, Yu-Ping; Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Oya, Yasuhisa; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Min; Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  10. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Xu, Yu-Ping [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China); Oya, Yasuhisa [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Zhao, Ming-Zhong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Mao, Hong-Min [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-Nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  11. Method of deuterium isotope separation and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating deuterium, i.e., heavy hydrogen, from certain naturally occurring sources using tuned infrared lasers to selectively decompose specified classes of organic molecules (i.e., RX) into enriched molecular products containing deuterium atoms is described. The deuterium containing molecules are easily separated from the starting material by absorption, distillation or other simple chemical separation techniques and methods. After evaporation such deuterium containing molecules can be burned to form water with an enriched deuterium content or pyrolyzed to form hydrogen gas with an enriched deuterium content. The undecomposed molecules and the other reaction products which are depleted of their deuterium containing species can be catalytically treated, preferably using normal water, to restore the natural abundance of deuterium and such restored molecules can then be recycled

  12. Rockets two classic papers

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Rockets, in the primitive form of fireworks, have existed since the Chinese invented them around the thirteenth century. But it was the work of American Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945) and his development of liquid-fueled rockets that first produced a controlled rocket flight. Fascinated by rocketry since boyhood, Goddard designed, built, and launched the world's first liquid-fueled rocket in 1926. Ridiculed by the press for suggesting that rockets could be flown to the moon, he continued his experiments, supported partly by the Smithsonian Institution and defended by Charles Lindbergh. T

  13. Advances in deuterium dioxide concentration measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, Woojung [University of Science & Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Sung Paal, E-mail: nspyim@kaeri.re.kr [University of Science & Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Lim; Park, Hyunmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Rag; Chung, Hongsuk [University of Science & Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheo Kyung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Heavy water (D{sub 2}O) with a high purity level is necessary for nuclear fusion application. • D{sub 2}O purity is analyzed using Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and newly introduced off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). • OA-ICOS has advantages in terms of analysis of D{sub 2}O vapor. • OA-ICOS is expected that it can be used for accurate isotopic analyses in the future. - Abstract: The deuterium–tritium (D–T) reaction has been identified as the most efficient reaction for fusion devices. Deuterium can be obtained by heavy water electrolysis. Heavy water (D{sub 2}O) with a high purity level is necessary for nuclear fusion application. A D{sub 2}O isotopic analysis is thus very important. A system for a heavy water analysis was built and a newly designed isotopic analysis experiment was carried out. We tried to analyze the D{sub 2}O purity using Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and newly introduced off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). We found that the OA-ICOS based on measurement via laser absorption spectroscopy shows very high sensitivity. We ameliorated the sensitivity by an order of magnitude of more than 10{sup 3}–10{sup 5}. We could make the apparatus smaller by employing very tiny diode laser and fiber optics elements of a DFB (Distributed Feedback) type. Consequently, our device has advantages in terms of maintainability and mobility even in a radioactive environment. This new method could be used for an accurate isotopic analysis in the future.

  14. History of Solid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Solid rockets are of interest to the space program because they are commonly used as boosters that provide the additional thrust needed for the space launch vehicle to escape the gravitational pull of the Earth. Larger, more advanced solid rockets allow for space launch vehicles with larger payload capacities, enabling mankind to reach new depths of space. This presentation will discuss, in detail, the history of solid rockets. The history begins with the invention and origin of the solid rocket, and then goes into the early uses and design of the solid rocket. The evolution of solid rockets is depicted by a description of how solid rockets changed and improved and how they were used throughout the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Modern uses of the solid rocket include the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) on the Space Shuttle and the solid rockets used on current space launch vehicles. The functions and design of the SRB and the advancements in solid rocket technology since the use of the SRB are discussed as well. Common failure modes and design difficulties are discussed as well.

  15. Can 250+ fusions per muon be achieved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear fusion of hydrogen isotopes can be induced by negative muons (μ) in reactions such as: μ - + d + t → α + n + μ - . This reaction is analagous to the nuclear fusion reaction achieved in stars in which hydrogen isotopes (such as deuterium, d, and tritium, t) at very high temperatures first penetrate the Coulomb repulsive barrier and then fuse together to produce an alpha particle (α) and a neutron (n), releasing energy. The muon in general reappears after inducing fusion so that the reaction can be repeated many (N) times. Thus, the muon may serve as an effective catalyst for nuclear fusion. Muon-catalozed fusion is unique in that it proceeds rapidly in deuterium-tritium mixtures at relatively cold temperatures, e.g., room temperature. The need for plasma temperatures to initiate fusion is overcome by the presence of the muon

  16. Analytic, empirical and delta method temperature derivatives of D-D and D-T fusion reactivity formulations, as a means of verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Booker, Jane M. [Booker Scientific, Fredericksburg, TX (United States)

    2017-07-21

    We examine the derivatives with respect to temperature, for various deuterium-tritium (DT) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion-reactivity formulations. Langenbrunner and Makaruk [1] had studied this as a means of understanding the time and temperature domain of reaction history measured in dynamic fusion experiments. Presently, we consider the temperature derivative dependence of fusion reactivity as a means of exercising and verifying the consistency of the various reactivity formulations.

  17. Process and device for the decontamination of the waste gas of the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor of waste gas components containing tritium and/or deuterium in chemically bound form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Glugla, M.; Schuster, P.

    1987-01-01

    The waste gas of the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor consists of a mixture of about 85% He and Ar and about 15% of deuteriated and/or tritiated ammonia, methane, water and hydrogen, apart from impurities such as CO, CO 2 , N 2 and O 2 . According to the invention, after oxidation of CO to CO 2 on an oxidation catalyst and after the reduction of water to hydrogen and the removal of O 2 by an O 2 getter metal, ammonia and methane are catalytically decomposed. The released hydrogen isotopes are separated for reuse via a membrane permeable to hydrogen, while the decontaminated waste gas is taken away to the environment. (orig.) [de

  18. Fusion-power demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S.; Moir, R.W.; Campbell, R.B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I.R.; Carpenter, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment

  19. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  20. Fusion power demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment

  1. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150 0 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength KEVLAR/epoxy composite. This arbon has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  2. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150 0 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength Kevlar/epoxy composite. This arbor has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  3. Fokker-Planck Modelling of Delayed Loss of Charged Fusion Products in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenstrasser, J.W.; Goloborod'ko, V.Ya.; Reznik, S.N.; Yavorskij, V.A.; Zweben, S.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a Fokker-Planck simulation of the ripple-induced loss of charged fusion products in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are presented. It is shown that the main features of the measured ''delayed loss'' of partially thermalized fusion products, such as the differences between deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium discharges, the plasma current and major radius dependencies, etc., are in satisfactory agreement with the classical collisional ripple transport mechanism. The inclusion of the inward shift of the vacuum flux surfaces turns out to be necessary for an adequate and consistent explanation of the origin of the partially thermalized fusion product loss to the bottom of TFTR

  4. Conventional sources of fast neutrons in 'cold fusion' experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cribier, M.; Spiro, M.; Favier, J.

    1989-04-01

    In 'cold fusion' experiments with heavy water a source of neutrons is the dissociation of deuterium induced by alpha particles emitted by natural occurring radioisotopes. We evaluate the rate of fast neutron emission as a function of the concentration of U, Th, Rn in contact with deuterium and discuss the possibility that the neutrons claimed to have been observed in 'cold fusion' experiments could be due to this conventional source

  5. Energy by nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buende, R.; Daenner, W.; Herold, H.; Raeder, J.

    1976-12-01

    This report reviews the state of knowledge in a number of fields of fusion research up to autumn 1976. Section 1 gives a very brief presentation of the elementary fusion reactions, the energies delivered by them and the most basic energy balances leading to Lawson-type diagrams. Section 2 outlines the reserves and cost of lithium and deuterium, gives estimates of the total energy available from DT fusion and comments on production technology, availlability and handling of the fuels. In section 3 a survey is given of the different concepts of magnetic confinement (stellarators, tokamaks, toroidal pinches, mirror machines, two-component plasmas), of confinement by walls, gas blankets and imploding liners and, finally, of the concepts of interial confinement (laser fusion, beam fusion). The reactors designed or outlined on the basis of the tokamak, high-β, mirror, and laser fusion concepts are presented in section 4, which is followed in section 5 by a discussion of the key problems of fusion power plants. The present-day knowledge of the cost structure of fusion power plants and the sensitivity of this structure with respect to the physical and technical assumptions made is analysed in section 6. Section 7 and 8 treat the aspects of safety and environment. The problems discussed include the hazard potentials of different designs (radiological, toxicological, and with respect to stored energies), release of radioactivity, possible kinds of malfunctioning, and the environmental impact of waste heat, radiation and radioactive waste (orig.) [de

  6. Tritium-assisted fusion breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1983-08-01

    This report undertakes a preliminary assessment of the prospects of tritium-assisted D-D fuel cycle fusion breeders. Two well documented fusion power reactor designs - the STARFIRE (D-T fuel cycle) and the WILDCAT (Cat-D fuel cycle) tokamaks - are converted into fusion breeders by replacing the fusion electric blankets with 233 U producing fission suppressed blankets; changing the Cat-D fuel cycle mode of operation by one of the several tritium-assisted D-D-based modes of operation considered; adjusting the reactor power level; and modifying the resulting plant cost to account for the design changes. Three sources of tritium are considered for assisting the D-D fuel cycle: tritium produced in the blankets from lithium or from 3 He and tritium produced in the client fission reactors. The D-D-based fusion breeders using tritium assistance are found to be the most promising economically, especially the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium mode of operation in which the 3 He exhausted from the plasma is converted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is in turn fed back to the plasma. The number of fission reactors of equal thermal power supported by Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium fusion breeders is about 50% higher than that of D-T fusion breeders, and the profitability is found to be slightly lower than that of the D-T fusion breeders

  7. Defect trapping of deuterium implanted in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Y.; Kakeno, M.; Yamada, K.; Hioki, T.; Kawamoto, J.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of deuterium implanted in Al was studied by the D( 3 He,p) 4 He and the D(d,p)T nuclear reactions. Changes of the depth profiles of the deuterium after heat treatments indicated that the implanted deuterium was trapped by the defect produced during the deuterium implantation and the release probability of the trapped deuterium increased as the specimen temperature was raised. Assuming a thermal equilibrium locally in the region of high defect concentration, the trapping energy of deuterium in Al was determined to be 0.12eV. Since the release probability for the single crystal was considerably larger than that for the polycrystal specimens, the deuterium was considered to be strongly trapped in the grain boundaries. Distributions of displaced Al atoms and the recovery of the lattice damage by annealing were measured by the channelling technique. (author)

  8. Hot muonic deuterium and tritium from cold targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Pippitt, B.; Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L.; Martoff, C.J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes in vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to study the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation

  9. Isotopic scaling of transport in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.D.; Adler, H.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, Z.; Duong, H.

    1995-01-01

    Both global and thermal energy confinement improve in high-temperature supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) when deuterium beam heating is partially or wholly replaced by tritium beam heating. For the same heating power, the tritium-rich plasmas obtain up to 22% higher total energy, 30% higher thermal ion energy, and 20-25% higher central ion temperature. Kinetic analysis of the temperature and density profiles indicates a favorable isotopic scaling of ion heat transport and electron particle transport, with τ Ei (a/2) ∝ (A) 0.7-0.8 and τ pe (a) ∝ (A) 0.8

  10. Deuterium - depleted water. Achievements and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titescu, Gh.; Stefanescu, I.; Saros-Rogobete, I.

    2001-01-01

    Deuterium - depleted water represents water that has an isotopic content lower than 145 ppm D/(D+H) which is the natural isotopic content of water. The research conducted at ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, regarding deuterium - depleted water were completed by the following patents: - technique and installation for deuterium - depleted water production; - distilled water with low deuterium content; - technique and installation for the production of distilled water with low deuterium content; - mineralized water with low deuterium content and technique to produce it. The gold and silver medals won at international salons for inventions confirmed the novelty of these inventions. Knowing that deuterium content of water has a big influence on living organisms, beginning with 1996, the ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, deuterium - depleted water producer, co-operated with Romanian specialized institutes for biological effects' evaluation of deuterium - depleted water. The role of natural deuterium in living organisms was examined by using deuterium - depleted water instead of natural water. These investigations led to the following conclusions: 1. deuterium - depleted water caused a tendency towards the increase of the basal tone, accompanied by the intensification of the vasoconstrictor effects of phenylefrine, noradrenaline and angiotensin; the increase of the basal tone and vascular reactivity produced by the deuterium - depleted water persists after the removal of the vascular endothelium; -2. animals treated with deuterium - depleted water showed an increase of the resistance both to sublethal and to lethal gamma radiation doses, suggesting a radioprotective action by the stimulation of non-specific immune defence mechanism; 3, deuterium - depleted water stimulates immune defence reactions, represented by the opsonic, bactericidal and phagocyte capacity of the immune system, together with increase in the numbers of polymorphonuclear neutrophils; 4. investigations regarding artificial

  11. Eddie Rocket's Franchise

    OpenAIRE

    Vahter, Jenni

    2008-01-01

    Eddie Rocket's Franchise - Setting up a franchise restaurant in Helsinki. TIIVISTELMÄ: Eddie Rocket's on menestynyt amerikkalaistyylinen 1950-luvun ”diner” franchiseravintolaketju Irlannista. Ravintoloita on perustettu viimeisen 18 vuoden aikana 28 kappaletta Irlantiin ja Isoon Britanniaan sekä yksi Espanjaan. Tämän tutkimuksen tarkoitus on tutkia onko Eddie Rocket'silla potentiaalia menestyä Helsingissä, Suomessa. Tutkimuskysymystä on lähestytty toimiala-analyysin, markkinatutkimuksen j...

  12. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 October 2016 – 26 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liquid Rocket Engine Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing SFTE Symposium 21 October 2016 Jake Robertson, Capt USAF AFRL...Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing • Engines and their components are extensively static-tested in development • This

  13. Dynamic Analysis of Sounding Rocket Pneumatic System Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armen, Jerald

    2010-01-01

    The recent fusion of decades of advancements in mathematical models, numerical algorithms and curve fitting techniques marked the beginning of a new era in the science of simulation. It is becoming indispensable to the study of rockets and aerospace analysis. In pneumatic system, which is the main focus of this paper, particular emphasis will be placed on the efforts of compressible flow in Attitude Control System of sounding rocket.

  14. The flight of uncontrolled rockets

    CERN Document Server

    Gantmakher, F R; Dryden, H L

    1964-01-01

    International Series of Monographs on Aeronautics and Astronautics, Division VII, Volume 5: The Flight of Uncontrolled Rockets focuses on external ballistics of uncontrolled rockets. The book first discusses the equations of motion of rockets. The rocket as a system of changing composition; application of solidification principle to rockets; rotational motion of rockets; and equations of motion of the center of mass of rockets are described. The text looks at the calculation of trajectory of rockets and the fundamentals of rocket dispersion. The selection further focuses on the dispersion of f

  15. The management of fusion waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fusion reactors based on the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle will generate radioactive waste as a result of neutron irradiation of the structural materials and absorption of the tritium fuel. An important issue is whether the volume of this waste and the risks associated with it can be reduced to a sufficiently low level that the environmental advantage of fusion can be maintained without incurring unacceptable additional costs. Information is presented on the radioactive waste expected from the decommissioning of three generations of fusion devices - the JET experiment, NET, and power reactors. The characteristics and probable volumes of this waste are considered, together with the risks associated with its disposal. (author)

  16. The management of fusion waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion reactors based on the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle will generate radioactive waste as a result of neutron irradiation of the structural materials and absorption of the tritium fuel. An important issue is whether the volume of this waste and the risks associated with it can be reduced to a sufficiently low level that the environmental advantage of fusion can be maintained without incurring unacceptable additional costs. Information is presented on the radioactive waste expected from the decommissioning of three generations of fusion devices - the JET experiment, NET, and power reactors. The characteristics and probable volumes of this waste are considered, together with the risks associated with its disposal. (orig.)

  17. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  18. Future with fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, F.

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews several current approaches to the development of nuclear fusion power sources by the year 2000. First mentioned is the only project to develop a nonpolluting, radiation-free source by using only natural and nonradioactive isotopes (nuclei of deuterium, helium 3 and boron) as ''advanced'' fuels. This system will also be capable of direct conversion of the released energy into electricity. Next described is the PACER concept, in which thermonuclear burning of deuterium occurs in fusion explosion taking place underground (e.g., in a salt dome). The released energy is absorbed in high-pressure steam which is then piped to a surface heat exchanger to provide steam for a turbogenerator. After filtration, the steam is returned. The PACER system also produces fissionable fuel. The balance of the article reviews three ''magnetic fusion'' approaches. Tokamak, mirror and theta pinch systems utilize magnetic fields to confine a plasma for either pulsed or steady-state operation. The tokamak and theta pinch are toroidal in shape, while the mirror can be thought of as a magnetic field configuration of roughly tubular shape that confines the plasma by means of higher fields at the ends than at its center. The tokamak approach accounts for about 65 percent of the magnetic fusion research and development, while theta pinches and mirrors represent about 15 percent each. Refs

  19. Thermally induced outdiffusion studies of deuterium in ceramic breeder blanket materials after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Maria, E-mail: maria.gonzalez@ciemat.es [LNF-CIEMAT, Materials for Fusion Group, Madrid (Spain); Carella, Elisabetta; Moroño, Alejandro [LNF-CIEMAT, Materials for Fusion Group, Madrid (Spain); Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Knitter, Regina [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Surface defects in Lithium-based ceramics are acting as trapping centres for deuterium. • Ionizing radiation affects the deuterium sorption and desorption processes. • By extension, the release of the tritium produced in a fusion breeder will be effective. - Abstract: Based on a KIT–CIEMAT collaboration on the radiation damage effects of light ions sorption/desorption in ceramic breeder materials, candidate materials for the ITER EU TBM were tested for their outgassing behavior as a function of temperature and radiation. Lithium orthosilicate based pebbles with different metatitanate contents and pellets of the individual oxide components were exposed to a deuterium atmosphere at room temperature. Then the thermally induced release of deuterium gas was registered up to 800 °C. This as-received behavior was studied in comparison with that after exposing the deuterium-treated samples to 4 MGy total dose of gamma radiation. The thermal desorption spectra reveal differences in deuterium sorption/desorption behavior depending on the composition and the induced ionizing damage. In these breeder candidates, strong desorption rate at approx. 300 °C takes place, which slightly increases with increasing amount of the titanate second phase. For all studied materials, ionizing radiation induces electronic changes disabling a number of trapping centers for D{sub 2} adsorption.

  20. Origin of excess heat generated during loading Pd-impregnated alumina powder with deuterium and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitriyeva, O., E-mail: olga.dmitriyeva@colorado.edu [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0425 (United States); Coolescence LLC, 2450 Central Ave Ste F, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Cantwell, R.; McConnell, M. [Coolescence LLC, 2450 Central Ave Ste F, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Moddel, G. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0425 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied heat produced by hydrogen and deuterium in Pd-impregnated alumina powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples were fabricated using light and heavy water isotopes and varied the gas used for loading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incorporation of hydrogen and deuterium influenced the amount of heat released or consumed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd nanoparticles appear to catalyze hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange chemical reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anomalous heating can be accounted for by chemical rather than nuclear reactions. - Abstract: We studied heat production in Pd-impregnated alumina powder in the presence of hydrogen and deuterium gases, investigating claims of anomalous heat generated as a result of nuclear fusion, usually referred to as a low energy nuclear reaction (LENR). By selecting the water isotope used to fabricate the material and then varying the gas used for loading, we were able to influence the amount of heat released or consumed. We suggest that Pd in its nanoparticle form catalyzes hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions in the material. This hypothesis is supported by heat measurements, residual gas analysis (RGA) data, and calculations of energy available from H/D exchange reactions. Based on the results we conclude that the origin of the anomalous heat generated during deuterium loading of Pd-enriched alumina powder is chemical rather than nuclear.

  1. Origin of excess heat generated during loading Pd-impregnated alumina powder with deuterium and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriyeva, O.; Cantwell, R.; McConnell, M.; Moddel, G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied heat produced by hydrogen and deuterium in Pd-impregnated alumina powder. ► Samples were fabricated using light and heavy water isotopes and varied the gas used for loading. ► Incorporation of hydrogen and deuterium influenced the amount of heat released or consumed. ► Pd nanoparticles appear to catalyze hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange chemical reactions. ► Anomalous heating can be accounted for by chemical rather than nuclear reactions. - Abstract: We studied heat production in Pd-impregnated alumina powder in the presence of hydrogen and deuterium gases, investigating claims of anomalous heat generated as a result of nuclear fusion, usually referred to as a low energy nuclear reaction (LENR). By selecting the water isotope used to fabricate the material and then varying the gas used for loading, we were able to influence the amount of heat released or consumed. We suggest that Pd in its nanoparticle form catalyzes hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions in the material. This hypothesis is supported by heat measurements, residual gas analysis (RGA) data, and calculations of energy available from H/D exchange reactions. Based on the results we conclude that the origin of the anomalous heat generated during deuterium loading of Pd-enriched alumina powder is chemical rather than nuclear.

  2. Measurement of the deuterium Balmer series line emission on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C. R.; Xu, Z.; Jin, Z.; Zhang, P. F. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang, J., E-mail: juan.huang@ipp.ac.cn; Gao, W.; Gao, W.; Chang, J. F.; Xu, J. C.; Duan, Y. M.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, J. G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Hou, Y. M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Volume recombination plays an important role towards plasma detachment for magnetically confined fusion devices. High quantum number states of the Balmer series of deuterium are used to study recombination. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two visible spectroscopic measurements are applied for the upper/lower divertor with 13 channels, respectively. Both systems are coupled with Princeton Instruments ProEM EMCCD 1024B camera: one is equipped on an Acton SP2750 spectrometer, which has a high spectral resolution ∼0.0049 nm with 2400 gr/mm grating to measure the D{sub α}(H{sub α}) spectral line and with 1200 gr/mm grating to measure deuterium molecular Fulcher band emissions and another is equipped on IsoPlane SCT320 using 600 gr/mm to measure high-n Balmer series emission lines, allowing us to study volume recombination on EAST and to obtain the related line averaged plasma parameters (T{sub e}, n{sub e}) during EAST detached phases. This paper will present the details of the measurements and the characteristics of deuterium Balmer series line emissions during density ramp-up L-mode USN plasma on EAST.

  3. Synthesis of deuterium labelled ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappon, V.J.; Halstead, G.W.; Theis, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The preparations of [ar- 2 H 4 ]-ibuprofen and [ar, 3,3,3- 2 H 7 ]-ibuprofen are described. The deuterium was incorporated into the aromatic ring of [ar- 2 H 4 ]-ibuprofen which is a metabolically stable position. [ar, 3,3,3- 2 H 7 ]-ibuprofen was synthesized by the same route using [ 2 H 3 ]-CH 3 I instead of CH 3 I for use as a GC/MS internal standard in stable isotope labelled bioavailability studies. (author)

  4. Deuterium and big bang nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burles, S.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of deuterium absorption in high redshift quasar absorption systems provide a direct inference of the deuterium abundance produced by big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). With measurements and limits from five independent absorption systems, we place strong constraints on the primordial ratio of deuterium to hydrogen, (D/H) p = 3.4 ± 0.3 x 10 -5 [1,2]. We employ a direct numerical treatment to improve the estimates of critical reaction rates and reduce the uncertainties in BBN predictions of D/H and 7 Li/H by a factor of three[3] over previous efforts[4]. Using our measurements of (D/H) p and new BBN predictions, we find at 95% confidence the baryon density ρ b = (3.6 ± 0.4) x 10 -31 g cm -3 (Ω b h 2 65 = 0.045 ± 0.006 in units of the critical density), and cosmological baryon-photon ratio η = (5.1 ± 0.6) x 10 -10

  5. Capabilities of nitrogen admixed cryogenic deuterium pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, Igor; Sergeev, Vladimir [SPU, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lang, Peter; Ploeckl, Bernhard; Cavedon, Marco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kocsis, Gabor; Szepesi, Tamas [Wigner RCP RMI, Budapest (Hungary); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Operation at high core density with high energy confinement - as foreseen in a future fusion reactor like DEMO - is being investigated at ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The efficiency of pellet fuelling from the high-field side usually increases with increasing injection speed. Due to the fragile nature of the deuterium ice, however, the increment of pellet mass losses and subsequent pellet fragmentations take place when the speed is increased. Studies show, that admixing of a small amount of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into D{sub 2} gas can be favorable for the mechanical stability of pellets. This might be helpful for deeper pellet penetration. Besides, seeding by N{sub 2} can enhance plasma performance due to both increasing the energy confinement time and reducing the divertor heat load in the envisaged ELMy H-mode plasma scenario. Fuelling efficiency of N{sub 2}-admixed solid D{sub 2} pellets and their nitrogen seeding capabilities were investigated. It was found that both the overall plasma density increase and the measured averaged pellet penetration depth were smaller in case of the admixed (1% mol. in the gas resulting in about 0.8% in the ice) pellet fuelling. Possibility of the N{sub 2}-seeding by admixed pellets was confirmed by CXRS measurements of N{sup 7+} content in plasma.

  6. Optimization of the fission--fusion hybrid concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltmarsh, M.J.; Grimes, W.R.; Santoro, R.T.

    1979-04-01

    One of the potentially attractive applications of controlled thermonuclear fusion is the fission--fusion hybrid concept. In this report we examine the possible role of the hybrid as a fissile fuel producer. We parameterize the advantages of the concept in terms of the performance of the fusion device and the breeding blanket and discuss some of the more troublesome features of existing design studies. The analysis suggests that hybrids based on deuterium--tritium (D--T) fusion devices are unlikely to be economically attractive and that they present formidable blanket technology problems. We suggest an alternative approach based on a semicatalyzed deuterium--deuterium (D--D) fusion reactor and a molten salt blanket. This concept is shown to emphasize the desirable features of the hybrid, to have considerably greater economic potential, and to mitigate many of the disadvantages of D--T-based systems

  7. Deuterium sputtering of Li and Li-O films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew; Buzi, Luxherta; Kaita, Robert; Koel, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    Lithium wall coatings have been shown to enhance the operational plasma performance of many fusion devices, including NSTX and other tokamaks, by reducing the global wall recycling coefficient. However, pure lithium surfaces are extremely difficult to maintain in experimental fusion devices due to both inevitable oxidation and codeposition from sputtering of hot plasma facing components. Sputtering of thin lithium and lithium oxide films on a molybdenum target by energetic deuterium ion bombardment was studied in laboratory experiments conducted in a surface science apparatus. A Colutron ion source was used to produce a monoenergetic, mass-selected ion beam. Measurements were made under ultrahigh vacuum conditions as a function of surface temperature (90-520 K) using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Results are compared with computer simulations conducted on a temperature-dependent data-calibrated (TRIM) model.

  8. Catalyzed deuterium fueled reversed-field pinch reactor assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrott, D.

    1985-01-01

    This study is part of a Department of Energy supported alternate fusion fuels program at Science Applications International Corporation. The purpose of this portion of the study is to perform an assessment of a conceptual compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR) that is fueled by the catalyzed-deuterium (Cat-d) fuel cycle with respect to physics, technology, safety, and cost. The Cat-d CRFPR is compared to a d-t fueled fusion reactor with respect to several issues in this study. The comparison includes cost, reactor performance, and technology requirements for a Cat-d fueled CRFPR and a comparable cost-optimized d-t fueled conceptual design developed by LANL

  9. South Pole rockets, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Iwane

    1977-01-01

    Wave-particle interaction was observed, using three rockets, S-210 JA-20, -21 and S-310 JA-2, launched from the South Pole into aurora. Electron density and temperature were measured with these rockets. Simultaneous observations of waves were also made from a satellite (ISIS-II) and at two ground bases (Showa base and Mizuho base). Observed data are presented in this paper. These include electron density and temperature in relation to altitude; variation of electron (60 - 80 keV) count rate with altitude; VLF spectra measured by the PWL of S-210 JA-20 and -21 rockets and the corresponding VLF spectra at the ground bases; low-energy (<10 keV) electron flux measured by S-310 JA-2 rocket; and VLF spectrum measured with S-310 JA-2 rocket. Scheduled measurements for the next project are also briefly described. (Aoki, K.)

  10. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion-source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at. (Auth.)

  11. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at

  12. Method of deuterium isotope separation and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for separating and enriching deuterium containing molecules comprising the steps of: providing a source of organic molecules containing a normal abundance of deuterium atoms, the organic molecules having a structural formula RX, in which R is an organic radical selected from ethyl, isopropyl, t-butyl and 3-cyclopentenyl, and in which X is selected from F, Cl, Br and OH, and wherein R represents 3-cyclopentenyl, X may additionally represent H; exposing the molecules to the radiation of at least one pulsed infrared laser source which has been specifically tuned and focussed to selectively decompose RX molecules containing deuterium to form an enriched olefin specie containing deuterium, and HX; and separating the deuterium enriched olefin specie from the undecomposed deuterium depleted RX molecules and HX. (author)

  13. Method of deuterium isotope separation and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    A method of deuterium isotope separation and enrichment using infrared laser technology in combination with chemical processes for treating and recycling the unreacted and deuterium-depleted starting materials is described. Organic molecules of the formula RX (where R is an ethyl, isopropyl, t-butyl, or cyclopentenyl group and X is F, Cl, Br or OH) containing a normal abundance of hydrogen and deuterium are exposed to intense laser infrared radiation. An olefin containing deuterium (olefin D) will be formed, along with HX. The enriched olefin D can be stripped from the depleted stream of RX and HX, and can be burned to form enriched water or pyrolyzed to produce hydrogen gas with elevated deuterium content. The depleted RX is decomposed to olefins and RX, catalytically exchanged with normal water to restore the deuterium content to natural levels, and recombined to form RX which can be recycled. (LL)

  14. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, K.M.; Batha, S.

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I i ) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I i discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed

  15. The hydrogen and deuterium concentrations in chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, F.; Merlivat, L.

    1978-01-01

    Water and isotopic concentration of H 2 O + are reported. It shows a correlation between the water, the deuterium concentrations and the petrologic types of chondrites. The Chainpur meteorite has been divided into several mineralogical fractions and the results are reported. The results of Orgueil are also reported. The correlation shows that as the sulfate content increases, the water and deuterium contents decrease. The terrestrial contamination is discussed and possible deuterium variation models are presented

  16. International fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy of the light elements deuterium and lithium can be released if the 100 MK degree temperature required for deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fusion reactions can be achieved together with sufficient thermal insulation for a net energy yield. Progress of world-wide research shows good prospect for these physical conditions being achieved by the use of magnetic field confinement and of rapidly developing heating methods. Tokamak systems, alternative magnetic systems and inertial confinement progress are described. International co-operation features a number of bilateral agreements between countries: the Euratom collaboration which includes the Joint European Torus, a joint undertaking of eleven Western European nations of Euratom, established to build and operate a major confinement experiment; the development of co-operative projects within the OECD/IEA framework; the INTOR workshop, a world-wide study under IAEA auspices of the next major step in fusion research which might be built co-operatively; and assessments of the potential of nuclear fusion by the IAEA and the International Fusion Research Council. The INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) studies have outlined a major plant of the tokamak type to study the engineering and technology of fusion reactor systems, which might be constructed on a world-wide basis to tackle and share the investment risks of the developments which lie ahead. This paper summarizes the recent progress of research on controlled nuclear fusion, featuring those areas where international co-operation has played an important part, and describes the various arrangements by which this international co-operation is facilitated. (author)

  17. Warming up to cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storms, E.

    1994-01-01

    The idea that tabletop equipment at room temperature could produce nuclear fusion was widely rejected five years ago by the scientific community. Nevertheless, recent results from numerous labs show that a novel phenomena of some kind may indeed be occurring, though theorist are still groping for an explanation. Many aspects of the cold fusion effect are now reproducible if known procedures are used. Palladium, when reacted with enough deuterium, apparently converts to a special condition of matter in which various nuclear reactions--including deuterium-deuterium fusion--can occur despite the repulsive force of the two positive charged nuclei. These reactions can be made to proceed rapidly enough to produce measurable heat. Scientist have published several dozen models, ranging from highly analytical approaches to pictorial representations, to explain these events. Most theories address only the problem of overcoming the coulombic barrier--how it is possible for nuclei to overcome their natural repulsion for each other without an infusion of massive amounts of energy from the outside. None of the proposed explanations accounts for the full range of experimental observations. Nevertheless a workable theory is crucial if we ever hope to apply cold fusion

  18. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  19. Fusion - 2050 perspective (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The results of strongly exothermic reaction of thermonuclear fusion between nuclei of deuterium and tritium are: helium nuclei and neutrons, plus considerable kinetic energy of neutrons of over 14 MeV. DT nuclides synthesis reaction is probably not the most favorable one for energy production, but is the most advanced technologically. More efficient would be possibly aneutronic fusion. The EU by its EURATOM agenda prepared a Road Map for research and implementation of Fusion as a commercial method of thermonuclear energy generation in the time horizon of 2050.The milestones on this road are tokomak experiments JET, ITER and DEMO, and neutron experiment IFMIF. There is a hope, that by engagement of the national government, and all research and technical fusion communities, part of this Road Map may be realized in Poland. The infrastructure build for fusion experiments may be also used for material engineering research, chemistry, biomedical, associated with environment protection, power engineering, security, ...

  20. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Present trends in magnetic fusion research and development indicate the promise of commercialization of one of a limited number of inexhaustible energy options early in the next century. Operation of the large-scale fusion experiments, such as the Joint European Torus (JET) and Takamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) now under construction, are expected to achieve the scientific break even point. Early design concepts of power producing reactors have provided problem definition, whereas the latest concepts, such as STARFIRE, provide a desirable set of answers for commercialization. Safety and environmental concerns have been considered early in the development of magnetic fusion reactor concepts and recognition of proplem areas, coupled with a program to solve these problems, is expected to provide the basis for safe and environmentally acceptable commercial reactors. First generation reactors addressed in this paper are expected to burn deuterium and tritium fuel because of the relatively high reaction rates at lower temperatures compared to advanced fuels such as deuterium-deuterium. This paper presents an overwiew of the safety and environmental problems presently perceived, together with some of the programs and techniques planned and/or underway to solve these problems. A preliminary risk assessment of fusion technology relative to other energy technologies is made. Improvements based on material selection are discussed. Tritium and neutron activation products representing potential radiological hazards in fusion reactor are discussed, and energy sources that can lead to the release of radioactivity from fusion reactors under accident conditions are examined. The handling and disposal of radioactive waste are discussed; the status of biological effects of magnetic fields are referenced; and release mechanisms for tritium and activation products, including analytical methods, are presented. (orig./GG)

  1. Deuterium measurement by emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, E.G.; Heilig, K.; Dumke, I.

    1978-01-01

    The method makes it possible to determine the relative deuterium content of enriched water samples. For this, the relative intensities of the Hα and Dα lines are measured which are emitted by a high-frequency discharge in water vapour. Although the method is not as exact as mass spectrometry, it has the following advantages: - Easy sample preparation (no reduction necessary); - samples of highly different enrichment can be measured one after the other without the danger of memory effects; - much lower apparatus and cost expenditure. The necessary sample size is about the same in both methods. (orig.) [de

  2. Kinetic simulation of neutron production in a deuterium z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostrom, C.; Stygar, William A.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R.E.; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Rose, David V.

    2010-01-01

    We have found computationally that, at sufficiently high currents, half of the neutrons produced by a deuterium z pinch are thermonuclear in origin. Early experiments below 1-MA current found that essentially all of the neutrons produced by a deuterium pinch are not thermonuclear, but are initiated by an instability that creates beam-target neutrons. Many subsequent authors have supported this result while others have claimed that pinch neutrons are thermonuclear. To resolve this issue, we have conducted fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium pinch. We find that at 1-MA pinch currents, most of the neutrons are, indeed, beam-target in origin. At much higher current, half of the neutrons are thermonuclear and half are beam-target driven by instabilities that produce a power law fall off in the ion energy distribution function at large energy. The implications for fusion energy production with such pinches are discussed.

  3. Nuclear fusion: power for the next century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The basis of fusion reactions is outlined, with special reference to deuterium and tritium (from lithium, by neutron reaction) as reactants, and the state of research worldwide is indicated. The problems inherent in fusion reactions are discussed, plasma is defined, and the steps to be taken to generate electricity from controlled nuclear fusion are stated. Methods of plasma heating and plasma confinement are considered, leading to a description of the tokamak plasma confinement system. Devices under construction include the JET (Joint European Torus) Undertaking in the UK. Plans and possibilities for fusion reactors are discussed. (U.K.)

  4. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  5. The History of Rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the origins and development of rockets mainly from the perspective of warfare. Includes some early enthusiasts, such as Congreve, Tsiolkovosky, Goddard, and Oberth. Describes developments from World War II, and during satellite development. (YP)

  6. Deuterium abundance, from ultraviolet to visible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebrard, Guillaume

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of the standard Big Bang model, the primordial abundance of deuterium is the most sensitive to the baryonic density of the Universe. It was synthesized only during the primordial nucleosynthesis few minutes after the Big Bang and no other standard mechanism is able to produce any further significant amount. On the contrary, since deuterium is burned up within stars, its abundance D/H decreases along cosmic evolution. Thus, D/H measurements constrain Big Bang and galactic chemical evolution models. There are three samples of deuterium abundances: primordial, proto-solar and interstellar. Each of them is representative of a given epoch, respectively about 15 Gyrs past, 4.5 Gyrs past and present epoch. Although the evolution of the deuterium abundance seems to be qualitatively understood, the measurements show some dispersion. Present thesis works are linked to deuterium interstellar abundance measurements. Such measurements are classically obtained from spectroscopic observations of the hydrogen and deuterium Lyman series in absorption in the ultraviolet spectral range, using space observatories. Results presented here were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and FUSE, which has recently been launched. Simultaneously, a new way to observe deuterium has been proposed, in the visible spectral range from ground-based telescopes. This has led to the first detections and the identification of the deuterium Balmer series, in emission in HII regions, using CFHT and VLT telescopes. (author) [fr

  7. A Flight Demonstration of Plasma Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Andrew; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schwenterly, WIlliam; Hitt, Michael; Lepore, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been engaged in the development of a variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (V ASIMR) for several years. This type of rocket could be used in the future to propel interplanetary spacecraft and has the potential to open the entire solar system to human exploration. One feature of this propulsion technology is the ability to vary its specific impulse so that it can be operated in a mode that maximizes propellant efficiency or a mode that maximizes thrust. Variation of specific impulse and thrust enhances the ability to optimize interplanetary trajectories and results in shorter trip times and lower propellant requirements than with a fixed specific impulse. In its ultimate application for interplanetary travel, the VASIMR would be a multi-megawatt device. A much lower power system is being designed for demonstration in the 2004 timeframe. This first space demonstration would employ a lO-kilowatt thruster aboard a solar powered spacecraft in Earth orbit. The 1O-kilowatt V ASIMR demonstration unit would operate for a period of several months with hydrogen or deuterium propellant with a specific impulse of 10,000 seconds.

  8. The ABC effect in double-pionic fusion to deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakimova, Olena

    2009-04-17

    In this work the first exclusive measurements of the reaction pd{yields}pd{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} have been carried out at beam energies of T{sub p}=1.03 and 1.35 GeV at CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala/Sweden. The reaction pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} has been measured as quasifree pd{yields} p{sub spec}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction with a spectator proton p{sub spec} of very small momentum. Since all particles except of the spectator proton have been measured, the spectator 4-momentum could be reconstructed by kinematical fits with 3 overconstraints. Hence one could exploit the Fermi motion of the target neutron to cover a range of relative energies in the pn-system for a given beam energy. The {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel, which is purely isoscalar and free of any isovector contributions, shows a large low-mass enhancement in the M{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} spectrum, which is much larger than observed in the inclusive measurements and also larger than predicted in previous {delta}{delta} calculations. In contrast to these and also to the inclusive data a high-mass enhancement in the M{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} spectrum was not observed and is meanwhile interpreted as 3{pi} and {eta}-meson production. All exclusive data can be described, if one assumes a resonance in the isoscalar pn-system, which dominantly decays via the isoscalar {delta}{delta} system. With this so-called s-channel resonance ansatz a very good description of the data in the total cross section as well as in the differential spectra has been achieved. Mass and width of this isoscalar dibaryonic resonance are M{sub R}{approx}2.36 GeV/c{sup 2} and {gamma}{sub R}{approx}80 MeV, respectively. (orig.)

  9. The ABC effect in double-pionic fusion to deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, Olena

    2009-01-01

    In this work the first exclusive measurements of the reaction pd→pdπ 0 π 0 have been carried out at beam energies of T p =1.03 and 1.35 GeV at CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala/Sweden. The reaction pn→dπ 0 π 0 has been measured as quasifree pd→ p spec dπ 0 π 0 reaction with a spectator proton p spec of very small momentum. Since all particles except of the spectator proton have been measured, the spectator 4-momentum could be reconstructed by kinematical fits with 3 overconstraints. Hence one could exploit the Fermi motion of the target neutron to cover a range of relative energies in the pn-system for a given beam energy. The π 0 π 0 channel, which is purely isoscalar and free of any isovector contributions, shows a large low-mass enhancement in the M π 0 π 0 spectrum, which is much larger than observed in the inclusive measurements and also larger than predicted in previous ΔΔ calculations. In contrast to these and also to the inclusive data a high-mass enhancement in the M π 0 π 0 spectrum was not observed and is meanwhile interpreted as 3π and η-meson production. All exclusive data can be described, if one assumes a resonance in the isoscalar pn-system, which dominantly decays via the isoscalar ΔΔ system. With this so-called s-channel resonance ansatz a very good description of the data in the total cross section as well as in the differential spectra has been achieved. Mass and width of this isoscalar dibaryonic resonance are M R ∼2.36 GeV/c 2 and Γ R ∼80 MeV, respectively. (orig.)

  10. Intelligible seminar on fusion reactors. (12) Next step toward the realization of fusion reactors. Future vision of fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Kenichi; Tobita, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    In the last session of this seminar the progress of research and development for the realization of fusion reactors and future vision of fusion energy research and development are summarized. The some problems to be solved when the commercial fusion reactors would be realized, (1) production of deuterium as the fuel, (2) why need the thermonuclear reactors, (3) environmental problems, and (4) ITER project, are described. (H. Mase)

  11. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoshi; Wang Feng; Tang Daorun; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Liu Yonggang; Xu Tao; Chen Ming; Mei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 10 10 . We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  12. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1990-04-01

    Fusion power, based on the nuclear fusion of light elements to yield a net gain of energy, has the potential to extend the world's resources in a way which is environmentally attractive. Nevertheless, the easiest route to fusion - the reaction between deuterium and tritium - involves hazards from the use of tritium and the neutron activation of the structural materials. These hazards have been considered on the basis of simple conceptual reactor designs, both in relation to normal operation and decommissioning and to potential accident situations. Results from several studies are reviewed and suggest that fusion reactors appear to have an inherently lower environmental impact than fission reactors. However, the realization of this potential has yet to be demonstrated. (author)

  13. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power

  14. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  15. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled fluphenazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, H U; Hawes, E M; Midha, K K

    1984-01-01

    The propylpiperazine side chain of fluphenazine has been labeled with two, four, and six deuterium atoms by lithium aluminum deuteride reduction of the appropriate ester or imide. The gamma-carbon of the propyl group was labeled with two deuterium atoms by reduction of 10- (2-methoxycarbonylethyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-10H-phenothiazine, while four deuterium atoms were incorporated into the piperazine ring by reduction of 10-[3-(3,5-dioxo-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-2-trifluoromethyl-10H-pheno thiazine. The latter reduction gave the d4-labeled N-deshydroxyethyl metabolite of fluphenazine.

  16. Equilibrium deuterium isotope effect of surprising magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.J.; Pressman, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Seemingly large deuterium isotope effects are reported for the preference of deuterium for the α-chloro site to the bridgehead or to the vinyl site in samples of anti-7-chlorobicyclo[4.3.2]undecatetraene-d 1 . Studies of molecular models did not provide a basis for these large equilibrium deuterium isotope effects. The possibility is proposed that these isotope effects only appear to be large for want of comparison with isotope effects measured for molecules that might provide even greater contrasts in local force fields

  17. High performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Bell, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    Plasmas composed of nominally equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium (DT) have been created in TFTR with the goals of producing significant levels of fusion power and of examining the effects of DT fusion alpha particles. Conditioning of the limiter by the injection of lithium pellets has led to an approximate doubling of the energy confinement time, τ E , in supershot plasmas at high plasma current (I p ≤ 2.5 MA) and high heating power (P b ≤ 33 MW). Operation with DT typically results in an additional 20% increase in τ E . In the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR, confinement enhancement H triple-bond τ E /τ E ITER-89P > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I p = 0.85 - 1.5 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, β N dia triple-bond 10 8 tperpendicular > aB 0 /I p = 3 has been obtained in these plasmas, exceeding the β N limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l i . Confinement of alpha particles appears to be classical and losses due to collective effects have not been observed. While small fluctuations in fusion product loss were observed during ELMs, no large loss was detected in DT plasmas

  18. Nuclear fusion an energetic option to the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medialdea Utande, A.; Sanchez Sanz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is the energy source of the Sun and the rest of starts. The great availability of deuterium on Earth, the inherent safety of the reactions involved and the intrinsic environmental respect make fusion an attractive energy source for the future of making of man king. International promising contributions are making Fusion Science and Technology progress by leaps and bounds to achieve its long term goal of cost-effective energy-producing plasmas. (Author)

  19. Fusion propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haloulakos, V.E.; Bourque, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The continuing and expanding national efforts in both the military and commercial sectors for exploration and utilization of space will require launch, assembly in space, and orbital transfer of large payloads. The currently available delivery systems, utilizing various forms of chemical propulsion, do not have the payload capacity to fulfill the planned missions. National planning documents such as Air Force Project Forecast II and the National Commission on Space Report to the President contain numerous missions and payload delivery schedules that are beyond the present capabilities of the available systems, such as the Space Shuttle and the Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELVs). The need, therefore, is very pressing to design, develop, and deploy propulsion systems that offer a quantum level increase in delivered performance. One such potential system is fusion propulsion. This paper summarizes the result of an Air Force Astronautics Laboratory (AFAL) sponsored study of fusion propulsion conducted by the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC), and its subcontractor General Atomics This study explored the potential of fusion propulsion for Air Force missions. Fusion fuels and existing confinement concepts were evaluated according to elaborate criteria. Two fuels, deuterium-tritium and deuterium-helium 3 (D- 3 He) were considered worthy of further consideration. D- 3 He was selected as the most attractive for this Air Force study. The colliding translating compact torus confinement concept was evaluated in depth and found to possibly possess the low mass and compactness required. Another possible concept is inertial confinement with the propellant surrounding the target. 5 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Transport of deuterium, tritium and helium in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potters, J.H.H.M.

    1984-02-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model for determining steady-state radial profiles of the densities of the particles, including neutrals, in a multispecies toroidal plasma is described. For prescribed temperature profiles, the coupled momentum and particle balances of the ions are solved numerically with a newly developed compact finite difference scheme for a non-equidistant mesh. Neutral densities are obtained by solving the Boltzmann equations, using a collocation method. The model is applied to deuterium-tritium plasmas without and with a helium admixture. For the charged particles, Pfirsch-Schlueter transport, including the highly collisional extension, and either of two anomalous transport models are adopted. For equal densities of deuterons and tritons in the plasma centre, the neutral tritium density in front of the wall is found to be 1.3 to 1.6 times higher than that of deuterium, depending on the plasma density, the temperature profile and the transport model. Secondly, it is found that pumping neutral helium, originating from fusion alpha particles, out of a cold plasma/gas blanket surrounding the hot plasma is not feasible, as the helium gas density, corresponding to a relative abundance of alpha-particles in the plasma core below 10%, is very low. Although depending strongly on the ion transport model and being increased by elastic collisions between neutral helium and charged hydrogen isotopes, the neutral helium enrichment ratio is always much less than unity. (Auth.)

  1. Measurement of anomalous neutron from deuterium/solid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Rongbao; Wang Xiaozhong; Lu Feng; Luo Longjun; He Jianyu; Ding Dazhao; Menlove, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    A series of experiments on both D 2 O electrolysis and thermal cycle of deuterium absorbed Ti Turnings are designed to examine the anomalous phenomena in Deuterium/Solid System. A neutron detector containing 16 BF 3 tubes with a detection limit of 0.38 n/s for two hour counting is used for electrolysis experiments. No neutron counting rate statistically higher than detection limit is observed from Fleischmann and Pons type experiments. An HLNCC-II neutron detector equipped with 18 3 He tubes and JSR-11 shift register unit with a detection limit of 0.20 n/s for a two hour run are employed to study the neutron signals in D 2 gas experiments. Ten batches of dry fusion samples are tested, among them, seven batches with neutron burst signals occur roughly at the temperature from -100 degrees centigrade to near room temperature. In the first four runs of a typical sample batch, seven neutron bursts are observed with neutron numbers from 15 to 482, which are 3 and 75 times, respectively, higher than the uncertainty of background. However, no bursts happened for H 2 dummy samples running in-between and afterwards and for sample batch after certain runs

  2. Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi E-mail: nakamura@tpl.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka; Arita, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji

    2001-09-01

    Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten has been investigated to estimate the amount of tritium permeation through its barrier in a thermo-nuclear fusion device. The permeation experiments were performed on pure tungsten foil of 25 {mu}m thickness under conditions of incident flux of 1.9x10{sup 18}-1.1x10{sup 19} D{sup +}/m{sup 2}s, incident ion energy of 200-2000 eV, and specimen temperature of 512-660 K. As a result of this steady-state permeation experiment, the rate-determining process of deuterium permeation was found to be controlled by diffusion at both implanted and permeated sides. On the other hand, transient permeation was strongly affected by trap effect in the specimen. Simulation analysis using TMAP code on transient permeation behavior indicates the existence of a trap site with a trap energy of nearly 1eV and with a trap density of over several ten's ppm in tungsten.

  3. Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka; Arita, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten has been investigated to estimate the amount of tritium permeation through its barrier in a thermo-nuclear fusion device. The permeation experiments were performed on pure tungsten foil of 25 μm thickness under conditions of incident flux of 1.9x10 18 -1.1x10 19 D + /m 2 s, incident ion energy of 200-2000 eV, and specimen temperature of 512-660 K. As a result of this steady-state permeation experiment, the rate-determining process of deuterium permeation was found to be controlled by diffusion at both implanted and permeated sides. On the other hand, transient permeation was strongly affected by trap effect in the specimen. Simulation analysis using TMAP code on transient permeation behavior indicates the existence of a trap site with a trap energy of nearly 1eV and with a trap density of over several ten's ppm in tungsten

  4. Rocket Flight Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Waters

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project uses Newton’s Second Law of Motion, Euler’s method, basic physics, and basic calculus to model the flight path of a rocket. From this, one can find the height and velocity at any point from launch to the maximum altitude, or apogee. This can then be compared to the actual values to see if the method of estimation is a plausible. The rocket used for this project is modeled after Bullistic-1 which was launched by the Society of Aeronautics and Rocketry at the University of South Florida.

  5. Heat load and deuterium plasma effects on SPS and WSP tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilémová Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten is a prime choice for armor material in future nuclear fusion devices. For the realization of fusion, it is necessary to address issues related to the plasma–armor interactions. In this work, several types of tungsten material were studied, i.e. tungsten prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS and by water stabilized plasma spraying (WSP technique. An intended surface porosity was created in the samples to model hydrogen/helium bubbles. The samples were subjected to a laser heat loading and a radiation loading of deuterium plasma to simulate edge plasma conditions of a nuclear fusion device (power density of 108 W/cm2 and 107 W/cm2, respectively, in the pulse intervals up to 200 ns. Thermally induced changes in the morphology and the damage to the studied surfaces are described. Possible consequences for the fusion device operation are pointed out.

  6. Isotopic scaling of transport in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.D.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.; Chang, Z.; Duong, H.; Grisham, L.R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Loughlin, M.J.; Mansfield, D.K.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Mikkelsen, D.M.; Murphy, J.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schivell, J.; Skinner, C.H.; Strachan, J.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.E.; Wieland, R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Both global and thermal energy confinement improve in high-temperature supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) when deuterium beam heating is partially or wholly replaced by tritium beam heating. For the same heating power, the tritium-rich plasmas obtain up to 22% higher total energy, 30% higher thermal ion energy, and 20-25% higher central ion temperature. Kinetic analysis of the temperature and density profiles indicates a favorable isotopic scaling of ion heat transport and electron particle transport, with τ Ei (a/2) ∝ left angle A right angle 0.7-0.8 and τ pe (a) ∝ left angle A right angle 0.8 . (orig.)

  7. Cryogenic rocket engine development at Delft aerospace rocket engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J; Hermsen, R.; Huijsman, R; Akkermans, C.; Denies, L.; Barreiro, F.; Schutte, A.; Cervone, A.; Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the current developments regarding cryogenic rocket engine technology at Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering (DARE). DARE is a student society based at Delft University of Technology with the goal of being the first student group in the world to launch a rocket into space. After

  8. Permeation of deuterium implanted into vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1986-05-01

    Permeation of deuterium through the vanadium alloy, V-15Cr-5Ti, was investigated using 3-keV, D 3 + ion beams from a small accelerator. The experiments consisted of measurements of the deuterium reemission and permeation rates as a function of implantation fluence for 0.5-mm thick specimens heated to tempertures from 623 to 823 0 K. Implantation-side surface characterization was made by simultaneous measurements of sputtered ions with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). Analyses of these measurements indicate that for the experimental conditions used, the steady-state deuterium permeation flux in V-15Cr-5Ti is approximately 18% of the implantation flux. This corresponds to approximately 1000 times that seen in the ferritic steel, HT-9, under comparable conditions. Measurement of deuterium diffusivity in V-15Cr-5Ti using permeation break-through times indicates D = 1.4 x 10 -8 exp(-.11 eV/kT) (m 2 /s)

  9. Synthesis of deuterium-labelled diclofenac sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, D.; Richard, J.; Godbillon, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dicolofenac sodium labelled with deuterium in the phenylacetic ring was prepared from [ 2 H 5 ]-bromobenzene in a six-step reaction. It was found to be suitable for use in pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies in man. (Author)

  10. DeUterium industrial production - tome 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagas, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Some selected bibliographical references about processes for deuterium industrial production are presented, as follow: isotope exchange H 2 S-H 2 O and NH 3 -H 2 , eletrolysis and distillation. (E.G.) [pt

  11. The Effect of Ion Energy and Substrate Temperature on Deuterium Trapping in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszell, John Patrick Town

    Tungsten is a candidate plasma facing material for next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER and there are major operational and safety issues associated with hydrogen (tritium) retention in plasma facing components. An ion gun was used to simulate plasma-material interactions under various conditions in order to study hydrogen retention characteristics of tungsten thus enabling better predictions of hydrogen retention in ITER. Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) was used to measure deuterium retention from ion irradiation while modelling of TDS spectra with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) was used to provide information about the trapping mechanisms involved in deuterium retention in tungsten. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) were used to determine the depth resolved composition of specimens used for irradiation experiments. Carbon and oxygen atoms will be among the most common contaminants within ITER. C and O contamination in polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) specimens even at low levels (˜0.1%) was shown to reduce deuterium retention by preventing diffusion of deuterium into the bulk of the specimen. This diffusion barrier was also responsible for the inhibition of blister formation during irradiations at 500 K. These observations may provide possible mitigation techniques for problems associated with tritium retention and mechanical damage to plasma facing components caused by hydrogen implantation. Deuterium trapping in PCW and single crystal tungsten (SCW) was studied as a function of ion energy and substrate temperature. Deuterium retention was shown to decrease with decreasing ion energy below 100 eV/D+. Irradiation of tungsten specimens with 10 eV/D+ ions was shown to retain up to an order of magnitude less deuterium than irradiation with 500 eV/D+ ions. Furthermore, the retention mechanism for deuterium was shown to be consistent across the entire energy range studied (10-500 e

  12. Compression of a spherically symmetric deuterium-tritium plasma liner onto a magnetized deuterium-tritium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarius, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Converging plasma jets may be able to reach the regime of high energy density plasmas (HEDP). The successful application of plasma jets to magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) would heat the plasma by fusion products and should increase the plasma energy density. This paper reports the results of using the University of Wisconsin’s 1-D Lagrangian, radiation-hydrodynamics, fusion code BUCKY to investigate two MIF converging plasma jet test cases originally analyzed by Samulyak et al.[Physics of Plasmas 17, 092702 (2010)]. In these cases, 15 cm or 5 cm radially thick deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma jets merge at 60 cm from the origin and converge radially onto a DT target magnetized to 2 T and of radius 5 cm. The BUCKY calculations reported here model these cases, starting from the time of initial contact of the jets and target. Compared to the one-temperature Samulyak et al. calculations, the one-temperature BUCKY results show similar behavior, except that the plasma radius remains about twice as long near maximum compression. One-temperature and two-temperature BUCKY results differ, reflecting the sensitivity of the calculations to timing and plasma parameter details, with the two-temperature case giving a more sustained compression.

  13. Thermal, thermoelectric, and cathode poisoning effects in cold fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesing, R.G.; Greenhow, R.C.; Cohler, M.D.; McQuillan, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an unsuccessful attempt to repeat the observations by Fleischmann and Pons of cold nuclear fusion in deuterium-charged palladium; no excess heat is found, nor is any gamma or neutron activity identified. Peltier heating at the palladium/platinum junction is investigated, but no effects are seen; the possibility remains, however, that a large Peltier coefficient may arise for deuterium concentrations that render the palladium-deuterium semiconducting. Finally, the effects of poisoning the palladium with cyanide were investigated

  14. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 142 NIST Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  15. Deuterium ion irradiation induced blister formation and destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jaemin; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Jin, Younggil; Roh, Ki-Baek; Kim, Gon-Ho, E-mail: ghkim@snu.ac.kr

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The areal number density of blisters on the grain with (1 1 1) plane orientation increased with increasing ion fluence. • No more blisters were created above the temperature about 900 K due to high thermal mobility of ions and inactivity of traps. • The destruction of blister at the boundary induced by sputtering is proposed. • The blisters were destructed at the position about the boundary by high sputtering yield of oblique incident ions and thin thickness due to plastic deformation at the boundary. - Abstract: The blisters formation and destruction induced by the deuterium ions on a polycrystalline tungsten were investigated with varying irradiation deuterium ion fluence from 3.04 × 10{sup 23} to 1.84 × 10{sup 25} D m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and an fixed irradiated ion energy of 100 eV in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source, which was similar to the far-scrape off layer region in the nuclear fusion reactors. Target temperature was monitored during the irradiation. Most of blisters formed easily on the grain with (1 1 1) plane orientation which had about 250 nm in diameter. In addition, the areal number density of blisters increased with increasing the ion fluence under the surface temperature reaching to about 900 K. When the fluence exceeded 4.6 × 10{sup 24} D m{sup −2}, the areal number density of the blister decreased. It could be explained that the destruction of the blister was initiated by erosion at the boundary region where the thickness of blister lid was thin and the sputtering yield was high by oblique incident ions, resulting in remaining the lid open, e.g., un-eroded center dome. It is possible to work as a tungsten dust formation from the plasma facing divertor material at far-SOL region of fusion reactor.

  16. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  17. This Is Rocket Science!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-09-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical than that offered by Estes Industries, but more basic than the analysis of Nelson et al. In particular, drag is neglected until the very end of the exercise, which allows the concept of conservation of energy to be shown when predicting the rocket's flight. Also, the variable mass of the rocket motor is assumed to decrease linearly during the flight (while the propulsion charge and recovery delay charge are burning) and handled simplistically by using an average mass value. These changes greatly simplify the equations needed to predict the times and heights at various stages of flight, making it more useful as a review of basic physics. Details about model rocket motors, range safety, and other supplemental information may be found online at Apogee Components4 and the National Association of Rocketry.5

  18. The Relativistic Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antippa, Adel F.

    2009-01-01

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  19. This "Is" Rocket Science!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

  20. ROCKETS: Soar to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Christine E. W.; O'Merle, Mary Jane; White, Gene

    2017-01-01

    This article describes ROCKETS, an after-school program for at-risk youth, and how the university students became involved in this service-learning project. The article discusses the steps that were taken to start the program, what is being done to continue the program, and the challenges that faculty have faced. This program is an authentic…

  1. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  2. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  3. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook covers the physics and technology upon which future fusion power reactors will be based. It reviews the history of fusion, reaction physics, plasma physics, heating, and confinement. Descriptions of commercial plants and design concepts are included. Topics covered include: fusion reactions and fuel resources; reaction rates; ignition, and confinement; basic plasma directory; Tokamak confinement physics; fusion technology; STARFIRE: A commercial Tokamak fusion power plant. MARS: A tandem-mirror fusion power plant; and other fusion reactor concepts

  4. Quantitative hydrogen analysis in fusion-relevant materials by SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, W.

    1991-04-01

    In fusion reactors graphite brazed on metallic substrates is commonly used for plasma-exposed components of the First Wall. Exposed to high heat-, hydrogen- and deuterium-fluxes, the stability of the braze under such conditions is essential. A sample of graphite brazed with zirconium on a molybdenum high temperature alloy was cut and exposed to a deuterium plasma (dose 10 22 cm -2 ). Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) has proven to combine high sensitivity to hydrogen and deuterium with the ability to perform depth profiling. Thus SIMS investigations should determine the extent of deuterium diffusion into the braze and the substrate. SIMS measurement conditions were optimized with special regard to energy filtering and to computer controlled magnetic field adjustment. Step scan measurements to obtain information on the surface concentration of deuterium and depth profiling to determine the distribution of the bulk concentration were performed. In the braze, directly exposed to the plasma, the deuterium content was up to a few atomic percent. The shielding of a thin graphite layer (0.5 mm) reduced the deuterium content to approximately 300 ppm at., but diffusion was still present. For deuterium quantification a homogenous graphite standard and molybdenum- and zirconium-implantation standards were used. With respect to the diffusivity of deuterium, MoD/Mo and ZrD/Zr ratios were measured. Different energy filtering was used to distinguish trapped and free deuterium. The comparison of experimental depth profiles with theoretical Monte Carlo simulations showed the effects of implantation damage in the bulk and of trapping. The relative sensitivity factors for deuterium in graphite, molybdenum and zirconium were calculated. (author)

  5. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure much-lt external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ''sling shot'' that is ''loaded'' to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10 -5 --10 -6 are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted

  6. Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.

    2010-01-01

    hydrogen (deuterium and tritium), are derived from water and the metal lithium, a relatively abundant resource. The fuels are virtually inexhaustible and they are available worldwide. Deuterium from one gallon of seawater would provide the equivalent energy of 300 gallons of gasoline, or over a half ton of coal. This energy is released when deuterium and tritium nuclei are fused together to form a helium nucleus and a neutron. The neutron is used to breed tritium from lithium. The energy released is carried by the helium nucleus (3.5 MeV) and the neutron (14 MeV). The energetic helium nucleus heats the fuel, helping to sustain the fusion reaction. Once the helium cools, it is collected and becomes a useful byproduct. A fusion power plant would produce no climate-changing gases.

  7. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  8. Radiation damage and deuterium trapping in deuterium-ion-irradiated Fe–9Cr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakir, Hirotomo, E-mail: iwakiri@edu.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Faculty and Graduate School of Education, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Tani, Munechika [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyusyu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoaki [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Thermal desorption of deuterium (D{sub 2}) from deuterium-ion (D{sub 2}{sup +})-irradiated Fe–9Cr was correlated with the microstructural evolution of the alloy during irradiation with 8-keV D{sub 2}{sup +} ions following annealing to determine the retention and desorption behavior of the implanted deuterium and to identify effective traps for them, particularly at high temperature. After irradiation at 573 K, a new desorption stage formed between 650 and 1100 K at higher fluences, and cavities were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The total amount of trapped deuterium following irradiation with a fluence of 3.0 × 10{sup 22} ions/m{sup 2} was 6.8 × 10{sup 17} D{sub 2}/m{sup 2}, or approximately 0.007%. These results indicate that the deuterium atoms recombined to form D{sub 2} molecules at the surfaces of the cavities.

  9. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 10 20 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  10. Concept of a charged fusion product diagnostic for NSTX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeglin, W U; Valenzuela Perez, R; Darrow, D S

    2010-10-01

    The concept of a new diagnostic for NSTX to determine the time dependent charged fusion product emission profile using an array of semiconductor detectors is presented. The expected time resolution of 1-2 ms should make it possible to study the effect of magnetohydrodynamics and other plasma activities (toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), neoclassical tearing modes (NTM), edge localized modes (ELM), etc.) on the radial transport of neutral beam ions. First simulation results of deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton yields for different detector arrangements and methods for inverting the simulated data to obtain the emission profile are discussed.

  11. Development of innovative fuelling systems for fusion energy science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.

    1996-01-01

    The development of innovative fueling systems in support of magnetic fusion energy, particularly the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is described. The ITER fuelling system will use a combination of deuterium-tritium (D-T) gas puffing and pellet injection to achieve and maintain ignited plasmas. This combination will provide a flexible fuelling source with D-T pellets penetrating beyond the separatrix to sustain the ignited fusion plasma and with deuterium-rich gas fuelling the edge region to meet divertor requirements in a process called isotopic fuelling. More advanced systems with potential for deeper penetration, such as multistage pellet guns and compact toroid injection, are also described

  12. Cryogenic hydrogen data pertinent to magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souers, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    To aid future hydrogen fusion researchers, I have correlated the measured physical and chemical properties of the hydrogens below 30 0 K. I have further estimated these properties for deuterium--deuterium tritide--tritium (D 2 --DT--T 2 ) fusion fuel. My resulting synthesis offers a timely view and review of cryogenic hydrogen properties, plus some hydrogen data to room temperature. My general thrust is for workers new to the field, although my discussion of the scientific background of the material would suit specialists

  13. The relativistic rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antippa, Adel F [Departement de Physique, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful method that can be applied to a wide range of special relativistic problems of linear acceleration.

  14. Method of deuterium isotope separation using ethylene and ethylene dichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, S.W.

    1982-01-01

    Compounds enriched in deuterium may be obtained from ethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, or propylene by laser isotope separation. Normal molecules of these organic compounds are exposed to infrared laser radiation of a suitable wavelength. Substantially all of the deuterium-containing molecules exposed to the laser can be selectively dissociated and the deuterium-containing products separated from the starting material and other reaction products. The deuterium-containing molecules can be burned to form water with an enriched deuterium content, or pyrolized to form hydrogen gas enriched in deuterium

  15. The deuterium inventory in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, M.; Rohde, V.; Ramos, G; Vainonen-Ahlgren, E.; Likonen, J.; Herrmann, A.; Neu, R.

    2007-01-01

    The deuterium inventory in ASDEX Upgrade was determined by quantitative ion beam analysis techniques and SIMS for different discharge campaigns between the years 2002 and 2005. ASDEX Upgrade was a carbon dominated machine during this phase. Full poloidal sections of the lower and upper divertor tile surfaces, limiter tiles, gaps between divertor tiles, gaps between inner heat shield tiles and samples from remote areas below the roof baffle and in pump ducts were analysed, thus offering an exhaustive survey of all relevant areas in ASDEX Upgrade. Deuterium is mainly trapped on plasma-exposed surfaces of inner divertor tiles, where about 70% of the retained deuterium inventory is found. About 20% of the inventory is retained at or below the divertor roof baffle, and about 10% is observed in other areas, such as the outer divertor and in gaps between tiles. The long term deuterium retention is 3-4% of the total deuterium input. The obtained results are compared with gas balance measurements, and conclusions about tritium retention in ITER are made

  16. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.) [pt

  17. Process for recovering water enriched with deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, H.

    1975-01-01

    By the process proposed herewith, enrichment of deuterium in water by cooling water recirculation through series-connection of several cooling ciruits in the form of columns is obtained. With this method, conventional, open-type cooling towers without special installations can be applied, which is an important advantage as compared with a formerly proposed single-stage process with specially designed, complicated cooling towers. Series-connection of the cooling towers is carried out in such a way that the circulating water of a certain cooling circuit, which has a corresponding output value of deuterium enrichment, is conveyed to a succeeding circuit where further enrichment is achieved. The water enriched with deuterium is removed from the last cooling circuit of the series while an amount of fresch water equivalent to the water removed or evaporated altogether is fed to the first circuit of the series. (RB) [de

  18. The Role of the JET Project in Global Fusion Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1983-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion research is to make fusion energy available as a new energy source. Fusion processes occur naturally in the sun, where hydrogen nuclei release energy by combining to form helium. A fusion reactor on earth will require even higher temperatures than in the interior...... of the sun, and it will be based on deuterium and tritium reactions. JET (Joint European Torus) is a major fusion experiment now under construction near Abingdon in the UK It is aimed at producing conditions approximating those necessary in a fusion reactor. The results expected from JET should permit...... a realistic evaluation of the prospects for fusion power and serve as a basis for the design of the next major fusion experiment....

  19. Continuum emission from irradiated solid deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forrest, J.A.; Brooks, R.L.; Hunt, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new emission feature from the spectrum of irradiated solid deuterium has been observed in the very near-infrared spectral region. Experiments from three laboratories, using different excitation conditions, have confirmed the observation. Comparison of the timing and temperature dependence...... of the spectral feature to the information previously available from electron spin resonance studies of solid deuterium, points to atomic association as the underlying cause. We shall show the connection of this emission to the occurrence of thermal spikes and optical flashes, previously observed in solid...

  20. Synthesis of deuterium-labelled viloxazine. [Antidepressant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamada, Kumiko; Furuta, Takashi; Kasuya, Yasuji

    1988-06-01

    The synthesis of deuterium-labelled viloxazine with high isotopic purity is described. The synthetic procedures employ alkylation of 2-(benzyloxy)phenol with (/sup 2/H/sub 5/)ethyl iodide for the introduction of deuterium. Catalytic removal of the benzyl group of the deuterated product followed by reaction with epichlorohydrin afforded 1,2-epoxy-3-(2'-pentadeuteroethoxy-phenoxy)propane. Addition of 2-aminoethyl hydrogen sulphate to the epoxide and subsequent ring formation into a morpholine derivative produced the desired (/sup 2/H/sub 5/)viloxazine.

  1. Deuterium electrodisintegration at high recoil momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenholen, G.

    1996-01-01

    The availability of continuous electron beams made it possible to carry out various deuterium electro-disintegration experiments in kinematical domains corresponding to a high recoil momentum. Three such experiments are discussed: 1) the left-right asymmetry with respect to the direction of the momentum transfer has been measured with good precision; 2) cross sections have been obtained in a kinematical region well above the quasi-elastic peak; 3) data have been taken in quasi-elastic kinematics that can be used to study high-momentum components in the deuterium wave function [ru

  2. Quantitative analysis of deuterium by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomura, Shohei; Kaetsu, Hayato

    1981-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of deuterium concentration in water and hydrogen gas by gas chromatography is described. HD and D 2 in a hydrogen gas sample were separated from H 2 by a column packed with Molecular Sieve 13X, using extra pure hydrogen gas as carrier. A thermal conductivity detector was used. Concentrations of deuterium were determined by comparison with standard samples. The error inherent to the present method was less a 1% on the basis of the calibration curves obtained with the standard samples. The average time required for the analysis was about 3 minutes. (author)

  3. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D- 3 He reaction and the p- 11 B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger βB 2 0 to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high β values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D- 3 He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D 3 He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D 3 He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion or liquid metal MHD conversion (LMMHD). For a D

  4. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D-{sup 3}He reaction and the p-{sup 11}B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger {beta}B{sup 2}{sub 0} to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high {beta} values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D-{sup 3}He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D{sub 3} He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D{sub 3} He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion

  5. A light water excess heat reaction suggests that cold fusion may be alkali-hydrogen fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Mills and Kneizys presented data in support of a light water excess heat reaction obtained with an electrolytic cell highly reminiscent of the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion cell. The claim of Mills and Kneizys that their excess heat reaction can be explained on the basis of a novel chemistry, which supposedly also explains cold fusion, is rejected in favor of their reaction being, instead, a light water cold fusion reaction. It is the first known light water cold fusion reaction to exhibit excess heat, it may serve as a prototype to expand our understanding of cold fusion. From this new reactions are deduced, including those common to past cold fusion studies. This broader pattern of nuclear reactions is typically seen to involve a fusion of the nuclides of the alkali atoms with the simplest of the alkali-type nuclides, namely, protons, deuterons, and tritons. Thus, the term alkali-hydrogen fusion seems appropriate for this new type of reaction with three subclasses: alkali-hydrogen fusion, alkali-deuterium fusion, and alkali-tritium fusion. A new three-dimensional transmission resonance model (TRM) is sketched. Finally, preliminary experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis of a light water nuclear reaction and alkali-hydrogen fusion is reported. Evidence is presented that appears to strongly implicate the transmission resonance phenomenon of the new TRM

  6. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  7. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  8. Progress of laser fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1988-01-01

    The history of the research on nuclear fusion utilizing laser is described. It started in USSR in 1968, but the full scale start of laser implosion nuclear fusion was in 1972. In Osaka University, nuclear fusion neutrons were detected with a solid deuterium target and the phenomenon of parametric abnormal absorption in laser plasma was found in 1971. The new type target for implosion nuclear fusion ''Canon ball'' was devised in 1975. The phenomenon of the abnormal transmission of laser beam through a thin metal film in a multiple film target was found in 1976, and named ''Osaka effect''. Also the development of lasers has been advanced, and in 1983, a largest glass laser in the world, Gekko 12, with 12 beams, 30 kJ output, 55 TW, was completed. The new target LHART was devised, which enabled the generation of 10 trillion D-T reaction neutrons. Due to the development of high power laser technology, the realization of the new design of fuel pellets, the evaluation of the data by computer simulation, and the realization of new plasma diagnostic method, the research on laser nuclear fusion has developed rapidly, and the attainment of break-even is expected in 1990s. The features of inertial nuclear fusion are enumerated. (Kako, I.)

  9. Rocket + Science = Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris,Bruce; Sullivan, Greg; Burkey, Martin

    2010-01-01

    It's a cliche that rocket engineers and space scientists don t see eye-to-eye. That goes double for rocket engineers working on human spaceflight and scientists working on space telescopes and planetary probes. They work fundamentally different problems but often feel that they are competing for the same pot of money. Put the two groups together for a weekend, and the results could be unscientific or perhaps combustible. Fortunately, that wasn't the case when NASA put heavy lift launch vehicle designers together with astronomers and planetary scientists for two weekend workshops in 2008. The goal was to bring the top people from both groups together to see how the mass and volume capabilities of NASA's Ares V heavy lift launch vehicle could benefit the science community. Ares V is part of NASA's Constellation Program for resuming human exploration beyond low Earth orbit, starting with missions to the Moon. In the current mission scenario, Ares V launches a lunar lander into Earth orbit. A smaller Ares I rocket launches the Orion crew vehicle with up to four astronauts. Orion docks with the lander, attached to the Ares V Earth departure stage. The stage fires its engine to send the mated spacecraft to the Moon. Standing 360 feet high and weighing 7.4 million pounds, NASA's new heavy lifter will be bigger than the 1960s-era Saturn V. It can launch almost 60 percent more payload to translunar insertion together with the Ares I and 35 percent more mass to low Earth orbit than the Saturn V. This super-sized capability is, in short, designed to send more people to more places to do more things than the six Apollo missions.

  10. Retention and features of deuterium detrapping from radiation-induced damages in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstolutskaya, G.D.; Ruzhytskiy, V.V.; Karpov, S.A.; Kopanets, I.E.

    2009-01-01

    The accelerators and ion-beam analysis techniques are used for simulation of displacement damage and detailed investigation of distribution profiles of damage and impurity gas atoms (especially helium and hydrogen) in the irradiation of targets for a wide ranges of doses and particle energies. The influence of preimplanted helium and heavy ion-induced damage on deuterium trapping in austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels was studied. The results obtained for 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel show that ion-implanted deuterium is weakly trapped by defects produced in 5 keV D + displacement cascades. The effective trapping temperature interval is between 300 and 600 K. The characteristics of trapping and the temperature range of hydrogen isotopes retention in traps formed by prior implantation of helium depend on the concentration of implanted helium and on the type of defects developed. The formation of helium bubbles in 18Cr10NiTi steel causes an order of magnitude increase in the content of retained deuterium atoms in the range of temperature 300-600 K and extends the interval of effective trapping temperatures to 1000 K. Energetic heavy-ion irradiation (1.4 MeV Ar + ) has been used for modeling defect cluster formation under displacement cascade conditions to simulate fusion reactor environments. It was found that retention of hydrogen and deuterium strongly increased in this case. It is shown that the presence of a surface-passive film considerably shifts the gas release interval to higher temperatures and reduces the deuterium surface recombination coefficient by several orders of magnitude.

  11. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  12. Muon catalyzed fusion under compressive conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cripps, G.; Goel, B.; Harms, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The viability of a symbiotic combination of Muon Catalyzed Fusion (μCF) and high density generation processes has been investigated. The muon catalyzed fusion reaction rates are formulated in the temperature and density range found under moderate compressive conditions. Simplified energy gain and power balance calculations indicate that significant energy gain occurs only if standard type deuterium-tritium (dt) fusion is ignited. A computer simulation of the hydrodynamics and fusion kinetics of a spherical deuterium-tritium pellet implosion including muons is performed. Using the muon catalyzed fusion reaction rates formulated and under ideal conditions, the pellet ignites (and thus has a significant energy gain) only if the initial muon concentration is approximately 10 17 cm -3 . The muons need to be delivered to the pellet within a very short-time (≅ 1 ns). The muon pulse required in order to make the high density and temperature muon catalyzed fusion scheme viable is beyond the present technology for muon production. (orig.) [de

  13. Nuclear rocket propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.S.; Miller, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has initiated planning for a technology development project for nuclear rocket propulsion systems for Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) human and robotic missions to the Moon and to Mars. An Interagency project is underway that includes the Department of Energy National Laboratories for nuclear technology development. This paper summarizes the activities of the project planning team in FY 1990 and FY 1991, discusses the progress to date, and reviews the project plan. Critical technology issues have been identified and include: nuclear fuel temperature, life, and reliability; nuclear system ground test; safety; autonomous system operation and health monitoring; minimum mass and high specific impulse

  14. Two-Dimensional Motions of Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the…

  15. Fusion engineering. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.E.; Pinter, G.R.; Spinos, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray crystal spectrometer is scheduled for installation in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in 1984 coinciding with the TFTR deuterium operation phase. This spectrometer is designed to measure the spectra of hydrogen-like and helium-like impurities in the plasma. Ion temperatures electron temperatures, electron density and the distribution of impurity charge states are obtained from the x-ray detector count ratios. The velocity of the toroidal rotation of the plasma is also discerned using this device. The x-ray crystal spectrometer is based on the Bragg diffraction of x-rays from a curved crystal impinging on a multiwire proportional counter. Only those x-rays that satisfy the Bragg relationship (lambda =2d sin theta) will be diffracted and strike the proportional counter. This paper is limited to a discussion of the physical characteristics of the spectrometer and the methods devised to satisfy the operational aspects of such a device

  16. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled prochlorperazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, E M; Gurnsey, T S; Shetty, H U; Midha, K K

    1983-06-01

    The propylpiperazine side chain of prochlorperazine was labeled with two, four, or six deuterium atoms by lithium aluminum deuteride reduction of the appropriate amide. The isotopic purity of the products after correcting for chlorine isotopes was greater than 95.7%.

  17. Total cross section results for deuterium electrodisintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopik, D.M.; Murphy, J.J. II; Shin, Y.M.

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical total cross sections for deuterium electrodisintegration are presented as a function of incident electron energy. The cross section has been calculated using virtual photon theory with Partovi's photodisintegration calculation for E/subx/ > 10 MeV and effective range theory for E/subx/ 2 H(e, n) reaction in Tokamak reactors

  18. The use of deuterium in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Sutton, J.; Marsac, J.

    1981-03-01

    Whenever a corporal function experiences a disturbance reflected either by changes in metabolic activity or modifications of the importance of pools of certain molecules the possibility exists of making use of isotopes in diagnosis. This paper discusses the use of deuterium to measure total body water and extravascular water in the lungs, and gives examples of clinical applications

  19. Deuterium in New Zealand rivers and streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.; Cox, M.A.; James, M.R.; Lyon, G.

    1983-07-01

    Over 750 deuterium measurements on rivers and streams in New Zealand are reported. Monthly samples were collected for periods of several years from a number of representative rivers. These show irregular storm-to-storm as well as seasonal deuterium variations. The seasonal variations range from as low as 1 per mille for lake-fed rivers to 8-10 per mille for rivers with large spring snow-melt contributions. Variations in mean annual ΔD values are believed to reflect changes in climatic variables; the present data will be used to compare with future changes. The bulk of the data are single samples; these show a geographic variation related to the altitude, latitude and climatic character of the catchments, with the highest deuterium contents (ΔD = -20 per mille) occurring in the far north, and lowest contents (-80 per mille) in the inland Otago region. Regression equations derived for the ΔD dependence on altitude (h) and latitude (l), are ΔD = -0.0169 h - 30.2 and westerly influence. Eastern climatic zones have lower deuterium contents because of rainout effects on the axial ranges. Contours of constant

  20. Deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, T.J.; Bennett, A.; Herbst, E.

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent gas-phase chemistry of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds ranging in temperature between 10 and 70 K was investigated using a pseudo-time-dependent model similar to that of Brown and Rice (1986). The present approach, however, considers much more complex species, uses more deuterium fractionation reactions, and includes the use of new branching ratios for dissociative recombinations reactions. Results indicate that, in cold clouds, the major and most global source of deuterium fractionation is H2D(+) and ions derived from it, such as DCO(+) and H2DO(+). In warmer clouds, reactions of CH2D(+), C2HD(+), and associated species lead to significant fractionation even at 70 K, which is the assumed Orion temperature. The deuterium abundance ratios calculated at 10 K are consistent with those observed in TMC-1 for most species. However, a comparison between theory and observatiom for Orion, indicates that, for species in the ambient molecular cloud, the early-time results obtained with the old dissociative recombination branching ratios are superior if a temperature of 70 K is utilized. 60 refs

  1. Deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, T. J.; Bennett, A.; Herbst, Eric

    1989-05-01

    The time-dependent gas-phase chemistry of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds ranging in temperature between 10 and 70 K was investigated using a pseudo-time-dependent model similar to that of Brown and Rice (1986). The present approach, however, considers much more complex species, uses more deuterium fractionation reactions, and includes the use of new branching ratios for dissociative recombinations reactions. Results indicate that, in cold clouds, the major and most global source of deuterium fractionation is H2D(+) and ions derived from it, such as DCO(+) and H2DO(+). In warmer clouds, reactions of CH2D(+), C2HD(+), and associated species lead to significant fractionation even at 70 K, which is the assumed Orion temperature. The deuterium abundance ratios calculated at 10 K are consistent with those observed in TMC-1 for most species. However, a comparison between theory and observatiom for Orion, indicates that, for species in the ambient molecular cloud, the early-time results obtained with the old dissociative recombination branching ratios are superior if a temperature of 70 K is utilized.

  2. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  3. Rhenium Rocket Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's On-Board Propulsion Branch has a research and technology program to develop high-temperature (2200 C), iridium-coated rhenium rocket chamber materials for radiation-cooled rockets in satellite propulsion systems. Although successful material demonstrations have gained much industry interest, acceptance of the technology has been hindered by a lack of demonstrated joining technologies and a sparse materials property data base. To alleviate these concerns, we fabricated rhenium to C-103 alloy joints by three methods: explosive bonding, diffusion bonding, and brazing. The joints were tested by simulating their incorporation into a structure by welding and by simulating high-temperature operation. Test results show that the shear strength of the joints degrades with welding and elevated temperature operation but that it is adequate for the application. Rhenium is known to form brittle intermetallics with a number of elements, and this phenomena is suspected to cause the strength degradation. Further bonding tests with a tantalum diffusion barrier between the rhenium and C-103 is planned to prevent the formation of brittle intermetallics.

  4. Nuclear fusion in a solid body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romodanov, V.A.; Savin, V.I.; Shakhurin, M.V.; Chernyavskij, V.T.; Pustovit, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The present work was aimed at investigating a possibility to have a fusion reaction during the interaction of gaseous deuterium with various metals under conditions of glow discharge. It is shown that neutron flux which presumably occurs due to the reaction of nuclear fusion exceeded the background level two times maximum for such materials as Cr, Pd, B, Li. A conclusion is made that for the recording of neutrons which can be generated under bombardment of material surfaces with accelerated ions an additional shielding of standard recorders is required against electromagnetic oscillations both in the input circuits and power supply circuits. A significant increase of tritium concentration in deuterium was recorded (by mass spectrometry and β activity measurement) during the passage of the latter through the metal being bombarded with accelerated ions from glow discharge plasma

  5. Once more about cold nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudanin, V.B.; Bystritsky, V.M.; Egorov, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the experiments on the search for cold nuclear d-d fusion in chemically pure titanium are given both for electrolysis of heavy water D 2 O and for titanium saturation with gaseous deuterium. The saturation took place at the temperature of 77K and pressure of 50 and 150 atm. A round of experiments with temperature varying from 1 to 600 atm was carried out. The limiting values of the partial rate of the nuclear reaction of d-d fusion with neutron production were obtained per deuteron (at the 95% confidence level): λ f ≤4x10 -25 s -1 (experiment with electrolysis), λ f ≤7x10 -28 s -1 (experiment with gaseous deuterium). 7 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  7. Neutron energy distribution function reconstructed from time-of-flight signals in deuterium gas-puff Z-pinch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klír, D.; Kravárik, J.; Kubeš, J.; Rezac, K.; Ananev, S.S.; Bakshaev, Y. L.; Blinov, P. I.; Chernenko, A. S.; Kazakov, E.D.; Korolev, V. D.; Ustroev, G. I.; Juha, Libor; Krása, Josef; Velyhan, Andriy

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2009), s. 425-432 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024 Grant - others:IAEA(XE) RC 14817 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : deuterium * fusion reaction * gas puff * Monte Carlo reconstruction * neutron energy spectra * neutron s * Z-pinch Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.043, year: 2009

  8. Micro-Rockets for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Jay S.; Fletcher, Alice S.; Cato, Julia A.; Barrett, Jennifer A.

    1999-01-01

    Compares micro-rockets to commercial models and water rockets. Finds that micro-rockets are more advantageous because they are constructed with inexpensive and readily available materials and can be safely launched indoors. (CCM)

  9. Critical safety function guidelines for experimental fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    As fusion experiments proceed toward deuterium-tritium operation, more attention is being given to public safety. This paper presents the four classes of functions that fusion experiments must provide to assure safe, stable shutdown and retention of radionuclides. These functions are referred to as critical safety functions (CSFs). Selecting CSFs is an important step in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). An example of CSF selection and usage for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is also presented. 10 refs., 6 figs

  10. Critical safety function guidelines for experimental fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    As fusion experiments proceed toward deuterium-tritium operation, more attention is being given to public safety. This paper presents the four classes of functions that fusion experiments must provide to assure safe, stable shutdown and retention of radionuclides. These functions are referred to as critical safety functions (CSFs). Selecting CSFs is an important step in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). An example of CSF selection and usage for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is also presented

  11. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through...... individual fusion events using time-lapse and antagonists of CD47 and syncytin-1. All time-lapse recordings have been studied by two independent observers. A total of 1808 fusion events were analyzed. The present study shows that CD47 and syncytin-1 have different roles in osteoclast fusion depending...... broad contact surfaces between the partners' cell membrane while syncytin-1 mediate fusion through phagocytic-cup like structure. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 1-8, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  12. Neutron penumbral imaging of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Ress, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Using a new technique, penumbral coded-aperture imaging, the first neutron images of laser-driven, inertial-confinement fusion targets were obtained. With these images the deuterium-tritium burn region within a compressed target can be measured directly. 4 references, 11 figures

  13. Experimental investigation of solid rocket motors for small sounding rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksila, Thada

    2018-01-01

    Experimentation and research of solid rocket motors are important subjects for aerospace engineering students. However, many institutes in Thailand rarely include experiments on solid rocket motors in research projects of aerospace engineering students, mainly because of the complexity of mixing the explosive propellants. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a solid rocket motor for total impulse in the class I-J that can be utilised as a small sounding rocket by researchers in the near future. Initially, the test stands intended for measuring the pressure in the combustion chamber and the thrust of the solid rocket motor were designed and constructed. The basic design of the propellant configuration was evaluated. Several formulas and ratios of solid propellants were compared for achieving the maximum thrust. The convenience of manufacturing and casting of the fabricated solid rocket motors were a critical consideration. The motor structural analysis such as the combustion chamber wall thickness was also discussed. Several types of nozzles were compared and evaluated for ensuring the maximum thrust of the solid rocket motors during the experiments. The theory of heat transfer analysis in the combustion chamber was discussed and compared with the experimental data.

  14. EURATOM strategy towards fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, C.

    2007-01-01

    Research and development (Research and Development) activities in controlled thermonuclear fusion have been carried out since the 60's of the last century aiming at providing a new clean, powerful, practically inexhaustive, safe, environmentally friend and economically attractive energy source for the sustainable development of our society.The EURATOM Fusion Programme (EFP) has the leadership of the magnetic confinement Research and Development activities due to the excellent results obtained on JET and other specialized devices, such as ASDEX-Upgrade, TORE SUPRA, FTU, TCV, TEXTOR, CASTOR, ISTTOK, MAST, TJ-II, W7-X, RFX and EXTRAP. JET is the largest tokamak in operation and the single device that can use deuterium and tritium mixes. It has produced 16 MW of fusion power, during 3 seconds, with an energy amplification of 0.6. The next steps of the EFP strategy towards fusion energy are ITER complemented by a vigorous Accompanying Programme, DEMO and a prototype of a fusion power plant. ITER, the first experimental fusion reactor, is a large-scale project (35-year duration, 10000 MEuros budget), developed in the frame of a very broad international collaboration, involving EURATOM, Japan, Russia Federation, United States of America, Korea, China and India. ITER has two main objectives: (i) to prove the scientific and technical viability of fusion energy by producing 500 MW, during 300 seconds and a energy amplification between 10 and 20; and (ii) to test the simultaneous and integrated operation of the technologies needed for a fusion reactor. The Accompanying Programme aims to prepare the ITER scientific exploitation and the DEMO design, including the development of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). A substantial part of this programme will be carried out in the frame of the Broader Approach, an agreement signed by EURATOM and Japan. The main goal of DEMO is to produce electricity, during a long time, from nuclear fusion reactions. The

  15. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  16. The DD Cold Fusion-Transmutation Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Talbot A.

    2005-12-01

    LENR theory must explain dd fusion, alpha-addition transmutations, radiationless nuclear reactions, and three-body nuclear particle reactions. Reaction without radiation requires many-body D Bloch+ periodicity in both location and internal structure dependencies. Electron scattering leads to mixed quantum states. The radiationless dd fusion reaction is 2-D Bloch+ -> {}4 He Bloch2+. Overlap between {}4 He Bloch2+ and surface Cs leads to alpha absorption. In the Iwamura et al. studies active deuterium is created by scattering at diffusion barriers.

  17. An advanced fusion neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Accelerator-based 14-MeV-neutron sources based on modifications of the original Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility are currently under consideration for investigating the effects of high-fluence high-energy neutron irradiation on fusion-reactor materials. One such concept for a D-Li neutron source is based on recent advances in accelerator technology associated with the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator accelerator under construction at Argonne National Laboratory, associated superconducting technology, and advances in liquid-metal technology. In this paper a summary of conceptual design aspects based on improvements in technologies is presented

  18. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    at very high temperature where all matter is in the plasma state as the involved energies are orders of magnitude higher than typical chemical binding energies. It is one of the great science and engineering challenges to construct a viable power plant based on fusion energy. Fusion research is a world...... The presentation will discuss the present status of the fusion energy research and review the EU Roadmap towards a fusion power plant. Further the cost of fusion energy is assessed as well as how it can be integrated in the distributed energy system......Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs...

  19. Cosmic Deuterium and Social Networking Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Suer, T.-A.; Lubowich, D. A.; Glaisyer, T.

    2006-08-01

    For the education of newcomers to a scientific field and for the convenience of students and workers in the field, it is helpful to have all the basic scientific papers gathered. For the study of deuterium in the Universe, in 2004-5 we set up http://www.cosmicdeuterium.info with clickable links to all the historic and basic papers in the field and to many of the current papers. Cosmic deuterium is especially important because all deuterium in the Universe was formed in the epoch of nucleosynthesis in the first 1000 seconds after the Big Bang, so study of its relative abundance (D:H~1:100,000) gives us information about those first minutes of the Universe's life. Thus the understanding of cosmic deuterium is one of the pillars of modern cosmology, joining the cosmic expansion, the 3 degree cosmic background radiation, and the ripples in that background radiation. Studies of deuterium are also important for understanding Galactic chemical evolution, astrochemistry, interstellar processes, and planetary formation. Some papers had to be scanned while others are available at the Astrophysical Data System, adswww.harvard.edu, or to publishers' Websites. By 2006, social networking software (http:tinyurl.com/ zx5hk) had advanced with popular sites like facebook.com and MySpace.com; the Astrophysical Data System had even set up MyADS. Social tagging software sites like http://del.icio.us have made it easy to share sets of links to papers already available online. We have set up http://del.icio.us/deuterium to provide links to many of the papers on cosmicdeuterium.info, furthering previous del.icio.us work on /eclipses and /plutocharon. It is easy for the site owner to add links to a del.icio.us site; it takes merely clicking on a button on the browser screen once the site is opened and the desired link is viewed in a browser. Categorizing different topics by keywords allows subsets to be easily displayed. The opportunity to expose knowledge and build an ecosystem of web

  20. Inertial fusion and energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is a technology for releasing nuclear energy from the fusion of light nuclei. For energy production, the most reactive hydrogen isotopes (deuterium (D) and tritium (T)) are commonly considered. The energy aplication requires the compression of a few milligrams of a DT mixture to great density, approximately 1000 times its liquid-state density, and to a high temperature, nearly 100 million 0 K. Under these conditions, efficient nuclear-fusion reactions occur, which can result in over 30% burn-up of the fusion fuel. The high density and temperature can be achieved by focusing very powerful laser or ion beams onto the target. The resultant ablation of the outer layers of the target compresses the fuel in the target, DT ignition occurs, and burn-up of the fuel results as the thermonuclear burn wave propagates outward. The DT-fuel burn-up occurs in about 199 picoseconds. On this short time scale, inertial forces are sufficiently strong to prevent target disassembly before fuel burn-up occurs. The energy released by the DT fusion is projected to be several hundred times greater than the energy delivered by the driver. The present statuds of ICF technology is described

  1. The present role of superconductivity in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, S.

    1986-01-01

    After completion of large fusion devices in the world, such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, high temperature plasma is proceeding to critical condition for fusion. The devices up to now use mainly conventional magnet. However, for the next generation machine which demonstrates fusion reaction, deuterium-tritium burning, superconducting magnet system is indispensable from view point of both net energy extraction and capacity limitation of power supply. In order to realize such a large and complicated system, a lot of development works is being carried out. This paper describes required parameters of superconducting magnet and helium refrigerator, the state of plasma condition and superconducting magnet. It is shown that the present technology of superconducting magnet is not so far from realization of fusion experimental reactor

  2. Investigation of condensed matter fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M.; Anderson, A.N.; McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N.; Goff, F.E.

    1990-12-01

    Work on muon-catalyzed fusion led to research on a possible new type of fusion occurring in hydrogen isotopes embedded in metal lattices. While the nuclear-product yields observed to date are so small as to require careful further checking, rates observed over short times appear sufficiently large to suggest that significant neutrons and triton yields could be realized -- if the process could be understood and controlled. During 1990, we have developed two charged-particle detection systems and three new neutron detectors. A segmented, high-efficiency neutron counter was taken into 600 m underground in a mine in Colorado for studies out of the cosmic-ray background. Significant neutron emissions were observed in this environment in both deuterium-gas-loaded metals and in electrolytic cells, confirming our earlier observations

  3. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  4. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on recent experiments which have shown the practicality of using activated carbon (coconut charcoal) at 4K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were satisfactory. The long-term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL was now known; therefore a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long-term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77 K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately one-third way through, and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict the use of charcoal as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high-vacuum pumping applications

  5. Fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of fusion power, and its advantages and disadvantages, are outlined. Present research programmes and future plans directed towards the development of a fusion power reactor, are summarized. (U.K.)

  6. Double recharge of pions on a deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichitiu, F.; Falomkin, I.V.; Shcherbakov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Assumptions on the dibaryon nature of the existing narrow resonances below the threshold of the NΔ-state with masses 1935, 1965, 2015 MeV are considered. New proposals on construction of the particle systematics with a new particle (R-particle of mass 1025 MeV, J=1/2, T=3/2) are used to draw a conclusion that double charge exchange is possible on deuterium and helium-3 if dibaryons or new R-particles are born in the final state. Attention is paid to a possible decay of these particles through a weak channel. A search for double charge exchange of pions on hydrogen and deuterium using a laser-illuminated streamer chamber of high pressure is proposed

  7. Deuterium content of the Venus atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertaux, -J.-L.; Clarke, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance of deuterium in the atmosphere of Venus is an important clue to the planet's history, because ordinary and deuterated water escape at different rates. Using the high-resolution mode of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), we measured hydrogen Lyman-α-emission but found only an upper limit on deuterium Lyman-α-emission, from which we inferred a D/H ratio of less than 2-5 x 10 -3 . This is smaller by a factor of 3-8 than the D/H ratio derived from measurements by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe, and may indicate either a stratification of D/H ratio with altitude or a smaller overall ratio than previously thought. (author)

  8. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum......This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...

  9. Rocket propulsion elements - An introduction to the engineering of rockets (6th revised and enlarged edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, George P.

    The subject of rocket propulsion is treated with emphasis on the basic technology, performance, and design rationale. Attention is given to definitions and fundamentals, nozzle theory and thermodynamic relations, heat transfer, flight performance, chemical rocket propellant performance analysis, and liquid propellant rocket engine fundamentals. The discussion also covers solid propellant rocket fundamentals, hybrid propellant rockets, thrust vector control, selection of rocket propulsion systems, electric propulsion, and rocket testing.

  10. Two-Rockets Thought Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2014-03-01

    Let n>=2 be identical rockets: R1 ,R2 , ..., Rn. Each of them moving at constant different velocities respectively v1, v2, ..., vn on parallel directions in the same sense. In each rocket there is a light clock, the observer on earth also has a light clock. All n + 1 light clocks are identical and synchronized. The proper time Δt' in each rocket is the same. Let's focus on two arbitrary rockets Ri and Rjfrom the previous n rockets. Let's suppose, without loss of generality, that their speeds verify virocket Rj is contracted with the factor C(vj -vi) , i.e. Lj =Lj' C(vj -vi) .(2) But in the reference frame of the astronaut in Rjit is like rocket Rjis stationary andRi moves with the speed vj -vi in opposite direction. Therefore, similarly, the non-proper time interval as measured by the astronaut inRj with respect to the event inRi is dilated with the same factor D(vj -vi) , i.e. Δtj . i = Δt' D(vj -vi) , and rocketRi is contracted with the factor C(vj -vi) , i.e. Li =Li' C(vj -vi) .But it is a contradiction to have time dilations in both rockets. (3) Varying i, j in {1, 2, ..., n} in this Thought Experiment we get again other multiple contradictions about time dilations. Similarly about length contractions, because we get for a rocket Rj, n-2 different length contraction factors: C(vj -v1) , C(vj -v2) , ..., C(vj -vj - 1) , C(vj -vj + 1) , ..., C(vj -vn) simultaneously! Which is abnormal.

  11. Influence of temperature and plasma composition on deuterium retention in refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, E.; Alves, L.C.; Barradas, N.P.; Mateus, R.; Carvalho, P.A.; Wright, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Refractory materials are being considered potential candidates to build the first wall of the fusion reactor chamber. This work reports on the results of the study of tungsten and molybdenum metals exposed to high flux densities (∼10 24 D/m 2 s) and low temperature (T e ∼ 3 eV) deuterium plasmas in Pilot-PSI irradiation facility. The hydrogenic retention in poly-crystalline W and Mo targets was studied with 3 He nuclear reaction analyses (NRA). The NRA results clearly show a two-dimensional radial distribution of the deuterium with a minimum at the center and a maximum close to the edge. These distribution correlates well with the thermal profile of the sample surface, where a maximum of ∼1600 K was measured at the center decreasing to ∼1000 K in the edges. A maximum deuterium fluence retention of 5 x 10 15 D/cm 2 was measured. The values of the retained fractions ranging from 10 -5 to 10 -6 D retained /D incident were measured with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and compares well with IBA results. Moreover, the presence of C in the plasma and its co-deposition increases the D retention in the region where a C film is formed. Both NRA and TDS results show no clear dependence of retention on incident fluence suggesting the absence of plasma related traps in W under these conditions.

  12. Synthesis of deuterium and tritium labelled tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanska, M.; Drabarek, S.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of synthesis of tyrosine labelled with deuterium and tritium in the aromatic ring has been developed. Deuterated and tritiated tyrosine was obtained by isotope exchange between tyrosine and deuterated or tritiated water at elevated temperature in hydrochloric acid medium using K 2 PtCl 4 as a catalyst. For synthesis of tritiated tyrosine 1 Ci HTO was used; the specific activity of the product was 5 mCi/mMol. (author)

  13. Photodisintegration of deuterium and big bang nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, K.Y.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goko, S.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Ohta, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Kudo, K.; Uritani, A.; Shibata, Y.; Lui, Y.-W.; Ohgaki, H.

    2003-01-01

    Photodisintegration cross sections were measured for deuterium with Laser-Compton scattering γ beams at seven energies near threshold. Combined with the preceding data, R(E)=N a σv for the p(n,γ)D reaction is for the first time evaluated based on experimental data with 6% uncertainty in the energy region relevant to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The result confirms the theoretical evaluation on which the BBN in the precision era relies

  14. Fusion: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's research programme on fusion. The decision to construct the ITER international nuclear fusion experiment in Cadarache is highlighted. A summary of the Belgian contributions to fusion research is given with particular emphasis on studies of radiation effects on diagnostics systems, radiation effects on remote handling sensing systems, fusion waste management and socio-economic studies

  15. The Swedish sounding rocket programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, R.

    1980-01-01

    Within the Swedish Sounding Rocket Program the scientific groups perform experimental studies of magnetospheric and ionospheric physics, upper atmosphere physics, astrophysics, and material sciences in zero g. New projects are planned for studies of auroral electrodynamics using high altitude rockets, investigations of noctilucent clouds, and active release experiments. These will require increased technical capabilities with respect to payload design, rocket performance and ground support as compared with the current program. Coordination with EISCAT and the planned Viking satellite is essential for the future projects. (Auth.)

  16. Initial deuterium pellet experiments on FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Initial experiments have been performed with the Single Pellet INjector (SPIN) on FTU. SPIN is a two-stage cryogenic deuterium pellet injector capable of injection,a pellets with velocities up to 2.5 km/s. The nominal pellet mass for these experiments was approximately 1 x 10 20 atoms. These initial pellet experiments concentrated on studying pellet penetration under a variety of plasma conditions to compare with code predictions and to examine toroidal particle transport. The principal diagnostics used were two fast (∼1 μsec) photomultiplier tubes at nearly opposite toroidal locations with H α (D α ) interference filters (λ = 656 nm), a microwave cavity for pellet mass and velocity, a vertical array of soft x ray diodes without filters looking down onto the pellet, a DCN interferometer for electron density profiles, and a Michelson ECE system for electron temperature profiles. The time integral of the absolutely calibrated fast H α signal appears to give reasonable agreement with the expected pellet mass. Toroidal transport of deuterium ions from the pellet to nearly the opposite side of the tokamak agrees with calculated thermal deuterium velocities near the plasma edge. Comparison of the experimental results with code calculations using the Neutral Gas Shielding model show good agreement for the post-pellet electron temperature and density profiles and the H α profiles in some cases. Calculated penetration distances agree within 20%

  17. Deuterium-depleted water. Romanian achievements and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Ion; Saros-Rogobete, Irina; Titescu, Gheorghe

    2001-01-01

    Deuterium-depleted water has an isotopic content smaller than 145 ppm D/(D+H) which is the natural isotopic content of water. Beginning with 1996 ICSI Rm. Valcea, deuterium-depleted water producer, co-operated with Romanian specialized institutes for biological effect's evaluation of deuterium-depleted water. These investigations lead to the following conclusions: - Deuterium-depleted water caused a tendency towards the increase of the basal tonus, accompanied by the intensification of the vasoconstrictor effects of phenylefrine, noradrenaline and angiotensin; the increase of the basal tonus and vascular reactivity produced by the deuterium-depleted water persist after the removal of the vascular endothelium; - Animals treated with deuterium-depleted water showed an increase of the resistance both to sublethal and to lethal gamma radiation doses, suggesting a radioprotective action; - Deuterium-depleted water stimulates immune defence reactions and increases the numbers of polymorphonuclear neutrophils; - Investigations regarding artificial reproduction of fish with deuterium-depleted water fecundated solutions confirmed favourable influence in embryo growth stage and resistance in subsequent growth stages; - It was studied germination, growth and quantitative character's variability in plants; one can remark the favourable influence of deuterium-depleted water on biological process in plants in various ontogenetic stages; - The deuterium depletion in seawater produces the diminution of the water spectral energy related to an increased metabolism of Tetraselmis Suecica. (authors)

  18. Desorption dynamics of deuterium in CuCrZr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Nguyen, Lan Anh; Lee, Sanghwa; Noh, S. J.; Lee, S. K.; Park, M. C.; Shu, Wataru; Pitcher, Spencer; Torcy, David; Guillermain, David; Kim, Jaeyong

    2017-12-01

    Desorption behavior of deuterium (D2) in CuCrZr alloy was investigated considering sample thickness, loading and baking temperature of deuterium followed by the ITER scopes. Cylindrical specimens of 1, 3, 5 mm thick with 4 mm diameter were exposed to deuterium at a pressure of 25 bar at 120, 240 and 350 °C for 24 h, then baked at 800 °C in a vacuum chamber maintained at a pressure lower than 10-7 Torr. Deuterium desorption characteristics such as desorption rate and amount of deuterium in the sample were estimated by analyzing the desorption peaks monitored with a residual gas analyzer (RGA), and the trapping energy of deuterium was calculated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) results showed that deuterium atoms embedded in the sample at a depth of less than 15 μm and desorbed as low as 400 °C. All absorbed deuterium atoms in the specimen were completely retrieved by dynamic pumping at 800 °C in 15 min. The desorption rate of deuterium per unit area was inversely proportional to the increment of the thickness of the sample, and was proportional to the loading temperature. Based on the assumption that a uniform distribution of interstitial sites for deuterium follows the Femi-Dirac statistics, the result of TDS demonstrated that the CuCrZr alloy has two types of trapping energies, which were estimated to be 62 and 79 kJ/mol.

  19. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  20. Fusion Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  1. Electrodeless, multi-megawatt reactor for room-temperature, lithium-6/deuterium nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a reactor design to facilitate a room-temperature nuclear fusion/fission reaction to generate heat without generating unwanted neutrons, gamma rays, tritium, or other radioactive products. The room-temperature fusion/fission reaction involves the sequential triggering of billions of single-molecule, 6 LiD 'fusion energy pellets' distributed in lattices of a palladium ion accumulator that also acts as a catalyst to produce the molecules of 6 LiD from a solution comprising D 2 O, 6 LiOD with D 2 gas bubbling through it. The D 2 gas is the source of the negative deuterium ions in the 6 LiD molecules. The next step is to trigger a first nuclear fusion/fission reaction of some of the 6 LiD molecules, according to the well-known nuclear reaction: 6 Li + D → 2 4 He + 22.4 MeV. The highly energetic alpha particles ( 4 He nuclei) generated by this nuclear reaction within the palladium will cause shock and vibrations in the palladium lattices, leading to compression of other 6 LiD molecules and thereby triggering a second series of similar fusion/fission reactions, leading to a third series, and so on. The absorption of the kinetic energy in the palladium will, in turn, generate a continuous flow of heat into the heavy water carrier, which would be removed with a heat exchanger. (author)

  2. Neutral beams for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances in forming energetic beams of neutral hydrogen and deuterium atoms have led to a breakthrough in magnetic fusion: neutral beams are now heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, here at LLL and at other laboratories. For example, in our 2XIIB experiment we have injected a 500-A-equivalent current of neutral deuterium atoms at an average energy of 18 keV, producing a dense plasma (10 14 particles/cm 3 ) at thermonuclear energy (14 keV or 160 million kelvins). Currently, LLL and LBL are developing beam energies in the 80- to 120-keV range for our upcoming MFTF experiment, for the TFTR tokamak experiment at Princeton, and for the Doublet III tokamak experiment at General Atomic. These results increase our long-range prospects of producing high-intensity beams of energies in the hundreds or even thousands of kilo-electron-volts, providing us with optimistic extrapolations for realizing power-producing fusion reactors

  3. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A.

    1995-03-01

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H triple-bond τ E /τ E ITER-89P > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I p = 0.85 - 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, β N dia triple-bond 10 8 tperpendicular > aB 0 /I p = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the β N limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l i . Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain Q DT = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased l i

  4. Absence of molecular deuterium dissociation during room-temperature permeation into polystyrene ICF target shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, A.; Alexander, N.; Fan, Q.; Gram, R.; Kim, H.

    1991-01-01

    Polystyrene microshells filled with deuterium and tritium gas are important target shells for inertially confined fusion (ICF) and are particularly promising for target containing spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. A currently active approach to the latter uses polarized D in HD, in a method which requires preservation of the high purity of the initially prepared HD (very low specified H 2 and D 2 concentrations). This would not be possible if dissociation should occur during permeation into the target shells. We have thus tested polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure ortho-D 2 as the test gas. An upper limit of 6 x 10 -4 was deduced for the dissociation of D 2 upon room temperature permeation through an approximately 8 um wall of polystyrene, clearing the way for use of polystyrene target shells for ICF fusion experiments with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. 19 refs., 1 fig

  5. Theodore von Karman - Rocket Scientist

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    seminal contributions to several areas of fluid and solid mechanics, as the first head of ... nent position in Aeronautics research, as a pioneer of rocket science in America ... toral work, however, was on the theory of buckling of large structures.

  6. Sounding rockets explore the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendillo, M.

    1990-01-01

    It is suggested that small, expendable, solid-fuel rockets used to explore ionospheric plasma can offer insight into all the processes and complexities common to space plasma. NASA's sounding rocket program for ionospheric research focuses on the flight of instruments to measure parameters governing the natural state of the ionosphere. Parameters include input functions, such as photons, particles, and composition of the neutral atmosphere; resultant structures, such as electron and ion densities, temperatures and drifts; and emerging signals such as photons and electric and magnetic fields. Systematic study of the aurora is also conducted by these rockets, allowing sampling at relatively high spatial and temporal rates as well as investigation of parameters, such as energetic particle fluxes, not accessible to ground based systems. Recent active experiments in the ionosphere are discussed, and future sounding rocket missions are cited

  7. EUVS Sounding Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan S.

    1996-01-01

    During the first half of this year (CY 1996), the EUVS project began preparations of the EUVS payload for the upcoming NASA sounding rocket flight 36.148CL, slated for launch on July 26, 1996 to observe and record a high-resolution (approx. 2 A FWHM) EUV spectrum of the planet Venus. These preparations were designed to improve the spectral resolution and sensitivity performance of the EUVS payload as well as prepare the payload for this upcoming mission. The following is a list of the EUVS project activities that have taken place since the beginning of this CY: (1) Applied a fresh, new SiC optical coating to our existing 2400 groove/mm grating to boost its reflectivity; (2) modified the Ranicon science detector to boost its detective quantum efficiency with the addition of a repeller grid; (3) constructed a new entrance slit plane to achieve 2 A FWHM spectral resolution; (4) prepared and held the Payload Initiation Conference (PIC) with the assigned NASA support team from Wallops Island for the upcoming 36.148CL flight (PIC held on March 8, 1996; see Attachment A); (5) began wavelength calibration activities of EUVS in the laboratory; (6) made arrangements for travel to WSMR to begin integration activities in preparation for the July 1996 launch; (7) paper detailing our previous EUVS Venus mission (NASA flight 36.117CL) published in Icarus (see Attachment B); and (8) continued data analysis of the previous EUVS mission 36.137CL (Spica occultation flight).

  8. Not just rocket science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAdam, S.; Anderson, R. [Celan Energy Systems, Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The paper explains a different take on oxyfuel combustion. Clean Energy Systems (CES) has integrated aerospace technology into conventional power systems, creating a zero-emission power generation technology that has some advantages over other similar approaches. When using coal as a feedstock, the CES process burns syngas rather than raw coal. The process uses recycled water and steam to moderate the temperature, instead of recycled CO{sub 2}. With no air ingress, the CES process produces very pure CO{sub 2}. This makes it possible to capture over 99% of the CO{sub 2} resulting from combustion. CES uses the combustion products to drive the turbines, rather than indirectly raising steam for steam turbines, as in the oxyfuel process used by companies such as Vattenfall. The core of the process is a high-pressure oxy-combustor adapted from rocket engine technology. This combustor burns gaseous or liquid fuels with gaseous oxygen in the presence of water. Fuels include natural gas, coal or coke-derived synthesis gas, landfill and biodigester gases, glycerine solutions and oil/water emulsion. 2 figs.

  9. Nuclear rocket engine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Covers a new technology of nuclear reactors and the related materials aspects. Integrates physics, materials science and engineering Serves as a basic book for nuclear engineers and nuclear physicists. The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  10. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  11. Easier Analysis With Rocket Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing rocket engines is one of Marshall Space Flight Center's specialties. When Marshall engineers lacked a software program flexible enough to meet their needs for analyzing rocket engine fluid flow, they overcame the challenge by inventing the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), which was named the co-winner of the NASA Software of the Year award in 2001. This paper describes the GFSSP in a wide variety of applications

  12. The electromagnetic rocket gun - a means to reach ultrahigh velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1983-01-01

    A novel kind of electromagnetic launcher for the acceleration of multigram-size macroparticles, up to velocities required for impact fusion, is proposed. The novel launcher concept combines the efficiency of a gun with the much higher velocities attainable by a rocket. In the proposed concept a rocket-like projectile is launched inside a gun barrel, drawing its energy from a travelling magnetic wave. The travelling magnetic wave heats and ionizes the exhaust jet of the rocket. As a result, the projectile i propelled both by the recoil from the jet and the magnetic pressure of the travelling magnetic wave. In comparison to magnetic linear accelerators, accelerating either superconducting or ferromagnetic projectiles, the proposed concept has several important advantages. First, the exhaust jet is much longer than the rocket-like projectile and which permits a much longer switching time to turn on the travelling magnetic wave. Second, the proposed concept does not require superconducting projectiles, or projectiles made from expensive ferromagnetic material. Third, unlike in railgun accelerators, the projectile can be kept away from the wall, and thereby can reach much larger velocities. (orig.)

  13. Deuterium as a tracer in coal liquefaction. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.A.; Collin, P.J.; Barron, P.F.; Vassallo, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Deuterium has been used to trace the pathways by which hydrogen reacts with an Australian bituminous coal (Liddell) in the presence of a nickel/molybdenum catalyst. The results show that at 400 0 C extensive scrambling of hydrogen and deuterium occurs among aromatic and α to aromatic aliphatic hydrogen and deuterium substituents. Deuterium can enter all structural groups in both asphaltene and hexane-soluble fractions of the coal-derived liquids, but it enters aromatic and α to aromatic groups in preference to alkyl groups remote from aromatic rings. Thus the results indicate that hydrogen atoms are very mobile during coal hydrogenation. Deuterium from deuterium oxide generated during conversion can also be incorporated into the coal-derived liquids. During coal hydrogenation, the eventual fate of much of the hydrogen in the gas phase is to substitute for hydrogen already in the coal. (Auth.)

  14. SAFE testing nuclear rockets economically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Travis, Bryan; Zerkle, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the Rover/NERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M

  15. Fuel procurement for first generation fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, B.F.; Hendrickson, P.L.

    1976-09-01

    The provision of deuterium, tritium, lithium and beryllium fuel materials for fusion power plants is examined in this document. Possible fusion reactions are discussed for use in first generation power plants. Requirements for fuel materials are considered. A range of expected annual consumption is given for each of the materials for a 1000 megawatts electric (MWe) fusion power plant. Inventory requirements are also given. Requirements for an assumed fusion power plant electrical generating capacity of 10 6 MWe (roughly twice present U.S. generating capacity) are also given. The supply industries are then examined for deuterium, lithium, and beryllium. Methods are discussed for producing the only tritium expected to be purchased by a commercial fusion industry--an initial inventory for the first plant. Present production levels and methods are described for deuterium, lithium and beryllium. The environmental impact associated with production of these materials is then discussed. The toxicity of beryllium is described, and methods are indicated to keep worker exposure to beryllium as low as achievable

  16. New extruder-based deuterium feed system for centrifuge pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    The pellet injection systems for the next-generation fusion devices (such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and future fusion reactors will have to provide deuterium-tritium fueling for much longer pulse lengths (up to ∼1000s) than present applications (typically limited to less than several seconds). Thus, a prototype pellet feed system for centrifuge pellet injection has been developed and used in long-pulse (>100s) tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The new apparatus has two key components: (1) a cryogenic deuterium extruder and (2) an electromagnetic pellet punch mechanism. For maximum testing flexibility, the prototype is equipped with several other active components that allow remote adjustments, including precise positioning of the punch and the capability to index through eight different pellet lengths. The new feed system was designed to mate with an existing centrifuge accelerator facility at ORNL, and experiments in the facility were carried out to document the performance and reliability of the new feed system. With 2.3-mm-diam deuterium pellets and a catenary-shaped accelerator (∼1.2mdiam), the prototype feed system was found to be capable of placing up to ∼90% of the punched pellets in the proper time/space window for pickup and acceleration by the high-speed rotating (∼50Hz) arbor. For these operating parameters, the pellet nominal speed was ∼430m/s, and maximum pellet feed rates of 10 pellets/s and greater were tested. In this article the equipment is briefly described, and the experimental test results are summarized. Also, issues affecting overall pellet delivery efficiency are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Fine target of deuterium; Blanco fino de deuterio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Diaz, J; Granados Gonzalez, C E; Gutierrez Bernal, R

    1959-07-01

    A fine target of deuterium on a tantalum plate by the absorption method is obtained. In order to obtain the de gasification temperature an induction generator of high frequency is used and the deuterium pass is regulated by means of a palladium valve. Two vacuum measures are available, one to measure the high vacuum in the de gasification process of the tantalum plate and the other, for low vacuum, to measure the deuterium inlet in the installation and the deuterium pressure change in the installation after the absorption in the tantalum plate. A target of 48 {mu} gr/cm{sup 2} thick is obtained. (Author) 1 refs.

  18. Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composites under high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetov, A.A.; Begrambekov, L.B.; Kuzmin, A.A.; Shigin, P.A.; Zakharov, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deuterium trapping in CFC, dance graphite MPG-8 and pyrolytic graphite (PG) under plasma ion- and electron irradiation. Number of specific features of deuterium trapping and retention under plasma ion and electron irradiation is presented and discussed. In particular it is shown that 1) deuterium trapping takes place even when energy of impinging ions approaches zero; 2) deuterium is trapped under irradiation by plasma electrons; 3) under irradiation at equal fluences deuterium trapping is higher, when ion flux is smaller. High energy ion penetrating the surfaces are trapped in the traps created at the expense of their kinetic energy. The process may be named 'kinetic trapping'. Under low energy (smaller than 200 eV) electron and/or ion irradiation the energy of inelastic interaction on the surface provides creation of active centers, which initiate dissociation of deuterium sorbed on the surface, penetration of deuterium atoms into graphite and their trapping in specific low energy traps. The term 'potential trapping' is proposed for this type of trapping. Under high energy irradiation such atoms can fill the traps formed through kinetic mechanism. Origination of moveable deuterium atoms from the layer of surface sorption seems to be time dependent process and it is a reason of increase of trapping along with irradiation time. New features of deuterium trapping and retention in graphite evaluated in this study offer new opportunities for analysis and correct estimation of hydrogen isotope trapping and retention in tokamaks having graphite tiles. (authors)

  19. Explosive-driven hemispherical implosions for generating fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagie, D.; Glass, I.I.

    1982-03-01

    The UTIAS explosive-driven-implosion facility was used to produce stable, centered and focussed hemispherical implosions to generate neutrons from D-D reactions. A high resolution scintillator-detection system measured the neutrons and γ-rays resulting from the fusion of deuterium. Several approaches were used to initiate fusion in deuterium. The simplest and most direct proved to be in a predetonated stoichiometric mixture of deuterium-oxygen. The other successful method was a miniature Voitenko-type compressor where a plane diaphragm was driven by the implosion wave into a secondary small spherical cavity that contained pure deuterium gas at one atmosphere. A great deal of work still remains in order to measure accurately the neutron flux and its velocity distribution as well as the precise interactions of the neturons with the steel chamber which produced the γ-rays. Nevertheless, this is the only known work where fusion neutrons were produced by chemical energy only in a direct and indirect manner

  20. Trends and developments in magnetic confinement fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of recent design trends and developments in reactor concepts for magnetic confinement fusion. The paper emphasizes the engineering and technology considerations of commercial fusion reactor concepts. Emphasis is placed on reactors that operate on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. Recent developments in tokamak, mirror, and Elmo Bumpy Torus reactor concepts are described, as well as a survey of recent developments on a wide variety of alternate magnetic fusion reactor concepts. The paper emphasizes recent developments of these concepts within the last two to three years

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation

  2. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described

  3. Muon-catalyzed fusion theory - introduction and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Muon-catalyzed fusion (μCF) has proved to be a fruitful subject for basic physics research as well as a source of cold nuclear fusion. Experiments have demonstrated that over 100 fusions per muon can be catalyzed by formation of the dtμ molecules in mixtures of deuterium and tritium. After a brief review of the subject's history, the dtμ catalysis cycle and the principle relations used in its analysis are described. Some of the important processes in the μCF cycle are then discussed. Finally, the status of current research is appraised. (author)

  4. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

  5. Vacuum pumping of tritium in fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Compound cryopumps of three different designs will be tested with deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures under simulated fusion reactor conditions at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) now being constructed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The first of these pumps is already in operation, and its preliminary performance is presented. The supporting vacuum facility necessary to regenerate these fusion facility cryopumps is also described. The next generation of fusion system vacuum pumps may include non-cryogenic or conventional-cryogenic hybrid systems, several of which are discussed

  6. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  7. Fusion Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang [eds.

    2012-09-15

    Recreating the energy production process of the Sun - nuclear fusion - on Earth in a controlled fashion is one of the greatest challenges of this century. If achieved at affordable costs, energy supply security would be greatly enhanced and environmental degradation from fossil fuels greatly diminished. Fusion Physics describes the last fifty years or so of physics and research in innovative technologies to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for energy production. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been involved since its establishment in 1957 in fusion research. It has been the driving force behind the biennial conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, today known as the Fusion Energy Conference. Hosted by several Member States, this biennial conference provides a global forum for exchange of the latest achievements in fusion research against the backdrop of the requirements for a net energy producing fusion device and, eventually, a fusion power plant. The scientific and technological knowledge compiled during this series of conferences, as well as by the IAEA Nuclear Fusion journal, is immense and will surely continue to grow in the future. It has led to the establishment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which represents the biggest experiment in energy production ever envisaged by humankind.

  8. ''Solid-state fusion'' effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    The ''Solid-State Fusion'' or ''Cold Fusion'' phenomenon, including excess heat generation and the production of nuclear particles, was first reported by Professors Martin Fleischmann and B. Stanley Pons in March 1989. The phenomenon described (the anomalous effects observed when deuterium oxide (heavy water) is electrolysed using a palladium cathode and a platinum anode in the presence of lithium deuteroxide) has many fascinating facets, not least of which is the fact that investigators are unable to produce the effects ''on demand''. Many of the experimental variables which seem to be significant were described and discussed at the ''First Annual Conference on Cold Fusion'' which was held in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, from 29th to 31st March 1990. The information presented at the conference is summarised here. Some papers addressed the excess heat effects observed, some the nuclear particles, and others the theoretical aspects. These are reviewed. At the end of the conference Fleischmann summarised all the areas where apparent evidence for solid state fusion had been obtained during the past year, namely: excess enthalpy, bursts in enthalpy; tritium, bursts in tritium; neutrons, bursts in neutrons; X-rays, gamma rays and bursts in these. He recommended that emphasis should now be concentrated on confirming reaction products, such as He 4 . New theories were emerging, but one year was too short a time in which to evaluate them fully. (author)

  9. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called ''International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)'' will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind

  10. Biological effects of deuterium - depleted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, I.; Titescu, Gh.; Croitoru, Cornelia; Saros-Rogobete, Irina

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium-depleted water (DDW) is represented by water that has an isotopic content smaller than 145 ppm D/(D + H). DDW production technique consists in the separation of deuterium from water by a continuous distillation process under pressure of about 133.3 mbar. The water used as raw material has a isotopic content of 145 ppm D/(D + H) and can be demineralized water, distillated water or condensed-steam. DDW results as a distillate with an isotopic deuterium content of 15-80 ppm, depending on the level we want to achieve. Beginning with 1996 the Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, DDW producer, co-operated with Romanian specialized institutes for studying the biological effects of DDW. The role of naturally occurring D in living organisms was examined by using DDW instead of natural water. These investigations led to the following conclusions: - DDW caused a tendency towards the increase of the basal tone, accompanied by the intensification of the vasoconstrictor effects of phenylefrine, noradrenaline and angiotensin; the increase of the basal tone and vascular reactivity produced by the DDW persists after the removal of the vascular endothelium; - Animals treated with DDW showed an increase of the resistance both to sublethal and lethal gamma radiation doses, suggesting a radioprotective action by the stimulation of non-specific immune defense mechanisms; - DDW stimulates immuno-defense reactions represented by the opsonic, bactericidal and phagocyte capacity of the immune system together with an increase in the number of poly-morphonuclear neutrophils; - Investigations regarding artificial reproduction of fish with DDW fecundated solutions confirmed favorable influence in embryo growth stage and resistance and following growth stages; - It was studied germination, growth and quantitative character variability in plants; one can remark the favorable influence of DDW on biological processes in plants in various ontogenetic stages. (authors)

  11. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange in mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Acter, Thamina; Zherebker, Alexander; Ahmed, Arif; Kim, Sunghwan; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2018-03-30

    The isotopic exchange approach is in use since the first observation of such reactions in 1933 by Lewis. This approach allows the investigation of the pathways of chemical and biochemical reactions, determination of structure, composition, and conformation of molecules. Mass spectrometry has now become one of the most important analytical tools for the monitoring of the isotopic exchange reactions. Investigation of conformational dynamics of proteins, quantitative measurements, obtaining chemical, and structural information about individual compounds of the complex natural mixtures are mainly based on the use of isotope exchange in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry. The most important reaction is the Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange, which is mainly performed in the solution. Recently we have developed the approach allowing performing of the Hydrogen/Deuterium reaction on-line directly in the ionization source under atmospheric pressure. Such approach simplifies the sample preparation and can accelerate the exchange reaction so that certain hydrogens that are considered as non-labile will also participate in the exchange. The use of in-ionization source H/D exchange in modern mass spectrometry for structural elucidation of molecules serves as the basic theme in this review. We will focus on the mechanisms of the isotopic exchange reactions and on the application of in-ESI, in-APCI, and in-APPI source Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange for the investigation of petroleum, natural organic matter, oligosaccharides, and proteins including protein-protein complexes. The simple scenario for adaptation of H/D exchange reactions into mass spectrometric method is also highlighted along with a couple of examples collected from previous studies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Erosion and deuterium retention of CLF-1 steel exposed to deuterium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L.; Wang, P.; Hu, M.; Gao, L.; Jacob, W.; Fu, E. G.; Luo, G. N.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel has been proposed as the plasma-facing material in remote regions of the first wall. This study reports the erosion and deuterium retention behaviours in CLF-1 steel exposed to deuterium (D) plasma in a linear experimental plasma system as function of incident ion energy and fluence. The incident D ion energy ranges from 30 to 180 eV at a flux of 4 × 1021 D m-2 s-1 up to a fluence of 1025 D m-2. SEM images revealed a clear change of the surface morphology as functions of incident fluence and impinging energy. The mass loss results showed a decrease of the total sputtering yield of CLF-1 steel with increasing incident fluence by up to one order of magnitude. The total sputtering yield of CLF-1 steel after 7.2 × 1024 D m-2 deuterium plasma exposure reduced by a factor of 4 compared with that of pure iron, which can be attributed to the enrichment of W at the surface due to preferential sputtering of iron and chromium. After D plasma exposure, the total deuterium retention in CLF-1 steel samples measured by TDS decreased with increasing incident fluence and energy, and a clear saturation tendency as function of incident fluence or energy was also observed.

  13. Liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets; Cibles a hydrogene et deuterium liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougon, M; Marquet, M; Prugne, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A description is given of 1) Atmospheric pressure target: liquid hydrogen, 400 mm thickness; thermal insulation: styrofoam; the hydrogen vapors are used to improve the target cooling; Mylar windows. 2) Vacuum target: 12 liter content: hydrogen or deuterium; liquid thickness 400 mm; thermal insulation is afforded by a vacuum vessel and a liquid nitrogen shield. Recovery and liquefaction of deuterium vapors are managed in the vacuum vessel which holds the target. The target emptying system is designed for operating in a few minutes. (author) [French] Description de: 1) Cible a pression atmospherique; hydrogene liquide, 400 mm d'epaisseur; l'isolement thermique: styrofoam; on utilise les vapeurs d'hydrogene pour ameliorer le refroidissement de la cible; hublots en Mylar. 2) Cible sous vide; contenance 12 litres; hydrogene ou deuterium; epaisseur du liquide 400 mm; l'isolement thermique est assure par une cuve a vide et un ecran d'azote liquide. Recuperation et liquefaction des vapeurs de deuterium sont effectuees dans la cuve a vide contenant la cible. Le systeme de vidange pour la cible est concu pour fonctionner en quelques minutes. (auteur)

  14. A Reexamination of Deuterium Fractionation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, A.; Paige, D. A.

    1997-07-01

    The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in the Martian atmosphere is enhanced by a factor of 5 with respect to the terrestrial value, probably due to fractionation associated with thermal Jeans escape from the top of the atmosphere. Theoretical analyses of the relative efficiency of H and D escape have suggested that the deuterium enrichment implies Mars has outgassed the vast majority of its H2O and that the Martian atmosphere is presently not exchanging water with a juvenile reservoir. However, measurements of high and variable D/H values within hydrous minerals in SNC meteorites strongly suggest that mixing between the atmosphere and juvenile water has taken place. Furthermore, the lack of any observed enrichment of atmospheric (18) O with respect to (16) O, in spite of fractionating nonthermal escape mechanisms, indicates buffering by some juvenile source of oxygen, most probably in the form of a surface or subsurface reservoir of water. We propose that this apparent paradox in the interpretation of isotopic hydrogen and oxygen fractionation --or lack thereof-- can be resolved by re-examining the standard model of deuterium fractionation efficiency on Mars. Specifically, we demonstrate the importance of using upper atmospheric temperatures more representative of the range experienced by the Martian exosphere over the course of the solar cycle. Preliminary calculations involving changes in effusion velocity and diffusive separation as a function of exospheric temperature indicate that incorporating these more representative lower exospheric temperatures will reduce the relative efficiency of D escape, in which case the observed enrichment of deuterium can indeed result from exchange with a juvenile source of water. We are in the process of confirming these computations with a one-dimensional upper atmospheric photochemical model that considers the effects of changing solar activity and exospheric temperature on ionospheric composition. If our initial calculations are

  15. Novel PEFC Application for Deuterium Isotope Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayoshi Matsushima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC with a Nafion membrane for isotopic separation of deuterium (D was investigated. Mass analysis at the cathode side indicated that D diffused through the membrane and participated in an isotope exchange reaction. The exchange of D with protium (H in H2O was facilitated by a Pt catalyst. The anodic data showed that the separation efficiency was dependent on the D concentration in the source gas, whereby the water produced during the operation of the PEFC was more enriched in D as the D concentration of the source gas was increased.

  16. Lamb shift in the muonic deuterium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P. [Samara State University, Pavlov street 1, 443011, Samara (Russian Federation); Samara State University, Pavlov Street 1, 443011, Samara, Russia and Samara State Aerospace University named after academician S.P. Korolyov, Moskovskoye Shosse 34, 443086, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    We present an investigation of the Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in the muonic deuterium ({mu}D) atom using the three-dimensional quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The vacuum polarization, nuclear-structure, and recoil effects are calculated with the account of contributions of orders {alpha}{sup 3}, {alpha}{sup 4}, {alpha}{sup 5}, and {alpha}{sup 6}. The results are compared with earlier performed calculations. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift at 202.4139 meV can be considered a reliable estimate for comparison with forthcoming experimental data.

  17. Apparatus and process for deuterium exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergenc, M.S.

    1976-01-01

    The deuterium exchange plant is combined with an absorption refrigeration plant in order to improve the exchange process and to produce refrigeration. The refrigeration plant has a throttling means for expanding and cooling a portion of the liquid exchange medium separated in the exchange plant as well as an evaporator, in which the said liquid exchange medium is brought into heat exchange with a cold consumer device, absorption means for forming a solution of the used exchange medium and fresh water and a pump for pumping the solution into the exchange plant

  18. Synthesis of deuterium labelled cocaine and pseudococaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casale, J.F.; Raney, H.T. (State Bureau of Investigation, Raleigh, NC (USA). Drug Chemistry Lab.); Lewin, A.H. (Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)); Cooper, D.A. (Drug Enforcement Administration, McLean, VA (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Cocaine and pseudococaine were mass-labelled with deuterium at various positions on the tropane ring. The synthetic procedures followed were adaptations of those previously published for the unlabelled compounds. The isotopic purity was greater than 95% for 2-({sup 2}H)-, 4,4-({sup 2}H2)-, and 1,5,6,6,7,7-({sup 2}H6)-cocaine and 3-({sup 2}H)-, 4,4-({sup 2}H2)-, and 1,5,6,6,7,7-({sup 2}H6)-pseudococaine, while that of 3-({sup 2}H)-cocaine exceeded 90%. (author).

  19. Synthesis of deuterium labelled cocaine and pseudococaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casale, J.F.; Raney, H.T.; Cooper, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Cocaine and pseudococaine were mass-labelled with deuterium at various positions on the tropane ring. The synthetic procedures followed were adaptations of those previously published for the unlabelled compounds. The isotopic purity was greater than 95% for 2-[ 2 H]-, 4,4-[ 2 H2]-, and 1,5,6,6,7,7-[ 2 H6]-cocaine and 3-[ 2 H]-, 4,4-[ 2 H2]-, and 1,5,6,6,7,7-[ 2 H6]-pseudococaine, while that of 3-[ 2 H]-cocaine exceeded 90%. (author)

  20. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  1. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S R; Grierson, B A; Burrell, K H; Chrystal, C; Groebner, R J; Kaplan, D H; Pablant, N A; Stagner, L

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  2. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meezan, N. B., E-mail: meezan1@llnl.gov; Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  3. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10 15 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield

  4. Fusion Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans

  5. Yes--This is Rocket Science: MMCs for Liquid Rocket Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelley, J

    2001-01-01

    The Air Force's Integrated High-Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technologies (IHPRPT) Program has established aggressive goals for both improved performance and reduced cost of rocket engines and components...

  6. Wake effect in rocket observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Akira; Hayashi, Tomomasa

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of the wake phenomena due to a probe and in rocket observation is discussed on the basis of experimental data. In the low energy electron measurement performed with the L-3H-5 rocket, the electron count rate changed synchronously with the rocket spin. This seems to be a wake effect. It is also conceivable that the probe itself generates the wake of ion beam. The latter problem is considered in the first part. Experiment was performed with laboratory plasma, in which a portion of the electron component of the probe current was counted with a CEM (a channel type multiplier). The change of probe voltage-count rate charactersitics due to the change of relative position of the ion source was observed. From the measured angular distributions of electron density and electron temperature around the probe, it is concluded that anisotropy exists around the probe, which seems to be a kinds of wake structure. In the second part, the wake effect due to a rocket is discussed on the basis of the measurement of leaking electrons with L-3H-5 rocket. Comparison between the theory of wake formation and the measured results is also shortly made in the final part. (Aoki, K.)

  7. Multi-Rocket Thought Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2014-03-01

    We consider n>=2 identical rockets: R1 ,R2 , ..., Rn. Each of them moving at constant different velocities respectively v1 ,v2 , ..., vn on parallel directions in the same sense. In each rocket there is a light clock, the observer on earth also has a light clock. All n + 1 light clocks are identical and synchronized. The proper time Δt' in each rocket is the same. (1) If we consider the observer on earth and the first rocket R1, then the non-proper time Δt of the observer on earth is dilated with the factor D(v1) : or Δt = Δt' D(v1) (1) But if we consider the observer on earth and the second rocket R2 , then the non-proper time Δt of the observer on earth is dilated with a different factor D(v2) : or Δt = Δt' D(v2) And so on. Therefore simultaneously Δt is dilated with different factors D(v1) , D(v2), ..., D(vn) , which is a multiple contradiction.

  8. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedditch, John, E-mail: john.hedditch@sydney.edu.au; Bowden-Reid, Richard, E-mail: rbow3948@physics.usyd.edu.au; Khachan, Joe, E-mail: joe.khachan@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Whales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  9. Permeation behavior of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; O' hira, Shigeru; Nishi, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    Study on Implantation Driven Permeation (IDP) behavior of deuterium through pure beryllium was investigated as a part of the research to predict the tritium permeation through the first wall components ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The permeation experiments were carried out with two beryllium specimens, one was an unannealed specimen and the other was that annealed at 1173 K. The permeation flux was measured as a function of specimen temperature and incident ion flux. Surface analysis of specimen was also carried out after the permeation experiment. Permeation was observed only with the annealed specimen and no significant permeation was observed with unannealed specimen under the present experimental condition (maximum temperature: 685 K, detection limit: 1x10{sup 13} D atoms/m{sup 2}s). It could be attributed that the intrinsic lattice defects, which act as diffusion preventing site, decreased with the specimen annealing. Based on the result of steady and transient permeation behavior and surface analysis, it was estimated that the deuterium permeation implanted into annealed beryllium was controlled by surface recombination due to the oxide layer on the surface of the permeated side. (author)

  10. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, Φ, from 1x10 20 D/m 2 to 1x10 21 D/m 2 proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at Φ ≥ 1.2x10 21 D/m 2 one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A 1 and A 2 at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A 1 is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak A 2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences

  11. Deuterium fractionation mechanisms in interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgarno, A.; Lepp, S.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of the fractionation of deuterated molecules is extended to include reactions with atomic deuterium. With the recognition that dissociative recombination of H + 3 is not rapid, observational data can be used in conjunction with the theory to derive upper and lower bounds to the cosmic deuterium-hydrogen abundance ratio. We find that [D]/[H] is at least 3.4 x 10 -6 and at most 4.0 x 10 -5 with a probable value of 1 x 10 -5 . Because of the reaction HCO + +D→DCO + +H, upper limits can be derived for the fractional ionization which depend only weakly on the cosmic ray flux, zeta. In four clouds, the upper limits to the fractional ionization lie between 1.1 x 10 -6 and 1.5 x 10 -6 if zeta = 10 -7 s -1 and between 3.1 x 10 -6 and 1.8 x 10 -6 if zeta = 10 -16 s -1

  12. Rocket Science 101 Interactive Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Dennis; Funkhouse, Deborah; DiMarzio, Donald

    2007-01-01

    To better educate the public on the basic design of NASA s current mission rockets, Rocket Science 101 software has been developed as an interactive program designed to retain a user s attention and to teach about basic rocket parts. This program also has helped to expand NASA's presence on the Web regarding educating the public about the Agency s goals and accomplishments. The software was designed using Macromedia s Flash 8. It allows the user to select which type of rocket they want to learn about, interact with the basic parts, assemble the parts to create the whole rocket, and then review the basic flight profile of the rocket they have built.

  13. Laser drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is the technology that we are developing to access the vast stored energy potential of deuterium fuel located in the world's water supply. This form of fusion is accomplished by compressing and heating small volumes of D-T fuel to very high temperatures (greater than 100M 0 C) and to very high densities (greater than 1000 times the normal liquid density). Under these fuel conditions, a thermonuclear reaction can occur, leading to a net energy release compared to the energy used to heat the fuel initially. To accomplish the condition where fusion reactions begin, effective drivers are required. These are lasers or particle beam accelerators which can provide greater than 10 14 W/cm 2 over millimeter scale targets with an appropriately programmed intensity vs time. At present, we are using research lasers to obtain an understanding of the physics and engineering of fuel compression

  14. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more pro...... pronounced than that for hydrogen projectiles in the same energy range....

  15. Method of producing deuterium-oxide-enriched water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, H.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing deuterium-oxide-enriched water (e.g., as a source of deuterium-rich gas mixtures) are disclosed wherein the multiplicity of individual cooling cycles of a power plant are connected in replenishment cascade so that fresh feed water with a naturally occurring level of deuterium oxide is supplied to replace the vaporization losses, sludge losses and withdrawn portion of water in a first cooling cycle, the withdrawn water being fed as the feed water to the subsequent cooling cycle or stage and serving as the sole feed-water input to the latter. At the end of the replenishment-cascade system, the withdrawn water has a high concentration of deuterium oxide and may serve as a source of water for the production of heavy water or deuterium-enriched gas by conventional methods of removing deuterium oxide or deuterium from the deuterium-oxide-enriched water. Each cooling cycle may form part of a thermal or nuclear power plant in which a turbine is driven by part of the energy and air-cooling of the water takes place in the atmosphere, e.g., in a cooling tower

  16. Deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.; Ghosh, S.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1982-01-01

    The overall separation factors for the deuterium exchange between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen have been calculated over a wide range of temperature, pressure and deuterium concentrations. These data would be useful in the design and other considerations for heavy water production, based on hydrogen-water exchange. (author)

  17. Consumption of potassium permanganate by impurities in deuterium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The titrimetric measurement of the consumption of potassium permanganate by impurities in deuterium oxide is one of the required methods intended for use in establishing whether the deuterium oxide is of sufficient purity to meet specifications. The method includes a discussion of reagents, procedure, and calculation

  18. Measuring the shock impedance mismatch between high-density carbon and deuterium at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, M.; Celliers, P. M.; Sterne, P. A.; Benedict, L. X.; Correa, A. A.; Hamel, S.; Ali, S. J.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Biener, J.; Collins, G. W.; Coppari, F.; Divol, L.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Haan, S. W.; Le Pape, S.; Meezan, N. B.; Moore, A. S.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Wild, C.; Eggert, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    Fine-grained diamond, or high-density carbon (HDC), is being used as an ablator for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate equation of state (EOS) knowledge over a wide range of phase space is critical in the design and analysis of integrated ICF experiments. Here, we report shock and release measurements of the shock impedance mismatch between HDC and liquid deuterium conducted during shock-timing experiments having a first shock in the ablator ranging between 8 and 14 Mbar. Using ultrafast Doppler imaging velocimetry to track the leading shock front, we characterize the shock velocity discontinuity upon the arrival of the shock at the HDC/liquid deuterium interface. Comparing the experimental data with tabular EOS models used to simulate integrated ICF experiments indicates the need for an improved multiphase EOS model for HDC in order to achieve a significant increase in neutron yield in indirect-driven ICF implosions with HDC ablators.

  19. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  20. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  1. Thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisse, J.

    2000-01-01

    This document takes stock of the two ways of thermonuclear fusion research explored today: magnetic confinement fusion and inertial confinement fusion. The basic physical principles are recalled first: fundamental nuclear reactions, high temperatures, elementary properties of plasmas, ignition criterion, magnetic confinement (charged particle in a uniform magnetic field, confinement and Tokamak principle, heating of magnetized plasmas (ohmic, neutral particles, high frequency waves, other heating means), results obtained so far (scale laws and extrapolation of performances, tritium experiments, ITER project), inertial fusion (hot spot ignition, instabilities, results (Centurion-Halite program, laser experiments). The second part presents the fusion reactor and its associated technologies: principle (tritium production, heat source, neutron protection, tritium generation, materials), magnetic fusion (superconducting magnets, divertor (role, principle, realization), inertial fusion (energy vector, laser adaptation, particle beams, reaction chamber, stresses, chamber concepts (dry and wet walls, liquid walls), targets (fabrication, injection and pointing)). The third chapter concerns the socio-economic aspects of thermonuclear fusion: safety (normal operation and accidents, wastes), costs (costs structure and elementary comparison, ecological impact and external costs). (J.S.)

  2. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  3. Site occupation state of deuterium atoms in fcc Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Katsutoshi; Machida, Akihiko; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Takanori; Sano-Furukawa, Asami

    2015-01-01

    The deuterization process of fcc Fe to form solid-solution fcc FeD x was investigated by in situ neutron diffraction measurements at high temperature and high pressure. In a completely deuterized specimen at 988 K and 6.3 GPa, deuterium atoms occupy the octahedral and tetrahedral interstitial sites with an occupancy of 0.532(9) and 0.056(5), respectively, giving a deuterium composition x of 0.64(1). During deuterization, the metal-lattice expands approximately linearly with deuterium composition at a rate of 2.21 Å 3 per deuterium atom. The minor occupation of tetrahedral site is likely driven by the intersite movement of deuterium atoms along the <111> direction in the fcc metal lattice. These results provide implications for the light elements in the Earth's core and the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement of ferrous metals. (author)

  4. Lymphocytes on sounding rocket flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli-Greuter, M; Pippia, P; Sciola, L; Cogoli, A

    1994-05-01

    Cell-cell interactions and the formation of cell aggregates are important events in the mitogen-induced lymphocyte activation. The fact that the formation of cell aggregates is only slightly reduced in microgravity suggests that cells are moving and interacting also in space, but direct evidence was still lacking. Here we report on two experiments carried out on a flight of the sounding rocket MAXUS 1B, launched in November 1992 from the base of Esrange in Sweden. The rocket reached the altitude of 716 km and provided 12.5 min of microgravity conditions.

  5. Consort 1 sounding rocket flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Maybee, George W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a payload of six experiments developed for a 7-min microgravity flight aboard a sounding rocket Consort 1, in order to investigate the effects of low gravity on certain material processes. The experiments in question were designed to test the effect of microgravity on the demixing of aqueous polymer two-phase systems, the electrodeposition process, the production of elastomer-modified epoxy resins, the foam formation process and the characteristics of foam, the material dispersion, and metal sintering. The apparatuses designed for these experiments are examined, and the rocket-payload integration and operations are discussed.

  6. Pegasus Rocket Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A small, desk-top model of Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus winged rocket booster. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable

  7. High convergence, indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Hatchett, S.P.; Caird, J.A.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Lane, S.M.; Laumann, C.; Murphy, T.J.; Murray, J.; Nelson, M.B.; Phillion, D.W.; Powell, H.; Ress, D.

    1996-01-01

    High convergence, indirect drive implosion experiments have been done at the Nova Laser Facility. The targets were deuterium and deuterium/tritium filled, glass microballoons driven symmetrically by x rays produced in a surrounding uranium hohlraum. Implosions achieved convergence ratios of 24:1 with fuel densities of 19 g/cm 3 ; this is equivalent to the range required for the hot spot of ignition scale capsules. The implosions used a shaped drive and were well characterized by a variety of laser and target measurements. The primary measurement was the fuel density using the secondary neutron technique (neutrons from the reaction 2 H( 3 H,n) 4 He in initially pure deuterium fuel). Laser measurements include power, energy and pointing. Simultaneous measurement of neutron yield, fusion reaction rate, and x-ray images provide additional information about the implosion process. Computer models are in good agreement with measurement results. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Hydrogen and deuterium plasma interactions with brazed first wall elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I. and others.

    1991-09-01

    Four different high temperature brazes (Zr, 90wt%Ni.10%Ti, 90Cu.10Ti and 70Ag.27Cu.3Ti, nominal composition prior to brazing) were used to join isotropic fine grain graphite and TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum. The general response of the brazes to a high flux deuterium plasma bombardement was examined using samples whose exposed surface intersected the braze line. Only in the case of Zr, which is known for its hydride forming properties, near-surface layers chipped off in the braze region directly exposed to the plasma. However, in graphite-shielded Zr-braze regions no disintegration of the interface was observed. The other brazes showed no visible attack at all. The interaction of a hydrogen plasma and a braze surface was studied in more detail by bombarding specimens in the PISCES-B facility. In this case the graphite was removed completely to enable an exaggerated plasma attack onto the bare braze. Even under these testing conditions the brazes CuTi and NiTi showed no particular sensitivity towards hydrogen. To prove the thermal stability of the brazed joints each quality was heat treated for 1 hr and 10 hrs, respectively, 50 o below the softening temperature of the braze in 1 bar of Ar or 96vol%Ar/4%H 2 . After the heat treatment no changes or damages were observed in the brazes AgCuTi and CuTi, whereas interstices are found in the widened NiTi-interlayer after 10 hrs in both, Ar and Ar/H 2 . Zr suffers different microstructural changes in particular after treatment in Ar/H 2 atmosphere. (Authors) (also appeared in Fusion Technology 1990, p. 411-415)

  9. Fundamental ion cyclotron resonance heating of JET deuterium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasilnikov, A V; Amosov, V N; Kaschuck, Yu A; Van Eester, D; Lerche, E; Ongena, J; Bonheure, G; Biewer, T; Crombe, K; Ericsson, G; Giacomelli, L; Hellesen, C; Hjalmarsson, A; Esposito, B; Marocco, D; Jachmich, S; Kiptily, V; Leggate, H; Mailloux, J; Kallne, J

    2009-01-01

    Radio frequency heating of majority ions is of prime importance for understanding the basic role of auxiliary heating in the activated D-T phase of ITER. Majority deuterium ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) experiments at the fundamental cyclotron frequency were performed in JET. In spite of the poor antenna coupling at 25 MHz, this heating scheme proved promising when adopted in combination with D neutral beam injection (NBI). The effect of fundamental ICRH of a D population was clearly demonstrated in these experiments: by adding ∼25% of heating power the fusion power was increased up to 30-50%, depending on the type of NBI adopted. At this power level, the ion and electron temperatures increased from T i ∼ 4.0 keV and T e ∼ 4.5 keV (NBI-only phase) to T i ∼ 5.5 keV and T e ∼ 5.2 keV (ICRH + NBI phase), respectively. The increase in the neutron yield was stronger when 80 keV rather than 130 keV deuterons were injected in the plasma. It is shown that the neutron rate, the diamagnetic energy and the electron as well as the ion temperature scale roughly linearly with the applied RF power. A synergistic effect of the combined use of ICRF and NBI heating was observed: (i) the number of neutron counts measured by the neutron camera during the combined ICRF + NBI phases of the discharges exceeded the sum of the individual counts of the NBI-only and ICRF-only phases; (ii) a substantial increase in the number of slowing-down beam ions was detected by the time of flight neutron spectrometer when ICRF power was switched on; (iii) a small D subpopulation with energies slightly above the NBI launch energy was detected by the neutral particle analyzer and γ-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, C.; Breuer, U.; Kreter, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (1026 m−2) and

  11. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.; Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kramer, Kevin J.

    2015-10-27

    A laser inertial-confinement fusion-fission energy power plant is described. The fusion-fission hybrid system uses inertial confinement fusion to produce neutrons from a fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium. The fusion neutrons drive a sub-critical blanket of fissile or fertile fuel. A coolant circulated through the fuel extracts heat from the fuel that is used to generate electricity. The inertial confinement fusion reaction can be implemented using central hot spot or fast ignition fusion, and direct or indirect drive. The fusion neutrons result in ultra-deep burn-up of the fuel in the fission blanket, thus enabling the burning of nuclear waste. Fuels include depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, spent nuclear fuel, thorium, and weapons grade plutonium. LIFE engines can meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the highly undesirable stockpiles of depleted uranium, spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials.

  12. Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate an Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension (ICRNE) for use in rocket thrust chambers. The ICRNE will utilize an...

  13. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  14. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  15. Peaceful fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Matthias [IANUS, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Like other intense neutron sources fusion reactors have in principle a potential to be used for military purposes. Although the use of fissile material is usually not considered when thinking of fusion reactors (except in fusion-fission hybrid concepts) quantitative estimates about the possible production potential of future commercial fusion reactor concepts show that significant amounts of weapon grade fissile materials could be produced even with very limited amounts of source materials. In this talk detailed burnup calculations with VESTA and MCMATH using an MCNP model of the PPCS-A will be presented. We compare different irradiation positions and the isotopic vectors of the plutonium bred in different blankets of the reactor wall with the liquid lead-lithium alloy replaced by uranium. The technical, regulatory and policy challenges to manage the proliferation risks of fusion power will be addressed as well. Some of these challenges would benefit if addressed at an early stage of the research and development process. Hence, research on fusion reactor safeguards should start as early as possible and accompany the current research on experimental fusion reactors.

  16. Deuterium pellet injection in the TFR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazare, O.

    1985-07-01

    Injecting fresh fuel deep inside the plasma of a thermonuclear reactor appears to be necessary; the only way to do that is to inject fast solid deuterium pellets. The existing theoretical, technical and experimental aspects of this method are presented. The experiments on TFR have confirmed that injecting pellets is technically feasible; a new kind of injector is presented. The injection does not degrade stability nor confinement of the plasma. The study of the transient phenomena occuring during the injection has proved to be an efficient way to investigate particles and energy transport in the discharge; in particular, a fast transport phenomenon, similar to those occuring during disruptions, has been studied in details. Conclusions about disruptions are drawn. (Ref 101) [fr

  17. Deuterium permeation through Flibe facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, S.; Anderl, R.A.; Smolik, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiment of deuterium permeation through Ni facing with purified Flibe is being carried out under the Japan-US joint research project (JUPITER-II). The experiment has been proceeding in the following phases; (i) fabrication and assembly of a dual-probe permeation apparatus, (ii) a single-probe Ni/D 2 , permeation experiment without Flibe, (iii) a dual-probe Ar/Ni/D 2 permeation experiment without Flibe, (iv) Flibe chemical purification by HF/H 2 gas bubbling, (v) physical purification by Flibe transport through a porous Ni filter, (vi) Ar/Ni/Flibe/Ni/D 2 permeation experiment using the dual Ni probe, and (vii) Ar/Ni/Flibe/Ni/HT permeation experiment. The present paper describe results until the Ar/Ni/Flibe/Ni/D 2 permeation experiment in detail. (author)

  18. Development of a powerful discharge in deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komelkov, V S; Skvortsov, U V; Tserevitinov, S S [Institute of Atomic Energy, Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Moscow (USSR)

    1958-07-01

    The investigations carried out at the Institute of Atomic Energy of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR resulted in the discovery of both neutron and hard X-ray radiation occurring under certain conditions in a powerful pulse discharge in deuterium. In the present work, the investigations in this field were continued with a view to studying these processes at greater currents and higher rates of increase of the current, by minimizing the circuit inductance and the size of the discharge chambers. Studies were made of the current distribution in the chamber, neutron radiation, electrode-metal vapour movement, and the effect of pre-ionization on the initial stages of the process.

  19. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    The application of stable Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes, as a tracer for fluxes between different compartments of the water cycle was subject of the present PhD-thesis. During a three year period, temporal data from a wide range of water cycle constituents was collected from...... the Skjern River catchment, Denmark. The presented applications focused on studying the isotopic 'input signal' to the hydrosphere in the form of precipitation, the isotopic 'output signal' with its related dynamic processes at a coastal saltwater-freshwater interface (groundwater isotopes) and the temporal...... development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence...

  20. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  1. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the report of a study group set up in 1971 by the Director of the UKAEA Culham Laboratory to investigate environmental and safety aspects of future commercial fusion reactors (1975, Carruthers, R., Dunster, H.J., Smith, R.D., Watson, C.J.H., and Mitchell, J.T.D., Culham Study Group Report on Fusion Reactors and the Environment, CLM-R148, HMSO, London). This report was originally issued in 1973 under limited distribution, but has only recently been made available for open circulation. Deuterium/tritium fusion is thought to be the most likely reaction to be used in the first generation of reactors. Estimates were made of the local and world-wide population hazards from the release of tritium, both under normal operating conditions and in the event of an accident. One serious type of accident would be a lithium metal fire in the blanket region of the reactor. The use of a fusible lithium salt (FLIBE), eliminating the lithium fire risk, is considered but the report concentrates on lithium metal in the blanket region. The main hazards to operating staff arise both from tritium and from neutron activation of the construction materials. Remote servicing of the reactor structure will be essential, but radioactive waste management seems less onerous than for fission reactors. Meaningful comparison of the overall hazards associated with fusion and fission power programmes is not yet possible. The study group emphasized the need for more data to aid the safety assessments, and the need for such assessments to keep pace with fusion power station design. (U.K.)

  2. Deuterium depleted water. Romanian achievements and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Ioan; Steflea, Dumitru; Titescu, Gheorghe; Tamaian, Radu

    2002-01-01

    The deuterium depleted water (DDW) is microbiologically pure distilled water with a deuterium content lower than that of natural waters which amounts to 140 - 150 ppm D/(D+H); variations depend on geographical zone and altitude. The procedure of obtaining DDW is based on isotopic separation of natural water by vacuum distillation. Isotope concentration can be chosen within 20 to 120 ppm D/(D+H). The ICSI at Rm. Valcea has patented the procedure and equipment for the production of DDW. According to the document SF-01-2002/INC-DTCI - ICSI Rm. Valcea, the product has a D/(D+H) isotope concentration of 25 ± 5. Studies and research for finding the effects and methods of application in different fields were initiated and developed in collaboration with different institutes in Romania. The following important results obtained so far could be mentioned: - absence of toxicity upon organisms; - activation of vascular reactivity; - enhancement of defence capacity of the organism through non-specific immunity activation; - increase of salmonid reproduction capacity and enhancement of the adaptability of alevins to the environmental conditions; - radioprotective effect to ionizing radiation; - maintaining meat freshness through osmotic shock; - stimulation of growth of aquatic macrophytes; - enhancement of culture plant development in certain ontogenetic stages. Mostly, the results and practical applications of the research were patented and awarded with gold medals at international invention fairs. At present, research-development programmes are undergoing to find active biological features of DDW in fighting cancer, on one hand, and its applicability as food additive of pets or performing animals, on the other hand

  3. Fusion advanced studies Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The successful development of ITER and DEMO scenarios requires preparatory activities on devices that are smaller than ITER, sufficiently flexible and capable of investigating the peculiar physics of burning plasma conditions. The aim of the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) proposal [2.1] (formerly FT3 [2.2]) is to show that the preparation of ITER scenarios and the development of new expertise for the DEMO design and RD can be effectively implemented on a new facility. FAST will a) operate with deuterium plasmas, thereby avoiding problems associated with tritium, and allow investigation of nonlinear dynamics (which are important for understanding alpha particle behaviour in burning plasmas) by using fast ions accelerated by heating and current drive systems; b) work in a dimensionless parameter range close to that of ITER; c) test technical innovative solutions, such as full-tungsten plasma-facing components and an advanced liquid metal divertor target for the first wall/divertor, directly relevant for ITER and DEMO; d) exploit advanced regimes with a much longer pulse duration than the current diffusion time; e) provide a test bed for ITER and DEMO diagnostics; f) provide an ideal framework for model and numerical code benchmarks, their verification and validation in ITER/ DEMO-relevant plasma conditions

  4. Fusion reactor fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1972-06-01

    For thermonuclear power reactors based on the continuous fusion of deuterium and tritium the principal fuel processing problems occur in maintaining desired compositions in the primary fuel cycled through the reactor, in the recovery of tritium bred in the blanket surrounding the reactor, and in the prevention of tritium loss to the environment. Since all fuel recycled through the reactor must be cooled to cryogenic conditions for reinjection into the reactor, cryogenic fractional distillation is a likely process for controlling the primary fuel stream composition. Another practical possibility is the permeation of the hydrogen isotopes through thin metal membranes. The removal of tritium from the ash discharged from the power system would be accomplished by chemical procedures to assure physiologically safe concentration levels. The recovery process for tritium from the breeder blanket depends on the nature of the blanket fluids. For molten lithium the only practicable possibility appears to be permeation from the liquid phase. For molten salts the process would involve stripping with inert gas followed by chemical recovery. In either case extremely low concentrations of tritium in the melts would be desirable to maintain low tritium inventories, and to minimize escape of tritium through unwanted permeation, and to avoid embrittlement of metal walls. 21 refs

  5. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized α-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We also discuss some important physics insights gained as a result of developing this model, such as the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated.

  6. Tritium burning in inertial electrostatic confinement fusion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Masami, E-mail: onishi@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yasushi; Osawa, Hodaka [Department of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Hatano, Yuji; Torikai, Yuji [Hydrogen Isotope Science Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Murata, Isao [Faculty of Engineering Environment and Energy Department, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kamakura, Keita; Onishi, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Keiji; Konda, Hiroki [Department of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Masuda, Kai [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hotta, Eiki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • An experiment on tritium burning is conducted in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) facility. • A deuterium–tritium gas mixture with 93% deuterium and 7% tritium is used. • The neutron production rate is measured to be 5–8 times more than that of pure deuterium gas. • The neutron production rate of the D–T gas mixture in 1:1 ratio is expected to be more than 10{sup 8}(1/sec) in the present D–T experiment. - Abstract: An experiment on tritium burning is conducted to investigate the enhancement in the neutron production rate in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) facility. The facility is designed such that it is shielded from the outside for safety against tritium and a getter pump is used for evacuating the vacuum chamber and feeding the fuel gas. A deuterium–tritium gas mixture with 93% deuterium and 7% tritium is used, and its neutron production rate is measured to be 5–8 times more than that of pure deuterium gas. Moreover, the results show good agreement with those of a simplified theoretical estimation of the neutron production rate. After tritium burning, the exhausted fuel gas undergoes a tritium recovery procedure through a water bubbler device. The amount of gaseous tritium released by the developed IECF facility after tritium burning is verified to be much less than the threshold set by regulations.

  7. Tritium burning in inertial electrostatic confinement fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Osawa, Hodaka; Hatano, Yuji; Torikai, Yuji; Murata, Isao; Kamakura, Keita; Onishi, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Keiji; Konda, Hiroki; Masuda, Kai; Hotta, Eiki

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An experiment on tritium burning is conducted in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) facility. • A deuterium–tritium gas mixture with 93% deuterium and 7% tritium is used. • The neutron production rate is measured to be 5–8 times more than that of pure deuterium gas. • The neutron production rate of the D–T gas mixture in 1:1 ratio is expected to be more than 10"8(1/sec) in the present D–T experiment. - Abstract: An experiment on tritium burning is conducted to investigate the enhancement in the neutron production rate in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) facility. The facility is designed such that it is shielded from the outside for safety against tritium and a getter pump is used for evacuating the vacuum chamber and feeding the fuel gas. A deuterium–tritium gas mixture with 93% deuterium and 7% tritium is used, and its neutron production rate is measured to be 5–8 times more than that of pure deuterium gas. Moreover, the results show good agreement with those of a simplified theoretical estimation of the neutron production rate. After tritium burning, the exhausted fuel gas undergoes a tritium recovery procedure through a water bubbler device. The amount of gaseous tritium released by the developed IECF facility after tritium burning is verified to be much less than the threshold set by regulations.

  8. ICF burn-history measurments using 17-MeV fusion gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Dendooven, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion reaction rate for inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the Nova Laser Facility is measured with 30-ps resolution using a high-speed neutron detector. We are investigating a measurement technique based on the 16.7-MeV gamma rays that are released in deuterium-tritium fusion. Our concept is to convert gamma-ray energy into a fast burst of Cerenkov light that can be recorded with a high-speed optical detector. We have detected fusion gamma rays in preliminary experiments conducted at Nova where we used a tungsten/aerogel converter to generate Cerenkov light and an optical streak camera to record the signal

  9. Method for measuring deuterium in erbium deuteride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brangan, J.R.; Thornberg, S.M.; Keenan, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    Determining the quantity of deuterium in an erbium deuteride (ErD 2 ) film is essential for assessing the quality of the hydriding process but is a challenging measurement to make. First, the ideal gas law cannot be applied directly due to high temperature (950 degrees C) and low temperature (25 degrees C) regions in the same manifold. Additionally, the metal hydride does not release all of the deuterium rapidly upon heating and metal evaporation occurs during extended heating periods. Therefore, the method developed must provide a means to compensate for temperature inhomogeneities and the amount of deuterium retained in the metal film while heating for a minimal duration. This paper presents two thermal desorption methods used to evaluate the kinetics and equilibria of the deuterium desorption process at high temperatures (950 degrees C). Of primary concern is the evaluation of the quantity of deuterium remaining in these films at the high temperature. A multiple volume expansion technique provided insight into the kinetics of the deuterium evolution and metal evaporation from the film. Finally a repeated pump-down approach yielded data that indicated approximately 10% of the deuterium is retained in the metal film at 950 degrees C and approximately 1 Torr pressure. When the total moles of deuterium determined by this method were divided by the moles of erbium determined by ICP/AES, nearly stochiometric values of 2:1 were obtained for several erbium dideuteride films. Although this work presents data for erbium and deuterium, these methods are applicable to other metal hydrides as well

  10. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Bretz, N.L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium beating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%-40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Energy confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority 3 He (n 3He /n e = 15% - 30%). By changing the 3 He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation indicated that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Analysis of heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated target plasma in TFTR

  11. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bush, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium heating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%--40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority 3 He (n 3 He /n e > 10%). By changing the 3 He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation showed that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated (OH) target plasma in TFIR

  12. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Hatano, Y.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Hara, M.; Calderoni, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehey, P.T.

    1994-02-01

    Solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments are numerically simulated using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, which includes many important experimental details, such as ''cold-start'' initial conditions, thermal conduction, radiative energy loss, actual discharge current vs. time, and grids of sufficient size and resolution to allow realistic development of the plasma. The alternating-direction-implicit numerical technique used meets the substantial demands presented by such a computational task. Simulations of fiber-initiated experiments show that when the fiber becomes fully ionized rapidly developing m=0 instabilities, which originated in the coronal plasma generated from the ablating fiber, drive intense non-uniform heating and rapid expansion of the plasma column. The possibility that inclusion of additional physical effects would improve stability is explored. Finite-Larmor-radius-ordered Hall and diamagnetic pressure terms in the magnetic field evolution equation, corresponding energy equation terms, and separate ion and electron energy equations are included; these do not change the basic results. Model diagnostics, such as shadowgrams and interferograms, generated from simulation results, are in good agreement with experiment. Two alternative experimental approaches are explored: high-current magnetic implosion of hollow cylindrical deuterium shells, and ''plasma-on-wire'' (POW) implosion of low-density plasma onto a central deuterium fiber. By minimizing instability problems, these techniques may allow attainment of higher temperatures and densities than possible with bare fiber-initiated Z-pinches. Conditions for significant D-D or D-T fusion neutron production may be realizable with these implosion-based approaches

  14. Does cold nuclear fusion exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudanin, V.B.; Bystritskij, V.M.; Egorov, V.G.; Shamsutdinov, S.G.; Shyshkin, A.L.; Stolupin, V.A.; Yutlandov, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    The results of investigation of cold nuclear fusion on palladium are given both for electrolysis of heavy water D 2 O and mixture D 2 O + H 2 O) (1:1) and for palladium saturation with gaseous deuterium. The possibility of existance of this phenomenon was examined by detection of neutrons and gamma quanta from reactions: d + d → 3 He + n + 3.27 MeV, p + d → 3 He + γ + 5.5 MeV. Besides these reactions were identified by measuring the characteristic X radiation of palladium due to effect of charged products 3 He, p, t. The upper limits of the intensities of hypothetical sources of neutrons and gamma quanta at the 95% confidence level were obtained to be Q n ≤ 2x10 -2 n/sxcm 3 Pd, Q γ ≤ 2x10 -3 γ/sxcm 3 Pd. 2 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere

  16. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  17. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  18. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, D.E.T.F.

    1976-01-01

    A short survey is given on laser fusion its basic concepts and problems and the present theoretical and experimental methods. The future research program of the USA in this field is outlined. (WBU) [de

  19. Process for the production of high purity deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrathoon, R.

    1977-01-01

    A process for the electrolysis of heavy water which results in the production of high purity deuterium without periodic replenishment of the electrolyte with additional deuterated compounds is defined. Electrolysis is effected through the use of an inexpensive cation-action permselective membrane which is essentially a solid polymer electrolyte and which is capable of automatically separating the evolved deuterium and oxygen gas. This cation-active permselective membrane does not introduce any intrinsic impurities or tritium contamination in the generated deuterium gas, does not require periodic revitalization with deuterated compounds or other chemical compounds, and is characterized by an unusually high electrical efficiency

  20. Method to separate deuterium isotopes using ethylene and ethylene dichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of deuterium by the dissociation of ethylene vinyl chloride, 1,2-dichloro-ethanes or propylene with the help of intensive, matched infrared lasers enables a relatively good yield if operated on a large scale, e.g. in refineries with large through-put. The deuterium from the laser photolysis of ethylene and vinyl chloride is found in the acetylene formed, which has to be separated off and processed. When using dichloroehtane, the deuterium is found in the vinal chloride formed. The methods are briefly described. (UWI) [de

  1. Electromigration of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.L.

    1977-10-01

    The electric mobility and effective valence of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, tantalum and three niobium-tantalum alloys were measured. A resistance technique was used to directly determine the electric mobility of hydrogen and deuterium at 30 0 C while a steady-state method was used to measure the effective valence. The use of mass spectrographic techniques on a single specimen which contained both hydrogen and deuterium greatly increased the precision with which the isotope effect in the effective valence could be measured

  2. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The efforts of the Chemical Technology Division in fusion energy include the areas of fuel handling, processing, and containment. Current studies are concerned largely with the development of vacuum pumps for fusion reactors and experiments and with development and evaluation of techniques for recovering tritium from solid or liquid breeding blankets. In addition, a small effort is devoted to support of the ORNL design of a major Tokamak experiment, The Next Step (TNS)

  3. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.H.; Oxford Univ.

    1990-04-01

    The use of lasers to drive implosions for the purpose of inertially confined fusion is an area of intense activity where progress compares favourably with that made in magnetic fusion and there are significant prospects for future development. In this brief review the basic concept is summarised and the current status is outlined both in the area of laser technology and in the most recent results from implosion experiments. Prospects for the future are also considered. (author)

  4. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F B; Hone, M A; Jarvis, O N; Loughlin, M J; Sadler, G [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Adams, J M; Bond, D S; Watkins, N [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.; Howarth, P J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  5. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hone, M.A.; Jarvis, O.N.; Loughlin, M.J.; Sadler, G.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs

  6. Observation of neutron bursts in saturation of titanium with deuterium by means of D2O electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artyukhov, V.I.; Bystritskij, V.M.; Gilev, A.I.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a correlation experiment on investigation of low-temperature nuclear dd-fusion during saturation of titanium with deuterium through electrolysis of heavy water D 2 O. The experiments with cathodes of chemically pure titanium and of titanium coated with a 0.4μm nickel layer (mass of titanium 26 g) were carried out. Emission of neutrons in the form of separate bursts was observed in the experiments with the nickel-coated cathode. The neutron emission density in the burst was found to be I n =(3.6±0.9)x10 4 s -1 . 17 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-zaelic, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fusion can be relied on to solve the global energy crisis if the process of limiting the heat produced by the fusion reaction (Plasma) is successful. Currently scientists are progressively working on this aspect whereas there are two methods to limit the heat produced by fusion reaction, the two methods are auto-restriction using laser beam and magnetic restriction through the use of magnetic fields and research is carried out to improve these two methods. It is expected that at the end of this century the nuclear fusion energy will play a vital role in overcoming the global energy crisis and for these reasons, acquiring energy through the use of nuclear fusion reactors is one of the most urge nt demands of all mankind at this time. The conclusion given is that the source of fuel for energy production is readily available and inexpensive ( hydrogen atoms) and whole process is free of risks and hazards, especially to general health and the environment . Nuclear fusion importance lies in the fact that energy produced by the process is estimated to be about four to five times the energy produced by nuclear fission. (author)

  8. 14 CFR 101.25 - Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. 101.25 Section 101.25 Aeronautics and Space... OPERATING RULES MOORED BALLOONS, KITES, AMATEUR ROCKETS AND UNMANNED FREE BALLOONS Amateur Rockets § 101.25 Operating limitations for Class 2-High Power Rockets and Class 3-Advanced High Power Rockets. When operating...

  9. Plasma Surface interaction in Controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The subjects presented in the 9th conference on plasma surface interaction in controlled fusion devices were: the modifications of power scrape-off-length and power deposition during various configurations in Tore Supra plasmas; the effects observed in ergodic divertor experiments in Tore-Supra; the diffuse connexion induced by the ergodic divertor and the topology of the heat load patterns on the plasma facing components in Tore-Supra; the study of the influence of air exposure on graphite implanted by low energy high density deuterium plasma

  10. Inertial fusion with hypervelocity impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, S.

    1998-01-01

    The physics of the compression and ignition processes in inertial fusion is to a certain extent independent of the nature of the incident energy pulse. The present strategy in the field of inertial fusion is to study several alternatives of deposition of the incident energy, and, at the same time, of conducting studies with the aid of available incident laser pulses. In a future reactor based on inertial fusion, the laser beams may be replaced by ion beams, which have a better energy efficiency. The main projects in the field of inertial fusion are the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in USA, Laser Megajoule (LMJ) in France, Gekko XII in Japan and Iskra V in Russia. NIF will be constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in California. LMJ will be constructed near Bordeaux. In the conventional approach to inertial confinement fusion, both the high-density fuel mass and the hot central spot are supposed to be produced by the deposition of the driver energy in the outer layers of the fuel capsule. Alternatively, the driver energy could be used only to produce the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities but relatively low temperatures, while the ignition of fusion reactions in the compressed capsule should be effected by a synchronized hypervelocity impact. Using this arrangement, it was supposed that a 54 μm projectile is incident with a velocity of 3 x 10 6 m s -1 upon a large-yield deuterium-tritium target at rest. The collision of the incident projectile and of the large-yield target takes place inside a high-Z cavity. A laser or heavy-ion pulse is converted at the walls of the cavity into X-rays, which compresses the incident projectile and the large-yield target in high-density states. The laser pulse and the movement of the incident projectile are synchronized such that the collision should take place when the densities are the largest. The collision converts the kinetic energy of the incident projectile into thermal energy, the

  11. Recombination in deuterium plasma at cryogenic temperatures (down to 130 K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, O.; Glosik, J.; Pysanenko, A.; Zakouril, P.; Plasil, R.; Tichy, M. [Prague Charles Univ., Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The ions H{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 3}{sup +} play an important role in the kinetics of media of astrophysical interest but also in laboratory produced plasmas (discharges, fusion plasmas). In the presented study variable temperature flowing afterglow with Langmuir probe (VT-FALP) was used to study plasma decay in D{sub 2}/He mixture at temperatures down to 130 K and total pressure up to 10 Torr. Large extend of partial number densities of D{sub 2} (10{sup 12} - 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) were used in the experiments. Langmuir probes and mass spectrometers were applied to monitor decay of the plasma during the afterglow. The study is a continuation of our previous measurements of recombination rate coefficients of D{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 5}{sup +} ions. In these studies we observed dependence of the recombination rate coefficient on partial pressure of deuterium indicating that third-body assisted recombination is efficient and significantly contributes to recombination in decaying deuterium-containing plasma. (authors)

  12. Remote device control and monitor system for the LHD deuterium experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hideya, E-mail: nakanisi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ohsuna, Masaki; Ito, Tatsuki; Nonomura, Miki; Imazu, Setsuo; Emoto, Masahiko; Iwata, Chie; Yoshida, Masanobu; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Maeno, Hiroya; Aoyagi, Miwa; Ogawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Osamu; Morita, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Kiyomasa [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Seiji; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Device remote control will be significant for the LHD deuterium experiments. • A central management GUI to control the power distribution for devices. • For safety, power management is separated from operational commanding. • Wi-Fi was tested and found to be not reliable with fusion plasmas. - Abstract: Upon beginning the LHD deuterium experiment, the opportunity for maintenance work in the torus hall will be conspicuously reduced such that all instruments must be controlled remotely. The LHD data acquisition (DAQ) and archiving system have been using about 110 DAQ front-end, and the DAQ central control and monitor system has been implemented for their remote management. This system is based on the “multi-agent” model whose communication protocol has been unified. Since DAQ front-end electronics would suffer from the “single-event effect” (SEE) of D-D neutrons, software-based remote operation might become ineffective, and then securely intercepting or recycling the electrical power of the device would be indispensable for recovering from a non-responding fault condition. In this study, a centralized control and monitor system has been developed for a number of power distribution units (PDUs). This system adopts the plug-in structure in which the plug-in modules can absorb the differences among the commercial products of numerous vendors. The combination of the above-mentioned functionalities has led to realizing the flexible and highly reliable remote control infrastructure for the plasma diagnostics and the device management in LHD.

  13. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  14. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92196 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  15. Ignition of deuterium based fuel cycles in a high beta system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.

    1987-01-01

    A steady state self-consistent plasma modeling applied to a system having close to unity, such as FRC or like, is found to be quite effective in solving the problems independently of any anomalous process and proves the existence of ignited state of deuterium based fuel cycles. The temperature ranges that the plasma falls into ignited state are obtained as a function of relative feeding rates of tritium and 3 He to deuterium's. We find pure DD cycle will not ignite so that 3 He or/and tritium must be added as catalyzer to achieve ignition. Standing on the points to construct a cleaner system yielding smaller amount of 14 MeV neutrons and to burn the fuel in steady state for long periods of time, we have confirmed superiority of the complex composed of the master reactor of 3 He-Cat.D cycle (catalyzed DD cycle reinjecting only fusion produced 3 He) and the satellite reactor of 3 He enriched D 3 He cycle. In case storage of tritium for 3 He by β - decay is turned out not to be allowed environmentally, we may utilize conventional catalyzed DD cycle although 14 MeV neutron yields will be increased by 35 % over the complex. It is demonstrated that advanced fuel cycle reactors can be very simple in constructions and compact in size such that the field strength and the plasma volume of the order of JT-60's may be enough for 1000 MW power plant. (author)

  16. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H/sup +/ beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10/sup 17/ He cm/sup -2/. The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 ..mu..m at 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/ to 5.5 ..mu..m at 3 x 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/.

  17. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  18. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing

  19. Transport of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions in RF-driven ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutser, R; Wuenderlich, D; Fantz, U

    2010-01-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources are major components of neutral beam injection systems for plasma heating in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER. In order to fulfill the requirements of the ITER neutral beam injection, a high-performance, large-area RF-driven ion source for negative ions is being developed at the MPI fuer Plasmaphysik. Negative hydrogen ions are mainly generated on a converter surface by impinging neutral particles and positive ions under the influence of magnetic fields and the plasma sheath potential. The 3D transport code TrajAn has been applied in order to obtain the total and spatially resolved extraction probabilities for H - and D - ions under identical plasma parameters and the realistic magnetic field topology of the ion source. A comparison of the isotopes shows a lower total extraction probability in the case of deuterium ions, caused by a different transport effect. The transport calculation shows that distortions of the spatial distributions of ion birth and extraction by the magnetic electron suppression field are present for both negative hydrogen and deuterium ions.

  20. Interactions of Deuterium Plasma with Lithiated and Boronized Surfaces in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, Predrag

    2015-09-01

    The main research goal of the presented research has been to understand the changes in surface composition and chemistry at the nanoscopic temporal and spatial scales for long pulse Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) and link these to the overall machine performance of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). A study is presented of the lithium surface science, with atomic spatial and temporal resolutions. The dynamic surface responds and evolves in a mixed material environments (D, Li, C, B, O, Mo, W) with impingement of plasma particles in the energy range below 100 eV. The results, obtained by quantum-classical molecular dynamics, include microstructure changes, erosion, surface chemistry, deuterium implantation and permeation. Main objectives of the research are i) a comparison of Li and B deposition on carbon, ii) the role of oxygen and other impurities e.g. boron, carbon in the lithium performance, and iii) how this performance will change when lithium is applied to a high-Z refractory metal substrate (Mo, W). In addition to predicting and understanding the phenomenology of the processes, we will show plasma induced erosion of PFCs, including chemical and physical sputtering yields at various temperatures (300-700 K) as well as deuterium uptake/recycling. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Science, Award Number DE-SC0013752.

  1. Deuterium in-vessel retention characterisation through the use of particle balance on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucalossi, J.; Brosset, C.; Pegourie, B.; Tsitrone, E.; Dufour, E.; Eckedahl, A.; Geraud, A.; Goniche, M.; Gunn, J.; Loarer, T.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Vallet, J.C.; Vartanian, S.

    2007-01-01

    Fuel retention inside plasma facing components will be a crucial issue not only in fusion reactors of the future, but also in ITER. The estimation of the fraction of the fuel which remains trapped inside the vessel is quite a difficult task. Particle balance analysis provides information for the whole vacuum chamber as a function of time and can be use to monitor the tritium in-vessel retention in real-time. On Tore Supra with a careful choice and position of pressure sensors, proper calibration procedures, the accuracy of the balance is around 10%. Particle balance analysis have been performed on many long pulse discharges and deuterium in-vessel retention has been found to be a constant around 5 x 10 20 D/s after several minutes of plasma. The evolution of the retention rate with plasma parameters indicates that deuterium bulk implantation and diffusion could dominate codeposition with carbon atoms. Particle balance is a powerful tool that should be implemented in ITER

  2. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H + beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 μm at 10 18 He cm -2 to 5.5 μm at 3 x 10 18 He cm -2

  3. Tritium generation and neutron measurements in Pd-Si under high deuterium gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claytor, T.N.; Tuggle, D.G.; Menlove, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the methods applicable for low level tritium detection needed in the search for anomalous fusion in metal hydrides. It is also intended to further detail our tritium and neutron results that have been obtained with the Pd-Si-D system, originally presented at earlier workshops. A measure of reproducibility that was not evident in our previous work has been achieved partially due to the better detection sensitivity afforded by the use of low tritium deuterium and partially from the fact that the foil-wafer cells can be made with nearly identical electrical characteristics. This reproducibility has allowed us to narrow the optimum conditions for the experiment. While this experiment is rather different from the ''standard'' electrolytic cell or the Ti gas hydride experiment, similarities exist in that non equilibrium conditions are sought and the tritium generation levels are low and neutron emission is extremely weak. In contrast to many electrochemical cell experiments, the system used in these experiments is completely sealed during operation and uses no electrolyte. The major improvements to the experiment have been the use of vary low tritium deuterium for the hydriding and the replacement of the aluminum neutron counter tubes with ones of stainless steel. These changes have resulted in pronounced improvements to the detection systems since the background tritium level in the gas has been reduced by a factor of 300 and the neutron background has been decreased by a factor of 14. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  4. Structural properties of hydrogen isotopes in solid phase in the context of inertial confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quality of Deuterium-Tritium capsules is a critical aspect in Inertial Confinement Fusion. In this work, we present a Quantum Molecular Dynamics methodology able to model hydrogen isotopes and their structural molecular organisation at extreme pressures and cryogenic temperatures (< 15 K. Our study sets up the basis for a future analysis on the mechanical and structural properties of DT-ice in inertial confinement fusion (ICF target manufacturing conditions.

  5. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  6. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    Details of the design, operation, testing and recovery procedures of the reusable solid rocket boosters (SRB) are given. Using a composite PBAN propellant, they will provide the primary thrust (six million pounds maximum at 20 s after ignition) within a 3 g acceleration constraint, as well as thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle. The drogues were tested to a load of 305,000 pounds, and the main parachutes to 205,000. Insulation in the solid rocket motor (SRM) will be provided by asbestos-silica dioxide filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber ('asbestos filled NBR') except in high erosion areas (principally in the aft dome), where a carbon-filled ethylene propylene diene monomer-neopreme rubber will be utilized. Furthermore, twenty uses for the SRM nozzle will be allowed by its ablative materials, which are principally carbon cloth and silica cloth phenolics.

  7. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, D.W.; Rochow, R.

    1993-06-01

    In January, 1992, a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars was introduced (Culver, 1992). This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1) the reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2) elimination need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3) a practical provision for reactor power control; and (4) use of near-term, long-life turbopumps

  8. Influence of impurities on the fuel retention in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retention in metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors. This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogen retention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ion energy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma composition is a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma will also contain impurities like helium or seeded impurities like argon. The experiments treated in this thesis were performed in the linear plasma generator PSI-2 at Forschungszentrum Juelich, and are divided in 3 parts: The first experiments cover the plasma diagnostics, most importantly the measurement of the impurity ion concentration in the plasma by optical emission spectroscopy. This is a requirement for the later experiments with mixed plasmas. Diagnostics like Langmuir probe measurements are not applicable for this task because they do not distinguish different ionic species. The results also show that the impurity ion concentrations cannot be simply concluded from the neutral gas input to the plasma source, because the relation between the neutral gas concentration and impurity ion concentration is not linear. The second and main part of the experiments covers the exposure of tungsten samples to deuterium plasmas. In the experiments, the impurity ion type and concentration is variated, to verify the general influence of helium and argon on the deuterium retention in tungsten samples exposed at low temperatures. It shows that helium impurities reduce the amount of retained deuterium by a factor of 3, while argon impurities slightly increase the total retention, compared to exposures to a pure deuterium plasma. Cross-sections of the exposed tungsten surfaces via TEM-imaging reveal a 12-15 nm deep helium nanobubble layer at the surface of the sample, while for the cases of

  9. Influence of impurities on the fuel retention in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retention in metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors. This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogen retention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ion energy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma composition is a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma will also contain impurities like helium or seeded impurities like argon. The experiments treated in this thesis were performed in the linear plasma generator PSI-2 at Forschungszentrum Juelich, and are divided in 3 parts: The first experiments cover the plasma diagnostics, most importantly the measurement of the impurity ion concentration in the plasma by optical emission spectroscopy. This is a requirement for the later experiments with mixed plasmas. Diagnostics like Langmuir probe measurements are not applicable for this task because they do not distinguish different ionic species. The results also show that the impurity ion concentrations cannot be simply concluded from the neutral gas input to the plasma source, because the relation between the neutral gas concentration and impurity ion concentration is not linear. The second and main part of the experiments covers the exposure of tungsten samples to deuterium plasmas. In the experiments, the impurity ion type and concentration is variated, to verify the general influence of helium and argon on the deuterium retention in tungsten samples exposed at low temperatures. It shows that helium impurities reduce the amount of retained deuterium by a factor of 3, while argon impurities slightly increase the total retention, compared to exposures to a pure deuterium plasma. Cross-sections of the exposed tungsten surfaces via TEM-imaging reveal a 12-15 nm deep helium nanobubble layer at the surface of the sample, while for the cases of

  10. Cytology is advanced by studying effects of deuterium environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, S.; Crespi, H. L.; Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.

    1967-01-01

    Research of deuterium effects on biological systems shows deuteriation is not incompatible with life. With the successful cultivation of deuteriated bacteria, work is now being done on extraction of deuterio-compounds from bacteria.

  11. Chemical behavior of energetic deuterium implanted into silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Kazunari; Morimoto, Yasutomi; Shimada, Asako; Inuduka, Nobuo; Okuno, Kenji; Nakamura, Hirohumi; Nishi, Masataka

    2000-01-01

    Studies on chemical behavior of energetic deuterium (D) ions implanted into SiC were carried out by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS). From XPS results, it was suggested that the implanted D was attracted strongly to Si and/or C. From TDS results, two peaks corresponding to D 2 release appeared near 470 K (1st peak) and 1080 K (2nd peak). The activation energies for the two D 2 release processes were also determined. It was found from these experimental results that the 1st peak seemed to be attributed to deuterium that existed in interstitial. The 2nd peak was considered to be caused by deuterium trapped in lattice defects produced through deuterium ion implantation. (author)

  12. Pneumatic injector of deuterium macroparticles for TORE-SUPRA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinyar, I.V.; Umov, A.P.; Lukin, A.Ya.; Skoblikov, S.V.; Reznichenko, P.V.; Krasil'nikov, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    The pneumatic injector for periodic injection of fuel-solid-deuterium pellets into the plasma of the TORE-SUPRA tokamak in a steady-state mode is described. The deuterium pellet injection with an unlimited duration is ensured by a screw extruder in which gaseous deuterium is frozen and squeezed outwards in the form of a rod with a rectangular cross section. A cutter installed on the injector's barrel cuts a cylinder with a diameter of 2 mm and a length of 1.0-3.5 mm out from this rod. The movement of the cutter is controlled by a pulsed electromagnetic drive at a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. In the injector's barrel, a compressed gas accelerates a deuterium pellet to a velocity of 100-650 m/s [ru

  13. Laser driven source of spin polarized atomic deuterium and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelker, M.; Coulter, K.P.; Holt, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Optical pumping of potassium atoms in the presence of a high magnetic field followed by spin exchange collisions with deuterium (hydrogen) is shown to yield a high flux of spin polarized atomic deuterium (hydrogen). The performance of the laser driven source has been characterized as a function of deuterium (hydrogen) flow rate, potassium density, pump laser power, and magnetic field. Under appropriate conditions, the authors have observed deuterium atomic polarization as high as 75% at a flow rate 4.2x10 17 atoms/second. Preliminary results suggest that high nuclear polarizations are obtained in the absence of weak field rf transitions as a result of a spin temperature distribution that evolves through frequent H-H (D-D) collisions

  14. Infrared presensitization photography at deuterium fluoride laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, J.M.; Ross, K.; Suter, K.

    1989-01-01

    Near-field irradiance distributions of a deuterium flouride laser system are obtained using infrared presensitization photography. This represents the shortest wavelength region to employ this technique thus far

  15. Synthesis of deuterium labeled ketamine metabolite dehydronorketamine-d₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulake, Rohidas S; Chen, Chinpiao; Lin, Huei-Ru; Lua, Ahai-Chang

    2011-10-01

    A convenient synthesis of ketamine metabolite dehydronorketamine-d(4), starting from commercially available deuterium labeled bromochlorobenzene, was achieved. Key steps include Grignard reaction, regioselective hydroxybromination, Staudinger reduction, and dehydrohalogenation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Deuterium content on surface waters VI to X Chile regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravena C, R; Pollastri J, A.; Suzuki S, O.

    1984-01-01

    One important parameter on any sitting study for a heavy water plant installation is the deuterium content of the feed water. Deuterium data on surface waters from differents areas located in the south of Chile, are presented. These results allow to idently some potential areas for a future heavy water plant. One of these areas, Lago Llanquihue, was sampled more in detail to study the vertical distribution and spatial variations. (Author)

  17. Synthesis of regio- and stereospecifically deuterium labelled 2-benzylindanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuck, D.

    1984-01-01

    2-Benzylindenes (1, 1a) are hydrogenated to 2-benzylindanes (2) using tris-(triphenylphosphine)-rhodium(I)-chloride in benzene by a strict cis-1,2 addition of hydrogen to the double bond. Thus, stereo- and regio-specific deuterium labelling at the five-membered ring of various 2-benzylindanes has been carried out. The high selectivity of deuterium incorporation is shown independently by 1 H NMR and mass (MIKEsup(*)) spectrometry of selected 2-benzylindanes. (orig.)

  18. SIMS investigations of wall coatings for application in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedbacher, G.; Virag, A.; Grasserbauer, M.; Esser, H.G.; Wienhold, P.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon coated metals have proven to be useful materials for limiters and the first wall in fusion reactors. In this paper SIMS investigations of a-C:B single coated and a-C:D/a-C:B double coated stainless steel samples, which have been exposed to TOKAMAK discharges in deuterium and helium, are described. (orig.)

  19. Pellets for fusion reactor refueling. Annual progress report, 1 January 1975--31 December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors using pellets of deuterium-tritium is discussed. A pellet injector has been constructed and experiments have been done injecting solid pellets into the ORMAK machine. Theoretical explanations of the results from these experiments have been successful. Other experiments underway include techniques for charging the pellets in order to accelerate and control them

  20. In situ deuterium inventory measurements of a-C:D layers on tungsten in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, N; Brezinsek, S; Coenen, J W; Huber, A; Laengner, M; Möller, S; Nonhoff, M; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Xiao, Q; Zlobinski, M; Samm, U; Giesen, T F

    2014-01-01

    Laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) is a diagnostic to provide temporally and spatially resolved in situ measurements of tritium retention and material migration in order to characterize the status of the first wall in future fusion devices. In LIAS, a ns-laser pulse ablates the first nanometres of the first wall plasma-facing components into the plasma edge. The resulting line radiation by plasma excitation is observed by spectroscopy. In the case of the full ionizing plasma and with knowledge of appropriate photon efficiencies for the corresponding line emission the amount of ablated material can be measured in situ. We present the photon efficiency for the deuterium Balmer α-line resulting from ablation in TEXTOR by performing LIAS on amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:D) layers deposited on tungsten substrate of thicknesses between 0.1 and 1.1 μm. An experimental inverse photon efficiency of [(D/(XB))] D α (EXP) a-C:D→ LIAS D =75.9±23.4 was determined. This value is a factor 5 larger than predicted values from the ADAS database for atomic injection of deuterium under TEXTOR plasma edge conditions and about twice as high, assuming normal wall recycling and release of molecular deuterium and break-up of D 2 via the molecular ion which is usually observed at the high temperature tokamak edge (T e  > 30 eV). (paper)

  1. Shock-tube study of fusion plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.; Tien, J.K.; Jensen, B.; Panayotou, N.F.; Feinberg, B.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have been made of phenomena which occur when a hot (T 1 approximately equal to 6 x 10 6 0 K), dense (n approximately equal to 10 16 cm -3 ), deuterium plasma containing a transverse magnetic field is brought into sudden contact with a cold metal wall. These studies are motivated by the need to understand plasma and metallurgical conditions at the first-wall of a fusion reactor. Experiments were carried out in the Columbia high energy electromagnetic shock tube. Computational simulation was used to investigate the detailed physics of the fusion plasma boundary layer which develops at the wall. The rate of energy transfer from the plasma to the wall was calculated and conditions under which surface melting occurs are estimated. Experimental measurements of plasma-wall heat transfer rates up to 3 x 10 5 watts/cm 2 were obtained and agreement with computed values are good. Fusion reactor first-wall materials have been exposed to 6.0 x 10 21 eV cm -2 (1,000 shots) of deuterium plasma bombardment. Scanning electron micrograph photographs show preferential erosion at grain boundaries, formation of deuterium surface blisters, and evidence of local surface melting. Some cracking is observed along grain boundaries, and a decrease in tensile ductiity is measured

  2. Mixed deuterium-tritium neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, L.; Lewis, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    An alternative mixed beam neutral beam injector (MNBI) for fusion reactors is proposed that eliminates the conventional isotope separation system (ISS) in the fuel cycle. The principal advantage of the alternative system is a capital and operating cost savings in the fuel cycle, as the ISS employs cryogenic distillation at liquid-hydrogen temperatures to effect a separation of hydrogen isotopes and to eliminate a buildup of normal hydrogen in the recycled fuel. Possible additional advantages of the alternative method involve an improvement in overall safety and a reduction of the amount of tritium in the fuel cycle. The alternative heating system uses an electromagnetic separation in the MNBI to limit the buildup of normal hydrogen. Calculations indicate that an MNBI can be reasonably optimized in the case of an upgraded injection system for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  3. Implanted deuterium retention and release in carbon-coated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Oates, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 angstrom. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 angstrom revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400 degrees C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400 degrees C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 X 10 19 D/m 2 sec), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  4. Implanted Deuterium Retention and Release in Carbon-Coated Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Longhurst, G. R.; Pawelko, R. J.; Oates, M. A.

    1997-06-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 Å. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 Å revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400°C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400°C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 × 1019 D/m2-s), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples.

  5. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  6. 233U breeding and neutron multiplying blankets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.G.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    In this work, along with a previous paper three possible uses of 14-MeV deuterium--tritium fusion neutrons are investigated: energy production, neutron multiplication, and fissile-fuel breeding. The results presented include neutronic studies of fissioning and nonfissioning thorium systems, tritium breeding systems, various fuel options (UO 2 , UC, UC 2 , etc.), and uranium as well as refractory metal first-wall neutron-multiplying regions. A brief energy balance and an estimate of potential revenues for fusion devices are given to help illustrate the potentials of these designs

  7. Equations of state for hydrogen and deuterium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerley, Gerald Irwin (Kerley Technical Services, Appomattox, VA)

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the complete revision of a deuterium equation of state (EOS) model published in 1972. It uses the same general approach as the 1972 EOS, i.e., the so-called 'chemical model,' but incorporates a number of theoretical advances that have taken place during the past thirty years. Three phases are included: a molecular solid, an atomic solid, and a fluid phase consisting of both molecular and atomic species. Ionization and the insulator-metal transition are also included. The most important improvements are in the liquid perturbation theory, the treatment of molecular vibrations and rotations, and the ionization equilibrium and mixture models. In addition, new experimental data and theoretical calculations are used to calibrate certain model parameters, notably the zero-Kelvin isotherms for the molecular and atomic solids, and the quantum corrections to the liquid phase. The report gives a general overview of the model, followed by detailed discussions of the most important theoretical issues and extensive comparisons with the many experimental data that have been obtained during the last thirty years. Questions about the validity of the chemical model are also considered. Implications for modeling the 'giant planets' are also discussed.

  8. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  9. Kinetic studies on the hafnium nad deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing Wenzeng; Long Xinggui; Zhu Zuliang

    2009-04-01

    Through the method of reaction rate analysis in a constant volume reactor, the time dependence of the pressure drop of the hafnium deuteride formation are studied over a temperature range 573-873 K on a metal hydride thermodynamic and kinetic parameters measuring apparatus. The rate constants of the hafnium deuteride formation, which are 0.0530 s -1 , 0.0452 s -1 , 0.0319 s -1 , 0.0261 s -1 , are calculated at a serial temperatures of 573 K, 673 K, 773 K, 873 K and the initial pressure of 13 kPa. The activation energy of the reaction is (-10.1±1.5) kJ·mol -1 . Comparing the above results with those of titanium deuteride formation on the same measuring apparatus, the kinetic mechanism of the deuteride formation of hafnium and titanium is considered different. It is concluded that the reaction rate of hafnium absorbing deuterium may be controlled by phase transformation and surface oxidation. (authors)

  10. What controls deuterium excess in global precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The deuterium excess (d of precipitation is widely used in the reconstruction of past climatic changes from ice cores. However, its most common interpretation as moisture source temperature cannot directly be inferred from present-day water isotope observations. Here, we use a new empirical relation between d and near-surface relative humidity (RH together with reanalysis data to globally predict d of surface evaporation from the ocean. The very good quantitative agreement of the predicted hemispherically averaged seasonal cycle with observed d in precipitation indicates that moisture source relative humidity, and not sea surface temperature, is the main driver of d variability on seasonal timescales. Furthermore, we review arguments for an interpretation of long-term palaeoclimatic d changes in terms of moisture source temperature, and we conclude that there remains no sufficient evidence that would justify to neglect the influence of RH on such palaeoclimatic d variations. Hence, we suggest that either the interpretation of d variations in palaeorecords should be adapted to reflect climatic influences on RH during evaporation, in particular atmospheric circulation changes, or new arguments for an interpretation in terms of moisture source temperature will have to be provided based on future research.

  11. Radiative corrections in neutrino-deuterium disintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurylov, A.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.J.; Vogel, P.

    2002-01-01

    The radiative corrections of order α for the charged- and neutral-current neutrino-deuterium disintegration for energies relevant to the SNO experiment are evaluated. Particular attention is paid to the issue of the bremsstrahlung detection threshold. It is shown that the radiative corrections to the total cross section for the charged current reaction are independent of that threshold, as they must be for consistency, and amount to a slowly decreasing function of the neutrino energy E ν , varying from about 4% at low energies to 3% at the end of the 8 B spectrum. The differential cross section corrections, on the other hand, do depend on the bremsstrahlung detection threshold. Various choices of the threshold are discussed. It is shown that for a realistic choice of the threshold and for the actual electron energy threshold of the SNO detector, the deduced 8 B ν e flux should be decreased by about 2%. The radiative corrections to the neutral-current reaction are also evaluated

  12. Measurement of scattering cross sections of liquid and solid hydrogen, deuterium and deuterium hydride for thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiffert, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The scattering cross sections for liquid and solid normal hydrogen, para-hydrogen, deuterium and deuterium hydride were measured for thermal neutrons at various temperatures. Solid samples of para-hydrogen exhibit distinct Bragg scattering. Liquid samples of deuterium and para-hydrogen also exhibit distinct coherence phenomena, which is indicative of strong local ordering of the molecules. In para-hydrogen and deuterium hydride, the threshold for scattering with excitation of rotations is distinctly visible. The positions of the thresholds show that the molecules in liquid hydrogen are not unhindered in their movement. After the beginning of the rotational excitation the scattering cross sections of liquid and solid para-hydrogen have different shapes which is to be explained by the differences in the dynamics of the liquid and the solid specimen. 22 references

  13. Fusion events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboufirassi, M; Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefebvres, F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Meslin, C.; Metivier, V.; Nakagawa, T.; Peter, J.; Popescu, R.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Wieloch, A.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.

    1998-01-01

    The fusion reactions between low energy heavy ions have a very high cross section. First measurements at energies around 30-40 MeV/nucleon indicated no residue of either complete or incomplete fusion, thus demonstrating the disappearance of this process. This is explained as being due to the high amount o energies transferred to the nucleus, what leads to its total dislocation in light fragments and particles. Exclusive analyses have permitted to mark clearly the presence of fusion processes in heavy systems at energies above 30-40 MeV/nucleon. Among the complete events of the Kr + Au reaction at 60 MeV/nucleon the majority correspond to binary collisions. Nevertheless, for the most considerable energy losses, a class of events do occur for which the detected fragments appears to be emitted from a unique source. These events correspond to an incomplete projectile-target fusion followed by a multifragmentation. Such events were singled out also in the reaction Xe + Sn at 50 MeV/nucleon. For the events in which the energy dissipation was maximal it was possible to isolate an isotropic group of events showing all the characteristics of fusion nuclei. The fusion is said to be incomplete as pre-equilibrium Z = 1 and Z = 2 particles are emitted. The cross section is of the order of 25 mb. Similar conclusions were drown for the systems 36 Ar + 27 Al and 64 Zn + nat Ti. A cross section value of ∼ 20 mb was determined at 55 MeV/nucleon in the first case, while the measurement of evaporation light residues in the last system gave an upper limit of 20-30 mb for the cross section at 50 MeV/nucleon

  14. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  15. Compared studies of natural and artificial deuterium depleted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butnaru, Gallia; Mihacea, Sorina; Sirbovan, Alina; Butnariu, H.; Titescu, Gh.

    2001-01-01

    The biological influence of the deuterium on animals was studied insensitively in the last years. When animal cell cultures were analyzed it turned out an inhibition of the development, due to the reduced deuterium concentration. In the in vivo experiments a decreasing of the number of tumoral cells was pointed out when performing the depleted water treatment. It is obvious that the presence of deuterium in water is necessary for the development, especially for the tumoral cell proliferation. The aim of this work was to establish influence of the natural and artificial deuterium depleted water on the vegetal organisms development. For this purpose, the developmental stages of Lactuca sativa L. growth were followed. The experimental data were compared with the data obtained with distilled water. The birch, wine sap and some fruit juices are considered 'natural depleted' water sources because their deuterium content is smaller in comparison to natural water (D 2 =150 ppm). The effect of artificial deuterium depleted water (29 ppm D 2 ) was analyzed in comparison to three types of wine saps, which also have a reduced deuterium concentration (125-130 ppm D 2 ). If the deuterium depleted water was used, the germination percent and the root and shoot length were higher compared to control in the first stages. In wine sap it had a negative effect on germination and development. After three days the plants were transferred to soil and their development was followed. The foliage area was larger for all of the experimental variants compared to control. The differences were without significance when deuterium depleted water was tested but they were high and very significant in case of wine sap. The experiment pointed out a stimulative effect of the artificial deuterium depleted water. In case of wine sap the effect was negative when the contact was direct, but the growth was stimulated after the stress cessation. The first ontogenetic stages were represented by direct action

  16. Fusion - still out in the cold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsley, Mike.

    1989-01-01

    Scepticism over the claims made by Professors Martin Fleischman and Stanley Pons about cold fusion is expressed. The background to their experiment and announcement of their results is given. Other research teams have failed to repeat the experiment which claims that deuterium nuclei fused in a special electrochemical cell. If tritium is also produced, as is claimed, this would have important military implications as tritium is used in hydrogen bombs. Failing cold fusion, there is always the JET project but after 10 years and an expenditure of Pound 600 million that has failed to produce a net energy gain it would be better to spend the money developing renewable energy sources. (U.K.)

  17. Mirror fusion test facility plasma diagnostics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Coffield, F.E.; Davis, G.E.; Felker, B.

    1979-01-01

    During the past 25 years, experiments with several magnetic mirror machines were performed as part of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program at LLL. The latest MFE experiment, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), builds on the advances of earlier machines in initiating, stabilizing, heating, and sustaining plasmas formed with deuterium. The goals of this machine are to increase ion and electron temperatures and show a corresponding increase in containment time, to test theoretical scaling laws of plasma instabilities with increased physical dimensions, and to sustain high-beta plasmas for times that are long compared to the energy containment time. This paper describes the diagnostic system being developed to characterize these plasma parameters

  18. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  19. ICRF Traveling Wave launcher for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragona, R

    2017-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive is a method that has the ability to heat directly the ions in the Deuterium-Tritrium fuel to the high temperature needed for the fusion reaction to works. The capability of efficiently couple the Radio Frequency power to the plasma plays a big role in the overall performance of a fusion device. A Traveling Wave Antenna in a resonant ring configuration is a good candidate for an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive system. It has the capability to increase the coupled power with respect to present designs and to have a highly selective power spectrum that can be peaked around the maximally absorbed wave. It is also insensitive to the loading variations due to fluctuation of the plasma edge increasing the reliability and the efficiency of the system. It works as a low power density launcher due to the possible large number of current carrying elements. (paper)

  20. Tritium handling facility at KMS Fusion Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.C.; Vis, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The tritium facility at KMS Fusion, Inc. supports the inertial confinement fusion research program. The main function of the facility is to fill glass and polymer Microshell (TM) capsules (small fuel containers) to a maximum pressure of 100 atm with tritium (T 2 ) or deuterium--tritium (DT). The recent upgrade of the facility allows us to fill Microshell capsules to a maximum pressure of 200 atm. A second fill port allows us to run long term fills of Macroshell (TM) capsules (large fuel containers) concurrently. The principle processes of the system are: (1) storage of the tritium as a uranium hydride; (2) pressure intensification using cryogenics; and (3) filling of the shells by permeation at elevated temperatures. The design of the facility was centered around a NRC license limit of 6000 Ci

  1. Deuterium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by deuterium plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, V.Kh.; Roth, J.; Shu, W.M.; Komarov, D.A.; Isobe, K.; Yamanishi, T.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of the deposition conditions on the surface morphology and deuterium (D) concentration in tungsten (W) deposition layers formed by magnetron sputtering and in the linear plasma generator has been carried out. Thick W layers (≥0.4 μm) deposited onto copper substrates demonstrate areas of pilling and, after post-deposition heating to 1300 K, flaking-off and fracturing. For thin W layers (≤80 nm) deposited onto stainless steel (SS) and W substrates, no areas of flaking-off and fracturing exist both after deposition and after post-deposition heating to 673 K for the SS substrate and to 1300 K for the W substrate. The concentration of deuterium in the W layers was found to decrease with increasing substrate temperature and with increasing tungsten deposition rate. For layers with relatively high concentration of oxygen (0.20-0.60 O/W), a decrease of the D concentration with increasing substrate temperature is more pronounced than that for layers deposited in good vacuum conditions. To describe the evolution of the D/W ratio with the substrate temperature and the tungsten deposition rate, an empirical equation proposed by De Temmerman and Doerner [J. Nucl. Mater. 389 (2009) 479] but with alternative parameters has been used.

  2. Measurement of the deuterium concentration in water samples using a CW chemical deuterium fluoride laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, M.

    1979-10-01

    In this study a new method for the determination of the deuterium content in water samples is described. The absorption of the radiation of a CW deuterium fluoride laser by the isotope HDO in the water vapor of the sample is measured by means of an optoacoustic detector (spectrophone). Thereby advantage is taken of the fact that H 2 O hardly absorbs the laser radiation and that D 2 O only exists in negligible concentrations. The isotope ratio of hydrogen can be calculated from the measured relative concentration of HDO. In the course of this investigation the relative absorption cross sections of HDO for the different laser lines were determined. It was thereby established that there exists a very good coincidence of an HDO absorption line with the 2P2 laser line. Using a very sensitive nonresonant spectrophone the relative concentration of HDO in natural water samples could be determined with an accuracy of about 10%. The experiments also demonstrated that with appropriate improvements made to the apparatus and using a second spectrophone as a reference it should be possible to increase this accuracy to 0,1%. (orig.)

  3. Two-dimensional motions of rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the descending parts of the trajectories tend to be gentler and straighter slopes than the ascending parts for relatively large launching angles due to the non-vanishing thrusts. We discuss the ranges, the maximum altitudes and the engine performances of the rockets. It seems that the exponential fuel exhaustion can be the most potent engine for the longest and highest flights

  4. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  5. Nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive survey is presented of the present state of knowledge in nuclear fusion research. In the first part, potential thermonuclear reactions, basic energy balances of the plasma (Lawson criterion), and the main criteria to be observed in the selection of appropriate thermonuclear reactions are dealt with. This is followed by a discussion of the problems encountered in plasma physics (plasma confinement and heating, transport processes, plasma impurities, plasma instabilities and plasma diagnostics) and by a consideration of the materials problems involved, such as material of the first wall, fuel inlet and outlet, magnetic field generation, as well as repair work and in-service inspections. Two main methods have been developed to tackle these problems: reactor concepts using the magnetic pinch (stellarator, Tokamak, High-Beta reactors, mirror machines) on the one hand, and the other concept using the inertial confinement (laser fusion reactor). These two approaches and their specific problems as well as past, present and future fusion experiments are treated in detail. The last part of the work is devoted to safety and environmental aspects of the potential thermonuclear aspects of the potential thermonuclear reactor, discussing such problems as fusion-specific hazards, normal operation and potential hazards, reactor incidents, environmental pollution by thermal effluents, radiological pollution, radioactive wastes and their disposal, and siting problems. (orig./GG) [de

  6. Short fusion

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    French and UK researchers are perfecting a particle accelerator technique that could aid the quest for fusion energy or make X-rays that are safer and produce higher-resolution images. Led by Dr Victor Malka from the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Avancees in Paris, the team has developed a better way of accelerating electrons over short distances (1 page).

  7. Magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project

  8. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author)

  9. Stabilization of atomic hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walraven, J.T.M.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with the first of a series of experiments done at the University of Amsterdam to study the properties of spin polarized atomic hydrogen (spa H) and deuterium (spa D) at very low temperatures (T approximately 0.3 K) and in high magnetic fields (B approximately 10 T). The experiments show that spa H and spa D may be subjected to experimental investigation like any normal (i.e. stable) gas. Chapter 2 deals with the experimental apparatus and in particular the development of a reliable method to cool atomic hydrogen to very low temperatures which turned out to be decisive for the experiments. An account of the first experiments with spa H can be found in chapter 3. These experiments showed that spa H can be stabilized for extended periods of time (at low temperature and in high magnetic fields) by covering all surfaces with a superfluid film of 4 He. The gas was detected by triggering recombination by locally breaking the helium film and measuring the heat of recombination. This method turned out to be very sensitive and easy to implement. In chapter 4 the physical picture of the gas is discussed. This includes a discussion of the density profile and the phenomenon of thermal leakage from the open structured sample cell. The density profile may be used to detect Bose-Einstein condensation. A second series of experiments is discussed in chapter 5. These measurements were aimed at achieving high densities and to study the limiting processes. They demonstrate that spa H behaves as a gas. Recombination measurements with spa D at low temperatures are discussed in chapter 6 and show that recombination predominantly occurs on the surface of the helium film. (Auth.)

  10. Neutron emission from deuterium plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Djordjevic, D.; Joksimovic, D.; Maric, Z.; Udovicic, V.; Vukovic, J.

    1998-01-01

    The anisotropy of emitted neutrons is investigated on a small 'Mather-type' plasma focus device (PF). This problem is of importance for determining the nature of the fusion reaction mechanisms. Mica detectors together with thick uranium foils were used for both detection and angular distribution measurements of the neutrons. Previously, the annealing of the detectors was done and measured after the irradiation with neutrons from Am-Be source. Also, annealing ability of H-plasma focus has been tested. Geometry of detectors in both experiments was the same. (authors)

  11. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  12. Recent experimental results on solutions of deuterium in lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, H.R.; Wu, C.H.

    1976-01-01

    The existence of a number of stable molecules containing lithium and hydrogen isotopes in the saturated vapor over dilute solutions of hydrogen isotopes in lithium causes an unexpectedly high density of hydrogen isotopes in the vapor at high temperature. An evaluation of the partial pressures of the gas species Li, Li 2 , LiD, Li 2 D, LiD 2 and D 2 over solutions of deuterium in lithium measured in the temperature range 770 to 970 0 K, and extrapolation to higher temperatures, leads to the conclusion that the ratio of the atom fraction of deuterium in the gas to its atom fraction in the liquid exceeds unity above approximately 1240 0 K; this ratio is independent of the deuterium atom fraction in the liquid at low concentrations. Therefore the thermodynamic supposition that hydrogen isotopes can be separated from lithium by fractional distillation even at extremely low concentration exists. A direct verification of this phenomenon was made by Rayleigh distillation of Li-D solutions in the temperature range 970 to 1600 0 K. These measurements yield also the ratio of the deuterium atom fraction in the gas to that in the liquid and are in good agreement with the data obtained by extrapolation of partial pressures. The enrichment and depletion of deuterium in dependence on the number of theoretical plates of a distillation column at total reflux is calculated using the results

  13. Thermodynamic and electrical properties of laser-shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyu; Jia, Guo; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Kui; Huang, Xiuguang; Shu, Hua; Fang, Zhiheng; Ye, Junjian; Xie, Zhiyong; Xia, Miao; Fu, Sizu

    2018-01-01

    Liquid deuterium at high pressure and temperature has been observed to undergo significant electronic structural changes. Reflectivity and temperature measurements of liquid deuterium up to around 70 GPa were obtained using a quartz standard. The observed specific heat of liquid deuterium approaches the Dulong-Petit limit above 1 eV. Discussions on specific heat indicate a molecular dissociation below 1 eV and fully dissociated above 1.5 eV. Also, the electrical conductivity of deuterium estimated from reflectivity reaches 1.3 × 105 (Ωṡm)-1, proving that deuterium in this condition is a conducting degenerate liquid metal and undergo an insulator-metal transition. The results from specific heat, carrier density and conductivity agreed well with each other, which might be a reinforcement of the insulator-metal transition and the molecular dissociation. In addition, a new correction method of reflectivity in temperature calculation was proposed to improve the accuracy of temperature results. A new "dynamic calibration" was introduced in this work to make the experiments simpler and more accurate.

  14. Selected bibliography on deuterium isotope effects and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.; Donde, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in using deuterium and heavy water not only in nuclear industry but also in various fields of basic as well as applied research in physics, chemistry and biology. As a result, the literature is being enriched with a large number of research papers and technical reports published each year. Thus, to enable the scientists to have an easy reference to these works, an endeavour has been made in this selected bibliography, to enlist the publications related to these fields. Since the interest is concerned mainly with heavy water production processes, deuterium isotope effects etc., several aspects (e.g. nuclear) of deuterium have not been covered here. The material in this bibliography which cites 2388 references has been classified under six broad headings, viz. (1) Production of heavy water, (2) Study of deuterium isotope effects, (3) Analysis and Properties of heavy water, (4) Laser Separation of deuterium, (5) Isotopic exchange reactions, and (6) Miscellaneous. The sources of information used for this compilation are chemical abstracts, nuclear science abstracts, INIS Atomindex and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in the B.A.R.C. library. However, in spite of sincere attempts for a wide coverage, no claim is being made towards the exhaustiveness of this bibliography. (author)

  15. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D 2 molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D 2 fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into 4 He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; 3 He to 4 He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He

  16. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  17. SSTO rockets. A practical possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekey, Ivan

    1994-07-01

    Most experts agree that single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) rockets would become feasible if more advanced technologies were available to reduce the vehicle dry weight, increase propulsion system performance, or both. However, these technologies are usually judged to be very ambitious and very far off. This notion persists despite major advances in technology and vehicle design in the past decade. There appears to be four major misperceptions about SSTOs, regarding their mass fraction, their presumed inadequate performance margin, their supposedly small payloads, and their extreme sensitivity to unanticipated vehicle weight growth. These misperceptions can be dispelled for SSTO rockets using advanced technologies that could be matured and demonstrated in the near term. These include a graphite-composite primary structure, graphite-composite and Al-Li propellant tanks with integral reusable thermal protection, long-life tripropellant or LOX-hydrogen engines, and several technologies related to operational effectiveness, including vehicle health monitoring, autonomous avionics/flight control, and operable launch and ground handling systems.

  18. Distribution of deuterium and hydrogen in Zr and Ti foil assemblies under the action of a pulsed deuterium high-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, G. G.; Volobuev, I. V.; Eriskin, A. A.; Kobzev, A. P.; Nikulin, V. Ya.; Peregudova, E. N.; Silin, P. V.; Borovitskaya, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    Deuteron and proton elastic recoil detection analysis is used to study the accumulation and redistribution of deuterium and hydrogen in assemblies of two high-pure zirconium or titanium foils upon pulsed action of high-temperature deuterium plasma (PHTDP) in a plasma-focus installation PF-4. It is noted that, under the action of PHTDP, an implanted deuterium and hydrogen gas impurity are redistributed in the irradiated foils in large depths, which are significantly larger than the deuterium ion free paths (at their maximum velocity to 108 cm/s). The observed phenomenon is attributed to the carrying out of implanted deuterium and hydrogen under the action of powerful shock waves formed in the metallic foils under the action of PHTDP and/or the acceleration of diffusion of deuterium and hydrogen atoms under the action of a compression-rarefaction shock wave at the shock wave front with the redistribution of deuterium and hydrogen to large depths.

  19. Prospects of the practical use of controlled fusion with plasma magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, I.N.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of energy power development reveals, that fossil fuel - gas, oil, coal - will be depleted in the coming century. To-day there are still no ways of economically efficient full-scale usage of solar energy. Energy power based on division of heavy nuclei causes concern linked with unavoidable accumulation of long-lived radioactive wastes. Thermonuclear power is essentially safe, but application of deuterium fusion with tritium faces invincible difficulties linked with radiation damages of materials. Deuterium fusion with helium-3 solves this problem and opens favourable horizon for development of energy power, which is by 10 5 -10 6 time safer, than modern nuclear reactors. Author does not see any other way to provide mankind with fuel for coming centuries than, to mine helium-3 in the Moon which is technically workable and attracts attenuation to urgency of comprehensive - theoretical, experimental, design -development of efforts linked with D 3 He thermonuclear fusion

  20. Basic study of cold fusion. 1. The development of excess heat measurement system in electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    We have an opportunity ripe to investigate the cold fusion phenomena. In order to declare the subjects to be examined, the precision calorimetry system was developed to try to reproduce the phenomena. The electrolysis of heavy water with palladium cathode was conducted based on the thought that it is important to confirm the cold fusion phenomena. For precision excess power measurement, the closed cell with recombiner and flow-calorimetry were adopted. The obtained accuracy for the excess power measurement of the system was ±0.2 W at up to 9 W of applied power. This is enough for the excess power reported as the cold fusion phenomena. For farther investigation, measurement of loading ratio of deuterium in the palladium cathode, maintenance of high deuterium loading and analysis of the palladium cathode are to be conducted. (author)