WorldWideScience

Sample records for detrusor overactivity incontinence

  1. Botulinum toxin A for treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity and incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs).......To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs)....

  2. Urinary incontinence at orgasm: relation to detrusor overactivity and treatment efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serati, Maurizio; Salvatore, Stefano; Uccella, Stefano; Cromi, Antonella; Khullar, Vik; Cardozo, Linda; Bolis, Pierfrancesco

    2008-10-01

    To understand the pathophysiological mechanism of incontinence during orgasm and to compare women affected by symptomatic detrusor overactivity (DO) with and without incontinence at orgasm in terms of efficacy of antimuscarinic treatment. All consecutive sexually active women with incontinence during intercourse were prospectively included and divided into two groups: women with coital incontinence at orgasm or at penetration. The two forms of coital incontinence were correlated to the urodynamic finding of DO. Women complaining of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms, with urinary incontinence at orgasm and urodynamically proven DO (cases), were prescribed tolterodine 4 mg extended release for at least 12 wk. The cases were compared in terms of efficacy of treatment on OAB symptoms to consecutive patients with symptomatic DO without coital incontinence (control group). Among the 1133 women who underwent urodynamic testings during the study period, 132 patients were eligible for final analysis. A significant difference in DO was observed in women with incontinence at orgasm (34 of 49; 69.4%) compared with women with incontinence during penetration (24 of 83; 28.9%) (porgasm associated with DO were given antimuscarinics treatment and were compared with 53 controls. Fourteen of 34 (41.2%) and 9 of 53 (17%) women did not respond to antimuscarinics in the cases and in the control group, respectively (p=0.023). Incontinence at orgasm is associated with DO in the majority of cases. This is the first study showing an inferior efficacy of antimuscarinic treatment in women with DO complaining of incontinence at orgasm.

  3. Mixed incontinence: does preoperative urodynamic detrusor overactivity affect postoperative quality of life after pubovaginal sling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Stoffel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine if women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI and urodynamic detrusor overactivity (DO have less improvement in urinary symptoms after pubovaginal sling surgery (PVS, compared to MUI without DO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Women with preoperative MUI symptoms prior to PVS were identified through retrospective review. DO was defined as a symptomatic 5 cm H20 detrusor pressure or greater rise during urodynamics. MUI patients with and without DO before PVS were divided into Groups A and B, respectively. All patients had returned a completed Urogenital Distress Inventory 6 (UDI-6 questionnaire and a 3-day diary of pad usage before surgery and at each postoperative visit. Study endpoints included change in total UDI-6 score, and change in number of pad use/day after PVS. RESULTS: 73 patients were identified, 31 in Group A and 42 in Group B. Mean follow-up after PVS was 15 and 16 months, respectively (p = 0.59. Preoperative total UDI-6 scores were 11.8 and 12.7 (p = 0.30 for Group A and B. Mean changes in total UDI-6 after PVS were - 8.0 and - 10.2 (p = 0.030, respectively. After PVS, both groups reported similar mean reduction in pad/day usage from preoperative baseline (-2.57 vs. --2.49, p = 0.83. There were no differences between the groups when comparing demographic, urodynamic, or operative data. CONCLUSION: MUI patients had improved continence and quality of life after PVS. However, MUI patients with DO had less improvement in UDI-6 scores after PVS, despite a similar reduction to pad use/day.

  4. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

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    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life.

  5. Can we predict detrusor overactivity in women with lower urinary tract symptoms? The King's Detrusor Overactivity Score (KiDOS)

    OpenAIRE

    Giarenis, Ilias; Musonda, Patrick; Mastoroudes, Heleni; Robinson, Dudley; Cardozo, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective Traditionally, urodynamic studies (UDS) have been used to assess lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), but their routine use is now discouraged. While urodynamic stress incontinence is strongly associated with the symptom of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and a positive cough test, there is a weak relationship between symptoms of overactive bladder and detrusor overactivity (DO). The aim of our study was to develop a model to predict DO in women with LUTS. Study Design This prospe...

  6. Urinary Incontinence due to Overactive Detrusor Muscle: A Rare Side Effect of Venlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vithyalakshmi Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of reemergence of urinary incontinence (UI in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH after starting treatment with venlafaxine who was stabilized on tamsulosin and finasteride for about 6 years. A 66-year-old Caucasian male with prior history of major depressive disorder developed UI within a week of starting venlafaxine 75 mg per day. He described symptoms in the form of involuntary leakage of urine both during the day and at night. His symptoms of UI resolved after stopping the venlafaxine. To the best of our knowledge, there are only four case reports of venlafaxine induced urinary incontinence which have been published.

  7. Female urinary incontinence at orgasm: a possible marker of a more severe form of detrusor overactivity. Can ultrasound measurement of bladder wall thickness explain it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serati, Maurizio; Salvatore, Stefano; Cattoni, Elena; Siesto, Gabriele; Soligo, Marco; Braga, Andrea; Sorice, Paola; Cromi, Antonella; Ghezzi, Fabio; Cardozo, Linda; Bolis, Pierfrancesco

    2011-06-01

    Coital incontinence (CI) during orgasm is a form of urinary incontinence possibly because of detrusor overactivity (DO), as the underlying pathophysiological condition. Women with this symptom usually show a pharmacological lower cure rate than those with DO alone. The ultrasound measurement of the bladder wall thickness (BWT) allows an indirect evaluation of detrusor muscle thickness, giving a potential index of detrusor activity. We wanted to understand if CI at orgasm could be a marker of severity of DO by comparing BWT in women with both DO and CI at orgasm vs. women with DO alone. In addition we aimed to confirm if CI during orgasm is related to antimuscarinics treatment failure. This is a prospective cohort study performed in two tertiary urogynecological referral departments, recruiting consecutive patients seeking treatment for symptomatic DO. All patients were thoroughly assessed including physical examination, urodynamic evaluation, and BWT measurement according to the International Continence Society/International Urogynecological Association and ICI recommendations. Solifenacine 5 mg once daily was then prescribed and follow-up was scheduled to evaluate treatment. Multiple logistic regression (MLR) was performed to identify risk factors for treatment failure. Between September 2007 and March 2010, 31 (22.6%) and 106 (77.4%) women with DO with and without CI at orgasm were enrolled. Women complaining of CI at orgasm had significantly higher BWT than the control group (5.8 ± 0.6 mm vs. 5.2 ± 1.2 mm [P=0.007]). In patients with CI at orgasm, the nonresponder rate to antimuscarinics was significantly higher than controls (P=0.01). After MLR, CI at orgasm was the only independent predictor decreasing antimuscarinics efficacy (odds ratio [OR] 3.16 [95% CI 1.22-8.18], P=0.02). Women with DO and CI at orgasm showed a significantly higher BWT values and worse cure rates than women with DO alone. CI at orgasm could be a marker of a more severe form of DO.

  8. Detrusor overactivity in diabetic and non-diabetic patients: is there a difference?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Golabek, Tomasz

    2013-07-22

    To compare urodynamic characteristics in patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) with those of an age matched cohort with diabetes mellitus (DM) and detrusor overactivity (DO). Secondly, to determine whether urodynamic features could help distinguish these two groups of patients.

  9. Can we predict detrusor overactivity in women with lower urinary tract symptoms? The King's Detrusor Overactivity Score (KiDOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarenis, Ilias; Musonda, Patrick; Mastoroudes, Heleni; Robinson, Dudley; Cardozo, Linda

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, urodynamic studies (UDS) have been used to assess lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), but their routine use is now discouraged. While urodynamic stress incontinence is strongly associated with the symptom of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and a positive cough test, there is a weak relationship between symptoms of overactive bladder and detrusor overactivity (DO). The aim of our study was to develop a model to predict DO in women with LUTS. This prospective study included consecutive women with LUTS attending a urodynamic clinic. All women underwent a comprehensive clinical and urodynamic assessment. The effect of each variable on the odds of DO was estimated both by univariate analysis and adjusted analysis using logistic regression. 1006 women with LUTS were included in the study with 374 patients (37%) diagnosed with DO. The factors considered to be the best predictors of DO were urgency urinary incontinence, urge rating/void and parity (p-value<0.01). The absence of SUI, vaginal bulging and previous continence surgery were also good predictors of DO (p-value<0.01). We have created a prediction model for DO based on our best predictors. In our scoring system, presence of UUI scores 5; mean urge rating/void≥3 scores 3; parity≥2 scores 2; previous continence surgery scores -1; presence of SUI scores -1; and the complaint of vaginal bulging scores -1. If a criterion is absent, then the score is 0 and the total score can vary from a value of -3 to +10. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis for the overall cut-off points revealed an area under the curve of 0.748 (95%CI 0.741, 0.755). This model is able to predict DO more accurately than a symptomatic diagnosis alone, in women with LUTS. The introduction of this scoring system as a screening tool into clinical practice may reduce the need for expensive and invasive tests to diagnose DO, but cannot replace UDS completely. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Failure of botulinum toxin injection for neurogenic detrusor overactivity: Switch of toxin versus second injection of the same toxin.

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    Peyronnet, Benoit; Castel-Lacanal, Evelyne; Manunta, Andréa; Roumiguié, Mathieu; Marque, Philippe; Rischmann, Pascal; Gamé, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a second injection of the same toxin versus switching to a different botulinum toxin A after failure of a first detrusor injection in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The charts of all patients who underwent detrusor injections of botulinum toxin A (either abobotulinumtoxinA or onabotulinumtoxinA) for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Patients in whom a first detrusor injection had failed were included in the present study. They were managed by a second injection of the same toxin at the same dosage or by a new detrusor injection using a different botulinum toxin A. Success was defined as a resolution of urgency, urinary incontinence and detrusor overactivity in a patient self-catheterizing seven times or less per 24 h. A total of 58 patients were included for analysis. A toxin switch was carried out in 29 patients, whereas the other 29 patients received a reinjection of the same toxin at the same dose. The success rate was higher in patients who received a toxin switch (51.7% vs. 24.1%, P = 0.03). Patients treated with a switch from abobotulinumtoxinA to onabotulinumtoxinA and those treated with a switch from onabotulinumtoxinA to abobotulinumtoxinA had similar success rates (52.9% vs. 50%, P = 0.88). After failure of a first detrusor injection of botulinum toxin for neurogenic detrusor overactivity, a switch to a different toxin seems to be more effective than a second injection of the same toxin. The replacement of onabotulinumtoxin by abobotulinumtoxin or the reverse provides similar results. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis patients

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    S. Deffontaines-Rufin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO is common in patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS. When the usual pharmacological treatment fails, botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections can be proposed. The safety and efficacy of this treatment are already well known, but only a few studies focus on its use in patients with MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients with MS underwent their first BTX-A injection for refractory NDO. They had clinical and urodynamic cystometry assessment before and three months after injection. The patients were divided in three groups according to treatment efficacy: full success (total urinary continence, no overactive detrusor, improvement, or total failure (urge incontinence and overactive detrusor. RESULTS: 77% of the patients had clinical improvement or full success of the treatment with a reduction of their urgency and incontinence. Significant urodynamic improvement after treatment was shown on different parameters: volume at first involuntary bladder contraction (p = 0.0000001, maximum cystometric capacity (p = 0.0035, maximum detrusor pressure (p = 0.0000001. 46% of the patients were in the "full success" group. 31% of the patients had a partial improvement. 23% of the patients had no efficacy of the treatment. Duration of MS was a predictive factor of treatment failure (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Despite that a full success was obtained in 46% of the cases, BTX-A injection therapy failed to treat refractory NDO in 23% of patients suffering from MS. Duration of the disease was a predictive factor for an inefficient treatment. The injection therapy should be considered as soon as oral anticholinergic drugs fail to reduce NDO.

  12. [Definition of botulinum toxin failure in neurogenic detrusor overactivity: Preliminary results of the DETOX survey].

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    Peyronnet, B; Sanson, S; Amarenco, G; Castel-Lacanal, E; Chartier-Kastler, E; Charvier, K; Damphousse, M; Denys, P; de Seze, M; Egon, G; Even, A; Forin, V; Karsenty, G; Kerdraon, J; le Normand, L; Loche, C-M; Manunta, A; Mouracade, P; Phe, V; Previnaire, J-G; Ruffion, A; Saussine, C; Schurch, B; Game, X

    2015-12-01

    There is currently no guideline regarding the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to intra-detrusor botulinum toxin injections. The primary objective of the present study was to find a consensus definition of failure of botulinum toxin intra-detrusor injections for NDO. The secondary objective was to report current trends in the managment of NDO refractory to botulinum toxin. A survey was created, based on data drawn from current literature, and sent via e-mail to all the experts form the Group for research in neurourology in french language (GENULF) and from the comittee of neurourology of the French urological association (AFU). The experts who did not answer to the first e-mail were contacted again twice. Main results from the survey are presented and expressed as numbers and proportions. Out of the 42 experts contacted, 21 responded to the survey. Nineteen participants considered that the definition of failure should be a combination of clinical and urodynamics criteria. Among the urodynamics criteria, the persistence of a maximum detrusor pressure>40 cm H2O was the most supported by the experts (18/21, 85%). According to the vast majority of participants (19/21, 90.5%), the impact of injections on urinary incontinence should be included in the definition of failure. Regarding the management, most experts considered that the first line treatment in case of failure of a first intra-detrusor injection of Botox(®) 200 U should be a repeat injection of Botox(®) at a higher dosage (300 U) (15/20, 75%), regardless of the presence or not of urodynamics risk factors of upper tract damage (16/20, 80%). This work has provided a first overview of the definition of failure of intra-detrusor injections of botulinum toxin in the management of NDO. For 90.5% of the experts involved, the definition of failure should be clinical and urodynamic and most participants (75%) considered that, in case of failure of a first injection of Botox(®) 200 U

  13. Muscarinic receptors mediate cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

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    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nakazawa, Masaki; Gautam, Sudha Silwal; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    This study determined if muscarinic receptors could mediate the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity induced in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats. Ten-week-old female Goto-Kakizaki diabetic rats (n = 12) and Wister Kyoto non-diabetic rats (n = 12) were maintained on a high-fat diet for 4 weeks. Cystometric investigations of the unanesthetized rats were carried out at room temperature (27 ± 2°C) for 20 min. They were intravenously administered imidafenacin (0.3 mg/kg, n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6). After 5 min, the rats were transferred to a low temperature (4 ± 2°C) for 40 min where the cystometry was continued. The rats were then returned to room temperature for the final cystometric measurements. Afterwards, expressions of bladder muscarinic receptor M3 and M2 messenger ribonucleic acids and proteins were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats, imidafenacin did not reduce cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats, just after transfer to a low temperature, the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in imidafenacin-treated rats was reduced compared with vehicle-treated rats. Within the urinary bladders, the ratio of M3 to M2 receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats was significantly higher than that of the non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats. The proportion of muscarinic M3 receptor-positive area within the detrusor in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats was also significantly higher than that in non-diabetic Wister Kyoto rats. Imidafenacin partially inhibits cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. In this animal model, muscarinic M3 receptors partially mediate cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Pathways Involving Beta-3 Adrenergic Receptors Modulate Cold Stress-Induced Detrusor Overactivity in Conscious Rats.

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    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nakazawa, Masaki; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate pathways involving beta-3 adrenergic receptors (ARs) in detrusor overactivity induced by cold stress, we determined if the beta-3 AR agonist CL316243 could modulate the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in normal rats. Two days prior to cystometric investigations, the bladders of 10-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were cannulated. Cystometric measurements of the unanesthetized, unrestricted rats were taken to estimate baseline values at room temperature (RT, 27 ± 2 °C) for 20 min. They were then intravenously administered vehicle, 0.1, or 1.0 mg/kg CL316243 (n = 6 in each group). Five minutes after the treatments, they were gently and quickly transferred to the low temperature (LT, 4 ± 2 °C) room for 40 min where the cystometric measurements were again made. Afterward, the rats were returned to RT for final cystometric measurements. The cystometric effects of CL316243 were also measured at RT (n = 6 in each group). At RT, both low and high dose of CL316243 decreased basal and micturition pressure while the high dose (1.0 mg/kg) significantly increased voiding interval and bladder capacity. During LT exposure, the high dose of CL316243 partially reduced cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity characterized by increased basal pressure and urinary frequency. The high drug dose also significantly inhibited the decreases of both voiding interval and bladder capacity compared to the vehicle- and low dose (0.1 mg/kg)-treated rats. A high dose of the beta-3 agonist CL316243 could modulate cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. Therefore, one of the mechanisms in cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity includes a pathway involving beta-3 ARs. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Randomized controlled trial of foot reflexology for patients with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Ho-Leung Jimmy; Cheon, Willy Cecilia; Wong, To; Liu, Yu Sun John; Tong, Wai Mei Anny

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether foot reflexology has beneficial effects on patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity. One hundred and nine women with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity were randomized into either foot reflexology treatment group or nonspecific foot massage control group. The primary outcome measure was the change in the diurnal micturition frequency. There was significant change in the number of daytime frequency in the reflexology group when compared with the massage group (-1.90 vs -0.55, p = 0.029). There was also a decrease in the 24-h micturition frequency in both groups, but the change was not statistically significant (-2.80 vs -1.04 p = 0.055). In the reflexology group, more patients believed to have received "true" reflexology (88.9 vs 67.4%, p = 0.012). This reflects the difficulty of blinding in trials of reflexology. Larger scale studies with a better-designed control group and an improved blinding are required to examine if reflexology is effective in improving patients' overall outcome.

  16. Brain SPECT study of detrusor overactivity and healthy men in urine withholding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yafu; Li Xuena; Li Yaming; Noriyuki Shuke; Atsutaka Okizaki; Junichi Sato; Tamio Aburano

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study is to identify the brain areas, which control the bladder storage by 99 Tc m -HMPAO SPECT with Neurological Statistical Image Analysis Software (NEUROSTAT). SPECT were performed on twenty-five patients with some storage symptoms of lower urinary tract, among which nineteen patients were with detrusor overactivity (DO) (Group II) and six patients were with normal detrusor function (Group III), and fifteen healthy volunteers (Group I). All the subjects were male and right-handed, and were scanned twice under two conditions: resting state and urine withholding state. NEUROSTAT was adopted to analyze the difference in rCBF between groups and states. The results were displayed on Z-score images at a significance threshold of P<0.05 with correction for multiple comparisons. No region reached significant threshold in comparison of Group II and III in resting state. There were significant increases in tracer activity in bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the right middle temporal gyrus in urine withholding state as compared with resting state in Group I and III (P<0.05 with correction for multiple comparisons, the corresponding Z value was more than 4.476 for Group I, more than 4.414 for Group III). Among the regions,the right inferior frontal gyrus was distinctly prominent at both Z-score and the extent. In Group II, only the left middle temporal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus were activated significantly in urine withholding state as compared with resting (P<0.05 with correction for multiple comparisons, the corresponding Z value was more than 4.35). The results indicated that bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the right middle temporal gyrus associated with the control of bladder storage.Especially, the right inferior frontal gyrus played a more important role in cerebral control of bladder storage, inhibiting the contraction of detrusor in urine storage. (authors)

  17. Prospective randomised controlled trial comparing trigone-sparing versus trigone-including intradetrusor injection of abobotulinumtoxinA for refractory idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manecksha, Rustom P

    2012-05-01

    Botulinum toxin A is effective for treatment of idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO). The trigone is generally spared because of the theoretical risk of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), although studies assessing injection sites are lacking.

  18. The role of muscarinic receptor subtypes on carbachol-induced contraction of normal human detrusor and overactive detrusor associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Yamanishi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of antimuscarinic antagonists on carbachol-induced contraction of normal human bladder and detrusor overactivity associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (DO/BPH. Samples of human bladder muscle were obtained from patients undergoing total cystectomy for bladder cancer (normal bladder, and those undergoing retropubic prostatectomy for BPH. All of the patients with DO/BPH had detrusor overactivity according to urodynamic studies. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 10-ml organ baths containing Krebs solution, and concentration–response curves for carbachol were obtained in the presence of antimuscarinic antagonists (4-DAMP, methoctramine, pirenzepine, tolterodine, solifenacin, trospium, propiverine, oxybutynin, and imidafenacin or vehicle. All antagonists competitively antagonized concentration–response curves to carbachol with high affinities in normal bladder. The rank order of mean pA2 values was as follows: trospium (10.1 > 4-DAMP (9.87, imidafenacin (9.3 > solifenacin (8.8 > tolterodine (8.6 > oxybutynin (8.3 > propiverine (7.7 > pirenzepine (7.4 > methoctramine (6.6. The effects of these antimuscarinic antagonists did not change when tested with DO/BPH bladder, suggesting that each antimuscarinic antagonist has a similar effect in this condition. Schild plots showed a slope corresponding to unity, except for propiverine with DO/BPH detrusor. In conclusion, M3-receptors mainly mediate contractions in human bladder strips with normal state and DO/BPH.

  19. Drug calculations for urinary incontinence in women

    OpenAIRE

    Nuttall, Dilyse

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 3–6 million people are affected by urinary incontinence in the UK, and women are most commonly affected (NHS Choices, 2015). Causes of urinary incontinence vary but urge incontinence is usually caused by over-activity of the bladder's detrusor muscles, and stress incontinence is caused by muscle damage or weakness (NHS Choices, 2015). The management of urinary incontinence may require pharmacological treatment in conjunction with pelvic floor and bladder training exercises (Joint...

  20. Role of antimuscarinics in the treatment of nonneurogenic daytime urinary incontinence in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, RJM

    Idiopathic or "functional" urinary incontinence in children-incontinence with no known neurologic or anatomic cause-may take the form of urge incontinence, the most common type of incontinence, which is characterized by detrusor overactivity during the filling phase, or dysfunctional voiding. The

  1. Pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder: report from the International Consultation on Incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Chapple, Christopher R.; Cardozo, Linda; Cruz, Francisco; Hashim, Hashim; Michel, Martin C.; Tannenbaum, Cara; Wein, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Treatment options for the overactive bladder were recently discussed at the 4th International Consultation on Incontinence (ICI) held in Paris, 5-8 July 2008. This article will overview current thoughts on the pharmacological and clinical basis for the different classes of drugs

  2. Comparison of symptom severity and treatment response in patients with incontinent and continent overactive bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Piro, Maria; Schneider, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Two thirds of patients with overactive bladder (OAB) are continent, but our knowledge on the treatment of the syndrome is largely based on studies with incontinent patients. Therefore, we have explored baseline symptoms and treatment responses to tolterodine in continent relative to

  3. [Treatment of non-neurogenic masculine urinary incontinence due to overactive bladder: a review by the LUTS committee of the French Urological Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebdai, S; Haillot, O; Azzouzi, A R; Benchikh, A; Campeggi, A; Cornu, J-N; Delongchamps, N B; Dumonceau, O; Faix, A; Fourmarier, M; Lukacs, B; Mathieu, R; Misrai, V; Robert, G; de La Taille, A; Descazeaud, A

    2014-07-01

    To perform an update on the treatment of masculine urinary incontinence due to idiopathic overactive bladder. A systematic review was conducted using PubMed/MEDLINE with the following keywords: "overactive bladder", "male urinary incontinence", "urgency", "antimuscarinic", "onabotulinumtoxinA", "neurostimulation", "cystoplasty". Antimuscarinic treatments were the first line option for overactive bladder incontinence (decreased incontinence under tolterodine versus placebo respectively -71% vs. -40%, P masculine population exclusively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical risk factors and urodynamic predictors prior to surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bing, Mette Hornum; Gimbel, Helga; Greisen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    incontinence, previous incontinence surgery, body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35, age ≥ 75, and presence of diabetes mellitus were significantly related to decreased outcome of incontinence surgery. Furthermore, noninvasive and invasive urodynamic parameters indicating detrusor overactivity, voiding difficulties, low...

  5. Urodynamic study in women with pure stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdevenito, J P; Águila, F; Naser, M; Manríquez, V; Wenzel, C; Díaz, J P

    2015-03-01

    To describe the results of urodynamic study in women with pure stress urinary incontinence symptoms, including the characteristics of the overactive detrusor. No other clinical assessments were taken into account. A retrospective study in women with urinary incontinence consecutively evaluated by urodynamic study. From a total of 710 women, only 108 (15%) with pure stress urinary incontinence symptoms were selected. Women with prior urinary incontinence surgery, pelvic organ prolapse (stage ≥iii), pelvic radiotherapy, using medication active on the lower urinary tract and neurological diseases were excluded. Infusion rate was 70 ml/min. Detrusor overactivity was induced only by cough. A standardized cough stress test with progressive cough intensity was carried out. Reference urodynamic values for stress incontinent women are described. Urodynamic stress incontinence was observed in 79 women (73.1%), detrusor overactivity in 4 (3.7%) and mixed urodynamic diagnosis in 15 (13.8%). Test was inconclusive in 10 patients (9.2%). Two women had detrusor overactivity incontinence (1.9%). One patient had detrusor overactivity induced by cough without urodynamic stress incontinence (0.9%). There was an association between detrusor overactivity and nocturia ≥2 (P=.002; odds ratio: 3.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-11.39). One woman had a bladder outlet obstruction (0.9%). In women with pure stress urinary incontinence, without knowing the outcome of other clinical assessments, urodynamic study can provide useful information to define the proper therapy. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Cerebral control of bladder storage in patients with detrusor overactivity: An activation study using SPECT with NEUROSTAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yafu, Y.; Li, X.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to identify the brain areas which control the bladder storage in the patients with detrusor overactivity (DO) and those without DO by 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) SPECT with Neurological Statistical Image Analysis Software (NEUROSTAT). Methods: SPECT scans were performed on fifteen healthy volunteers (Group I) and twenty-five patients with some storage symptoms of lower urinary tract, among whom nineteen patients were with DO (Group II) and six patients were with normal detrusor function (Group III). All the subjects were male and right-handed. Each subject was scanned twice without movement in a supine position. 444MBq and 555MBq 99mTc- HMPAO were separately injected intravenously under the following two conditions: resting state with empty bladder and urine withholding state with full bladder. The final image during urine withholding was obtained by subtracting the first scan data from the second. NEUROSTAT was adopted to analyze the difference in rCBF between groups in resting state and to analyze the change in rCBF between urine withholding and resting states in each group. The results were displayed on Z-score images at a significance threshold of P < 0.05 with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: No region reached significant threshold in comparison of Group II and Group III in resting state, although Group II and III , as compared with Group I, showed decreases in tracer activity in superior temporal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate and cingulate gyrus. There were significant increases in tracer activity in bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the right middle temporal gyrus in urine withholding state as compared with resting state in Group III. Among the regions, the right inferior frontal gyrus was distinctly prominent at both Z-score and the extent. In Group II, the regions that were activated significantly in Group III did not reach significant

  7. Bladder base/trigone injection is safe and as effective as bladder body injection of onabotulinumtoxinA for idiopathic detrusor overactivity refractory to antimuscarinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA injections at bladder base/trigone and compare with injections at bladder body or bladder body/trigone for the treatment of idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) refractory to antimuscarinics. A single blind, randomized, paralleled, actively controlled trial was performed in patients with urodynamically proven IDO who failed antimuscarinic therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravesical injections of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA into three different bladder sites. All treatments were evaluated by voiding diary variables, urgency severity score, urodynamic studies, and patient perception of bladder condition. Long-term success rates over 12 months were also determined. Among the patients, 37 were randomized to injections in the bladder body, 35 into the bladder body/trigone, and 33 into the bladder base/trigone. Successful results were reported in 76 (72%) patients at 3 months: 26 (70%) in the bladder body group, 26 (74%) in the bladder body/trigone group, and 24 (73%) in the bladder base/trigone group. There were no significant differences in success rates, changes in urgency and urgency incontinence episodes, urodynamic variables, or long-term success rates among the three subgroups. The incidence of adverse events was similar among three groups. No vesicoureteral reflux was noted in all patients with or without involving trigone injection. Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injection is an effective treatment for IDO regardless of the bladder injection site. Bladder base/trigone injection is as safe and effective as bladder body injections with or without trigone involvement. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Neuromodulation: urodynamic effects of sacral (S3) spinal nerve stimulation in patients with detrusor instability or detrusor hyperflexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, J L; Groen, J

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the urodynamic effects of sacral (S3) nerve stimulation in patients with urge incontinence due to detrusor overactivity which has been refractory to conservative treatment. A total of 24 patients with idiopathic detrusor instability and five with neurogenic hyperreflexia were studied urodynamically before and 6 months after a permanent S3 foramen electrode implant. The urodynamic studies at follow-up were done with the stimulus on. Clinically, the average voiding frequency, the number of leakage episodes and pad use per 24 h decreased significantly. Improvement in several urodynamic parameters was noted. In the idiopathic as well as in the neurogenic group, the correlation between symptomatic and urodynamic improvement was incomplete. Neuromodulation leads to improvement of several urodynamic parameters in patients with urge incontinence due to detrusor overactivity which has been refractory to conservative treatment and appears to be a valuable treatment option in these patients.

  9. Fahr Syndrome Unknown Complication: Overactive Bladder

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    Devrim Tuglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient’s medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome.

  10. Efficacy of peripheral lidocaine application (neural therapy) in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamam, Yusuf; Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Gedik, Abdullah; Tamam, Cüneyt; Nazlıkul, Hüseyin

    2017-09-01

    Many agents and treatments are used in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in MS patients, but no study has been conducted on the use of peripheric lidocaine (neural therapy-NT) on MS patients. We evaluated the effects of local administration of lidocaine on NDO in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients. For each patient local anesthetic lidocaine was injected at each session. Sessions were held once a week for 5 weeks. At each session, Th 10-L1, urogenital segment intradermal injections, Frankenhauser, and sacral epidural injections were given. The patients had clinical and urodynamic assessment 1 month before and 3, 9, and 12 months after NT. In addition, multiple sclerosis quality of life inventory (MSQL-54) and bladder control scale (BLCS) was performed for patients. Twenty-eight patients were included in the study (8 males, 20 females). The patients' average age was 31.7 ± 8.1 years. The injection therapy significantly improved volume at first involuntary bladder contraction (FCV), maximal detrusor pression during filling (P det. max.), maximal cystometric bladder capacity (MCC) after 3 months. Also, the MSQL-54 and BLCS scores were improved with treatment. However, these improvements reached a maximum 3 months after treatment, but from the 9 month a regression was seen in the parameters, and after 12 months the findings were seen to be slightly above their basal levels. These results suggest that NDO treatment in MS patients could be an effective treatment which is easy and has very few side effects, and is cost effective. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phasic or terminal detrusor overactivity in women: age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior relationships

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    Françoise A. Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To search for relationships between phasic (P and terminal (T DO with age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior during involuntary detrusor contraction in woman. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urodynamic studies (triple lumen catheter 7F, seated position of 164 successive women referred for LUTS with diagnosis of DO were reviewed. Patients were stratified in 4 sub-groups: pre- (18-44y, peri- (45-54 y, post-menopause (55-74 y and oldest old (≥ 75 y. The urethral sensor was positioned at the level of the maximum urethral closure pressure for sphincter behavior analysis. A variation of at least 5 cmH2O in pressure (detrusor or urethra was chosen to assert DO or sphincter response. Sphincter response was classified as relaxation (re before or during DO, or steady (st. RESULTS: Occurrence of P and TDO was similar: 77 P and 87 T. The PDO group was significantly younger (p = 0.0003. TDO was more frequent in patients with a history of neurological disease. The percentage of PDO remained almost constant in age groups, while that of TDO increased with age from 6.7% to 23.2% (p = 0.0013. Uninhibited contraction occurred at a smaller bladder volume in the P group: 149 ± 95 vs. 221 ± 113 mL (p < 0.0001. Steady sphincter predominated in the TDO subgroup: 45.9% vs. 32.1% and increased significantly in each DO sub-group of ³ 75y. CONCLUSION: Steady sphincter during both P and TDO, and occurrence of TDO appear as specific of aging. The last result could be related to structural changes in the detrusor muscle with aging.

  12. Fesoterodine for the treatment of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder

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    Pamela Ellsworth

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pamela EllsworthThe Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a highly prevalent condition, affecting males and females. The prevalence increases with age. Behavioral therapy and antimuscarinic therapy remain the first-line therapies for management of OAB. Despite improvements in symptoms, persistence with antimuscarinic therapy has remained low. Multiple factors including patient expectations, adverse effects and cost may affect persistence. Fesoterodine is one of the newest antimuscarinic agent approved for the management of OAB. It is unique in that it shares the same active metabolite as tolterodine, 5-hydoxymethyltolterodine (5-HMT; however, this conversion is established via ubiquitous esterases and not via the cytochrome P450 system, thus providing a faster and more efficient conversion to 5-HMT. Fesoterodine is available in 2 doses, 4 mg and 8 mg. Clinical trials have established a dose response relationship in efficacy parameters as well as improvements in quality of life. As with all antimuscarinics, dry mouth and constipation are the more common side effects. A combination of medical therapy and behavioral therapy improves the overall outcome in management of OAB. Dose flexibility may help improve efficacy outcomes and patient education on the management of common adverse effects may improve tolerability with these agents.Keywords: overactive bladder, antimuscarinic agent, esterase, 5-HMT, fesoterodine

  13. Role of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α3 and α7 Subunits in Detrusor Overactivity Induced by Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Rats

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    Hyo Sin Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the role of α3 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits (nAChRs in the bladder, using a rat model with detrusor overactivity induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. Methods: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were used: 10 were sham-operated (control group and 30 were observed for 3 weeks after partial BOO. BOO-induced rats were further divided into 3 groups: Two groups of 10 rats each received intravesicular infusions with hexamethonium (HM group; n=10 or methyllycaconitine (MLC group; n=10, which are antagonists for α3 and α7 nAChRs, respectively. The remaining BOO-induced rats received only saline infusion (BOO group; n=10. Based on the contraction interval measurements using cystometrogram, the contraction pressure and nonvoiding bladder contractions were compared between the control and the three BOO-induced groups. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blotting were used to analyze α3 and α7 nAChRs levels. Results: The contraction interval of the MLC group was higher than that of the BOO group (P<0.05. Nonvoiding bladder contraction almost disappeared in the HM and MLC groups. Contraction pressure increased in the BOO group (P<0.05 compared with the control group and decreased in the HM and MLC groups compared with the BOO group (P<0.05. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the α3 nAChR signals increased in the urothelium, and the α7 nAChR signals increased in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the BOO group compared with the control group. Western blot analysis showed that both α3 and α7 nAChR levels increased in the BOO group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Alpha3 and α7 nAChRs are associated with detrusor overactivity induced by BOO. Furthermore, nAChR antagonists could help in clinically improving detrusor overactivity.

  14. The novel β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron reduces carbachol-induced contractile activity in detrusor tissue from patients with bladder outflow obstruction with or without detrusor overactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalø, Julie; Nordling, Jørgen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    preparations from patients with bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) with and without detrusor overactivity (DO), and from patients with normal bladder function. We compared the effects to those of isoprenaline, a non-selective β-adrenoceptor agonist. Detrusor specimens were obtained from patients with benign...... carbachol-induced tone in tissues from all groups. Isoprenaline decreased tension with higher potency than mirabegron in normal, BOO and BOO+DO detrusor strips with pIC(50) values of 7.49 ± 0.16 vs. 6.23 ± 0.26 (P=0.0002), 6.89 ± 0.34 vs. 6.04 ± 0.31 (P=0.01), and 6.57 ± 0.20 vs. 5.41 ± 0.08 (P...), respectively. The maximal relaxant effect of isoprenaline and mirabegron in the normal, BOO and BOO+DO detrusor was 37.7 ± 14.4% and 36.1 ± 23.3%, 14.4 ± 12.2% vs. 33.4 ± 21.0% and 18.3 ± 10.0% vs. 28.3 ± 12.2% (n=4, P>0.05), respectively. Mirabegron and isoprenaline reduced carbachol-induced tone in both...

  15. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity is associated with decreased expression and function of the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels.

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    Kiril L Hristov

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from a variety of neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis often develop neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, which currently lacks a universally effective therapy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NDO is associated with changes in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM large conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BK channel expression and function. DSM tissue samples from 33 patients were obtained during open bladder surgeries. NDO patients were clinically characterized preoperatively with pressure-flow urodynamics demonstrating detrusor overactivity, in the setting of a clinically relevant neurological condition. Control patients did not have overactive bladder and did not have a clinically relevant neurological disease. We conducted quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR, perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology on freshly-isolated DSM cells, and functional studies on DSM contractility. qPCR experiments revealed that DSM samples from NDO patients showed decreased BK channel mRNA expression in comparison to controls. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated reduced whole cell and transient BK currents (TBKCs in freshly-isolated DSM cells from NDO patients. Functional studies on DSM contractility showed that spontaneous phasic contractions had a decreased sensitivity to iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, in DSM strips isolated from NDO patients. These results reveal the novel finding that NDO is associated with decreased DSM BK channel expression and function leading to increased DSM excitability and contractility. BK channel openers or BK channel gene transfer could be an alternative strategy to control NDO. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate the value of BK channel opening drugs or gene therapies for NDO treatment and to identify any possible adverse effects.

  16. Combined treatment with a β3 -adrenergic receptor agonist and a muscarinic receptor antagonist inhibits detrusor overactivity induced by cold stress in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nagai, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshiro; Saito, Tetsuichi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Nakazawa, Masaki; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    This study determined if combined treatment with the muscarinic receptor (MR) antagonist solifenacin and the β 3 -adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist mirabegron could inhibit detrusor overactivity induced by cold stress in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Thirty-two female 10-week-old SHRs were fed an 8% NaCl-supplemented diet for 4 weeks. Cystometric measurements of the unanesthetized, unrestricted rats were performed at room temperature (RT, 27 ± 2°C) for 20 min. The rats were then intravenously administered vehicle, 0.1 mg/kg solifenacin alone, 0.1 mg/kg mirabegron alone, or the combination of 0.1 mg/kg mirabegron and 0.1 mg/kg solifenacin (n = 8 each group). Five minutes later, the treated rats were exposed to low temperature (LT, 4 ± 2°C) for 40 min. Finally, the rats were returned to RT. After the cystometric investigations, the β 3 -ARs and M 3 -MRs expressed within the urinary bladders were analyzed. Just after transfer from RT to LT, vehicle-, solifenacin-, and mirabegron-treated SHRs exhibited detrusor overactivity that significantly decreased voiding interval and bladder capacity. However, treatment with the combination of solifenacin and mirabegron partially inhibited the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity patterns. The decreases of voiding interval and bladder capacity in the combination-treated rats were significantly inhibited compared to other groups. Within the urinary bladders, there were no differences between expression levels of M 3 -MR and β 3 -AR mRNA. The tissue distribution of M 3 -MRs was similar to that of the β 3 -ARs. This study suggested that the combination of solifenacin and mirabegron act synergistically to inhibit the cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity in SHRs. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1026-1033, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The effect of intravesical oxybutynin on the ice water test and on electrical perception thresholds in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meel, Tom David; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2010-03-01

    The C-fiber-mediated bladder-cooling reflex and the determination of the current perception thresholds (CPTs) permit to investigate afferent LUT pathways. They have both been proposed to detect and differentiate neurologic bladder dysfunction. This study evaluates, prospectively, the effect of oxybutynin, an antimuscarinic with direct antispasmodic effect on smooth muscle, on repeated ice water test (IWT) and CPTs in patients with a known incomplete neurogenic bladder. Patients with a known incomplete lesion of the bladder innervation, detrusor overactivity during cystometric bladder filling and a continuous positive response to repeated IWT were included. After the initial tests, 30 mg intravesical oxybutynin (1 mg/ml) was instilled and left in the bladder for 15 min. Afterwards CPTs and IWT were re-assessed. After the drug application, the bladder-cooling reflex could not be initiated, even after three instillations, in 16/17 patients. The bladder CPT increased from 29.7 +/- 11.3 to 39.1 +/- 15.7 mA after oxybutynin (P = 0.001). No difference was found in CPT of the left forearm (P = 0.208). Intravesical oxybutynin blocks the bladder-cooling reflex and increases but does not block CPT sensation in the bladder in most patients with incomplete neurogenic lesion and detrusor overactivity. These results help explain the clinical effect of intravesical oxybutynin in neurogenic patients. They also indicate that a pharmacological local influence on C-fiber-related activity can give different clinical effects. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. The telocytes/myofibroblasts 3-D network forms a stretch receptor in the human bladder mucosa. Is this structure involved in the detrusor overactive diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Maria-Giuliana; Traini, Chiara

    2018-04-11

    Several connective tissue cells are present in the human bladder wall; among them, the myofibroblasts (MyF) and the so-called interstitial cells (IC) are a matter of investigation either by basic researchers or clinicians. The interest derives from the possibility that these two cell types could regulate the organ function forming a special sensory system in the bladder mucosa. Whereas attention for the myofibroblasts was mainly focused on understanding their role, the so-called IC are debatable starting from their nomenclature. Indeed, the IC should correspond to the previously called fibroblasts-like cells/interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLC)/interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) or PDGFRα positive cells, or CD34 positive cells. Recently a proper name was proposed to give them an identity, i.e. telocyte (TC). To date, this nomenclature is a better term than IC that is quite vague and can be used for all the cells that reside in the connective tissue. Noteworthy, in the bladder mucosa, TC and MyF form a hetero-cellular 3-D network. The detrusor overactivity/overactive bladder (DO/OAB) are pathological conditions characterized by hypersensitivity to filling. It has been hypothesized that erroneous afferent inputs generated in the mucosa affect the efferent pathways and, consequently, the detrusor response. Presently, we review the literature regarding the presence and the potential role of TC and MyF in control conditions and in DO/OAB. On the possibility that the 3D-network made up by these two cell types might play a major role in the genesis of anomalous afferent stimuli will be given attention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of PKC and CaV1.2 in detrusor overactivity in a model of obesity associated with insulin resistance in mice.

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    Luiz O Leiria

    Full Text Available Obesity/metabolic syndrome are common risk factors for overactive bladder. This study aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM in high-fat insulin resistant obese mice, focusing on the role of protein kinase C (PKC and Ca(v1.2 in causing bladder dysfunction. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high-fat diet for 10 weeks. In vitro functional responses and cystometry, as well as PKC and Ca(v1.2 expression in bladder were evaluated. Obese mice exhibited higher body weight, epididymal fat mass, fasting glucose and insulin resistance. Carbachol (0.001-100 µM, α,β-methylene ATP (1-10 µM, KCl (1-300 mM, extracellular Ca(2+ (0.01-100 mM and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu; 0.001-3 µM all produced greater DSM contractions in obese mice, which were fully reversed by the Ca(v1.2 blocker amlodipine. Cystometry evidenced augmented frequency, non-void contractions and post-void pressure in obese mice that were also prevented by amlodipine. Metformin treatment improved the insulin sensitivity, and normalized the in vitro bladder hypercontractility and cystometric dysfunction in obese mice. The PKC inhibitor GF109203X (1 µM also reduced the carbachol induced contractions. PKC protein expression was markedly higher in bladder tissues from obese mice, which was normalized by metformin treatment. The Ca(v1.2 channel protein expression was not modified in any experimental group. Our findings show that Ca(v1.2 blockade and improvement of insulin sensitization restores the enhanced PKC protein expression in bladder tissues and normalizes the overactive detrusor. It is likely that insulin resistance importantly contributes for the pathophysiology of this urological disorder in obese mice.

  20. Role of urodynamics in stress urinary incontinence: A critical appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yande, Shirish Dattatraya; Joglekar, Omkar Vinay; Joshi, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Role of urodynamics prior to surgery of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is under constant debate. Demonstration of the presence of detrusor overactivity is the only aspect that has been emphasized in the literature so far. We believe that there are number of other factors which may influence the evaluation and in turn the choice of surgical management and prediction of outcome of treatment. They are as follows: (1) Presence of voiding inefficiency, (2) asymptomatic detrusor overactivity, (3) and severity of SUI. These features may complicate the precise evaluation of patients of SUI. The main objective of this study is to analyze the dynamics of leakage and voiding using urodynamics. This study also aims at correlating these findings with clinical information. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive cases referred to our center for preoperative evaluation of SUI were recruited in the study prospectively. All patients were interrogated using International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. All patients underwent complete urodynamic evaluation including uroflowmetry, filling cystometry, leak point pressure measurement, and pressure flow studies, according to Good Urodynamic Practice guidelines. Patients’ symptoms were correlated with urodynamic findings, with special emphasis on the presence of detrusor overactivity, severity of SUI, voiding efficiency, and presence of bladder outlet obstruction. Clinical information and urodynamic findings were correlated using Chi-square test. Results: There is a statistically significant correlation between the presence of symptoms of urge urinary incontinence and urodynamic findings of detrusor overactivity at P incontinence (in addition to SUI) and urodynamic findings of intrinsic sphincter deficiency at P incontinence and incidental finding of detrusor overactivity at P urinary incontinence can predictably diagnose detrusor overactivity in these cases. However, the incidence of asymptomatic

  1. Role of urodynamics in stress urinary incontinence: A critical appraisal

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    Shirish Dattatraya Yande

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Urodynamic study in SUI has a potential of giving much more information than demonstration of Detrusor Overactivity alone. The predominant symptom of urge urinary incontinence can predictably diagnose detrusor overactivity in these cases. However, the incidence of asymptomatic detrusor overactivity remains as high as 15% and may have implication in postoperative results. This study clearly shows that there is a definite incidence of significant voiding dysfunction, which cannot be reliably evaluated without properly conducted pressure flow study. This factor may govern the choice of correct treatment which also predicts the outcome more reliably. Preoperative urodynamic study thus adds a dimension of precision to evaluation of the patients of SUI and may also influence technique and outcome measures in this group of patients.

  2. Impact of daily number of urgency urinary incontinence episodes on overactive bladder patient reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J C; Brenes, F J; Lizarraga, I; Rejas, J; Trillo, S; Ochayta, D; Arumi, D

    2016-04-01

    To explore the impact of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) on well-being in non-institutionalized patients with overactive bladder (OAB) in a community sample. A cross-sectional web-based study was conducted in the general population, including males and females, >18 years of age. Patients with probable OAB were identified using a validated algorithm together with a score ≥8 on the OAB-V8 scale. Presence of coping behavior was considered determinant for the clinical diagnosis of OAB. Individual well-being was determined through a battery of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) measurements including assessment of health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), sleep disturbances (MOS Sleep), and life satisfaction (LISAT-8). Patients were grouped according to the number of daily UUI episodes (UUI severity): 0 (dry OAB),1, 2-3, or ≥4. Multivariate analysis to evaluate factors independently affecting quality of life was undertaken. A total of 396 patients (52.5% women, mean age: 55.3 [11.1] years, OAB-V8 mean score: 14.5 [7.9]) out of 2035 subjects participating from the general population met the criteria for OAB: 203 (51.3%) with 0episodes, 119 (30.1%) with 1, 52 (13.1%) with 2 or 3, and 22 (5.6%) with ≥4 episodes. A statistically significant linear adjusted association was found between number of UUI episodes and PRO scores. Participants with more episodes had poorer health profiles and self-evaluated quality of life, worse life satisfaction, and more sleep disturbances and fewer hours of sleep per night. Number of incontinence episodes was independent factor to affect quality of life using both LISAT-8 and MOS questionnaires. Severity of UUI was significantly associated with poorer individual well-being in subjects with OAB in a community sample in Spain. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. OVERACTIVE BLADDER SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

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    E.L. Vishnevskiy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder is a specific syndrome characterized by bladder dysfunction that is clinically manifested by imperative urination (pollakiuria, urgency, urgent incontinence and nocturia. This state is very widely spread among children: every fifth child aged 4 to 7 shows typical bladder dysfunction. Quite often if urinary distresses are not studied well enough such children are falsely diagnosed with monosymptom enuresis, which, according to our information, actually happens in only 3,9% of cases. When examining children with urinary disorders it is reasonable to be geared to the protocol of European urologist association. According to this protocol, treatment should be started with antimuscarinimedications. The only antimuscarinic medication for treating children with hyperactive bladder that is legal in Russia is oxybutinin (Driptane, that is presently considered to be the «golden standard» of pharmaceutical treatment of overactive bladder for patients of any age. This statement is based on the modern idea of overactive bladder pathogenesis, that presupposes detrusorhypersensibility to acetylcholine. However, in some cases it might be reasonable to use some other medications, physiotherapy, sometimes as part of complex therapy. If individual dosage is observed, which will enable preventing or significantly lowering possible side effects, oxybutinin will be still considered «the golden standard» for treating overactive bladder for years to come in cases when detrusor hypersensibility to acetylcholine is the key component of bladder dysfunction pathogenesis.Key words: overactive bladder, oxybutinin, urination disorder, children.

  4. Reproducibility of urodynamic filling sensation at weekly interval in healthy volunteers and in women with detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meel, Tom David; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of bladder sensation during standardized filling cystometry in female volunteers and overactive bladder (OAB) patients, repeated with weekly interval. We recruited 13 female nulliparous volunteers (age 21-47) and 17 female patients with OAB between (age 18-72). They participated in three investigation periods, each separated by 7 days to assess reproducibility of sensation related to standardized cystometry. Subjects were asked to report all sensations they felt during bladder filling. The previously described pattern of sensation was reported during bladder filling in all. Consecutive sensations corresponded to statistically higher bladder volumes. Volumes, at which different sensations of bladder filling were reported, were significantly higher in controls than in OAB patients [first sensation of filling (FSF) P = 0.003, first desire to void (FDV) P sensation/volume ratios were significantly higher in patients with OAB than in the healthy volunteers: FSF occurred at mean 46% and FDV at mean 73% of SDV in OAB patients, compared to 36% and 64% in healthy volunteers. Sensations proved highly reproducible when determined with weekly interval. Our data demonstrate that cystometric filling sensation determined in a standardized way with weekly interval is highly reproducible in healthy and in OAB patients. This finding has, in our opinion, clinical importance as it shows that the technique is reliable both for a sensory evaluation of the LUT as to study influence of treatment aimed at changing this sensation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hiperatividade do detrusor: comparação entre oxibutinina, eletroestimulação funcional do assoalho pélvico e exercícios perineais. Estudo randomizado Detrusor overactivity: comparative study among oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation and pelvic floor training. A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martins Arruda

    2007-09-01

    management of women with detrusor overactivity. METHODS: a total of 64 women, 35 to 80 years old, were enrolled in this randomized prospective trial. Patients were randomized in three groups: Oxybutynin (n=22, ES (n=21 and PFT (n=21. There were no statistical differences between the three groups with regards to race (p=0.948, age (p=0.747, hormonal status (p=0.813, time of symptomatology (p=0.789, previous surgery for urinary incontinence (p=0.993, or body mass index (p=0.897. Patients were assessed before and after treatment by urodynamic test, a seven-day voiding diary, and subjective response. The duration of the treatment was twelve weeks. For statistical analyses, the Pearson chi2, analysis of variance (ANOVA and the paired t-test were used. RESULTS: there was a decrease in the urge-incontinence episodes and in the number of pads required in all groups (p0.05. Urgency was resolved in 14 (63.6%, 11 (52.4% and 12 (57.1% patients of the Oxybutynin, ES and PFT Groups, respectively, without differences among the groups (p=0.754. Subjectively, 17 (77.3%, 11 (52.4% and 16 (76.2% women who had accomplished oxybutynin, ES and PFT, respectively, were satisfied, without differences among the groups (p = 0.142. Urodynamic was normal in 8 (36.4%, 12 (57.1% and 11 (52.4% patients of the Oxybutynin, ES and PFT Groups, respectively. This urodynamic analysis revealed no differences between the three groups (p=0.358. The reduction of urge-incontinence correlated with patient satisfaction (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: treatments were equally effective; reduction of urge-incontinence was correlated with patient satisfaction.

  6. [Male urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, T.A. de; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2008-01-01

    *Urinary incontinence in males is gaining increasingly more attention. *Male urinary incontinence can be classified as storage incontinence due to overactive bladder syndrome or stress incontinence due to urethral sphincter dysfunction. *Most patients benefit from the currently available treatment

  7. The analysis of incontinence episodes and other count data in patients with overactive bladder by Poisson and negative binomial regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, R; Kay, R; van Maanen, R; Ridder, A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies in overactive bladder have traditionally used analysis of covariance or nonparametric methods to analyse the number of incontinence episodes and other count data. It is known that if the underlying distributional assumptions of a particular parametric method do not hold, an alternative parametric method may be more efficient than a nonparametric one, which makes no assumptions regarding the underlying distribution of the data. Therefore, there are advantages in using methods based on the Poisson distribution or extensions of that method, which incorporate specific features that provide a modelling framework for count data. One challenge with count data is overdispersion, but methods are available that can account for this through the introduction of random effect terms in the modelling, and it is this modelling framework that leads to the negative binomial distribution. These models can also provide clinicians with a clearer and more appropriate interpretation of treatment effects in terms of rate ratios. In this paper, the previously used parametric and non-parametric approaches are contrasted with those based on Poisson regression and various extensions in trials evaluating solifenacin and mirabegron in patients with overactive bladder. In these applications, negative binomial models are seen to fit the data well. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine and sertraline prevents forced swimming test-induced hypercontractility of rat detrusor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Sirri; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Bas, Duygu B; Aksoz, Elif; Savli, Evren; Ilkaya, Fatih; Kesim, Yuksel

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake inhibitors represent important targets for the development of new treatments for detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the forced swimming test (FST) on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle and to examine the effects of in vivo treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline on altered detrusor muscle contractility. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg ip) and sertraline (10 mg/kg ip) were administered once a day for 14 days. Rats were exposed to the FST on the 15th day. After the test, detrusor muscles were removed and placed in organ baths, and the contraction responses induced by carbachol, potassium chloride (KCl) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were recorded. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to carbachol and electrical field stimulation were found to be increased at all carbachol doses and frequencies, respectively. FST also increased the contractile responses to KCl, which is used to test the differences in postreceptor-mediated contractions. The hypercontractile responses of detrusor strips to carbachol, EFS and KCl were abolished by treatment with both fluoxetine and sertraline. These treatments also decreased the immobility duration in the FST consistent with an antidepressant-like effect in this test. The results of this study provide the first evidence that FST increases contractility of the rat detrusor muscle, and this hypercontractility was abolished by chronic treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline at antidepressant doses by decreasing the postreceptor-mediated events.

  9. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-02-29

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  10. Diagnostic agreement of the 3 Incontinence Questionnaire to video-urodynamics findings in women with urinary incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mohammad Ali; Laniado, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There are limited studies evaluating the 3 Incontinence Questionnaire (3IQ) against urodynamics based diagnosis as a reference standard. The 3IQ has been proposed to be useful to evaluate women at the level of primary care. The aim of this study was to determine correlation between 3IQ and video-urodynamics (VUDS) in diagnosing types of urinary incontinence. Material and methods Prospective data was collected on 200 consecutive female patients referred by primary care physicians for urinary incontinence. The mean age was 55 years (range 15–83 years). The patients were evaluated using the 3IQ and video-urodynamics. The 3IQ-based diagnosis of type of female urinary incontinence was compared to VUDS-based results. Sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios and positive predictive values were calculated. Results On 3IQ based self-evaluation, 28% of patients were classified as having stress urinary incontinence, 20% with urge incontinence and 40% with mixed incontinence. On video-urodynamics, urodynamic stress urinary incontinence (UDSUI) was detected in 56% of patients, detrusor overactivity (DO) in 15% and mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) in 19%. The 3IQ had a sensitivity and specificity respectively of 43% and 92% for UDSUI, 57% and 86% for DO and 58% and 64% for MUI. The corresponding positive likelihood ratios (CI, 95%) were 5.4 (CI 2.6 to 11.3) for stress urinary incontinence, 4.0 (CI 2.5 to 6.5) for DO and 1.62 (1.2 to 2.3) for MUI. The respective positive predictive values were 87% (CI 75% to 95%), 42% (CI 26% to 58%) and 28% (18% to 39%). Conclusions In our study population, stress urinary incontinence was reasonably well predicted by the 3IQ, but the questionnaire under-performed in the diagnoses of detrusor overactivity and mixed urinaryincontinence. PMID:29732212

  11. Pelvic floor electrostimulation in women with urinary incontinence and/or overactive bladder syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez-Roig, J; Souza, D L B; Espelt, A; Costa-Marín, M; Belda-Molina, A M

    2013-01-01

    Electrostimulation (ES) is one of the techniques employed in conservative treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) and/or overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Nevertheless, there is controversy in the scientific literature regarding its effectiveness as monotherapy. To evaluate the scientific evidence on ES of the pelvic floor in women with UI and with/without OAB. A systematic review of clinical trials was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane, PEDro, Elsevier (Doyma) and EnFisPo (1980-2011). Quality of study registries was evaluated and information was obtained from those that presented the inclusion criteria established in the review. The 27 clinical trials were included in the review: 13 randomized controlled trials, 11 randomized non-controlled trials and 3 non-randomized trials. Most of the clinical trials conclude that ES is effective in the treatment of UI and OAB in women. However, better methodological quality studies are needed to obtain a higher level of scientific evidence and to know the optimal current modality, type and parameters for each type of UI and OAB. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, overactive bladder and urinary incontinence in western Turkey: results of a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumrutbas, Ali E; Bozkurt, Ali I; Tas, Erdogan; Acar, Cenk I; Alkis, Okan; Coban, Kazim; Cetinel, Bulent; Aybek, Zafer

    2014-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary incontinence and overactive bladder in western Turkey. This cross-sectional, population-based survey was carried out between May and October 2012. A random sample of 2128 women and men aged ≥18 years was selected from the health registries. A questionnaire including sociodemographic data, comorbid conditions, lower urinary tract symptoms, overactive bladder and urinary incontinence symptoms, body mass index, vital signs, and dipstick urinalysis was developed. The questions were answered by the participants, and remaining data were provided by the site staff. International Continence Society definitions were used. A total of 1571 (74%) individuals agreed to participate, and analysis were carried out on 1555 people (636 men [40.9%] and 919 women [59.1%]) after 16 individuals with a nitrite-positive dipstick test were excluded. Lower urinary tract symptoms were reported by 71.0% of the study population. The prevalence of storage, voiding and post-micturition symptoms were 56.1% (44.2% men, 64.1% women), 39.3% (40.9% men, 37.8% women) and 30.7% (38.6% men, 28.7% women), respectively. The most prevalent storage symptom was urgency, which was reported by 29.3% of the study population (20.1% men, 35.6% women). The prevalence of urge, stress and mixed urinary incontinence were: 6.5% (3.9% men, 8.2% women), 14.1% (3.9% men, 21.2% women) and 5.6% (0.8% men, 9.0% women), respectively. The present study is the first and largest population-based survey evaluating the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary incontinence and overactive bladder in Turkey. Our findings show these symptoms are highly prevalent in western Turkey. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Overactive bladder, differential diagnosis, and clinical utility of fesoterodine

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    Wyndaele J-J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Jacques WyndaeleDepartment of Urology, Antwerp University, Antwerp, BelgiumAbstract: Overactive bladder is a symptom syndrome with urgency, frequency and, in many cases, nocturia. Urge incontinence is not present in all. There is no direct correlation with detrusor overactivity, an objective finding during urodynamic testing where involuntary contractions can be noticed. In the pathophysiology, much more attention has been given to the afferent/sensory arm of the micturition reflex in the last decade. Anatomical and infectious causes have to be diagnosed or ruled out. Diagnosis of overactive bladder is made mostly by history-taking, but other tests can be necessary in specific patients. Treatment consists of behavioral measures, a good explanation of the condition, training, and pelvic floor physiotherapy. Drugs are often used. Until recently, antimuscarinic drugs have been the mainstay of pharmacological therapy. Fesoterodine is a newer antimuscarinic agent which is more pharmacodynamically stable then tolterodine. Fesoterodine has been extensively researched using different dosages and compared with placebo and tolterodine, in different age groups, and under different conditions. Fesoterodine is superior to placebo and to tolterodine in the short term and long term. Its safety is very acceptable.Keywords: overactive bladder, fesoterodine, incontinence, urgency, lower urinary tract

  14. Medical management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  15. Pain during ice water test distinguishes clinical bladder hypersensitivity from overactivity disorders

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    Bountra Chas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bladder cooling reflex (BCR i.e. uninhibited detrusor contractions evoked by intravesical instillation of cold saline, is a segmental reflex believed to be triggered by menthol sensitive cold receptors in the bladder wall, with the afferent signals transmitted by C fibres. The BCR is a neonatal reflex that becomes suppressed by descending signals from higher centres at approximately the time when the child gains full voluntary control of voiding. It re-emerges in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity as a consequence of loss of central descending inhibition, resulting from conditions such as spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. We have recently shown an increase of nerve fibres expressing the cool and menthol receptor TRPM8 in both overactive (IDO and painful bladder syndrome (PBS, but its functional significance is unknown. We have therefore studied the bladder cooling reflex and associated sensory symptoms in patients with PBS and overactivity disorders. Methods The BCR, elicited by ice water test (IWT was performed in patients with painful bladder syndrome (PBS, n = 17, idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO, n = 22, neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, n = 4 and stress urinary incontinence (as controls, n = 21. The IWT was performed by intravesical instillation of cold saline (0 – 4°C. A positive IWT was defined as presence of uninhibited detrusor contraction evoked by cold saline, associated with urgency or with fluid expulsion. Patients were asked to report and rate any pain and cold sensation during the test. Results A positive IWT was observed in IDO (6/22, 27.3% and NDO (4/4, 100% patients, but was negative in all control and PBS patients. Thirteen (76.5% PBS patients reported pain during the IWT, with significantly higher pain scores during ice water instillation compared to the baseline (P = 0.0002, or equivalent amount of bladder filling (100 mls with saline at room temperature (P = 0.015. None

  16. Urinary leakage during sexual intercourse among women with incontinence: Incidence and risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hsuan Lau

    Full Text Available Coital incontinence is an under-reported disorder among women with urinary incontinence. Women seldom voluntarily report this condition, and as such, related data remains limited and is at times conflicting.To investigate the incidence and quality of life in women with coital incontinence and to determine associated predictors.This observational study involved 505 sexually active women attending the urogynecologic clinic for symptomatic urinary incontinence at a tertiary medical center. All of the patients were consulted about the experience of coital incontinence and completed evaluations including urodynamics, and valid questionnaires including the short form of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire, the Urogenital Distress Inventory and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire.Of these women, 281 (56% had coital incontinence, while 224 (44% did not. Among women with coital incontinence, 181 (64% had urodynamic-proven stress incontinence, 29 (10% had mixed incontinence, and 15 (5% had detrusor overactivity. Only 25 (9% sought consultation for this disorder before direct questioning. Fifty percent (84/281 of the women rarely or sometimes had incontinence during coitus, while 33% (92/281 often had incontinence, and 17% (48/281 always had incontinence. The frequency of coital incontinence was not different regarding the types of incontinence (p = 0.153. Women with mixed incontinence had the worst sexual quality of life and incontinence-related symptom distress. Based on univariate analysis, higher body mass index (OR 2.47, p = 0.027, and lower maximal urethral closure pressure (≤ 30 cmH2O (OR 4.56, p = 0.007 were possible predictors for coital incontinence. Multivariate analysis showed lower MUCP was independently significant predictors (OR3.93, p = 0.042.The prevalence of coital intercourse in urinary incontinence women was high. Coital incontinence in these women was associated with abnormal urodynamic diagnosis and

  17. Impact of urinary incontinence on healthcare resource utilization, health-related quality of life and productivity in patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Derek H; Colayco, Danielle C; Khalaf, Kristin M; Piercy, James; Patel, Vaishali; Globe, Denise; Ginsberg, David

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on healthcare resource utilization (HRU), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and productivity measures in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). This retrospective, cross-sectional study used data from the Adelphi OAB/UI Disease Specific Programme, a multinational survey of patient- and physician-reported data, fielded between November 2010 and February 2011. The primary patient groups of interest were those with OAB, both with and without UI. Health-related quality of life and productivity measures were derived from the EuroQoL-5D, the Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire, the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire. Measures of HRU included OAB-related surgeries, OAB-related hospitalizations, incontinence pads, anticholinergic use and physician visits. Multivariate linear regression models and literature-based minimal clinically important differences were used to assess statistically significant and clinically meaningful differences in HRQoL and productivity measures between patients with OAB with UI and those without UI. A total of 1 730 patients were identified, with a mean age of 60.7 years, and 77.0% of them were women, 84.2% were non-Hispanic whites, and 71% were incontinent. Bivariate analyses showed that HRU was significantly higher among patients with OAB with UI than among those without UI in all categories except for the number of OAB-related physician visits. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, incontinent patients presented with clinically and statistically significantly lower HRQoL and productivity measures with respect to all study endpoints, except for percentage of work time missed due to their OAB/UI. Urinary incontinence was associated with significantly higher HRU and lower HRQoL and productivity in this population of patients with OAB from five different countries. In addition to clinical considerations, the

  18. Recent research on the role of urodynamic study in the diagnosis and treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2017-01-01

    Although evidence shows that urodynamic study may not improve outcomes, it can be used to evaluate men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) which have not been adequately delineated and treated. In young men with LUTS not responding to treatment based on clinical examination, or elderly men with LUTS and incontinence, a complete urodynamic evaluation is mandatory to understand the pathophysiology underlying LUTS, such as bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), detrusor overactivity, and detrusor underactivity. Preoperative urodynamic study-proven BOO is a predictor of a successful surgical outcome. An urodynamic study should be performed when patients with LUTS are planning to undergo surgical treatment for benign prostatic obstruction.

  19. Epidemiology and impact of urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, and other lower urinary tract symptoms: results of the EPIC survey in Russia, Czech Republic, and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Mikhail Iosifovich; Zachoval, Roman; Ozyurt, Ceyhun; Schäfer, Thomas; Christensen, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI), overactive bladder (OAB), and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in the Czech Republic, Russia, and Turkey. Stage one of this population-based survey consisted of computer-assisted telephone interviews to obtain prevalence estimates of storage, voiding, and post-micturition LUTS. Stage two face-to-face interviews evaluated subjects with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), stress urinary incontinence (SUI) or OAB (case group) and a control group (subjects with other incontinence or LUTS complaints, or no symptoms). Prevalence of LUTS categories were determined for each country based on International Continence Society (ICS) criteria. A total of 3130 individuals agreed to participate in the survey, which found high rates of LUTS (men 80%; women 84%) and OAB (men 18%; women 28%). Duration of urinary symptoms was relatively brief (approximately 60% ≤ 3 years) and was associated with relatively modest effects on quality of life and work performance in the majority of individuals. Forty percent had consulted with a healthcare provider about their urinary symptoms, of whom 37% had consulted with a physician and 34% with an urologist, and 12% had been treated with a prescription medication. Drug therapy, while uncommon, was associated with a high degree of self-reported improvement (96%). Because of between-country population differences, aggregate results may not always be representative of results for each of the three countries individually. Study limitations include reliance on patient self-report, and potential bias introduced by patients who declined to participate in the survey. The results of this epidemiologic survey found high rates of LUTS and OAB, but low levels of medical consultation and very low use of medication treatment, despite high levels of improvement when medications were used.

  20. Effect of extracorporeal magnetic energy stimulation on bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life in female patients with stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tsia-Shu; Tseng, Ling-Hong; Lin, Yi-Hao; Liang, Ching-Chung; Lu, Ching-Yi; Pue, Leng Boi

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of extracorporeal magnetic stimulation (EMS) for the treatment of bothersome and severe symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) in female patients. A retrospective review was conducted on patients with SUI and OAB who were referred to EMS therapy. Successful treatment for the bothersome symptoms of OAB and SUI was defined as score ≤1 for questions 2 and 3 on the Urodynamic Distress Inventory-6. The objective cure of SUI and OAB was defined as no urinary leakage during the cough stress test and any urgency, urge incontinence and voiding frequency of less than eight times per 24 h based on the 3-day bladder diary, after the 9 weeks of treatment, respectively. Ninety-three patients with SUI or OAB underwent a 9-week course of EMS at 20 min twice weekly. Seventy-two (77%) patients completed EMS treatment. Geographical factor and poor economic status were two main factors for dropout. A total of 94.1% (32 of 34) and 86.8% (33 of 38) of subjects had successful treatment for the bothersome symptoms of OAB and SUI, respectively. In contrast, the cure rate for OAB and SUI was only 61.7% and 42.1%, respectively. There was also a significant improvement in both Urogenital Distress Inventory Short Form (bothersome on lower urinary tract symptoms) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire Short Form (quality of life) total score in both groups after EMS. EMS is a safe and effective alternative method for treating SUI and OAB. Further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term efficacy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Evaluation of flurbiprofen in detrusor instability.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardozo, L D; Stanton, S L; Robinson, H; Hole, D

    1980-01-01

    Thirty women with detrusor instability (27 cases idiopathic, and three secondary to multiple sclerosis) completed a double-blind, cross-over trial of the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor flurbiprofen and a placebo, results being evaluated by questionnaire and cystometry. Frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence were all significantly reduced with flurbiprofen (P less than 0.001, P less than 0.025, and P less than 0.025 respectively), as was the detrusor-pressure rise during bladder filling...

  2. OnabotulinumtoxinA 100U provides significant improvements in overactive bladder symptoms in patients with urinary incontinence regardless of the number of anticholinergic therapies used or reason for inadequate management of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, K-D; Chapple, C; Herschorn, S; Joshi, M; Zhou, J; Nardo, C; Nitti, V W

    2014-10-01

    A prespecified pooled analysis of two placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials evaluated whether the number of prior anticholinergics used or reason for their discontinuation affected the treatment response to onabotulinumtoxinA 100U in overactive bladder (OAB) patients with urinary incontinence (UI). Patients with symptoms of OAB received intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA 100U or placebo, sparing the trigone. Change from baseline at week 12 in UI episodes/day, proportion of patients reporting a positive response ('greatly improved' or 'improved') on the treatment benefit scale (TBS), micturition and urgency were evaluated by number of prior anticholinergics (1, 2 or ≥ 3) and reason for their discontinuation (insufficient efficacy or side effects). Adverse events (AE) were assessed. Patients had taken an average of 2.4 anticholinergics before study enrolment. OnabotulinumtoxinA reduced UI episodes/day from baseline vs. placebo, regardless of the number of prior anticholinergics (-2.82 vs. -1.52 for one prior anticholinergic; -2.58 vs. -0.58 for two prior anticholinergics; and -2.92 vs. -0.73 for three or more prior anticholinergics; all p reason for discontinuation. OnabotulinumtoxinA reduced the episodes of urgency and frequency of micturition vs. placebo in all groups. AEs were well tolerated, with a comparable incidence in all groups. In patients with symptoms of OAB who were inadequately managed by one or more anticholinergics, onabotulinumtoxinA 100U provided significant and similar treatment benefit and safety profile regardless of the number of prior anticholinergics used or reason for inadequate management of OAB. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00910845, NCT00910520. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Renal deterioration after spinal cord injury is associated with length of detrusor contractions during cystometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmelund, Marlene; Klarskov, Niels; Bagi, Per

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate which urodynamic parameters are associated with renal deterioration over a median of 41 years follow-up after traumatic spinal cord injury. METHODS: Medical records of patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury sustained 1944-1975 were reviewed from time of injury until 2012....... Patients who attended regular renography and/or renal clearance examinations and had minimum one cystometry and pressure-flow study were included. Renal deterioration was diagnosed as split renal function ≤30% in one kidney or relative glomerular filtration rate ≤51% of expected according to age and gender....... Detrusor function, presence of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, maximum detrusor pressure, post-void residual volume, and cystometric bladder capacity were obtained. In patients with detrusor overactivity, a detrusor overactivity/cystometry ratio was calculated using duration of detrusor contraction...

  4. Detrusor Arreflexia as an End Stage of Neurogenic Bladder in HAM/TSP?

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    Matheus Tannus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The HTLV-1 virus is a known agent involved in the development of HAM/TSP. Past studies have typically observed patients with autonomic dysfunction consisting of detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia, with the occasional observation of underactive detrusor or detrusor arreflexia. However, studies have not yet evaluated the progression of neurogenic bladder over time. In this paper, we describe a HAM/TSP patient with the initial development of overactive detrusor, and subsequent development of detrusor arreflexia. Given a paucity of studies characterizing the effects of HTLV-1 on the autonomic nervous system, particularly aspects controlling continence, this patient's clinical course may represent one type of end point for patients with HAM/TSP and neurogenic bladder. Further cohort or case-series studies, with particular emphasis on the progression of neurogenic bladder, are needed to evaluate the significance of this described case in relation to typical disease progression patterns.

  5. Effectiveness of Retropubic Tension-Free Vaginal Tape and Transobturator Inside-Out Tape Procedures in Women With Overactive Bladder and Stress Urinary Incontinence

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    Ji-Yeon Han

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose We compared the effectiveness of the retropubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT and the transobturator inside-out tape (TVT-O in treating symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Methods Women with urodynamic SUI and OAB (mean urgency episodes ≥1 and frequency ≥8/24 hours on a 3-day voiding diary were assigned to the TVT or TVT-O group. Preoperative measures were based on a urodynamic study, 3-day voiding diary, the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms questionnaire (BFLUTSSF, and the urgency perception scale (UPS. At 12 postoperative months, the 3-day voiding diary, symptoms questionnaire, patient satisfaction, and standing stress test were assessed. The primary endpoint was change in the number of urgency episodes/24 hours from baseline to 12 months. Results In this group of 132 women, 42 received TVT and 90 received TVT-O. The mean urgency episodes/24 hours decreased from 6.3±5.5 to 1.6±3.2 in the TVT group and from 5.1±4.4 to 1.8±3.0 in the TVT-O group. The mean percent change was significantly greater after TVT than after TVT-O (73% vs. 60%, P=0.049. All subscales of BFLUTSSF and UPS were significantly improved using either method, with significantly greater improvement seen in the quality of life (QoL domain after TVT (P=0.002. There were no significant differences in the cure and satisfaction rates between the two groups. Conclusions Intervention with the TVT or the TVT-O significantly improved symptoms of OAB in women with SUI and OAB. Urgency and QoL significantly improved after TVT compared with that after TVT-O.

  6. Effectiveness of Retropubic Tension-Free Vaginal Tape and Transobturator Inside-Out Tape Procedures in Women With Overactive Bladder and Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Yeon; Choo, Myung-Soo; Lee, Young-Suk; Seo, Ju Tae; Kim, Jang Hwan; Kim, Young Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We compared the effectiveness of the retropubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) and the transobturator inside-out tape (TVT-O) in treating symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Women with urodynamic SUI and OAB (mean urgency episodes ≥1 and frequency ≥8/24 hours on a 3-day voiding diary) were assigned to the TVT or TVT-O group. Preoperative measures were based on a urodynamic study, 3-day voiding diary, the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms questionnaire (BFLUTSSF), and the urgency perception scale (UPS). At 12 postoperative months, the 3-day voiding diary, symptoms questionnaire, patient satisfaction, and standing stress test were assessed. The primary endpoint was change in the number of urgency episodes/24 hours from baseline to 12 months. Results In this group of 132 women, 42 received TVT and 90 received TVT-O. The mean urgency episodes/24 hours decreased from 6.3±5.5 to 1.6±3.2 in the TVT group and from 5.1±4.4 to 1.8±3.0 in the TVT-O group. The mean percent change was significantly greater after TVT than after TVT-O (73% vs. 60%, P=0.049). All subscales of BFLUTSSF and UPS were significantly improved using either method, with significantly greater improvement seen in the quality of life (QoL) domain after TVT (P=0.002). There were no significant differences in the cure and satisfaction rates between the two groups. Conclusions Intervention with the TVT or the TVT-O significantly improved symptoms of OAB in women with SUI and OAB. Urgency and QoL significantly improved after TVT compared with that after TVT-O. PMID:24143294

  7. The relationships between preoperative urodynamic parameters and clinical outcomes in urinary stress incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Bozkurt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to evaluate the influence of urodynamic parameters on preoperative and postoperative clinical pictures in stress incontinence.Charts of patients, who were operated for stress incontinence using autologous rectus fascia sling between March 1999 and January 2005 in Tepecik Training and Research Hospital Urology Clinic, were evaluated retrospectively.A total of 41 patients were divided into two subgroups as, pure (10 patients and mixed stress incontinence (31 patients groups. Mean age of patients was 50.4 (33-70 years. Fifteen patients had intrinsic sphincter insufficiency (ISI. Mixed incontinence group had lower volume for first sensation and more detrusor overactivity than pure group. ISI did not alter the success of operation. Urodynamically no relationship was found between detrusor pressure and postoperative postvoiding residual urine (P>0.05.In conclusion, urodynamic evaluation before surgery was not related to preoperative and postoperative clinical picture of patients, but first sensation of bladder is only predictive for the success in fascial sling surgery.

  8. Urinary Incontinence Surgery: When Other Treatments Aren't Enough

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development of overactive bladder, which could include urge incontinence Urinary tract infection Difficult or painful intercourse Talk with ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/urinary-incontinence/in-depth/urinary-incontinence-surgery/ART-20046858 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal ...

  9. Anticholinergic versus botulinum toxin A comparison trial for the treatment of bothersome urge urinary incontinence: ABC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Anthony G; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela; Menefee, Shawn A; Schaffer, Joseph; Wei, John; Chai, Toby; Janz, Nancy; Spino, Cathie; Meikle, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This trial compares the change in urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, tolerability and cost effectiveness between women receiving daily anticholinergic therapy plus a single intra-detrusor injection of saline versus a single intra-detrusor injection of 100 U of botulinum toxin A plus daily oral placebo tablets. We present the rationale and design of a randomized-controlled trial, Anticholinergic versus Botulinum Toxin, Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC trial, conducted by the NICHD-funded Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. We discuss the innovative nature of this trial and the challenges related to choice of patient population, maintaining masking, cost effectiveness, ethical considerations, measuring adherence, and placebo development and testing. Enrollment began in April, 2010. 242 participants will be randomized and primary outcome data analysis is anticipated to begin in mid 2012. Several challenges in the trial design are discussed. Randomization to placebo intra-detrusor injections may limit recruitment, potentially impacting generalizability. Other challenges included the heavy marketing of drugs for overactive bladder which could impact recruitment of drug-naïve women. In addition, anticholinergic medications often cause dry mouth, making masking difficult. Finally, adverse reporting of transient urinary retention is challenging as there is no standardized definition; yet this is the most common adverse event following intra-detrusor botulinum toxin injection. The ABC trial will help women with urgency urinary incontinence balance efficacy, side effects and cost of anticholinergic medication versus botulinum toxin intra-detrusor injection. The results have the potential to fundamentally change the therapeutic approach to this condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional outcomes of polypropylene midurethral sling resection for treatment of mesh exposure/extrusion: Does it lead to a relapse of incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töz, Emrah; Sahin, Cağdaş; Apaydin, Nesin; Ozcan, Aykut; Taner, Cüneyt E

    2015-07-01

    The Burch colposuspension, which was regarded as the gold standard treatment for stress urinary incontinence for several years, has been replaced by minimally invasive sling devices. Although these procedures are simple and minimally invasive, they are associated with complications such as infection, mesh erosion, chronic pain, and de novo detrusor overactivity, which may necessitate surgical resection or tape removal. The aim of the study was to assess urinary function outcomes including continence, after partial resection of suburethral tapes. Patients were admitted for resection of tape due to extrusion/exposure, between 2011 and 2014. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, transvaginal ultrasound, cough stress test, 24-hour bladder diary, Incontinence Impact Questionnairre-7 form and Urogenital Distress Inventory-6 form. Minimum follow-up time was 2 months after treatment of the tape complication (mean 20, range 2 to 38). Recurrence of incontinence after partial tape resection was observed in 9% (3/32) cases. In two patients due to stress urinary incontinence recurrence repeat anti-incontinence surgery was necessary. Although one patient had suffered from incontinence after resection of tape, she did not desire operation. The results of this study indicated that preservation of the anti-incontinence effects of slings might not be dependent on the intactness of the sling. Recurrence of incontinence after partial tape resection is uncommon and in the majority of cases this stress incontinence is minimally and does not require repeat operation.

  11. Tibial nerve stimulation for overactive bladder syndrome unresponsive to medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridout, A E; Yoong, W

    2010-02-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is defined as a symptom syndrome which includes urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency (>8 micturitions/24 h) and nocturia. Conservative treatment usually comprises behavioural techniques, bladder retraining, pelvic floor re-education and pharmacotherapy but up to 30% of patients will remain refractory to treatment. Although second-line treatment options such as sacral nerve stimulation and intravesical botulinum A injections are valuable additions to the therapeutic arsenal, they are relatively invasive and can have serious side-effects. Inhibition of detrusor activity by peripheral neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve was first described in 1983, with recent authors further confirming a 60-80% positive response rate. This review was undertaken to examine published literature on percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation and to discuss outcome measures, maintenance therapy and prognostic factors of this technique.

  12. Clarifying the Role of Urodynamics in the Preoperative Evaluation of Stress Urinary Incontinence

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    Sophie G. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has not yet been definitively demonstrated that preoperative evaluation of women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI with urodynamic testing (UDS enhances surgical outcomes. Nonetheless, UDS is frequently utilized in the assessment of women with SUI in the hopes that results will shed light on preoperative risk factors for failure or postoperative voiding dysfunction. Poorer outcomes for stress incontinence surgery are primarily attributed to intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD, detrusor overactivity (DO, and voiding dysfunction. The ability of UDS to identify and characterize those parameters reliably remains under investigation. Furthermore, debate continues regarding the association of each of those factors with postoperative success for various SUI procedures. Since UDS is invasive, costly, and not always available, it is imperative that its benefit be carefully explored. In this review, we discuss the value of UDS in identifying risk factors for poor outcome and how those risk factors are associated with surgical failure.

  13. Radiologic signs of detrusor instability in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo Teran, D.G.; Podesta, M.; Mendel, R.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To revalue radiologic signs of detrusor instability in children. Material and Methods: Retrospective analysis of videourodynamic studies performed in 85 children consulting for urinary incontinence and/or infection. Patients were free from neuropathic diseases, alterations of the urinary tract, previous surgery or anticholinergic treatment. Images of the bladder coinciding to the peaks of unstable detrusor contractions in patients with unstable bladders, and those at the end of filling in stable bladders were analyzed. Results: Bladder outlets were open in 38 patients and close in 47. Detrusor instability was found in 97 % of those with an open bladder outlet and in 36 % when close. Bladder outlets were open in all cases with contractions stronger than 60 cm.water. All 'spinning-top' urethras were associated to contractions stronger than 70 cm.water. Most false negatives (close bladder outlet in unstable bladders) corresponded to contractions lower than 30 cm.water. Different shapes of the bladder were found irrespective of detrusor instability. Conclusions: 1) An open bladder outlet observed during bladder filling is a reliable sign of significant detrusor instability in children without neuropathy; 2) It is highly specific of instability; 3) Most false negatives coincide with low amplitude contractions; 4) 'Spinning-top' images indicate strong contractions. (author)

  14. Newer agents for the management of overactive bladder | Epstein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Newer agents for the management of overactive bladder. ... that these newer agents decrease the frequency of incontinence episodes, the number ... for selection of an appropriate agent based on individual factors such as cost and tolerability.

  15. Development of oxybutynin chloride topical gel for overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucente VR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vincent R Lucente1, David R Staskin2, Elise De31Institute of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Allentown, PA, USA; 2Division of Urology, St Elizabeth’s Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Urological Institute of Northeastern New York, Albany, NY, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is an age-related syndrome often associated with urinary incontinence. Symptoms of OAB, such as urgency, frequency, and nocturia, can be treated effectively with inhibitors of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Antimuscarinic agents promote relaxation of the detrusor muscle and may modulate afferent neuronal signals involved in the regulation of the micturition reflex. Despite the availability of an increasing number of oral antimuscarinic agents, treatment persistence among patients with OAB generally appears to be low. This may be attributed, at least in part, to the common occurrence of anticholinergic adverse effects, such as dry mouth, constipation, and dizziness. Oxybutynin is a well-established antimuscarinic agent that is available in a variety of formulations. Transdermal formulations have been developed to avoid the first-pass hepatic and gastrointestinal drug metabolism responsible for the anticholinergic adverse effects often observed with oral delivery of oxybutynin. Oxybutynin chloride topical gel (OTG is a formulation of oxybutynin that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in January 2009. OTG was the result of a systematic evidence-based effort to develop a formulation that preserves the efficacy of oral oxybutynin formulations while eliminating most of their anticholinergic adverse effects. Additional emphasis was put on creating a transdermal formulation with minimal potential for application-site skin reactions. The formulation and pharmacokinetic properties of OTG are reviewed in the context of recently published efficacy and tolerability data from a large multicenter, placebo

  16. Female ejaculation orgasm vs. coital incontinence: a systematic review.

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    Pastor, Zlatko

    2013-07-01

    Women may expel various kinds of fluids during sexual arousal and at orgasm. Their origins, quantity, compositions, and expulsion mechanisms depend on anatomical and pathophysiological dispositions and the degree of sexual arousal. These are natural sexual responses but may also represent symptoms of urinary incontinence. The study aims to clarify the etiology of fluid leakage at orgasm, distinguish between associated physiological sexual responses, and differentiate these phenomena from symptoms of illness. A systematic literature review was performed. EMBASE (OvidSP) and Web of Science databases were searched for the articles on various phenomena of fluid expulsions in women during sexual arousal and at orgasm. Articles included focused on female ejaculation and its variations, coital incontinence (CI), and vaginal lubrication. Female ejaculation orgasm manifests as either a female ejaculation (FE) of a smaller quantity of whitish secretions from the female prostate or a squirting of a larger amount of diluted and changed urine. Both phenomena may occur simultaneously. The prevalence of FE is 10-54%. CI is divided into penetration and orgasmic forms. The prevalence of CI is 0.2-66%. Penetration incontinence occurs more frequently and is usually caused by stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Urodynamic diagnoses of detrusor overactivity (DOA) and SUI are observed in orgasmic incontinence. Fluid expulsions are not typically a part of female orgasm. FE and squirting are two different physiological components of female sexuality. FE was objectively evidenced only in tens of cases but its reported high prevalence is based mostly on subjective questionnaire research. Pathophysiology of squirting is rarely documented. CI is a pathological sign caused by urethral disorder, DOA, or a combination of both, and requires treatment. An in-depth appreciation of these similar but pathophysiologically distinct phenomena is essential for distinguishing normal, physiological sexual

  17. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center

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    Adrienne Lebl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Results: Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%, urgency incontinence (56.0%, urinary retention (8.0%, nocturnal enuresis (70.0%, urinary tract infections (62.0%, constipation (62.0%, and fecal incontinence (16.0% were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. Conclusions: This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment.

  18. Urinary incontinence and voiding dysfunction after radical retropubic prostatectomy (prospective urodynamic study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoros, Attila; Bach, Dietmar; Keszthelyi, Attila; Hamvas, Antal; Romics, Imre

    2006-01-01

    During this prospective study we analyzed the effects of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) on bladder and sphincter function by comparing preoperative and postoperative urodynamic data. The aim of the study was to determine the reason for urinary incontinence after RRP and explain why one group of patients will be immediately continent after catheter removal, while others need some time to reach complete continence. Urodynamic examination was performed in 63 patients 3-7 days before and 2 months after surgery. Forty-three (68.2%) and 53 (84.1%) patients regained continence at 2 and 9 months following RRP, respectively. Ten patients (15.9%) were immediately continent after catheter removal. Urodynamic stress incontinence was detected in 18 (28.6%), and detrusor overactivity incontinence in 2 (3.2%) patients 2 months after surgery. The amplitude of preoperative maximal voluntary sphincteric contractions was significantly higher in the postoperative continent group (125 vs. 96.5 cmH(2)O, P continent following catheter removal had no lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urodynamic abnormality preoperatively, and they had significantly higher preoperative and postoperative maximum urethral closure pressure (at rest and during voluntary sphincter contraction) than those who became continent later on. These data suggest that the main cause of incontinence after RRP is sphincteric weakness. In the continent group, those who became immediately continent had significantly higher maximum urethral closure pressure values at rest and at voluntary sphincteric contraction even before the surgery. Neurourol. Urodynam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Detrusor after-contraction: a new insight

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    Françoise A. Valentini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAims:Detrusor after-contractions (DAC are non-common in adults. Both definition (nothing in ICS reports and significance (artefact, link with detrusor overactivity (DO or bladder outlet obstruction (BOO remain discussed. Our purpose was to carry out an analysis of the urodynamic parameters during voidings with DAC and, using the VBN model, to simulate pathophysiological conditions able to explain both voiding phase and DAC.Materials and Methods:From large urodynamic database of patients referred for evaluation of lower urinary tract dysfunction, DAC were observed in 60 patients (5.7%. Criteria for DAC were post-void residual 10cmH2O. VBN model was used for analysis of both pressure and flow curves, and simulations of pathophysiological conditions.Results:Onset of DAC (ODAC occurred when Q=7.3±5.7mL/s and bladder volume=17.9±15.4mL. Urgency-frequency syndrome and urodynamic diagnosis of DO were the more frequent scenarios associated with DAC. ODAC was associated to an inversion of the slope of detrusor pressure curve without any perturbation in flow curve. Among tested pathophysiological hypothesis (great, abnormal, detrusor force, sphincter contraction, none allowed restoring all recorded curves (flow rate, voiding pressure and DAC.Conclusion:No urodynamic characteristic of the first part of voiding is an index of occurrence of DAC. ODAC is a significant phenomenon linked with the bladder collapse. DAC is not associated with BOO but more probably with DO and appears as the result of local conditions in an almost empty bladder (concentration of stresses around a transducer; thus DAC seems of weak clinical significance.

  20. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral function among men with lower urinary tract symptoms after radical prostatectomy: A comparison between men with and without urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hansol; Kim, Ki Bom; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Myong; Cho, Sung Yong; Oh, Seung-June; Jeong, Seong Jin

    2015-12-01

    We compared bladder and urethral functions following radical prostatectomy (RP) between men with and without urinary incontinence (UI), using a large-scale database from SNU-experts-of-urodynamics-leading (SEOUL) Study Group. Since July 2004, we have prospectively collected data on urodynamics from 303 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) following RP at three affiliated hospitals of SEOUL Study Group. After excluding 35 patients with neurogenic abnormality, pelvic irradiation after surgery, or a history of surgery on the lower urinary tract, 268 men were evaluated. We compared the urodynamic findings between men who had LUTS with UI (postprostatectomy incontinence [PPI] group) and those who had LUTS without UI (non-PPI group). The mean age at an urodynamic study was 68.2 years. Overall, a reduced bladder compliance (≤20 mL/cmH2O) was shown in 27.2% of patients; and 31.3% patients had idiopathic detrusor overactivity. The patients in the PPI group were older (p=0.001) at an urodynamic study and had a lower maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) (p<0.001), as compared with those in the non-PPI group. Bladder capacity and detrusor pressure during voiding were also significantly lower in the PPI group. In the logistic regression, only MUCP and maximum cystometric capacity were identified as the related factor with the presence of PPI. In our study, significant number of patients with LUTS following RP showed a reduced bladder compliance and detrusor overactivity. PPI is associated with both impairment of the urethral closuring mechanism and bladder storage dysfunction.

  1. OnabotulinumtoxinA in overactive bladder: Evidence-based consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cidre, M A; Arlandis-Guzmán, S

    2016-04-01

    To offer a set of useful recommendations for urologists who are starting to provide treatment of overactive bladders with onabotulinumtoxinA. A literature search to December 2013 was conducted, as well as a subsequent critical reading of the selected publications. The coordinators prepared a document that was submitted for review by the members of the Spanish Group for the use of Botulinum Toxin in Urology. The expert group considered that onabotulinumtoxinA may be used for overactive bladder syndrome with urinary urge incontinence secondary to neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity for patients for whom conservative treatment and first-line medical treatment has failed, is not tolerated or is contraindicated. Treatment in most cases was performed with local intravesical anesthesia, although it can also be performed under epidural or general anesthesia. Patients must be informed of the possibility of requiring self-catheterization or temporary catheterization. Clinicians should ensure that the patients are capable of performing this catheterization before the treatment is conducted. Patients must also be informed of the need for antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections. At least 2 follow-up visits are recommended: the first at days 7-14 after the injection and the second at 2-3 months. Reinjection is indicated when the effect of the treatment decreases. These guidelines can help clinicians in their daily decisions and limit the potential risks associated with the incorrect use of the drug. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Economic impact of overactive bladder symptoms in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Sachie; Kobayashi, Makoto; Sugaya, Kimio

    2008-11-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is characterized by involuntary contractions of the detrusor muscles of the bladder. The primary symptoms of OAB include urinary urgency and frequency, with or without urge incontinence. Despite the growing awareness of OAB as a chronic medical condition, little is known about the disease's economic burden. Therefore, in the present study, the costs associated with the management of OAB symptoms in Japan were estimated, and the potential cost saving by increasing the rate of physician visits in OAB population was analyzed. To estimate the costs of OAB symptoms in Japan, we collected a variety of epidemiologic and economic literatures about OAB or urinary incontinence published by June, 2007. Three types of costs were considered in this estimation: 1. OAB treatment cost (pharmacological treatment cost, diagnostic cost and cost for physician visits), 2. direct cost (OAB-related cost [urinary tract infections, skin infections and fractures] and incontinence care cost [costs of pads, diapers and cleaning]), and 3. indirect cost (work loss due to absence from work and decrease in productivity). The analysis was conducted on community dwelling Japanese persons aged > or = 40 years, and assumed that OAB patients visited a hospital or a clinic once every four weeks. For the estimation of pharmacological treatment cost, four anticholinergic drugs (immediate-release oxybutynin (Pollakisu), propiverine (BUP-4), extended-release tolterodine (Detrusitol) and solifenacin (Vesicare)) were referred. Potential cost saving was estimated on the assumption that the hospital visit rate would increase from the current 22.7% to 35% and 50%, respectively. The number of persons with OAB symptoms and OAB patients was estimated at 8.6 million (4.6 million men, 4.0 million women) and 2.0 million (1.7 million men, 0.3 million women), respectively. The annual cost for OAB was estimated to be 956.2 billion yen (112,000 yen per one person with OAB symptoms). This cost

  3. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Truzzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder.

  4. Current management of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Rufus; Renganathan, Arasee; Cardozo, Linda

    2008-10-01

    The concept of overactive bladder has helped us address the problem of urgency and urge incontinence from a symptomatic perspective. In this review, we provide a critical summary of clinically relevant recent publications, focusing in particular on advances in our understanding of assessment methods and therapeutic interventions for overactive bladder in women. According to current definitions, the prevalence of overactive bladder in western nations is now estimated as 13.0%. Although the prevalence increases with age, the symptoms of overactive bladder may follow a relapsing and remitting course. There has been a proliferation of validated symptom and quality of life measures and increasing sophistication in the analysis of bladder diaries. The role of urodynamics in the evaluation of urgency remains uncertain, with many trials showing limited benefit as a preoperative investigation. Fluid restriction and bladder retraining remain important first-line interventions. Many new anticholinergic medications have been licensed, with limited benefits compared with existing preparations. Intravesical botulinum toxin has become a popular alternative for patients who fail oral therapies. Although there have been few important therapeutic innovations, recent publications have led to greater sophistication in assessment methods and a clearer understanding of the role of existing interventions.

  5. Urodynamic changes associated with successful stress urinary incontinence surgery: is a little tension a good thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Stephen R; Lemack, Gary E; Sirls, Larry T; Chai, Toby C; Brubaker, Linda; Albo, Michael; Leng, Wendy W; Lloyd, L Keith; Norton, Peggy; Litman, Heather J

    2011-12-01

    To identify urodynamic changes that correlate with successful outcomes after stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgery. Six-hundred fifty-five women were randomized to Burch colposuspension or autologous fascial sling as part of the multicenter Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial. Preoperatively and 24 months after surgery, participants underwent standardized urodynamic testing that included noninvasive uroflowmetry, cystometrogram, and pressure flow studies. Changes in urodynamic parameters were correlated to a successful outcome, defined a priori as (1) negative pad test; (2) no urinary incontinence on 3-day diary; (3) negative cough and Valsalva stress test; (4) no self-reported SUI symptoms on the Medical, Epidemiologic and Social Aspects of Aging Questionnaire; and (5) no re-treatment for SUI. Subjects who met criteria for surgical success showed a greater relative increase in mean Pdet@Qmax (baseline vs 24 months) than women who were considered surgical failures (P = .008). Although a trend suggested an association between greater increases in bladder outlet obstruction index and outcome success, this was not statistically significant. Other urodynamic variables, such as maximum uroflow, bladder compliance, and the presence of preoperative or de novo detrusor overactivity did not differ with respect to outcome status. Successful outcomes in both surgical groups (Burch and sling) were associated with higher voiding pressures relative to preoperative baseline values. However, concomitant changes in other urodynamic voiding parameters were not significantly associated with outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Urinary incontinence in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yoshitaka; Brown, Heidi W.; Brubaker, Linda; Cornu, Jean Nicolas; Daly, J. Oliver; Cartwright, Rufus

    2018-01-01

    Urinary incontinence symptoms are highly prevalent among women, have a substantial effect on health-related quality of life and are associated with considerable personal and societal expenditure. Two main types are described: stress urinary incontinence, in which urine leaks in association with physical exertion, and urgency urinary incontinence, in which urine leaks in association with a sudden compelling desire to void. Women who experience both symptoms are considered as having mixed urinary incontinence. Research has revealed overlapping potential causes of incontinence, including dysfunction of the detrusor muscle or muscles of the pelvic floor, dysfunction of the neural controls of storage and voiding, and perturbation of the local environment within the bladder. A full diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence requires a medical history, physical examination, urinalysis, assessment of quality of life and, when initial treatments fail, invasive urodynamics. Interventions can include non-surgical options (such as lifestyle modifications, pelvic floor muscle training and drugs) and surgical options to support the urethra or increase bladder capacity. Future directions in research may increasingly target primary prevention through understanding of environmental and genetic risks for incontinence. PMID:28681849

  7. The impact of overactive bladder, incontinence and other lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life, work productivity, sexuality and emotional well-being in men and women: results from the EPIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Karin S; Sexton, Chris C; Irwin, Debra E; Kopp, Zoe S; Kelleher, Con J; Milsom, Ian

    2008-06-01

    To examine the effect overactive bladder (OAB) and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a population sample, as OAB often occurs in conjunction with many other LUTS. A nested case-control analysis was performed on men and women with (cases) and without (controls) OAB, from the EPIC study. OAB was assessed using 2002 International Continence Society definitions. Based on their responses to questions about LUTS, cases were classified into five groups; continent OAB, OAB with incontinence, OAB + postmicturition, OAB + voiding, and OAB + postmicturition + voiding. Both cases and controls were asked questions about symptom bother (OAB-q), generic QoL (EQ-5D), work productivity (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment, WPAI), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), sexual satisfaction, and erectile dysfunction (men only) using the Massachusetts Male Aging Study. Cases answered additional condition-specific questions HRQoL (OAB-q short form), Patient Perception of Bladder Condition and work productivity related to a specific health problem (WPAI-SHP). General linear models were used to evaluate group differences. Of the EPIC participants, 1434 identified OAB cases were matched by age, gender and country, with 1434 participants designated as controls. Cases and controls were primarily Caucasian (96.2% and 96.7%, respectively), and most (65%) were female; the mean age was 53.8 and 53.7 years, respectively. Comorbid conditions differed significantly by case/control status, with cases reporting significantly greater rates of chronic constipation, asthma, diabetes, high blood pressure, bladder or prostate cancer, neurological conditions and depression. There were significant differences between the cases and controls in all reported LUTS. The OAB + postmicturition + voiding group reported significantly greater symptom bother, worse HRQoL, higher rates of depression and decreased enjoyment of

  8. [Urinary incontinence and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffieux, X

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to systematically review the literature concerning urinary incontinence and pregnancy, in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice. The prevalence of urinary stress incontinence and overactive bladder symptoms increase with gestational age during pregnancy (from the first to the third trimester), and decrease during the third months following delivery. Obstetrics factors (position during delivery, length of the second part of the labour, forceps, episiotomy, epidural or pudendal anaesthesia) do not modify the risk of post-partum or long term urinary incontinence. At short term follow-up, caesarean delivery is associated with a lower rate of post-partum urinary incontinence. At long term follow-up, data are lacking. Non elective caesarean section is not associated with a decrease in the rate of post-partum or long-term urinary incontinence. Elective caesarean section and systematic episiotomy are not recommended methods for the prevention of post-partum urinary incontinence (grade B), even in "high risk" women. Pelvic floor muscle therapy is the first line treatment for prenatal or post-partum urinary incontinence (grade A). Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Detrusor Acontractility after Acute Spinal Cord Injury-Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Mirjam; Tornic, Jure; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M

    2018-01-17

    We assessed urodynamic parameters within the first 40 days after spinal cord injury to investigate whether the detrusor is acontractile during the acute phase of spinal cord injury. We performed a prospective cohort study in 54 patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to acute spinal cord injury who underwent urodynamic investigation within the first 40 days after injury at a single university spinal cord injury center. Urodynamic investigation revealed an acontractile detrusor in only 20 of the 54 patients (37%) but unfavorable urodynamic parameters in 34 (63%). We found detrusor overactivity in 32 patients, detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia in 25, maximum storage detrusor pressure greater than 40 cm H 2 O in 17, vesicoureteral reflux in 3 and low bladder compliance (less than 20 ml/cm H 2 O) in 1. More than 1 unfavorable urodynamic parameter per patient was possible. In contrast to the common notion of an acontractile detrusor during acute spinal cord injury, almost two-thirds of our patients showed unfavorable urodynamic parameters within the first 40 days after spinal cord injury. Considering that early treatment of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with acute spinal cord injury might improve the long-term urological outcome, urodynamic investigation should be performed timely to optimize patient tailored therapy. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is Detrusor Contraction during Rapid Bladder Filling Caused by Cold or Warm Water? A Randomized, Controlled, Double-Blind Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozomara, Marko; Mehnert, Ulrich; Seifert, Burkhardt; Kessler, Thomas M

    2018-01-01

    We investigated whether detrusor contraction during rapid bladder filling is provoked by cold or warm water. Patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction were included in this randomized, controlled, double-blind trial. At the end of a standard urodynamic investigation patients underwent 2 bladder fillings using a 4C ice water test or a 36C warm water test saline solution at a filling speed of 100 ml per minute. The order was randomly selected, and patients and investigators were blinded to the order. The primary outcome measure was detrusor overactivity, maximum detrusor pressure and maximum bladder filling volume during the ice and warm water tests. Nine women and 31 men were the subject of data analysis. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction was caused by spinal cord injury in 33 patients and by another neurological disorder in 7. Irrespective of test order detrusor overactivity occurred significantly more often during the ice water test than during the warm water test (30 of 40 patients or 75% vs 25 of 40 or 63%, p = 0.02). When comparing the ice water test to the warm water test, maximum detrusor pressure was significantly higher and maximum bladder filling volume was significantly lower during the ice water test (each p warm water first) had no effect on the parameters. Our findings imply that the more frequent detrusor overactivity, higher maximum detrusor pressure and lower bladder filling volume during the ice water test compared to the warm water test were caused by cold water. This underlies the theory of a C-fiber mediated bladder cooling reflex in humans. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of prejunctional serotonin receptors modulating [3H]acetylcholine release in the human detrusor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Gianluigi; Condino, Anna M; Gallinari, Paola; Franceschetti, Gian P; Tonini, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Bladder overactivity (OAB) is a chronic and debilitating lower urinary tract (LUT) disorder that affects millions of individuals worldwide. LUT symptoms associated with OAB, such as urgency and urinary incontinence, cause a hygienic and social concern to patients, but their current pharmacological treatment is largely inadequate due to the lack of uroselectivity. Although OAB etiology remains multifactorial and poorly understood, increasing evidence indicates that serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is an endogenous substance involved in the control of micturition at central and peripheral sites. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of three distinct 5-HT receptors localized at parasympathetic nerve terminals of the human bladder by measuring electrically evoked tritiated acetylcholine release in isolated detrusor strips. These prejunctional receptors, involved in both positive and negative feedback mechanisms regulating cholinergic transmission, have been characterized by means of three highly selective 5-HT antagonists for 5-HT(4), 5-HT(7), and 5-HT(1A) receptors, namely GR113808A ([1-[2-[(-methylsulphonyl) amino] ethyl]4-piperinidyl]methyl1-methyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylate succinate), SB269970 [(R)-3-(2-(2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl)pyrrolidine-1-sulfonyl)phenol hydrochloride], and WAY100635 [N-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl)-cyclohexane-carboxamide trichloride]. Under these conditions, we confirmed the facilitatory role of 5-HT(4) heteroreceptors on acetylcholine release and revealed for the first time the occurrence of 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(1A) heteroreceptors with a facilitatory and an inhibitory action, respectively. Our findings strengthen the novel concept for the use of recently patented selective 5-HT agonists and antagonists for the control of OAB dysfunctions associated with inflammatory conditions, although their therapeutic efficacy needs to be explored in the clinical setting.

  12. Pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder symptoms – A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Fitz

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT involves the contraction of the puborectal, anal sphincter and external urethral muscles, inhibiting the detrusor contraction, what justify its use in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB symptoms. Objective: To verify the effects of isolated PFMT on the symptoms of OAB. Method: Prospective clinical trial with 27 women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, with predominance of OAB symptoms and loss ≥ 2 g in the pad test. It was evaluated: pelvic floor muscles (PFMs function (digital palpation and manometry; urinary symptoms (nocturia, frequency and urinary loss; degree of discomfort of OAB symptoms; and quality of life (Incontinence Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [I-QoL]. The PFMT program consisted of 24 outpatient sessions (2x/week + home PFMT. The Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (with a significance level of 5% were used to analyse the data. Results: There was a significant improvement of the urinary symptoms to the pad test (5.8±9.7, p<0.001, urinary loss (0.7±1.1, p=0.005 and nocturia (0.8±0.9, p=0.011. Reduction in the degree of discomfort of urinary symptoms was observed according to OAB-V8 questionnaire (10.0±7.7, p=0.001. There were also significant results in PFMs function: Oxford (3.6±0.9, p=0.001, endurance (5.2±1.8, p<0.001, fast (8.9±1.5, p<0.001 and manometry (26.6±15.8, p=0.003. In addition, quality of life had a significant improvement in the three domains evaluated by I-QoL. Conclusion: The PFMT without any additional guidelines improves the symptomatology, the function of PFMs and the quality of life of women with OAB symptoms.

  13. Low amplitude rhythmic contraction frequency in human detrusor strips correlates with phasic intravesical pressure waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colhoun, Andrew F; Speich, John E; Cooley, Lauren F; Bell, Eugene D; Barbee, R Wayne; Guruli, Georgi; Ratz, Paul H; Klausner, Adam P

    2017-08-01

    Low amplitude rhythmic contractions (LARC) occur in detrusor smooth muscle and may play a role in storage disorders such as overactive bladder and detrusor overactivity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LARC frequencies identified in vitro from strips of human urinary bladder tissue correlate with in vivo LARC frequencies, visualized as phasic intravesical pressure (p ves ) waves during urodynamics (UD). After IRB approval, fresh strips of human urinary bladder were obtained from patients. LARC was recorded with tissue strips at low tension (rhythmic frequency similar to the in vitro LARC frequency quantified in human urinary bladder tissue strips. Further refinements of this technique may help identify subsets of individuals with LARC-mediated storage disorders.

  14. Sacral Nerve Stimulation For Urinary Urge Incontinence, Urgency-Frequency, Urinary Retention, and Fecal Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. Background: Condition and Target Population Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. The Technology Being Reviewed: Sacral Nerve Stimulation Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is

  15. Stress Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress incontinence Overview Urinary incontinence is the unintentional loss of urine. Stress incontinence happens when physical movement or activity — such ... coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related ...

  16. [Consensus document on overactive bladder in older patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo-Bravo, Carlos; Brenes-Bermúdez, Francisco; Valverde-Moyar, Maria Victoria; Alcántara-Montero, Antonio; Pérez-León, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Overactive nladder (OAB) is a clinical entity with a high prevalence in the population, having a high impact on quality of life, especially when it occurs with urge urinary incontinence. It is very important to highlight the low rate of consultation of this condition by the older population. This appears to depend on several factors (educational, cultural, professional), and thus leads to the low percentage of older patients who receive appropriate treatment and, on the other hand, a large percentage of older patients with a significant deterioration in their quality of life. Therefore, Scientific societies and Working Groups propose the early detection of OAB in their documents and clinical guidelines. Its etiology is not well known, but is influenced by cerebrovascular processes and other neurological problems, abnormalities of the detrusor muscle of bladder receptors, and obstructive and inflammatory processes of the lower urinary tract. Its diagnosis is clinical, and in the great majority of the cases it can be possible to establish its diagnosis and etiopathogenic orientation, without the need for complex diagnostic procedures. Currently, there are effective treatments for OAB, and we should decide the most appropriate for each elderly patient, based on their individual characteristics. Based on the main clinical practice guidelines, a progressive treatment is proposed, with the antimuscarinics being the most recommended drug treatment. Therefore, a group of very involved professionals in clinical practice for the elderly, and representing two scientific Societies (Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology [SEGG], and the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians [SEMERGEN]) developed this consensus document with the main objective of establishing practices and valid strategies, focused to simplify the management of this clinical entity in the elderly population, and especially to improve their quality of life. The recommendations presented in this

  17. Neurological aspects of urinary incontinence in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2013-01-01

    The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly. There is a high rate of urinary incontinence among the patients who have experienced stroke or suffer from dementia or other neurological diseases. The ideas on the pathogenesis and manifestations of overactive bladder, stress urinary incontinence are outlined. Currently available drugs (anticholinergics, antidepressants, botulinum toxin preparations), methods for behavioral therapy and...

  18. Bladder sensation measures and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David E; Neil, Nancy J; Govier, Fred E; Kobashi, Kathleen C

    2009-09-01

    We performed a prospective multicomponent study to determine whether subjective and objective bladder sensation instruments may provide data on sensory dysfunction in patients with overactive bladder. We evaluated 70 prospectively enrolled patients with urodynamics and questionnaires on validated urgency (Urgency Perception Score), general overactive bladder (Urogenital Distress Inventory) and quality of life (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire). We first sought a correlation between sensory specific (Urgency Perception Score) and quality of life questionnaire scores. We then assessed a correlation between sensory questionnaire scores and urodynamic variables, exploring the hypothesis that certain urodynamic parameters may be bladder sensation measures. We evaluated 2 urodynamic derivatives (first sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity) to increase sensory finding discrimination. We noted a moderate correlation between the Urgency Perception Score (0.56) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (0.74) vs the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (each p Perception Score and bladder capacity (-0.25, p sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity statistically significantly correlated with the Urgency Perception Score despite the lesser or absent correlation associated with the individual components of these derivatives. Bladder sensation questionnaires may be valuable to identify patients with sensory dysfunction and provide additional data not obtained in generalized symptom questionnaires. Urodynamic variables correlated with bladder sensation questionnaire scores and may be an objective method to assess sensory dysfunction.

  19. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT) in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure or transobturator tape (TOT) procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°), were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009). On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223-12.582, p = 0.022) was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment. TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD.

  20. Comparison of Predictive Factors for Postoperative Incontinence of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate by the Surgeons' Experience During Learning Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Chiba, Koji; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-03-01

    To detect predictive factors for postoperative incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) according to surgeon experience (beginner or experienced) and preoperative clinical data. Of 224 patients, a total of 203 with available data on incontinence were investigated. The potential predictive factors for post-HoLEP incontinence included clinical factors, such as patient age, and preoperative urodynamic study results, including detrusor overactivity (DO). We also classified the surgeons performing the procedure according to their HoLEP experience: beginner (predictive factor at the super-short period (the next day of catheter removal: odds ratio [OR], 3.375; P=0.000). Additionally, patient age, surgeon mentorship (inverse correlation), and prostate volume were significant predictive factors at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 1.072; P=0.004; OR, 0.251; P=0.002; and OR, 1.008; P=0.049, respectively). With regards to surgeon experience, DO and preoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (inverse) at the super-short period, and patient age and mentorship (inverse correlation) at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 3.952; P=0.002; OR, 1.084; P=0.015; and OR,1.084; P=0.015; OR, 0.358; P=0.003, respectively) were significant predictive factors for beginners, and first desire to void (FDV) at 1 month after HoLEP (OR, 1.009; P=0.012) was a significant predictive factor for experienced surgeons in multivariate analysis. Preoperative DO, IPSS, patient age, and surgeon mentorship were significant predictive factors of postoperative patient incontinence for beginner surgeons, while FDV was a significant predictive factors for experienced surgeons. These findings should be taken into account by surgeons performing HoLEP to maximize the patient's quality of life with regards to urinary continence.

  1. Botulinum toxin and neuromodulation for overactive bladder treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yavuz Akman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The overactive bladder (OAB is a symptom complex characterized by urgency with /without urge incontinence, and often associated with frequency and nocturia. First-line therapy for OAB includes behavioral therapies and anticholinergic drugs. Although a large number of patients respond to conservative or pharmacological therapy or a combination of the two, some patients are refractory and require additional options for intervention. Botulinum toxin therapy and neuromodulation are frequently used treatment options in refractory OAB patients.

  2. [Some complications of tension-free midurethral tapes for the treatment of stress incontinence in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    Complications occurred in two women of 45 and 54 years of age who were treated with tension-free midurethral sling procedures. The first woman was treated with transobturator tape due to stress incontinence and an overactive bladder. The procedure resulted in a worsening of the overactive bladder.

  3. Bladder contractility is modulated by Kv7 channels in pig detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalø, Julie; Bille, Michala; Parameswaran Theepakaran, Neeraja

    2013-01-01

    Kv7 channels are involved in smooth muscle relaxation, and accordingly we believe that they constitute potential targets for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. We have therefore used myography to examine the function of Kv7 channels in detrusor, i.e. pig bladder, with a view...... relaxation, suggesting that Kv7.2 and/or Kv7.4 channels constitute the subtypes that are relevant to bladder contractility. The effects of retigabine and ML213 were attenuated by pre-incubation with 10µM XE991 (Kv7.1-7.5 channel blocker) (P...

  4. Neurological aspects of urinary incontinence in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly. There is a high rate of urinary incontinence among the patients who have experienced stroke or suffer from dementia or other neurological diseases. The ideas on the pathogenesis and manifestations of overactive bladder, stress urinary incontinence are outlined. Currently available drugs (anticholinergics, antidepressants, botulinum toxin preparations, methods for behavioral therapy and physiotherapy, and skin care in urinary incontinence are discussed. The current treatment options can improve quality of life in the elderly and their milieu.

  5. Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why does urinary incontinence affect more women than men? Women have unique health events, such as pregnancy, ... urge incontinence, urine leakage usually happens after a strong, sudden urge to urinate and before you can ...

  6. Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with nerve signals involved in bladder control, causing urinary incontinence. Risk factors Factors that increase your risk of developing urinary incontinence include: Gender. Women are more likely to have ...

  7. Urinary incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss of bladder control; Uncontrollable urination; Urination - uncontrollable; Incontinence - urinary ... and take out yourself. Bladder nerve stimulation. Urge incontinence and urinary frequency can sometimes be treated by electrical nerve ...

  8. THC/CBD oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis overactive bladder: a pilot prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Aponte, R; Bruzzese, D; Guarcello, G; Manzo, V; Napolitano, M; Moreggia, O; Chiariello, F; Florio, C

    2018-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunctions (LUTDs) are commonly reported in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and are mainly related to neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB). The aim of this observational study was to assess the effect of a tetrahydrocannabinol-cannabidiol (THC/CBD) oromucosal spray on resistant OAB by means of clinical and instrumental tools. Twenty-one MS patients were screened, and 15 cases have been evaluated. They underwent a specific clinical assessment (overactive bladder symptom score, OABSS) and a urodynamic assessment evaluating the maximal cystometric capacity (CCmax), bladder compliance (Qmax), maximum detrusor pressure (Pdet max), detrusor pressure at the first desire (Pdet first), bladder volume at the first desire (BVFD), leakage volume (LV), and post-void residual volume (PVR), before and after 4 weeks of THC/CBD administration. A complete neurological evaluation, including the assessment of their spasticity using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and the spasticity 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS), was performed at the same times. Mobility was evaluated through the 25-ft walking-time test (T25-WT). The THC/CBD treatment successfully reduced the OAB symptoms (p = 0.001). Regarding the urodynamic findings after the end of treatment, PVR was significantly reduced (p = 0.016). Regarding the urodynamic findings after the end of treatment, PVR was significantly reduced (p = 0.016), while BVFD and CCmax were increased although the difference was not statistically significant. THC/CBD oromucosal spray has shown to be effective in improving overactive bladder symptoms in MS patients demonstrating a favorable impact on detrusor overactivity.

  9. Post-stroke urinary incontinence with impaired awareness of the need to void: clinical and urodynamic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Renate; Stien, Ragnar; Wyller, Torgeir B

    2007-05-01

    To describe a clinical subtype of urinary incontinence (UI) after a stroke, i.e. with impaired awareness of the need to void (IA-UI), and to compare it to urge UI after a stroke for the risk factors and medium-term outcome. In a consecutive sample of 315 hospitalized stroke patients who were clinically stable and able to communicate, 65 with UI were identified (27 urge UI, 38 IA-UI). All had a comprehensive clinical assessment and cerebral computed tomography (CT). Cysto-urethrometry was performed in seven patients with IA-UI. Of the 38 patients with IA-UI, 16 were partially aware of leakage, but not of bladder fullness; the remaining 22 denied leakage. Patients with IA-UI were more functionally impaired (P=0.001), had more visible new CT lesions (24 of 38 vs 10 of 27, P=0.04) and less frontal lobe involvement (seven of 24 vs seven of 10, P=0.05) than those with urge UI. Ten of 12 patients with parietal lobe involvement denied leakage; no particular lesion pattern was found in those with partial awareness. Two patients had normal cysto-urethrometry, four showed terminal detrusor overactivity, and one had an incompetent urethral closure mechanism. In all, bladder sensation was reduced or absent. Only two of the surviving patients had regained continence after 1 year, whereas half of those with urge UI had become continent. IA-UI after a stroke differs from urge UI in clinical and prognostic respects, and probably reflects greater brain damage. It might explain the prognostic importance of stroke-related UI. There are various urodynamic patterns. Patients with better preserved insight might benefit from early awareness training and even from additional medical treatment if bladder overactivity is present; this needs further investigation.

  10. Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuwei; Zhou, Jing; Mo, Qian; Wang, Yang; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Overactive bladder is stated as the occurrence of urinary urgency which will cause negative impacts and decrease patients’ health-related quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficiency and safety of acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder (OAB) comparing with sham-acupuncture, drugs, and acupuncture plus drugs. Methods: We independently searched 9 databases from beginning to August 15, 2017. Two writers extracted data at the same time independently. Study outcomes were calculated by standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and mean difference (MD) with 95% CIs. Results: Ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 794 patients were included in this systematic review. The combined results showed that electroacupuncture (EA) may be more effective than sham electroacupuncture (sham EA) in improving the 24-hour nocturia episodes and EA may enhance tolterodine for relieving voiding symptoms and enhancing patients’ quality of life. However, more trials with high quality and larger sample sizes will be needed in the future to provide sufficient evidence. Only 15 of 794 OAB patients from the included studies reported mild adverse reactions related to EA, therefore, acupuncture is safe for treating OAB. Conclusion: Acupuncture might have effect in decreasing the number of micturition episodes, incontinence episodes, and nocturia episodes. However, the evidence is insufficient to show the effect using acupuncture alone or the additional effect to drugs in treating OAB. PMID:29465566

  11. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Truzzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  12. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years. PMID:27176184

  13. [EPIDEMIOLOGY OF OVER-ACTIVE BLADDER (OAB) SYNDROME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshkoli, Tamar; Yohai, David; Laron, Elad; Weintraub, Adi Y

    2016-11-01

    An over-active bladder is a common disorder which influences women's health and quality of life. There is difficulty defining the exact prevalence of the disorder since there are various definitions in the literature. The ICS definition from 2002 on the over-active bladder (OAB) syndrome enables more uniformity, by declaring that OAB syndrome is a symptomatic syndrome defined as presence of urgency with or without urinary incontinence, mostly accompanied by frequency and nocturia. In this article we reviewed the current medical literature on the prevalence of the OAB syndrome by focusing on relevant crosssectional and longitudinal studies, the trend changes during life, co-morbidities, the influence of quality of life and the economic burden following the disorder and its treatment. The authors' hope is that elevating awareness of the OAB syndrome will help improve its diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Are patients with bladder oversensitivity different from those with urodynamically proven detrusor overactivity in female overactive bladder syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Lang Chen

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Patients with BO seemed to be on a different spectrum compared to those with DO and also had different symptom-specific and associative factors. It was also found that FDV could be good predictive indicator for detecting DO at a low filling rate.

  15. Solifenacin objectively decreases urinary sensation in women with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstein, Lior; Kenton, Kimberly; Mueller, Elizabeth R; Brubaker, Linda; Sabo, Edmond; Durazo-Arivzu, Ramón A; Fitzgerald, Mary P

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the test-retest reliability of a device that measures urinary sensation during cystometry, and to use that device to determine whether treatment of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) with solifenacin is associated with a change in urinary sensation. Overall 15 women were recruited for this study, ten women with OAB and urodynamically demonstrated detrusor overactivity and five controls without OAB underwent filling cystometry twice with contemporaneous, continuous recording of urinary sensation. Women with OAB received solifenacin 10 mg daily during the weeks between testing. We compared the areas under the initial and repeat sensation-volume curves. While taking solifenacin, the maximum cystometric capacity increased from 329 ± 168 ml to 464 ± 123 ml (P sensation curve decreased (P sensation during the treatment of OAB with solifenacin. If clinical correlations are confirmed by future study, such urinary sensation measures may prove useful as assessment, treatment predictor, or outcome measures in OAB research and/or clinical care.

  16. Mirabegron, a breakthrough in overactive bladder syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Maestro Nombela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Overactive bladder syndrome is a condition with high prevalence, which has a negative impact on patients’ quality of life. A drug with a novel mechanism of action has been recently approved: mirabegron. The objective of this study is to review the scientific evidence available on mirabegron, with the aim to analyze its efficacy, safety and cost, and thus estimate its role within current pharmacotherapy. Methods: The effectiveness and safety of mirabegron were analyzed through an evaluation of scientific evidence. The cost of different pharmacological alternatives was calculated based on their Defined Daily Dose (DDD and their manufacturer’s sale price. Results: The use of mirabegron in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome is supported by three randomized clinical trials, controlled with placebo, at 12 weeks. All three share the same primary efficacy variables (number of incontinence episodes per 24 hours and number of micturitions per 24 hours. Long-term efficacy data are based on a 12-month study, where efficacy outcomes were measured as secondary variables. In all studies, mirabegron showed a significant but modest effect. Some of the most frequently detected adverse effects were: hypertension, increase of glucose in blood, headache, urinary tract infections, constipation and tachycardia. Special attention must be paid to cardiovascular events. Conclusions: The clinical efficacy of mirabegron is very modest and comparable to that achieved with the other drugs approved for this indication. Moreover, it is more expensive than other therapeutic options. Cardiac risks and urinary infections only allow to consider it as an alternative option to anticholinergic drugs, when these are contraindicated, show no clinical efficacy, or cause unacceptable adverse effects.

  17. Predictive factors that influence treatment outcomes of innovative single incision sling: comparing TVT-Secur to an established transobturator sling for female stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eugene; Shin, Ju Hyun; Lim, Jae Sung; Song, Ki Hak; Sul, Chong Koo; Na, Yong Gil

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to identify independent risk factors for treatment failure of tension-free vaginal tape TVT-Secur (TVT-S) compared to that of the well-established transobturator tape. Of a total of 175 consecutive patients with urodynamically confirmed stress urinary incontinence (SUI) identified between July 2007 and March 2010, 89 patients underwent TVT-S, and 86 underwent TOT. Cure was defined using the Urogenital Distress Inventory as no urinary leakage during physical activity, coughing, or sneezing as reported by patients during a telephone survey. To identify predictors of treatment failure, multivariable logistic regression models were used, and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using variables identified during univariate analysis. There were more patients with cystocele ≥ grade 2 in the TVT-S group (p = 0.031); otherwise the groups were well matched. After a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 12-44 months), the overall cure rate was 80.6%; it was 70.8% for those treated with TVT-S and 90.7% for those treated with TOT (p = 0.001). In a multivariate model, previous incontinence surgery (OR 27.1, p = 0.005) and a cystocele ≥ grade 2 (OR 3.0, p = 0.020) were independent risk factors influencing the outcome of TVT-S procedures. For the TOT procedures, detrusor overactivity was an independent risk factor in a multivariate model (OR 8.6, p = 0.033). TVT-S could be performed for selected patients, but conventional TOT procedures are still superior to the novel TVT-S device.

  18. Evaluation and management of overactive bladder: strategies for optimizing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis-Gray MG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Marcella G Willis-Gray, Alexis A Dieter, Elizabeth J Geller Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition affecting millions of men and women worldwide. It is an embarrassing condition with far-reaching consequences. Although many treatment options exist, no single treatment has been proven to be most effective. Often a combination of therapy is required to successfully manage OAB symptoms. In this review, we provide an overview of OAB, including risk factors for development of OAB; keys to diagnosis; therapeutic options including conservative and medical management, as well as treatments for refractory OAB; when to consider referral to a specialist; and resources for clinicians and patients. The aim of this review is to inform clinicians regarding OAB management in order to improve patient counseling and care. Keywords: overactive bladder, urge incontinence, urinary incontinence, bladder training, lifestyle modifications

  19. Overactive bladder in the vulnerable elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff GF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gillian F Wolff,1 George A Kuchel,2 Phillip P Smith1,21Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, 2UConn Center on Aging, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a common problem that may occur in individuals of all ages. It has a considerable impact on patient quality of life, and although moderately effective management strategies do exist, this condition often remains undiagnosed and untreated. OAB needs to be viewed as a symptom complex. Its presentation and management are complicated in the vulnerable elderly by the presence of baseline frailty and multiple coexisting chronic conditions. Furthermore, and beyond a simple understanding of symptomatology, providers must address patient goals and motivations as well as the expectations of caretakers. These multiple levels of perception, function, expectations, and treatment efficacy/risks must be tailored to the individual patient. While the vulnerable elderly patient may often have evidence of urinary tract dysfunction, OAB and urge urinary incontinence in this population must be understood as a multifactorial geriatric syndrome and viewed in the context of medical and functional baseline and precipitating risk factors. Expectations and goals must be tailored to the resources of vulnerable elderly patients and their caregivers, and care must be coordinated with other medical care providers. The management of OAB in the vulnerable elderly often poses significant management challenges. Nonetheless, with a thoughtful approach and an aim towards future research specifically for this population, significant reductions in morbidity and mortality long with enhancement in health-related quality of life are possible.Keywords: urinary incontinence, urgency, antispasmodics, aging, frailty

  20. Physiotherapy Management of Idiopathic Detrusor Instability in elderly women is effective for continence rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Gazzar, Samir A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to give an overview of the conservative treatment of idiopathic detrusor instability (IDI) in elderly women, describe the clinical and urodynamic features of the over-active bladder and the role of physiotherapy as well as the various physiotherapeutic techniques in the management of this condition. A prospective, uncontrolled clinical trial was designed. Twenty elderly women aged 55-75 were participated for 8 weeks in this study. Therapeutic modalities including biofeedback training, bladder retraining, pelvic floor exercise and electrical stimulation were applied for all subjects. Each of 1st desire to void, maximum capacity, flow rate and voiding intervals were increased in its mean at the end of the study (p<0.0001), while the means of residual volume and frequency of micturation had significantly decreased at the end of the study (p<0.0001). The study showed that correctly taught pelvic floor exercise, biofeed back combined with bladder retaining, electrical stimulation and restriction of fluids intake are an effective treatment for the idiopathic detrusor instability in elderly women and should be considered effective approach for continence rehabilitation. (author)

  1. Comparison of Predictive Factors for Postoperative Incontinence of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate by the Surgeons’ Experience During Learning Curve

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    Katsumi Shigemura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To detect predictive factors for postoperative incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP according to surgeon experience (beginner or experienced and preoperative clinical data. Methods: Of 224 patients, a total of 203 with available data on incontinence were investigated. The potential predictive factors for post-HoLEP incontinence included clinical factors, such as patient age, and preoperative urodynamic study results, including detrusor overactivity (DO. We also classified the surgeons performing the procedure according to their HoLEP experience: beginner (<21 cases and experienced (≥21 cases. Results: Our statistical data showed DO was a significant predictive factor at the super-short period (the next day of catheter removal: odds ratio [OR], 3.375; P=0.000. Additionally, patient age, surgeon mentorship (inverse correlation, and prostate volume were significant predictive factors at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 1.072; P=0.004; OR, 0.251; P=0.002; and OR, 1.008; P=0.049, respectively. With regards to surgeon experience, DO and preoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (inverse at the super-short period, and patient age and mentorship (inverse correlation at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 3.952; P=0.002; OR, 1.084; P=0.015; and OR,1.084; P=0.015; OR, 0.358; P=0.003, respectively were significant predictive factors for beginners, and first desire to void (FDV at 1 month after HoLEP (OR, 1.009; P=0.012 was a significant predictive factor for experienced surgeons in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Preoperative DO, IPSS, patient age, and surgeon mentorship were significant predictive factors of postoperative patient incontinence for beginner surgeons, while FDV was a significant predictive factors for experienced surgeons. These findings should be taken into account by surgeons performing HoLEP to maximize the patient’s quality of life with regards to urinary continence.

  2. Tamsulosin and Solifenacin in the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in combination with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Chang, Yanhua; Liang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the clinical effect of tamsulosin and Solifenacin in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in combination with overactive bladder and its safety. Another objective was to investigate the clinical effect and safety of mega dose of tamsulosin in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in combination with overactive bladder. One hundred and twenty-four patients who were admitted to the Dept. of Urology at Binzhou People's Hospital, , China with confirmed benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with overactive bladder were randomly divided into two groups. Sixty-two patients in the control group were treated with tamsulosin, while sixty-two patients in the observation group were treated with tamsulosin in combination with solifenacin. The treatment of both groups lasted for 12 weeks. The effect and adverse reaction were compared between the two groups. The international prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL), and overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS), Q max , pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), daytime urination frequency, urgent urination frequency, urge urinary incontinence frequency and night urinary frequency of both groups improved after treatment, and the difference had statistical significance (P0.05). Treating benign prostatic hyperplasia in combination with overactive bladder with tamsulosin in combination with solifenacin is more effective than tamsulosin, without significantly increasing adverse reactions. Thus the therapy is worth clinical promotion.

  3. Skin care and incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin care; Incontinence - pressure sore; Incontinence - pressure ulcer Patient Instructions Preventing pressure ulcers Images Male urinary system References Holroyd S. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: identification, prevention and care. Br J Nurs . 2015;24( ...

  4. Onabotulinumtoxin type A improves lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life in patients with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 associated overactive bladder

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    Jose Abraão Carneiro Neto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of the onabotulinum toxin type A in the treatment of HTLV-1 associated overactive bladder and its impact on quality of life (QoL. Methods: Case series with 10 patients with overactive bladder refractory to conservative treatment with anticholinergic or physical therapy. They received 200Ui of onabotulinumtoxin type A intravesically and were evaluated by overactive bladder symptoms score (OABSS and King's Health Questionnaire. Results: The mean (SD of the age was 52 + 14.5 years and 60% were female. All of them had confirmed detrusor overactivity on urodynamic study. Seven patients had HAM/TSP. The median and range of the OABSS was 13 (12–15 before therapy and decreased to 1.0 (0–12 on day 30 and to 03 (0–14 on day 90 (p < 0.0001. There was a significant improvement in 8 of the 9 domains of the King's Health Questionnaire after the intervention. Hematuria, urinary retention and urinary infection were the complications observed in 3 out of 10 patients. The mean time to request retreatment was 465 days. Conclusion: Onabotulinum toxin type A intravesically reduced the OABSS with last long effect and improved the quality of life of HTLV-1 infected patients with severe overactive bladder. Keywords: Overactive bladder, Onabotulinum toxin, HTLV-1

  5. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... and disorders: physiology of micturition, voiding dysfunction, urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, and painful bladder syndrome. In: Lobo ...

  6. Factors associated with fecal incontinence in women with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Chen; Chang, Shiow-Ru; Hsiao, Sheng-Mou; Hsiao, Chin-Fen; Chen, Chi-Hau; Lin, Ho-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with fecal incontinence in female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.   Data regarding clinical and urodynamic parameters and history of fecal incontinence of 1334 women with lower urinary tract symptoms who had previously undergone urodynamic evaluation were collected and subjected to univariate, multivariate, and receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis to identify significant associations between these parameters and fecal incontinence.   Multivariate analysis identified age (odds ratio [OR]=1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.01-1.05, P=0.005), presence of diabetes (OR=2.10, 95%CI=1.22-3.61, P=0.007), presence of urodynamic stress incontinence (OR=1.90, 95%CI=1.24-2.91, P=0.003), pad weight (OR=1.01, 95%CI=1.00-1.01, P=0.04), and detrusor pressure at maximum flow (OR=1.02, 95%CI=1.01-1.03, P=0.003) as independent risk factors for fecal incontinence. Receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis identified age≥55years, detrusor pressure at maximum flow≥35 cmH(2) O, and pad weight≥15g as having positive predictive values of 11.4%, 11.5%, and 12.4%, respectively, thus indicating that they are the most predictive values in concomitant fecal incontinence.   Detrusor pressure at maximum flow and pad weight may be associated with fecal incontinence in female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms, but require confirmation as indicators by further study before their use as screening tools. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Prevalence of overactive bladder syndrome (OABS among women with gynaecological problems and its risk factors in a tertiary hospital, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia: Implication for primary healthcare providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Sulaiha Syed Aznal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is defined as frequent urination with or without urge incontinence and is usually associated with frequency and nocturia in the absence of an infection or other pathological conditions. It is a common and distressing medical condition that can severely affect patient’s quality of life.

  8. Detrusor instability in children with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Nielsen, K K; Kristensen, E S

    1986-01-01

    Of 41 children, aged 5-15 years, referred consecutively because of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and/or enuresis, 18 (44%) showed detrusor instability (DI) in at least 2 of 6 CO2 cystometries. One child was excluded from the study because of lack of follow-up. Four children with less...... pronounced DI (instability during less than or equal to 50% of the cystometries performed) and frequent UTIs were given antibiotics prophylactically for 3 months. In the remaining 13 children, DI was found during more than half the cystometries performed, and 11 of these children, who also had urge...... incontinence, were treated with emepronium bromide, 400-600 mg daily (10-12 mg/kg) for 3 months. In 7 of the patients this treatment was supplemented by antibiotics prophylactically because of frequent UTIs. Two children with special problems received other types of treatment. All children were free from...

  9. Urinary Bladder Detrusor Dysfunction Symptoms in Lyme Disease

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    Basant K. Puri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Symptoms of urinary bladder detrusor dysfunction have been rarely reported in Lyme disease. The aim was to carry out the first systematic study to compare the prevalence of such symptoms in a group of Lyme disease patients and a group of matched controls. Methods A questionnaire relating to detrusor function was administered to 17 serologically positive Lyme disease patients and to 18 control subjects. Results The two groups were matched in respect of age, sex, body mass, and mean arterial blood pressure. None of the 35 subjects was taking medication which might affect urinary function and none had undergone a previous operative procedure on the lower urinary tract. Six of the Lyme patients (35% and none of the controls (0% had symptoms of detrusor dysfunction (P<0.01. Conclusions This first systematic controlled study confirms that Lyme disease is associated with urinary bladder detrusor dysfunction. Further evaluation of detrusor function is warranted in this disease.

  10. Impact of overactive bladder on work productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Karin S; Sexton, Chris C; Thompson, Christine L; Clemens, J Quentin; Chen, Chieh I; Bavendam, Tamara; Dmochowski, Roger

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of overactive bladder (OAB) on work productivity in a large, population-based study in the United States, with an overrepresentation of minorities. This cross-sectional, Internet-based survey was conducted among men and women aged 18-70. The lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) tool was used to assess symptoms over past 4 weeks. OAB was defined by urinary urgency of at least "sometimes" and/or urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). Outcomes included work status, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire--General Health (WPAI-GH) and Specific Health (WPAI-SH), and questions about the impact of urinary symptoms on work. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate group differences (no/minimal symptoms [NMS] vs OAB). Logistic regressions evaluated predictors of unemployment status controlling for comorbid conditions, risk factors, and demographic variables. The response rate was 57%. A total of 5795 men and women were included in the analysis (OAB, 2323; NMS, 3472). OAB cases were significantly more likely to be unemployed (men, 44%; women, 54%) compared to those with NMS (men, 24%; women, 41%). Mean work productivity and activity impairment (WPAI) percent impairment while working was as follows: 19% and 21% among men and women with OAB; NMS, 4% and 7%. Significant differences were found for all urinary-specific WPAI-SHP items and other condition-specific outcomes. Men with OAB were 1.5 times more likely to be unemployed as compared to those with NMS when covariates were controlled for, whereas the association between OAB and unemployment in multivariate analysis was nonsignificant among women. Comparison with other outcomes suggests that OAB impairs work at levels comparable to other serious chronic conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Urinary incontinence in frail elderly persons: Report from the 5th International Consultation on Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagg, Adrian; Gibson, William; Ostaszkiewicz, Joan; Johnson, Theodore; Markland, Alayne; Palmer, Mary H; Kuchel, George; Szonyi, George; Kirschner-Hermanns, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    Evidence based guidelines for the management of frail older persons with urinary incontinence are rare. Those produced by the International Consultation on Incontinence represent an authoritative set of recommendations spanning all aspects of management. To update the recommendations of the 4th ICI. A series of systematic reviews and evidence updates were performed by members of the working group in order to update the 2009 recommendations. The resulting guidelines were presented at the 2012 meeting of the European Associatioon of Urology. Along with the revision of the treatment algorithm and accompanying text. There have been significant advances in several areas including pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder. The committee continue to notes the relative paucity of data concerning frail older persons and draw attention to knowledge gaps in this area. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effectiveness of foot reflexology and behavior treatment in patient with overactive bladder syndrome: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the foot reflexology and activity of behavior therapy in the patients who have overactive bladder syndrome. In the study, behavior therapy (Bladder Training + Diet Modifications) and foot reflexology were applied together. Foot reflexology treatment was performed for 12 sessions and each session took 45 to 60 minutes to complete. For data collection, a descriptive information form, The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), Urinary Diarie...

  13. NS309 decreases rat detrusor smooth muscle membrane potential and phasic contractions by activating SK3 channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar P; Hristov, Kiril L; Soder, Rupal P; Kellett, Whitney F; Petkov, Georgi V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Overactive bladder (OAB) is often associated with abnormally increased detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractions. We used NS309, a selective and potent opener of the small or intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK or IK, respectively) channels, to evaluate how SK/IK channel activation modulates DSM function. Experimental Approach We employed single-cell RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, whole cell patch-clamp in freshly isolated rat DSM cells and isometric tension recordings of isolated DSM strips to explore how the pharmacological activation of SK/IK channels with NS309 modulates DSM function. Key Results We detected SK3 but not SK1, SK2 or IK channels expression at both mRNA and protein levels by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in DSM single cells. NS309 (10 μM) significantly increased the whole cell SK currents and hyperpolarized DSM cell resting membrane potential. The NS309 hyperpolarizing effect was blocked by apamin, a selective SK channel inhibitor. NS309 inhibited the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude, force, frequency, duration and tone of isolated DSM strips in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of NS309 on spontaneous phasic contractions was blocked by apamin but not by TRAM-34, indicating no functional role of the IK channels in rat DSM. NS309 also significantly inhibited the pharmacologically and electrical field stimulation-induced DSM contractions. Conclusions and Implications Our data reveal that SK3 channel is the main SK/IK subtype in rat DSM. Pharmacological activation of SK3 channels with NS309 decreases rat DSM cell excitability and contractility, suggesting that SK3 channels might be potential therapeutic targets to control OAB associated with detrusor overactivity. PMID:23145946

  14. Randomized controlled trial comparing TVT-O and TVT-S for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: 2-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-Ferraro, Ana Maria H M; Jarmy-DiBella, Zsuzsanna I K; de Aquino Castro, Rodrigo; Bortolini, Maria Augusta T; Sartori, Marair G F; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of single-incision sling TVT-Secur (TVT-S) and transobturator midurethral sling (TVT-O) for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) over 2 years' follow-up. This is a randomized controlled trial in which women with SUI were randomly assigned to have either TVT-O (n = 56) or TVT-S (n = 66). Exclusion criteria included: voiding dysfunction, detrusor overactivity, and pelvic organ prolapse beyond the hymen. The primary outcomes were objective and subjective cure rates at a follow-up visit at 24 months, defined as a negative stress test and pad test as well as absence of self-reported SUI symptoms. Secondary endpoints included quality of life assessment using the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and complication and reoperation rates. Analysis was performed using intention to treat, and statistical significance was fixed at 5% (p TVT-S and TVT-O groups were 77.3% and 83.6%, while subjective cure rates were 75.7% and 80.3% respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the techniques. There was a significant improvement in all KHQ domains in both groups (p TVT-O, while the long-term one was tape exposure observed in 5.3% of TVT-O and in 7.5% of TVT-S cases. The efficacy of the TVT-S was similar to that of the TVT-O after 2 years' assessment. This cohort will continue to be followed in order to maintain commitment to contributing data on long-term results.

  15. OnabotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsey Cox, Anne P Cameron Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: OnabotulinumtoxinA injection is a safe and effective treatment for adults with refractory overactive bladder. There is sufficient level 1 evidence to support offering onabotulinumtoxinA injections as a second-line treatment to patients who have failed behavioral therapy and oral medications such as antimuscarinics and β3 agonists. An intradetrusor injection of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA is likely the optimal dose to balance risks and benefits, and this is the dose approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Improvement in urgency urinary incontinence episodes, as well as symptom scores and quality of life, were seen in around 60%–65% of patients, and were significantly improved compared with those on placebo. Most studies have reported a duration of symptom relief ranging from 6 to 12 months, with repeat injections being safe and efficacious. Overall, the risk of urinary retention was around 6% across the study populations. Keywords: urgency urinary incontinence, urinary retention, nocturia, frequency

  16. Longitudinal associations between mental health conditions and overactive bladder in women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Catherine S; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Hillis, Stephen L; Torner, James C; Sadler, Anne G

    2017-10-01

    One in 5 recently deployed US women veterans report overactive bladder symptoms. Mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety commonly co-occur in women with overactive bladder, but temporal relationships between these outcomes have not been well studied, and the mechanism behind this association is unknown. The Women Veterans Urinary Health Study, a nationwide longitudinal study in recently deployed women veterans, was designed to better understand relationships between overactive bladder and mental health conditions. We sought to estimate the 1-year incidence and remission of overactive bladder and to identify the impact of depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and prior sexual assault on 1-year overactive bladder incidence and remission rates. Participants of this 1-year prospective cohort study were female veterans separated from military service who had returned from Iraq or Afghanistan deployment within the previous 2 years. Eligible women were identified through the Defense Manpower Data Center and recruited by mail and telephone. Telephone screening confirmed participants were ambulatory, community-dwelling veterans and excluded those with urinary tract fistula, congenital abnormality, or cancer; pelvic radiation; spinal cord injury; multiple sclerosis; Parkinson disease; stroke; or current/recent pregnancy. Data collection included computer-assisted telephone interviews performed at enrollment and 1 year later. The interview assessed demographic and military service characteristics; urinary symptoms and treatment; depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and treatment; and a lifetime history of sexual assault. Overactive bladder was identified if at least moderately bothersome urgency urinary incontinence and/or urinary frequency symptoms were reported on Urogenital Distress Inventory items. Exposures included depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and lifetime sexual assault, assessed at

  17. Enhancement of S1P-induced contractile response in detrusor smooth muscle of rats having cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Irfan; Denizalti, Merve; Kandilci, Hilmi Burak; Durlu-Kandilci, Nezahat Tugba; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2017-11-05

    Interstitial cystitis is a chronic disease characterized by lower abdominal pain and some nonspecific symptoms including an increase in urinary frequency and urgency. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid that controls smooth muscle tone via G-protein coupled receptors (S1P 1-3 receptors). S1P production is known to take place both in physiological states and some pathological situations, such as in overactive bladder syndrome. The intracellular mechanism of S1P-induced contractile response was investigated in β-escin permeabilized detrusor smooth muscle of rats having cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. The bladder was isolated from rats and detrusor smooth muscle strips were permeabilized with β-escin. S1P (50µM)-induced contraction and calcium sensitization response were significantly increased in cystitis. S1P-induced augmented contractile response was inhibited by S1P 2 receptor antagonist JTE-013 and S1P 3 receptor antagonist suramin. S1P 2 receptor protein expressions were increased in cystitis, where no change was observed in S1P 3 expressions between control and cystitis groups. S1P-induced contraction was reduced by Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF-109203X in both control and cystitis group. S1P-induced increased calcium sensitization response was decreased by ROCK inhibitor and PKC inhibitor in cystitis. Our findings provide the first evidence that interstitial cystitis triggers S1P-induced increase in intracellular calcium in permeabilized detrusor smooth muscle of female rats. Both S1P 2 and S1P 3 receptors are involved in S1P mediated enhanced contractile response. The augmentation in S1P-induced contraction in interstitial cystitis involves both PKC and ROCK pathways of calcium sensitization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO, a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO. PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM. We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ∼50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5' myosin heavy chain (MHC alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM increased 3-fold while 3' MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20% only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable

  19. Urinary incontinence products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003973.htm Urinary incontinence products To use the sharing features on this ... There are many products to help you manage urinary incontinence . You can decide which product to choose based ...

  20. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Rørtveit, Guri; Bø, Kari; Hunskår, Steinar

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate incidence and prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy, and associated risk factors.Method: The data collection was conducted as part of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. We present questionnaire data about urinary incontinence obtained from 43,279 women (response rate 45%) by week 30. We report data on any incontinence in addition to type, frequency and amount of incontinence. Po...

  1. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinski, Ronald W.; Siegel, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB) that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or without

  2. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Glinski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS, have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or

  3. Comparison of 3 Different Teaching Methods for a Behavioral Therapy Program for Female Overactive Bladder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezginci, Elif; Iyigun, Emine; Yilmaz, Sercan

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of 3 instructional methods for behavioral therapy on lower urinary tract symptom (LUTS) severity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in women with overactive bladder. Single-center, parallel-group, randomized, clinical trial. The sample comprised 60 women diagnosed with overactive bladder. The study setting was a university-based female urology clinic in Ankara, Turkey; data were collected from November 2012 to May 2013. Eligible participants were ambulatory women 18 years or older with predominant overactive bladder and urge urinary incontinence (UI) symptoms, with or without stress UI symptoms. Subjects were randomized into 4 groups based on educational intervention; group 1 received structured verbal instruction plus a leaflet, group 2 received structured verbal instruction, group 3 received a leaflet alone, and group 4 received usual care that included unstructured verbal counseling about continence care. The primary outcome measures were Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7) and Urinary Distress Inventory-6 (UDI-6) scores. We also measured changes in UI-specific HRQOL scores via the Urinary Incontinence Quality of Life Instrument (I-QOL). All outcomes were measured before and 6 to 8 weeks after the interventions. The Wilcoxon test was used to identify differences in LUTS severity and HRQOL before and after the educational intervention. The Kruskall-Wallis test was used to compare differences among the groups. The severity of LUTS and UI-specific quality of life assessed by the IIQ-7, UDI-6, and I-QOL scores significantly improved after training in all 4 groups (P women with overactive bladder and urge UI.

  4. Monitoring Detrusor Oxygenation and Hemodynamics Noninvasively during Dysfunctional Voiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew J.; Stothers, Lynn S.; Shadgan, Babak

    2012-01-01

    The current literature indicates that lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have a heterogeneous pathophysiology. Pressure flow studies (UDSs) remain the gold standard evaluation methodology for such patients. However, as the function of the detrusor muscle depends on its vasculature and perfusion, the underlying causes of LUTS likely include abnormalities of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics, and available treatment options include agents thought to act on the detrusor smooth muscle and/or vasculature. Hence, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), an established optical methodology for monitoring changes in tissue oxygenation and hemodynamics, has relevance as a means of expanding knowledge related to the pathophysiology of BPH and potential treatment options. This methodological report describes how to conduct simultaneous NIRS monitoring of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics during UDS, outlines the clinical implications and practical applications of NIRS, explains the principles of physiologic interpretation of NIRS voiding data, and proposes an exploratory hypothesis that the pathophysiological causes underlying LUTS include detrusor dysfunction due to an abnormal hemodynamic response or the onset of oxygen debt during voiding. PMID:23019422

  5. Monitoring Detrusor Oxygenation and Hemodynamics Noninvasively during Dysfunctional Voiding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Macnab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature indicates that lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH have a heterogeneous pathophysiology. Pressure flow studies (UDSs remain the gold standard evaluation methodology for such patients. However, as the function of the detrusor muscle depends on its vasculature and perfusion, the underlying causes of LUTS likely include abnormalities of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics, and available treatment options include agents thought to act on the detrusor smooth muscle and/or vasculature. Hence, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, an established optical methodology for monitoring changes in tissue oxygenation and hemodynamics, has relevance as a means of expanding knowledge related to the pathophysiology of BPH and potential treatment options. This methodological report describes how to conduct simultaneous NIRS monitoring of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics during UDS, outlines the clinical implications and practical applications of NIRS, explains the principles of physiologic interpretation of NIRS voiding data, and proposes an exploratory hypothesis that the pathophysiological causes underlying LUTS include detrusor dysfunction due to an abnormal hemodynamic response or the onset of oxygen debt during voiding.

  6. [Health related quality of life and productivity of women with overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péntek, Márta; Gulácsi, László; Majoros, Attila; Piróth, Csaba; Rubliczky, Levente; Böszörményi Nagy, Géza; Törzsök, Ferenc; Timár, Petra; Baji, Petra; Brodszky, Valentin

    2012-07-08

    The objective of the research was to assess the health related quality of life and productivity of women with overactive bladder. A cross-sectional survey was performed in 5 outpatient centers. General health status (EQ-5D), disease-specific quality of life (King's Health Questionnaire) and productivity (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment) were assessed. Sixty-one women with mean age of 57.7 (SD = 11.6) years have had symptoms for 6.6 (SD = 6.2) years and 57 (93%) had incontinence. The EQ-5D (mean 0.668, SD = 0.314) was not significantly lower than that of the average population (p>0.05). The impact of incontinence and physical limitation (mean 70.5 and 68.9, respectively) were significant, the King's Health Questionnaire-utility was 0.932 (SD = 0.029). Productivity scores of involved patients were: absenteeism 0.04% (SD = 0.11), presenteeism 43.64% (SD = 28.54), overall work impairment 40.97% (SD = 26.91), and other activities 47.72% (SD = 27.24). Applicability of the EQ-5D and King's Health Questionnaire as utility measures in overactive bladder deserve further research. Presenteeism should be considered in the evaluation of the therapy.

  7. Urinary Incontinence in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Neki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Incontinence (UI is dened any involuntary leakage of urine. It is twice as common in women as in men and affects at least 1 in 3 older women. It is not a normal result of aging. Rather it is a medical problem that is often curable and should be treated. Urine is stored in the bladder and emptied via the urethra. During urination, muscles of the bladder wall contract, forcing urine from the bladder into the urethra. Sphincter muscles surrounding the urethra relax thus releasing urine from the body. Incontinence occurs if bladder muscles suddenly contract or sphincter muscles are not strong enough to contain urine. The diagnosis of geriatric urinary incontinence includes evaluation for overow incontinence, functional incontinence and stress incontinence. The treatment goal should be realistic and aim to improve the patient's functional status and quality of life. Best treatment outcomes can only be achieved by a holistic treatment approach.

  8. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-05-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-center randomized controlled trial of cognitive treatment, placebo, oxybutynin, bladder training, and pelvic floor training in children with functional urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Tamminen-Moebius, Tytti; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Hjalmas, Kelm; Jodal, Ulf; Bachmann, Hannsjoerg; Hoebeke, Piet; Vande Walle, Johan; Misselwitz, Joachim; John, Ulrike; Bael, An

    Objective Functional urinary incontinence causes considerable morbidity in 8.4% of school-age children, mainly girls. To compare oxybutynin, placebo, and bladder training in overactive bladder (OAB), and cognitive treatment and pelvic floor training in dysfunctional voiding (DV), a multi-center

  10. Multi-center randomized controlled trial of cognitive treatment, placebo, oxybutynin, bladder training, and pelvic floor training in children with functional urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Tamminen-Möbius, Tytti; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Hjälmås, Kelm; Jodal, Ulf; Bachmann, Hannsjörg; Hoebeke, Piet; Walle, Johan Vande; Misselwitz, Joachim; John, Ulrike; Bael, An

    2014-01-01

    Functional urinary incontinence causes considerable morbidity in 8.4% of school-age children, mainly girls. To compare oxybutynin, placebo, and bladder training in overactive bladder (OAB), and cognitive treatment and pelvic floor training in dysfunctional voiding (DV), a multi-center controlled

  11. Do we need a new definition of the overactive bladder syndrome? ICI-RS 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus J

    2014-06-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) has a symptom-based definition. Following a presentation of issues, the definition was subjected to expert discussion at the International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society to identify key issues. OAB is a widely used term; it is a pragmatic approach to categorizing a recognized group of patients, and is understood by the patients, however, expert opinion suggested several issues for which additional evidence should be sought. Naming an organ (bladder) in the condition may suggest underlying mechanism, when contributory aspects may lie outside the bladder. No severity thresholds are set, which can cause uncertainty. Urgency is prominent in the definition, but may not be prominent in patients whose adaptive behavior reduces their propensity to urgency. OAB can co-exist with other common conditions, such as benign prostate enlargement (BPE), stress incontinence or nocturnal polyuria. Consensus led by the International Continence Society can be attempted for aspects such as "fear of leakage." To develop a new definition, more substantive evidence is needed for key elements, and until such evidence is available, full redefinition is not appropriate. Thus, the medical profession should accept constructive compromise and work supportively. The ICI-RS proposes that the terminology is slightly rephrased as: "overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is characterized by urinary urgency, with or without urgency urinary incontinence, usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia, if there is no proven infection or other obvious pathology." More substantive changes would require additional scientific evidence. Strengths, limitations, and practicalities of the definition of OAB were discussed at the ICIRS meeting 2013. Following a presentation of issues, the definition was subjected to expert discussion. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Rortveit, Guri; Bø, Kari; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2007-04-01

    To investigate incidence and prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy and associated risk factors. The data collection was conducted as part of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. We present questionnaire data about urinary incontinence obtained from 43,279 women (response rate 45%) by week 30. We report data on any incontinence, in addition to type, frequency, and amount of incontinence. Potential risk factors were investigated by logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of incontinence increased from 26% before pregnancy to 58% in week 30. The corresponding figures for nulliparous women were 15% and 48%, and for parous women 35% and 67%. The cumulative incidence was 46%. Stress urinary incontinence was the most common type of incontinence in week 30 of pregnancy, experienced by 31% of nulliparous and 42% of parous women. The majority of pregnant women had leakage less than once per week and droplets only, both before and during pregnancy. Parity was a strong and significant risk factor for incontinence in adjusted analyses both before pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4-2.7 for primiparous and OR 3.3, 95% CI 3.1-3.5 for multiparous women) and during pregnancy (ORs 2.0, 95% CI 1.9-2.1 and 2.1, 95% CI 2.0-2.2, respectively). Age and body mass index were weaker, but still statistically significant, risk factors. The prevalence of urinary incontinence increases substantially during pregnancy. Incontinence both before and during pregnancy seems to be associated with parity, age, and body mass index. II.

  13. Enuresis and overactive bladder in children: what is the relationship between these two conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Sampaio Sousa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Evaluate clinical aspects associated with the presence of nocturnal enuresis (NE in children with a diagnosis of overactive bladder (OAB. Material and Methods: A data base of 200 children who were evaluated by a structured questionnaire was analysed retrospectively . OAB was defined as the presence of urinary urgency (n=183 cases and/or daytime urinary incontinence associated with holding maneuvers (n=168 cases. Inclusion criteria were a confirmed diagnosis of OAB, age 5-16 years, and no anatomical or neurological alterations of the urinary tract. Patients were divided into enuretics and non-enuretics. The two groups were compared with respect to sex, age, skin color, presence urinary infection, urgency, urge incontinence, non-urge incontinence, pollakiuria, urinary dysfunction, nocturia, holding maneuvers, number of episodes of enuresis and bowel alterations. In a univariate analysis, the chi-square test was used to compare proportions, with p-values <0.05 being considered significant. A multivariate analysis was conducted to identify independent predictive factors. Results: Enuresis was diagnosed in 141/200 children. The two groups were similar with respect to sex, age and skin color. No difference was found in relation to urinary infection, non-urge incontinence, urinary dysfunction, nocturia, encopresis or constipation. The two groups were significantly different with regard to some symptoms related to OAB such as urgency (p=0.001, urge incontinency (p=0.001 and holding maneuvers (p=0.033. Following multivariate analysis, only holding maneuvers (p=0.022 remained as an independent predictive factor. Conclusion: The only independent predictive factor for resolution of enuresis in children with OAB, as detected in the multivariate analysis, was holding maneuvers.

  14. Detrusor wall thickness compared to other non-invasivemethods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The current study aims to compare the diagnostic accuracy of detrusor wall thickness to othernoninvasive, tools, using pressure flow studies as a reference, in the assessment of bladder outlet, obstructionamong men presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms. Patients and Methods: Men aged 50 or older ...

  15. Neuromodulation of detrusor hyper-reflexia by functional magnetic stimulation of the sacral roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, M K; Shah, P J; Fowler, C; Mundy, A R; Craggs, M D

    1996-07-01

    To investigate the acute effects of functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) on detrusor hyper-reflexia using a multi-pulse magnetic stimulator. Seven male patients with established and intractable detrusor hyper-reflexia following spinal cord injury were studied. No patient was on medication and none had had previous surgery for detrusor hyper-reflexia. After optimization of magnetic stimulation of S2-S4 sacral anterior roots by recording toe flexor electromyograms, unstable detrusor activity was provoked during cystometry by rapid infusion of fluid into the bladder. The provocation test produced consistent and predictable detrusor hyper-reflexia. On some provocations, supramaximal FMS at 20 pulses/s for 5 s was applied at detrusor pressures which were > 15 cmH2O. Following FMS there was an obvious acute suppression of detrusor hyper-reflexia. There was a profound reduction in detrusor contraction, as assessed by the area under the curves of detrusor pressure with time. Functional magnetic stimulation applied over the sacrum can profoundly suppress detrusor hyper-reflexia in man. It may provide a non-invasive method of assessing patients for implantable electrical neuromodulation devices and as a therapeutic option in its own right.

  16. Botulinum toxin for conditions of the female pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khawand, Dominique; Wehbe, Salim; Whitmore, Kristene

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum toxin has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of urinary incontinence associated with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. However, it has also been used off-label for a multitude of other conditions in the female pelvis, including urological, gynecological, and colorectal. This article reviews the most recent data regarding its efficacy and safety, and administration techniques for those conditions. A literature review of the most relevant reports published between 1985 and 2012. Urinary incontinence related to neurogenic detrusor overactivity is currently the only approved indication in the female pelvis. Other supported off-label uses include: idiopathic detrusor overactivity, interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction, anal fissure, anismus, and functional anal pain. Botulinum toxin may effectively and safely be used in many conditions of the female pelvis. More high quality research is needed to better clarify its role in the therapeutic algorithm for those indications.

  17. Delayed Diagnosis of Vesicouterine Fistula After Treatment for Mixed Urinary Incontinence: Menstrual Cup Management and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Leah; Elsamra, Sammy; Hutchinson-Colas, Juana; Segal, Saya

    2016-01-01

    A vesicouterine fistula is a rare form of urogenital fistula, yet there is increasing prevalence in the United States because of the rising rate of cesarean deliveries. Vesicouterine fistulas have various presentations including menouria, hematuria, or urinary incontinence. A 39-year-old multiparous woman presented with urine leakage after her third cesarean delivery. She had been treated for mixed urinary incontinence with overactive bladder medications and a midurethral sling with continued complaints of urine leakage. The patient noticed her symptoms of urine leakage improved during menses when she used a menstrual cup. After confirmation of vesicouterine fistula, the patient underwent robotic-assisted surgery and her symptoms of insensible urine leakage resolved. When evaluating women with urinary incontinence and a history of cesarean deliveries, use of menstrual cup may aid in the diagnosis of vesicouterine fistula. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair with tissue interposition flap is an efficacious minimally invasive method for treatment of vesicouterine fistula.

  18. Evaluation of intra-individual test–re-test variability of uroflowmetry in healthy women and women suffering from stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunacek, Libor; Gärtner, Marcel; Krhut, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis: The objective was to evaluate the intra-individual variability of uroflowmetry (UFM) in healthy control subjects and women suffering from stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence. Methods: A total of 35 healthy controls (group A) and 105 women suffering from urinary...... incontinence were enrolled in the study. Thirty-five women suffered from stress urinary incontinence (group B), 35 women suffered from mixed urinary incontinence (group C), and 35 women with overactive bladder both dry and wet (group D). All participants were asked to perform UFM measurement three times......-individual difference in any of the recorded parameters was identified among the three UFM recordings in groups A, C, and D. The intra-individual variability of the following parameters reached statistical significance in patients suffering from stress urinary incontinence (group B): Qmax (p = 0.0016), Qave (p = 0...

  19. What is Urinary Incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes of urinary incontinence For women, thinning and drying of the skin in the vagina or urethra, ... make some changes in your diet. Alcohol, caffeine, foods high in acid (such as tomato or grapefruit) ...

  20. Vaginal position and length in the bitch: relationship to spaying and urinary incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, S.P.; Holt, P.E.; Parkinson, T.J.; Wathes, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if the vagina might be a suitable site for the measurement of intra-abdominal pressure during cystometry in the bitch, The position of the cranial vagina and vaginal length were measured radiographically and the effects of spaying and urinary Incontinence on these variables were evaluated in 30 continent and 30 incontinent bitches. The study used retrograde vaginourethrograms which had been obtained from animals used in a previous study, The cranial vagina was intra-abdominal on 36 of the vaginourethrograms, being least commonly intra-abdominal in incontinent bitches (11/30), Vaginal position was related linearly to vaginal length and continence status (P<0.01), while its length was related to bodyweight(P<0.01). Allowing for bodyweight, neutered animals had significantly shorter vaginas than entire bitches (P<0.01). Measurement of intra-abdominal pressure with concomitant measurement of intravesical pressure is essential if accurate assessment of detrusor pressure is to be determined during cystometry, The vagina is unlikely to be a useful location from which to measure intra-abdominal pressure since any pressure-measuring catheter inserted into it may fall outside the abdominal pressure zone. This is particularly true of neutered and/or incontinent bitches, the groups in which urodynamic investigations of urinary incontinence are most frequently indicated

  1. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Lains Mota

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training, surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence.

  2. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence. PMID:28124522

  3. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stress Urinary Incontinence Special Procedures What is stress urinary incontinence (SUI)? What causes SUI? What nonsurgical treatment options may help with SUI? What are the surgical treatment options for SUI? What factors are considered when deciding which SUI surgery is ...

  4. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007376.htm Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures To use the sharing features ... are types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ...

  5. Factors Associated with Therapeutic Efficacy of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection for Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Mou Hsiao

    Full Text Available To analyze the predictors of therapeutic efficacy after intravesical botulinum toxin A injection for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB refractory to antimuscarinic therapy.All consecutively OAB patients, who visited the urologic outpatient clinics of a medical center and refractory to antimuscarinic treatment, were prospectively enrolled. All enrolled patients received intravesical injection of 100 U onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox. The Global Response Assessment (GRA score ≥ 2 at 3 months after Botox injection was defined as a successful treatment, otherwise failed.Overall, 89 patients received intravesical injection. Eighty patients, including 42 men and 38 women, had received follow-up at 3 months. The overall success rate was 63.8%. The global response assessment, urgency severity score, urgency, urgency urinary incontinence and frequency episodes, and functional bladder capacity improved after treatment. However, post-void residual volume (PVR increased, and voiding efficiency (VE decreased after treatment. Female gender (odds ratio = 3.75 was the only independent factor associated with the success. Female gender (coefficient = 0.74, low baseline overactive bladder symptoms score (coefficient = -0.12 and the presence of OAB-wet (coefficient = 0.79 were independent factors associated with therapeutic efficacy (i.e., GRA score. VE (odds ratio = 0.062 was the only predictor for a large PVR at 3 months. The optimum cutoff value of VE was <87% with the area under the ROC curve being 0.64 (sensitivity = 63.8%, specificity = 57.1%.The therapeutic effects of Botox can persist till 6 months after treatment. Female gender, low overactive bladder symptoms score and OAB-wet are associated better therapeutic efficacy, and low baseline VE is associated with large PVR. These findings can serve as an initial guide or assist in consultation regarding the treatment of OAB patients with Botox injection.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01657409.

  6. A pharmacoeconomic evaluation of two new products for the treatment of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikian, S R; Casciano, J; Doyle, J J; Tarride, J E; Casciano, R N

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost effectiveness of two new treatments for overactive bladder: once-daily controlled-release oxybutynin, and twice-daily tolterodine, with a comparison with oxybutynin immediate release. Also estimated are the potential cost savings to a health plan budget resulting from increased utilization of the most cost-effective treatment. The design is a decision-tree model based on clinical trial data and expert panel estimates with a six-month time horizon conducted from a payer perspective. The primary outcome measure used in the analysis was treatment success, with success defined as zero incontinence episodes per week. A secondary outcome measure was the expected number of continent days. As first-line therapy, controlled-release oxybutynin is the most cost-effective treatment as measured by expected cost per success and expected cost per continent days. Controlled-release, once-daily oxybutynin yielded the highest expected success rate and the highest number of expected continent days. The expected cost of treatment with controlled-release oxybutynin was lower than tolterodine and equivalent to immediate-release oxybutynin. Increased utilization of controlled-release oxybutynin results in an estimated saving of $0.007 to $0.026 per member per month for a hypothetical HMO. The model was robust, incorporating all assumptions based on univariate and multivariate sensitivity analysis. Initiating treatment with controlled-release oxybutynin is the most cost-effective approach to treatment for overactive bladder.

  7. Correlation between overactive bladder symptom score and neuropsychological parameters in Alzheimer’s disease patients with lower urinary tract symptom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ha Bum; Choi, Don Kyoung; Lee, Seong Ho; Cho, Sung Tae; Na, Hae Ri; Park, Moon Ho

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To examine an association between the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) and neuropsychological parameters. Moreover, we investigate the factors that affect each item in the questionnaire. Materials and Methods A total of 376 patients (males: 184; females: 192) with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were recruited. Cognitive testing was conducted using the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale, Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), and Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Lower urinary tract symptom (LUTS) was assessed using OABSS and voiding diary. Results The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) (defined as OABSS ≥3 with an urgency score of ≥2) in patients with AD was 72.6%. Among the OAB subjects, the most common severity of symptom was moderate (72.6%), followed by mild (21.2%), and severe (5.8%). It was found that OABSS had a very high correlation with aging (r=0.75; p<0.001). When compared with neuropsychological parameters, it was found that OABSS was highly correlated with the CDR scores (r=0.446; p<0.001). However, no significant correlation was found between the changes in OABSS scores and those in other neuropsychological parameters. Based on the individual symptom scores, urgency incontinence was highly correlated with the CDR scores (r=0.43; p<0.001). Conclusions OABSS is a useful tool in assessing AD patients with LUTS. There was a consistent positive association between OABSS severity, including urgency incontinence, and CDR scores. PMID:27802001

  8. Incontinence: The Potential Budget Buster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Someone who lives with incontinence, whether bowel, bladder, or both, knows the social stigma and personal toll on his life. Incontinence is the ever-present shadowy silhouette lurking over almost every decision, sometimes requiring complex preplanning. In this article, the author describes the challenges of incontinence and discusses how she…

  9. Reoperation for urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss Hansen, Margrethe; Lose, Gunnar; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    for urinary incontinence (retropubic midurethral tape, transobturator tape, urethral injection therapy, Burch colposuspension, pubovaginal slings, and miscellaneous operations). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for factors......BACKGROUND: The synthetic midurethral slings were introduced in the 1990s and were rapidly replaced the Burch colposuspension as the gold standard treatment for urinary incontinence. It has been reported that the retropubic midurethral tape has an objective and subjective cure rate of 85% at 5...... years of follow-up, but the rate of reoperation after retropubic midurethral tape at the long-term follow-up is less well described. The existing literature specifies an overall lifetime rate of reoperation of about 8-9% after an initial operation for urinary incontinence. There are, however...

  10. Does the Severity of Overactive Bladder Symptoms Correlate With Risk for Female Sexual Dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliato, Cássia Raquel Teatin; Melotti, Iane Glauce Ribeiro; Junior, Luiz Carlos Santos; Britto, Luiz Gustavo Oliveira; Riccetto, Cássio Luiz Zanettini

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have associated overactive bladder (OAB) with female sexual dysfunction (FSD); however, there are no reports using a quantitative approach to measure OAB severity and to relate OAB to the risk of FSD. To evaluate women with OAB and to correlate the severity of their urinary symptoms with their sexual function. This cross-sectional study included 267 women older than 18 years with untreated OAB. All subjects completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Overactive Bladder (ICIQ-OAB) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Linear regression was used to analyze the association between variables and the numeric FSFI score, and categorical FSFI scores were analyzed using logistic regression. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlation between ICIQ-OAB results and the different FSFI domains. The significance level was 5%. Subjects' mean age was 50.2 ± 11.9 years. Most women were married, had at least three children, and were postmenopausal (54.3%). Mean FSFI total score was 19.2 ± 9.8. For menopausal status, 65.6% of premenopausal women had a risk for FSD vs 86.2% of postmenopausal women. Mean ICIQ-OAB score was 10 ± 3.17. Postmenopausal women had the following risk factors statistically associated with sexual dysfunction: age, ICIQ score, and marital status. For these women, greater OAB severity, especially those with urgency and/or urge incontinence, was associated with worse scores in the arousal, lubrication, orgasm, and sexual pain domains. However, there was no statistically significant association for premenopausal women. Health professionals have to pay attention to OAB in women because of the greater risk for FSD in these patients. The strength was using a quantitative approach to measure OAB severity in a larger population. Limitations include a convenience sample with no power calculation; exclusion of women who did not have sexual intercourse in the past month; unmeasured distress

  11. Relation between flexor spasms, uninhibited detrusor contractions and anal sphincter activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E; Petersen, T; Schrøder, H D

    1986-01-01

    The time relation between flexor spasms, detrusor contractions and anal sphincter activity was recorded in a consecutive series of 111 patients with hyperreflexic bladder and flexor spasms. In 76 of the patients flexor spasms were preceded by detrusor contractions. The opposite pattern, namely de...

  12. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  13. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  14. Prospective analyses of female urinary incontinence symptoms following total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Tamaki, Tatsuya; Oinuma, Kazuhiro; Tomoe, Hikaru; Akita, Keiichi

    2017-04-01

    Some patients with hip osteoarthritis report that urinary incontinence (UI) is improved following total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, the type and severity of UI remain unclear. In this study, we hypothesize that both stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and urge urinary incontinence (UUI) are improved after THA. We assess the characteristics of UI and discuss the anatomical factors related to UI and THA for improved treatment outcome. Fifty patients with UI who underwent direct anterior-approach THA were evaluated. Type of UI was assessed using four questionnaires: Core Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score (CLSS), Urogenital Distress Inventory Short Form (UDI-6), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine were measured using ultrasound technology. Hip-joint function was evaluated using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and range of motion (ROM). Of the 50 patients, 21 had SUI, 16 had mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), and eight had urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). In total, 36 patients were better than improved (72 %). The rate of cured and improved was 76 % for SUI, 100 % MUI, and 50 % UUI. The improvement of ROM was more significant in cured or improved patients than in stable or worse patients. Improvement in mild UI may be an added benefit for those undergoing THA for hip-joint disorders. These data suggest that for patients with hip-joint disorder, hip-joint treatment could prove to also be a useful treatment for UI.

  15. [Combined lumbosacral and vaginal physiotherapy in the treatment of overactive bladder in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neĭmark, B A; Neĭmark, A I; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Tishchenko, G E; Gol'braĭkh, G E

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of combined application of physical factors including lumbosacral magnetotherapy and vaginal vibromagnetic impact is shown in 48 postmenopausal women (mean age 62.5 +/- 1.6 years) with overactive bladder (OAB). Choice of this combination is explained by a multifactorial OAB pathogenesis and degenerative spinal diseases often encountered in postmenopausal women (70.8% in this study). The exposures of the spine and the bladder (vaginal) were made one after the other with duration of the first stage 10-15 min, of the second--5-7 min, the course consisted of 10-12 procedures. The results of the treatment were assessed by urination rhythm, volume, number of incontinence episodes. Quality of life was evaluated according to special questionnaires. Trophic function of the spinal cord and innervation of the bladder were studied by n. tibialis conduction measured by electroneuromyography (ENMG). The following results were obtained: reduction of urinations for 24 hours by 36.9%, urgent episodes--by 44%, urgent incontinence--by 59.7%. Voiding volume significantly increased (by 26%). A total score of anxiety related to OAB fell by 51.3%. M-response amplitude in ENMG rose 1.5-fold, while velocity of the impulse conduction along the n. tibialis enhanced 1.2-fold. The technique was accomplished with AMUS-01-Intramag device and attachment to it Rectomassager made in Russia.

  16. Impact of overactive bladder on work productivity in the United States: results from EpiLUTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Chris C; Coyne, Karin S; Vats, Vasudha; Kopp, Zoe S; Irwin, Debra E; Wagner, Todd H

    2009-03-01

    Little research has focused on the impact of overactive bladder (OAB) on work productivity. Consequently, the impact of OAB and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) on work productivity was evaluated in employed men and women aged 40 to 65 in the United States. Data from a population-based, cross-sectional Internet survey were used to examine the impact of OAB symptoms on work productivity. US participants aged 40 to 65 working full- or part-time were included in the analysis. Participants were asked about the incidence of OAB and other LUTS and a series of questions about work productivity. Descriptive statistics and linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate outcome differences for men and women by the OAB groups of no/minimal symptoms, continent OAB, and incontinent OAB. The response rate was 60%, and a total of 2876 men and 2820 women were analyzed. Men and women with incontinent OAB reported the lowest levels of work productivity and highest rates of daily work interference. Storage symptoms associated with OAB were most consistently associated with work productivity outcomes; however, significant associations were also found for other storage, voiding, and postmicturition LUTS. In this large US population-based study, OAB was highly prevalent and was associated with lower levels of work productivity. These findings add to the literature documenting the burden of OAB and other LUTS, underscoring the need for increased screening and treatment.

  17. [Treatment of Urinary incontinence associated with genital prolapse: Clinical practrice guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesse, A; Cardot, V; Basset, V; Le Normand, L; Donon, L

    2016-07-01

    Prolapse and urinary incontinence are frequently associated. Patente (or proven) stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is defined by a leakage of urine that occurs with coughing or Valsalva, in the absence of any prolapse reduction manipulation. Masked urinary incontinence results in leakage of urine occurring during reduction of prolapse during the clinical examination in a patient who does not describe incontinence symptoms at baseline. The purpose of this chapter is to consider on the issue of systematic support or not of urinary incontinence, patent or hidden, during the cure of pelvic organs prolapse by abdominal or vaginal approach. This work is based on an systematic review of the literature (PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE) for meta-analyzes, randomized trials, registries, literature reviews, controlled studies and major not controlled studies, published on the subject. Its implementation has followed the methodology of the HAS on the recommendations for clinical practice, with a scientific argument (with the level of evidence, NP) and a recommendation grade (A, B, C, and professional agreement). In case of patent IUE, concomitant treatment of prolapse and SUI reduces the risk of postoperative SUI. However, the isolated treatment of prolapse can treat up to 30% of preoperative SUI. Concomitant treatment of SUI exposed to a specific overactive bladder and dysuria morbidity. The presence of a hidden IUE represents a risk of postoperative SUI, but there is no clinical or urodynamic test to predict individually the risk of postoperative SUI. Moreover, the isolated treatment of prolapse can treat up to 60% of the masked SUI. Concomitant treatment of the hidden IUE therefore exposes again to overtreatment and a specific overactive bladder and dysuria morbidity. In case of overt or hidden urinary incontinence, concomitant treatment of SUI and prolapse reduces the risk of postoperative SUI but exposes to a specific

  18. Are Electronic and Paper Questionnaires Equivalent to Assess Patients with Overactive Bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Cristina; Farhan, Bilal; Nguyen, Nobel; Zhang, Lishi; Do, Rebecca; Nguyen, Danh V; Ghoniem, Gamal

    2018-03-30

    Overactive bladder syndrome is defined as urinary urgency, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency urinary incontinence in the absence of urinary tract infection or another obvious pathological condition. Electronic questionnaires have been used in a few specialties with the hope of improving treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction. However, they have not been widely used in the urological field. When treating overactive bladder, the main outcome is to improve patient quality of life. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate whether electronic questionnaires would be equally accepted as or preferred to paper questionnaires. The secondary objective was to look at the preference in relation to patient age, education and iPad® tablet familiarity. We prospectively evaluated the iList® electronic questionnaire application using a friendly iPad tablet in patients with overactive bladder who presented to the urology clinic at our institution. Each of the 80 patients who were recruited randomly completed the validated OABSS (Overactive Bladder Symptom Score) and the PPBC (Patient Perception of Bladder Condition) questionnaires in paper and electronic format on the tablet. Variables potentially associated with the outcomes of interest included demographic data, questionnaire method preference, patient response rate and iPad familiarity. We used the 2-sided Z-test to determine whether the proportion of patients who considered the tablet to be the same, better or much better than paper was significantly greater than 50%. The 2-sided chi-square test was applied to assess whether the intervention effect significantly differed among the demographic subgroups. A total of 80 patients 21 to 87 years old were enrolled in the study from November 2015 to August 2016. Of the patients 53% were female and 49% were 65 years or younger. The incidence of those who considered the tablet to be the same or better than paper was 82.5% (95% CI 74

  19. Qualidade de vida em mulheres após tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço com fisioterapia Women's life quality after physical therapy treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Tirolli Rett

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETVO: comparar a qualidade de vida (QV antes e após tratamento fisioterápico de mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE. MÉTODOS: ensaio clínico não controlado com 26 mulheres com queixa clínica predominantemente de IUE. Foram excluídas mulheres na pós-menopausa, com hiperatividade do detrusor, com cistocele grau II ou maior e tratamento cirúrgico/conservador anterior. O tratamento fisioterápico constituiu-se em 12 sessões individuais de cinesioterapia do assoalho pélvico associadas ao biofeedback eletromiográfico, e as mesmas realizavam 200 contrações divididas entre fásicas (rápidas e tônicas (lentas. Para avaliar a QV, todas responderam ao King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ, antes e após o tratamento. Os dados foram descritos em freqüências, médias e desvios-padrões, medianas, mínimos e máximos. Os escores do KHQ foram comparados pelo teste de Wilcoxon para amostras pareadas, com nível de significância de 0,05. RESULTADOS: houve uma diminuição dos sintomas urinários, particularmente da freqüência urinária, noctúria, urgência miccional e perdas urinárias aos esforços. Observou-se uma melhora significativa nos escores dos domínios do KHQ: percepção da saúde (49,0±24,0 versus 26,9±15,7; p=0,0015, impacto da incontinência (78,2±28,2 versus 32,1±30,5; p=0,001, limitações das atividades diárias (75,0±28,2 versus 13,5±22,6; pPURPOSE: to compare women's quality of life (QoL before and after physical therapy treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI. METHODS: an uncontrolled clinical trial of 26 women, who had mainly complaints of SUI. Post-menopausal women with overactive bladder, cystocele >grade II and previous surgical/conservative treatments were excluded from the study. The physiotherapy treatment relied on 12 individual pelvic floor exercises assisted by electromyographyc-biofeedback sessions. A total of 200 contractions were carried out, divided in phasic (quick and tonic

  20. Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation for the treatment of women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Diana; Han, Julia; Neuberger, Molly M; Moy, M Louis; Wallace, Sheila A; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Dahm, Philipp

    2015-03-18

    evidence using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. We included in the analysis one small sham-controlled randomised trial of 173 women performed in the United States. Participants enrolled in this study had been diagnosed with stress UI and were randomly assigned to transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation (treatment) or a sham surgery using a non-functioning catheter (no treatment). Mean age of participants in the 12-month multi-centre trial was 50 years (range 22 to 76 years).Of three patient-important primary outcomes selected for this systematic review, the number of women reporting UI symptoms after intervention was not reported. No serious adverse events were reported for the transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation arm or the sham treatment arm during the 12-month trial. Owing to high risk of bias and imprecision, we downgraded the quality of evidence for this outcome to low. The effect of transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation on the number of women with an incontinence quality of life (I-QOL) score improvement ≥ 10 points at 12 months was as follows: RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.62; participants = 142, but the confidence interval was wide. For this outcome, the quality of evidence was also low as the result of high risk of bias and imprecision.We found no evidence on the number of women undergoing repeat continence surgery. The risk of other adverse events (pain/dysuria (RR 5.73, 95% CI 0.75 to 43.70; participants = 173); new detrusor overactivity (RR 1.36, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.93; participants = 173); and urinary tract infection (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.24 to 3.86; participants = 173) could not be established reliably as the trial was small. Evidence was insufficient for assessment of whether use of transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation was associated with an increased rate of urinary retention, haematuria and hesitancy compared with sham treatment in 173 participants. The GRADE

  1. Changes in incontinence after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Anne Raabjerg; Jensen, Trine Dalsgaard; Lauszus, Finn Friis

    2017-01-01

    . Sample size calculation indicated that 102 women had to be included. The incontinence status was estimated by a Danish version of the ICIG questionnaire; further, visual analogue scale, dynamometer for hand grip, knee extension strength and balance were applied. Work capacity was measured ergometer cycle......Purpose: Information about the perioperative incontinence following hysterectomy is limited. To advance the postoperative rehabilitation further we need more information about qualitative changes in incontinence, fatigue and physical function of patients undergoing hysterectomy. Methods: 108...

  2. Preventing urinary incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Diane K; Cardozo, Linda; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich

    2013-10-01

    This review examines the evidence to date, analyzes specific risk factors and assesses the ability to prevent urinary incontinence in women, while providing clinical recommendations. More extraordinary risk factors such as ethnicity and race, mixed and fecal incontinence, iatrogenic and neurogenic factors should be discussed in a follow-up report. Studies have revealed that certain factors place women at risk for developing urinary incontinence, including age, obesity, diabetes, pregnancy and delivery, high-impact physical exercise factors and estrogen deficiency. Healthcare providers should screen women who are at risk for developing urinary incontinence and institute specific interventions, specifically behavioral and even rehabilitative techniques, to prevent this prevalent and distressing condition.

  3. High-power Magnetotherapy: A New Weapon in Urinary Incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadalà, Maria; Palmieri, Beniamino; Malagoli, Andrea; Laurino, Carmen

    2017-06-18

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is one of the most common urinary system diseases that mostly affects women but also men. We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) as potential UI treatment with improvements in the pelvic floor musculature, urodynamic tests and quality of life. A total of 20 UI patients (10 females and 10 men, mean age 64, 14 years), including 10 with stress UI, four with urgency UI and six with mixed UI, were treated with FMS (20 min/session) twice a week for 3 weeks. The patients' impressions, records in urinary diaries, and scores of three life stress questionnaires (overactive bladder symptom questionnaire [OAB-q], urogenital distress inventory questionnaire-short form [UDI-6], incontinence impact questionnaire-short form [IIQ-7]) were performed pre- and post-treatment. Significant reductions (P < 0.01) of micturition number and nocturia after magnetic treatment were evidenced. The urodynamic tests recorded a significant increase in cystometric capacity (147 ± 51.3%), in maximum urethral closure pressure (110 ± 34%), in urethral functional length (99.8 ± 51.8%), and in pressure transmission ratio (147 ± 51.3%) values compared with the baseline values. These preliminary findings suggest that FMS with Magneto STYM (twice weekly for 3 weeks) improves the UI and may be an effective treatment for this urogenital disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. CD34-positive interstitial cells of the human detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle; Hansen, Alastair; Smedts, Frank

    2007-01-01

    using a panel of antibodies directed against CD117/c-kit, CD34, CD31, S100, tryptase, neurofilament, NSE, Factor-VIII and GFAP. A striking finding was an interstitial type of cell which is CD34 immunoreactive (CD34-ir) but CD117/c-kit negative. The cells have a tentacular morphology, enveloping...... flattened processes, ramifying primarily in a bipolar fashion. Using immunoelectron microscopy (I-TEM) it was possible to view CD34 gold labelling of cells corresponding to interstitial cells. Although similar CD34-positive cells have been demonstrated in the bowel wall, they have never been described...... in the detrusor. The ontogeny and function of CD34-ir, a kit-negative cell, is unknown, but it may be involved in smooth muscle contraction....

  5. Drug-induced urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsakiris, Peter; Oelke, Matthias; Michel, Martin C.

    2008-01-01

    Physiological urinary continence depends on many factors that are potentially vulnerable to adverse drug effects, which may lead to incontinence. In principle, drugs could cause incontinence by lowering bladder outlet resistance and/or by increasing intravesical pressure, which disrupts the normal

  6. Faecal incontinence in myotonic dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Abercrombie, J; Rogers, J; Swash, M

    1998-01-01

    Two siblings with myotonic dystrophy presented for treatment of faecal incontinence. The pathophysiology of this functional disorder is described with the results of anorectal manometry, EMG, and biopsy of smooth and striated muscle of the anorectal sphincters. Both medical and surgical management of the incontinence was unsatisfactory in the long term. Involvement of gastrointestinal musculature is a characteristic feature the disease.



  7. Selective detrusor activation by electrical sacral nerve root stimulation in spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkhoff, N. J.; Wijkstra, H.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Debruyne, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    Electrical sacral nerve root stimulation can be used in spinal cord injury patients to induce urinary bladder contraction. However, existing stimulation methods activate simultaneously both the detrusor muscle and the urethral sphincter. Urine evacuation is therefore only possible using poststimulus

  8. Evaluation of Overactive Bladder in Male Antidepressant Users: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Solmaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose In this study, we investigated overactive bladder (OAB functions in male patients who used antidepressant drugs (ADs that were previously examined in female patients, based on conflicting data in literature regarding the effects of AD on OAB and the differences between male and female urinary system physiologies (anatomical and hormonal. Methods The study included 202 male patients (a control group of 90 healthy subjects, and an experimental group of 112 patients taking ADs for different disorders. All the patients completed the overactive bladder-validated 8 (OAB-V8 questionnaire, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDS. Results The OAB-V8, ICIQ-SF, and BDS scores for the antidepressant users were significantly higher than those of the control group. The highest prevalence of OAB symptoms was observed in patients taking venlafaxine (68.2%, and the lowest prevalence was in patients taking sertraline (28.0%. Moreover, the frequency of OAB between the antidepressant groups was statistically significant. The univariate logistic regression analyses showed a significant relationship between the presence of OAB, antidepressant usage, BDS score, and the age of a patient. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, the association between the presence of OAB and antidepressant usage was statistically significant. Conclusions The present study showed that the incidence of OAB and the severity of OAB symptoms increased in males using antidepressants for various disorders. This may have been due to unique pharmacological effects, on a molecular or individual level, of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.

  9. Adherence to fesoterodine in women with overactive bladder in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, M; Porta, O; Pubill, J; Castillo, M T; Mora, I; Huguet, E; Ortega, J A; Martínez, E

    2015-05-01

    To assess the short-term compliance with fesoterodine treatment and to identify the reasons for lack of adherence and discontinuation in routine clinical practice. The secondary aim was to estimate the patient-reported outcomes. This was an observational retrospective, multicenter study conducted in a sample of women with overactive bladder on fesoterodine treatment for at least three months. Adherence to medication was assessed using the Morisky-Green test. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF), Overactive Bladder Questionnaire Short Form (OAB-qSF), and Treatment Benefit Scale (TBS). One hundred and twenty women with a mean age [standard deviation (SD)] of 62.2 (12.0) years with severe OAB [mean (SD) ICIQ-SF score 13.2 (4.0)] were included. 42.1% of the patients were considered compliant with fesoterodine treatment. The main causes for non-compliance/discontinuation stated by the remaining 57.9% of the patients were adverse events (62.2%) and lack of clinical benefits (20.0%). The illness status as well as the patient-perceived bother occasioned by the OAB symptoms and their impact on the quality of life improved significantly after three months on fesoterodine treatment (p<0.0001). Most of the patients stated that the current state of their urinary problems had greatly improved/ improved. In routine clinical practice, a high percentage of patients were adherent to fesoterodine and perceived the benefit that the treatment provided them three months after starting treatment. However, more than half of the study population failed to comply or discontinued the treatment mainly due to intolerance or lack of efficacy. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation on lower urinary tract function in normal and spinal cord injury mice with overactive bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zaghloul

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is a monumental problem affecting quality of life following neurotrauma, such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Proper function of the bladder and its associated structures depends on coordinated activity of the neuronal circuitry in the spinal cord and brain. Disconnection between the spinal and brain centers controlling the LUT causes fundamental changes in the mechanisms involved in the micturition and storage reflexes. We investigated the effects of cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation (c-tsDCS) of the lumbosacral spine on bladder and external urinary sphincter (EUS) functions. Approach. We used cystometry and electromyography (EMG), in mice with and without SCI. Main results. c-tsDCS caused initiation of the micturition reflex in urethane-anesthetized normal mice with depressed micturition reflexes. This effect was associated with normalized EUS-EMG activity. Moreover, in urethane-anesthetized normal mice with expressed micturition reflexes, c-tsDCS increased the firing frequency, amplitude, and duration of EUS-EMG activity. These effects were associated with increased maximum intravesical pressure (P max) and intercontraction interval (ICI). In conscious normal animals, c-tsDCS caused significant increases in P max, ICI, threshold pressure (P thres), baseline pressure (P base), and number and amplitude of non-voiding contractions (NVCnumb and P im, respectively). In conscious mice with severe contusive SCI and overactive bladder, c-tsDCS increased P max, ICI, and P thres, but decreased P base, NVCnumb, and P im. c-tsDCS reduced the detrusor-overactivity/cystometry ratio, which is a measure of bladder overactivity associated with renal deterioration. Significance. These results indicate that c-tsDCS induces robust modulation of the lumbosacral spinal-cord circuitry that controls the LUT.

  11. Urodynamics in a community-dwelling population of females 80 years or older: which motive? Which diagnosis?

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    Françoise A. Valentini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine why community-dwelling women aged 80 years or over were referred for urodynamic evaluation despite their advanced age and which urodynamic diagnosis was made. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred consecutive females (80-93 years were referred to our urodynamics outpatient clinic for evaluation of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS between 2005 and 2008. Clinical evaluation comprised of a previous history of LUTS, previous medical history of neurological disease or dementia, pelvic floor dysfunction or prior pelvic surgery. Exclusion criteria were complete retention and severe dementia involving failure to understand simple instructions. Assessed items were results of uroflows (free flow and intubated flow, cystometry and urethral pressure profilometry, and final urodynamic diagnosis. RESULTS: The main complaint evoked by the patients was incontinence (65.0% of which 61.5% was "complicated" and urgency was reported by 70.0%. Interpretable free flow at arrival was very low (44.0%. Prevalence of detrusor overactivity was high, found in 45 patients of whom 16 had detrusor hyperactivity with impaired detrusor contractility. Detrusor overactivity and urgency were strongly associated (p = 0.004. Twenty-five patients had intrinsic sphincteric deficiency alone and 15 detrusor underactivity. CONCLUSION: In this particular community-dwelling with an elderly female population, urodynamics is easily feasible. Incontinence, mainly "complicated" is the more frequent complaint and urgency the more frequent symptom. Urodynamic diagnosis underlines the high incidence of detrusor overactivity as well as impaired detrusor function.

  12. Short-term Effects of a Systematized Bladder Training Program for Idiopathic Overactive Bladder: A Prospective Study

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    Hahn-Ey Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was to investigate whether a systematized bladder training (BT program is effective for patients with idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 105 patients with OAB from March 2009 to November 2011. We developed a 30 minutes BT program, which consisted of first, refraining from going to the bathroom after feeling an urge to void, second, in order to stop thinking about voiding, ceasing action and thought temporarily, and third, performing pelvic floor exercises 5 to 6 times. Before and after BT, the patients filled out voiding diaries as well as the following questionnaires; International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire for overactive bladder (ICIQ-OAB, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, overactive bladder questionnaire (OAB-q, the short form 36-item health survey (SF-36 questionnaire, the work productivity and activity impairment questionnaire, and a patients’ perception of treatment benefit (PPTB. Results: A final analysis was performed from on 85 patients (38 male, 47 female with idiopathic OAB. After the first BT, the results of the ICIQ-OAB showed improvement in frequency, nocturia, and urgency (P<0.05, and all domains of IPSS questionnaires showed significant improvement (P<0.05. Among the SF-36 domains, the role-physical domain showed significant improvement after the first BT, and the general health domain showed significant improvement after the second. The voiding diaries showed statistically significant changes in maximal voided volume after the first BT, and nocturia index and nocturnal polyuria index after the second BT. According to the PPTB questionnaire, the perceived usefulness of BT increased after each session, and almost all of the patients replied that BT improved their symptoms. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that BT was effective in improving many OAB related symptoms and quality of life in patients with idiopathic OAB. More clinical

  13. Changes in incontinence after hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Anne Raabjerg; Jensen, Trine Dalsgaard; Lauszus, Finn Friis; Kallfa, Ervin; Madsen, Mogens Rørbæk

    2017-10-01

    Information about the perioperative incontinence following hysterectomy is limited. To advance the postoperative rehabilitation further we need more information about qualitative changes in incontinence, fatigue and physical function of patients undergoing hysterectomy. 108 patients undergoing planned hysterectomy were compared pre- and postoperatively. In a sub-study of the prospective follow-up study the changes in incontinence, postoperative fatigue, quality of life, physical function, and body composition were evaluated preoperatively, 13 and 30 days postoperatively. Sample size calculation indicated that 102 women had to be included. The incontinence status was estimated by a Danish version of the ICIG questionnaire; further, visual analogue scale, dynamometer for hand grip, knee extension strength and balance were applied. Work capacity was measured ergometer cycle together with lean body mass by impedance. Quality of life was assessed using the SF-36 questionnaire. Patients were examined preoperatively and twice postoperatively. In total 41 women improved their incontinence after hysterectomy and 10 women reported deterioration. Preoperative stress incontinence correlated with BMI (r = 0.25, p effect on incontinence and de-novo cure.

  14. Impact of overactive bladder symptoms on work activity: The ACTIVHA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapariz, M; Mora, A M; Roset, M

    2018-04-01

    To analyse the impact of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms on the work activity of patients in Spain. An observational, multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted with 149 urologists and 131 gynaecologists of Spain and included patients diagnosed with OAB, according to clinical judgment, who were of working age (18-65 years). We collected sociodemographic, clinical and work activity data. The patients filled out the Bladder Control Self-Assessment Questionnaire (B-SAQ) and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire-General Health (WPAI-GH). The effect of each symptom on the daily and occupational activity was assessed. The results were stratified according to sex and the presence of emergency and urinary incontinence (UI) according to the B-SAQ. We assessed 768 patients (89% women), with a mean (SD) age of 52.5 (9.3) years and 2.6 (2.6) years of OAB progression. The most common symptoms according to the patients were urgent urination (89.8%), nocturia (75.7%), urge incontinence (68.5%) and frequent urination (68.2%). Ninety-six percent of the patients adopted adaptive measures for their OAB. According to the B-SAQ, 543 patients (71%) presented urgent urination; of these, 294 (54%) showed UI. The symptom that most affected work activity was frequent urination (59.8%). According to the WPAI-GH, the patients reported an impact of 32% during the workday (41% in patients with urgent urination and UI) and a loss of work time of 6.5% (9.9% in patients with urgent urination and UI). The symptoms of OAB negatively affect work activity, especially in patients who have urgent urination and UI. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Aging and recurrent urinary tract infections are associated with bladder dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Li; Chen, Gin-Den; Chen, Yi-Ching; Huang, Chien-Ning; Ng, Soo-Cheen

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the diversity of urodynamic findings and temporal effects on bladder dysfunction in diabetes as well as to evaluate the predisposing factors that attenuate the storage and voiding function of diabetic women. In this prospective study, 181 women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and lower urinary tract dysfunction underwent complete urogynecological evaluations and urodynamic studies. The patients' histories of DM and the treatment agents used were documented from chart records and interviews. The urodynamic diagnoses were recategorized into two groups for comparison, namely overactive detrusor (detrusor overactivity and/or increased bladder sensation as well as mixed incontinence) and voiding dysfunction (detrusor hyperactivity with insufficient contractility and detrusor underactivity with poor voiding efficiency) in order to evaluate the temporal effect of DM on diabetic bladder dysfunction. The development of bladder dysfunction showed a trend involving time-dependent progression, beginning with storage problems (i.e. advancing from urodynamic stress incontinence to detrusor overactivity and/or increased bladder sensation) and eventually led to impaired voiding function. The duration of DM relative to the urodynamic diagnoses of these women was longer in women with voiding dysfunction (6.8 ± 2.8 years with urodynamic stress incontinence, 7.3 ± 6.5 years with detrusor overactivity and/or increased bladder sensation, and 10.4 ± 8.3 years with women with voiding dysfunction). Notwithstanding these findings, stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that age and recurrent urinary tract infections were the two independent factors associated with developing voiding dysfunction. The urodynamic study revealed a temporal effect on bladder function, and women with diabetic voiding dysfunction were found to have had a longer duration of DM than women with an overactive detrusor. However, aging and recurrent

  16. SUBJECTIVE CURE RATES AFTER TVT PROCEDURE FOR TREATMENT OF FEMALE URINARY INCONTINENCE – A QUESTIONNAIRE BASED STUDY

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    Igor But

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to assess the subjective cure rate after the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT procedure in patients with stress (SUI and mixed (MUI urinary incontinence.Methods. This is a questionnaire based study done in 43 patients with SUI and 52 patients with MUI. In the assessement of the subjective cure rate the visual analogue scale and the symptom assessment index (SAI were used. Data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics.Results. The subjective cure rate assessed 19.6 months after TVT amounted to 89.3%. Urinary incontinence after TVT procedure was noted in 26 patients (27.4% and the majority of these women (73.1% were diagnosed with MUI. In patients with SUI and postoperative stable bladder a higher success rate was observed (96.7%. In 18.6% patients with SUI, de novo overactive bladder symptoms occurred. These patients estimated a significantly (p = 0.027 lower cure rate (81.9% after TVT procedure. In patients with MUI, the cure rate after TVT amounted to 85.6%. The subjective cure rate was lower (79.4% in case of persistent overactive bladder symptoms. However, it was significantly higher (97.5% in case of a postoperatively stable bladder (p = 0.016. In the group of MUI patients, the symptoms of overactive bladder disease resolved spontaneously in 17 patients (32.7% postoperatively. The patients were satisfied with TVT and 92.6% would recommend this procedure to others.Conclusions. The TVT procedure is a very effective method of treatment for stress as well as mixed urinary incontinence. The success rate of the procedure is high, however, it is influenced by bladder activity.

  17. Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activities, such as golfing, playing tennis, bowling, running, biking, weight lifting, gardening or mowing, and vacuuming for ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Urinary Incontinence Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  18. Bowel Control Problems (Fecal Incontinence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Hemorrhoids Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & ... Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Constipation Diarrhea Hemorrhoids Related Diagnostic Tests Colonoscopy Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Lower GI ...

  19. Evaluation and treatment of the overactive bladder Avaliação e tratamento da bexiga hiperativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Rovner

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The overactive bladder is characterized by symptoms of frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence, substantially affecting the quality of life of millions of people throughout the world. The symptoms are associated with significant social, psychological, occupational, domestic, physical, and sexual problems. Despite the considerable impact of this condition on quality of life, sufferers are often unwilling to discuss their problem with family members or health care professionals. This situation is unfortunate, for much can be done to alleviate the symptoms of this distressing condition. It is therefore of utmost importance that medical education about symptoms of the overactive bladder and other related problems be improved to help health care professionals identify and treat patients who will benefit from therapy. This article reviews current thinking regarding definition, epidemiology, quality of life effects, evaluation, and management of the overactive bladder.A bexiga hiperativa é caracterizada pelos sintomas de freqüência, urgência e urge-incontinência e afeta de forma significativa o estilo de vida de milhões de pessoas em todo o mundo. Os sintomas são responsáveis por problemas nas esferas social, psicológica, ocupacional, doméstica, física e sexual dos pacientes. Apesar do considerável impacto desta condição sobre a qualidade de vida, grande parte dos pacientes reluta em discutir o problema com membros da família ou profissionais de saúde. Esta situação é lamentável, já que existem muitas maneiras de aliviar os sintomas da hiperatividade vesical. Por essa razão, é fundamental que se aprimore a educação médica sobre os sintomas de hiperatividade vesical e outros problemas relacionados, de modo a preparar os profissionais de saúde a identificar e tratar os pacientes com esta condição. Este artigo é uma revisão dos conceitos atuais, definição, epidemiologia, efeitos sobre a qualidade de vida, avaliação e

  20. Estimated cost of overactive bladder in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasopsanti, Kriangsak; Santi-Ngamkun, Apirak; Pornprasit, Kanokwan

    2007-11-01

    To estimate the annual direct and indirect costs of overactive bladder (OAB) in indigenous Thai people aged 18 years and over in the year 2005. Economically based models using diagnostic and treatment algorithms from clinical practice guidelines and current disease prevalence data were used to estimate direct and indirect costs of OAB. Prevalence and event probability estimates were obtained from the literature, national data sets, and expert opinion. Costs were estimated from a small survey using a cost questionnaire and from unit costs of King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. The annual cost of OAB in Thailand is estimated as 1.9 billion USD. It is estimated to consume 1.14% of national GDP The cost includes 0.33 billion USD for direct medical costs, 1.3 billion USD for direct, nonmedical costs and 0.29 billion USD for indirect costs of lost productivity. The largest costs category was direct treatment costs of comorbidities associated with OAB. Costs of OAB medication accountedfor 14% of the total costs ofOAB.

  1. Physician-patient communication about overactive bladder: Results of an observational sociolinguistic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R Hahn

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB and urinary incontinence are common problems that have significant impact on quality of life (QOL. Less than half of sufferers seek help from their physicians; many who do are dissatisfied with treatment and their physicians' understanding of their problems. Little is known about the sociolinguistic characteristics of physician-patient communication about OAB in community practice.An IRB-approved observational sociolinguistic study of dialogues between patients with OAB and treating physicians was conducted. Study design included semi-structured post-visit interviews, post-visit questionnaires, and follow-up phone calls. Conversations were analyzed using techniques from interactional sociolinguistics.Communication was physician- rather than patient-centered. Physicians spoke the majority of words and 83% of questions were closed-ended. The impact of OAB on QOL and concerns about and adherence to treatment were infrequently addressed by physicians, who were poorly aligned with patients in their understanding. These topics were addressed more frequently when open-ended questions successfully eliciting elaborated responses were used in ask-tell-ask or ask-tell sequences.Clinical dialogue around OAB is physician-centered; topics critical to managing OAB are infrequently and inadequately addressed. The use of patient-centered communication is correlated with more discussion of critical topics, and thus, more effective management of OAB.

  2. Physician-patient communication about overactive bladder: Results of an observational sociolinguistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Steven R; Bradt, Pamela; Hewett, Kathleen A; Ng, Daniel B

    2017-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) and urinary incontinence are common problems that have significant impact on quality of life (QOL). Less than half of sufferers seek help from their physicians; many who do are dissatisfied with treatment and their physicians' understanding of their problems. Little is known about the sociolinguistic characteristics of physician-patient communication about OAB in community practice. An IRB-approved observational sociolinguistic study of dialogues between patients with OAB and treating physicians was conducted. Study design included semi-structured post-visit interviews, post-visit questionnaires, and follow-up phone calls. Conversations were analyzed using techniques from interactional sociolinguistics. Communication was physician- rather than patient-centered. Physicians spoke the majority of words and 83% of questions were closed-ended. The impact of OAB on QOL and concerns about and adherence to treatment were infrequently addressed by physicians, who were poorly aligned with patients in their understanding. These topics were addressed more frequently when open-ended questions successfully eliciting elaborated responses were used in ask-tell-ask or ask-tell sequences. Clinical dialogue around OAB is physician-centered; topics critical to managing OAB are infrequently and inadequately addressed. The use of patient-centered communication is correlated with more discussion of critical topics, and thus, more effective management of OAB.

  3. Physician-patient communication about overactive bladder: Results of an observational sociolinguistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Steven R.; Bradt, Pamela; Hewett, Kathleen A.; Ng, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Overactive bladder (OAB) and urinary incontinence are common problems that have significant impact on quality of life (QOL). Less than half of sufferers seek help from their physicians; many who do are dissatisfied with treatment and their physicians’ understanding of their problems. Little is known about the sociolinguistic characteristics of physician-patient communication about OAB in community practice. Methods An IRB-approved observational sociolinguistic study of dialogues between patients with OAB and treating physicians was conducted. Study design included semi-structured post-visit interviews, post-visit questionnaires, and follow-up phone calls. Conversations were analyzed using techniques from interactional sociolinguistics. Results Communication was physician- rather than patient-centered. Physicians spoke the majority of words and 83% of questions were closed-ended. The impact of OAB on QOL and concerns about and adherence to treatment were infrequently addressed by physicians, who were poorly aligned with patients in their understanding. These topics were addressed more frequently when open-ended questions successfully eliciting elaborated responses were used in ask-tell-ask or ask-tell sequences. Discussion Clinical dialogue around OAB is physician-centered; topics critical to managing OAB are infrequently and inadequately addressed. The use of patient-centered communication is correlated with more discussion of critical topics, and thus, more effective management of OAB. PMID:29140974

  4. The value of oxybutynin in transdermal patches for treating overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Casado, J; Esteban-Fuertes, M; Serrano, O; Galván, J

    2015-12-01

    There is currently a broad therapeutic arsenal of drugs for treating overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). However, there is still a need for new compounds and for improving known drugs in terms of efficacy, compliance and tolerability. To report the scientific evidence on the safety and efficacy of transdermal oxybutynin (OXY-TDS) for treating OAB. A systematic review without time restrictions was conducted until May 2015 in the MEDLINE/PubMed database. We also performed a manual review of abstracts published in international urogynaecology congresses. The evaluated studies show that patients treated with OXY-TDS experience a significant reduction in urinary incontinence episodes compared with placebo, which is comparable to that observed in patients treated with oral oxybutynin or with tolterodine. In all of the studies, we observed improvements in symptoms from the second or third week of treatment and in a sustained manner until the end of treatment (6, 12 or 24 weeks). The clinical practice study also showed improved quality of life, achieving benefits in numerous patient profiles, with an efficacy independent of previous treatments. The safety of the drug was demonstrated in the various patient profiles. OXY-TDS represents an effective alternative for the symptomatic treatment of adult patients with OAB, which, thanks to its pharmacokinetic profile, better tolerability, different administration method and dosage, could represent an added value in treating special populations. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. A urodynamic study of surface neuromodulation versus sham in detrusor instability and sensory urgency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W F; Moore, K H; Adams, R D; Shepherd, R

    1998-12-01

    We studied the effect of surface neuromodulation on cystometric pressure and volume parameters in women with detrusor instability or sensory urgency. Electrical current was delivered to the suprapubic region and third sacral foramina via a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator with sham neuromodulation control. A consecutive series of women with proved detrusor instability or sensory urgency were randomized to 3 surface neuromodulation groups. Volume and pressure parameters were the main outcomes of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied during second cystometric fill. Sham transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation did not alter the outcome measures. However, neuromodulation delivered across the suprapubic and sacral skin effected a reduction in mean maximum height of detrusor contraction. A current which inhibits motor activity was not superior to that which inhibits sensory perception in reducing detrusor pressure. Response in sensory urgency was poor. Results from our sham controlled study suggest that short-term surface neuromodulation via transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may have a role in the treatment of detrusor instability. Future studies must examine the clinical effect of long-term surface neuromodulation.

  6. Dextranomer Based Implant (Deflux) for Endoscopic Treatment of Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-El-Azayem, Khaled M.; Abdel-Meguid, Taha A.; Soliman, S.

    2006-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence has gained popularity using several inject-able bulking materials. The current study reports our experience with endoscopic submucosal injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer for treatment of post-prostatectomy incontinence due to sphincteric deficiency. A total of 14 patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence; 13 post-trans urethral resection of prostate (TURP) and 1 post-open prostatectomy, were enrolled. The patients aged between 59-85 years. Preoperative evaluation included multi-channel video urodynamics. Patients who had verified intrinsic sphincteric deficiency, adequate bladder capacity, absent unhibited detrusor contractions and minimal or no post void residual (PVR) urine were selected for injection therapy. The standard 4 quadrant sub-mucosal injection technique was utilized. Follow-up was scheduled at 1 month after each injection and at 6-months interval thereafter. A total of 25 procedures were done. Seven patients (50%) received single injection, 3 patients (21.4%) required 2 injections and 4 patients (28.6%) needed 3 injections. The mean volume of injected material was 3.7 mL per procedure (range 2-8). The mean operative time was 30 minutes (range 15-60). The procedure was performed without intraoperative adverse events or significant postoperative complications. The overall cure rate, significant improvement rate and failure rate were 28.6%, 35.7% and 35.7%.respectively, with a total of 64.3% considered as success (cured or significantly improved). At 1 year of follow-up, 71.4% of the patients (cured or improved) demonstrated persistence of the favourable outcome. Endoscopic treatment of post prostatectomy incontinence due sphinteric deficiency is a minimally invasive, safe and successful procedure. Endoscopic submucosal injection of dextranomer has shown a durable favorable outcome at 1 year of follow-up. (author)

  7. Inferior Oblique Overaction: Anterior Transposition Versus Myectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavi, Zhale; Feizi, Mohadeseh; Behradfar, Narges; Yaseri, Mehdi; Sayanjali, Shima; Motevaseli, Tahmine; Sabbaghi, Hamideh; Faghihi, Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of inferior oblique myectomy and anterior transposition for correcting inferior oblique overaction (IOOA). This retrospective study was conducted on 56 patients with IOOA who had either myectomy or anterior transposition of the inferior oblique muscle from 2010 to 2015. The authors compared preoperative and postoperative inferior oblique muscle function grading (-4 to +4) as the main outcome measure and vertical and horizontal deviation, dissociated vertical deviation (DVD), and A- and V-pattern between the two surgical groups as secondary outcomes. A total of 99 eyes of 56 patients with a mean age of 5.9 ± 6.5 years were included (47 eyes in the myectomy group and 52 eyes in the anterior transposition group). There were no differences in preoperative best corrected visual acuity, amblyopia, spherical equivalent, and primary versus secondary IOOA between the two groups. Both surgical procedures were effective in reducing IOOA and satisfactory results were similar between the two groups: 61.7% and 67.3% in the myectomy and anterior transposition groups, respectively (P = .56). After adjustment for the preoperative DVD, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups postoperatively. The preoperative hypertropia was 6 to 14 and 6 to 18 prism diopters (PD) in the myectomy and anterior transposition groups, respectively. After surgery, no patient had a vertical deviation greater than 5 PD. Both the inferior oblique myectomy and anterior transposition procedures are effective in reducing IOOA with similar satisfactory results. DVD and hypertropia were also corrected similarly by these two surgical procedures. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54(4):232-237.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Idiopathic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in neurologically normal patients with voiding abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, T M; Djurhuus, J C; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding was vesico......Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding...... was vesicoureteral reflux in 11 cases with kidney scarring in 10. Bladder trabeculation was found in 13 patients, bladder hyperreflexia in 8, and significant residual urine in 16 patients. The etiology of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in non-neurological patients is discussed. By means of exclusion it is most...

  9. Detrusor instability in children with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Kristensen, E S; Nielsen, K K

    1986-01-01

    Forty-one children, aged 5-15 years, were referred because of recurrent urinary infections and/or enuresis. They were examined prospectively by means of cystometry. CO2 cystometry revealed detrusor instability in 18 children (44%), but if complete reproducibility were to be requested in repeated ...... tests, only 7 children (17%) would have presented instability. Detrusor instability was not significantly related to definite pathological changes in the urinary tract or to irritative bladder symptoms.......Forty-one children, aged 5-15 years, were referred because of recurrent urinary infections and/or enuresis. They were examined prospectively by means of cystometry. CO2 cystometry revealed detrusor instability in 18 children (44%), but if complete reproducibility were to be requested in repeated...

  10. The influence of an overactive bladder on falling: a study of females aged 40 and older in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seung-Jin; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Tchun Yong; Moon, Hongsang; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Shin Ah; Choi, Bo Youl

    2011-03-01

    An overactive bladder (OAB) affects a person's quality of life. Patients who suffer from OAB run to the toilet frequently to prevent incontinence, and this behavior increases their risk of falling and fear of falling. This study evaluated the influence of OAB on falls and concern about falling in females aged 40 and over living in urban and rural communities. We conducted a population-based cohort study using King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), the Korean version of Falls Efficacy Scale-International (KFES-I) and a questionnaire regarding falls, in females aged 40 and over in Guri city and Yangpyeong county. The data from 514 responders were analyzed. The definition of OAB was 'moderately' or 'a lot' of urgency, or urge incontinence in KHQ. Falls was defined as experience of falls in the last year. High fear of falling was defined as a score of 24 or over in KFES-I. The factors were analyzed by the exact chi-square test and Student's t-test. The multivariate logistic regression model was adopted in order to examine the effects of OAB on falls and concern about falling. Of the 514 responders, 98 fitted the criterion of OAB. Eighty-nine (17.3%) of the responders had experienced falls in the last year: twenty-seven (27.5%) in the group with OAB and 62 (14.9%) in the group without OAB. There was a significant association between falls and OAB (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 3.08; P=0.0485), and between high fear of falling and OAB (OR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.42 to 5.20; P=0.0024). Urgency and symptoms of urge incontinence increase the risk of falls in women aged 40 or older in the community. Early diagnosis and proper treatment may prevent falls and improve quality of life in OAB patients.

  11. Beta adrenoreceptors in the rabbit bladder detrusor muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.F.; Marks, B.H.

    1984-01-01

    This study examines the beta adrenergic receptors of the rabbit detrusor smooth muscle, employing [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as a ligand for the binding of beta adrenergic receptors. Saturation binding experiments on the isolated membrane fraction yielded a KD for ICYP of 14.7 pM and a maximum binding of 147.6 fmol/mg of protein. Displacement of labeled ICYP by a series of beta adrenergic agents yielded the following KD values for the combined high and low affinity binding sites: I-propranolol, 0.76 nM; ICI 118,551, 1.7 nM; zinterol, 38.0 nM; metoprolol, 3.5 microM; and practolol, 61.4 microM. When these displacement experimental results were compared to KD values from other reported binding studies with ICYP for beta adrenoreceptors, both the order of potency and the KD values indicated primarily beta-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes. Computer program Scatfit analysis of the displacement curves indicated a single slope and affinity constant for all five beta adrenergic agents. Hofstee plots for zinterol, ICI 118,551 and metoprolol, however, were not linear and indicated that minor populations of beta-1 adrenoreceptors were also present as both high and low affinity binding sites could be defined. It is concluded that the primary receptor population is beta-2 and that this tissue is heterogenous with a small population of beta-1 adrenoreceptors representing approximately 13 to 23% of the total beta adrenoreceptor population

  12. Beta adrenoreceptors in the rabbit bladder detrusor muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G.F.; Marks, B.H.

    1984-02-01

    This study examines the beta adrenergic receptors of the rabbit detrusor smooth muscle, employing (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as a ligand for the binding of beta adrenergic receptors. Saturation binding experiments on the isolated membrane fraction yielded a KD for ICYP of 14.7 pM and a maximum binding of 147.6 fmol/mg of protein. Displacement of labeled ICYP by a series of beta adrenergic agents yielded the following KD values for the combined high and low affinity binding sites: I-propranolol, 0.76 nM; ICI 118,551, 1.7 nM; zinterol, 38.0 nM; metoprolol, 3.5 microM; and practolol, 61.4 microM. When these displacement experimental results were compared to KD values from other reported binding studies with ICYP for beta adrenoreceptors, both the order of potency and the KD values indicated primarily beta-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes. Computer program Scatfit analysis of the displacement curves indicated a single slope and affinity constant for all five beta adrenergic agents. Hofstee plots for zinterol, ICI 118,551 and metoprolol, however, were not linear and indicated that minor populations of beta-1 adrenoreceptors were also present as both high and low affinity binding sites could be defined. It is concluded that the primary receptor population is beta-2 and that this tissue is heterogenous with a small population of beta-1 adrenoreceptors representing approximately 13 to 23% of the total beta adrenoreceptor population.

  13. Pediatric urinary incontinence: Classification, evaluation, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.J. Schaeffer

    tinuous incontinence refers to constant leakage of urine and can occur even in .... evaluation of pediatric urinary incontinence and guide which tests, if any, should ..... ments taken during bladder filling and storage include the maximal bladder ...

  14. [Characteristic Features of Urinary Incontinence--Diagnostic Investigation in Geriatric Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2016-02-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common medical and social problem in elderly people. It leads to a massive reduction in the quality of life of affected persons and their dependants and causes an enormous socio-economic burden, which will increase significantly within the next years and decades as the age structure of the German population changes. Successful treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly requires a good pathophysiological understanding of the underlying problem as well as individually tailored diagnostic procedures, which must be oriented at the patient's wishes, the social environment and the resulting therapeutic consequences. This especially applies to persons with symptoms of dementia. Comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, reduced mobility and a medication-induced decrease in cognitive function play a major role in the severity of urgency and urinary incontinence in the elderly. Also the frequently described concomitant diagnosis of urinary tract infection must be exactly evaluated. Before antibiotic treatment is given, it should be clarified if the patient suffers from "harmless" bacteriuria or a urinary tract infection requiring treatment. Patients with an age-associated decrease in brain power must be diagnosed quite carefully, because these patients may potentially be harmed by pharmacological treatment for overactive bladder syndrome. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. The "costs" of urinary incontinence for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subak, Leslee L; Brown, Jeanette S; Kraus, Stephen R; Brubaker, Linda; Lin, Feng; Richter, Holly E; Bradley, Catherine S; Grady, Deborah

    2006-04-01

    To estimate costs of routine care for female urinary incontinence, health-related quality of life, and willingness to pay for incontinence improvement. In a cross-sectional study at 5 U.S. sites, 293 incontinent women quantified supplies, laundry, and dry cleaning specifically for incontinence. Costs were calculated by multiplying resources used by national resource costs and presented in 2005 United States dollars (2005). Health-related quality of life was estimated with the Health Utilities Index. Participants estimated willingness to pay for 25-100% improvement in incontinence. Potential predictors of these outcomes were examined using multivariable linear regression. Mean age was 56 +/- 11 years; participants were racially diverse and had a broad range of incontinence severity. Nearly 90% reported incontinence-related costs. Median weekly cost (25%, 75% interquartile range) increased from 0.37 dollars (0, 4 dollars) for slight to 10.98 dollars (4, 21 dollars) for very severe incontinence. Costs increased with incontinence severity (P women (P women with urge compared with those having stress incontinence (P lower Health Utilities Index score (mean 0.90 +/- 0.11 for weekly and 0.81 +/- 0.21 for daily incontinence; P = .02). Women were willing to pay a mean of 70 dollars +/- 64 dollars per month for complete resolution of incontinence, and willingness to pay increased with income and greater expected benefit. Women with severe urinary incontinence pay 900 dollars annually for incontinence routine care, and incontinence is associated with a significant decrement in health-related quality of life. Effective incontinence treatment may decrease costs and improve quality of life. III.

  16. Undertreatment of urinary incontinence in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning-van Beest, F.J.A.; Sturkenboom, M.C.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.; Herings, R.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the urinary incontinence guidelines that are issued by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, treatment guidelines are related to the type of incontinence. It is unknown whether treatment of urinary incontinence in general practice complies with these guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To

  17. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  18. NETUPITANT, A POTENT AND HIGHLY SELECTIVE NK1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST, ALLEVIATES ACETIC ACID-INDUCED BLADDER OVERACTIVITY IN ANESTHETIZED GUINEA-PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palea

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tachykinins potently contract the isolated urinary bladder from a number of animal species and play an important role in the regulation of the micturition reflex. On the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder we examined the effects of a new potent and selective NK1 receptor antagonist (netupitant on the contractions induced by a selective NK1 receptor agonist, SP-methylester (SP-OMe. Moreover, the effects of netupitant and another selective NK1 antagonist (L-733,060 were studied in anesthetized guinea-pigs using two experimental models, the isovolumetric bladder contractions and a model of bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of acetic acid (AA. Methods and Results. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 5 mL organ baths and isometric contractions to cumulative concentrations of SP-OME were recorded before and after incubation with increasing concentrations of netupitant. In anesthetized female guinea-pigs, reflex bladder activity was examined under isovolumetric conditions with the bladder distended with saline or during cystometry using intravesical infusion of acetic acid (AA. After a 30 min stabilization period, netupitant (0.1-3 mg/kg, i.v. or L-733,060 (3-10 mg/kg, i.v. were administered. In the detrusor muscle, netupitant produced a concentration-dependent inhibition (mean pKB = 9.24 of the responses to SP-OMe. Under isovolumetric conditions, netupitant or L-733,060 reduced bladder contraction frequency in a dose-dependent manner, but neither drug changed bladder contraction amplitude. In the AA model, netupitant dose-dependently increased intercontraction interval (ICI but had no effect on the amplitude of micturition (AM. L-733,060 dose-dependently increased ICI also but this effect was paralleled by a significant reduction of AM. Conclusion. Netupitant decreases the frequency of reflex bladder contractions without altering their amplitude, suggesting that this drug targets the afferent limb of the

  19. Prevalence and risk of sport types to stress urinary incontinence in sportswomen: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagovska, Magdaléna; Švihra, Ján; Buková, Alena; Dračková, Dana; Švihrová, Viera

    2018-02-21

    The objective of our study was to investigate the prevalence and risk of developing stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in each type of high-intensity sport, and the associated impact on quality of life in sportswomen. This cross-sectional study was conducted between March and November 2016. The study included 278 sportswomen. The basic inclusion criteria were being nulliparous and engaging in high-intensity physical activity. The exclusion criteria were childbirth, surgical treatment of gynecological and urological illnesses and urinary tract infection. For evaluation were used: The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence (ICIQ-UISF), the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q), the Urinary Incontinence Quality of Life Scale (I-QOL). The highest percentage of SUI was found in athletes (23.8%), followed by volleyball players (19.6%). We found that cumulative metabolic equivalent (MET) did not affect SUI, but the type of sport did. The risk of SUI was highest in volleyball sportswomen (odds ratio[OR] = 2.16,95% confidence interval[CI] = 0.96-4.89, P physiotherapy for strengthening pelvic floor muscles. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Transcutaneous stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve for treating refractory urge incontinence of idiopathic and neurogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles-Antuña, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; González-Ruiz de L, C; Quintás-Blanco, A; Tamargo-Diaz, E M; García-Rodríguez, J; San Martín-Blanco, A; Fernandez-Gomez, J M

    2017-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of treatment with transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (TPTNS) in patients with urge urinary incontinence, of neurogenic or nonneurogenic origin, refractory to first-line therapeutic options. We included 65 patients with urge urinary incontinence refractory to medical treatment. A case history review, a urodynamic study and a somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) study were conducted before the TPTNS, studying the functional urological condition by means of a voiding diary. The treatment consisted of 10 weekly sessions of TPTNS lasting 30minutes. Some 57.7% of the patients showed abnormal tibial SEPs, and 42% showed abnormal pudendal SEPs. A statistically significant symptomatic improvement was observed in all clinical parameters after treatment with TPTNS, and 66% of the patients showed an overall improvement, regardless of sex, the presence of underlying neurological disorders, detrusor hyperactivity in the urodynamic study or SEP disorders. There were no adverse effects during the treatment. TPTNS is an effective and well tolerated treatment in patients with urge incontinence refractory to first-line therapies and should be offered early in the treatment strategy. New studies are needed to identify the optimal parameters of stimulation, the most effective treatment protocols and long-term efficacy, as well as its applicability to patients with a neurogenic substrate. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Association between Menopausal Symptoms and Overactive Bladder: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Survey in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingping Zhu

    Full Text Available The association between menopause and overactive bladder is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between menopausal symptoms and overactive bladder, and identify the risk factors for overactive bladder.A cross-sectional study was performed. The study included 403 women aged 36-76 years who visited the menopause clinic at Peking University First Hospital between September 2012 and December 2013. The overactive bladder symptom score and modified Kupperman index questionnaires were used. Differences were assessed using descriptive statistics to determine any association between the overactive bladder symptom score and modified Kupperman index score, and to evaluate the risk factors for overactive bladder.A total of 304 women were finally enrolled. The prevalence of overactive bladder was 9.43%, and the modified Kupperman index score; number of sexual problems; and frequency of urinary tract infections, vertigo, melancholia, and mood swings were significantly higher in patients with overactive bladder than in the patients without overactive bladder (p < 0.05. Menopausal symptoms (modified Kupperman index score ≥ 15 (odds ratio: 1.049, 95% confidence interval: 1.006-1.095, p = 0.025 and a low frequency of sexual intercourse in the last 6 months (odds ratio: 2.580, 95% confidence interval: 1.228-5.422, p = 0.012 were identified as independent risk factors for overactive bladder. The frequency of sexual intercourse was found to decrease with an increase in the severity of overactive bladder (p = 0.004, linear-by-linear association = 0.001.Menopausal symptoms may be closely associated with overactive bladder, and sexual activity may be associated with the severity of overactive bladder. Moreover, sexual problems, urinary tract infections, vertigo, melancholia, and mood swings may be associated with overactive bladder.

  2. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in porcine detrusor: comparison with humans and regulation by bladder augmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goepel, M.; Gronewald, A.; Krege, S.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of porcine and human bladder detrusor were compared in radioligand binding studies using [3H]quinuclidinylbenzylate as the radioligand. The receptor affinity for the radioligand and the density of muscarinic receptors was similar in male and

  3. The cholinergic and purinergic components of detrusor contractility in a whole rabbit bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, M B; Kaplan, S A; Blaivas, J G

    1992-09-01

    Whole rabbit bladders were suspended in a bath chamber and stimulated with ATP, bethanechol, electrical field stimulation, and bethanechol + ATP. Detrusor pressure and fluid expelled by the bladder were recorded, synchronized, and digitized. Detrusor work and power were calculated with a computer program. Maximum work was 61.4 +/- 28.7, 83.3 +/- 17.0, 85.0 +/- 15.0, 90.8 +/- 13.1 cm. H2O, ml. for ATP, bethanechol, electrical and bethanechol + ATP, respectively. Maximum power generated by ATP was 4.8 +/- 3.0 cm. H2O, ml./sec and was approximately 66% of that generated by bethanechol, and 50% of that generated by electrical stimulation, and bethanechol + ATP. ATP cannot empty the bladder with moderate outlet resistance while bethanechol and electrical stimulation can. Our results suggest that ATP is able to generate detrusor power and achieve work in bladder emptying. However, ATP generated power and work is considerably less than that of electrical stimulation or bethanechol alone. ATP mediated contraction is not inhibited by atropine or tetrodotoxin but is inhibited by P2 purinoceptor desensitization, suggesting a functional role of purine receptors on detrusor smooth muscle. Since ATP generated pressure is more rapid than with bethanechol alone, we support the hypothesis that ATP may be important in the initiation of micturition.

  4. Effect of a Carbohydrate-Rich Diet on Rat Detrusor Smooth Muscle Contractility: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Suat Bolat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We aimed to investigate the effect of a carbohydrate-rich diet on detrusor contractility in rats. Materials and Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. The control group received regular food and water. The study group received carbohydrate-rich diet for six weeks. The rats’ detrusor muscle was isolated for pharmacological and histopathological examinations. Results. In the control and study groups, mean body weights were 431.5 ± 27.6 g and 528.0 ± 36.2 g, respectively (p < 0.001. Electrical stimulation of the detrusor strips of the control group resulted in gradual contraction. A decreased contractile response was shown in the study group. Acetylcholine in 10-7-10-3 molar concentration produced a decreased contractile response in the study group, compared to the control group (p < 0.01. The study group showed marked subepithelial and intermuscular fibrosis in the bladder. Conclusion. Carbohydrate-rich diet causes marked subepithelial and extracellular fibrosis and changes in contractility in the detrusor within a six-week period. Changes have higher costs in therapeutic choices and correction of these changes remains difficult. Putting an end to carbohydrate-rich diet would seem to be more cost-effective than dealing with the effects of consuming it in high proportions which should be the national policy worldwide.

  5. [Male Urinary Incontinence--a Taboo Issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozomara-Hocke, Marko; Hermanns, Thomas; Poyet, Cédric

    2016-03-02

    Male urinary incontinence is an underestimated and frequently not broached issue. The urinary incontinence is divided into stress-, urge incontinence and hybrid forms as well as overflow incontinence. The fact that there are increasingly more men over 60 means that the prevalence of the urinary incontinence is up to 40%, and urinary incontinence will increasingly gain importance in daily routine practice. Many investigations and therapies can be realized by the general practitioner. Already simple therapy approaches can lead to a considerable clinical improvement of male urinary incontinence. If the initial therapy fails or pathological results (i. e. microhaematuria, recurrent urinary tract infections, raised residual urine and so on) are found, the patient should be referred to a urologist.

  6. Incontinência urinária após gonadectomia em fêmeas caninas Urinary incontinence after gonadectomy in female dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Azevedo Voorwald

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A incontinência urinária adquirida é uma condição debilitante e, muitas vezes, incurável que acomete fêmeas castradas e raramente fêmeas inteiras ou machos. A manifestação clínica pode ocorrer em qualquer momento após a gonadectomia e resulta em graves problemas no manejo do paciente. Os mecanismos que desencadeiam a incontinência após ovariectomia envolvem decréscimo na pressão de fechamento uretral, alterações hormonais, aumento na deposição de colágeno na musculatura lisa da bexiga, diminuição na contratilidade do músculo detrusor e redução na resposta aos estímulos elétricos e ao carbachol. O diagnóstico é realizado pelo histórico do animal, pelo exame físico, pelos exames laboratoriais, pelo perfil de pressão uretral, pela ultrassonografia e pelas radiografias abdominais. O tratamento clínico envolve utilização de fármacos -adrenérgicos, estrógenos, análogos de GnRH e agentes antidepressivos. As técnicas cirúrgicas recomendadas correspondem à uretropexia, cistouretropexia, aplicação de colágeno na uretra e colpossuspensão. Melhor compreensão da etiologia, da fisiopatologia, dos métodos de diagnóstico e tratamentos é fundamental em razão do pouco conhecimento e da identificação dessa condição no Brasil.Acquired urinary incontinence is a debilitating, incurable condition, prevalent in spayed bitches and rarely seen in entire bitches or males. In bitches, acquired urinary incontinence can occur anytime from one week after neutering and is associated with severe management problems. Incontinence in neutered bitches can be associated with a decrease in maximal urethral closure pressure, hormonal changes and increase in the percentage of collagen in the bladder wall. It's also associated to a reduced contractility of the detrusor muscle, decrease in the magnitude of response of the bladder wall to both carbachol and eletrical field stimulation, and there are risk factors involved. The

  7. Pathophysiology of pediatric fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Benninga, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric fecal incontinence in 4 main categories: (1) Functional fecal retention, the withholding of feces because of fear of painful defecation, results in constipation and overflow soiling. Treatment includes dietary changes, use of laxatives,

  8. Deletion of Dicer in smooth muscle affects voiding pattern and reduces detrusor contractility and neuroeffector transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardjaneh Karbalaei Sadegh

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulators of smooth muscle phenotype and may play important roles in pathogenesis of various smooth muscle related disease states. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs for urinary bladder function. We used an inducible and smooth muscle specific Dicer knockout (KO mouse which resulted in significantly reduced levels of miRNAs, including miR-145, miR-143, miR-22, miR125b-5p and miR-27a, from detrusor preparations without mucosa. Deletion of Dicer resulted in a disturbed micturition pattern in vivo and reduced depolarization-induced pressure development in the isolated detrusor. Furthermore, electrical field stimulation revealed a decreased cholinergic but maintained purinergic component of neurogenic activation in Dicer KO bladder strips. The ultrastructure of detrusor smooth muscle cells was well maintained, and the density of nerve terminals was similar. Western blotting demonstrated reduced contents of calponin and desmin. Smooth muscle α-actin, SM22α and myocardin were unchanged. Activation of strips with exogenous agonists showed that depolarization-induced contraction was preferentially reduced; ATP- and calyculin A-induced contractions were unchanged. Quantitative real time PCR and western blotting demonstrated reduced expression of Cav1.2 (Cacna1c. It is concluded that smooth muscle miRNAs play an important role for detrusor contractility and voiding pattern of unrestrained mice. This is mediated in part via effects on expression of smooth muscle differentiation markers and L-type Ca(2+ channels in the detrusor.

  9. The inflammatory and normal transcriptome of mouse bladder detrusor and mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyer David W

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An organ such as the bladder consists of complex, interacting set of tissues and cells. Inflammation has been implicated in every major disease of the bladder, including cancer, interstitial cystitis, and infection. However, scanty is the information about individual detrusor and urothelium transcriptomes in response to inflammation. Here, we used suppression subtractive hybridizations (SSH to determine bladder tissue- and disease-specific genes and transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs. Unique TREs and genes were assembled into putative networks. Results It was found that the control bladder mucosa presented regulatory elements driving genes such as myosin light chain phosphatase and calponin 1 that influence the smooth muscle phenotype. In the control detrusor network the Pax-3 TRE was significantly over-represented. During development, the Pax-3 transcription factor (TF maintains progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state whereas, during inflammation, Pax-3 was suppressed and genes involved in neuronal development (synapsin I were up-regulated. Therefore, during inflammation, an increased maturation of neural progenitor cells in the muscle may underlie detrusor instability. NF-κB was specifically over-represented in the inflamed mucosa regulatory network. When the inflamed detrusor was compared to control, two major pathways were found, one encoding synapsin I, a neuron-specific phosphoprotein, and the other an important apoptotic protein, siva. In response to LPS-induced inflammation, the liver X receptor was over-represented in both mucosa and detrusor regulatory networks confirming a role for this nuclear receptor in LPS-induced gene expression. Conclusion A new approach for understanding bladder muscle-urothelium interaction was developed by assembling SSH, real time PCR, and TRE analysis results into regulatory networks. Interestingly, some of the TREs and their downstream transcripts originally involved in

  10. Tension-free vaginal taping in pakistani women with stress urinary incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, A.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and determine the peroperative and postoperative complications of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) sling for urinary stress incontinence (USI) and contributing factors to complications. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Kidney Centre Postgraduate Institute, Karachi, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: One hundred consecutive patients underwent TVT as per Ulmsten Technique for urinary stress incontinence and patients were followed for 3 years. The subjective cure rate and improvement rate was based on the international consultation on incontinence questionnaire for evaluating female lower urinary tract symptoms (ICIQ - FLUS). The subjective cure was defined as the statement of the woman not experiencing any loss of urine upon physical stress and improvement rate was defined as occasional leakage during stress. Results: Patients at 1- and 3-year up follow-up showed subjective cure rate and improvement rate of 98% and 2%, and 95% and 5%, respectively. Mean operative time was 32 minutes. UTI was the commonest complication observed in 7 (7%) patients. Women with voiding dysfunction preoperatively had 9-fold odds of difficulty postoperatively (0<0.001). There was a significant association of preoperative symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) with the same postoperative symptoms (p<0.0001). Preoperative hysterectomy had a significant (p< 0.005) 15.63 fold odds of intraoperative bladder perforation. Conclusion: Tension-free vaginal tape sling is an efficacious and secure surgical procedure for the treatment of urinary stress incontinence. Bladder perforation, voiding dysfunction, supra-pubic discomfort and UTI are the commonest complications. Risk factors for perforation include preoperative hysterectomy. Pre-existing voiding dysfunction and UTI lead to persistent similar postoperative problems. (author)

  11. Evidence available on the use of the selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron for the treatment of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J C; Khullar, V; Nitti, V W; Siddiqui, E

    2013-01-01

    Mirabegron, the selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist, heralds the latest development for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). To present the evidence available on the efficacy and tolerability of mirabegron and to discuss this treatment's potential in our setting. We reviewed 11 studies conducted with mirabegron in patients with OAB (2 phase II, 9 phase III), all studies were compared to placebo with 6 studies also including tolterodine as an additional arm. Greater emphasis shall be given to the main phase III trials performed in Europe, the USA and Australia evaluating efficacy and safety after 12 weeks (NCT00662909, NCT00689104, NCT00912964) and safety after 12 months (NCT00688688). The combined analyses of these 12 week studies is also available, with emphasis on global efficacy (FAS), efficacy with regard to incontinence (FAS i) and safety (SAF). More than 50% of patients had previously discontinued anticholinergics medication for OAB, thus allowing us to obtain data on the effectiveness of mirabegron in patients already treated with anticholinergics. Mirabegron is an efficacious drug which presents a statistically significant reduction in the number of incontinence episodes and in urinary frequency as of 4 weeks, with a higher percentage of dry patients and a higher percentage of patients with reduction ≥50% in the number of incontinence episodes than placebo. The efficacy of mirabegron 50 and 100mg in the reduction of incontinence episodes occurs in de novo patients and who have received antimuscarinics, with adjusted mean difference and improvement in urinary frequency greater in treated patients. Its tolerability is very similar to placebo particularly for the adverse effects of the antimuscarinics (dry mouth, constipation and blurred vision). A minimal, non-clinically significant change is observed in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse. Its efficacy is long-term. Mirabegron at the doses of 50 and 100mg presents an improvement versus

  12. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Vecchioli Scaldazza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction This study compared percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training (ES + PFMT in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB. Materials and Methods 60 women with OAB were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. In group A, women underwent ES with PFMT, in group B women underwent PTNS. Results A statistically significant reduction in the number of daily micturitions, episodes of nocturia and urge incontinence was found in the two groups but the difference was more substantial in women treated with PTNS; voided volume increased in both groups. Quality of life improved in both groups, whereas patient perception of urgency improved only in women treated with PTNS. Global impression of improvement revealed a greater satisfaction in patients treated with PTNS. Conclusion This study demonstrates the effectiveness of PTNS and ES with PFMT in women with OAB, but greater improvements were found with PTNS.

  13. Increased Bladder Wall Thickness in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Women With Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı Uzun

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Bladder wall thickness has been reported to be associated with overactive bladder (OAB in women. Diabetic women have an increased risk for OAB syndrome and may have an increased risk for bladder wall thickness. Methods: A total of 235 female patients aged 40 to 75 years were categorized into four groups. The first group consisted of women free of urgency or urge urinary incontinence. The second group included nondiabetic women with idiopathic OAB. The third group consisted of women with diabetes and clinical OAB, and women with diabetes but without OAB constituted the fourth group. Bladder wall thickness at the anterior wall was measured by ultrasound by the suprapubic approach with bladder filling over 250 mL. Results: The diabetic (third group and nondiabetic (second group women with OAB had significantly greater bladder wall thickness at the anterior bladder wall than did the controls. However, the difference was not significant between the diabetic (third group and the nondiabetic (second group women with OAB. Women with diabetes but without OAB (fourth group had greater bladder wall thickness than did the controls but this difference was not significant. Additionally, the difference in bladder wall thickness between diabetic women with (third group and without (fourth group OAB was not significant. Conclusions: This is the first study to show that bladder wall thickness is increased in diabetic women with and without OAB. Additionally, nondiabetic women with OAB had increased bladder wall thickness. Further studies may provide additional information for diabetic and nondiabetic women with OAB, in whom the etiopathogenesis of the disease may be similar.

  14. Development of an overactive bladder assessment tool (BAT): A potential improvement to the standard bladder diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Con; Chapple, Christopher; Johnson, Nathan; Payne, Christopher; Homma, Yukio; Hakimi, Zalmai; Siddiqui, Emad; Evans, Christopher; Egan, Shayna; Kopp, Zoe

    2018-01-23

    To develop a comprehensive patient-reported bladder assessment tool (BAT) for assessing overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms, bother, impacts, and satisfaction with treatment. Subjects were consented and eligibility was confirmed by a recruiting physician; subjects were then scheduled for in-person interviews. For concept elicitation and cognitive interviews, 30 and 20 subjects, respectively, were targeted for recruitment from US sites. All interviews were conducted face-to-face, audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, anonymized, and analyzed using a qualitative data analysis software program. A draft BAT was created based on the results of the concept elicitation interviews and further revised based on cognitive interviews as well as feedback from an advisory board of clinical and patient-reported outcome (PRO) experts. Nocturia, daytime frequency, and urgency were reported by all subjects (n = 30, 100.0%), and incontinence was reported by most subjects (n = 25, 83.3%). The most frequently reported impacts were waking up to urinate (n = 30, 100.0%), embarrassment/shame (n = 24, 80.0%), stress/anxiety (n = 23, 76.7%), and lack of control (n = 23, 76.7%). Following analysis, item generation, cognitive interviews, and advisory board feedback, the resulting BAT contains four hypothesized domains (symptom frequency, symptom bother, impacts, and satisfaction with treatment) and 17 items with a 7-day recall period. The BAT has been developed in multiple stages with input from both OAB patients and clinical experts following the recommended processes included in the FDA PRO Guidance for Industry. Once fully validated, we believe it will offer a superior alternative to use of the bladder diary and other PROs for monitoring OAB patients in clinical trials and clinical practice. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Practical Aspects of Botulinum Toxin-A Treatment in Patients With Overactive Bladder Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hou Liao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A injection is an effective treatment for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB that is refractory to antimuscarinics. An injectable dose of 100 U has been suggested to achieve the optimal balance of benefit and safety in patients with OAB. BoNT-A (total volume of 10 mL was administered as evenly distributed intradetrusor injections (5 U across 20 sites approximately 1 cm apart (0.5 mL per site using a flexible or rigid cystoscope. Treatment with BoNT-A was generally well tolerated by most patients, and most treatment-related adverse events were localized to the urinary tract. The prevalence of OAB increases with age, and elderly patients are more vulnerable to complications. The short-term efficacy of intravesical BoNT-A injection for refractory OAB with no treatment-related complications in the elderly population has been documented. Frail elderly patients can experience the same treatment results, such as significantly improved urgent urinary incontinence and quality of life, as young and nonfrail elderly patients with 100-U BoNT-A injections. However, increased risk of larger postvoid residual (PVR urine and lower long-term success rates were noted in frail elderly patients; around 11% had acute urinary retention, while 60% had PVR urine volume >150 mL after treatment. In addition, intravesical injection of BoNT-A effectively decreased urgency symptoms in elderly patients with OAB and central nervous system lesions. The adverse effects were acceptable, while the long-term effects were comparable to those in patients with OAB without central nervous system lesions. Nonetheless, the possibility of longstanding urinary retention and chronic catheterization in this vulnerable population requires careful evaluation before treatment with intravesical BoNT-A. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that intravesical BoNT-A is an effective and safe treatment for OAB in elderly patients.

  16. A randomized, multicenter, controlled study, comparing efficacy and safety of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) versus Solifenacin Succinate in women with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchioli-Scaldazza, Carlo; Morosetti, Carolina; Maruccia, Serena; Casellato, Stefano; Rociola, Wilma; Illiano, Ester; Garofalo, Francesco

    2017-12-31

    To assess efficacy and tolerability of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) consisting of vitamins (C and D), herbal products (cucurbita maxima, capsicum annum, polygonum capsicatum) and amino acid L-Glutammina, in the treatment of female Overactive Bladder syndrome (OAB). 90 consecutive women with OAB symptoms were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, controlled study. Women were divided randomly into two groups of 45 patients each. In group A, women received Solifenacin Succinate (SS), 5 mg. once a day for 12 weeks. In group B, women received CAM, 930 mg, twice daily for 12 weeks. Women were assessed with 3-day micturition diary, Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale (PPIUS), Overactive Bladder questionnaire Short Form (OAB-q SF) and Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire (PGI-I). 8 patients in group A and 1 patient in group B dropped out from therapy because of side effects. A reduction in the number of daily micturitions, nocturia and episodes of urge incontinence was present with both SS and CAM with statistically highly significant differences, but CAM was significantly more effective than SS. PPIUS and OAB-q SF showed improvements with both SS and CAM with a more significant efficacy of CAM. PGI-I, demonstrated improvements in the two groups of patients with a greater satisfaction expressed by patients treated with CAM. the small number of patients does not permit definitive conclusions; however, the results of the research showed the greater effectiveness and tolerability of CAM.

  17. The menopause and urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, Søren

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to study the possible role of the menopause in adult female urinary incontinence (UI) etiology, using a cross-sectional population study comprising a random sample of adult females and self-reported data based on postal questionnaires. The study group comprised 915 women who...... prevalence in 1987 of episodes of stress and urge urinary incontinence; prevalence of menopause and exposure to childbirth, gynecologic surgery, cystitis and obesity as indicated by body mass index more than 29; prevalence relative risks, as indicated by odds ratio of UI conditional on menopause and other...... the year of final menstruation. The findings suggest perimenopausal processes rather than the menopause in general to be responsible for an increased risk of developing UI. The elevation of UI prevalence in the perimenopause may reflect the adjustment of the female continence mechanism to function...

  18. [Caesarean section and anal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalis, V; Stipán, J; Chaloupka, P; Karbanová, J; Rokyta, Z

    2008-04-01

    Summary of the impact of Caesarean section on anal incontinence. Review. Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Charles University and University Hospital Plzen. Review of the current international literature. Currently, Caesarean section is not considered to reduce symptoms of anal incontinence. If there is any reduction of symptoms, that remains only for a short term (40% in 3 months after the delivery in the largest trial). In a long term, virtually in no trial has been observed any difference, and others, non-obstetrical factors (particularly aging) prevail. Current knowledge does not allow to assess sufficiently pros and cons of Caesarean compared to vaginal delivery. High risk groups, that would profit from elective Ceasarean, have not been clearly identified yet.

  19. Sympathetic Overactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Consequences and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, with more than 26 million people suffering from CKD in the United States alone. More patients with CKD die of cardiovascular complications than progress to dialysis. Over 80% of CKD patients have hypertension, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another common, perhaps underappreciated, feature of CKD is an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA not only contributes to hypertension but also plays a detrimental role in the progression of CKD independent of any increase in blood pressure. Indeed, high SNA is associated with poor prognosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of its effect on blood pressure. This brief review will discuss some of the consequences of sympathetic overactivity and highlight some of the potential pathways contributing to chronically elevated SNA in CKD. Mechanisms leading to chronic sympathoexcitation in CKD are complex, multifactorial and to date, not completely understood. Identification of the mechanisms and/or signals leading to sympathetic overactivity in CKD are crucial for development of effective therapeutic targets to reduce the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient group.

  20. Treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer-Rasmussen, W

    1990-01-01

    This review presents reported cure and improvement rates of stress urinary incontinence in women obtained by different treatment modalities. Apart from the urodynamic findings, histological and histochemical changes of the pelvic floor may be clinically relevant to treatment in the future. Long......-term cure and improvement rates achieved by non-surgical treatment (physiotherapy, biofeedback, bladder training, electrostimulation) are commented on. These rates range from 40-60% for physiotherapy and electrostimulation but are considerably less after biofeedback and bladder training. Pharmacotherapy...

  1. [Urinary incontinence in degenerative spinal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riggo, J; Benčo, M; Kolarovszki, B; Lupták, J; Svihra, J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of urinary incontinence in patients with chronic degenerative spinal disease and to identify factors affecting the occurrence and changes in urinary incontinence after surgery. The group evaluated comprised 214 patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spinal disease at our department between January 1 and December 31, 2008. The patients were categorised according to the type of their degenerative disease (cervical disc herniation, lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spinal instability or olisthesis) and the spine level involved (cervical or lumbar spine). The symptoms of urinary incontinence included leakage of urine and non-obstructive chronic urinary retention developing in association with the manifestation of vertebrogenic disorder. Patients with diseases known to increase the risk of incontinence were not included in the study. Based on a retrospective analysis of the patients' clinical notes, the occurrence of urinary incontinence in each type of degenerative spinal disease was assessed. The effect of gender, age, body mass index (BMI), neurological status and spinal disease type on the development of incontinence was statistically evaluated. The efficacy of surgical treatment was assessed on the basis of the patients' subjective complaints at the first follow-up one month after surgery. The data were evaluated by the statistical programme InSTAT (analysis of variance ANOVA, t-test). All tests were two-sided; a 0.05 level of statistical significance was used. Of the 214 patients with degenerative spinal disease, 27 (12.6%) had urinary incontinence. A higher risk of developing incontinence was found in women (p = 0.008) and in patients with radicular weakness (p = 0.023). The patients with urinary incontinence had their BMI significantly lower than patients without this disorder (p = 0.019). Age had no effect. The differences in the occurrence of urinary incontinence amongst the different types of

  2. Incontinence in persons with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander; Equit, Monika; Medoff, David; Wagner, Catharina; Curfs, Leopold

    2017-08-01

    To assess the rates of incontinence and associated psychological problems in children, adolescents and adults with Down Syndrome, a genetic syndrome caused by partial or complete triplication (trisomy) of chromosome 21 and characterized by typical facial features, a physical growth delay and mild or moderate intellectual disability. Three hundred and seventeen persons with Down Syndrome (4-51 years) were recruited through a German parent support group (59.6% male, mean age 19.2 years). The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the Incontinence Questionnaire-Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC) for parents or for adults were filled out by parents or care-givers. 17.2% of the sample had nocturnal enuresis, 15.9% had daytime urinary incontinence, and 14.2% had fecal incontinence. Incontinence was present in 64.0% of young children (4-12 years), 10.3% of teens (13-17 years), 12.8% of young adults (18-30 years) and in 22.4% of older adults (>30 years). 13.6% of children and 8.4% of adults had a DBC score in the clinical range. 19.5% of children and 27.8% of adults with incontinence had behavioral problems. There was a significant association between nocturnal enuresis, daytime urinary incontinence and clinical DBC scores in adults. Incontinence in Down Syndrome is mainly present in young children and increases in older adults. Behavioral comorbidity is associated with incontinence only in adults with Down Syndrome. Screening and treatment of incontinence in individuals with Down Syndrome is recommended. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical Factors Associated With Dose Escalation of Solifenacin for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder in Real Life Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Chun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTo determine the baseline clinical characteristics associated with dose escalation of solifenacin in patients with overactive bladder (OAB.MethodsWe analyzed the data of patients with OAB (micturition frequency ≥8/day and urgency ≥1/day who were treated with solifenacin and followed up for 24 weeks. According to our department protocol, all the patients kept voiding diaries, and OAB symptom scores (OABSS were monitored at baseline and after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of solifenacin treatment.ResultsIn total, 68 patients (mean age, 60.8±10.0 years were recruited. The dose escalation rate by the end of the study was 41.2%, from 23.5% at 4 weeks and 17.6% at 12 weeks. At baseline, the dose escalator group had significantly more OAB wet patients (53.6% vs. 20.0% and higher total OABSS (10.2±2.4 vs. 7.9±3.5, P=0.032 than the nonescalator group. OAB wet (odds ratio [OR], 4.615; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.578-13.499; P<0.05 and total OABSS (OR, 1.398; 95% CI, 1.046-1.869; P<0.05 were found to be independently associated with dose escalation.ConclusionsPatients who have urgency urinary incontinence and high total OABSS have a tendency for dose escalation of solifenacin.

  4. Biofeedback as a first-line treatment for overactive bladder syndrome refractory to standard urotherapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebiloglu, Turgay; Kaya, Engin; Köprü, Burak; Topuz, Bahadır; Irkilata, Hasan Cem; Kibar, Yusuf

    2016-10-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) and dysfunctional voiding (DV) are subgroups of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). Standard urotherapy is the first-line treatment option of OAB in children. The aim was to investigate the use of biofeedback as a first-line treatment option in OAB refractory to standard urotherapy, and determine the factors affecting efficacy. Between 2005 and 2015, we retrospectively analyzed a total of 136 hospital records of children with OAB who had not previously used any anticholinergics and were refractory to standard urotherapy. Patients with urgency and/or urge incontinence and/or making holding maneuvers to suppress urgency were defined as having OAB symptoms, and resolution of these complaints was defined as successful biofeedback therapy. Seventy-three of 136 OAB patients' urgency recovered by biofeedback therapy with the success rate of 53% (p biofeedback therapies, respectively (p Biofeedback can be thought of as the first-line treatment option when standard urotherapy fails in children with OAB. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Urinary incontinence in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Gina; De Boe, Veerle; Braeckman, Johan; Michielsen, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Owing to evolution in treatment, the average life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has increased. This has been followed by an increase in urological complications such as urinary incontinence. As stress incontinence occurs during exercise, it may have a negative effect on the implementation of respiratory physiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence and its effect on the quality of life and physiotherapy in a population with CF. Questionnaires were used to determine the prevalence of incontinence in patients of the Cystic Fibrosis Clinic of the University Hospital in Brussels. Two different surveys were used, depending on the age of the patients (incontinence were emphasized. Questionnaires were completed by 122 participants aged 6-59 years, showing an overall prevalence of 27% for urinary incontinence. Mainly adults reported urinary incontinence, with a prevalence of 11% in men and 68% in women aged 12 and above. The amount of urinary leakage was usually only a few drops and it was mainly triggered by coughing. Many of the participants had never mentioned this symptom to anyone. Doctors' and physical therapists' attention should be drawn to the fact that urinary incontinence is part of the complication spectrum of CF. A quarter of the study population refrained from coughing up phlegm and from physiotherapy. It is important to actively question and inform about this problem, to enable its detection and treatment.

  6. Urinary incontinence: the role of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trutnovsky, Gerda; Rojas, Rodrigo Guzman; Mann, Kristy Pamela; Dietz, Hans P

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of menopause and hormone therapy on the symptoms and signs of stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. Records of women who attended a tertiary urogynecological unit were reviewed retrospectively. A standardized interview included evaluations of symptoms, menopause age (ie, time since last menstrual period or onset of menopausal symptoms), current or previous hormone use, and visual analogue scales for bother. Multichannel urodynamics, including urethral pressure profilometry and determination of abdominal leak point pressure, was performed. Of 382 women seen during the inclusion period, 62% were postmenopausal. Current systemic or local hormone use was reported by 7% and 6%, respectively. Two hundred eighty-eight women (76%) reported symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 5.7, and 273 women (72%) reported symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 6.4. On univariate analysis, symptoms and bother of urge incontinence were significantly related to menopause age, whereas this relationship was not found for stress incontinence. After calendar age was controlled for, length of menopause showed no significant relationship with any symptom or sign of urinary incontinence. Hormone deficiency after menopause is unlikely to play a major role in urinary incontinence.

  7. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  8. Cultured smooth muscle cells of the human vesical sphincter are more sensitive to histamine than are detrusor smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Oberbach, Andreas; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe

    2006-05-01

    To compare histamine receptor expression in cultured smooth muscle cells from the human detrusor and internal sphincter using receptor-specific agonists. Smooth muscle cells from the bladder dome and internal sphincter were cultured from 5 male patients undergoing cystectomy for bladder cancer therapy. Calcium transients in cells stimulated with carbachol, histamine, histamine receptor 1 (H1R)-specific heptanecarboxamide (HTMT), dimaprit (H2R), and R-(alpha)-methylhistamine (H3R) were measured by calcium imaging. Histamine receptor proteins were detected by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. H1R, H2R, and H3R expression was found in tissue and cultured cells. Carbachol stimulated equal numbers of detrusor and sphincter cells (60% and 51%, respectively). Histamine stimulated significantly more cells than carbachol in detrusor (100%) and sphincter (99.34%) cells. Calcium responses to carbachol in detrusor and sphincter cells were comparable and did not differ from those to histamine in detrusor cells. However, histamine and specific agonists stimulated more sphincter cells than did carbachol (P <0.001), and the calcium increase was greater in sphincter cells than in detrusor cells. Single cell analysis revealed comparable H2R responses in detrusor and sphincter cells, but H1R and H3R-mediated calcium reactions were significantly greater in sphincter cells. Histamine very effectively induces calcium release in smooth muscle cells. In sphincter cells, histamine is even more effective than carbachol regarding the number of reacting cells and the intracellular calcium increase. Some of the variability in the outcome of antihistaminic interstitial cystitis therapies might be caused by the ineffectiveness of the chosen antihistaminic or unintentional weakening of sphincteric function.

  9. Effect of non-ablative laser treatment on overactive bladder symptoms, urinary incontinence and sexual function in women with urodynamic stress incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hao Lin

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Erbium:YAG laser treatment can resolve USI and coexistent OAB symptoms three months after therapy. Sexual experience is also improved. However, repeated laser therapy may be necessary after six months.

  10. The translation and validation of Chinese overactive bladder symptom score for assessing overactive bladder syndrome and response to solifenacin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chieh-Lung Chou

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The Chinese OABSS has been validated as a reliable instrument for assessing OAB. Solifenacin 5 mg once daily improved urgency and other symptoms of OAB including frequency, urge incontinence, OABSS and International Prostatic Symptom Score. The adverse effects were acceptable and became less significant with time in the three months of treatment.

  11. OnabotulinumtoxinA in urinary incontinence: Prospective Study of a Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martínez, A; Fernández-Mederos, A; García-Hernández, J Á

    2017-09-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of a single intravesical injection of onabotulinumtoxinA (OnaBTA) for treating urge urinary incontinence (UUI) in women. We performed a prospective case-series study of consecutive patients with refractory UUI treated with an intravesical injection of OnaBTA. The patients were administered 100 units of OnaBTA injected into the bladder wall following 4 weeks of flushing with anticholinergic agents or beta 3 agonists. The urodynamic and clinical endpoints were evaluated before and 6 months after the injection of OnaBTA. The primary study endpoint was the number of episodes of urinary leakage. A total of 204 of the 210 selected patients conducted a valid visit 6 months after the therapeutic application. At 6 months of treatment with OnaBTA, 110 (53.9%) patients remained continent and were considered a success. However, 57 (27.9%) patients experienced one episode of urinary leakage per day, and 37 (18.2%) had 2 or more. In terms of the urodynamic parameters, we observed the following changes: increase in maximum bladder capacity (P<.0001) and reduced maximum pressure of the detrusor (P<.0001). In terms of the safety profile, 8 (3.9%) patients had self-limiting haematuria during the procedure, which resolved spontaneously, and 9 (4.4%) patients had acute urinary retention that required intermittent catheterisation. This study supports the use of OnabotulinumtoxinA in patients with urge urinary incontinence that does not respond to medical treatment. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Contractures and involuntary muscle overactivity in severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan; Rockstroh, Günter; Rückriem, Stefan; Koch, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of contractures with an increase or reduction of non-spastic muscle overactivity due to severe cerebral damage. Forty-five patients with tetraparesis after severe cerebral damage were investigated. Three groups were defined based on the presence of spasticity (revealed as resistance to passive stretch (= hypertonia)), and the presence of contracture of the relevant knee joint: Group(s) (17 patients with hypertonia without contracture), Group(s+c) (20 patients with hypertonia and contracture), and Group(c) (eight patients without hypertonia and with contracture). In all groups spontaneous involuntary muscle activity was assessed continuously over a 12-hour period through isometric measurement of knee joint flexion torque. A mathematical algorithm differentiated an hourly muscle activity spectrum (PI(h)). The frequency of peaks (peaks(h)) from the activity spectrum was determined. We revealed that Group(s) had higher PI(h) and more frequent peaks(h) compared with Group(s+c) and Group(c) (p0.05). The presence of contractures was associated with lower involuntary muscle overactivity in terms of lower PI(h) and less frequent peaks(h), indicating that contractures may be associated with reduced non-spastic positive features of the upper motor neurone syndrome in patients with severe brain damage.

  13. Inventing urine incontinence devices for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, B; Cleland, V; Johnson, D E; O'Reilly, J L

    1989-01-01

    Nurses have long been aware of the devastating effects of urinary incontinence on women. Although women may find diapers, pads and protective clothing valuable protection, there are few options for a continuous wear, external urine incontinence device (EUID). Inventors have attempted to develop an EUID since ancient times; the first United States patent for an EUID was awarded in 1949. The purpose of this paper is to review technological considerations for development of an external urinary incontinence device for women. Patents and products illustrate the considerations.

  14. Adult female urinary incontinence and childhood bedwetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, S.

    1994-01-01

    A cross-sectional random population sample of women 30 to 59 years old was sent a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and, among other things, childhood bedwetting. Among 2,613 responders 17.0% reported prevalent urinary incontinence (14.7% stress provoked, 8.3% associated with urge, 6.8% stress...... and urge overlap, 2.2% occurring especially during sleep and 3.9% occurring especially when anxious), and 6.5% reported childhood bedwetting after age 5 years and 3.3% after age 10 years. Childhood bedwetting was associated with prevalent urge urinary incontinence (p ... during sleep (p anxiety (p

  15. TVT-O vs TVT: a randomized trial in patients with different degrees of urinary stress incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araco, F; Gravante, G; Sorge, R; Overton, J; De Vita, D; Sesti, F; Piccione, E

    2008-07-01

    TVT-O and TVT were compared in patients stratified according the severity of Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). Those patients with intrinsic sphincter deficiencies, overactive bladders, associated prolapses, neurovegetative disorders and recurrent SUI or under rehabilitative/medical therapies were all excluded. There were 208 women included. Operating times were longer, and postoperative pain greater for TVT (p TVT produced longer hospitalizations in severe SUI patients (p TVT and in 66% of them when treated with TVT-O (p TVT-O (p = 0.01), bladder perforations during TVT (p = NS), bladder obstructions in mild SUI patients after TVT (p TVT-O and TVT, and could be used to guide surgeons in selecting the most effective intervention.

  16. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  17. The Endoscopic Morphological Features of Congenital Posterior Urethral Obstructions in Boys with Refractory Daytime Urinary Incontinence and Nocturnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Hyuga, Taiju; Kawai, Shina; Kubo, Taro; Nakai, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study aims to evaluate the endoscopic morphological features of congenital posterior urethral obstructions in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis. Patients and Methods A total of 54 consecutive patients underwent endoscopy and were diagnosed with a posterior urethral valve (PUV) (types 1-4). PUV type 1 was classified as severe, moderate, or mild. A transurethral incision (TUI) was mainly performed for anterior wall lesions of the PUV. Voiding cystourethrography and pressure flow studies (PFS) were performed before and 3 to 4 months after TUI. Clinical symptoms were evaluated 6 months after TUI, and outcomes were assessed according to PFS waveform pattern groups (synergic pattern [SP] and dyssynergic pattern [DP]). Results All patients had PUV type 1 and/or 3 (i.e., n = 34 type 1, 7 type 3, and 13 types 1 and 3). There were severe (n = 1), moderate (n = 21), and mild (n = 25) cases of PUV type 1. According to PFS, SP and DP were present in 43 and 11 patients, respectively. TUI was effective in the SP group and symptoms improved in 77.4 and 69.3% of patients with daytime incontinence and nocturnal enuresis, respectively. Almost no effect was observed in the DP group. A significant decrease in the detrusor pressure was observed at maximum flow rate using PFS in the SP group. Conclusions PUV type 1 encompassed lesions with a spectrum of obstructions ranging from severe to mild, with mild types whose main obstructive lesion existed at the anterior wall of urethra occurring most frequently in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. TVT for the treatment of urodynamic stress incontinence: Efficacy and adverse effects at 13-year follow-up.

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    Serati, Maurizio; Sorice, Paola; Bogani, Giorgio; Braga, Andrea; Cantaluppi, Simona; Uccella, Stefano; Caccia, Giorgio; Salvatore, Stefano; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    To assess long-term subjective, objective, and urodynamic outcomes of retropubic mid-urethral slings at 13-year follow-up. This was a prospective observational study. Consecutive women with proven urodynamic stress incontinence were treated with standard retropubic tension free vaginal tape (TVT). Patients with mixed incontinence and/or anatomic evidence of pelvic organ prolapse were excluded. All the included patients underwent preoperative clinical and urodynamic evaluations. During follow-up examinations, women were assessed for subjective satisfaction and objective cure rates. The Cox model was used in order to investigate factors predicting the risk of recurrent stress urinary incontinence (SUI), over the study period. Overall, 55 patients were suitable for the analysis. At 13-year follow-up, 47 out of 55 (85.5%) patients declared themselves cured (p-for-trend 0.02) and 48 out of 58 (87.2%) were at least improved (p-for-trend 0.07). No significant deterioration of objective cure rates was observed over time (P = 0.29). At the time of the last evaluation, 50 out of 55 (90.9%) women were objectively cured; urodynamic evaluation confirmed this finding in 49 (89.1%) patients. Considering factors predictive of SUI recurrence, we observed that, via multivariate analysis, obesity (HR 7.2; P = 0.01) and maximum detrusor pressure during the voiding phase ≤29 cmH 2 O (HR 8.0; P = 0.01) were the only independent predictors of recurrent SUI. Our data confirmed that TVT is a highly effective and safe procedure also at 13-year follow-up. Interestingly, we observed a significant decrease of subjective satisfaction over time. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:192-197, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Physical therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

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    Parezanović-Ilić Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is an involuntary release of urine through the urethra during the increase of abdominal pressure in the absence of m. detrusor contraction. The exercise of pelvic floor muscles is recommended as the first line of cure. It is the least invasive and the only method without any undesirable side effects, which leads to either improvement or complete cure of SUI in 80-85% of cases. Objective. The aim of this study was to establish whether the strengthening of pelvic floor muscles using proprioceptive neural facilitation (PNF spiral dynamic technique was more efficient in comparison to classical Kegel exercise. Methods. The research was carried out at the Centre for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Centre Kragujevac. Sixty-six female patients with the symptoms of SUI were monitored in the period of two years. Thirty-four patients did pelvic floor muscle exercises twice a day, in the morning and in the evening, with 15-20 contractions. Thirty-two patients used PNF spiral dynamic technique for strengthening pelvic floor muscles. The patients who used the spiral dynamic technique also did some exercises from the program; they exercised twice a day, in the morning and in the evening, following the prescribed schedule. Treatment outcome was assessed by measuring the pelvic floor muscles by a vaginal dynamometer. Results. The values of the pelvic floor muscle force that were measured using the vaginal dynamometer in both examined groups (PNF spiral dynamic technique or Kegel exercise were statistically significantly higher after the implemented exercise program (t-test; p=0.000. No statistically significant difference in pelvic floor muscle values was found between the patients who applied PNF spiral dynamic technique and those who did Kegel exercise either before or after the exercise (two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measurements, factor of exercise type; p=0.899. Conclusion

  20. Frequency of the superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in unilateral fourth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Andrea; Ugrin, Maria Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Superior oblique palsy is accompanied in most cases by overaction of the muscle's ipsilateral antagonist, the inferior oblique muscle. Overaction and contracture of the ipsilateral superior rectus muscle in patients with unilateral fourth (trochlear) nerve palsy is seldom discussed in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency of superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy. The records of 198 patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy examined by the authors between July 1987 and July 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent complete eye examination with measurement of the deviation in the 9 positions of gaze and with the head tilted to both sides in all cooperative patients. Selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in these patients were as follows: vertical deviation of 15(Delta) or larger in primary position, equal or larger hypertropia with the ipsilateral forced tilt test than with the eyes looking straight ahead, more than 5(Delta) hypertropia of the affected eye in horizontal gaze to the same side, hypertropia in all upgazes, and overaction of the contralateral superior oblique muscle. Of 198 patients, 33 (16.6%) met the selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome. Superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome frequently occurs in unilateral superior oblique palsy.

  1. Dealing with complex overactive bladder syndrome patient profiles with focus on fesoterodine: in or out of the EAU guidelines?

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    Heesakkers J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John Heesakkers,1 Montserrat Espuña Pons,2 Philip Toozs Hobson,3 Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler4 1Department of Urology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands; 2Pelvic Floor Unit, ICGON, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Urogynecology, Birmingham Women’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK; 4Department of Urology, Academic Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Pierre et Marie Curie Medical School, Paris 6 University, Sorbonne Universités, Paris, France Abstract: Overactive bladder (OAB syndrome is a common, complex, and challenging condition. To assist the management of these patients, the European Association of Urology (EAU updates its guidelines annually. This review reports the presentations from the symposium titled “Dealing with complex OAB patient profiles: in or out of the EAU guidelines?” held at the 32nd EAU Annual Congress in March 2017 in London. The symposium focused on three groups of OAB patients: women who may also suffer pelvic organ prolapse, stress urinary incontinence, the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM; patients at risk of cognitive impairment; and elderly patients. The aim of the symposium was to determine how the 2017 EAU guidelines can best assist physicians, as well as to assess the benefits of fesoterodine in these patients. The EAU guidelines recommend antimuscarinic agents (grade A for the medical treatment of OAB. In women, OAB is correlated with GSM, both of which are underdiagnosed and undertreated. Fesoterodine decreases OAB symptoms and the associated limitation of physical activity. A combination of fesoterodine and vaginal estrogens is appropriate for OAB associated with GSM. In patients at risk of cognitive impairment, prescribers should pay particular attention to the choice of medication. Fesoterodine is a Pgp substrate with limited ability to cross the blood–brain barrier, which may explain the lack

  2. Quality of life and objective outcome assessment in women with tape division after surgery for stress urinary incontinence.

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    Daniela Ulrich

    Full Text Available Midurethral tapes may cause long-term complications such as voiding dysfunction, groin pain, de novo urgency or mesh erosion, which necessitate a reoperation. There is a paucity of data regarding health related quality of life in patients undergoing tape removal. The aim of the study was to evaluate quality of life (QoL and objective outcome after midurethral tape division or excision.All patients who underwent a midurethral tape division for voiding difficulties, pain or therapy resistant de novo overactive bladder between 1999 and 2014 were invited for follow-up. A control group with a suburethral tape without division was established in a 1:2 ratio and matched for age, tape used and year of tape insertion. Patients completed the Kings´ Health Questionnaire (KHQ, Incontinence Outcome Questionnaire, Female Sexual Function Index Questionnaire and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement score.Tape division or excision was performed in 32 women. Overall, 15 (60% of 25 women who were alive were available for clinical examination and completed the questionnaires. Tape division was performed for voiding dysfunction (n = 7, overactive bladder (n = 2, mesh extrusion (n = 3 and ongoing pain (n = 3. Median time to tape division/excision was 10 months. Three women in the tape division group had undergone reoperation for stress urinary incontinence (SUI. At a median follow-up of 11 years (IQR 9-13 subjective SUI rate was 53% (8/15 women in the tape division group and 17% (5/30 in the control group (p = 0.016, with no significant differences in objective SUI rates between groups. With regard to quality of life, the study group had significantly worse scores in the SUI related domains role limitation, physical limitation, severity measures and social limitations (KHQ compared to the control group.Women needing tape division or excision have lower SUI related QoL scores compared to controls mostly because of higher subjective SUI rates.

  3. Urinary incontinence - tension-free vaginal tape

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    ... ency/article/007377.htm Urinary incontinence - tension-free vaginal tape To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Placement of tension-free vaginal tape is surgery to help control stress urinary ...

  4. Urinary Incontinence: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor, or surgery. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Start Here Urinary Incontinence (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Urinary Tract Health (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) ...

  5. Re: Prospective Pilot Study of Mirabegron in Pediatric Patients with Overactive Bladder

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    Sinharib Çitgez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available EDITORIAL COMMENT Overactive bladder (OAB is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This event negatively affects and impairs children’s development. Antimuscarinics are the mainstay pharmacological management of OAB, but their side effects profile limits their use. Mirabegron, a new molecule with a distinct mechanism of action (b3-adrenoreceptor agonist, was recently approved as monotherapy for idiopathic OAB in adults but has not been studied in the pediatric population. Blais et al. have evaluated the efficacy and safety of mirabegron in the treatment of urinary incontinence in children with idiopathic OAB who were refractory to and/or intolerant of antimuscarinics. This prospective off-label study, using an adjusted-dose regimen of mirabegron (25-50 mg, included pediatric patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to OAB. Patients without symptom improvement or with partial response under intensive behavioral protocol and medical therapy (at least two different antimuscarinic agents were included in the study. Their primary outcome was better reported efficacy than with the use of prior anticholinergic medication. Secondary end points were tolerability and safety. Families were questioned for continence, side effects, compliance, and Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC questionnaire. A total of 58 patients (14 girls, 44 boys were enrolled in a mirabegron open-label trial. The median age at initiation of mirabegron was 10.1 years [interquartile range (IQR: 8.8-13.5]. The median duration of treatment was 11.5 months (IQR: 6.0-15.0. The median bladder capacity improved from 150 ml to 200 ml (p<0.001. Continence improved in 52 of 58, with 13 being completely dry. The median PPBC score improved from 4.0 to 2.0 (p<0.001. The authors also assessed the safety of mirabegron. All electrocardiogram and blood tests remained normal. No significant change in blood pressure (<5 mmHg and heart rate (fewer than five beats

  6. [A prophylactic program for strain urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnicka, Grazyna; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grazyna J; Bień, Agnieszka M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to work out a prophylactic program for strain urinary incontinence. Analysis of literature on the subject and results of own investigations presented in the first part of the paper indicate that the program of prophylaxis of strain urinary incontinence should primarily include: (1) Preparation of the medical staff (nurses, midwives) for propagating health education among women on prevention of strain urinary incontinence. (2) Preparation of adequate educational materials in the form of brochures, leaflets, information posters about symptoms, causes and prophylaxis of urinary incontinence indicating health care institutions available to all women when the disease is suspected or already present. (3) Propagation of problems connected with strain urinary incontinence in the mass media providing information to a wide audience in order to make people realize the significance of this social problem and break stereotypes associated with this disease of "shame". (4) Preparation of sets of exercises for the muscles of the base of the pelvis to be performed during pregnancy, confinement and menopause to maintain their proper function. (5) Indicating factors predisposing to strain urinary incontinence with focus on possibilities of their reduction or elimination.

  7. A pilot study of acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate in patients with detrusor underactivity

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    Sugimoto K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Koichi Sugimoto,1 Takahiro Akiyama,2 Nobutaka Shimizu,3 Naoki Matsumura,1 Taiji Hayashi,1 Tsukasa Nishioka,1 Hirotsugu Uemura3 1Department of Urology, Sakai Hospital, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Sakai, Osaka, Japan; 2Department of Urology, Sakai-Onshinkai Hospital, Sakai, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Urology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka, Japan Aim: To investigate the clinical efficacy of acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate in patients with detrusor underactivity. Methods: We measured the post-void residual urinary volume in 19 patients with underactive bladders. All these patients had been under treatment with distigmine bromide and were prescribed acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate at a dose of 100 mg three times daily for 2 weeks. Results: Compared with the post-void residual urinary volume value at baseline (161.4±90.0 mL a statistically significant reduction was observed at the end of treatment (116.3±63.1 mL (P=0.006. The drug was generally well tolerated by the majority of patients. Conclusion: Maybe, acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate showed clinical efficacy in patients with underactive bladders and may, therefore, be used alternatively in patients who do not respond sufficiently to distigmine bromide. Keywords: acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, distigmine bromide, underactive bladder, detrusor underactive

  8. Luminal DMSO: Effects on Detrusor and Urothelial/Lamina Propria Function

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    Katrina J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DMSO is used as a treatment for interstitial cystitis and this study examined the effects of luminal DMSO treatment on bladder function and histology. Porcine bladder was incubated without (controls or with DMSO (50% applied to the luminal surface and the release of ATP, acetylcholine, and LDH assessed during incubation and in tissues strips after DMSO incubation. Luminally applied DMSO caused ATP, Ach, and LDH release from the urothelial surface during treatment, with loss of urothelial layers also evident histologically. In strips of urothelium/lamina propria from DMSO pretreated bladders the release of both ATP and Ach was depressed, while contractile responses to carbachol were enhanced. Detrusor muscle contractile responses to carbachol were not affected by DMSO pretreatment, but neurogenic responses to electrical field stimulation were enhanced. The presence of an intact urothelium/lamina propria inhibited detrusor contraction to carbachol by 53% and this inhibition was significantly reduced in DMSO pretreated tissues. Detection of LDH in the treatment medium suggests that DMSO permeabilised urothelial membranes causing leakage of cytosolic contents including ATP and Ach rather than enhancing release of these mediators. The increase in contractile response and high levels of ATP are consistent with initial flare up in IC/PBS symptoms after DMSO treatment.

  9. [Developments in the medical treatment of overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara Montero, A

    Overactive Bladder (OAB) is a common problem among men and women. Antimuscarinic drugs are a reference treatment for OAB and act by blocking the muscarinic receptors (M2 and M3 subtypes) in the bladder. Adherence to antimuscarinic treatment is usually low, due to the perceived lack of efficacy and adverse effects. Therefore, new treatments with different mechanisms of action and a more acceptable tolerability profile are needed, and that improve the symptoms of OAB. Mirabegron is a new treatment option for all patients with OAB and could solve an unmet need in patients still not satisfied, or where the antimuscarinic therapy is not indicated, is an alternative option for patients with OAB. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavior profiles in children with functional urinary incontinence before and after incontinence treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bael (An); P. Winkler (Pauline); H. Lax (Hildegard); H. Hirche (Herbert); E. Gäbel (Elisabeth); M. Vijverberg (Marianne); R. van Zon (Roelie); E. van Hoecke (Eline); J.D. van Gool (Jan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE. The purpose of this work was to analyze prospectively the prevalence of behavioral disorders in children with urinary incontinence because of nonneuropathic bladder-sphincter dysfunction before and after treatment for incontinence. METHODS. A total of 202 children with

  11. Behavior profiles in children with functional urinary incontinence before and after incontinence treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bael, An; Winkler, Pauline; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Gaebel, Elisabeth; Vijverberg, Marianne; van Zon, Roelie; Van Hoecke, Eline; van Gool, Jan D.

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this work was to analyze prospectively the prevalence of behavioral disorders in children with urinary incontinence because of nonneuropathic bladder-sphincter dysfunction before and after treatment for incontinence. METHODS. A total of 202 children with nonneuropathic

  12. A randomized, multicenter, controlled study, comparing efficacy and safety of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM versus Solifenacin Succinate in women with overactive bladder syndrome

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    Carlo Vecchioli-Scaldazza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To assess efficacy and tolerability of a new complementary and alternative medicine (CAM consisting of vitamins (C and D, herbal products (cucurbita maxima, capsicum annum, polygonum capsicatum and amino acid L-Glutammina, in the treatment of female Overactive Bladder syndrome (OAB. Materials and methods: 90 consecutive women with OAB symptoms were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, controlled study. Women were divided randomly into two groups of 45 patients each. In group A, women received Solifenacin Succinate (SS, 5 mg. once a day for 12 weeks. In group B, women received CAM, 930 mg, twice daily for 12 weeks. Women were assessed with 3-day micturition diary, Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale (PPIUS, Overactive Bladder questionnaire Short Form (OAB-q SF and Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire (PGI-I. Results: 8 patients in group A and 1 patient in group B dropped out from therapy because of side effects. A reduction in the number of daily micturitions, nocturia and episodes of urge incontinence was present with both SS and CAM with statistically highly significant differences, but CAM was significantly more effective than SS. PPIUS and OAB-q SF showed improvements with both SS and CAM with a more significant efficacy of CAM. PGI-I, demonstrated improvements in the two groups of patients with a greater satisfaction expressed by patients treated with CAM. Conclusions: the small number of patients does not permit definitive conclusions; however, the results of the research showed the greater effectiveness and tolerability of CAM.

  13. Efficacy and persistence of low-dose mirabegron (25 mg) in patients with overactive bladder: analysis in a real-world urological practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuan Chi; Wang, Hung Jen; Chuang, Yao Chi

    2018-06-07

    Mirabegron is a relatively new drug to treat overactive bladder (OAB). The therapeutic doses are between 25 and 100 mg in clinical trials. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and persistence of low-dose mirabegron (25 mg) in patients with OAB in daily urological practice. The study was a retrospective consecutive cohort of 177 OAB patients (101 male and 76 female) treated with 25 mg of mirabegron mg since January 2016 to November 2016. The therapeutic outcomes were assessed at baseline, 4, 12, and 24 weeks. Mirabegron usage was associated with a statistically significant decrease in Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, Urgency Severity Score, urge urinary incontinence, International Prostate Symptom Score (both storage and voiding symptom) at 4-week follow-up, and the therapeutic effects were further improved at 12- and 24-week follow-up. Among them, 118 patients (66.7%) and 84 patients (47.5%) were maintained on mirabegron therapy for more than 3 and 6 months, respectively. However, 29 patients (16%) had poor response with drug discontinuation within 3 months and 8 patients (4.5%) stopped medication due to adverse effects. The overall side effect was 10.2%, and the most common side effect was elevated blood pressure (2.8%) and increased post-void residual (2.8%). Between male and female patients, there was no statistical difference of symptom improvement and drug persistence rate. Low-dose mirabegron (25 mg) improves clinical outcomes in two-thirds of OAB patients with good safety profile and high persistence in daily urological practice. The therapeutic effect is similar between the genders.

  14. Muscarinic receptor antagonists for overactive bladder treatment: does one fit all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Lambertus P. W.; Mulder, Wilhelmina M. C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Michel, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To review evidence and regulatory dosing recommendations for muscarinic receptor antagonists used in the treatment of overactive bladder symptom complex (darifenacin, fesoterodine oxybutynin propiverine solifenacin tolterodine trospium) in special patient populations. Recent

  15. Effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence in women

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    Whitcomb EL

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Emily L Whitcomb1, Leslee L Subak21Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Orange County-Irvine Medical Center, Irvine, CA, USA; 2University of California San Francisco, UCSF Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, and Urology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, SF Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: The purpose of this research was review the epidemiology of the association of obesity and urinary incontinence, and to summarize the published data on the effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence.Methods: A literature review of the association between urinary incontinence and overweight/obesity in women was performed. Case series and clinical trials reporting the effect of surgical, behavioral, and/or pharmacological weight loss on urinary incontinence are summarized.Results: Epidemiological studies demonstrate that obesity is a strong and independent risk factor for prevalent and incident urinary incontinence. There is a clear dose-response effect of weight on urinary incontinence, with each 5-unit increase in body mass index associated with a 20%–70% increase in risk of urinary incontinence. The maximum effect of weight on urinary incontinence has an odds ratio of 4–5. The odds of incident urinary incontinence over 5–10 years increase by approximately 30%–60% for each 5-unit increase in body mass index. There appears to be a stronger association between increasing weight and prevalent and incident stress incontinence (including mixed incontinence than for urge incontinence. Weight loss studies indicate that both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss leads to significant improvements in prevalence, frequency, and/or symptoms of urinary incontinence.Conclusion: Epidemiological studies document overweight and obesity as important risk factors for urinary incontinence. Weight loss by both surgical and more conservative

  16. Urinary incontinence in pregnant women and their quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaöz, Semra; Talas, Melek S; Atabekoğlu, Cem S

    2010-12-01

    The aim was to investigate the prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy and the related risk factors as well as to assess its influence on the quality of life. Although urinary incontinence is common during pregnancy and can have a substantial impact on quality of life, women rarely seek help for this symptom. This study was designed as a cross-sectional and descriptive survey. A total of 393 pregnant women participated in the study between March and June 2007. The data was collected using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form and Wagner's quality of life scale. Potential risk factors were investigated through logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 27% (106/393). Factors significantly associated with urinary incontinence included age group, parity, previous urinary incontinence, constipation, urinary incontinence in mother and sister, previous urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum. According to the results of our study, urinary incontinence is common in women during pregnancy. The quality of life of pregnant women was found to be either unaffected or affected very little by urinary incontinence. This study reveals that the prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy is very high. The findings will help increase the awareness of health care workers involved in the care of pregnant women about urinary incontinence and aid the design of more intensive education programmes directed towards the prevention of urinary incontinence during pregnancy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Quantifying over-activity in bipolar and schizophrenia patients in a human open field Paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Kincaid, Meegin; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that a cardinal symptom of mania is over-activity and exaggerated goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to quantify this behavior objectively in a laboratory environment. Having a methodology to assess over-activity reliably might be useful in distinguishing manic bipolar disorder (BD) from schizophrenia (SCZ) during highly activated states. In the current study, quantifiable measures of object-interaction were assessed using a multivariate ...

  18. [Urinary incontinence 6 months after childbirth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Viñaspre Hernández, Regina; Rubio Aranda, Encarnación; Tomás Aznar, Concepción

    2013-08-17

    Urinary incontinence initiated before and right after delivery and persisting 3 months after delivery tends to become chronic. We intended to estimate the persistence of urinary incontinence 6 months postpartum and to analyse the different factors associated with it. Follow-up study 6 months after delivery of women presenting urinary incontinence symptoms in gestation or in the first 2 months of postpartum. The dependent variable was the persistence and the independent variables were grouped in obstetric and non-obstetric. Odds ratio (OR) were calculated with their confidence interval at 95% (IC 95%) in the bivariate analysis. The variables that showed an important risk of persistence of incontinence were used to perform a multivariate model of logistic regression. The persistence of incontinence 6 months after delivery was 21.4% (CI 95% 16-26.7). The risk of persistence increased with the Kristeller maneuver (OR 7.89, CI 95% 3.04-20.49), not weight recovery (OR 3.64, CI 95% 1.10-12.02), not practising pelvic floor muscle exercises in postpartum (OR 9.36, CI 95% 2.71-32.33), appearance of incontinence after delivery (OR 6.66, CI 95% 2.37-18.68) and the weight of the newborn>3.5 kg (OR 6.76, CI 95% 2.54-18.03), all of them explaining 58% of the variability of persistence. 21.4% of women with urinary incontinence caused by pregnancy/delivery will continue to have it 6 months postpartum. An important part of this persistence is associated with some factors easy to modify. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Faecal soiling: pathophysiology of postdefaecatory incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciani, F

    2013-08-01

    Passive postdefaecatory incontinence is poorly understood and yet is an important clinical problem. The aim of this study was to characterize the pathophysiology of postdefaecatory incontinence in patients affected by faecal soiling. Seventy-two patients (30 women, age range 49-79 years; 42 men, age range, 53-75 years) affected by faecal passive incontinence with faecal soiling were included in the study. Two patient groups were identified: Group 1 comprised 42 patients with postdefaecatory incontinence and Group 2 had 30 patients without incontinence after bowel movements. After a preliminary clinical evaluation, including the Faecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI) score and the obstructed defaecation syndrome (ODS) score, all patients of Groups 1 and 2 were studied by means of endoanal ultrasound and anorectal manometry. The results were compared with those from 20 healthy control subjects. A significantly higher ODS score was found in Group 1 (P IAS) in Group 2 (P IAS atrophy and the FISI score (ρs 0.78; P < 0.03). Anal resting pressure (Pmax and Pm ) was significantly lower in Group 2 (P < 0.04). The straining test was considered positive in 30 (71.4%) patients in Group 1, significantly greater than in Group 2 (P < 0.01). A significantly higher conscious rectal sensitivity threshold (CRST) was found in Group 1 patients (P < 0.01). The ODS score, a positive straining test and high CRST values suggest that postdefaecatory incontinence is secondary to impaired defaecation. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. The impact of overactive bladder on mental health, work productivity and health-related quality of life in the UK and Sweden: results from EpiLUTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Karin S; Sexton, Chris C; Kopp, Zoe S; Ebel-Bitoun, Caty; Milsom, Ian; Chapple, Chris

    2011-11-01

    • To examine the prevalence and burden of overactive bladder (OAB) with bother in the UK and Sweden compared to OAB without bother and no/minimal OAB/lower urinary tract (LUTS) symptoms, respectively. • A cross-sectional population-representative survey was conducted via the Internet in the UK, Sweden and USA. • Participants rated the frequency and bother of OAB and LUTS. Patient outcomes included the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire Short Form, Patient Perception of Bladder Condition, Short Form-12, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression, as well as questions about treatment seeking and work productivity. • OAB was defined as urgency at least sometimes or the presence of urinary urgency incontinence. Three subgroups were compared: no/minimal symptoms, OAB without bother and OAB with bother. • Analyses were conducted by gender and country using general linear and logistic regression models to examine bothersome OAB and treatment seeking. • Survey response was 59.2%; 10,000 people (4724 men and 5276 women) participated. • The prevalence of OAB with bother at least 'somewhat' was 10.9% and 14.6% for men in the UK and Sweden, and 22.5% and 33.7% for women in the UK and Sweden, respectively. • Men and women with bothersome OAB were significantly more likely to seek treatment, report the lowest levels of health-related quality of life and work productivity and the highest levels of anxiety and depression compared to those with no/minimal symptoms and OAB without bother. • Greater symptom severity of urgency, urgency urinary incontinence, frequency, nocturia, and increasing levels of anxiety were strongly predictive of OAB bother in both men and women. • Predictors of treatment seeking included frequency, bother as a result of urgency, and lower levels of depressive symptoms in men, and frequency, nocturia and urgency in women. • OAB is common in the UK and Sweden, and women are more

  1. Urodynamic and molecular characteristics of detrusor underactivity in a rat cryoinjury model and effects of low energy shock wave therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Tyagi, Pradeep; Wang, Hung-Jen; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Chancellor, Michael B

    2018-02-01

    Low energy shock wave (LESW) has been shown to facilitate tissue regeneration and reduce inflammation. We investigated the effects of LESW in an underactive (DU) model induced by cryoinjury of rat detrusor. Forty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham, cryoinjury with or without LESW (0.12 mJ/mm 2 ; 200 pulses). Under halothane anesthesia, a low midline incision was made and a cryoinjury of detrusor was induced by placing an aluminum rod (chilled with dry ice) for 30 s on the serosal side of the bladder filled with 1 mL sterile saline bilaterally. Awake cystometrogram (CMG), molecular and histopathology studies were performed on Day 8 or 15 after cryoinjury. Significant urodynamic, histological, and molecular changes induced by cryoinjury of rat detrusor were detected on Day 8 and decrease in the contraction amplitude (54.3%), a significant increase in wet bladder weight (64.1%), edematous changes, muscle thinning and downregulation of α-SMA, IL-6, and upregulation of COX-2. LESW reversed the cryoinjury induced histological and COX-2 expression to cause a 49.0% increase in the contraction amplitude (P < 0.05). LESW induced cell proliferation was revealed by increased CD31 and Ki67 immunostaining. The effect of cryoinjury on urodynamic and histological changes was maintained till Day 15. The cryoinjury of rat detrusor models myogenic DU, which is partially reversed by LESW. LESW may afford a simple, non-invasive modality to facilitate tissue regeneration and improve voiding function in myogenic detrusor underactivity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bladder Control Problems: Medications for Treating Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control problems, including how they work to treat urinary incontinence and possible side effects. By Mayo Clinic Staff ... a look at medications commonly prescribed to treat urinary incontinence and their possible side effects. Keep in mind ...

  3. Are urge incontinence and aging risk factors of erectile dysfunction in patients with male lower urinary tract symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Toshiyasu; Earle, Carolyn; Imao, Tetsuya; Takemae, Katsuro

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that erectile dysfunction (ED) patients also suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). We investigated a group of men with LUTS and assessed their sexual function with the aim of being able to predict ED risk factors and introduce ED treatments earlier for this patient group. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Overactive Bladder Symptoms Score (OABSS) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) score were obtained from 236 men with LUTS at their first out-patients visit. Clinical parameters such as body mass index, prostate volume, residual urine volume and prostate specific antigen were also evaluated. The relationship between the SHIM score and other clinical data was analyzed. According to the SHIM score, ED in men with LUTS was severe 15%, moderate 19%, moderate to mild 28%, mild 17%, normal 7% and data was incomplete in 14%. Based on the results of a multivariate analysis, aging (p urinary incontinence was a risk factor for severe and moderate ED (p = 0.005). Aging and OAB (notably urinary urge incontinence) are risk factors for severe and moderate ED in men with LUTS.

  4. Factors Associated with Urinary Stress Incontinence in Primiparas

    OpenAIRE

    Pei-Ling Chou; Fang-Ping Chen; Li-Fen Teng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate obstetric and maternal risk factors for stress urinary incontinence in primiparas. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 to August 2002, 378 primiparas were interviewed about stress urinary incontinence 1 year after delivery. The association between symptoms of urinary stress incontinence and obstetric factors was assessed. Results: Twenty-four (6%) primiparas had urinary stress incontinence after delivery. Maternal age was positively associated with urinary st...

  5. Effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Emily L; Subak, Leslee L

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this research was review the epidemiology of the association of obesity and urinary incontinence, and to summarize the published data on the effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence. Methods A literature review of the association between urinary incontinence and overweight/obesity in women was performed. Case series and clinical trials reporting the effect of surgical, behavioral, and/or pharmacological weight loss on urinary incontinence are summarized. Results Epidemiological studies demonstrate that obesity is a strong and independent risk factor for prevalent and incident urinary incontinence. There is a clear dose-response effect of weight on urinary incontinence, with each 5-unit increase in body mass index associated with a 20%–70% increase in risk of urinary incontinence. The maximum effect of weight on urinary incontinence has an odds ratio of 4–5. The odds of incident urinary incontinence over 5–10 years increase by approximately 30%–60% for each 5-unit increase in body mass index. There appears to be a stronger association between increasing weight and prevalent and incident stress incontinence (including mixed incontinence) than for urge incontinence. Weight loss studies indicate that both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss leads to significant improvements in prevalence, frequency, and/or symptoms of urinary incontinence. Conclusion Epidemiological studies document overweight and obesity as important risk factors for urinary incontinence. Weight loss by both surgical and more conservative approaches is effective in reducing urinary incontinence symptoms and should be strongly considered as a first line treatment for overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence. PMID:24198645

  6. Factors Associated with Urinary Stress Incontinence in Primiparas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling Chou

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: For primiparas who underwent vaginal delivery, an increase in age was associated with increased risk of development of stress incontinence. Increased vulnerability of the pelvic floor with age might explain this finding. Pelvic floor exercise had a protective effect against postpartum stress incontinence in primiparas who underwent cesarean section. This reflects the fact that pregnancy per se carries a risk of stress incontinence. We recommend that primiparas perform pelvic floor exercises to prevent the development of postpartum stress incontinence.

  7. The cost-effectiveness of solifenacin vs fesoterodine, oxybutynin immediate-release, propiverine, tolterodine extended-release and tolterodine immediate-release in the treatment of patients with overactive bladder in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Linda; Thorpe, Andrew; Warner, Juliet; Sidhu, Manpreet

    2010-08-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of solifenacin vs other antimuscarinic strategies commonly used in UK clinical practice, based on the results of a recent published review. Overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is characterized by symptoms of urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. Pharmacological treatment comprises oral antimuscarinic agents, which are divided into older-generation treatments, including oxybutynin, and new-generation treatments, comprising solifenacin, tolterodine, darifenacin and fesoterodine. The latter have reduced central nervous system penetration and have better selectivity for the M3 subclass of acetylcholine receptors, resulting in improved tolerability. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of antimuscarinics provided an opportunity for an economic evaluation of these agents using a rigorous assessment of efficacy. A cost-utility analysis was undertaken using a 1-year decision-tree model. Treatment success was defined separately for urgency, frequency and incontinence, with efficacy data taken from the recent review. Treatment persistence rates were taken from the Information Management System database. Utility values for the calculation of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were taken from published sources. The analysis included costs directly associated with treatment for OAB, i.e. antimuscarinic therapy, consultations with general practitioners, and outpatient contacts. Resource use was based on expert opinion. Costs were reported at 2007/2008 prices. Extensive deterministic and probabilistic analyses were conducted to test the robustness of the base-case results. Solifenacin was associated with the highest QALY gains (per 1000 patients) for all three outcomes of interest, i.e. urgency (712.3), frequency (723.1) and incontinence (695.0). Solifenacin was dominant relative to fesoterodine, tolterodine extended-release (ER) and tolterodine immediate-release (IR), and cost-effective relative to

  8. The interaction of stress and urgency urinary incontinence and its effect on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Vatché A; Sun, Haiyan; Yan, Xiaowei S; Clarke, Deseraé N; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to estimate the impact of stress and urgency urinary incontinence (UI) on the quality of life (QOL), and to determine whether the impact varies according to UI severity. We used data from the General Longitudinal Overactive Bladder Evaluation-UI study in women. Stress and urgency UI symptom severity scores ranged from 0 to 8. We used logistic regression to test the relation among different severity levels of stress and urgency UI, and their interaction with the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7). This was categorized according to percentage ranges as 0-40% (reference), 41-80%, and 81-100%. Both stress and urgency UI were significantly associated with IIQ-7. Higher scores had higher odds ratios (ORs). The OR for urgency vs stress UI was greater at the same severity level. For instance, comparing IIQ-7 quintiles (0-40% vs 41-80%), the OR for an association with an urgency UI score of 5-6 was 5.27 (95% CI = 3.78-7.33) vs 2.76 (95% CI = 2.07-3.68) for a stress UI score of 5-6. Both UI subtypes were more strongly related to the upper (81-100%) than the to the lower (41-80%) quintiles. There was a strong positive urgency UI and stress UI interaction with the upper (i.e., 81-100%) but not the two next lower (41-80%) quintiles. The impact of UI subtypes on QOL varies according to the score of IIQ-7, stress and urgency UI, and their interaction. Urgency vs stress UI has a stronger impact. The effect is greatest for high IIQ-7 scores with a significant share mediated by the interaction of the two UI subtypes.

  9. Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence in a geriatric cohort - a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrberger, Clemens; Madersbacher, Stephan; Jungwirth, Susanne; Fischer, Peter; Tragl, Karl-Heinz

    2012-11-01

    To assess prevalence and severity of lower urinary tract function in 85-year-old men and women. Little is known on the prevalence of lower urinary tract dysfunction in this geriatric age group, which is now the fastest growing sector of the population worldwide. The Vienna Trans-Danube Aging study (VITA) is a longitudinal, population-based study initiated in 2000 that included men/women aged 75 years living in a well-defined area in Vienna. The main purpose of the VITA study was to identify risk factors for incident Alzheimer's disease. All study participants alive in 2010 were contacted by mail to complete a detailed questionnaire on various aspects of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urinary incontinence (UI). The response rate was 68%, resulting in a total of 262 questionnaires available for analysis (men n= 96; women n= 166). All study participants were 85 years of age. Urinary incontinence defined as any involuntary loss during the past 4 weeks was reported by 24% of men and 35% of women (P= 0.04). Stress UI was more frequent in women (39%) than in men (14%, P 0.05). Nocturia more often than twice was more prevalent in men (69%) than in women (49%) (P= 0.02). Overactive bladder, according to International Continence Society criteria, was present in 55% of women and 50% of men. No difference regarding quality of life impairment as the result of LUTS and UI was noticed between sexes. A few co-morbidities were identified to correlate with UI and storage symptoms. These data provide insights into the prevalence and severity of LUTS and UI in individuals in their eighties, to our knowledge the largest population-based study in this age group. Demographic changes in upcoming decades underline the importance of a thorough understanding of lower urinary tract dysfunction in a geriatric population. © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  10. Urinary incontinence after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensen, E.J.M.; Withagen, M.I.J.; Kluivers, K.B.; Milani, A.L.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: This study focused on the changes in urinary incontinence (UI) rates pre- and postoperatively and identified risk factors which predict the presence of symptoms of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) or stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) without

  11. Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence During Pregnancy and Associated Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç, Ayten

    2017-07-04

    To investigate the prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy and associated risk factors. The study is a cross-sectional and descriptive study. A questionnaire was conducted with a total of 750 pregnant women about their urinary incontinence complaints between April and December 2013. The prevalence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy was 300 in 750 (40%). Stress urinary incontinence was the most common type of incontinence during pregnancy. 41.7% of nulliparous women, 38% of primipara women, and 20.3% of multipara women experienced urinary incontinence. Among women reporting UI, 29.3% experienced leakage a few times a day and the amount of leakage was generally (59.7%) moderate. Factors significantly associated with urinary incontinence included age group, gestational age, parity, previous urinary incontinence, constipation, mode of delivery at last childbirth, previous urinary tract infection, body mass index during pregnancy. But on multivariable analysis, the risk factors for urinary incontinence during pregnancy were previous urinary tract infection (OR = 3.8, 95%CI 1.5-9.3), constipation (OR 3.1, 95%CI 1.7-5.6) and gestational age (OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.9). As a result of this study, urinary incontinence is a common condition during pregnancy. Results would help the design of more intensive training programs to prevent incontinence during pregnancy by increasing the awareness about urinary incontinence of healthcare staff engaging in the care of pregnant women. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Rectus Fascia Sling for the Treatment of Total Urethral Incontinence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Urinary incontinence in patients with neurological disease is a major health problem. A modified rectus fascial sling has been assessed in incontinent male patients. Patients and Methods: Fourteen adult male patients with total incontinence due to neurogenic or post-traumatic and etiology were included in this ...

  13. Satisfaction with tolterodine: assessing symptom-specific patient-reported goal achievement in the treatment of overactive bladder in female patients (STARGATE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, M-S; Doo, C K; Lee, K-S

    2008-02-01

    Open-label study to evaluate the effect of tolterodine extended-release (ER) on symptom-specific patient-reported goal achievement (PGA) of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in females. Eligible patients who had frequency >or= 8 and urgency >or= 2 episodes per 24 h with or without urgency incontinence were treated with 12-week tolterodine ER (4 mg once daily). Primary end-point was the rate of PGA by a visual analogue scale compared with initial expectation with treatment. At baseline, patients were asked to set their personal goals for each OAB symptom with treatment. Secondary efficacy variables were changes in symptom severity, voiding diary and patient perception of bladder condition (PPBC), global impression of improvement (GII), and willingness to continue treatment. A total of 56 patients were entered. The median rate of symptom-specific PGA and reductions in symptom severity were for frequency (60%, 45%), episodes of urgency 60%, 55%), urge incontinence (80%, 71%), nocturia (50%, 52%) and tenesmus (30%, 26%) after 12 weeks treatment. There was a significant improvement in all OAB symptoms in voiding diary. Thirty-five patients (62.5%) experienced an improvement of >or= 2 points in PPBC. Thirty (53.6%) and 22 (39.3%) of patients reported much and little improvement of their symptoms in GII. A total of 41 (73.2%) patients wanted to continue taking the medication at the end of the study. Most OAB patients reported improvement of their OAB symptoms with 12-week tolterodine ER 4 mg treatment. There was a significant achievement of symptom-specific goal on the key OAB symptoms. But, PGA did not correlate with objective outcomes.

  14. Impact of convenience void in a bladder diary with urinary perception grade to assess overactive bladder symptoms: a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Hisashi; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Nakao, Masahiro; Ukimura, Osamu; Kitakoji, Hiroshi; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2010-09-01

    Bladder diaries including bladder perception grade were analyzed to assess convenience void (CV) in community-dwelling women 40 years of age or older. A total of 310 women completed a 3-day bladder diary with a grade for bladder perception. The grade was defined on scores 0-5 as follows: 0 = No bladder sensation, 1 = Sensation of bladder filling without desire to void, 2 = Desire to void, 3 = Strong desire to void, 4 = Urgency without urge urinary incontinence (UUI), and 5 = Urge incontinence episode. CV was defined as void without desire to void: when the grade was 0, CV in a narrow sense, and when 0 or 1, CV in a broad sense. The incidence of CV in the broad sense significantly decreased with age. Of the 310 women, 48 (15.5%) had overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms on the medical interview, including 37 (11.9%) without UUI (OAB-Dry) and 11 (3.5%) with UUI (OAB-Wet). Of the remaining 262 women, 111 (35.8%), who had urgency but a urinary frequency of 7 or less, and another 141 (48.7%) were classified into the Normal with Urgency and Normal without Urgency groups, respectively. The incidence of CV in a broad sense in the Normal without Urgency group was significantly greater than that in the Normal with Urgency and OAB-Wet groups. The mean voided volumes of CV in the broad sense in the OAB-Wet group were significantly smaller than those in the other three groups. The evaluation of CV may be a new tool in assessing storage condition and voiding dysfunction. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Outcomes of different protocols of pelvic floor physical therapy and anti-cholinergics in women with wet over-active bladder: A 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuri, Joseph; Kafri, Rachel; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Stav, Kobi

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the 4-year outcomes of three protocols of pelvic floor physical therapy and anticholinergic drug in women with wet over-active bladder (OAB). One hundred and sixty-four women were randomly allocated to one of four interventions: drug therapy (DT), bladder training (BT), pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), or combined pelvic floor rehabilitation (CPFR) that includes BT, PFMT, and behavioral advice. The active treatment in each group lasted 3 months. Of the 132 women who completed a 1-year follow-up, 120 women (90%) responded to our questionnaires and therefore were included in this study. Outcome measures were the number of voids per day, number of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes per week, completely dry rate and Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire (I-QOL) at 4 years. After 4 years of follow-up, the outcome measures improved significantly and equally in all four groups. The median number of UUI episodes/week dropped by 3, 1, 2, and 2 in the DT, BT, PFMT, and CPFR groups, respectively (P = ns). The dry rates were 25%, 31%, 44%, 34% in the DT, BT, PFMT, and CPFR groups, respectively (P = ns). I-QOL scores improved significantly in all four groups. Women who suffer from wet-OAB may experience the same degree of long-term improvement following various pelvic floor physical therapy protocols as they would from drug therapy. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:755-758, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Epidemiology of mixed, stress, and urgency urinary incontinence in middle-aged/older women: the importance of incontinence history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komesu, Yuko M; Schrader, Ronald M; Ketai, Loren H; Rogers, Rebecca G; Dunivan, Gena C

    2016-05-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is common and the relationship among its subtypes complex. Our objective was to describe the natural history and predictors of the incontinence subtypes stress, urgency, and mixed, in middle-aged and older US women. We tested our hypothesis that UI subtype history predicted future occurrence, evaluating subtype incidence/remission over multiple time points in a stable cohort of women. We analyzed longitudinal urinary incontinence data in 10,572 community-dwelling women aged ≥50 in the 2004-2010 Health and Retirement Study. Mixed, stress, and urgency incontinence prevalence (2004, 2006, 2008, 2010) and 2-year cumulative incidence and remissions (2004-2006, 2006-2008, 2008-2010) were estimated. Patient characteristics and incontinence subtype status 2004-2008 were entered into a multivariable, transition model to determine predictors for incontinence subtype occurrence in 2010. The prevalence of each subtype in this population (median age 63-66) was 2.6-8.9 %. Subtype incidence equaled 2.1-3.5 % and remissions for each varied between 22.3 and 48.7 %. Incontinence subtype incidence predictors included ethnicity/race, age, body mass index, and functional limitations. Compared with white women, black women had decreased odds of incident stress incontinence and Hispanic women had increased odds of stress incontinence remission. The age range 80-90 and severe obesity predicted incident mixed incontinence. Functional limitations predicted mixed and urgency incontinence. The strongest predictor of incontinence subtype was subtype history. The presence of the respective incontinence subtypes in 2004 and 2006 strongly predicted 2010 recurrence (odds ratio [OR] stress incontinence = 30.7, urgency OR = 47.4, mixed OR = 42.1). Although the number of remissions was high, a previous history of incontinence subtypes predicted recurrence. Incontinence status is dynamic, but tends to recur over the longer term.

  17. Female urinary incontinence, from pregnancy to menopause: a review of epidemiological and pathophysiological findings. : Female urinary incontinence, a review

    OpenAIRE

    Fritel , Xavier; Ringa , Virginie; Quiboeuf , Emeline; Fauconnier , Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Hypotheses that might explain urinary incontinence during pregnancy and after childbirth have been examined. The prevalence of urinary incontinence reaches a maximum during pregnancy and decreases after childbirth. Cesarean delivery is associated with lower rates of stress incontinence than vaginal delivery. Women delivered by cesarean section differ from women who had a vaginal delivery through pre-existing characteristics associated with the incontinence risk, produc...

  18. Clinical anatomy of fecal incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam-Halani, Priyanka K; Arya, Lily A; Andy, Uduak U

    2017-10-01

    Fecal incontinence is a devastating condition that has a severe impact on quality of life. This condition disproportionately affects women and its incidence is increasing with the aging United States population. Fecal continence is maintained by coordination of a functioning anal sphincter complex, intact sensation of the anorectum, rectal compliance, and the ability to consciously control defecation. Particularly important are the puborectalis sling of the levator ani muscle complex and intact innervation of the central and peripheral nervous systems. An understanding of the intricate anatomy required to maintain continence and regulate defecation will help clinicians to provide appropriate medical and surgical management and diminish the negative impact of fecal incontinence. In this article, we describe the anatomic and neural basis of fecal continence and normal defecation as well as changes that occur with fecal incontinence in women. Clin. Anat. 30:901-911, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Teflon injections in post-prostatectomy incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Røhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five males with post-prostatectomy incontinence due to sphincter damage underwent transperineal or transurethral Teflon injections. The results were classified into three grades: good, moderate, and poor. Good or moderate results were obtained in 24%. No major immediate complications...... or longterm side-effects were observed. This intervention is associated with a minimum of discomfort for the patient and hospitalization can be limited to 48-72 hours. The results are not so good as those obtained in female incontinence, and the procedure cannot be recommended as first choice treatment...... in patients with post-prostatectomy incontinence, but because of the simplicity of the procedure, it is considered to be a valuable alternative in patients not suitable for prosthetic surgery....

  20. Immunoexpression of adrenergic receptors in detrusor from patients with prune belly syndrome: a digital quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Monteiro, Edison D; Dénes, Francisco T; Hampel, Christian; Leite, Katia R M; Thüroff, Joachim W; Srougi, Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS) presents with large-capacity bladders, high compliance and post-void residual volumes. Operative and conservative treatments are controversial. When histologically compared to normal bladder, bladder outlet obstruction results in an up- or down-regulation of adrenoceptors. Our goal was to study the immunoexpression of adrenoceptors in detrusor from patients with PBS. Bladder domes from PBS patients (n=14) were studied (PBG). For normal controls, bladder specimens were obtained at adult surgery (n=13) (CG1) and at child autopsy (n=5) (CG2). Staining was performed using antibodies to alpha1a, alpha1b, alpha1d and beta3 adrenoceptors. Five to 10 images were captured on an optic microscope with a digital camera and analysed with Photoshop. The immunocyhistochemical index with arbitrary units was calculated and compared. Mean age was 1.28, 64 and 1.41 years for PBG, CG1 and CG2, respectively. The immunohistochemical index with arbitrary units of alpha1a receptors was 0.06 in PBG, 0.16 in CG1 and 0.14 in CG2 (p=0.008); of alpha1b 0.06, 0.06 and 0.07 (p=0.781); and of alpha1d 0.04, 0.04 and 0.05 (p=0.618). Regarding beta3 the respective values were 0.07, 0.14 and 0.10 (p=0.378). Our results show a decrease in alpha1a-adrenoceptor immunostaining intensity in detrusor from children with PBS. Further in vitro studies are needed to determine whether these observations are physiologically significant. Copyright (c) 2010 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and temporary S3 neuromodulation in idiopathic detrusor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, S T; Robson, W A; Pridie, A K; Neal, D E

    1996-06-01

    We studied the effects of electrical stimulation on idiopathic detrusor instability. Between January 1993 and December 1994, 30 men and 41 women (mean age plus or minus standard deviation 48 +/- 16 years) underwent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of the S2-S3 dermatomes, and 13 men and 22 women (mean age 48 +/- 12 years) underwent S3 neuromodulation. Subjective assessment was performed using a diary and symptom score of 0 to 14. Objective outcome was analyzed with urodynamic studies. Mean duration of TENS was 3 +/- 1 weeks (range 2 to 4). Although there were no major complications 31% of the patients reported local skin irritation. The overall urinary symptom scores improved from 10 +/- 2 (range 5 to 14) before the study to 7 +/- 3 (range 1 to 14) during stimulation. Urodynamic analysis revealed significant (p neuromodulation was 6 +/- 1 days (range 4 to 8 days). Four procedures failed due to electrode displacement in 3 cases and procedure intolerance in 1. Hemorrhage from the puncture site occurred in 1 patient. Overall urinary symptom scores were 10 +/- 3 (range 5 to 14) before the study and 5 +/- 2 (range 2 to 10) during stimulation. Although symptomatic relief was more pronounced with S3 neuromodulation, no statistically significant differences were found regarding urinary symptoms compared to TENS. In patients with severe detrusor instability refractory to conservative treatments the use of TENS and S3 neuromodulation produced significant changes in urodynamic parameters and presenting symptoms. Our results appear to justify evaluation with neuromodulatory techniques before definitive surgical intervention in these patients.

  2. Incontinence and sexuality in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Dawne; Tomlin, Karen

    2015-07-01

    This article explores the interrelated aspects of incontinence and sexuality in older age. It describes the physiological changes that may have an effect on sexual function and the genitourinary system as people age. The enduring importance of sexual intimacy is discussed. Treatments for incontinence and to improve sexual function are explored. The authors conclude that nurses, particularly those involved in continence management, have a role in ensuring sensitive assessment and access to treatment, which can support many older people to maintain fulfilling sexual activity.

  3. The relationship between overactive bladder and sexual activity in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Ankur S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We assessed the relationships between bladder symptoms, demographic, and medical history variables and sexual dysfunction in women with overactive bladder (OAB disorder. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight women diagnosed with OAB completed self-administered questionnaires related to overall heath status, bladder function, and sexual function. Data were compiled for questionnaire responses, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of sexual dysfunction. RESULTS: Bothersome bladder symptoms were reported by superscript three 60% of the sample. Sixty-percent of the sample was sexually active in the past month. Difficulty with sexual arousal, orgasm, and sexual enjoyment were reported by about 25% of the women. Sexual partner status was the best predictor of sexual arousal, orgasm, and sexual enjoyment. Menopausal status emerged as an important predictor of arousal and sexual enjoyment. CONCLUSION: The majority of women with symptoms of OAB viewed these symptoms as bothersome. However, the extent of symptom bother did not predict aspects of female sexual dysfunction (FSD. Instead, menopausal and partner status emerged as the best predictors of FSD in our sample.

  4. Tolterodine Tartrate Proniosomal Gel Transdermal Delivery for Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Rajabalaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to formulate and evaluate side effects of transdermal delivery of proniosomal gel compared to oral tolterodine tartrate (TT for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB. Proniosomal gels are surfactants, lipids and soy lecithin, prepared by coacervation phase separation. Formulations were analyzed for drug entrapment efficiency (EE, vesicle size, surface morphology, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, in vitro skin permeation, and in vivo effects. The EE was 44.87%–91.68% and vesicle size was 253–845 nm for Span formulations and morphology showed a loose structure. The stability and skin irritancy test were also carried out for the optimized formulations. Span formulations with cholesterol-containing formulation S1 and glyceryl distearate as well as lecithin containing S3 formulation showed higher cumulative percent of permeation such as 42% and 35%, respectively. In the in vivo salivary secretion model, S1 proniosomal gel had faster recovery, less cholinergic side effect on the salivary gland compared with that of oral TT. Histologically, bladder of rats treated with the proniosomal gel formulation S1 showed morphological improvements greater than those treated with S3. This study demonstrates the potential of proniosomal vesicles for transdermal delivery of TT to treat OAB.

  5. Urinary incontinence in primigravida: the neglected pregnancy predicament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, B; Ayub, S H; Mohd Zahid, A Z; Noorneza, A R; Isa, Mohamad Rodi; Ng, P Y

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence among primigravida in the third trimester, its risk factors and its effect to quality of life. This is a cross sectional study involving primigravida in their third trimester of pregnancy, who attended the Patient Assessment Centre of a tertiary referral hospital in Klang Valley from July 2012 to June 2013. The participants were chosen randomly using convenience sampling. A face-to-face interview and a review of their antenatal record were done by trained interviewers. Data on sociodemographic and risk factors were obtained followed by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form (ICIQ-SF). The data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science version 20.0. A total of 306 women were involved. The prevalence of urinary incontinence during third trimester was 34.3% (95%CI: 29.0, 39.7). Stress incontinence (64.8%) is the commonest followed by mixed incontinence (24.8%) and urge incontinence (6.7%). Childhood enuresis (p=0.003) and previous history of urinary incontinence (purinary incontinence. More than 50 percent of women with urinary incontinence in the third trimester felt that it did not affect their daily activities at all. Only 10% of women felt greatly affected by this problem. Urinary incontinence is not uncommon among primigravida however many women did not feel that it affected their quality of life. Childhood enuresis and history of urinary incontinence were proven risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Overactive bladder syndrome in the older woman: conservative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ellie

    2009-11-01

    Over active bladder syndrome (OAB) is the most common cause of urinary incontinence in the older population (Gadgil and Wagg, 2008). Many women do not seek medical help and advice as they consider it to be an inevitable part of ageing. It can have significant impact on sufferers' lives and can contribute to an increased risk of falls, reduced quality of life, social isolation and depression. It is also known to be hugely underreported as patients are often too embarrassed to discuss their symptoms with members of their family or health professionals. OAB syndrome can however, be treated effectively in primary care with conservative, nurse-led treatments. This article will discuss the causes, implications, assessment and conservative treatments available to women over 65 years old presenting with OAB syndrome in primary care.

  7. Urinary incontinence after vaginal delivery or cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, João Bosco Ramos; Guarisi, Telma; Camargo, Ana Carolina Marchesini de; Gollop, Thomaz Rafael; Machado, Rogério Bonassi; Borges, Pítia Cárita de Godoy

    2010-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence, urge incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence among women residing in the city of Jundiaí (São Paulo, Brazil), and the relation between the type of incontinence and the obstetric history of these women. A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted. A total of 332 women were interviewed; they were seen for whatever reason at the public primary healthcare units of the city of Jundiaí, from March 2005 to April 2006. A pre-tested questionnaire was administered and consisted of questions used in the EPINCONT Study (Epidemiology of Incontinence in the County of Nord-Trondelag). Statistical analysis was carried out using the χ2 test and odds ratio (95%CI). Urinary incontinence was a complaint for 23.5% of the women interviewed. Stress urinary incontinence prevailed (50%), followed by mixed urinary incontinence (35%) and urge incontinence (15%). Being in the age group of 35-64 years, having a body mass index of 30 or greater and having had only vaginal delivery or cesarean section, with uterine contraction, regardless of the number of pregnancies, were factors associated with stress urinary incontinence. However, being in the age group of 55 or older, having a body mass index of 30 or greater and having had three or more pregnancies, only with vaginal deliveries, were factors associated with mixed urinary incontinence. One third of the interviewees complained of some type of urinary incontinence, and half of them presented stress urinary incontinence. Cesarean section, only when not preceded by contractions, was not associated with stress urinary incontinence. The body mass index is only relevant when the stress factor is present.

  8. Surgical aspects of pediatric urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Thomas Pius Vianney Maria de

    2001-01-01

    This thesis tries to bridge between functional and structural non-neuro- genic incontinence and to give insight in the surgical options. Children with anatomically based bladder neck and urethral insufficiency often present with the same symptoms as children with genuine non-neurogenic functional

  9. Surgery versus physiotherapy for stress urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrie, J.; Berghmans, B.L.; Fischer, K.; Milani, A.L.; Wijk, I. van; Smalbraak, D.J.; Vollebregt, A.; Schellart, R.P.; Graziosi, G.C.; Ploeg, J.M. van der; Brouns, J.F.; Tiersma, E.S.; Groenendijk, A.G.; Scholten, P.; Mol, B.W.; Blokhuis, E.E.; Adriaanse, A.H.; Schram, A.; Roovers, J.P.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Vaart, C.H. van der

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physiotherapy involving pelvic-floor muscle training is advocated as first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence; midurethral-sling surgery is generally recommended when physiotherapy is unsuccessful. Data are lacking from randomized trials comparing these two options as initial

  10. Surgery versus Physiotherapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrie, Julien; Berghmans, Bary L. C. M.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Milani, Alfredo L.; van der Wijk, Ileana; Smalbraak, Dina J. C.; Vollebregt, Astrid; Schellart, Rene P.; Graziosi, Giuseppe C. M.; van der Ploeg, J. Marinus; Brouns, Joseph F. G. M.; Tiersma, E. Stella M.; Groenendijk, Annette G.; Scholten, Piet; Mol, Ben Willem; Blokhuis, Elisabeth E.; Adriaanse, Albert H.; Schram, Aaltje; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L. M.; van der Vaart, Carl H.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundPhysiotherapy involving pelvic-floor muscle training is advocated as first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence; midurethral-sling surgery is generally recommended when physiotherapy is unsuccessful. Data are lacking from randomized trials comparing these two options as initial

  11. [Biofeedback effectiveness in patients with fecal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Mora, José Raúl; Buenrostro-Acebes, José María; Erciga-Vergara, Nancy; Zubieta-O'Farrill, Gregorio; Castillo-Calcáneo, Juan de Dios; Mosqueda, Maria Elena; Monroy-Argumedo, Montserrat; González-Alvarado, Carlos; Villanueva-Saenz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is defined as an involuntary bowel movement through the anal canal in inadequate time and place. There are different types of therapies for the management of fecal incontinence, being biofeedback therapy one of the most effective techniques. The aim of this study was to evaluate the necessary number of sessions of biofeedback electromyographyc therapy to achieve the maximum sphincteric complex contraction. Descriptive, retrospective and longitudinal study. 65 patients with fecal incontinence were included. Weekly electromyographyc biofeedback therapies were applied, with a maximum of 6, in which the sphincteric complex contraction was measured. A two ways Friedman analysis was made to determine the significant differences between the sessions. A total of 65 patients were evaluated for fecal incontinence. The values for pelvic floor contraction were significantly higher in the third session, and did not show any significant difference in posterior sessions. The maximum contraction of the sphicnteric complex was achieved in the third weekly biofeedback session, without any significant differences in the posterior sessions.

  12. Introital ultrasonography in female urinary incontinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weon, Young Cheol; Cho, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Jin Seong; Choi, Sang Hee; Kim, Keon Seok; Choo, Myung Soo [Ulsan Univ. Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of introital ultrasonography in the assessment of female urinary incontinence. Introital ultrasonography was performed in fifteen with stress urinary incontinence(mean age 50) and six patients without symptoms of incontinence(mean age 37). Using a sagittal section of the anterior pelvis in the plane of the symphysis pubis the posterior urethrovesical angle, the pubourethral distance and the pubo-yregrak abgle were measured at rest and during stress(Valsalva's maneuver state). The student T-test and the ANOVA test were used in statistical analysis. The posterior urethrovesical angles of the controls were 125.3 deg ({+-}10.9) at rest and 125.7 deg ({+-}7.6) during stress. In the patients, the corresponding angles were 135.3 deg ({+-}11.3) and 139.6 deg({+-}10.8). The posterior urethrovesical angles increased 0.3 deg ({+-}4.7) in the controls and 5.6 deg ({+-}4.0) in the patients(p=0.018). In the controls, the pubo-urethral distances were 21.8 mm({+-}5.8) at rest and 18.2 mm({+-}7.1) during stress, while in the patients these distances were 18.4 mm({+-}3.9) and 12.6 mm({+-}4.4). The pubo-urethral distance decreased 3.5 mm ({+-}1.5) in the controls and 5.8 mm ({+-}2.3) in the patients(p=0.039). In the patients with mild incontinence(Grade I), the posterior urethrovesical angles increased 3.4 deg ({+-}2.8) : 132.3 deg ({+-}12.5) at rest and 135.6 deg (12.8) during stress. In the patients with moderate incontinence(Grade II), the angles increased 8.1 deg({+-}3.8) : 136.0 deg({+-}6.5) at rest and 144.1 deg({+-}5.9) during stress. The change of the posterior urethrovesical angle was related to the grade of urinary incontinence in the patients(p<0.05). There was no statistical significancy in the pubo-urethral angle (p=0.315). Introital ultrasonography may be useful for assessment of stress urinary incontinence.

  13. TVT-O for the treatment of pure urodynamic stress incontinence: efficacy, adverse effects, and prognostic factors at 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serati, Maurizio; Bauer, Ricarda; Cornu, Jean Nicolas; Cattoni, Elena; Braga, Andrea; Siesto, Gabriele; Lizée, Daphné; Haab, François; Torella, Marco; Salvatore, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    Inside-out tension-free vaginal transobturator tape (TVT-O) is currently one of the most effective and popular procedures for the surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), but data reporting long-term outcomes are scarce. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of TVT-O 5-yr implantation for management of pure SUI in women. A prospective observational study was conducted in four tertiary reference centers. Consecutive women presenting with urodynamically proven, pure SUI treated by TVT-O were included. Patients with mixed incontinence and/or anatomic evidence of pelvic organ prolapse were excluded. TVT-O implantation without any associated procedure. Data regarding subjective outcomes (International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form [ICIQ-SF], Patient Global Impression of Improvement, patient satisfaction scores), objective cure (stress test) rates, and adverse events were collected during follow-up. Multivariable analyses were performed to investigate outcomes. Of the 191 women included, 21 (11.0%) had previously undergone a failed anti-incontinence surgical procedure. Six (3.1%) patients were lost to follow-up. The 5-yr subjective and objective cure rates were 90.3% and 90.8%, respectively. De novo overactive bladder (OAB) was reported by 24.3% of patients at 5-yr follow-up. Median ICIQ-SF score significantly improved from 17 (interquartile range [IQR]:16-17) preoperatively to 0 (IQR: 0-2) (pTVT-O implantation is a highly effective option for the treatment of women with pure SUI, showing a very high cure rate and a low incidence of complications after 5-yr follow-up. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ocular surface changes following oral anticholinergic use for overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ali; Hekimoglu, Emre; Tasci, Yasemin; Dolen, Ismail; Arslan, Umut

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effect of oral solifenacin succinate on Schirmer I test results, tear break-up time (TBUT) and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) scores in overactive bladder (OAB) patients and to compare these results with those of healthy control subjects. The female OAB patients who were prescribed oral solifenacin succinate 5 mg/day (Group I, N = 80) and age-matched healthy female subjects (Group II, N = 40) were recruited for the study and underwent ophthalmological examination prior to oral treatment and after 4 weeks. They completed the OSDI questionnaire and underwent ocular surface tests including Schirmer I test and TBUT. The statistical analysis of the Schirmer I test and TBUT revealed no significant difference between the baseline and 4th week values in both groups (Group I, p = 0.506 and p = 0.070 consecutively) (Group II, p = 0.810 and p = 0.823 consecutively). OSDI scores were found to be significantly increased in group I (21.8 ± 4.2 vs 23.1 ± 4.6, p = 0.020) and remained unchanged in group II (20.5 ± 7.0 vs 20.7 ± 7.0, p = 0.805). Short-term solifenacin succinate treatment has no effect on the Schirmer I test results and TBUT, but ocular surface symptoms appeared to be exacerbated in respect with increased OSDI scores. However, the clinical significance needs to be further evaluated with larger studies.

  15. Bladder symptoms assessed with overactive bladder questionnaire in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Elisa; Gilio, Francesca; Meco, Giuseppe; Fattapposta, Francesco; Vanacore, Nicola; Brusa, Livia; Giacomelli, Elena; Gabriele, Maria; Rubino, Alfonso; Locuratolo, Nicoletta; Iani, Cesare; Pichiorri, Floriana; Colosimo, Carlo; Carbone, Antonio; Palleschi, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2010-07-15

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) the urinary dysfunction manifests primarily with symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB). The OAB questionnaire (OAB-q) is a measure designed to assess the impact of OAB symptoms on health-related quality of life. In this study, we quantified the urinary symptoms in a large cohort of PD patients by using the OAB-q short form. Possible correlations between the OAB-q and clinical features were tested. Three hundred and two PD patients were enrolled in the study. Correlations between the OAB-q and sex, age, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III), Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) staging, disease duration, and treatment were analyzed. Data were compared with a large cohort of 303 age-matched healthy subjects. The OAB-q yielded significantly higher scores in PD patients than in healthy subjects. In the group of PD patients, all the variables tested were similar between men and women. Pearson's coefficient showed a significant correlation between mean age, disease duration, mean OAB-q scores, UPDRS-III scores, and H-Y staging. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OAB-q values were significantly influenced by age and UPDRS-III. No statistical correlations were found between OAB-q scores and drug therapy or the equivalent levodopa dose, whilst the items relating to the nocturia symptoms were significantly associated with the equivalent levodopa dose. Our findings suggest that bladder dysfunction assessed by OAB-q mainly correlates with UPDRS-III scores for severity of motor impairment, possibly reflecting the known role of the decline in nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in bladder dysfunction associated with PD and patients' age. Our study also suggests that the OAB-q is a simple, easily administered test that can objectively evaluate bladder function in patients with PD.

  16. Gabapentin for overactive bladder and nocturia after anticholinergic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong T. Kim

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We reviewed our experience with the use of gabapentin to treat symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB and nocturia in patients who have failed conventional anticholinergic therapy. METHODS: Thirty-one patients referred to us with refractory (OAB and/or nocturia were treated with oral gabapentin. All the patients had tried or remained on antimuscarinic drugs during treatment. Twenty-four of 31 complained of bothersome symptoms during day and night and the other seven had primary complaints of nocturia. Initial gabapentin doses ranged from 100-300 mg at bedtime. Dose was slowly titrated up to 3,000 mg based on patients' symptomatology and tolerability. RESULTS:The mean age was 51 years old (range 27-78. There were 13 men and 18 women. The median steady state dose chosen by the patient after initial titration was 600 mg/day. Fourteen of 31 patients reported subjective improvement of their frequency and 8 have been on the medication for over 12 months with persistent efficacy. For the 14 improved patients, mean frequency/24 hours decreased from 14.1 ± 2.2 to10.0 + 2.1. Three patients with primary nocturia reported improvement from a mean of 4.0 ± 1.3 to 1.0 ± 0.3 episodes/night. Six patients stopped taking the drug within one month due to side effects mostly described as drowsiness or lethargy. CONCLUSION: Fourteen of 31 patients with refractory (OAB and nocturia improved with oral gabapentin. Gabapentin was generally well tolerated and can be considered in selective patients when conventional modalities have failed.

  17. Impact of urinary incontinence types on women's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboia, Dayana Maia; Firmiano, Mariana Luisa Veras; Bezerra, Karine de Castro; Vasconcelos, José Ananias; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista; Vasconcelos, Camila Teixeira Moreira

    2017-12-21

    To identify the most frequent type of urinary incontinence in women assisted in two outpatient clinics of urogynecology, and to compare general and specific quality of life among the different types of incontinence measured through validated questionnaires. Cross-sectional study conducted at the urogynecology outpatient clinic. The following questionnaires were used for quality of life assessment: Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire Short-Form (ICIQ-SF), King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and Pelvic Organ Prolapse Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12). The study included 556 women. Mixed Urinary Incontinence was the most frequent type (n=348/62.6%), followed by Stress Urinary Incontinence (n=173/31.1%) and Urge Urinary Incontinence (n=35/6.3%). Women with mixed urinary incontinence had greater impact on the general (SF-36) and specific quality of life (KHQ and ICIQ-SF) compared to the others (p<0.05). In the evaluation of sexual function (PISQ-12), there was no difference between groups (p=0.28). All types of urinary incontinence interfere both in the general and specific quality of life, but women with mixed urinary incontinence are the most affected.

  18. [Assessment of Urinary Incontinence in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Observational Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Juliana; Brandão, Pedro; Melo, Anabela; Torres, Silvia; Mota, Lurdes; Costa, Fernanda

    2017-08-31

    The urinary incontinence can affect up to 50% of women at some stage of their lives, particularly during pregnancy and postpartum. This study was designed in order to identify and assess the prevalence and risk factors for urinary incontinence during the third trimester of pregnancy and three months postpartum. Observational and cross-sectional study. The population of the study was composed of 268 women who delivered and were admitted to the Centro Hospitalar Tâmega e Sousa in the years 2013 and 2014, and who agreed to participate in this study. Postpartum women were asked to fill out a questionnaire adapted from the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form, for urinary incontinence research in the third trimester of pregnancy. Three months after delivery, they were contacted by telephone and asked to answer the same questions about the urinary incontinence postpartum. Of the 268 women interviewed, 31 were excluded from the study, taking into account the defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. In total (n = 237), 51.89% of women included in the study, reported the occurrence of urinary incontinence during pregnancy. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in pregnancy by parity (primiparous versus multiparous) was statistically significant (p = 0.006). At postpartum (n = 237), 28.69% of women with urinary incontinence had vaginal delivery and 5.91% of women underwent cesarean delivery (p = 0.001). In these group of women with postpartum urinary incontinence (n = 82), 31.69% have had urinary incontinence only in the postpartum and 68.31% of women have had symptoms during pregnancy (p urinary incontinence in pregnancy and the respective decrease in postpartum. Multiparity and occurrence of urinary incontinence in pregnancy appear as potential risk factors in the emergence of the urinary incontinence.

  19. Testosterone Modifies Alterations to Detrusor Muscle after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Juvenile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Flum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to posterior urethral valves (PUV arise in boys during adolescence. The reasons for this have previously been attributed to increased urine output as boys experience increased growth. Additionally, there are few choices for clinicians to effectively treat these complications. We formed the new hypothesis that increased androgen levels at this time of childhood development could play a role at the cellular level in obstructed bladders. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of testosterone on bladder detrusor muscle following injury from partial bladder outlet obstruction (PO in mice. A PO model was surgically created in juvenile male mice. A group of mice were castrated by bilateral orchiectomy at time of obstruction (CPO. Testosterone cypionate was administered to a group of castrated, obstructed mice (CPOT. Bladder function was assessed by voiding stain on paper (VSOP. Bladders were analyzed at 7 and 28 days by weight and histology. Detrusor collagen to smooth muscle ratio (Col/SM was calculated using Masson’s trichrome stain. All obstructed groups had lower max voided volumes (MVV than sham mice at 1 day. Hormonally intact mice (PO continued to have lower MVV at 7 and 28 days while CPO mice improved to sham levels at both time points. In accordance, PO mice had higher bladder-to-body weight ratios than CPO and sham mice demonstrating greater bladder hypertrophy. Histologically, Col/SM was lower in sham and CPO mice. When testosterone was restored in CPOT mice, MVV remained low at 7 and 28 days compared to CPO and bladder-to-body weight ratios were also greater than CPO. Histologic changes were also seen in CPOT mice with higher Col/SM than sham and CPO mice. In conclusion, our findings support a role for testosterone in the fibrotic changes that occur after obstruction in male mice. This suggests that while other changes may occur in adolescent boys that cause complication in boys

  20. Assessment of noninvasive predictors of bladder detrusor underactivity in BPH/LUTs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fei; Sun, Hong-Hong; Su, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Ya-Shen; Zhao, Zhen; Li, Jian

    2017-05-01

    To retrospectively assess the diagnostic predictive value of clinical characteristics to improve the diagnostic accuracy of bladder detrusor underactivity (DU) among benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS) patients who cannot undergo urodynamic examinations. A total of 704 BPH/LUTS patients at Tianjin Medical Union Center from January 2013 through June 2016 were enrolled in the study. All cases were stratified by maximum detrusor pressure (Pdet.max) into two groups (DU and control). Patient and clinical variables were analyzed in both groups. One hundred twelve and 592 cases were classified into the DU and control group, respectively. PV (OR 0.976, 95% CI 0.961-0.991, P = 0.002) and PVR (OR 1.004, 95% CI 1.001-1.007, P = 0.004) were independent predictors of DU. In addition, Pdet.max was positively correlated with HTN (≥10 years) (r = 0.373, P = 0.001), smoking (r = 0.108, P = 0.039), IPSS (20-23) (r = 0.257, P = 0.013), PV (r = 0.305, P 76 years) (r = -0.265, P = 0.015), BMI (21-23) (r = -0.382, P = 0.001), DM (0-20 years) (r = 0.365, P = 0.009) and PVR (50-400 mL) (r = 0.423, P = 0.001). The AUCs for BMI, PV, tPSA, PSAD, Q max , and PVR were 0.762, 0.739, 0.727, 0.681, 0.749, and 0.716, respectively. Combined ROC analysis showed the AUC for PV + PVR was 0.774 with sensitivity of 77.78% and specificity of 73.68%. Clinical factors were effective for predicting DU and could help improve the diagnostic accuracy for BPH/LUTS patients who cannot undergo urodynamic examinations.

  1. Izalpinin from fruits of Alpinia oxyphylla with antagonistic activity against the rat bladder contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Tan, Yin-Feng; Xu, Peng; Li, Hailong; Li, Yong-Hui; Chen, Wen-Ya; Zhang, Jun-Qing; Chen, Feng; Huang, Guo-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Alpinia oxyphylla (Zingiberaceae), an herbaceous perennial plant, its capsular fruit is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of different urinary incontinence symptoms including frequency, urgency and nocturia. These symptoms are similar to the overactive bladder syndrome. In our lab, we found that the 95% ethanol extract of the capsular fruits exhibited significant anti-muscarinic activity. Some constituents in capsular fruits including flavonoids (e.g., izalpinin and tectochrysin), diarylheptanoids (e.g., yakuchinone A and yakuchinone B) and sesquiterpenes (e.g., nootkatone), are regarded as representative chemicals with putative pharmacological activities. This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro antagonistic actions of izalpinin on carbachol-induced contraction of the rat detrusor muscle. In vitro inhibition of rat detrusor contractile response to carbachol was used to study the functional activity of izalpinin. The isolated detrusor strips of rats were mounted in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs' solution. The cumulative consecutive concentration-response curves to carbachol-evoked contractions in strips of rat bladder were obtained. Carbachol induced concentration-dependent contractions of isolated rat bladder detrusor strips. The vehicle DMSO had no impact on the contraction response. The contraction effects were concentration-dependently antagonized by izalpinin, with a mean EC50 value of 0.35 µM. The corresponding cumulative agonist concentration-response curves shifted right-ward. Izalpinin exhibits inhibitory role of muscarinic receptor-related detrusor contractile activity, and it may be a promising lead compound to treat overactive bladder.

  2. Urinary incontinence nursing diagnoses in patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Alteniza Leandro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Identifying the prevalence of Stress urinary incontinence (SUI, Urge urinary incontinence (UUI, Functional urinary incontinence (FUI, Overflow urinary incontinence (OUI and Reflex urinary incontinence (RUI nursing diagnoses and their defining characteristics in stroke patients. METHOD A cross-sectional study with 156 patients treated in a neurological clinic. Data were collected through interviews and forwarded to nurses for diagnostic inference. RESULTS 92.3% of the patients had at least one of the studied diagnoses; OUI showed the highest prevalence (72.4%, followed by FUI (53.2%, RUI (50.0%, UUI (41.0% and SUI (37.8%. Overdistended bladder and reports of inability to reach the toilet in time to avoid urine loss were the most prevalent defining characteristics. A statistically significant association of the defining characteristics with the studied diagnosis was verified. CONCLUSION The five incontinence diagnoses were identified in the evaluated patients, with different prevalence.

  3. Histamine receptors in human detrusor smooth muscle cells: physiological properties and immunohistochemical representation of subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Weimann, Annett; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Dawood, Waled; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Dorschner, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    The potent inflammatory mediator histamine is released from activated mast cells in interstitial cystitis (IC). Here, we report on the histamine receptor subtypes involved in the intracellular calcium response of cultured smooth muscle cells (cSMC). Fura-2 was used to monitor the calcium response in cSMC, cultured from human detrusor biopsies. The distribution of histamine receptor subtypes was addressed by immunocytochemistry in situ and in vitro. Histamine stimulated a maximum of 92% of the cells (n=335), being more effective than carbachol (70%, n=920). HTMT (H1R-agonist), dimaprit (H2R) and MTH (H3R) lead to significant lower numbers of reacting cells (60, 48 and 54%). Histamine receptor immunoreactivity (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) was found in situ and in vitro. Histamine-induced calcium increase is mediated by distinct histamine receptors. Thus, pre-therapeutic evaluation of histamine receptor expression in IC patients may help to optimize therapy by using a patient-specific cocktail of subtype-specific histamine receptor antagonists.

  4. [Women's strategies for coping with urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarmelindo, Rita de Cássia Altino; Parada, Cristina Maria Garcia de Lima; Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Bocchi, Silvia Cristina Mangini

    2013-04-01

    This article is part of a more comprehensive qualitative study which used grounded theory and symbolic interactionism as theoretical and methodological frameworks, resulting in the theoretical model entitled, Between suffering and hope: rehabilitation of urinary incontinence as an intervenient component. In order to communicate all the knowledge produced, part of this model is presented, and it refers to the process of coping with urinary incontinence by women without perspectives of access to surgical treatment after failure of conservative procedures. When interrelating the components (categories and subcategories) of these women's experience in order to compare and analyze them to understand their interaction, moral and psychosocial vulnerability were noticed within the experience of the group, which makes them susceptible to health risks and to compromise of their quality of life, observed in the movement of the group's experience. Research is needed to further understand experiences in which there are barriers to surgical treatment due to physicians' disbelief in its effectiveness.

  5. Urinary stress incontinence in postpartum women. Bibliographic review

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Manuel Barranco Cuadros; Irene Herrera Vargas; Raquel Rodríguez-Blanque; Juan Carlos Sánchez-García

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Both pregnancy and childbirth are important risk factors for urinary stress incontinence in women. For its prevention, exercies of the pelvic floor musculature have been shown to be effective. Guidelines for urinary stress incontinence management recommend offering pelvic floor muscle training to women during their first pregnancy as a preventive measure. Objective: To update the information provided in the scientific literature on urinary stress incontinence during postpartu...

  6. Risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    Lígia da Silva Leroy; Adélia Lúcio; Maria Helena Baena de Moraes Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence (UI) and its characteristics. METHOD: This was a case-control study with 344 puerperal women (77 cases and 267 controls) with up to 90 days postpartum. In a single session, participants were given a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical data and two others that assessed urine leakage, leakage situations, and type of UI. RESULTS: Stress UI was present in 45.5% of the women, incidents of urine...

  7. Transanal irrigation is effective in functional fecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Cecilie Siggaard; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Modin, Line

    2017-01-01

    Functional fecal incontinence (FFI) is divided into cases related to functional constipation (FC) and cases without concomitant constipation termed functional non-retentive fecal incontinence (FNRFI). Transanal irrigation (TAI) is widely used in children with neurogenic fecal incontinence...... and 35% (n = 25) were titrated to daily sessions. Of the 63 children who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of constipation, 46 (73%) showed full response with complete remission of incontinence episodes. Eleven (17%) showed partial response (≥50% reduction). Of nine children with FNRFI, four (44%) showed...

  8. Stress urinary incontinence in the female

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldelli, S.; Giovagnoni, A.; Bichi Secchi, E.; Argaglia, G.; Caraceni, E.; Muzzonigro, G.

    1988-01-01

    This work is aimed at demonstrating the validity of conventional radiological procedures, correlated with urodynamics, in the study of female urinary stress incontinence. In a study population of 110 patients with a clinical-urodynamic diagnosis of stress incontinence, radiological evaluation was performed by means of retrograde cystography, bead chain cystourethrography, and voiding cystourethrography. Radiographic findings were correlated with urodynamic data, and in particular with urethral pressure profile (fuctional lenght of the urethra, maximum closing pressure, maximum urethral pressure). In all patients the posterior urethro-vesical angle values were higher than 100 grade centigrades; moreover, a correlation was proven to exist between an increase in the angle of front urethral inclination, the lowering and mobility of the urethro-vesical junction, and the severeness of urodynamic findings. Furtheremore, in the different stages of urodynamic severeness, urethral funnelling was most frequent, and the flattening of the posterior vesical floor in voiding cystourethrography. The high reliability of the radiographic findings, although obtained by means of conventional techniques, and the variability of the morphodynamic results confirm the importance of a combined radiographic and urodynamic study in the evaluation of stress incontinence

  9. [Sport and urinary incontinence in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousquy, R; Jean-Baptiste, J; Barranger, E; Hermieux, J-F

    2014-09-01

    Women are more attentive to their physical appearance and a quarter of French women use to practice a regular physical activity. Benefits of sport on general health are recognized. However, sport may be the cause of various diseases when it is poorly chosen or improperly performed. In literature, intensive exercise is a risk factor for urinary incontinence, defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine". It is essentially stress urinary incontinence, occurring because of the phenomenon of intrabdominal hyperpressure, inherent with certain activities, and excess capacity of sphincters. Some sports are more risky than others, and high-level sportswomen are the most exposed. Health professionals must invest in information, screening, prevention, counseling and treatment track athletes So, the general practitioner and the doctor of sports play a vital role in informing, screening, prevention, therapeutic and monitoring of sportswomen. Better information is needed because according to the severity of incontinence and its impact, there are simple, effective, more or less invasive treatment options. The aim of this study was to establish an inventory of scientific knowledge and to improve the management of these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictors of outcome in children and adolescents with overactive bladder treated with parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Anselmo; Sampaio, Clara; Nascimento, Ana Aparecida; Veiga, Maria Luiza; Barroso, Ubirajara

    2018-02-01

    Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has emerged as an effective treatment for overactive bladder (OAB) in view of its high success rates in improving lower urinary tract symptoms and constipation, with no direct side effects. However, the clinical characteristics associated with the outcomes remain to be established. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential predictors of outcome in children with OAB treated using parasacral TENS. This was a prospective study of children with symptoms of isolated OAB, enrolled consecutively to the study and treated with parasacral TENS (figure). Isolated OAB was defined as the presence of urinary urgency with no signs of dysfunctional voiding. The symptoms were considered completely resolved when a patient's parents/guardians or the patients themselves reported a 100% improvement. Parasacral TENS was performed twice weekly for a total of 20 sessions of 20 min each at 10 Hz. The potential predictive factors evaluated were: sex, age, daytime incontinence, nocturia, a prior history of urinary tract infection, the presence of nocturnal enuresis, constipation and holding maneuvers. Eighty-three patients with a mean age of 7.8 ± 2.8 years were included in the study. Complete resolution of symptoms was achieved in 47 (56.6%). Following parasacral TENS treatment, a significant response was reported in 96.4% of cases. Of the 55 patients with nocturnal enuresis, partial resolution was achieved in 30 cases (54.5%), with a statistically significant association between nocturnal enuresis and the patient's response to treatment (p < 0.004; OR = 4.4, 95% CI 1.5-12.5). No other factor was associated with response to treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this association between nocturnal enuresis and failure to respond to parasacral TENS treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction has not previously been reported. The identification of factors capable of predicting therapeutic failure may allow

  11. [Surgical treatment of prolapse by abdominal route and effort-related urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, L; Fatton, B; Delmas, V; Haab, F; Costa, P

    2009-12-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is often associated with prolapse. The suburethral tapes have modified the indication for a preventive treatment of incontinence. The tapes are necessary in case of patent or masked incontinence, discussed in case of potential incontinence. The diagnosis of incontinence is done on questions to the patient, clinical exam, more than in urodynamic study. There is no absolute sign allowing to predict postoperative incontinence after surgery for prolapse. A continent woman can be incontinent postoperatively. If a potential incontinence is treated in the same as the prolapse, the patient must be informed of risk of obstruction and/or urgency.

  12. Inattention/Overactivity Following Early Severe Institutional Deprivation: Presentation and Associations in Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Suzanne E.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Kreppner, Jana M.; Beckett, Celia; Castle, Jenny; Colvert, Emma; Groothues, Christine; Hawkins, Amanda; Rutter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the persistence and phenotypic presentation of inattention/overactivity (I/O) into early adolescence, in a sample of institution reared (IR) children adopted from Romania before the age of 43 months. Total sample comprised 144 IR and 21 non-IR Romanian adoptees, and a comparison group of 52 within-UK adoptees, assessed…

  13. Effect of tramadol on pain-related behaviors and bladder overactivity in rodent cystitis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Tatsuya; Homan, Takashi; Kyotani, Junko; Oka, Michiko

    2012-02-15

    Tramadol is a widely used analgesic that stimulates the μ opioid receptor and inhibits serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake. There have been studies on the analgesic effects of tramadol based on the tail-flick test, the formalin test, and the induction of allodynia by sciatic-nerve ligation. However, the effects of tramadol on behaviors related to bladder pain and bladder overactivity induced by cystitis have not been reported. To investigate the usefulness of tramadol for patients with cystitis, we investigated these effects of tramadol in rodent cystitis models. Intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide caused bladder-specific inflammation and increases in pain-related behaviors, the number of voids and bladder weight in mice. Tramadol suppressed the cyclophosphamide-induced pain-related behaviors but did not affect the number of voids or the bladder weight. During continuous-infusion cystometrograms in anesthetized rats, cyclophosphamide shortened the intercontraction interval, indicating bladder overactivity. Tramadol significantly prolonged the intercontraction interval, and the effect was partially blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone. This finding indicates that μ opioid receptors may be involved in the action of tramadol. In conclusion, tramadol ameliorated cyclophosphamide-induced bladder-pain-related behaviors and bladder overactivity in rodents. These findings suggest that tramadol might be a treatment option for cystitis-induced bladder pain and bladder overactivity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Is It Safe to Reduce Water Intake in the Overactive Bladder Population? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lauren N; Markowitz, Melissa A; Parameshwar, Pooja S; Hannemann, Alex J; Ogawa, Shellee L; Anger, Jennifer T; Eilber, Karyn S

    2018-03-01

    Overactive bladder imposes a significant socioeconomic burden on the health care system. It is a commonly held belief that increased fluid intake (8 glasses of water per day) is beneficial for health. However, increased fluid intake exacerbates overactive bladder symptoms. Thus, it is imperative that clinicians appropriately educate patients for whom increased water intake may be detrimental (women with overactive bladder), in contrast to patients with comorbidities that necessitate increased water intake (nephrolithiasis). We systematically reviewed the literature to determine the potential health advantages of increased water intake and identify specific subpopulations that need increased hydration. We systematically reviewed published articles from 1972 through 2017 on PubMed® and the Cochrane Library. The data were reviewed independently by 2 individuals. Studies were included if they explored water intake in relation to the risk of a particular disease. Level 1 evidence supported increased fluid intake in patients with nephrolithiasis. There was no available evidence to support increased fluid intake in patients with cardiovascular disease, constipation, venous thromboembolism, headaches, cognitive function or bladder cancer. Dehydration may exacerbate some conditions, specifically chronic constipation and headache intensity. Increased fluid intake may have a role in preventing stroke recurrence but not in preventing primary stroke. The available reviewed literature suggests no benefit to drinking 8 glasses of water per day in patients without nephrolithiasis. Also, excess fluid intake can exacerbate symptoms of overactive bladder. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Finger taps and constipation are closely related to symptoms of overactive bladder in male patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Akira; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Sakoda, Saburo; Okuda, Hidenobu; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Yoshioka, Iwao; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Nonomura, Norio

    2014-01-01

    To assess which motor and non-motor symptoms are closely related to overactive bladder severity in male patients with Parkinson's disease. A total of 160 male patients (mean age 71.4 ± 8.2 years) diagnosed with Parkinson's disease were included in the present study at Osaka University and affiliated hospitals. The severity of Parkinson's disease was classified as stage 3, 4 or 5 based on the Hoehn and Yahr staging system. Disease duration was 8.9 ± 5.1 years. Age, seven items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor section part III and three non-motor symptoms were assessed by multivariate analysis for their impact on the overactive bladder symptom score, a specific questionnaire for overactive bladder. Overactive bladder symptom score was significantly higher in the group with severe motor symptoms related to finger taps and gait than in the group with mild motor symptoms related to these two factors. Furthermore, overactive bladder symptom score of patients with erectile dysfunction and constipation was significantly higher than that in patients without these symptoms. Multivariate analysis identified only finger taps and constipation as factors independently associated with overactive bladder symptom score. Although a study on a larger scale is required to further assess the association of Parkinson's disease symptoms with overactive bladder symptom score, information on finger taps and severity of constipation should be obtained when assessing urological patients with Parkinson's disease. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Quantifying over-activity in bipolar and schizophrenia patients in a human open field paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Kincaid, Meegin; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2010-06-30

    It has been suggested that a cardinal symptom of mania is over-activity and exaggerated goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to quantify this behavior objectively in a laboratory environment. Having a methodology to assess over-activity reliably might be useful in distinguishing manic bipolar disorder (BD) from schizophrenia (SCZ) during highly activated states. In the current study, quantifiable measures of object interaction were assessed using a multivariate approach. Additionally, symptom correlates of over-activity were assessed. Patients admitted to an acute care psychiatric hospital for either BD with mania or SCZ (paranoid and non-paranoid subtypes) as well as non-patient comparison (NC) participants were assessed in an open field setting referred to as the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM). Activity and interactions with novel and engaging objects were recorded for 15min via a concealed video camera and rated for exploratory behavior. Both BD and SCZ patients spent more time near the objects and exhibited more overall walking compared to NC. In contrast, BD patients exhibited greater physical contact with objects (number of object interactions and time spent with objects) relative to SCZ patients or NC participants, as well as more perseverative and socially disinhibited behaviors, indicating a unique pattern of over-activity and goal-directed behavior. Further analyses revealed a distinction between SCZ patients according to their subtype. The current study extends our methodology for quantifying exploration and over-activity in a controlled laboratory setting and aids in assessing the overlap and distinguishing characteristics of BD and SCZ.

  17. TVT-Secur mini-sling for stress urinary incontinence: a review of outcomes at 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colin A

    2011-09-01

    • Synthetic mid-urethral slings (MUSs) are considered the first choice surgical procedure for stress urinary incontinence. Recent publications have raised concerns about the efficacy of third generation single-incision mini-slings. The present paper is a systematic review of studies reporting 12-month outcomes after the TVT-Secur (TVT-S) procedure. • Pubmed/Medline online databases, abstracts from recent International Continence Society and International Urogynecological Association annual scientific meetings and the Clinicaltrials.gov and Controlled-trials.com online trial registries were searched for English-language articles containing the terms 'TVT-Secur', 'TVT Secur' or 'mini-sling'. The primary outcomes were objective and subjective cure rates at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included peri-operative (vaginal perforation, urinary retention, urinary tract infection [UTI]) and postoperative (mesh exposure, de novo overactive bladder (OAB), dyspareunia and return to theatre) complication rates. • Among 1178 women undergoing the TVT-S procedure, from 10 studies, both objective and subjective cure rate at 12 months was 76%, with objective cure significantly higher in women undergoing the 'U-type' approach. Vaginal perforation was a complication in 1.5% of cases, with a 2.4% incidence of mesh exposure in the first year. The incidence of de novo OAB symptoms was 10%. Rates of urinary retention (2.3%), UTI (4.4%), dyspareunia (1%) and return to theatre for complications (0.8%) were low. In the first year after a TVT-S procedure 5% of women required repeat continence surgery. • Longer-term studies and randomized comparisons with more established MUSs are required before TVT-S should be routinely used in the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. © 2011 THE AUTHOR. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  18. Incontinence in Individuals with Rett Syndrome: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, S.A.H.; Didden, H.C.M.; Radstaake, M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Gontard, A. von; Lang, R.; Smeets, E.E.J.; Curfs, L.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Frequency and type of incontinence and its association with other variables were assessed in females with Rett Syndrome (RS) (n = 63), using an adapted Dutch version of the ‘Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence’ (Beetz et al. 1994). Also, incontinence in RS was compared to a control

  19. Combined stress urinary incontinence surgery at the time of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-18

    Sep 18, 2009 ... Stanton SL, Hilton P, Norton C, Cardozo L. Clinical and urodynamic effects of anterior colporrhaphy and vaginal hysterectomy for prolapse with and without incontinence. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 1982; 89: 459-463. 2. Borstad E, Rud T. The risk of developing urinary stress-incontinence after vaginal repair in ...

  20. Effective Factors on Urinary Incontinence in Natural Menopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Shohani; V Carson; Sayehmiri; Shohani

    2015-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence are common urogenital problems affecting 7 - 10% of menopausal women. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to quantify effective factors on urinary incontinence in a cohort of menopausal women. Patients and Methods A sample of 150 menopausal women (natural menopause for at least 12 months) were recruited fro...

  1. Towards patient centered care in female stress urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focussed on the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. It comprises the results of the PORTRET study (Physiotherapy OR Tvt Effectiveness Trial). Currently, pelvic floor muscle training is advised as initial treatment for all women with stress urinary incontinence. We

  2. High prevalence of urinary incontinence and poor knowledge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-12-02

    Dec 2, 2010 ... Demographic and Health Survey (SADHS) measured the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in South. Africa for the first time, but only among women who had had children.2. In 1998, the World Health Organization's first International. Consultation on Incontinence classified UI as a disease,.

  3. The Sexual Function and Influence of Urinary Incontinence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To develop and psychometrically validate a questionnaire that assesses sexual function of urinary incontinent women in South Africa and the influence of incontinence on their sexual function. Design. A prospective descriptive study. Setting. Urogynaecology and gynaecology outpatient clinics at Tygerberg ...

  4. Sling surgery for stress urinary incontinence; the perfect solution?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, C.R.C.

    2017-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most observed type of urinary incontinence and is defined as the loss of urine following a rise in abdominal pressure. The TVT (Tension-free Vaginal Tape), a mid-urethral sling (MUS), was introduced in 1996 and soon became the gold standard in the surgical

  5. The Management of Urinary Incontinence by Community-Living Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteness, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Explored ways elderly people (N=30) manage urinary incontinence. Subjects tended to dismiss their urinary incontinence as a normal part of aging and used various behavioral and psychological strategies to maintain their independence, usually without any assistance from the health professions. Management strategies commonly involved some degree of…

  6. Safety, Efficacy, and Persistence of Long-Term Mirabegron Treatment for Overactive Bladder in the Daily Clinical Setting: Interim (1-Year) Report from a Japanese Post-Marketing Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daisuke; Tabuchi, Hiromi; Uno, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    To report interim 1-year results from a 3-year surveillance study evaluating safety, efficacy, and persistence of long-term mirabegron for overactive bladder (OAB). Patients starting treatment with mirabegron for urinary urgency, daytime frequency, and urgency incontinence associated with OAB were registered and followed up for 3 years. Data were collected on adverse drug reactions (ADR), changes in OAB symptoms, changes in Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), and treatment discontinuations. Treatment persistence rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Eighty-one ADR were observed in 72/1139 patients (6.3%) through 1 year of mirabegron treatment, with the incidence highest during the first month. No significant change in residual urine volume was observed at any observation point up to 1 year of mirabegron treatment. Mirabegron was deemed "effective" in 883/1091 patients (80.9%) at 1 year/discontinuation. Total OABSS was decreased with statistical significance at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year, or at discontinuation (P similar for male and female patients but significantly higher for patients aged ≥65 years (67.3%; n = 908) compared with those aged <65 years (59.8%; n = 231; log-rank test: P = 0.032). Long-term OAB treatment with mirabegron was well-tolerated, with effectiveness maintained through 1 year. Mirabegron treatment persistence was higher than has been previously reported, and was greater in patients aged ≥65 years compared with those aged <65 years. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Skin vasomotor hemiparesis followed by overactivity: characteristic thermography findings in a patient with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We present a 21-year-old female with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction. In this patient, infrared thermography revealed a hemibody skin temperature increase followed by excessive focal decreases, indicating skin vasomotor hemiparesis and overactivity.

  8. Parturition events and risk of urinary incontinence in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, David H; Brown, Jeanette S; Schembri, Michael; Ragins, Arona I; Creasman, Jennifer M; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K

    2011-11-01

    To examine the association between specific events during vaginal deliveries and urinary incontinence later in life. A retrospective cohort study of 1,521 middle-aged and older women with at least one vaginal delivery who were long-term members of an integrated health delivery system. Age, race/ethnicity, current incontinence status, medical, surgical history, pregnancy and parturition history, menopausal status, hormone replacement, health habits, and general health were obtained by questionnaire. Labor and delivery records, archived since 1948, were abstracted by professional medical record abstractors to obtain parturition events including induction, length of labor stages, type of anesthesia, episiotomy, instrumental delivery, and birth weight. The primary dependent variable was current weekly urinary incontinence (once per week or more often) versus urinary incontinence less than monthly (including no incontinence) in past 12 months. Associations of parturition events and later incontinence were assessed in multivariate analysis with logistic regression. The mean age of participants was 56 years. After adjustment for multiple risk factors, weekly urinary incontinence significantly associated with age at first birth (P = 0.036), greatest birth weight (P = 0.005), and ever having been induced for labor (OR = 1.51; 95%CI = 1.06-2.16, P = 0.02). Risk of incontinence increased from OR = 1.35 (95%CI = 0.92-1.97, P = 0.12) for women with one induction to OR = 2.67 (95%CI = 1.25-5.71, P = 0.01) for women with two or more inductions (P = 0.01 for trend). No other parturition factors were associated with incontinence. Younger age at first birth, greatest birth weight, and induction of labor were associated with an increased risk of incontinence in later life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Quality of life in women with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DraLjiljana Mladenović Segedi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the characteristics of urinary incontinence and its impact on the quality of life in adult women with urinary incontinence who presented to a tertiary care clinic of Vojvodina from September 2008 to May 2009 for treatment Methods We used a prospective case-control study. Cases were defined as patients (47 with urinary incontinence symptoms. Controls(50 were defined as patients without urinary incontinence who presented to a tertiary care gynecology clinic for other reasons. Both, cases and controls, completed two questionnaires recommended for the evaluation of symptoms, The Urinary Distress Inventory, and quality of life impact The Urinary Impact Questionnaire. Results There was a significant correlation between aging(r=0.614; p<0.01, body mass index (r=0.357; p<0.01 and menopause(r= -0.572; p<0.01 and urinary incontinence. All patients had symptoms of stress incontinence, 61.7% had urge incontinence symptoms, 21.3% voiding difficulty and 85.1% dysuria. Ninety-four patients believed that urinary incontinence impaired their quality of life: 50% of patients reported an impaired ability to do household activities, 59.1% avoided social activities, 70.4% reported an impaired ability to travel more than 30 minutes by car or bus, 88.6% avoided leisure activities, 45.5% of patients had impaired emotional health and 34% felt frustrated. Conclusion The dominant type of urinary incontinence in more than half of the respondents was a mixed type, with moderate to very severe problems. Symptoms of urinary incontinence interfere with the performance of everyday household and social activities, causing the appearance of anxiety, depression and frustration, and in more than 50% of women leads to reduced quality of life.

  10. Sacral neuromodulation and Botulinum toxin A for refractory idiopathic overactive bladder: a cost-utility analysis in the perspective of Italian Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertapelle, Maria Paola; Vottero, Mario; Popolo, Giulio Del; Mencarini, Marco; Ostardo, Edoardo; Spinelli, Michele; Giannantoni, Antonella; D'Ausilio, Anna

    2015-08-01

    To assess the relative cost-effectiveness of two therapeutic strategies: one starting with sacral neuromodulation (SNM) versus one starting with Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for the management of refractory incontinent idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB) patients, from the perspective of the Italian National Health Service (INHS). Direct medical costs (2011) and benefits (quality-adjusted life years-QALYs) were assessed over a ten-year time frame adapting to the Italian practice a published Markov model. Clinical inputs were based on the published literature and on the expert opinion. Resource consumption rates were provided by clinical experts; unit costs were collected from a single hospital accounting and from standard tariff lists and public prices. Interventional procedures and management of adverse events were costed through a micro-costing approach. The primary outcome was incremental costs per QALYs gained (i.e. differential costs divided by differential benefits). Deterministic (DSA) and probabilistic (PSA) sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the model. Starting with SNM appears to be cost effective (i.e. under 40.000/QALY) from year three (21,259/QALY) onwards and becomes dominant (i.e. more effective and less costly) at year ten: cumulative costs were 32,975 for early SNM and 33,309 for early BTX-A, while cumulative QALYs were 7.52 and 6.93, respectively. At year ten, DSA suggests the results robustness and 99.8 % of the PSA iterations fell within the cost-effectiveness threshold. A therapeutic strategy starting with SNM may be considered cost effective in the midterm and cost saving in the long-term treatment of idiopathic OAB from the INHS perspective.

  11. A systematic review of the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borau, A; Adot, J M; Allué, M; Arlandis, S; Castro, D; Esteban, M; Salinas, J

    Neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity (NDH) is a urodynamic observation characterised by involuntary detrusor contractions during the filling phase that are caused by an underlying neurological disease. The common and severe complications that can result from NDH warrant the preparation of healthcare protocols for the proper management of patients with NDH. The aim of this study is to standardise the criteria for the decision-making process in the management of patients with diagnosed or suspected NDH, providing personalised medical care. We performed a systematic noncomprehensive literature review on the aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of NDH. Based on the review, recommendations were issued by nominal consensus of a group of urology specialists. In general, the diagnosis of NDH is arrived at by a proper review of the medical history, physical examination and voiding diary before performing any diagnostic study. The main treatment objectives are to protect the upper urinary tract, restore function of the lower tract and improve these patients' continence and quality of life. The treatment consists of several steps aimed at obtaining proper bladder storage that allows for sufficiently spaced voidings. The follow-up should be personalised based on each patient's needs. The identification and management of NDH is important for positively redirecting the function of the lower urinary tract, in terms of filling and voiding, thereby improving the patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. TVT-ABBREVO: efficacy and two years follow-up for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, G; Dessole, M; Lutzoni, R; Surico, D; Ambrosini, G; Dessole, S

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of inside-out TVT-ABBREVO in the surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with mean two-year follow-up. Fifty-six women underwent surgery for moderate-severe SUI. The technology used was the TVT-ABBREVO inside-out. Each woman at 12 and 24 months underwent postoperative evaluation by means of urodynamics, Q-tip test, CST, transperineal ultrasonography, and administration of "King's Health Questionnaire" (KHQ). The mean age of the women was 57.03 +/- 11.1 years (range 42-75). Postoperative urodynamics (12 months follow-up) resulted to be normal in 43/56 patients (76.79%), in 10/56 (17.86%) cases resulted in a considerable improvement of the symptomatology, and only 1/56 (1.78%) case had de novo overactive bladder (OAB), in 2/56 (3.57%) symptomatology unchanged. After administration of the KHQ 43/56 cases (76.79%) had resolution of the symptomatology, 10/56 cases (17.86%) improvement of the symptomatology, and no change in 3/56 cases (5.36%). In the authors' experience, the TVT-ABBREVO resulted technically simple. The TVT-ABBREVO procedure provides high objective and subjective long-term efficacy, a clinically meaningful improvement in patient quality of life, and an excellent safety profile.

  13. Surgical Management of Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthi Satyanarayan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI is a common and significant issue that can affect the quality of life in men who are undergoing treatment for prostate cancer. While some patients opt for conservative management of their incontinence, many elect to undergo surgical treatment as a result of the significant impact to quality of life. The most commonly employed surgical techniques to address PPI are placement of a male sling or artificial urinary sphincter (AUS. Currently, the AUS continues to serve as the gold standard for management, with robust data concerning longitudinal outcomes available. However, in recent years, the various methods to place the male sling have emerged as viable, less complex alternatives that avoid the need for pump manipulation. In the present review, we discuss these main surgical treatment modalities for PPI, and focus on the selection criteria that may influence appropriate operative stratification of PPI patients. Indeed, an individualised, comprehensive assessment of baseline urinary function, age, radiation, prior surgeries, functional status, and other comorbidities must be considered in the context of shared decision-making between the treatment provider and the patient in determining the optimal approach to managing PPI.

  14. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Nishimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB. Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS. Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans.

  15. The pattern of autonomic tone disorder and its correction in children with overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Morozov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysregulation is one of the leading components in the pathogenesis of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. These disorders lead to diverse changes in the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems with disordered release of mediators (norepinephrine, acetylcholine, hormones of the adrenal cortex and other endocrine glands, a number of biologically active substances (polypeptides, prostaglandins, as well as to the impaired sensitivity of vascular a- and p-adrenoceptors. Children with dysuria concurrently develop visceral, CNS, and circulatory system dysfunctions and metabolic disturbances. The paper describes the clinical trial of children with overactive bladder, which demonstrates the autonomic tone in these patients (и=44. The findings point to the important involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the pathogenesis of the disease and provide a rationale for the incorporation of vegetotropic drugs normalizing the autonomic nervous system into the combination therapy of overactive bladder.

  16. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans.

  17. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans. PMID:24872936

  18. Profile of mirabegron in the treatment of overactive bladder: place in therapy

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    Sharaf A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ala’a Sharaf, Hashim Hashim Female and Functional Urology Unit, Bristol Urological Institute, Bristol, UK Abstract: Mirabegron is a relatively new drug introduced to treat overactive bladder syndrome. It can be used either on its own or as part of a combination. This drug has been extensively studied, with a good number of Phase II and Phase III trials showing promising outcomes. These studies show that mirabegron is an effective, well-tolerated drug, which could have some adverse effects of concern. In this review, we look at the trials on mirabegron, as well as its pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, and side effects as documented in the literature. Keywords: mirabegron, overactive bladder disorder, antimuscarinics

  19. Anatomy of melancholia: focus on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis overactivity and the role of vasopressin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dinan, Timothy G

    2012-02-03

    Overactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis characterized by hypercortisolism, adrenal hyperplasia and abnormalities in negative feedback is the most consistently described biological abnormality in melancholic depression. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are the main secretagogues of the HPA\\/stress system. Produced in the parvicellular division of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus the release of these peptides is influenced by inputs from monoaminergic neurones. In depression, anterior pituitary CRH1 receptors are down-regulated and response to CRH infusion is blunted. By contrast, vasopressin V3 receptors on the anterior pituitary show enhanced response to AVP stimulation and this enhancement plays a key role in maintaining HPA overactivity.

  20. Reliability and validity of the Incontinence Quiz-Turkish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Kerime C; Çıtak Karakaya, İlkim; Tunalı, Nur; Karakaya, Mehmet G

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Incontinence Quiz, which was developed by Branch et al. (1994), to assess women's knowledge of and attitudes toward urinary incontinence. Comprehensibility of the Turkish version of the 14-item Incontinence Quiz, which was prepared following translation-back translation procedures, was tested on a pilot group of eight women, and its internal reliability, test-retest reliability and construct validity were assessed in 150 women who attended the gynecology clinics of three hospitals in İçel, Turkey. Physical and sociodemographic characteristics and presence of incontinence complaints were also recorded. Data were analyzed at the 0.05 alpha level, using SPSS version 22. The scale had good reliability and validity. The internal reliability coefficient (Cronbach α) was 0.80, test-retest correlation coefficients were 0.83-0.94; and with regard to construct validity, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin coefficient was 0.76 and Barlett sphericity test was 562.777 (P = 0.000). Turkish version of the Incontinence Quiz had a four-factor structure, with Eigenvalues ranging from 1.17 to 4.08. The Incontinence Quiz-Turkish version is a highly comprehensible, reliable and valid scale, which may be used to assess Turkish-speaking women's knowledge of and attitudes toward urinary incontinence. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. [Effects of transcranial magnetotherapy on electroencephalographic parameters in females with overactive urinary bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neĭmark, A I; Klyzhina, E A; Neĭmark, B A; Mel'nik, M A

    2007-01-01

    Urodynamic parameters and bioelectric brain activity were studied in 30 females aged 24-66 years with overactive bladder (OAB) before and after transcranial magnetotherapy. It was found that OAB patients have disorders of bioelectric brain activity by two types of EEG patterns (I.A. Svyatogor classification)--thalamic and stem, Patients with thalamic type EEG benefit more from magnetotherapy higher efficacy of which manifests with regress of clinical symptoms and urodynamic improvement.

  2. [Distribution and significance of α1-adrenoceptor subtypes in patients with chronic prostatitis in prostate, bladder detrusor and posterior urethral tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Xie, Hui; Zheng, Jian-jian; Chen, Bi-cheng; He, Qiu-xiang; Shen, Ji-hong

    2010-12-14

    To study the distribution of alpha1-adrenoceptor (α1-AR) subtype in prostate, posterior urethra and bladder detrusor of patients with chronic prostatitis (CP). The prostate specimens were collected at autopsy from 30 organ donors (aged 20-35 years old) dying of non-prostatic diseases. The pathological specimens of prostate peripheral zone were examined. The method of real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) was employed for quantification of α1a-AR and α1b-AR subtype expression in prostate transition zone and its surrounding zone, posterior urethra and bladder detrusor tissue. Among all donors, there were 24 cases with pathological inflammation in prostatic peripheral zone and 6 with pathological non-inflammation. The mRNA expression of α1-AR subtypes in bladder detrusor and posterior urethra was significantly higher in the inflammation group than in the control group (Pposterior urethra was significantly lower in the inflammation group than in the control group (Pposterior urethra may explain various urodynamic changes in CP and lead to the occurrence and development of CP in prostate, posterior urethra and bladder detrusor.

  3. Functional investigation of β-adrenoceptors in human isolated detrusor focusing on the novel selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist KUC-7322

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Igawa, Yasuhiko; Schneider, Tim; Yamazaki, Yoshinobu; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Homma, Yukio; Nishizawa, Osamu; Michel, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) subtype mediating relaxation of isolated human bladder strips and to explore relaxation by the novel β3-AR-selective agonist KUC-7322 for its relaxant effect on the human isolated detrusor and for its effect on the carbachol (CCh)-induced

  4. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Gülşah; Güven, Emine Seda G; Tekin, Yeşim B; Şentürk, Şenol; Kağitci, Mehmet; Üstüner, Işık; Mete Ural, Ülkü; Şahin, Figen K

    2016-05-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) can frequently be seen in pregnant women. Pregnancy and delivery have been considered as risk factors in the occurrence of pelvic floor dysfunction and determinants of LUTS. The main associated risk factor is parity. In the present study, we aim to determine the frequency of LUTS and urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy and the associated risk factors. This prospective study was carried out in a total of 250 women during their 28- and 40-gestational week checks. The Urinary Distress Inventory-6, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form were used to determine LUTS and its effect on quality of life. The mean age and gestational age of the participants were 29.41 ± 5.70 year (range 18-44) and 35.45 ± 2.98 weeks (range 28-40), respectively. The prevalence of LUTS was 81.6%. The prevalence of UI during pregnancy was 37.2%. Stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were diagnosed as 15.6, 4.8 and 16.8%, respectively. We found that advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with incontinence. Incontinence reduced pregnant women's quality of life. Lower urinary tract symptoms are commonly seen among pregnant women and these symptoms negatively affect the quality of life of pregnant women. Advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with urinary incontinence and LUTS. Obstetricians should be on the lookout for individual urological problems in pregnancy. Resolving any urological issues and cessation of smoking for the affected individuals will help alleviate the problem. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Avaliação da qualidade de vida e da perda urinária de mulheres com bexiga hiperativa tratadas com eletroestimulação transvaginal ou do nervo tibial Evaluation of quality of life and loss urine of women with overactive bladder treated with intravaginal or tibial nerve electro stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra de Menezes Franco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um ensaio clínico prospectivo comparativo que objetivou comparar os efeitos do tratamento com eletroestimulação transvaginal (ET e do nervo tibial (ENT sobre a qualidade de vida (QV e queixas de perda urinária em mulheres com bexiga hiperativa. Participaram 42 pacientes com bexiga hiperativa ou incontinência urinária (IU mista e foram divididas para tratamento com ET ou ENT. A QV foi avaliada pelo questionário de QV genérico, o Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 e um questionário específico para IU, o Incontinence Quality of Life Instrument (I-QOL. Os relatos de perdas urinárias e incômodos ocasionados foram avaliados, respectivamente, por meio do diário miccional de 24 horas e Escala Visual Analógica (EVA. O tratamento foi realizado uma vez por semana, totalizando doze semanas. O grupo da ENT teve melhora significativa em três domínios do I-QOL, na EVA, que avaliou o grau de incômodo causado pela IU e em quatro aspectos do diário miccional. No grupo de ET houve melhora significativa de dois domínios do SF-36, três domínios do I-QOL, na EVA e em quatro aspectos do diário. Houve melhora da QV em ambos os grupos, assim como uma diminuição das queixas de perda urinária, entretanto, o grupo que recebeu ET obteve melhora nos escores em dois domínios do questionário de QV genérico após o tratamento, que teve limitação por aspectos físicos e limitação por aspectos emocionais. O que não ocorreu com o grupo de ENT.This is a prospective comparative clinical study. This study aimed to compare the effects of intravaginal electrical stimulation therapy (IS and the tibial nerve (TNS on quality of life (QOL and complaints of urinary incontinence in women with overactive bladder. Participants 42 patients with overactive bladder or urinary incontinence (UI mix and were divided for treatment with IS or TNS. To assess QOL we used a generic QOL questionnaire, the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 and

  6. Vascular incontinence: incontinence in the elderly due to ischemic white matter changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Sakakibara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This review article introduces the new concept of vascular incontinence, a disorder of bladder control resulting from cerebral white matter disease (WMD. The concept is based on the original observation in 1999 of a correlation between the severity of leukoareosis or WMD, urinary symptoms, gait disorder and cognitive impairment. Over the last 20 years, the realization that WMD is not a benign incidental finding in the elderly has become generally accepted and several studies have pointed to an association between geriatric syndromes and this type of pathology. The main brunt of WMD is in the frontal regions, a region recognized to be crucial for bladder control. Other disorders should be excluded, both neurological and urological, such as normalpressure hydrocephalus, progressive supranuclear palsy, etc., and prostatic hyperplasia, physical stress incontinence, nocturnal polyuria, etc. Treatment involves management of small vessel disease risk factors and anticholinergic drugs that do not easily penetrate the blood brain barrier to improve bladder control.

  7. Diagnosis and management of urinary incontinence and functional fecal incontinence (encopresis) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Rien J M

    2008-09-01

    The ability to maintain normal continence for urine and stools is not achievable in all children by a certain age. Gaining control of urinary and fecal continence is a complex process, and not all steps and factors involved are fully understood. While normal development of anatomy and physiology are prerequisites to becoming fully continent, anatomic abnormalities, such as bladder exstrophy, epispadias, ectopic ureters, and neurogenic disturbances that can usually be recognized at birth and cause incontinence, will require specialist treatment, not only to restore continence but also to preserve renal function. Most forms of urinary incontinence are not caused by an anatomic or physiologic abnormality and, hence, are more difficult to diagnose and their management requires a sound knowledge of bladder and bowel function.

  8. Urinary incontinence: hospital-based prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Nojomi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in women aged 30 to 70 years, who were attending to a gynecologic hospital.
    • METHODS: During 2006, married women (aged 30-70 years attending to a teaching gynecological hospital were assessed during their visits for any gynecologic diseases. We used a questionnaire with interview for collecting data. The potential risk factors were measured; i.e., the demographics, menopausal status, urinary symptoms (frequency, nocturia and urgency, urinary incontinence, (urgency, stress and mixed, body mass index, medical history (type of delivery, parity, gravidity, chronic illnesses, medication use, pelvic surgery and seeking medical care for their problem.
    • RESULTS: The mean age was 46.5 (± 8.4 years. The mean parity was 5.1 ± 1.5. 27% of the participants reported urinary incontinence. Out of 111 women with urinary incontinence, 77 (18.7%, CI: 14.7-22.7%, 17 (4.1%, CI: 2.2-5.8% and 17 (4.1%, CI: 2.2-5.8% were classified as having stress, urge and mixed urinary incontinence, respectively. The overall prevalence of urinary incontinence was 18.9% (34 subjects in women aged 30-44 years, 30.9% (46 subjects in those aged 45-54 years and 37.8% (31 subjects in those aged 55 years and older. Out of 117 menopause women, 39 (33.3% were incontinent. On average, women reported 4.4 (± 1.06 diurnal and 0.55 (± 0.66 nocturnal voidings in 24 hours. Diurnal and nocturnal frequencies were different between continent and incontinent women. The high parity, excessive birth weight, pelvic trauma, constipation, chronic illnesses (specially diabetes and gynecologic and other pelvic surgeries were known as risk factors for urinary incontinence.>
    • CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant association between urinary incontinence and high parity, excessive birth weight, pelvic

    • Obesity, overweight, and eating problems in children with incontinence.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wagner, Catharina; Equit, Monika; Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander

      2015-08-01

      The aim was to analyze the prevalence of eating problems and specific associations between overweight, obesity, and eating behavior in children with incontinence. Forty-three consecutively presented children with incontinence, diagnosed to International Children's Continence Society standards, and 44 matched continent controls were examined prospectively. All children received a physical examination, sonography, and a one-dimensional intelligence test. Child psychopathology was measured with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/4-18). Eating problems were assessed with the German version of the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire for Children (DEBQ-C) and a 40-item-parental questionnaire referring to atypical eating problems. Of the 43 children with incontinence, 23.3% had nocturnal enuresis (NE) only, 37.2% had any form of daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) (isolated or combined with NE) and 39.5% had fecal incontinence (FI) (isolated or combined with NE and/or DUI). Incontinent children showed significantly more CBCL externalizing symptoms (35.7% vs. 6.8%) and total problems (46.3% vs. 6.8%) in the clinical range (>90th percentile), as well as significantly lower mean IQ (105.5 vs. 120.6) than continent controls. Of the children with incontinence, 16.9% were affected by obesity (≥95th body mass index [BMI] percentile) compared with none of the continent controls. Especially in children with FI, the rate of obesity was significantly increased (23.5%). In addition, 46.5% of incontinent children, but none of the controls, had constipation. Again, children with FI (82.4%) had the highest rate of constipation (>DUI: 25% > NE only: 20%). "Food refusal" (FR) and "intense fear of gaining weight" (GW), but not other eating problems, were significantly more common among incontinent children (FR mean score 7.3; GW mean score 1.4) than in controls (FR mean score 5.6; GW mean score 0.7). After controlling for BMI percentiles, FR still was significantly higher in

    • Diagnosis and conservative management of female stress urinary incontinence

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Anil Krishna Dass

      2013-05-01

      Full Text Available Urinary incontinence affects 17–45% of women worldwide and stress urinary incontinence is responsible for 48% of all cases. Detailed history, physical examination and investigations are crucial to identify the diagnosis underlying the incontinence symptoms to select effective therapy. Although mid-urethral sling procedures are considered to be ‘gold standard’ treatment of SUI, conservative treatment with pelvic floor muscle training and lifestyle modification is still the first line of management. This article discusses the diagnosis and conservative management of female SUI.

    • An Unusual Cause of Urinary Incontinence: Ewing's Sarcoma

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Serhan Kupeli

      2015-03-01

      Full Text Available Urinary incontinence in children can be originated mostly from urinary tract infections, but constipation, neurologic disorders, obstruction and tumors can also be considered among other causes. Pelvic tumors may present with back pain, bladder or bowel dysfunction. Ewing's sarcoma is among the small round-cell tumors of the childhood and potentially can arise from any part of the body. Here, we report an 11-year-old male presented with urinary incontinence and diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma after 6 weeks' delay. Clinicians should suspect from pelvic tumors in the presence of urinary incontinence especially associated with low back pain. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 94-96

    • Surgery versus physiotherapy for stress urinary incontinence.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Labrie, Julien; Berghmans, Bary L C M; Fischer, Kathelijn; Milani, Alfredo L; van der Wijk, Ileana; Smalbraak, Dina J C; Vollebregt, Astrid; Schellart, René P; Graziosi, Giuseppe C M; van der Ploeg, J Marinus; Brouns, Joseph F G M; Tiersma, E Stella M; Groenendijk, Annette G; Scholten, Piet; Mol, Ben Willem; Blokhuis, Elisabeth E; Adriaanse, Albert H; Schram, Aaltje; Roovers, Jan-Paul W R; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M; van der Vaart, Carl H

      2013-09-19

      Physiotherapy involving pelvic-floor muscle training is advocated as first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence; midurethral-sling surgery is generally recommended when physiotherapy is unsuccessful. Data are lacking from randomized trials comparing these two options as initial therapy. We performed a multicenter, randomized trial to compare physiotherapy and midurethral-sling surgery in women with stress urinary incontinence. Crossover between groups was allowed. The primary outcome was subjective improvement, measured by means of the Patient Global Impression of Improvement at 12 months. We randomly assigned 230 women to the surgery group and 230 women to the physiotherapy group. A total of 49.0% of women in the physiotherapy group and 11.2% of women in the surgery group crossed over to the alternative treatment. In an intention-to-treat analysis, subjective improvement was reported by 90.8% of women in the surgery group and 64.4% of women in the physiotherapy group (absolute difference, 26.4 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18.1 to 34.5). The rates of subjective cure were 85.2% in the surgery group and 53.4% in the physiotherapy group (absolute difference, 31.8 percentage points; 95% CI, 22.6 to 40.3); rates of objective cure were 76.5% and 58.8%, respectively (absolute difference, 17.8 percentage points; 95% CI, 7.9 to 27.3). A post hoc per-protocol analysis showed that women who crossed over to the surgery group had outcomes similar to those of women initially assigned to surgery and that both these groups had outcomes superior to those of women who did not cross over to surgery. For women with stress urinary incontinence, initial midurethral-sling surgery, as compared with initial physiotherapy, results in higher rates of subjective improvement and subjective and objective cure at 1 year. (Funded by ZonMw, the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development; Dutch Trial Register number, NTR1248.).

    • [The artificial sphincter: therapy for faecal incontinence].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Baumgartner, U

      2012-08-01

      Faecal incontinence (FI) challenges a patient's professional, social and sexual life. Often the patient becomes depressive and socially isolated. If able to break open for therapy the patient should receive as first line a conservative treatment (like dietary measures, pelvic re-education, biofeedback, bulking agents, irrigation). When is the time to implant an artificial anal sphincter? If conservative therapy fails as well as surgical options (like a sphincteroplasty - if indicated a reconstruction of the pelvic floor if insufficient, or a sacral nerve stimulation) an ultimo surgical procedure should be offered to appropriate and compliant patients: an artificial anal sphincter. Worldwide, there are two established devices on the market: the artificial bowel sphincter® (ABS) from A. M. S. (Minnetonka, MN, USA) and the soft anal band® from A. M. I. (Feldkirch, Austria). How to implant the artificial anal sphincter? Both devices consist of a silicon cuff which can be filled with fluid. Under absolute aseptic conditions this cuff is placed in the lithotomy position by perianal incisions around the anal canal below the pelvic floor. A silicon tube connects the anal cuff with a reservoir (containing fluid) which is placed either behind the pubis bone in front of the bladder (ABS) or below the costal arch (anal band). With a pump placed in the scrotum/labia (ABS) or by pressing the balloon (anal band) in both types operated by the patient the fluid is shifted forth and back between the anal cuff and the reservoir closing or opening the anal canal. Both systems are placed completely subcutaneously. Both devices improve significantly the anal continence. Both systems have a high rate of reoperations. However, the causes for the redos are different. The ABS is associated with high infection and anal penetration rates of the cuff leading to an explantation rate to up to 60 % of the implants. This kind of complication seems to be much lower with the anal band. The major

    • Impact of a direct-to-consumer information campaign on prescription patterns for overactive bladder.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Tomio, Jun; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuki

      2018-05-03

      Direct-to-consumer information (DTCI) campaign is a new medium to inform and empower patients in their decision-making without directly promoting specific drugs. However, little is known about the impact of DTCI campaigns, expanding rapidly in developed countries, on changes in prescription patterns. We sought to determine whether a DTCI campaign on overactive bladder increases the prescription rate for overactive bladder treatment drugs. We performed a 3-year retrospective cohort study of 1332 participants who were diagnosed overactive bladder but not prescribed treatment drugs prior to the examined DTCI campaign (exposure), using the health insurance claims dataset of the Japan Medical Data Center (November 19, 2010 to November 18, 2013). The DTCI campaign for overactive bladder included television, Internet, and print advertising (November 19, 2011 to December 22, 2011). We divided the study period into Pre-Campaign Year (2010-2011), Year 1 (2011-2012), and Year 2 (2012-2013). Each year began on November 19 and included Period 1 (weeks 1-5) through Period 10 (weeks 46-50). The main outcome was first-time prescription of the treatment drug for each patient, measured by 5-week periods. Using Period 10 in the Pre-Campaign Year as the referent period, we applied the Cox proportional hazard model for each period. Additionally, we performed the interrupted time series analysis (ITSA) for the first-time prescription rate per 5-week period. Following the DTCI campaign, patients were about seven times more likely to receive a first prescription of a treatment drug during Period 4 in Year 1 (hazard ratio 7.09; 95% CI, 2.11-23.8; p-valueimpact on the level of prescription rate (one-time increase in the regression-intercept) that increased by 1128.1 [per standardized 100,000 persons] (p < .05) during Period 4 in Year 1. The examined DTCI campaign appeared to increase the prescription rate among patients with overactive bladder for 15 weeks with a 15-week delay. Clinical

    • Correlates of urinary incontinence in pregnancy

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Hvidman, Lone; Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, S.

      2002-01-01

      for the nulliparous and the primiparous, respectively. The present data suggest pregnancy UI not to be provoked by the mere onset of pregnancy, but by increasing hormonal concentrations or local tissue changes caused by hormones, whereas there was no support for a theory based on increasing pressure on the bladder......In a population sample, the period prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy was found to be 19.9% and 24.1% among 352 nulliparous and 290 primiparous women, respectively. The first UI episode ever was experienced by 16.7% and 7.0% during the two last trimesters of the first...... and second pregnancies, respectively. None of the pregnancy-specific risk factors, such as emesis and birthweight, was significantly associated with UI during pregnancy. Previous UI was a significant risk factor for period prevalent UI during pregnancy, explaining 34% and 83% of pregnancy UI...

    • Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

      2010-01-01

      Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature......, taxonomy, epidemiology, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, symptom scales, outcome assessment, principles of management, specific therapies, and future directions in research. Study Design, Materials, Methods: The emphasis was on new information developed since the last consultation 4 years previously. Where...... possible, existing evidence was assessed and a level of recommendation was developed according to the Oxford system of classification. Results: The consultation decided to refer to the condition as "bladder pain syndrome" (BPS) because the designation is more descriptive of the clinical condition...

    • Risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Lígia da Silva Leroy

      2016-04-01

      Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence (UI and its characteristics. METHOD: This was a case-control study with 344 puerperal women (77 cases and 267 controls with up to 90 days postpartum. In a single session, participants were given a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical data and two others that assessed urine leakage, leakage situations, and type of UI. RESULTS: Stress UI was present in 45.5% of the women, incidents of urine leakage several times a day in 44.2%, of which 71.4% were in small amounts and 57.1% when coughing or sneezing. In 70.1% of cases, UI began during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. After running a binary logistic regression model, the following factors remained in the final model: UI during pregnancy (OR 12.82, CI 95% 6.94 - 23.81, p<0.0001, multiparity (OR 2.26, CI 95% 1.22 - 4.19, p=0.009, gestational age at birth greater or equal to 37 weeks (OR 2.52, CI 95% 1.16 - 5.46, p=0.02 and constipation (OR 1.94, CI 95% 1.05 - 5.46, p=0.035. CONCLUSION: Most often, UI first appeared during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy, multiparity, gestational age at birth greater or equal to 37 weeks, and constipation were presented as risk factors. In the studied group, stress UI was more frequent.

    • Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - slideshow

      Science.gov (United States)

      ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100110.htm Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series— ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The vaginal opening lies just below the urethral opening, and ...

    • Combined stress urinary incontinence surgery at the time of ...

      African Journals Online (AJOL)

      based approach to the problem of preventing stress urinary incontinence (SUI) following prolapse surgery. Design. We reviewed the current English language literature available on PubMed (Medline), as well as current relevant textbooks in print.

    • Duloxetine in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Michel, Martin C.; Oelke, Matthias

      2005-01-01

      This manuscript reviews the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of duloxetine and its efficacy and safety in women with stress urinary incontinence. Duloxetine is a selective inhibitor of neuronal serotonin and norepinephrine uptake which increases urethral striated muscle activity and bladder

  1. Urinary incontinence and overactive bladder in patients attending the family practice physicians office: a pan-Slovenian cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor But

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: Both, UI and OAB represent a significant problem among patients attending the family practice physician office. It seems that the knowledge of both dysfunctions is satisfactory among physicians. The majority of patients would tell their doctors about UI and OAB and would also receive appropriate instructions regarding the bladder training and PFMT, both methods being very important for the prevention and treatment of these dysfunctions.

  2. Experiences Related to Urinary Incontinence of Stroke Patients: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkan, Gulcihan; Beser, Ayse; Ozturk, Vesile

    2018-02-01

    Poststroke urinary incontinence is a common problem, with a prevalence ranging from 32% to 79%. Urinary incontinence after stroke has negative physiological, psychological, and economic effects, which lead to lifestyle changes for both patients and caregivers. Nurses play an important role in preventing and improving incontinence, understanding the experiences of individuals experiencing incontinence, providing healthcare for them, and implementing behavioral therapy methods. The aim of this study was to determine the experience related to urinary incontinence of stroke patients. In this qualitative descriptive study, using semistructured interviews, 15 participants with urinary incontinence after stroke selected through purposeful sampling were interviewed. Data were collected with a semistructured interview form prepared within the framework of the Health Belief Model. All data were analyzed using content analysis. Three main themes were identified: "perception of urinary incontinence," "effects of urinary incontinence," and "management of urinary incontinence." The respondents explained that urinary incontinence also adversely affected their caregivers. They experienced many daily life and psychological problems because of urinary incontinence. In addition, they made several changes to management urinary incontinence such as limiting fluid intake, changing underwear frequently, using waterproof mattress protectors, applying traditional practice, and taking medicine. This study revealed that stroke patients needed help and support for urinary incontinence management. Nurses should provide information about management and urinary incontinence after stroke.

  3. Urethro-cystography for female urinary stress incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, R.; Starker, K.; Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena

    1985-01-01

    The normal parameters of urethro-cystography were evaluated in 324 examinations. There were definite differences between continent and pressure-incontinent women on the one hand, and stress-incontinent patients on the other, as regards the pubo-urethral angle, but not as regards the posterior vesico-urethral angle. Preoperative and post-operative urethro-cystograms showed statistically significant differences. (orig.) [de

  4. Quality-of-life assessment in children with fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Humberto S; Mastroti, Roberto A; Klug, Wilmar A

    2015-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is a clinical condition that causes embarrassment and changes the perception of quality of life. The absence of a specific tool for assessing fecal incontinence in children led us to adapt an instrument originally developed for adults, which has already been validated into Portuguese. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the quality of life of children with fecal incontinence. This is a single-center, prospective study based on the application of survey. The Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire was modified by eliminating 2 questions related to sexuality and by substituting the word "depressed" with "sad" in the statement, "I feel depressed." The study took place at a tertiary academic medical center. Forty-one children >5 years of age, with incontinence of organic etiology and preserved cognition but without stomy, were interviewed with the use of the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life modified questionnaire. To evaluate the discrimination validity, 28 healthy children were interviewed as control subjects. As to reproducibility, a test/retest was performed, involving 25 children. For construct validation, the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life modified was correlated with the generic instrument Autoquestionnaire Qualité de Vie Enfant Imagé with the continence index São Paulo Score of Continence. The average values by scale included lifestyle, 3.1; emotional, 2.8; behavior, 2.3; and embarrassment, 1.6. The average values for the control group included lifestyle, 3.7; emotional, 4.0; behavior, 3.6; and embarrassment, 3.6. The instrument showed a general reliability of 0.78, measured by the Cronbach α. Reproducibility was also >0.90 according to the Cronbach α. The intrinsic characteristics of children include their constant growth, and this presented a challenge in our search for an instrument that permitted us to identify and measure these variations. The experiment showed a reduction in all of the scale values, particularly

  5. Pathophysiology of pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence

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    Payal D Patel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although they may present with significant morbidity, pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence are mainly afflicitions that affect quality of life. To appropiately treat these entities, comprehension of the various theories of pathophysiology is paramount. Utilizing a Medline search, this article reviews recent data concerning intrinsic (i.e., genetics, postmenopausal status and extrinsic factors (i.e., previous hysterectomy, childbirth leading to organ prolapse or stress incontinence

  6. Incontinence in children, adolescents and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander; Niemczyk, Justine; Borggrefe-Moussavian, Sorina; Wagner, Catharina; Curfs, Leopold; Equit, Monika

    2016-11-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a microdeletion syndrome (chromosome 7q11.23) characterized by typical facial features, cardiovascular disease, behavioural symptoms, and mild intellectual disability (ID). The aim of this study was to assess the rates of incontinence and psychological problems in persons with WS. 231 individuals with WS were recruited through the German parent support group (52.0% male, mean age 19.4 years). Faecal incontinence (FI) was diagnosed from the age of 4 years and nocturnal enuresis (NE) and daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) of 5 years onwards. The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the International-Consultation-on-Incontinence-Questionnaire-Pediatric LUTS (ICIQ-CLUTS), as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist for parents (DBC-P) or for adults (DBC-A) were filled out by parents or caregivers. 17.8% of the sample had NE, 5.9% DUI and 7.6% FI. NE was present in 44.9% of children (4-12 years), 13.5% of teens (13-17y), 3.3% of young adults (18-30y) and in 3.6% of adults (> 30y). DUI (and FI) decreased from 17.9% (21.4%) in children to 0% in adults. 3.5% of the sample had an ICIQ-CLUTS score in the clinical range. 30.5% of children and 22.1% of adults had a clinical DBC score. Children and teens with clinically relevant DBC-P-scores had significantly higher DUI rates. Children with WS have high rates of incontinence and LUTS, which decrease with age. Most adults are continent. NE is the most common subtype. Except for DUI in children, incontinence is not associated with behavioural problems. Screening, assessment and treatment of incontinence in individuals with WS is recommended. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:1000-1005, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Diabetes, glycemic control, and urinary incontinence in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Lefevre, Roger; Hacker, Michele R.; Golen, Toni H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To estimate the association between urinary incontinence and glycemic control in women ages 20 to 85. METHODS We included 7,270 women from the 2005–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, stratified into three groups of glycemic control defined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): i) those below the diagnostic threshold (HbA1c8.5%) to allow for a different relationship between glycemic control and urinary incontinence within each group. The primary outcomes were the presence of any, only stress, only urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence. We calculated adjusted risk ratios using Poisson regressions with robust variance estimates. RESULTS The survey-weighted prevalence was 52.9% for any, 27.2% for only stress, 9.9% for only urgency, and 15.8% for mixed urinary incontinence. Among women with relatively controlled diabetes, each one-unit increase in HbA1c was associated with a 13% (95% CI: 1.03–1.25) increase for any urinary incontinence and a 34% (95% CI 1.06–1.69) increase in risk for only stress incontinence but was not significantly associated with only urgency and mixed incontinence. Other risk factors included body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, smoking, and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS Worsening glycemic control is associated with an increased risk for stress incontinence for women with relatively controlled diabetes. For those either below the diagnostic threshold or with poorly controlled diabetes, the risk may be driven by other factors. Further prospective investigation of HbA1c as a modifiable risk factor may motivate measures to improve continence in women with diabetes. PMID:26313496

  8. Patient reported outcome measures in male incontinence surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M G B; Yip, J; Uveili, K; Biers, S M; Thiruchelvam, N

    2014-10-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) were used to evaluate outcomes of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) and the AdVance™ (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, US) male sling system (AVMS) for the symptomatic management of male stress urinary incontinence. All male patients with stress urinary incontinence referred to our specialist clinic over a two-year period completed the ICIQ-UI SF (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire on Urinary Incontinence Short Form) and the ICIQ-MLUTS LF (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire on Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Long Form) at consultation as well as at subsequent follow-up appointments. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test for non-parametric paired data was used for pre and postoperative comparisons. The chi-squared test was used for categorical variables. Thirty-seven patients (forty surgical cases) completed a preoperative and at least one follow-up questionnaire. There was a statistically significant improvement in PROMs postoperatively, regardless of mode of surgery (p25) had greater improvement with an AUS than with the AVMS (p<0.01). This prospective study shows that completion and collection of PROMs as part of routine clinical practice is achievable and useful in the assessment of male stress incontinence surgery. PROMs are important instruments to assess effectiveness of healthcare intervention and they are useful adjuncts in surgical studies.

  9. Quality of life in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenović Segedi, Ljiljana; Segedi, Dimitrije; Parezanović Ilić, Katarina

    2011-08-01

    To determine the characteristics of urinary incontinence and its impact on the quality of life in adult women with urinary incontinence who presented to a tertiary care clinic of Vojvodina from September 2008 to May 2009 for treatment We used a prospective case-control study. Cases were defined as patients (47) with urinary incontinence symptoms. Controls (50) were defined as patients without urinary incontinence who presented to a tertiary care gynecology clinic for other reasons. Both, cases and controls, completed two questionnaires recommended for the evaluation of symptoms, The Urinary Distress Inventory, and quality of life impact The Urinary Impact Questionnaire. There was a significant correlation between aging (r=0.614; ptravel more than 30 minutes by car or bus, 88.6% avoided leisure activities, 45.5% of patients had impaired emotional health and 34% felt frustrated. The dominant type of urinary incontinence in more than half of the respondents was a mixed type, with moderate to very severe problems. Symptoms of urinary incontinence interfere with the performance of everyday household and social activities, causing the appearance of anxiety, depression and frustration, and in more than 50% of women leads to reduced quality of life.

  10. Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos Alivizatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy remains the treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer in age-appropriate and health-appropriate men. Although cancer control is the most important aspect of a radical prostatectomy, minimization of postoperative morbidity, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, is becoming a greater concern. We reviewed recent data available on Medline regarding the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of incontinence and sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. Health-related quality of life issues have been specifically addressed. Although low incidences of incontinence and erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy have been reported in the hands of experienced surgeons, the literature review revealed a great variety, with incontinence rates ranging from 0.3–65.6% and potency rates ranging from 11–87%. Several factors contribute to this wide difference, the most important being the application of a meticulous surgical technique. General and cancer-specific health-related quality of life is not being affected after radical prostatectomy. The incidence of incontinence and erectile dysfunction is higher after radical prostatectomy when compared to the incidence observed when other therapies for localized prostate cancer are applied. However, the majority of the patients undergoing radical prostatectomy would vote for the operation again. Today, avoidance of major complications after radical prostatectomy depends mostly on a high-quality surgical technique. When incontinence or erectile dysfunction persists after radical prostatectomy, the majority of the treated patients can be managed effectively by various methods.

  11. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Holmium Laser Enucleation and Transurethral Resection of the Prostate in Patients With Detrusor Underactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Jin Woo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Currently, holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP are the standard surgical procedures used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the surgical management of BPH in patients with detrusor underactivity (DU can effectively improve voiding symptoms, but comparative data on the efficacy of HoLEP and TURP are insufficient. Therefore, we compared the short-term surgical outcomes of HoLEP and TURP in patients with DU. Methods From January 2010 to May 2015, 352 patients underwent HoLEP or TURP in procedures performed by a single surgeon. Of these patients, 56 patients with both BPH and DU were enrolled in this study (HoLEP, n=24; TURP, n=32. Surgical outcomes were retrospectively compared between the 2 groups. DU was defined as a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate of <40 cm H2O as measured by a pressure flow study. Results The preoperative characteristics of patients and the presence of comorbidities were comparable between the 2 groups. The TURP group showed a significantly shorter operative time than the HoLEP group (P=0.033. The weight of the resected prostate was greater in the HoLEP group, and postoperative voiding parameters, including peak flow rate and postvoid residual urine volume were significantly better in the HoLEP group than in the TURP group. Conclusions HoLEP can be effectively and safely performed in patients with DU and can be expected to have better surgical outcomes than TURP in terms of the improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms.

  12. The effect of urinary incontinence status during pregnancy and delivery mode on incontinence postpartum. A cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Hunskår, Steinar; Bø, Kari; Rørtveit, Guri

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to investigate prevalence of urinary incontinence at 6 months postpartum and to study how continence status during pregnancy and mode of delivery influence urinary incontinence at 6 months postpartum in primiparous women.Design: Cohort study.Setting: Pregnant women attending routine ultrasound examination were recruited to the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).Population A total of 12 679 primigravidas who were contin...

  13. Protocol for Physiotherapy OR Tvt Randomised Efficacy Trial (PORTRET: a multicentre randomised controlled trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of the tension free vaginal tape versus pelvic floor muscle training in women with symptomatic moderate to severe stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buskens Eric

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress urinary incontinence is a common condition affecting approximately 20% of adult women causing substantial individual (quality of life and economic (119 million Euro/year spent on incontinence pads in the Netherlands burden. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT is regarded as first line treatment, but only 15-25% of women will be completely cured. Approximately 65% will report that their condition improved, but long term adherence to treatment is problematic. In addition, at longer term (2-15 years follow-up 30-50% of patients will end up having surgery. From 1996 a minimal invasive surgical procedure, the Tension-free Vaginal Tape (TVT has rapidly become the gold standard in surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. With TVT 65-95% of women are cured. However, approximately 3-6% of women will develop symptoms of an overactive bladder, resulting in reduced quality of life. Because of its efficacy the TVT appears to be preferable over PFMT but both treatments and their costs have not been compared head-to-head in a randomised clinical trial. Methods/Design A multi-centre randomised controlled trial will be performed for women between 35 - 80 years old with moderate to severe, predominantly stress, urinary incontinence, who have not received specialised PFMT or previous anti-incontinence surgery. Women will be assigned to either PFMT by a specialised physiotherapist for a standard of 9-18 session in a period of 6 months, or TVT(O surgery. The main endpoint of the study is the subjective improvement of urinary incontinence. As secondary outcome the objective cure will be assessed from history and clinical parameters. Subjective improvement in quality of life will be measured by generic (EQ-5D and disease-specific (Urinary Distress Inventory and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire quality of life instruments. The economical endpoint is short term (1 year incremental cost-effectiveness in terms of costs per additional

  14. Risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Lígia da Silva; Lúcio, Adélia; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence (UI) and its characteristics. This was a case-control study with 344 puerperal women (77 cases and 267 controls) with up to 90 days postpartum. In a single session, participants were given a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical data and two others that assessed urine leakage, leakage situations, and type of UI. Stress UI was present in 45.5% of the women, incidents of urine leakage several times a day in 44.2%, of which 71.4% were in small amounts and 57.1% when coughing or sneezing. In 70.1% of cases, UI began during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. After running a binary logistic regression model, the following factors remained in the final model: UI during pregnancy (OR 12.82, CI 95% 6.94 - 23.81, ppregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy, multiparity, gestational age at birth greater or equal to 37 weeks, and constipation were presented as risk factors. In the studied group, stress UI was more frequent. Investigar os fatores de risco para a incontinência urinária (IU) no puerpério e as suas características. Trata-se de estudo caso-controle com 344 puérperas (77 casos e 267 controles), com até 90 dias pós-parto. Foi aplicado, em um único momento, um questionário para os dados sociodemográficos e clínicos, e dois outros para avaliar a perda urinária, situações de perda e o tipo de IU. Apresentaram IU de esforço 45,5%, perda urinária diversas vezes ao dia 44,2%, sendo 71,4% em pequena quantidade e 57,1% ao tossir ou espirrar. Em 70,1% dos casos a IU iniciou-se na gestação e permaneceu no puerpério. Ao ajustar-se um modelo de regressão logística binária, apenas IU na gestação (OR 12,82, IC 95% 6,94 - 23,81, p<0,0001), multiparidade (OR 2,26, IC 95% 1,22 - 4,19, p=0,009), idade gestacional no parto maior ou igual a 37 semanas (OR 2,52, IC 95% 1,16 - 5,46, p=0,02) e constipação (OR 1,94, IC

  15. Botulinum toxin for the management of bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurch, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    This review highlights a recent innovation in the medical treatment of detrusor overactivity (DO). Anticholinergics are usually the gold standard to treat bladder overactivity. Adverse effects and lack of efficacy are the two main causes for considering alternative treatments. Until recently, invasive surgery (mainly bladder augmentation) was the only available treatment option for patients with intractable DO. This article considers botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection as an alternative treatment to surgery in patients with DO who do not respond to anticholinergic therapy. To identify papers for inclusion in this review, we searched PubMed with the keywords 'botulinum toxin', 'overactive bladder', 'urinary incontinence' and 'neurogenic bladder' for the years 2000-5. Review articles were not included. Abstracts were cited only if they contained important new information. Experimental animal studies and articles or book chapters related to the use of botulinum toxin for other indications (such as achalasia and cervical dystonia) were analysed with regard to the mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin. From this review, it appears that BTX-A injection into the detrusor muscle is a very effective method for treating urinary incontinence secondary to neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), as well as urinary incontinence due to idiopathic overactive bladder (IDO). In both conditions, the duration of effect seems to be at least 6 months. Overall success rates seem to be similar in both patient populations. For NDO, only one evidence-based medicine level 1 study is available, whereas for IDO, only evidence-based medicine level 3 or 4 studies have been published. Particularly in this latter indication, injection technique and outcome parameters vary from study to study and need to be standardised. Without randomised controlled studies aimed at comparing different techniques and dosages, it remains difficult to decide what technique is optimal for treating patients

  16. Comparative study of unilateral versus bilateral inferior oblique recession/anteriorization in unilateral inferior oblique overaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Attiat M; Kassem, Rehab R

    2018-05-01

    To compare the effect of, and the rate of subsequent development of iatrogenic antielevation syndrome after, unilateral versus bilateral inferior oblique graded recession-anteriorization to treat unilateral inferior oblique overaction. Thirty-four patients with unilateral inferior oblique overaction were included in a randomized prospective study. Patients were equally divided into 2 groups. Group UNI underwent unilateral, group BI bilateral, inferior oblique graded recession-anteriorization. A successful outcome was defined as orthotropia, or within 2 ∆ of a residual hypertropia, in the absence of signs of antielevation syndrome, residual inferior oblique overaction, V-pattern, dissociated vertical deviation, or ocular torticollis. A successful outcome was achieved in 11 (64.7%) and 13 (76.5%) patients in groups UNI and BI, respectively (p = 0.452). Antielevation syndrome was diagnosed as the cause of surgical failure in 6 (35.3%) and 2 (11.8%) patients, in groups UNI and BI, respectively (p = 0.106). The cause of surgical failure in the other 2 patients in group BI was due to persistence of ocular torticollis and hypertropia in a patient with superior oblique palsy and a residual V-pattern and hypertropia in the other patient. The differences between unilateral and bilateral inferior oblique graded recession-anteriorization are insignificant. Unilateral surgery has a higher tendency for the subsequent development of antielevation syndrome. Bilateral surgery may still become complicated by antielevation syndrome, although at a lower rate. In addition, bilateral surgery had a higher rate of undercorrection. Further studies on a larger sample are encouraged.

  17. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary ...

  18. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

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    Jundt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12% to after childbirth (21 and 28% in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women.

  19. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine" and is a common problem in the female population with prevalence rates varying between 10% and 55% in 15- to 64-year-old women. The most frequent form of urinary incontinence in women is stress urinary incontinence, defined as "involuntary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing". The aim of this article is to systematically review the literature on urinary incontinence and participation in sport and fitness activities with a special emphasis on prevalence and treatment in female elite athletes. Stress urinary incontinence is a barrier to women's participation in sport and fitness activities and, therefore, it may be a threat to women's health, self-esteem and well-being. The prevalence during sports among young, nulliparous elite athletes varies between 0% (golf) and 80% (trampolinists). The highest prevalence is found in sports involving high impact activities such as gymnastics, track and field, and some ball games. A 'stiff' and strong pelvic floor positioned at an optimal level inside the pelvis may be a crucial factor in counteracting the increases in abdominal pressure occurring during high-impact activities. There are no randomised controlled trials or reports on the effect of any treatment for stress urinary incontinence in female elite athletes. However, strength training of the pelvic floor muscles has been shown to be effective in treating stress urinary incontinence in parous females in the general population. In randomised controlled trials, reported cure rates, defined as athletes than in other women. There is a need for more basic research on pelvic floor muscle function during physical activity and the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in female elite athletes.

  20. Fecal incontinence in operated cases for anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondelli, P.; Taccone, A.; Martucciello, G.; Dodero, P.; Caffarena, P.

    1989-01-01

    In spite of great progress in surgical treatment of anorectal malformations, fecal incontinence is still, in variable degrees, a frequent and unpleasant postsurgical sequela. The most frequent causes of incontinence are: 1) the incorrect placement of the pulled-through colon in the levator ani and sphincteric muscular complex during abdomino-perineal surgical procedures; 2) the poor development of sphinteric musculature; 3) the associated sacral anomalies. Postoperative CT helps to evaluate all the above-mentioned conditions, in view of possible new surgical procedure for improving continence (besides postoperative CT can help in choosing the more suitable surgical technique). Nine patients, aged 3 to 13 years (2 with good continence and 7 with various degrees of incontinence), were studied with pelvic postoperative CT. In the cases (2) with good continence the CT picture was: good development of sphincteric musculature and neo-anorectum correctly placed into sphinteric musculature; in the cases (3) with low degree of continence: neoanorectum correctly placed, but hypoplasic puborectal muscle; in the case (4) with complete incontinence, neo-anorectum incorrectly placed and poor development of sphinteric musculature. A further Posterior Sagittal Anorectoplasty (according Pena) is only suitable in the incontinence cases with: 1) neo-anorectum seriously misplaced; 2) good development of sphinteric musculature; 3) absence of sacral anomalies. Postoperative CT is a valid mean for demostrating all the above-mentioned conditions and for chooosing the best surgical technique in each case

  1. Urinary stress incontinence in postpartum women. Bibliographic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Barranco Cuadros

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both pregnancy and childbirth are important risk factors for urinary stress incontinence in women. For its prevention, exercies of the pelvic floor musculature have been shown to be effective. Guidelines for urinary stress incontinence management recommend offering pelvic floor muscle training to women during their first pregnancy as a preventive measure. Objective: To update the information provided in the scientific literature on urinary stress incontinence during postpartum and possible forms of treat it. Methodology: A systematic bibliographic review was carried out in the following databases: PUBMED, COCHRANE, CINHAL, MEDLINE, SciELO and SCOPUS. The date was restricted to the last 5 years (2012-2017, in Spanish, English and Portuguese. Restrictions were made regarding the type of study, and Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs were considered for this review. Results: After reviewing the literature consulted, it is concluded that the training of the pelvic floor musculature is beneficial to prevent the occurrence of urinary stress incontinence during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Conclusions: The results obtained in this review are consistent with previous studies and bibliographic reviews of the same topic. It follows that training of the pelvic floor muscles is beneficial in preventing the occurrence of urinary stress incontinence during pregnancy or postpartum.

  2. Urinary incontinence in women in relation to occupational status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonjung; Kwak, Yeunhee

    2017-01-01

    Through this cross-sectional study the authors explore urinary incontinence in women in relation to occupational status and environment. Data from the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2009) were used (n = 5,928) excluding those aged under 19 or over 65 years, male, with renal disease, and with missing data. Urinary incontinence was prevalent in working women. Compared to unemployed women, the adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for women working in services/sales was 1.62 (1.21-2.19); for paid workers was 1.81 (1.20-2.73); and for self-employed workers was 1.46 (1.05-2.03). Compared to unemployed women, the adjusted odds ratio for working women with a daytime work schedule was 2.14 (1.18-3.87), while for those with evening work schedules, it was 1.35 (1.05-1.74). Urinary incontinence was significantly associated with various occupational environments: an unclean and uncomfortable workplace, dangerous job and probability of accidents, feeling pressed for time, awkward position for long periods, and carrying heavy weights. These findings suggest that urinary incontinence was prevalent in working women and was associated with occupational status and working environment. Therefore, improving occupational status and environment for working women-such as modifying the working schedule, posture, and workplace atmosphere-are needed to prevent urinary incontinence.

  3. MR imaging of pelvic floor in stress urinary incontinence=20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Rae; Park, Heung Jae; Kook, Shin Ho; Chung, Eun Chul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    To demonstrate the anatomy of the female pelvic floor and to determine the anatomic differences between normal controls and women with stress urinary incontinence, using MRI. Five healthy, young, nulliparous women and 12 with stress urinary incontinence underwent MR imaging. We obtained FSE T2-weighted axial images, 3mm thick, of the region extending from the urethroversical junction to the perineal membrane. The following parameters were determined : angle, asymmetry and signal intensity of the levator ani muscles, the distance between the urethra and symphysis, and the presence, shape and angulation of urethropelvic ligament. In contrast to normal controls, frequent findings in women with stress incontinence were as follows : increased angle (43%), asymmetry (43%) and higher signal intensity (67%) of the levator ani muscles; increased distance between the urethra and symphysis; loss (43%), discontinuity (60%) and dorsal angulation (43%) of the urethropelvic ligament. In women with stress urinary incontinence, MRI clearly demonstrates the anatomy of the female pelvic floor, changes in the levator ani muscles, the distance between the urethra and symphysis, and the urethropelvic ligament. The modality can therefore be used to evaluate the anatomical changes occurring in cases of stress urinary incontinence. (author)

  4. Studies on risk factors for urinary incontinence in Swedish female twins

    OpenAIRE

    Tettamanti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Approximately half of all women in industrialized countries will experience urinary incontinence during their lifetime. Even though urinary incontinence is not a life threatening disease, it often has severe implications for daily function, social interactions, sexuality and psychological well-being. Moreover, urinary incontinence has a major impact on health economy and is increasingly recognized as a global health burden. Hence, identifying risk factors for urinary incontinence is of import...

  5. Transvaginal prolapse repair with or without the addition of a midurethral sling in women with genital prolapse and stress urinary incontinence: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, J M; Oude Rengerink, K; van der Steen, A; van Leeuwen, J H S; Stekelenburg, J; Bongers, M Y; Weemhoff, M; Mol, B W; van der Vaart, C H; Roovers, J-P W R

    2015-06-01

    To compare transvaginal prolapse repair combined with midurethral sling (MUS) versus prolapse repair only. Multi-centre randomised trial. Fourteen teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Women with symptomatic stage two or greater pelvic organ prolapse (POP), and subjective or objective stress urinary incontinence (SUI) without prolapse reduction. Women were randomly assigned to undergo vaginal prolapse repair with or without MUS. Analysis was according to intention to treat. The primary outcome at 12 months' follow-up was the absence of urinary incontinence (UI) assessed with the Urogenital Distress Inventory and treatment for SUI or overactive bladder. Secondary outcomes included complications. One hundred and thirty-four women were analysed at 12 months' follow-up (63 in MUS and 71 in control group). More women in the MUS group reported the absence of UI and SUI; respectively 62% versus 30% UI (relative risk [RR] 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-3.15) and 78% versus 39% SUI (RR 1.97; 95% CI 1.44-2.71). Fewer women underwent treatment for postoperative SUI in the MUS group (10% versus 37%; RR 0.26; 95% CI 0.11-0.59). In the control group, 12 women (17%) underwent MUS after prolapse surgery versus none in the MUS group. Severe complications were more common in the MUS group, but the difference was not statistically significant (16% versus 6%; RR 2.82; 95% CI 0.93-8.54). Women with prolapse and co-existing SUI are less likely to have SUI after transvaginal prolapse repair with MUS compared with prolapse repair only. However, only 17% of the women undergoing POP surgery needed additional MUS. A well-informed decision balancing risks and benefits of both strategies should be tailored to individual women. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Influence of Gluteus Maximus Inhibition on Upper Trapezius Overactivity in Chronic Mechanical Neck Pain with Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Mohamed Koura

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical neck pain is the most common type of neck pain and commonly to accompany with radiculopathy. Patients of neck pain exhibit greater activation of accessory muscles, (sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, and upper trapezius muscles and may also show changed patterns of motor control of other postural muscles as pelvic muscles for reducing activation of painful muscles of neck. Aim of the study: To determine if there is an association between gluteus maximus inhibition and overactivity of upper fibres of trapezius in patients with chronic mechanical neck pain with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: Forty female patients participated in this study diagnosed as chronic mechanical neck pain with radiculopathy. Amplitude and onset of muscle activation were assessed by using the surface electromyography (EMG during prone hip extension test. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that there is no correlation between the amplitude of EMG activity of right and left gluteus maximus and the amplitude of EMG activity of right and left upper trapezius (P<0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the overactivity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with chronic mechanical neck pain with radiculopathy is not related to the inhibition of the gluteus maximus muscle during prone hip extension test.

  7. Physiotherapy and behavior therapy for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolz-Beck, Martina; Reisenauer, Christl; Kolenic, Giselle E; Hahn, Sabine; Brucker, Sara Y; Huebner, Markus

    2017-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of physiotherapy and behavior therapy and to find specific subgroups of women with overactive bladder syndrome that might gain increased benefit from this therapy. Women with ≥10 micturitions per 24-h period were included. Six to nine therapy sessions were held within a 14-day interval. Efficacy end point was a reduction in micturitions and in episodes of nocturia. Secondary outcomes included ICIQ-OAB, ICIQ-OABqol and visual analog scales. Follow-up was 6 months. Levene test, Student's t test, Pearson´s and Spearman's correlations were utilized as well as the Friedman test and a multivariable-multilevel model. 32 women were included. Mean age was 51 ± 15.9 (years ± standard deviation, sd). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 24.4 ± 4.8 (kg/m 2  ± sd). There was a 22.9% reduction in the number of micturitions per 24 h (11.7 ± 1.6 vs. 9.0 ± 1.3 p physiotherapy and behavior therapy in women with overactive bladder syndrome with a post-therapy effect especially for women with no prior treatment.

  8. Validation of the urgency questionnaire in Portuguese: A new instrument to assess overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Rodolfo Pacheco de; Silva, Jonas Lopes da; Calado, Adriano Almeida; Cavalcanti, Geraldo de Aguiar

    2018-01-01

    Overactive Bladder (OAB) is a clinical condition characterized by symptoms reported by patients. Therefore, measurement instruments based on reported information are important for understanding its impact and treatment benefits. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Urgency Questionnaire (UQ) in Portuguese. Initially, the UQ was translated and culturally adapted to Portuguese. Sixty-three volunteers were enrolled in the study and were interviewed for responding the Portuguese version of the UQ and the validated Portuguese version of the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire short-form (OABq-SF), used as the gold standard measurement for the validation process. Psychometric properties such as criterion validity, stability, and reliability were tested. Forty-six subjects were included in the symptomatic group (presence of "urgency"), and seventeen were included in the asymptomatic group (control group). There was difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects on all of the subscales (p≤0.001). The UQ subscales correlated with the OABq-SF subscales (p≤0.01), except the subscale "time to control urgency" and the item "impact" from the visual analog scales (VAS). However, these scales correlated with the OABq-SF - Symptom Bother Scale. The UQ subscales demonstrated stability over time (pPortuguese version of the UQ proved to be a valid tool for the evaluation of OAB in individuals whose native language is Portuguese. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  9. Nocturnal Polyuria and Hypertension in Patients with Lifestyle Related Diseases and Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu; Homma, Yukio; Takeda, Masayuki; Gotoh, Momokazu; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Akino, Hironobu; Hayashi, Koichi; Yonemoto, Koji

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to investigate the relationship of nocturnal polyuria in patients with common lifestyle related diseases and overactive bladder, with special attention to hypertension. After baseline assessment, patients recorded 24-hour urinary frequency/volume, blood pressure and heart rate for 3 days. They were stratified into 4 groups based on mean blood pressure, including no hypertension, and controllable, untreated and uncontrolled hypertension, respectively. The 2,353 eligible patients, who had urinary urgency once or more per week and 1 or more nocturnal toilet visits, were enrolled from 543 sites in Japan. Of these patients complete data, including the 24-hour frequency volume chart, were collected from 1,271. Multivariable analyses showed a statistically significant association of nocturnal polyuria with increasing age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.05, p polyuria in women alone (p = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia were significantly associated with nocturnal polyuria in men alone (p polyuria was significantly associated with age, male gender, and untreated hypertension in patients with lifestyle related diseases and overactive bladder. The association between hypertension and nocturnal polyuria was significant in women alone. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The multidimensional sensation of desire to void differs between people with and without overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rebekah; Buckley, Jonathan D; Williams, Marie T

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether the multidimensional sensation of desire to void can be reliability assessed and whether differences exist between people with and without overactive bladder (OAB). Assessing reliability and convergent validity of OAB screening tools comprised a secondary aim. This observational, repeated-measures study involved 64 volunteers (47 female), aged ≥50 years, with and without OAB symptoms. Six sensory dimensions (intensity, unpleasantness, suddenness, perceived difficulty "holding on," bladder fullness and location of sensation) were assessed by structured interview on two occasions. Overactive bladder status was determined using the OAB Symptom Score and OAB Awareness Tool. Reliability of sensory dimensions was assessed via random effects mixed modeling. The ability of each sensory dimension to predict OAB status was determined by partial least squares regression. With the exception of sensory intensity, perceived bladder fullness, and one location of sensation, sensory dimensions were reliably reported. Sensory intensity, unpleasantness, suddenness, and perceived difficulty "holding on" predicted OAB, whereas perceived bladder fullness and sensory location did not. The OAB screening questionnaires demonstrated comparable test-retest reliability and convergent validity. People with and without OAB can reliably describe the multidimensional sensation of desire to void. The sensation of desire to void is more intense, unpleasant, sudden, and perceived as more difficult to hold on in people with OAB. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of Acute Sacral Neuromodulation at Different Frequencies on Bladder Overactivity in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose We investigated the effects of different stimulation frequencies on the inhibition of bladder overactivity by sacral neuromodulation (SNM in pigs. Methods Implant-driven stimulators were used to stimulate the S3 spinal nerve in 13 pigs. Cystometry was performed by infusing normal saline (NS or acetic acid (AA. SNM (pulse width, 210 µsec at frequencies ranging from 5 to 50 Hz was conducted at the intensity threshold at which observable perianal and/or tail movement was induced. Multiple cystometrograms were performed to determine the effects of different frequencies on the micturition reflex. Results AA-induced bladder overactivity significantly reduced the bladder capacity (BC to 34.4%±4.7% of the NS control level (354.4±35.9 mL (P0.05, but SNM at 15, 30, and 50 Hz significantly increased the BC to 54.5%±7.1%, 55.2%±6.5%, and 57.2%±6.1% of the NS control level (P0.05. Conclusions This study demonstrated that 15 Hz was an appropriate frequency for SNM and that frequencies higher than 15 Hz did not lead to better surgical outcomes.

  12. Growth trajectories of early aggression, overactivity, and inattention: Relations to second-grade reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah A O; Carter, Alice S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Jones, Stephanie M; Wagmiller, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    The link between behavior problems and low academic achievement is well established, but few studies have examined longitudinal relations between early externalizing behaviors before school entry and low academic achievement following transition to formal schooling. Early inattention has been particularly overlooked, despite strong associations between inattention and reading difficulties later in development. Trajectories of infant and toddler aggression, overactivity, and inattention, developed from parent reports about 1- to 3-year-old children, were examined as predictors of direct assessments of 2nd-grade reading in an at-risk epidemiological study subsample (N = 359). Reports of inattentive and overactive behaviors at ages 1-3 years and changes in inattention through toddlerhood predicted reading achievement in 2nd grade. A parallel process model suggested that the effects of early inattention on reading appear to be most robust. Findings underscore the contribution of social-emotional development to school readiness and the importance of early identification of children with externalizing problems, as early interventions designed to reduce externalizing problems may improve later reading skills.

  13. Growth Trajectories of Early Aggression, Overactivity, and Inattention: Relations to Second Grade Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah A. O.; Carter, Alice S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Jones, Stephanie M.; Wagmiller, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The link between behavior problems and low academic achievement is well established, but few studies have examined longitudinal relations between early externalizing behaviors before school entry and low academic achievement following transition to formal schooling. Early inattention has been particularly overlooked, despite strong associations between inattention and reading difficulties later in development. Trajectories of infant/toddler aggression, overactivity, and inattention, developed from parent reports about 1- to 3-year-old children, were examined as predictors of direct assessments of second grade reading in an at-risk epidemiological study subsample (N = 359). Reports of inattentive and overactive behaviors at age 1-to-3 years and changes in inattention through toddlerhood predicted reading achievement in second grade. A parallel process model suggested that the effects of early inattention on reading appear to be most robust. Findings underscore the contribution of social-emotional development to school readiness and the importance of early identification of children with externalizing problems, as early interventions designed to reduce externalizing problems may improve later reading skills. PMID:25046126

  14. Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderschee, Roselien; Hay-Smith, E. Jean C.; Herbison, G. Peter; Roovers, Jan Paul; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women. Whilst most of the PFMT trials have been done in women with stress urinary incontinence, there is also some trial evidence that PFMT is effective for urgency urinary incontinence and mixed urinary

  15. Prevalence of double incontinence, risk and influence on quality of life in a general female population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slieker- ten Hove, Marijke; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Eijkemans, MJ; Steegers-Theunissen, R. P M; Burger, CW; Vierhout, ME

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) and anal incontinence (AI) are complaints with impact on quality of life (QOL). Few data are available on prevalence of double incontinence (DI) in the general female population. OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence of UI, AI, and DI, their associations with age,

  16. PHYSICAL TREATMENT OF THE STRESS URINARY INCONTINENCE IN WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jugoslav Stojiljković

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents various methods of the physical treatment used in healing women with the stress urinary incontinence. It is emphasized that the exercises for strengthening the pelvic floor are effective in curing the stress incontinence but the most efficient exercise program has not been determined yet. Likewise, it is pointed out that the biofeedback application, along with the exercise, is no more efficient than the application of the exercises only but, still, much better results are achieved by applying the biofeedback at the beginning of the treatment. In order to evaluate the effects of the vaginal coni, electric and magnetic simulations in treating women with the stress urinary incontinence further explorations are necessary.

  17. Impact of Loss of Work Productivity in Patients with Overactive Bladder Treated with Antimuscarinics in Spain: Study in Routine Clinical Practice Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth; Ruiz-Torrejón, Amador; Sáez-Zafra, Marc; Coll-de Tuero, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome characterized by presenting symptoms of urgency, with or without urge incontinence, and normally accompanied by day and night frequency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lost work productivity [number of days of sick leave] in patients treated with fesoterodine versus tolterodine and solifenacin to treat OAB in Spain. A retrospective, observational study was carried out using the records (digital databases) of actively working patients (2008-2013). The study population comprised of patients from two autonomous communities; 31 primary care centres agreed to participate. Patients who began first treatment with antimuscarinics (fesoterodine, solifenacin or tolterodine) and who met certain inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the study. Follow-up lasted for 1 year. The main outcome measures were comorbidity, medication possession ratio (MPR), treatment persistence, and number of days of sick leave and associated costs. Indirect costs were considered to be those related to lost work productivity (number of days of sick leave, exclusively), (1) due to OAB and (2) overall total. The cost was expressed as the average cost per patient (cost/unit). Multivariate analyses (Cox, ANCOVA) were used to correct the models. A total of 3094 patients were recruited into the study; 43.0 % were treated with solifenacin, 29.2 % with tolterodine, and 27.8 % with fesoterodine. The average age of patients was 54 years (standard deviation 9.2), and 62.2 % were women. The comparison of fesoterodine versus solifenacin and tolterodine showed a higher MPR (90.0 vs. 87.0 and 86.1 %, respectively), higher treatment persistence (40.2 vs. 34.7 and 33.6 %), lower use of sick leave (22.8 vs. 52.9 and 36.7 %), total number of days of sick leave (5.1 vs. 9.7 and 9.3 days) and costs corrected for covariates (€371 vs. €703 and €683); p productivity.

  18. Pharmacological profile of β3-adrenoceptor agonists in clinical development for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Igawa, Yasuhiko; Michel, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    β(3)-Adrenoceptor agonists are an emerging drug class for the treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome, and clinical proof-of-concept data have been obtained for three representatives of this class, mirabegron, ritobegron, and solabegron. We review here the pharmacological profile of these three

  19. Rectal motility after sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, H B; Worsøe, J; Krogh, K

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is effective against faecal incontinence, but the mode of action is obscure. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of SNS on fasting and postprandial rectal motility. Sixteen patients, 14 women age 33-73 (mean 58), with faecal incontinence of various...... contractions, total time with cyclic rectal contractions, the number of aborally and orally propagating contractions, the number of anal sampling reflexes or rectal wall tension during contractions. Postprandial changes in rectal tone were significantly reduced during SNS (P

  20. Faecal incontinence following radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Høyer, Morten; Lundby, Lilli

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Faecal incontinence (FI) after radiotherapy is a known phenomenon, but has received little attention to date. This article aimed to review current knowledge on faecal incontinence related to radiotherapy for prostate cancer. METHODS: PubMed was searched for English-language articles......-volume parameters and incidence is equivocal, although some studies suggest parameters confined to the lower rectum and/or anal canal may be of value to predict the extent of the injury and could be used as constraints in the dose planning process. CONCLUSIONS: Interpretation of data is limited due to lack of large...

  1. Urinary incontinence monitoring system using laser-induced graphene sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2017-12-25

    This paper presents the design and development of a sensor patch to be used in a sensing system to deal with the urinary incontinence problem primarily faced by women and elderly people. The sensor patches were developed from laser-induced graphene from low-cost commercial polyimide (PI) polymers. The graphene was manually transferred to a commercial tape, which was used as sensor patch for experimentation. Salt solutions with different concentrations were tested to determine the most sensitive frequency region of the sensor. The results are encouraging to further develop this sensor in a platform for a fully functional urinary incontinence detection system.

  2. Electrophysiological Basis of Fecal Incontinence and Its Implications for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The majority of patients with neuropathic incontinence and other pelvic floor conditions associated with straining at stool have damage to the pudendal nerves distal to the ischial spine. Sacral nerve stimulation appears to be a promising innovation and has been widely adopted and currently considered the standard of care for adults with moderate to severe fecal incontinence and following failed sphincter repair. From a decision-to-treat perspective, the short-term efficacy is good (70%–80%), but the long-term efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation is around 50%. Newer electrophysiological tests and improved anal endosonography would more effectively guide clinical decision making. PMID:29159162

  3. Reliability and Validation of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire in Over Active Bladder to Persian Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari Motlagh, Reza; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Joodi Tutunsaz, Javad

    2015-05-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is a common syndrome in the world in both men and women. Correct diagnosis and accurate measurement of symptoms severity and also quality of life of patients is necessary to ensure proper treatment and to facilitate sound relationships among patients, researchers and doctors. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire in Over Active Bladder (ICIQ-OAB) questionnaire is a concise and strong tool to evaluate the symptoms of OAB and their effects on patients' quality of life and treatment results. The objective of this study was to translate and validate a simple and strong tool that could be used in clinics and research. First, the original British English questionnaire was translated into Persian by two bilingual and originally Persian-speaking translators. Then the Persian version was back translated to English and a native English speaker studied and compared the questionnaire with the original version. At the end, the translated and corrected Persian version was finalized by a research team. Content validity of the items and ensuring that the questions could convey the main concept to readers was assessed through Modified Content Validity Index (MCVI). Reliability was calculated by Cronbach's α coefficient. Internal Consistency of the questionnaire with the calculation of Kendall correlation coefficient were evaluated by performing test-retest in 50 participants. The modified content validity index was > 0.78 for all of the questions. Cronbach's α coefficient was calculated 0.76 for all of the participants. Kendall correlation coefficient was calculated for test-re-test assessment 0.66. Both of which indicates the reliability of this questionnaire. Persian version of ICIQ-OAB questionnaire is a simple and strong tool for research, treatment and screening purposes. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training versus attention-control massage treatment in patients with faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussing, Anja; Dahn, Inge; Due, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    supplements is recommended as first-line treatment for faecal incontinence. Despite this, the effect of pelvic floor muscle training for faecal incontinence is unclear. No previous trials have investigated the efficacy of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment...... treatment and conservative treatment. The primary outcome is participants' rating of symptom changes after 16 weeks of treatment using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement Scale. Secondary outcomes are the Vaizey Incontinence Score, the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, the Fecal Incontinence...

  5. Incontinência do choro e infarto protuberancial unilateral Incontinence of crying and unilateral pontine infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo trata do caso de um paciente que apresentou incontinência do choro e hemiplegia direita por infarto ventroprotuberancial paramediano detectado pela RNM. O caráter circunscrito da lesão foi endossado pela normalidade dos potenciais evocados sômato-sensitivos e auditivos de curta-latência. Os episódios de choro desapareceram poucos dias depois do início do tratamento com doses baixas de imipramina. Discutimos o choro e riso patológicos como forma de incontinência da mímica resultante de desconexão límbico-motora, enfatizando a impropriedade de incluí-los na síndrome pseudobulbar, uma vez que dependem de correlatos anatômicos e funcionais distintos.A 64-year-old man presented with pathologic crying and right hemiplegia due to a unilateral pontine infarct from probable branch disease of the basilar artery. The circumscribed nature of the lesion was supported by MRI and short-latency evoked potentials. The weeping spells ceased after a few days of imipramine in low doses. Pathologic laughing and crying can be viewed as a limbic-motor disconnection syndrome, in which the faciovocal motor system is released from forebrain afferents carrying information of emotional content. The inclusion of pathologic laughing and crying in the syndrome pseudobulbar palsy is inaccurate and misleading, since each is related to distinct functional and anatomic systems intrinsic to the human brainstem.

  6. Overactive Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially if your symptoms disrupt your work schedule, social interactions and everyday activities. Causes Normal bladder function The ... fills, nerve signals sent to your brain eventually trigger the need to urinate. When you urinate, nerve ...

  7. Time to and predictors of dual incontinence in older nursing home admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Gurvich, Olga V; Eberly, Lynn E; Harms, Susan

    2018-01-01

    There are few studies of nursing home residents that have investigated the development of dual incontinence, perhaps the most severe type of incontinence as both urinary and fecal incontinence occur. To determine the time to and predictors of dual incontinence in older nursing home residents. Using a cohort design, records of older nursing home admissions who were continent or had only urinary or only fecal incontinence (n = 39,181) were followed forward for report of dual incontinence. Four national US datasets containing potential predictors at multiple levels describing characteristics of nursing home residents, nursing homes (n = 445), and socioeconomic and sociodemographic status of the community surrounding nursing homes were analyzed. A Cox proportional hazard regression with nursing home-specific random effect was used. At 6 months after admission, 28% of nursing home residents developed dual incontinence, at 1 year 42% did so, and at 2 years, 61% had dual incontinence. Significant predictors for time to developing dual incontinence were having urinary incontinence, greater functional or cognitive deficits, more comorbidities, older age, and lesser quality of nursing home care. The development of dual incontinence is a major problem among nursing home residents. Predictors in this study offer guidance in developing interventions to prevent and reduce the time to developing this problem which may improve the quality of life of nursing residents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of Age, Educational Status, Parity and BMI on Development of Urinary Incontinence - a Cross Sectional Study in Saudi Population

    OpenAIRE

    Saadia, Zaheera

    2015-01-01

    Background: The research article looks at the background of women with urinary incontinence and exposed to different demographic factors. Women who had urinary incontinence and women without urinary incontinence were compared with regards to their demographic features and risk of development of urinary problems. These risk factors can either cause short term or temporary urinary incontinence or they can cause long term or permanent urinary incontinence. This article explores the association o...

  9. Prevalence of Stress Urinary Incontinence in Elite Female Endurance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poświata Anna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in a group of elite female endurance athletes, as professional sport is one of the risk factors for stress urinary incontinence. SUI rates in the groups of female cross-country skiers and runners were compared to determine whether the training weather conditions like temperature and humidity influenced the prevalence of urinary incontinence. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed among 112 elite female athletes ie., 57 cross-country skiers and 55 runners. We used a short form of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6 to assess the presence of SUI symptoms and the level of urogenital distress. Only women who had been practicing sport professionally for at least 3 years, on an international and national level, were included in the research. The study group consisted of 76% nulliparous and 24% parous women. 45.54% of all participants reported leakage of urine associated with sneezing or coughing which indicates stress urinary incontinence. 29.46% were not bothered by the urogenital distress symptoms. 42.86% of the participants were slightly bothered by the symptoms, 18.75% were moderately bothered, 8.04% were significantly bothered and 0.89% were heavily bothered. The absence of statistically significant differences between both groups seems to indicate that training weather conditions did not influence the prevalence of SUI in elite female endurance athletes.

  10. Quality of life in women with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Senra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary The aim of this study is to examine the relationship among psychological, clinical and sociodemographic variables, and quality of life in women with urinary incontinence. The sample consisted of 80 women diagnosed with urinary incontinence (UI followed in a Northern Central Hospital in Portugal. Participants answered the Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QOL; Satisfaction with Sexual Relationship Questionnaire (SSRQ; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS and the Brief Cope. The results revealed that women with higher quality of life considered their symptoms of urine loss as mild or moderated compared to those with severe urine loss. The less severe urine loss was associated with greater sexual satisfaction and less use of religion and self-blame as coping strategies. In terms of coping, women who considered the loss of urine as severe expressed more feelings regarding UI. Stress urinary incontinence, high sexual satisfaction, and less use of denial, distraction, and religion as coping strategies, predicted higher quality of life. According to the results, UI has an impact on women’s sexual satisfaction and quality of life. Therefore, intervention programs should target these women, including their partners, helping them to adjust to their condition and teaching effective coping strategies in order to improve their sexual satisfaction and quality of life.

  11. Urinary incontinence in persons with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gontard, A. von; Didden, H.C.M.; Sinnema, M.; Curfs, L.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess and identify the frequency and type of urinary incontinence (UI), as well as associated symptoms in persons with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). PWS is characterized by mental retardation, short stature, obesity and hypogonadism. The behavioural phenotype includes eating problems,

  12. Stress urinary incontinence: effect of pelvic muscle exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson, K. L.; McKey, P. L.; Bishop, K. R.; Kloen, P.; Verheul, J. B.; Dougherty, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty women with stress urinary incontinence diagnosed by urodynamic testing participated in a 6-week pelvic muscle exercise program. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercise program, with or without an intravaginal balloon, on urinary leakage as determined by a

  13. Pathophysiology and Contributing Factors in Postprostatectomy Incontinence: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Farag, F.; Bauer, R.M.M.J.; Sandhu, J.; Ridder, D. de; Stenzl, A.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: The incidence and awareness of postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI) has increased during the past few years, probably because of an increase in prostate cancer surgery. Many theories have been postulated to explain the pathophysiology of PPI. OBJECTIVE: The current review scrutinizes

  14. Anal incontinence in women with recurrent obstetric anal sphincter rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgeskov, Reneé; Nickelsen, Carsten Nahne Amtoft; Secher, Niels Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Abstract Objectives: To determine the risk of recurrent anal sphincter rupture (ASR), and compare the risk of anal incontinence (AI) after recurrent ASR, with that seen in women with previous ASR who deliver by caesarean section or vaginally without sustaining a recurrent ASR. METHODS...

  15. Yoga for treatment of urinary incontinence in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, L. Susan; Shrestha, Nipun; Lassi, Zohra S; Panda, Sougata; Chiaramonte, Delia; Skoetz, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effectiveness and safety of yoga for treatment of urinary incontinence in women, compared to no specific treatment, to another active treatment, or to an active treatment without adjuvant yoga, with a focus on patient symptoms and quality of life. PMID:29081716

  16. Assessment and management of urinary incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ellie

    2018-05-02

    Urinary incontinence is a common and usually hidden issue that can affect women of all ages. It is often ignored by the patient because of their misconception that incontinence is an inevitable consequence of ageing and their low expectations of successful treatment. There are various types of incontinence, with symptoms that can significantly affect patients' quality of life. This article aims to enhance nurses' understanding of the types of urinary incontinence affecting women, associated risk factors and continence assessment, as well as the initial investigations and conservative treatments that can be instigated by general nurses. It also discusses some of the advanced treatments offered by specialist services. The article emphasises the importance of undertaking a holistic continence assessment to ensure appropriate continence care is provided, and how tailoring this care to the individual can improve adherence to treatment plans. © 2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  17. Prospective assessment of interobserver agreement for defecography in fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobben, Annette C.; Wiersma, Tjeerd G.; Janssen, Lucas W. M.; de Vos, Rien; Terra, Maaike P.; Baeten, Cor G.; Stoker, Jaap

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The primary aim of our study was to determine the interobserver agreement of defecography in diagnosing enterocele, anterior rectocele, intussusception, and anismus in fecal-incontinent patients. The subsidiary aim was to evaluate the influence of level of experience on interpreting

  18. Ano-rectal tuberculous granulomapresenting with faecal incontinence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... present a case of a 68-year old man with a huge mass in the ano-rectum with faecal incontinence, which was clinically diagnosed as an advanced carcinoma of the ano-rectum for which the biopsy was reported as tuberculosis. He improved with anti-tuberculosis treatment. Keywords: Ano-rectum, tuberculosis, cancer.

  19. Evaluation of a behavioral treatment for female urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santacreu M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marta Santacreu, Rocío Fernández-BallesterosBiological and Health Psychology, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Urinary incontinence is a medical, psychological, social, economic, and hygienic problem. Although it is difficult to state its prevalence, all authors agree that it is related to age and gender. This study aimed to carry out a urinary incontinence behavioral treatment in order to reduce urine leakages in 14 participants recruited from a senior center. The program consists of daily training of the pelvic floor muscles with a weekly control by a supervisor during a 2-month period and follow-up of results 2 months after the last control session. Urinary incontinence episodes were reduced by 75.67% after program completion. It appears that pelvic floor muscles training, carried out under controlled and constant supervision, significantly reduces urinary leakage. Moreover, maintaining this improvement after treatment depends on the continuation of the exercises as well as on the urinary leakage frequency baseline and the urinary leakage frequency during the last treatment session.Keywords: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, quasi-experimental design

  20. [Increase in number of operations for stress urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of the minimally invasive tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) the number of operations performed for treatment of stress urinary incontinence has increased dramatically from over 1600 in 1999 to more than 4200 in 2003. Both gynaecologists and urologists now perform more TVTs and

  1. High-resolution endovaginal MR imaging in stress urinary incontinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Johan S. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rociu, Elena [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bosch, J.L.H. Ruud [Department of Urology, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Messelink, Embert J. [Department of Urology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Urology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, 1091 HA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der [Department of Radiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, 1091 HA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groenendijk, Annette G. [Department of Gynecology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, 1091 HA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eijkemans, Marinus J.C. [Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2003-08-01

    The causes of stress urinary incontinence are not completely known. Recent papers have stressed the importance of more anatomical information, which may help to elucidate the mechanism of stress urinary incontinence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of lesions of the urethral support mechanism and lesions (defects and scars, thinning) of levator ani muscle with endovaginal MRI in a case-control study. Forty women (median age 52 years, age range 40-65 years) - 20 patients with stress urinary incontinence (cases) and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers (controls) - underwent endovaginal MRI: axial, coronal, and sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin echo. The examinations were evaluated for the presence of lesions of urethral supporting structures and levator ani and scar tissue of the levator ani. The thickness of the levator ani muscle was measured. Lesions of the urethral support system and levator ani were significantly more prevalent in cases than in controls (p<0.01). Median levator ani thickness in patients was significantly lower than in healthy controls [2.5 mm (range 0.9-4.1 mm) vs 3.9 mm (range 1.4-7 mm)] (p<0.01). This study indicates a relationship between stress urine incontinence and the presence of lesions of the urethral support and levator ani and levator ani thinning. (orig.)

  2. Development of hydrogel implants for urinary incontinence treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šefc, L.; Přádný, Martin; Vacík, Jiří; Michálek, Jiří; Povýšil, C.; Vítková, I.; Halaška, M.; Šimon, V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 17 (2002), s. 3711-3715 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : urinary incontinence * swelling materials * artificial obstruction Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 3.008, year: 2002

  3. Cross-cultural differences for adapting overactive bladder symptoms: results of an epidemiologic survey in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Myung-Soo; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Lee, Jong Bok; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Joon Chul; Kim, Hyung-Jee; Lee, Jeong Ju; Park, Won-Hee

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) in a Korean national community sample of adults aged 40-89 years. A national Korean telephone survey using quota sampling methods was conducted. A clinically validated computer-assisted telephone interview approach was used in the survey. In 2,005 subjects (1,005 women and 1,000 men) interviewed, the prevalence of OAB(wet) increased with age in both men and women but OAB(dry) did not. OAB(dry) of men and women was not different in each age decade but OAB(wet) was more common among women than men aged cross-cultural differences for adapting OAB symptoms.

  4. Management of overactive bladder review: the role of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elita Wibisono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition that is experienced by around 455 million people (11% of the world population and associated with significant impact in patients’ quality of life. The first line treatments of OAB are conservative treatment and anti-muscarinic medication. For the refractory OAB patients, the treatment options available are surgical therapy, electrical stimulation, and botulinum toxin injection. Among them, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS is a minimally invasive option that aims to stimulate sacral nerve plexus, a group of nerve that is responsible for regulation of bladder function. After its approval by food and drug administration (FDA in 2007, PTNS revealed considerable promise in OAB management. In this review, several non-comparative and comparative studies comparing PTNS with sham procedure, anti-muscarinic therapy, and multimodal therapy combining PTNS and anti-muscarinic had supportive data to this consideration.

  5. Analysis of the prevalence and associated factors of overactive bladder in adult Korean men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a prevalent condition characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. Age, education, income, marital status, sleep, and emotional problems have been associated with OAB; however, conflicting results exist. The present study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of OAB and comprehensively analyze its associated factors in a large cross-sectional, population-based study. The data of 94,554 participants aged 19-107 were analyzed from the Korean Community Health Survey (KCHS of 2012. Data on marital status, physical activity, education level, occupation, body mass index (BMI, income level, sleep time, and stress level were retrieved for all enrolled participants. The overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS was used to evaluate the presence and degree of OAB. Simple and multiple logistic regression analyses with complex sampling were used for the associations between various factors and the presence of OAB. Overall, OAB was present in approximately 2.9% of the participants. The prevalence of OAB increased with age and steeply increased after 60 years of age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for each 10 years = 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61-1.80, P 2.16 (1.88-2.48 > 1.39 (1.23-1.57 for severe stress > moderate stress > some stress, respectively, P<0.001]. A medical history of diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and/or cerebral stroke was significantly related to OAB. Approximately 2.9% of adult Korean men experienced OAB based on the OABSS. Unmarried status; occupation; being underweight; inadequate sleep; stress; and medical history of diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or cerebral stroke were significantly correlated with OAB.

  6. How should we address the diagnosis of overactive bladder in women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Cidre, M A; López-Fando, L; Esteban, M; Franco, A; Arlandis, S; Castro, D; Prieto, L; Salinas, J; Gutiérrez, C; Gutiérrez Baños, J L; Cambronero, J

    2016-01-01

    Determine the degree of completion, agreement and diagnostic performance of various instruments for assessing the presence and intensity of urgency and other symptoms of idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB) and determine which is the best diagnostic combination. Observational, noninterventional, cross-sectional multicentre study on 247 women aged 18 years or older, with a clinical diagnosis of OAB, evaluated in 55 functional urology and urodynamic units. The women completed the Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale questionnaire, an independent bladder control self-assessment questionnaire (B-SAQ), the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire Short-Form and a 3-day voiding diary (VD3d), and they underwent a urodynamic study (UDS). The degree of completion and agreement among the instruments was assessed using the Kappa index (95% CI) and Cramér's V. The diagnostic performance of each tool and their combination was studied using absolute frequencies of positive cases for each OAB symptom. The patients mean age was 57.66 years (SD, 13.43). There was a high degree of completion (>85%). The agreement among the instruments was poor or moderate, and there was no agreement with the UDS. The best combination of tools for the diagnosis of OAB in women was the B-SAQ and VD3d. The degree of completion of all instruments was high, the agreement between them was poor-moderate and not significant for the UDS. The instruments that had the best diagnostic performance for assessing urgency and other OAB symptoms, providing data on their severity and discomfort, were the B-SAQ and the VD3d. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. [Analysis of risk factors about stress urinary incontinence in female].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan-feng; Lin, Jian; Li, Ya-qin; He, Xiao-yu; Xu, Bo; Hao, Lan; Song, Jian

    2003-12-01

    The aim was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in community dwelling women and to assess the relationship between the various risk factors and this disease. Selecting the community of Gulou at random and sending questionnaires to 6,066 women who living there. The questionnaire was designed to investigate the lower urinary tract symptoms, especially urinary incontinence. The questionnaire included some questions such as: age, weight, occupation, the level of education, menopause pregnancy and delivery, delivery through vagina or by cesarean section, the maximum body weight of fetus, chronic disease (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cough, constipation), operation in abdomen and pelvis, the behaviour of life (smoking, alcohol abuse, exercise), the prevalence and frequency of urinary incontinence, the quality of life and the recognition of this disease. The collecting rate was 92.1% (5,587/6,066). The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 18.1% and the prevalence of SUI was 8.8%. Age (OR: 1.010, 95% CI: 1.001 - 1.025), higher body mass index (OR: 1.092, 95% CI: 1.054 - 1.132), hypertension (OR: 2.342, 95% CI: 1.026 - 5.349), constipation (OR: 1.448, 95% CI: 1.216 - 1.725), multiple abortion (OR: 1.306, 95% CI: 1.113 - 1.533), multipara (OR: 1.205, 95% CI: 1.009 - 1.440), using abdominal pressure in laboring (OR: 1.684, 95% CI: 1.140 - 2.489), straight cutting of perineum (OR: 2.244, 95% CI: 1.162 - 4.334), perineum tear (OR: 2.576, 95% CI: 1.724 - 3.851), infection of perineal incision (OR: 5.988, 95% CI: 1.936 - 18.616) were risk factors of SUI in women. Many risk factors can cause urinary incontinence, among them age, pregnancy and childbirth are most important ones.

  8. [Established treatment options for male stress urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, C; Gillitzer, R; Wiesner, C; Thüroff, J W

    2007-03-01

    Nowadays, male stress urinary incontinence is rare and almost always of iatrogenic origin (radiotherapy, pelvic surgery). However, the prognosis of urinary incontinence following surgery is good and can be improved by pelvic floor muscle exercises in combination with biofeedback systems. For the remaining patient cohort with persistent urinary incontinence, several established surgical treatment options are available. Suburothelial injections of bulking agents can easily be performed in an ambulatory setting. However, regardless of the material used, long-term results are disappointing. Moreover, the residual urethral function deteriorates due to cicatrization of the suburothelial plexus with consequent loss of urethral elasticity. The fascial sling procedure in males has to be performed in preoperated areas and is as technically demanding for the surgeon as it is burdening for the patient. Alloplastic material is not used, thus minimizing risks for arrosion or infection. Since the sling tension can neither be standardized nor postoperatively readjusted, the risk of overcorrection is considerable and the success of the procedure is heavily dependent on the surgeon's experience. Despite wear and high revision rates, the technically mature artificial sphincter produces excellent continence results and has become the gold standard in the therapy of male stress urinary incontinence. The circumferential and continuous urethral compression by the cuff is highly effective, but at the price of an almost inevitable urethral atrophy. To overcome this problem, various surgical techniques have been developed (tandem cuff, cuff downsizing, transcorporal cuff placement). However, the expensive artificial sphincter is not a nostrum for every incontinent man, since it requires certain minimal cognitive and manual capabilities. Therefore, the search for less demanding treatment alternatives seems to be necessary, even if one has to accept lower continence rates.

  9. Trans-obturator Tape in surgical treatment of urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashrafi M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a new minimally-invasive surgical procedure using trans-obturator Tape (TOT to treat female stress urinary incontinence.Methods: This clinical trial study was performed from 2003 to 2004 in the Gynecology Department of Imam Hospital, Vali-e-Asr, Tehran, Iran. A total of 35 women with stress urinary incontinence underwent the TOT procedure. All patients underwent pre-operative clinical examination, cough-stress test (full bladder, uroflowmetry and post-voiding residual volume assessment. Results: The mean age of patients was 50 years, ranging from 26 to 74 years, with an average urinary stress incontinence duration of six years. The mean time of follow-up was 14 months (at 1, 6, 12 and 24 months and the average duration of surgery was about 20 minutes. The perioperative complication rate was 9% with no vascular, nerve or bowel injuries. The rate of hemorrhagic side effects (spontaneously-absorbed hematoma and blood loss not requiring blood transfusion was 2.9%. Post-operative urinary retention and vaginal erosion occurred in one case each; the former was treated by intermittent self-catheterization. In total, 91.4% of patients were completely cured and 8.6% were improved without failure of treatment. Conclusions: The present study confirms the results obtained by Delorme and coworkers, and allows us to consider TOT as a safe, minimally invasive and efficient short-term surgical technique for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence, alone or in combination with prolapse repair. Following this study, a randomized control trial is recommended to compare TOT with the gold standard surgery for women with urinary incontinence.

  10. The female urinary microbiome in urgency urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Meghan M; Zilliox, Michael J; Rosenfeld, Amy B; Thomas-White, Krystal J; Richter, Holly E; Nager, Charles W; Visco, Anthony G; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Barber, Matthew D; Schaffer, Joseph; Moalli, Pamela; Sung, Vivian W; Smith, Ariana L; Rogers, Rebecca; Nolen, Tracy L; Wallace, Dennis; Meikle, Susan F; Gai, Xiaowu; Wolfe, Alan J; Brubaker, Linda

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the urinary microbiota in women who are planning treatment for urgency urinary incontinence and to describe clinical associations with urinary symptoms, urinary tract infection, and treatment outcomes. Catheterized urine samples were collected from multisite randomized trial participants who had no clinical evidence of urinary tract infection; 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing was used to dichotomize participants as either DNA sequence-positive or sequence-negative. Associations with demographics, urinary symptoms, urinary tract infection risk, and treatment outcomes were determined. In sequence-positive samples, microbiotas were characterized on the basis of their dominant microorganisms. More than one-half (51.1%; 93/182) of the participants' urine samples were sequence-positive. Sequence-positive participants were younger (55.8 vs 61.3 years old; P = .0007), had a higher body mass index (33.7 vs 30.1 kg/m(2); P = .0009), had a higher mean baseline daily urgency urinary incontinence episodes (5.7 vs 4.2 episodes; P urinary incontinence episodes, -4.4 vs -3.3; P = .0013), and were less likely to experience urinary tract infection (9% vs 27%; P = .0011). In sequence-positive samples, 8 major bacterial clusters were identified; 7 clusters were dominated not only by a single genus, most commonly Lactobacillus (45%) or Gardnerella (17%), but also by other taxa (25%). The remaining cluster had no dominant genus (13%). DNA sequencing confirmed urinary bacterial DNA in many women with urgency urinary incontinence who had no signs of infection. Sequence status was associated with baseline urgency urinary incontinence episodes, treatment response, and posttreatment urinary tract infection risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Study on reductive surgery for pelvic organ prolapse concomitant with anti-incontinence sling for treatment of occult stress urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Lu, Yongxian; Shen, Wenjie; Liu, Jingxia; Ge, Jing; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Ying; Niu, Ke; Zhang, Yinghui; Wang, Wenying; Qiu, Chengli

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of anti-incontinence sling in the treatment of occult stress urinary incontinence (OSUI) during reductive surgery for advanced pelvic organ prolapse (POP). From Jun. 2003 to Dec. 2012, 78 patients with OSUI underwent reductive surgery for advanced POP such as high uterosacral ligament suspension, sacrospinous ligament suspension and sacral colpopexy in the First Affiliated Hospital, General Hospital of People's Liberation Army. Among them, 41 patients received reductive surgery alone was enrolled in non-concomitant anti-incontinence group and the other 37 patients who underwent same surgery with tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) or tension-free vaginal tape-obturator technique (TVT-O) was in anti-incontinence group. The patient's demography, objective and subjective outcomes, as well as complications and injures were compared between the two groups. The pelvic organ prolapse quantitation (POP-Q) was used to evaluate the objective outcomes of POP. Urinary distress inventory (UDI-6) and incontinence impact questionnaire short form (IIQ-7) were used to evaluate the subjective outcomes of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Compared with the non-concomitant anti-incontinence group, the objective outcomes of reductive surgery exhibited no significant differences (100%, 78/78), and only the operation time of anti-incontinence group slightly increased 16 minutes. The occurrence rate of postoperative SUI was 12% (5/41), 15% (6/41), 17% (7/41) respectively after the operation at 2-month, 6-month and 12-month follow up in the non-concomitant anti-incontinence group; and the occurrence rate of the anti-incontinence group was 3% (1/37), 3% (1/37), 3% (1/37); but none of patients in the two groups require further surgery for stress urinary incontinence. Mean score of UDI-6 and IIQ-7 in all the patients decreased significantly after operation at 2-month, 6-month and 12-month follow up (all P statistic difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). It

  12. Effect of Preoperative Low Maximal Flow Rate on Postoperative Voiding Trials after the Midurethral Sling Procedure in Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ji Y; Bae, Jae H; Lee, Jeong G; Park, Hong S; Moon, Du G; Oh, Mi M

    2017-06-02

    To evaluate the effects of preoperative low maximal flow rate (Qmax) on voiding trials after the midurethral sling (MUS) procedure in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). One hundred and sixty-eight women who underwent MUS procedure were enrolled. Preoperative free uroflowmetry was performed and patients were divided by Qmax. Low Qmax was defined as a Qmax under 15 mL/sec with voided volume at least 150 mL. Surgical results, failure of voiding trial, and postoperative uroflowmetry parameters were compared between the groups. Failure of voiding trial was defined by a PVR more than 100 mL on postoperative uroflowmetry. At the discharge day, there were 42 cases showing failure of voiding trial and 33 cases requiring CIC, but only one patient showed failure of voiding trial at 12 months postoperatively. Overall, 48 patients had preoperative low Qmax. Low Qmax group showed lower Qmax in all of postoperative uroflowmetry, but there were no significant differences in the rate of postoperative voiding trial failure or CIC. The low Qmax group was then divided into two groups according to the preoperative detrusor pressure at Qmax over and under 20 cmH 2 O in pressure flow study. Comparing the two groups, no significant differences were observed in the cure rate, voiding trial failure or CIC. Our results suggest that women with preoperative low Qmax experienced no definite unfavorable voiding problem from the MUS procedure compared to those with normal voiding function. MUS procedure may be regarded as a safe and successful procedure in SUI women with low Qmax. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Urinary and anal incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum: incidence, severity, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solans-Domènech, Maite; Sánchez, Emília; Espuña-Pons, Montserrat

    2010-03-01

    To estimate frequency and severity and to identify risk factors of urinary incontinence (UI) and anal incontinence during pregnancy and after delivery in previously continent nulliparous women. We designed a cohort study of healthy, continent, nulliparous pregnant women attending public health care services. The field work was conducted during the control visits of the three trimesters of pregnancy, at the time of delivery, and postpartum. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess UI (validated and adapted) and anal incontinence. Frequency of UI and anal incontinence and their confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. The correlations between the severity of UI and the degree of effect on daily life were also estimated. Multivariable Cox models were applied to estimate hazard ratios for both incontinences (urinary/anal) during pregnancy and postpartum. The cumulative incidence rate during pregnancy was 39.1% (95% CI 36.3-41.9) for UI and 10.3% (95% CI 8.3-12.3) for anal incontinence. The correlation between severity of UI and effect on daily life was moderate. Age, baseline body mass index, and family history of UI were significantly associated with the occurrence of UI during pregnancy, while age and excess weight gain during pregnancy were associated with the occurrence of anal incontinence during pregnancy. Postpartum, the identified risk factors for both incontinences were incontinence during pregnancy and vaginal delivery. The occurrence of UI and anal incontinence during the postpartum period is related to the presence of incontinence in pregnancy, and vaginal delivery increases the risk of persistent incontinence. Some risk factors for both incontinences during pregnancy and postpartum are related to lifestyles and obstetric practices.

  14. Effects of stigma on Chinese women's attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuili; Li, Jingjing; Wan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Kane, Robert L; Wang, Kefang

    2015-04-01

    To examine whether and how stigma influences attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence, and whether its effect varies by symptom severity. Urinary incontinence is prevalent among women, but few seek treatment. Negative attitudes towards urinary incontinence treatment inhibit from seeking care. Urinary incontinence is a stigmatised attribute. However, the relationship between stigma and attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence has not been well understood. This was a cross-sectional community-based study. We enrolled a sample of 305 women aged 40-65 years with stress urinary incontinence from three communities in a Chinese city between May-October in 2011. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, urinary incontinence symptoms, stigma and attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence using a self-reported questionnaire. Effects of stigma were analysed using path analysis. Attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence were generally negative. For the total sample, all the stigma domains of social rejection, social isolation and internalised shame had direct negative effects on treatment-seeking attitudes. The public stigma domain of social rejection also indirectly affected treatment-seeking attitudes through increasing social isolation, as well as through increasing social isolation and then internalised shame. The final model accounted for 28% of the variance of treatment-seeking attitudes. Symptom severity influenced the strength of paths: the effect of internalised shame was higher in women with more severe urinary incontinence. Stigma enhances the formation of negative attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence; public stigma affects treatment-seeking attitudes through internalisation of social messages. Stigma reduction may help incontinent women to form positive treatment-seeking attitudes and engage them in treatment. Interventions should specifically target

  15. Prevention of urinary and anal incontinence: role of elective cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Mira

    2003-10-01

    Currently, prophylactic elective cesarean to prevent incontinence is being promoted without robust evidence supporting it, this has created confusion among health personnel [corrected]. Past research centered on defining the damaging effect of vaginal birth on continence whilst the limited research on elective cesarean considered it protective. Cesarean delivery has economic, obstetric, gynecological and psychosocial consequences, but incontinence is not uncommon with a persistent morbidity. There is confusion among health personnel about advocating elective cesarean delivery to prevent incontinence. Reviewing current research would facilitate obstetric thinking. Multiplanar endosonography and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging scanning are reportedly better in delineating structural alterations in the continence mechanism following vaginal birth and could be applied to postcesarean incontinence. Incontinence can follow vaginal or elective cesarean delivery and the severity following either mode is comparable. Urinary incontinence can resolve, persist or start de novo and the primiparous prevalence is similar following cesarean or vaginal birth. Transient anal incontinence can manifest during pregnancy. Paradoxically, pelvic floor strengthening exercises are beneficial for pregnancy-related incontinence, yet urinary incontinence occurs in nulliparas notwithstanding a strong pelvic floor. Improved imaging techniques should promote a better understanding of postcesarean incontinence. Since severe incontinence can occur after elective cesarean, its reportedly preventative role deserves more scrutiny. When incontinence occurs without labor, it is transient or shows exercise-related improvement; the role of elective cesarean delivery seems tenuous and needs careful evaluation. Current evidence does not support the routine use of elective cesarean to prevent incontinence so the delivery mode should continue to be dictated by obstetric considerations.

  16. Risk of urinary incontinence following prostatectomy: the role of physical activity and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Kathleen Y; Luly, Jason; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Andriole, Gerald L; Kibel, Adam S

    2010-02-01

    Urinary incontinence is one of the most commonly reported and distressing side effects of radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma. Several studies have suggested that symptoms may be worse in obese men but to our knowledge no research has addressed the joint effects of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. We evaluated the association of obesity and lack of physical activity with urinary incontinence in a sample of men who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Height and weight were abstracted from charts, and obesity was defined as body mass index 30 kg/m(2) or greater. Men completed a questionnaire before surgery that included self-report of vigorous physical activity. Men who reported 1 hour or more per week of vigorous activities were considered physically active. Men reported their incontinence to the surgeon at their urology visits. Information on incontinence was abstracted from charts at 6 and 58 weeks after surgery. At 6 weeks after surgery 59% (405) of men were incontinent, defined as any pad use. At 58 weeks after surgery 22% (165) of men were incontinent. At 58 weeks incontinence was more prevalent in men who were obese and physically inactive (59% incontinent). Physical activity may offset some of the negative consequences of being obese because the prevalence of incontinence at 58 weeks was similar in the obese and active (25% incontinent), and nonbese and inactive (24% incontinent) men. The best outcomes were in men who were nonobese and physically active (16% incontinent). Men who were not obese and were active were 26% less likely to be incontinent than men who were obese and inactive (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.52-1.06). Pre-prostatectomy physical activity and obesity may be important factors in post-prostatectomy continence levels. Interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and decreasing weight in patients with prostate cancer may improve quality of life by offsetting the negative side effects of treatment. Copyright 2010 American Urological

  17. Novel role for the transient potential receptor melastatin 4 channel in guinea pig detrusor smooth muscle physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy C.; Hristov, Kiril L.; Cheng, Qiuping; Xin, Wenkuan; Parajuli, Shankar P.; Earley, Scott; Malysz, John

    2013-01-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily, including the Ca2+-activated monovalent cation-selective TRP melastatin 4 (TRPM4) channel, have been recently identified in the urinary bladder. However, their expression and function at the level of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) remain largely unexplored. In this study, for the first time we investigated the role of TRPM4 channels in guinea pig DSM excitation-contraction coupling using a multidisciplinary approach encompassing protein detection, electrophysiology, live-cell Ca2+ imaging, DSM contractility, and 9-phenanthrol, a recently characterized selective inhibitor of the TRPM4 channel. Western blot and immunocytochemistry experiments demonstrated the expression of the TRPM4 channel in whole DSM tissue and freshly isolated DSM cells with specific localization on the plasma membrane. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp recordings and real-time Ca2+ imaging experiments with fura 2-AM, both using freshly isolated DSM cells, revealed that 9-phenanthrol (30 μM) significantly reduced the cation current and decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels. 9-Phenanthrol (0.1–30 μM) significantly inhibited spontaneous, 0.1 μM carbachol-induced, 20 mM KCl-induced, and nerve-evoked contractions in guinea pig DSM-isolated strips with IC50 values of 1–7 μM and 70–80% maximum inhibition. 9-Phenanthrol also reduced nerve-evoked contraction amplitude induced by continuous repetitive electrical field stimulation of 10-Hz frequency and shifted the frequency-response curve (0.5–50 Hz) relative to the control. Collectively, our data demonstrate the novel finding that TRPM4 channels are expressed in guinea pig DSM and reveal their critical role in the regulation of guinea pig DSM excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:23302778

  18. Do β3-adrenergic receptors play a role in guinea pig detrusor smooth muscle excitability and contractility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afeli, Serge A. Y.; Hristov, Kiril L.

    2012-01-01

    In many species, β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs) have been reported to play a primary role in pharmacologically induced detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) relaxation. However, their role in guinea pig DSM remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether β3-ARs are expressed in guinea pig DSM and to evaluate how BRL37344 and L-755,507, two selective β3-AR agonists, modulate guinea pig DSM excitability and contractility. We used a combined experimental approach including RT-PCR, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and isometric DSM tension recordings. β3-AR mRNA message was detected in freshly isolated guinea pig DSM single cells. BRL37344 but not L-755,507 caused a slight decrease in DSM spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and frequency in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of atropine (1 μM), only the spontaneous phasic contractions frequency was inhibited by BRL37344 at higher concentrations. Both BRL37344 and L-755,507 significantly decreased DSM carbachol-induced phasic and tonic contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. However, only BRL37344 inhibitory effect was partially antagonized by SR59230A (10 μM), a β3-AR antagonist. In the presence of atropine, BRL37344 and L-755,507 had no inhibitory effect on electrical field stimulation-induced contractions. Patch-clamp experiments showed that BRL37344 (100 μM) did not affect the DSM cell resting membrane potential and K+ conductance. Although β3-ARs are expressed at the mRNA level, they play a minor to no role in guinea pig DSM spontaneous contractility without affecting cell excitability. However, BRL37344 and L-755,507 have pronounced inhibitory effects on guinea pig DSM carbachol-induced contractions. The study outlines important DSM β3-ARs species differences. PMID:21993887

  19. Effects of electroacupuncture at BL33 on detrusor smooth muscle activity in a rat model of urinary retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Kun; Zhi, Mujun; Mo, Qian; Gao, Xinyan; Liu, Zhishun

    2017-12-01

    Detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) underactivity may lead to urinary retention (UR). Electroacupuncture (EA) at BL33 may be effective in improving DSM contractions. This study aimed to investigate: (1) the effect of EA at BL33; and (2) the effect of different manipulation methods at BL33 on the modulation of DSM contractions in UR rats. 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetised with urethane and modelled by urethral outlet obstruction. First, 2 Hz EA at BL33, SP6 and LI4 wasrandomly applied to the UR rats for 5 min to observe the immediate effects (n=10); second, manual acupuncture (MA) (n=10) and 100 Hz EA (n=10) were applied with the same programme. DSM electromyography (EMG) and cystometrogram data were evaluated. (1) 2 Hz EA at BL33 and SP6 significantly increased DSM discharging frequency (0.80±0.10 Hz, P0.05). Compared with SP6, EA at BL33 had greater positive effects on DSM discharging frequency, duration of discharging, and duration of voiding (all P<0.05). (2) No statistically significant differences were shown between MA, 2 Hz EA and 100 Hz EA interventions when stimulating at BL33, SP6 or LI4. EA at BL33 improved DSM contractions to a greater degree than EA at SP6 or LI4. There were no differences in effect when stimulating using 2 Hz EA, 100 Hz EA and MA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. The predictive value of demonstrable stress incontinence during basic office evaluation and urodynamics in women without symptomatic urinary incontinence undergoing vaginal prolapse surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, J. Marinus; Zwolsman, Sandra E.; Posthuma, Selina; Wiarda, Hylco S.; van der Vaart, C. Huub; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2017-01-01

    Women with pelvic organ prolapse without symptoms of urinary incontinence (UI) might demonstrate stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with or without prolapse reduction. We aimed to determine the value of demonstrable SUI during basic office evaluation or urodynamics in predicting SUI after vaginal

  1. Evaluation of a simple, non-surgical concept for management of urinary incontinence (minimal care) in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, P; Mouritsen, L; Andersen, J T

    2000-01-01

    influence on lower urinary tract function. More than half of the patients had urge or mixed incontinence. Most of the patients were managed with conservative treatment. Fifteen percent were referred to in-hospital treatment, with 5% to incontinence surgery. In total 44% felt cured or very much improved......Our objective was to evaluate a new concept for assessment and treatment of urinary incontinence in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic. A standardized program for investigation and treatment of incontinence was based on minimal relevant investigations, primarily non......-surgical treatment with a limited consumption of resources ("minimal care"). This was a prospective observational study of 408 consecutive women examined and treated in the clinic. The main characteristics of the women were a high median age and a high prevalence of severe concomitant diseases with possible...

  2. Functional and Molecular Evidence for Kv7 Channel Subtypes in Human Detrusor from Patients with and without Bladder Outflow Obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalø, Julie; Sheykhzade, Majid; Nordling, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether Kv7 channels and their ancillary β-subunits, KCNE, are functionally expressed in the human urinary bladder. Kv7 channels were examined at the molecular level and by functional studies using RT-qPCR and myography, respectively. We found mRNA expressi...... between Kv7 channels and β-adrenoceptors in the human urinary bladder. The performed gene expression analysis combined with the organ bath studies imply that compounds that activate Kv7 channels could be useful for treatment of overactive bladder syndrome.......The aim of the study was to investigate whether Kv7 channels and their ancillary β-subunits, KCNE, are functionally expressed in the human urinary bladder. Kv7 channels were examined at the molecular level and by functional studies using RT-qPCR and myography, respectively. We found mRNA expression...... (activator of Kv7.1 channels, 10 μM) and ML213 (activator of Kv7.2, Kv7.4, Kv7.4/7.5 and Kv7.5 channels, 10 μM), reduced the tone of 1 μM carbachol pre-constricted bladder strips. XE991 (blocker of Kv7.1-7.5 channels, 10 μM) had opposing effects as it increased contractions achieved with 20 mM KPSS...

  3. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Melissa St; Shridharani, Anand; Barboi, Alexandru C; Guralnick, Michael L; Jaradeh, Safwan S; Prieto, Thomas E; O'Connor, R Corey

    2015-12-01

    With the goal of better defining the types of bladder dysfunction observed in this population, we present the chief urologic complaints, results of urodynamic studies, and treatments of patients with dysautonomia-related urinary symptoms. All patients with dysautonomia referred to our neurourology clinic between 2005 and 2015 for management of lower urinary tract dysfunction were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient's chief urologic complaint was recorded and used to initially characterize the bladder storage or voiding symptoms. Patient evaluation included history and physical examination, urinalysis, post void bladder ultrasound, and urodynamic studies. Successful treatment modalities that subjectively or objectively improved symptoms were recorded. Of 815 patients with the diagnosis of dysautonomia, 82 (10 %) were referred for evaluation of lower urinary tract dysfunction. Mean age was 47 years (range 12-83) and 84 % were female. The chief complaint was urinary urgency ± incontinence in 61 % and hesitancy in 23 % of patients. Urodynamic findings demonstrated detrusor overactivity ± incontinence in 50 % of patients, although chief complaint did not reliably predict objective findings. Successful objective and subjective treatments were multimodal and typically non-operative. Lower urinary tract dysfunction may develop in at least 10 % of patients with dysautonomia, predominantly females. Bladder storage or voiding complaints do not reliably predict urodynamic findings. Urodynamically, most patients exhibited detrusor overactivity. The majority of patients were successfully managed with medical or physical therapy.

  4. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on symptoms and uroflowmetry parameters in female patients with overactive bladder

    OpenAIRE

    KULAKSIZOĞLU, HALUK; AKAND, MURAT; ÇAKMAKÇI, EVRİM; GÜL, MURAT; SEÇKİN, BEDREDDİN

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: To evaluate the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) as well as uroflowmetry parameters and functional bladder capacity. Materials and methods: Fifty-nine female patients with OAB symptoms were included. Patients were assessed by SEAPI-QMM, uroflowmetry, and abdominal ultrasound. A specially designed PFMT program using a Pilates ball was generated for patients. The training period was 1-h sessions twice a week for 6 weeks and ...

  5. The association of pelvic organ prolapse severity and improvement in overactive bladder symptoms after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Gee Hoon; Na, Eun Duc; Jang, Ji Hyon; Kim, Hyeon Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair on overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women with POP and the effect of baseline POP severity on improvement in OAB after surgical repair of POP. And we also tried to identify any preoperative factors for persistent postoperative OAB symptoms. Methods A total of 87 patients with coexisting POP and OAB who underwent surgical correction of POP were included and retrospectively analyzed and post...

  6. Mitigating effects of the home environment on inattention and overactivity in children adopted from Romanian orphanages: a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Audet, Karyn Nicole

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the potential mitigating effects of the adoptive home environment on inattention and overactivity (I/O) in children adopted from Romanian orphanages. Three groups were studied: (1) Children who experienced at least 8 months of deprivation in an orphanage prior to being adopted to British Columbia (RO group), (2) Children adopted to British Columbia from Romanian orphanages prior to 4-months-of-age (EA group), and (3) Canadian born non-adopted children (CB grou...

  7. Effect of a vaginal device on quality of life with urinary stress incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, P; Thyssen, H; Lose, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a vaginal device (Continence Guard) on urine leakage and quality of life. METHODS: Fifty-five women with stress incontinence participated in a 3-month study. They were assessed by the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, two incontinence-related quality-of-life qu......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a vaginal device (Continence Guard) on urine leakage and quality of life. METHODS: Fifty-five women with stress incontinence participated in a 3-month study. They were assessed by the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, two incontinence-related quality......-to-treat basis, the vaginal device was associated with subjective cure in 11 women (20%) and improvement in 27 (49%). The mean 24-hour pad test leakage and leakage episodes in the voiding diary decreased significantly. Fifty-eight percent of the 55 women enrolled wanted to continue using the device after 3...

  8. The impact of urinary incontinence on self-efficacy and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broome Barbara

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Urinary incontinence impacts 15 to 35% of the adult ambulatory population. Men after the removal of the prostate for cancer can experience incontinence for several weeks to years after the surgery. Women experience incontinence related to many factors including childbirth, menopause and surgery. It is important that incontinence be treated since it impacts not only the physiological, but also the psychological realms of a person's life. Depression and decreed quality of life have been found to co-occur in the person struggling with incontinence. Interventions include pharmacological, surgical as well as behavioral interventions. Effective treatment of incontinence should include the use of clinical guidelines and research to promote treatment efficacy.

  9. [Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in female workers of hotels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, L; Falconi, G; Di Martino, T; Iavicoli, I

    2007-01-01

    The International Continence Society defines urinary incontinence (UI) as "a condition in which involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable". There are three different jorms of UI. stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed incontinence. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of UI in a group of female workers in the hotel sector. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI Short Form) was administered to all female workers and data were collected about age, body mass index, number of vaginal and Caesarean delivery. Results showed a prevalence of UI widely bigger in the plans waitress than in video display terminal workers and suggest the hypothesis that manual handling of loads representing a possible occupational risk for UI.

  10. The management of stress urinary incontinence: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preshani Reddy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conservative management is the first option for patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI. However, successful management of women diagnosed with SUI is dependent on a proper assessment and a tailored treatment plan. This case report aims to show the effectiveness of physiotherapy management in a 42-year-old patient diagnosed with SUI. Patient presentation: The patient’s main complaints were involuntary loss of urine on coughing, sneezing and lifting of heavy objects, which started following the birth of her third child. Management and outcome: The patient was taught the ‘Knack’ manoeuvre and provided with a tailored pelvic floor exercise programme. Improvement was noted at the third visit and the patient no longer had involuntary episodes. Conclusion: This case report shows the successful outcome of conservative management in a patient with stress urinary incontinence.

  11. Management of occult stress urinary incontinence with prolapse surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mandeel, H; Al-Badr, A

    2013-08-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI), are two common health-related conditions, each affecting up to 50% women worldwide. Stress urinary incontinence only observed after the reduction of co-existent prolapse is called occult SUI (OSUI), and is found in up to 80% of women with advanced POP. Although there is no consensus on how to diagnose OSUI, there are several reported methods to better diagnose. Counseling symptomatically continent women with POP concerning the potential risk for developing SUI postoperatively cannot be overstated. Evidence suggests that positive OSUI in symptomatically continent women who are planning to have POP repair is associated with a high risk of POSUI, furthermore, adding continence procedure is found to reduce postoperative SUI. Therefore, adding continence surgery at the time of POP surgery in patients who are found to have OSUI preoperatively is advocated.

  12. Radiation therapy in carcinoma of the prostate: a contributing cause of urinary incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, J.J.; Smith, R.B.; Raz, S.

    1984-01-01

    The authors believe that radiation therapy as a postoperative adjuvant or preceding salvage prostatectomy for carcinoma is particularly conducive to the complication of urinary incontinence by virtue of its sclerosing effect on residual sphincter mechanisms. Obviously, such dual therapy will continue to prevail in the foreseeable future but patients should be notified of the added risk and be prepared for further treatment of the incontinence. Unfortunately, these patients have an extra risk of complications and failure from anti-incontinence operations

  13. Urinary leakage during sexual intercourse among women with incontinence: Incidence and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Hui-Hsuan; Huang, Wen-Chu; Su, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-01-01

    Background Coital incontinence is an under-reported disorder among women with urinary incontinence. Women seldom voluntarily report this condition, and as such, related data remains limited and is at times conflicting. Aims and objectives To investigate the incidence and quality of life in women with coital incontinence and to determine associated predictors. Methods This observational study involved 505 sexually active women attending the urogynecologic clinic for symptomatic urinary inconti...

  14. Specific obstetrical risk factors for urinary versus anal incontinence 4years after first delivery.

    OpenAIRE

    Fritel , Xavier; Khoshnood , Babak; Fauconnier , Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    International audience; AIM: Delivery can be complicated by urinary or anal incontinence (UI or AI). We hypothesized that the mechanisms of injury may differ for UI and AI. Hence, obstetrical risk factors may be specific for different types of incontinence. DESIGN: Data on maternal characteristics were collected at first delivery. Data on incontinence were obtained by a questionnaire completed by 627 women 4years after first delivery. UI was defined by "Do you have involuntary loss of urine" ...

  15. Urinary and fecal incontinence in a community-residing older population in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, N; Tatara, K; Naramura, H; Fujiwara, H; Takashima, Y; Fukuda, H

    1997-02-01

    To estimate the prevalence and risk factors of urinary and fecal incontinence among a community-residing older population in Japan. Population-based cross-sectional study. A randomly selected sample of 1473 people aged 65 years and older living in the City of Settsu, Osaka, in 1992. Data collected via in-home visits were used to estimate the prevalence of urinary and fecal incontinence and to provide information regarding potential risk factors of urinary and fecal incontinence. Data were obtained from 1405 older adults, a response rate of 95.4%. The prevalence of any degree of urinary incontinence was 98/1000 in both sexes, and 87/ 1000 men and 66/1000 women admitted to some degree of fecal incontinence. Daily, 34/1000 and 20/1000 of the population were incontinent of urine and feces, respectively. There was an increasing prevalence of urinary and fecal incontinence with age in both sexes, but the expected greater prevalence in women was not found. By univariate analyses, age older than 75 years, poor general health as measured by Activities of Daily Living, stroke, dementia, no participation in social activities, and lack of life worth living (Ikigai) were associated significantly with both urinary and fecal incontinence. In the multivariate analyses using logistic regression, age older than 75 years, poor general health, and stroke were independent risk factors for any type of incontinence. Diabetes was an independent risk factor for isolated fecal incontinence, and dementia and no participation in social activities were independent risk factors for double incontinence. Incontinence of urine and feces is a prevalent condition among very old people living in the community in Japan and is associated highly with health and psychosocial conditions.

  16. Analysis of computed X-ray tomography of the brain in incontinence patients with senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Machida, Toyohei; Oishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kamachi, Chikahumi; Okabe, Tsutomu; Akazawa, Kouhei; Takasaka, Satoshi

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the condition of incontinence in patients with senile dementia, we performed computed tomography X-rays to the brain and analyzed the relationship among the circulatory defect of the brain, the brain atrophy and the degree of incontinence. There were 92 patients subjected to this study who were hospitalised due to senile dementia; 74 patients had vascular dementia, 10 patients had senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and 8 patients had the mixed type. (age range: 54-95 years; mean: 80.3 years). The degree of incontinence in these patients varied as follows: 18 patients with continence, 16 patients with moderate incontinence, 58 patients with total incontinence. The diagnosis of circulatory defect of the brain was based on computed tomography observation of periventricular lucency (P.V.L.), and the degree of brain atrophy was evaluated based on 4 criteria: the Lateral body ratio, the Huckman number, the Evans ratio, and the enlargement of the subarachnoid space. Among the 92 patients, P.V.L. was present in 31 patients, among them 27 patients suffered from incontinence. There was a significant correlation between P.V.L. and incontinence (p<0.001). As the incontinence progressively worsened (Continence, Moderate incontinence, Total incontinence), the lateral body ratio increased to 24.8, 27.8, 28.6, (p<0.05). The Huckman number also increased to 18.3, 19.3, 21.3, (p<0.01), and the evans ratio likewise 29.9, 32.3, 33.7 (p<0.01). The enlargement of the subarachnoid space was also correlated with the severity of incontinence. We conclude that urinary incontinence originating from senile dememtia is connected to brain atrophy and is strongly influenced by the circulatory disorders of the brain. (author).

  17. Dutch guidelines for physiotherapy in patients with stress urinary incontinence: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Bernards, Arnold T. M.; Berghmans, Bary C. M.; Slieker-ten Hove, Marijke C. Ph.; Staal, J. Bart; de Bie, Rob A.; Hendriks, Erik J. M.

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction and hypothesis: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most common form of incontinence impacting on quality of life (QOL) and is associated with high financial, social, and emotional costs. The purpose of this study was to provide an update existing Dutch evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for physiotherapy management of patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in order to support physiotherapists in decision making and improving efficacy and...

  18. Why Irish women delay seeking treatment for urinary incontinence : a focus group study

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Aileasa, Mairead

    2011-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Background: Urinary Incontinence is defined as "any involuntary leakage of urine" (Abrams et al, 2002). Living with incontinence can effect one's life greatly. Many women delay seeking treatment and often do not seek any help (Dolan et al, 1999), despite physiotherapy being an effective treatment (Neumann et al, 2005). Therefore, there is a need to discover why women delay seeking help, such as physiotherapy and continue to live with incontinence. Objectives: To establ...

  19. EFFICACY OF PELVIC FLOOR THERAPY IN TREATING URINARY INCONTINENCE AMONG FEMALE COPD PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohankumar Thekkinkattil; T. S. Muthukumar; R. Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The major manifestation of COPD includes dyspnea, decreased oxygenation and reduced exercise tolerance. The other manifestations such as urinary incontinence are less noted and treated inadequately. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in Indian COPD population has not been well documented. The treatment of urinary incontinence includes pelvic floor exercises (Kegel’s exercises)...

  20. Effects of physiotherapy treatment for urinary incontinence in patient with multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Carla Maria de Abreu; Castiglione, Mariane; Kasawara, Karina Tamy

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of physical therapy for urinary incontinence in patients with multiple sclerosis and to verify the impact of urinary incontinence on the patient?s quality of life. [Subject and Methods] A case study of a 55-year-old female patient diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and mixed urinary incontinence was conducted. Physical therapy sessions were conducted once a week, in total 15 sessions, making use of targeted functional electrical vagin...

  1. Association between urinary incontinence in women and a previous history of surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommsen, S.; Foldspang, Anders; Elving, L.

    1993-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, 85% of 3114 women responded to a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and a history of abdominal, gynaecological and urological surgery. In 1987 the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 17%; 63% had undergone surgery, mainly gynaecological, and almost one......-third of the respondents had had more than one operation. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed stress urinary incontinence to be associated with previous exposure to surgery....

  2. Identifying the quality of life effects of urinary incontinence with depression in an Australian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery Jodie C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the additive effect of urinary incontinence, in people with comorbid depression, on health related quality of life. Methods Males and females, 15 to 95 years (n = 3010, response rate 70.2% were interviewed face to face in the 1998 Autumn South Australian Health Omnibus Survey. Results Self-reported urinary incontinence was found in 20.3% (n=610, and depression as defined by the PRIME-MD in 15.2% (n=459 of the survey population. Urinary incontinence with comorbid depression was found in 4.3% of the overall population. Univariate analysis showed that respondents with urinary incontinence and comorbid depression were more likely to be aged between 15 and 34 years and never married when compared to those with incontinence only. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that in people with incontinence, the risk of having comorbid depression was increased by an overall health status of Fair or Poor, or the perception that their incontinence was moderately or very serious. Respondents reporting that they experienced incontinence with comorbid depression scored significantly lower than those experiencing incontinence without depression on all dimensions of the SF-36. The interaction of the presence of incontinence and the presence of depression was significantly associated with the dimensions of physical functioning. Conclusions Depression and incontinence both reduce QOL. When they occur together there appears to be an additive effect which affects both physical and mental health, perhaps by increasing a person’s negative perceptions of their illness. Clinicians should identify and manage comorbid depression when treating patients who have incontinence to improve their overall QOL.

  3. Treatment of urinary incontinence in women in general practice: observational study.

    OpenAIRE

    Seim, A.; Sivertsen, B.; Eriksen, B. C.; Hunskaar, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine what is attainable when treating urinary incontinence in women in general practice. DESIGN--Observational study with 12 months' follow up. Interview and clinical examination before, during, and after treatment of women seeking help for urinary incontinence in general practice. SETTING--General practice in the rural district of Rissa, Norway. SUBJECTS--105 women aged 20 or more with urinary incontinence. INTERVENTIONS--Treatment with pelvic floor exercises, electrostimula...

  4. Biceps brachii long head overactivity associated with elbow flexion contracture in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A

    2012-02-15

    The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow

  5. The impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Miller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the impact of incontinence etiology on artificial urinary sphincter (AUS device outcomes. Materials and Methods: We identified 925 patients who underwent primary AUS placement from 1983 to 2011. The etiology of incontinence was categorized as radical prostatectomy alone, radical prostatectomy with radiation, benign prostate resection, and those with cryotherapy as a salvage prostate cancer treatment. Hazard regression and competing risk analyses were used to determine the association of the etiology of incontinence with device outcomes. Results: The distribution of the 4 etiologies of incontinence included: 598 patients (64.6% treated with prostatectomy alone, 206 (22.2% with prostatectomy and pelvic radiation therapy, 104 (11.2% with benign prostate resection, and 17 (1.8% with prior cryotherapy. With a median follow-up of 4.9 years (interquartile range, 1.2–8.8 years, there was significant difference in the cumulative incidence of device infection/urethral erosion events between the four etiologies (p=0.003. On multivariable analysis, prior cryotherapy (reference prostatectomy alone; hazard ratio [HR], 3.44; p=0.01, older age (HR, 1.07; p=0.0009 and history of a transient ischemic attack (HR, 2.57; p=0.04 were associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion. Notably, pelvic radiation therapy with prostatectomy was not associated with an increased risk of device infection or erosion (reference prostatectomy alone, p=0.30. Conclusions: Compared to prostatectomy alone, prior treatment with salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer was associated with an increased risk of AUS infection/erosion, whereas radiation (in addition to prostatectomy was not.

  6. Dietary Macronutrient and Energy Intake and Urinary Incontinence in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Maserejian, Nancy N.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; McVary, Kevin T.; McGrother, Catherine; McKinlay, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Weight loss involving diet modification improves urinary incontinence (UI) in women, but little is known about dietary correlates of UI. The authors examined intakes of total energy, carbohydrate, protein, and fats in relation to UI in a cross-sectional sample of 2,060 women in the population-based Boston Area Community Health Survey (2002–2005). Data were collected from in-person home interviews and food frequency questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% ...

  7. Physiotherapy for Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaderi, Fariba; Oskouei, Ali E.

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This review article is designed to expose physiotherapists to a physiotherapy assessment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and the treatment and possibly preventive roles that they might play for women with SUI. Specifically, the goal of this article is to provide an understanding of pelvic floor muscle function and the implications that this function has for physiotherapy treatment by reviewing articles published in this area. [Methods] A range of databases was searched to ident...

  8. Prevalence and factors associated with urinary incontinence in climacteric

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    Máyra Cecilia Dellú

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To estimate the prevalence and identify associated factors to urinary incontinence (UI in climacteric women. Method: In a cross-sectional study with a stratified random sample, 1,200 women aged between 35 and 72 years were studied, enrolled in the Family Health Strategy in the city of Pindamonhangaba, São Paulo. Urinary incontinence was investigated using the International Consultation of Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form, while associated factors were assessed based on a self-reported questionnaire with socio-demographic, obstetric and gynecological history, morbidities and drug use. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was estimated with a 95% confidence interval (95CI and the associated factors were identified through multiple logistic regression model performed using Stata software, version 11.0. Results: Women had a mean age of 51.9 years, most were in menopause (59.4%, married (87.5%, Catholic (48.9%, and declared themselves black or brown (47.2%. The mean age of menopause of women with UI was 47.3 years. The prevalence of UI was 20.4% (95CI: 17.8-23.1%. The factors associated with UI were urinary loss during pregnancy (p=0.000 and after delivery (p=0.000, genital prolapse (p=0.000, stress (p=0.001, depression (p=0.002, and obesity (p=0.006. Conclusion: The prevalence of UI was lower but similar to that found in most similar studies. Factors associated with the genesis of UI were urinary loss during pregnancy and after delivery, genital prolapse and obesity.

  9. Findings of universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and their sequelae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczynski, Halina M.; Sirls, Larry T.; Greer, W. Jerod; Rahn, David D.; Casiano, Elizabeth; Norton, Peggy; Kim, Hae-Young; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report the frequency of abnormal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and to identify risk factors and sequelae of injury. STUDY DESIGN Findings of cystoscopy were collected prospectively in 3 multicenter surgical trials. Clinical, demographic, and procedure characteristics and surgeon experience were analyzed for association with iatrogenic injury and noninjury abnormalities. Impact of abnormalities on continence outcomes and adverse events during 12 months after the procedure were assessed. RESULTS Abnormal findings in the bladder or urethra were identified in 95 of 1830 women (5.2%). Most injuries (75.8%) were iatrogenic. Lower urinary tract (LUT) injury was most common at retropubic urethropexy and retropubic midurethral sling procedures (MUS; 6.4% each), followed by autologous pubovaginal sling procedures (1.7%) and transobturator MUS (0.4%). Increasing age (56.9 vs 51.9 years; P = .04), vaginal deliveries (3.2 vs 2.6; P = .04), and blood loss (393 vs 218 mL; P=.01) were associated with LUT injury during retropubic urethropexy; however, only age (62.9 vs 51.4 years; P = .02) and smoking history (P = .04) were associated for pubovaginal sling procedures. No factors correlated with increased risk of injury at retropubic and transobturator MUS. Notably, previous incontinence surgery, concomitant procedures, anesthesia type, and trainee participation did not increase LUT injury frequency. Although discharge with an indwelling catheter was more common after trocar perforation compared with the noninjury group (55.6% vs 18.5%; P urinary tract infections, or urge urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery detects abnormalities in 1 in 20 women. Urinary trocar perforations that are addressed intraoperatively have no long-term adverse sequelae. PMID:24380742

  10. Surgery for stress urinary incontinence in women: A 2006 review

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    Bertil FM Blok

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence is a rapidly changing field. This review discusses recent advances in various injectables, minimally invasive techniques and open procedures. It particularly evaluates data from long-term outcome studies and describes peri- and postoperative complications from several procedures, such as bulking agents, tension-free vaginal tape and its modifications (TOT, TVT-O as well as open and laparoscopic colposuspension.

  11. Neuromodulation for fecal incontinence: An effective surgical intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Palsson, Olafur S; Asteria, Corrado R; Whitehead, William E

    2013-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a disabling symptom with medical and social implications, including fear, embarrassment, isolation and even depression. Most patients live in seclusion and have to plan their life around the symptom, with secondary impairment of their quality of life. Conservative management and biofeedback therapy are reported to benefit a good percentage of those affected. However, surgery must be considered in the non-responder population. Recently, sacral nerve electrostimulation, la...

  12. Women with urinary incontinence: self-perceived worries and general practitioners' knowledge of problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagro-Janssen, T L; Smits, A J; Van Weel, C

    1990-01-01

    In the context of a large scale survey of health problems in women aged 50 to 65 years, a study was undertaken on the effects of incontinence on daily life. For this purpose 1442 women randomly selected from the practice files of 75 general practitioners in the eastern part of the Netherlands were interviewed at home (response rate 60%). In cases of moderate or severe incontinence the general practitioner of the woman concerned was asked whether this problem had been diagnosed in general practice. Incontinence was reported in 22.5% of the women. Overall, 77.8% of the women did not feel worried about it and 75.4% did not feel restricted in their activities; even for women with severe incontinence (daily frequency and needing protective pads) only 15.6% experienced much worry and 15.7% much restriction. About a third of the women with incontinence (32.0%) had been identified by their general practitioner. The greater the worries and restrictions owing to incontinence, the greater the chance that the incontinence was known to the general practitioner concerned. Only a small minority of the women who felt severely restricted were not identified by their general practitioner. There was a positive relation b