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Sample records for detrusor overactivity incontinence

  1. Mixed incontinence: does preoperative urodynamic detrusor overactivity affect postoperative quality of life after pubovaginal sling?

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffel, John T.; John J. Smith; Simone Crivellaro; Bresette,John F.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine if women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) and urodynamic detrusor overactivity (DO) have less improvement in urinary symptoms after pubovaginal sling surgery (PVS), compared to MUI without DO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Women with preoperative MUI symptoms prior to PVS were identified through retrospective review. DO was defined as a symptomatic 5 cm H20 detrusor pressure or greater rise during urodynamics. MUI patients with and without DO before PVS w...

  2. AB206. Combined detrusor-trigone BTX-A injections for urinary incontinence secondary to neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Xie, Keji; Jiang, Chonghe; Tang, Ping; Ou, Rubiao; Zeng, Jianweng; Deng, Xiangrong; Zhou, Liling; Huang, Maping; Li, Qingqing; Liu, Qiuling; Huang, Jiebing; Huang, Tanghai

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect and safety of trigonal injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for patients with neurological detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence. Methods A prospective, multicenter, single-blind and randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted between June 2011 and June 2014. Spinal cord injury patients with urinary incontinence secondary to NDO were recruited. At a 1:1 ratio, patients randomly received 200 U BTX-A intradetrusor injections excluding the trigone (control group) or 160 U intradetrusor and 40 U intratrigonal injections (experimental group). Patients were evaluated at baseline, and 4, 12 weeks after injection. The efficacy and safety outcomes included I-QoL, voiding volume, urinary incontinence episodes, complete dryness, maximum detrusor pressure (Pdetmax), volume at first involuntary detrusor contraction (VFIDC). Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and other adverse events were recorded. Results Ninety-six patients were recruited and 91 of them completed the trial. Among the 91 patients, 47 were randomized to experimental group and 44 to the control group. There were no significant differences in baseline evaluation items (gender, age, duration of spinal cord injury, level of neurological injury, AIS scores) between the two groups. At 12 weeks, the improvement was significantly better in the experimental group than in the control group for I-QoL (26.01 vs. 18.75, P=0.01), mean urinary incontinence episodes (−5.22/d vs. −4.68/d, P=0.01), complete dryness (13 vs. 5, P=0.03), mean voiding volume (159.72 vs. 139.07 mL, P=0.02), Pdetmax (−33.34 vs. −28.02 cmH2O, P=0.04), and VFIDC (106.81 vs. 97.86 mL, P=0.02), duration of first detrusor contraction (−41.54 vs. −18.65 s, P=0.03) and the number of patients with detrusor contraction (−20 vs. −9, P=0.02). In both of two groups, no patients developed VUR. Conclusions BTX-A intradetrusor and intratrigonal injections are more effective than those excluding the trigone for

  3. Mixed incontinence: does preoperative urodynamic detrusor overactivity affect postoperative quality of life after pubovaginal sling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Stoffel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine if women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI and urodynamic detrusor overactivity (DO have less improvement in urinary symptoms after pubovaginal sling surgery (PVS, compared to MUI without DO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Women with preoperative MUI symptoms prior to PVS were identified through retrospective review. DO was defined as a symptomatic 5 cm H20 detrusor pressure or greater rise during urodynamics. MUI patients with and without DO before PVS were divided into Groups A and B, respectively. All patients had returned a completed Urogenital Distress Inventory 6 (UDI-6 questionnaire and a 3-day diary of pad usage before surgery and at each postoperative visit. Study endpoints included change in total UDI-6 score, and change in number of pad use/day after PVS. RESULTS: 73 patients were identified, 31 in Group A and 42 in Group B. Mean follow-up after PVS was 15 and 16 months, respectively (p = 0.59. Preoperative total UDI-6 scores were 11.8 and 12.7 (p = 0.30 for Group A and B. Mean changes in total UDI-6 after PVS were - 8.0 and - 10.2 (p = 0.030, respectively. After PVS, both groups reported similar mean reduction in pad/day usage from preoperative baseline (-2.57 vs. --2.49, p = 0.83. There were no differences between the groups when comparing demographic, urodynamic, or operative data. CONCLUSION: MUI patients had improved continence and quality of life after PVS. However, MUI patients with DO had less improvement in UDI-6 scores after PVS, despite a similar reduction to pad use/day.

  4. Efficacy and Tolerability of Propiverine Hydrochloride in Patients With Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    Neurogenic Urinary Bladder Disorder; Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic; Bladder Disorder, Neurogenic; Urinary Bladder Disorder, Neurogenic; Neurogenic Bladder Disorder; Urinary Bladder Neurogenic Dysfunction; Urologic Diseases; Overactive Detrusor Function; Urinary Incontinence

  5. Response to fesoterodine in patients with an overactive bladder and urgency urinary incontinence is independent of the urodynamic finding of detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitti, Victor W; Rovner, Eric S; Bavendam, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    To determine whether the presence of detrusor overactivity (DO) in patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a predictor of the response to treatment with fesoterodine. This phase 2 randomized, multicentre, placebo-controlled trial consisted of a 1-week placebo run-in phase followed by an 8-week double-blind period. Eligible for the study were men and women aged 18-78 years with symptoms or signs of OAB with UUI; they were stratified into two balanced strata depending on the outcome of a baseline urodynamic assessment. By using this particular study design it was possible to investigate whether there were differences between the strata. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline to week 8 in mean voids/24 h. Secondary endpoints were the changes in UUI episodes/week, and for those patients with DO at baseline, the mean changes in volume at first involuntary contraction associated with a feeling of urgency, first desire to void, and strong desire to void, and change in maximum cystometric capacity. Because there were few patients the secondary analyses were considered exploratory. Overall, there were linear dose-response relationships for placebo and the fesoterodine groups for the reduction in the number of voids/24 h and UUI episodes/week. Compared with the placebo group, the least squares mean changes from baseline to week 8 in both variables were significantly improved in patients receiving fesoterodine 4 mg (P = 0.045 and 0.040, respectively), 8 mg (P fesoterodine treatment groups and worsened in the placebo group. Regardless of the presence of DO, the response to fesoterodine treatment was dose-proportional and associated with significant improvements in OAB symptoms, indicating that the response to OAB pharmacotherapy in patients with UUI was independent of the urodynamic diagnosis of DO.

  6. Urinary Incontinence due to Overactive Detrusor Muscle: A Rare Side Effect of Venlafaxine

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    Vithyalakshmi Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of reemergence of urinary incontinence (UI in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH after starting treatment with venlafaxine who was stabilized on tamsulosin and finasteride for about 6 years. A 66-year-old Caucasian male with prior history of major depressive disorder developed UI within a week of starting venlafaxine 75 mg per day. He described symptoms in the form of involuntary leakage of urine both during the day and at night. His symptoms of UI resolved after stopping the venlafaxine. To the best of our knowledge, there are only four case reports of venlafaxine induced urinary incontinence which have been published.

  7. Urinary Incontinence due to Overactive Detrusor Muscle: A Rare Side Effect of Venlafaxine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Vithyalakshmi; Gunasekar, Palanikumar; Kumar, Suneel; Alsakaf, Imad

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reemergence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) after starting treatment with venlafaxine who was stabilized on tamsulosin and finasteride for about 6 years. A 66-year-old Caucasian male with prior history of major depressive disorder developed UI within a week of starting venlafaxine 75 mg per day. He described symptoms in the form of involuntary leakage of urine both during the day and at night. His symptoms of UI resolved after stopping the venlafaxine. To the best of our knowledge, there are only four case reports of venlafaxine induced urinary incontinence which have been published. PMID:26491599

  8. Managing incontinence due to detrusor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Urinary incontinence affects around 3.5 million people of all ages in the UK. For many, incontinence severely restricts their routine activities and damages their quality of life and self-esteem. In about one-third of women sufferers, and around a half of all men with incontinence, the cause is detrusor instability. This condition is characterised by involuntary bladder contractions or pressure rises during bladder filling, which result in a strong or uncontrollable urge to pass urine and, often, incontinence. Here, we consider a primary care-based approach to managing urinary incontinence in adults, concentrating on the medical management of detrusor instability.

  9. Chapter 5: Clinical data in neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and overactive bladder (OAB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Francisco; Nitti, Victor

    2014-07-01

    Following use of botulinum toxin in the 1980s for the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), the potential therapeutic value of this neurotoxin in urology has been the subject of much interest. The DIGNITY (Double-blind InvestiGation of purified Neurotoxin complex In neurogenic deTrusor overactivitY) clinical research program aimed to compare onabotulinumtoxinA with placebo in terms of efficacy and safety in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) due to SCI or multiple sclerosis. The EMBARK clinical research program mirrored these aims in patients with overactive bladder with urinary incontinence (UI). Each program comprised two phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled studies. In all four trials, primary efficacy endpoints were met, and significant benefits of onabotulinumtoxinA versus placebo were demonstrated across a range of secondary endpoints, including measures of health-related quality of life. The most common adverse event across both programs was urinary tract infection. Interim analyses of data from ongoing long-term extensions to these phase III trials have provided promising evidence for the efficacy of repeated injections. While further investigation is recommended to enrich the dataset, the available evidence indicates that onabotulinumtoxinA provides an effective treatment option for these two populations, which were previously considered very difficult to treat.

  10. Long-term efficacy and safety of tolterodine in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pramod P; Borgstein, Niels G; Nijman, Rien J M; Ellsworth, Pamela I

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated long-term (> or =12 months) efficacy and safety of tolterodine in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Subjects successfully completed one of three 12-week, open-label studies and had stable neurologic disease and urodynamic evidence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity requiring intermittent catheterization. Drug formulation and dosing were based on age (4 months-4 years, tolterodine oral solution 0.2-2mg twice daily; 5-10 years, tolterodine oral solution 0.5-4 mg twice daily; 11-16 years, tolterodine extended-release capsules 2, 4, or 6 mg once daily). Daily doses were individualized for each subject. Efficacy was evaluated urodynamically and using parent-completed 3-day bladder diaries. Thirty subjects were enrolled. Functional bladder capacity (volume at first leakage, first sensation of bladder fullness or 40 cm H(2)O pressure) increased by month 12 in the younger age groups but not in the oldest subjects. Volume to first detrusor contraction >10 cm H(2)O pressure and detrusor leak point pressure did not change in any age group. The number of incontinence episodes per 24h decreased in all subjects, as did the number of catheterizations per 24h. Mean volume per catheterization increased in all subjects. Seven treatment-related adverse events were reported. Both tolterodine formulations were effective and well tolerated in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

  11. Detrusor overactivity in diabetic and non-diabetic patients: is there a difference?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Golabek, Tomasz

    2013-07-22

    To compare urodynamic characteristics in patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) with those of an age matched cohort with diabetes mellitus (DM) and detrusor overactivity (DO). Secondly, to determine whether urodynamic features could help distinguish these two groups of patients.

  12. Chapter 1: The conditions of neurogenic detrusor overactivity and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haab, Francois

    2014-07-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom syndrome consisting of urinary urgency, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), in the absence of a causative infection or pathological conditions. The prevalence of OAB is approximately 11-19% in both men and women, and leads to a significant negative effect on a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQOL). OAB is also associated with comorbidities such as urinary tract infection (UTI) and an increased risk of falls. Following behavioral therapy, anticholinergic agents are commonly prescribed, but these often fail because of lack of efficacy and/or poor tolerability. Evaluation of treatment success in OAB should include pre-defined, patient-centered goals. Patients for whom oral therapy has failed to meet such goals may be considered refractory to oral therapy and candidates for minimally invasive therapy. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a bladder dysfunction frequently observed in patients with conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Increased storage pressure can put the upper urinary tract at risk of deterioration and reducing this risk is a primary aim of therapy. Urinary incontinence (UI) is reported by approximately 50% of MS patients, and most SCI patients will develop some bladder dysfunction. NDO leads to a negative impact on HRQOL, independent of the impact of the primary condition. NDO patients in whom oral therapy has failed to normalize storage pressure may be considered refractory and are candidates for minimally invasive therapy.

  13. Botulinum toxin A in the treatment of spinal cord injury patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

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    Ronaldo A. Alvares

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injections in the detrusor muscle in patients with spinal cord injury and urinary incontinence due to detrusor overactivity and refractory to anticholinergic agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 22 patients with spinal cord injuries, whose bladders were emptied by intermittent catheterization. All patients had detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence that proved difficult to treat, despite using high doses of two different anticholinergics. The pre-treatment assessment included a complete urodynamic study and ultrasonography of the kidneys and urinary tract. A one-month follow-up was completed with urodynamic evaluation and the clinical response was evaluated through outpatient consultations and telephone contact. RESULTS: After the procedure, the maximum cystometric capacity and the bladder reflex volume increased, whereas the maximum detrusor pressure and compliance decreased. The mean duration of continence was 7 ± 7 months. In 18 patients (81.8%, it was necessary to administer anticholinergics to achieve continence. Five patients (22.7% had indication of reinjection, and augmentation cystoplasty was indicated in 9 patients (40.9%. CONCLUSION: The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity refractory to anticholinergics is an option before more invasive treatments, such as augmentation cystoplasty, are attempted. In our study as well as in the literature, there was improvement in most urodynamic parameters. Overall, 40.9% of patients underwent augmentation cystoplasty and 81.8% of patients needed anticholinergic agents to reach urinary continence. Further studies are necessary to improve the procedure and to achieve better clinical results.

  14. Overactive bladder in women with stress urinary incontinence

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    A. I. Neymark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the role of a functional component in the development of urination disorders in women with stress urination incontinence (SUI concurrent with imperative urge urination incontinence that is a manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB has become particularly relevant in recent years. Urodynamic study reveals the signs of SUI concurrent with detrusor overactivity. The purpose of the investigation was to improve the results of OAB treatment in women with SUI and to study a relationship between the clinical and urodynamic manifestations of the disease. Forty treated women with OAB and SUI were examined. All the patients received combination medical therapy: an Mcholinolytic (solifenacin 10 mg once daily in the morning, picamilonum 5 mg thrice daily, and exercises to strengthen pelvic floor muscles. The treatment lasted 3 months. After the treatment, urinary output and maximal urine flow rate changed, by reaching the normal values in patients with rapid and obstructive urination. Cystometric capacity was increased; involuntary detrusor contractions (spontaneous or provoked became fewer during bladder filling or they were absent at all. Our investigation has determined that the combination medical treatment whose basis is the M-cholinolytic drug solifenacin is effective in treating OAB in women with SUI. Thus, the combination medical treatment considerably reduces the degree of clinical symptoms of OAB in women with SUI and it is the first stage in the treatment of patients with mixed urinary incontinence. According to the results of the performed treatment and examination, the clinical effect was observed in 18 (72 % patients.

  15. Overactive bladder in women with stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neymark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the role of a functional component in the development of urination disorders in women with stress urination incontinence (SUI concurrent with imperative urge urination incontinence that is a manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB has become particularly relevant in recent years. Urodynamic study reveals the signs of SUI concurrent with detrusor overactivity. The purpose of the investigation was to improve the results of OAB treatment in women with SUI and to study a relationship between the clinical and urodynamic manifestations of the disease. Forty treated women with OAB and SUI were examined. All the patients received combination medical therapy: an Mcholinolytic (solifenacin 10 mg once daily in the morning, picamilonum 5 mg thrice daily, and exercises to strengthen pelvic floor muscles. The treatment lasted 3 months. After the treatment, urinary output and maximal urine flow rate changed, by reaching the normal values in patients with rapid and obstructive urination. Cystometric capacity was increased; involuntary detrusor contractions (spontaneous or provoked became fewer during bladder filling or they were absent at all. Our investigation has determined that the combination medical treatment whose basis is the M-cholinolytic drug solifenacin is effective in treating OAB in women with SUI. Thus, the combination medical treatment considerably reduces the degree of clinical symptoms of OAB in women with SUI and it is the first stage in the treatment of patients with mixed urinary incontinence. According to the results of the performed treatment and examination, the clinical effect was observed in 18 (72 % patients.

  16. Decreased intravesical adenosine triphosphate in patients with refractory detrusor overactivity and bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colin A; Cheng, Ying; Mansfield, Kylie J; Parkin, Katrina; Mukerjee, Chinmoy; Moore, Kate H

    2013-04-01

    Although several studies have examined the relationship between adenosine triphosphate release from the urothelium and bladder sensations including painful filling and urgency, the association between bacteriuria and urothelial adenosine triphosphate release has not been well studied. We evaluated women with refractory detrusor overactivity who were experiencing an acute exacerbation of detrusor overactivity symptoms including frequency, urgency and nocturia (and/or urge incontinence). We measured changes in intravesical adenosine triphosphate levels in these women with and without bacteriuria. In this prospective cohort study women with refractory detrusor overactivity were invited to our unit during acute symptomatic exacerbation. On presentation a catheter urine specimen was collected and 50 ml normal saline instilled into the bladder to evoke gentle stretch, with removal after 5 minutes. Adenosine triphosphate concentrations were determined on fresh washings using a bioluminescence assay. The incidence of bacteriuria 10(3) cfu/ml or greater was 27% (15 of 56 specimens) during the 16-month study period. Adenosine triphosphate concentrations were lower during episodes of bacteriuria in the overall cohort (p = 0.0013) and paired samples from individual patients (p = 0.031) compared to episodes of sterile urine. In the first study on the subject to our knowledge, we demonstrated a striking difference between adenosine triphosphate levels measured in the presence and absence of bacteriuria in this patient group. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis patients

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    S. Deffontaines-Rufin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO is common in patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS. When the usual pharmacological treatment fails, botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections can be proposed. The safety and efficacy of this treatment are already well known, but only a few studies focus on its use in patients with MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients with MS underwent their first BTX-A injection for refractory NDO. They had clinical and urodynamic cystometry assessment before and three months after injection. The patients were divided in three groups according to treatment efficacy: full success (total urinary continence, no overactive detrusor, improvement, or total failure (urge incontinence and overactive detrusor. RESULTS: 77% of the patients had clinical improvement or full success of the treatment with a reduction of their urgency and incontinence. Significant urodynamic improvement after treatment was shown on different parameters: volume at first involuntary bladder contraction (p = 0.0000001, maximum cystometric capacity (p = 0.0035, maximum detrusor pressure (p = 0.0000001. 46% of the patients were in the "full success" group. 31% of the patients had a partial improvement. 23% of the patients had no efficacy of the treatment. Duration of MS was a predictive factor of treatment failure (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Despite that a full success was obtained in 46% of the cases, BTX-A injection therapy failed to treat refractory NDO in 23% of patients suffering from MS. Duration of the disease was a predictive factor for an inefficient treatment. The injection therapy should be considered as soon as oral anticholinergic drugs fail to reduce NDO.

  18. Minimal invasive electrode implantation for conditional stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve in neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Experimental. OBJECTIVES: Electrical stimulation of the dorsal genital nerves (DGN) suppresses involuntary detrusor contractions (IDCs) in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DO). The feasibility of minimal invasive electrode implantation near the DGN and the effectiveness

  19. Semiconditional electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents stimulation to manage neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Jung Moon; Im, Hyung Tae; Lee, Kye-Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hur, Dong Min

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of semiconditional electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve afferents for the neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Forty patients (36 males, 4 males) with spinal cord injury who had urinary incontinence and frequency, as well as felt bladder contraction with bladder filling sense or autonomic dysreflexic symptom participated in this study. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were subdivided into complete injury and incomplete injury groups by ASIA classification and subdivided into tetraplegia and paraplegia groups by neurologic level of injury. Bladder function, such as bladder volumes infused to the bladder until the first occurrence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (V(ini)) and the last contraction suppressed by electrical stimulation (V(max)) was measured by water cystometry (CMG) and compared with the results of each subgroup. Among the 40 subjects, 35 patients showed neurogenic detrusor overactivity in the CMG study. Among these 35 patients, detrusor overactivity was suppressed effectively by pudendal nerve afferent electrical stimulation in 32 patients. The infusion volume until the occurrence of the first reflex contraction (V(ini)) was 99.4±80.3 ml. The volume of saline infused to the bladder until the last contraction suppressed by semiconditional pudendal nerve stimulation (V(max)) was 274.3±93.2 ml, which was significantly greater than V(ini). In patients with good response to the pudendal nerve afferent stimulation, the bladder volume significantly increased by stimulation in all the patients. In this study, semiconditional electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile afferent nerve could effectively inhibit neurogenic detrusor overactivity and increase bladder volume in patients with spinal cord injury.

  20. Inosine Improves Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity following Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Yeun Goo Chung

    Full Text Available Neurogenic detrusor overactivity and the associated loss of bladder control are among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI. Anticholinergic agents are the mainstay for medical treatment of detrusor overactivity. However, their use is limited by significant side effects such that a search for new treatments is warranted. Inosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside with neuroprotective, neurotrophic and antioxidant effects that is known to improve motor function in preclinical models of SCI. However, its effect on lower urinary tract function has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of systemic administration of inosine on voiding function following SCI and to delineate potential mechanisms of action. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection, or cord compression by application of an aneurysm clip at T8 for 30 sec. Inosine (225 mg/kg or vehicle was administered daily via intraperitoneal injection either immediately after injury or after a delay of 8 wk. At the end of treatment, voiding behavior was assessed by cystometry. Levels of synaptophysin (SYP, neurofilament 200 (NF200 and TRPV1 in bladder tissues were measured by immunofluorescence imaging. Inosine administration decreased overactivity in both SCI models, with a significant decrease in the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions during filling, compared to vehicle-treated SCI rats (p<0.05, including under conditions of delayed treatment. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated increased levels of the pan-neuronal marker SYP and the Adelta fiber marker NF200, but decreased staining for the C-fiber marker, TRPV1 in bladder tissues from inosine-treated rats compared to those from vehicle-treated animals, including after delayed treatment. These findings demonstrate that inosine prevents the development of detrusor overactivity and attenuates existing overactivity following SCI, and may

  1. Urinary ATP may be a dynamic biomarker of detrusor overactivity in women with overactive bladder syndrome.

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    Miguel Silva-Ramos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nowadays, there is a considerable bulk of evidence showing that ATP has a prominent role in the regulation of human urinary bladder function and in the pathophysiology of detrusor overactivity. ATP mediates nonadrenergic-noncholinergic detrusor contractions in overactive bladders. In vitro studies have demonstrated that uroepithelial cells and cholinergic nerves from overactive human bladder samples (OAB release more ATP than controls. Here, we compared the urinary ATP concentration in samples collected non-invasively from OAB women with detrusor overactivity and age-matched controls. METHODS: Patients with neurologic diseases, history of malignancy, urinary tract infections or renal impairment (creatinine clearance <70 ml/min were excluded. All patients completed a 3-day voiding diary, a 24 h urine collection and blood sampling to evaluate creatinine clearance. Urine samples collected during voluntary voids were immediately freeze-preserved for ATP determination by the luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay; for comparison purposes, samples were also tested for urinary nerve growth factor (NGF by ELISA. RESULTS: The urinary content of ATP, but not of NGF, normalized to patients' urine creatinine levels (ATP/Cr or urinary volume (ATP.Vol were significantly (P<0.05 higher in OAB women with detrusor overactivity (n = 34 than in healthy controls (n = 30. Significant differences between the two groups were still observed by boosting urinary ATP/Cr content after water intake, but these were not detected for NGF/Cr. In OAB patients, urinary ATP/Cr levels correlated inversely with mean voided volumes determined in a 3-day voiding diary. CONCLUSION: A high area under the receiver operator characteristics (ROC curve (0.741; 95% CI 0.62-0.86; P<0.001 is consistent with urinary ATP/Cr being a highly sensitive dynamic biomarker for assessing detrusor overactivity in women with OAB syndrome.

  2. Prospective randomized comparison of oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation, and pelvic floor training for treatment of detrusor overactivity in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Raquel M; Castro, Rodrigo A; Sousa, Gabriela C; Sartori, Marair G F; Baracat, Edmund C; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation (FES), and pelvic floor training (PFT) for treatment of women with detrusor overactivity. Sixty-four subjects were randomized to oxybutynin (n=22), FES (n=21), or PFT (n=21). Women were evaluated before and after completion of 12 weeks of treatment by subjective response, voiding diary, and urodynamic test. There was subjective symptomatic improvement in 77% of the women treated with oxybutynin, 52% with FES, and 76% with PFT. Urgency resolved in 64% of women treated with oxybutynin, 52% with FES, and in 57% with PFT. Urodynamic evaluation was normal in 36% treated with oxybutynin, 57% with FES, and 52% with PFT. Maximum detrusor involuntary contraction pressure decreased in all groups (p<0.05). All treatments were equally effective. Subjective reduction of urge-incontinence episodes was associated with symptomatic improvement.

  3. Predicting Refractory Detrusor Overactivity: Are There any Clues at Diagnosis

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    Kylie J Mansfield

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of patients diagnosed with detrusor overactivity (DO will be refractory to treatment with antimuscarinic drugs. In this study, we examined baseline clinical details and history of urinary tract infection (UTI, urodynamics parameters, urinary pH and ATP in voided urodynamic fluid for any prognostic factors that would allow prediction of the refractory state at the time of diagnosis. At follow-up (2 to 5 years, patients were characterised as responders or non-responders based on a >50% decrease in urge leaks and voids per 24 hours. Of the 61 patients who met the inclusion criteria, follow-up revealed that 25% of these did not respond to antimuscarinic therapy. There were no significant differences in urodynamic parameters in responders compared to non-responders. Patients with a greater number of leaks/week at baseline and a history of UTI were more likely to be non-responsive to antimuscarinic therapy. There was no difference in urinary pH or ATP concentration in voided urodynamic fluid in the two groups. The results indicate that severity of leakage at baseline history and a history of recurrent UTI appears to be poor prognostic features in patients with DO. These may be associated with the development of the ‘refractory’ state.

  4. Botulinum-A toxin injections into the detrusor muscle decrease nerve growth factor bladder tissue levels in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

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    Giannantoni, Antonella; Di Stasi, Savino M; Nardicchi, Vincenza; Zucchi, Alessandro; Macchioni, Lara; Bini, Vittorio; Goracci, Gianfrancesco; Porena, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    We investigated the effects of BTX-A on visceral afferent nerve transmission by measuring bladder tissue NGF levels in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity before and after intravesical treatment with BTX-A. We also compared the bladder tissue NGF content with clinical and urodynamic data. A total of 23 patients underwent clinical evaluation and urodynamics with detection of the UDC threshold, maximum pressure and maximum cystometric capacity before, and at the 1 and 3-month followups. Endoscopic bladder wall biopsies were also obtained at the same time points. NGF levels were measured in tissue homogenate by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Promega, Madison, Wisconsin). At 1 and 3 months mean catheterization and incontinent episodes were significantly decreased (p BTX-A intravesical treatment induces a state of NGF deprivation in bladder tissue that persists at least up to 3 months. As caused by BTX-A, the decrease in acetylcholine release at the presynaptic level may induce a decrease in detrusor contractility and in NGF production by the detrusor muscle. Alternatively BTX-A can decrease the bladder level of neurotransmitters that normally modulate NGF production and release.

  5. OnabotulinumtoxinA improves quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, Michael B; Patel, Vaishali; Leng, Wendy W; Shenot, Patrick J; Lam, Wayne; Globe, Denise R; Loeb, Alex L; Chapple, Christopher R

    2013-08-27

    To evaluate the effects of onabotulinumtoxinA on patient-reported outcomes including health-related quality of life (HRQOL), treatment satisfaction, and treatment goal attainment in patients with urinary incontinence (UI) due to neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). In this multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase III, 52-week study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00311376), patients with UI due to NDO who were not adequately managed with anticholinergic therapy were treated with intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (200 or 300 U) or placebo (0.9% saline). HRQOL measures included the Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QOL) Questionnaire total score, and the 3 domain scores (avoidance and limiting behavior, psychosocial, and social embarrassment), the modified Overactive Bladder Patient Satisfaction with Treatment Questionnaire (OAB-PSTQ), and Patient Global Assessment. Assessments were made at baseline, posttreatment week 6 (primary time point), week 12, and at 12-week intervals. Patients (mean age of 46 years with 30.5 weekly UI episodes at baseline) were randomized to receive placebo (n = 149) or onabotulinumtoxinA (200 U [n = 135] or 300 U [n = 132]). At week 6, improvements from baseline in I-QOL Questionnaire total score were greater (p Patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA also reported greater improvement in the Patient Global Assessment than those in the placebo group (p ≤ 0.001 vs placebo). Patients with UI due to NDO reported greater improvement in HRQOL and treatment satisfaction with onabotulinumtoxinA than with placebo consistently across several patient-reported outcome instruments. This study provides Class I evidence that onabotulinumtoxinA intradetrusor injections (200 or 300 U) can improve quality of life measures in patients with NDO not adequately managed with anticholinergic therapy.

  6. Early Fesoterodine Fumarate Administration Prevents Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity in a Spinal Cord Transected Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biardeau, Xavier; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Aharony, Shachar; Loutochin, George; Campeau, Lysanne; Kyheng, Maeva; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    In spinal cord injury, onset of detrusor overactivity (DO) is detrimental for quality of life (incontinence) and renal risk. Prevention has only been achieved with complex sophisticated electrical neuromodulation techniques. To assess the efficacy of early fesoterodine fumarate (FF) administration in preventing bladder overactivity in a spinal cord transected (SCT) rat model. 33 Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 6 groups-Group 1: 3 normal controls; Group 2: 6 SCT controls; Group 3: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d; Group 4: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d; Group 5: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period; Group 6: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period. SCT was performed at T10. FF was continuously administered. Cystometry was undertaken 6 weeks after SCT in awake rats recording intermicturition pressure (IMP), baseline pressure, threshold pressure (Pthres) and maximum pressure (Pmax). Normal controls and SCT controls were initially compared using the Mann-Whitney U tests in order to confirm the SCT effect on cystometric parameters. The comparisons in cystometric and metabolic cage parameters between SCT controls and treated rats were done using post-hoc Dunn's tests for Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Statistical testing was conducted at the two-tailed α-level of 0.05. Pressure parameters were significantly higher in SCT control group compared to normal controls. Six weeks after SCT, IMP was significantly lower in low dose treated group than in SCT controls. Pmax was significantly lower in 3 treated groups compared to SCT controls. Pthres was significantly lower in full time treated groups than in SCT controls. Early administration of FF modulates bladder overactivity in a SCT rat model. Whereas short-term prevention has been demonstrated, the long-term should be further analyzed. Clinical application of these results should confirm this finding through randomized research protocols.

  7. The effect of penile vibratory stimulation on male fertility potential, spasticity and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Læssøe, Line; Sønksen, J

    2005-01-01

    Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS).......Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS)....

  8. Experience with different botulinum toxins for the treatment of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our experience with the use of the botulinum toxin-A (BoNT/A formulations Botox® and Prosigne® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, 45 consecutive patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to NDO received a single intradetrusor (excluding the trigone treatment with botulinum toxin type A 200 or 300 units. Botox was used for the first 22 patients, and Prosigne for the subsequent 23 patients. Evaluations at baseline and week 12 included assessment of continence and urodynamics. Safety evaluations included monitoring of vital signs, hematuria during the procedure, hospital stay, and spontaneous adverse event reports. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients were evaluated (74% male; mean age, 34.8 years. Significant improvements from baseline in maximum cystometric capacity (MCC, maximum detrusor pressure during bladder contraction, and compliance were observed in both groups (P < 0.05. Improvement in MCC was significantly greater with Botox versus Prosigne (+103.3% vs. +42.2%; P = 0.019. Continence was achieved by week 12 in 16 Botox recipients (76.2% and 10 Prosigne recipients (47.6%; P = 0.057. No severe adverse events were observed. Mild adverse events included 2 cases of transient hematuria on the first postoperative day (no specific treatment required, and 3 cases of afebrile urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: Botox and Prosigne produce distinct effects in patients with NDO, with a greater increase in MCC with Botox. Further evaluation will be required to assess differences between these formulations.

  9. AB204. Repeated intradetrusor botulinum toxin type A injections are still effective for patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity secondary to spinal cord injury in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Yang, Xinghua; Zeng, Jingwen; Huang, Maping; Liu, Qiuling; Huang, Jiebing; Huang, Tianhai; Xie, Keji; Jiang, Chonghe

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess effective outcomes following repeated treatment with intradetrusor botulinum toxin type A in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Methods Patients with NDO secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI) were enrolled. Botulinum toxin type A 200 U detrusor injections by a rigid cystoscope were repeated. Primary outcomes were urodynamic variables including maximum detrusor pressure during first involuntary detrusor contraction (Pdetmax IDC) filling cystometry, detrusor compliance (DC). Secondary outcomes were improvement of the patient’s quality of life (QoL) measured by Incontinence-Specific Quality-of-Life Instrument (I-QoL), the validated short forms of Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7). Related adverse events were recorded. Results From 2012 to 2014, 159 injections were performed in 52 patients (44 male, 8 female). The mean age was 36.67 years. The maximum number of repeated injections was five. BC increased from (4.03–7.45) to (6.96–10.86) mL/cmH2O, Pdetmax in bladder storage decreased from (42.80–79.52) to (26.40–43.33) cmH2O, respectively. The I-QoL, UDI-6 and IIQ-7 showed a consistent improvement after repeated injections. Conclusions Repeated intradetrusor botulinum toxin type A injections remain improve QoL in patients with NDO secondary to SCI.

  10. Tolterodine reduces the number of urge incontinence episodes in patients with an overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquetin, B; Wyndaele, J

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of tolterodine compared to placebo in patients with an overactive bladder. A double-blind, multi-centre phase III study in France and Belgium 251 patients with overactive bladder symptoms, and urodynamically verified detrusor overactivity, were randomised to receive 4-week treatment with either placebo or tolterodine 1 or 2mg twice daily (bd). Efficacy was evaluated from patient micturition diaries. Safety and tolerability endpoints were also evaluated. After 4-week treatment, the number of incontinence episodes/24h decreased significantly relative to placebo in the tolterodine 1 and 2 mgbd groups (P=0.045 and P=0.0089, respectively). Both dosages of tolterodine increased volume voided per micturition compared with placebo (P=0.055 and P=0.056, respectively), although significant decreases in micturition frequency were not apparent. Tolterodine was safe and well tolerated, few patients were withdrawn due to adverse events. Dry mouth, mainly of mild-to-moderate intensity, was the most common adverse event. No clinically relevant changes in blood pressure or laboratory safety variables were reported. Tolterodine is effective, safe and well tolerated for the treatment of symptoms of an overactive bladder, particularly urge incontinence.

  11. Feasibility of noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy to diagnose detrusor overactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farag, F.; Martens, F.M.J.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an optical technology able to detect the hemodynamic changes in biological tissues. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of applying NIRS in the noninvasive diagnosis of detrusor overactivity (DO). Patients and Methods: Comparative analysi

  12. Use of tolterodine in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity : Relationship between dose and urodynamic response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellsworth, PI; Borgstein, NG; Nijman, RJM; Reddy, PP

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Three exploratory studies were conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of tolterodine in children 1 month to 15 years old with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. We urodynamically evaluated the dose and concentration effects of tolterodine to establish safe and effectiv

  13. Early Fesoterodine Fumarate Administration Prevents Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity in a Spinal Cord Transected Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biardeau, Xavier; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Aharony, Shachar; Loutochin, George; Campeau, Lysanne; Kyheng, Maeva; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Background In spinal cord injury, onset of detrusor overactivity (DO) is detrimental for quality of life (incontinence) and renal risk. Prevention has only been achieved with complex sophisticated electrical neuromodulation techniques. Purpose To assess the efficacy of early fesoterodine fumarate (FF) administration in preventing bladder overactivity in a spinal cord transected (SCT) rat model. Methods 33 Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 6 groups–Group 1: 3 normal controls; Group 2: 6 SCT controls; Group 3: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d; Group 4: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d; Group 5: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.18 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period; Group 6: 6 SCT rats + FF 0.12 mg/kg/d + 72-h wash-out period. SCT was performed at T10. FF was continuously administered. Cystometry was undertaken 6 weeks after SCT in awake rats recording intermicturition pressure (IMP), baseline pressure, threshold pressure (Pthres) and maximum pressure (Pmax). Normal controls and SCT controls were initially compared using the Mann-Whitney U tests in order to confirm the SCT effect on cystometric parameters. The comparisons in cystometric and metabolic cage parameters between SCT controls and treated rats were done using post-hoc Dunn’s tests for Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Statistical testing was conducted at the two-tailed α-level of 0.05. Results Pressure parameters were significantly higher in SCT control group compared to normal controls. Six weeks after SCT, IMP was significantly lower in low dose treated group than in SCT controls. Pmax was significantly lower in 3 treated groups compared to SCT controls. Pthres was significantly lower in full time treated groups than in SCT controls. Conclusion Early administration of FF modulates bladder overactivity in a SCT rat model. Whereas short-term prevention has been demonstrated, the long-term should be further analyzed. Clinical application of these results should confirm this finding through randomized research protocols. PMID:28060912

  14. Nonselective Blocking of the Sympathetic Nervous System Decreases Detrusor Overactivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Shin Park

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The involuntary dual control systems of the autonomic nervous system (ANS in the bladder of awake spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs were investigated through simultaneous registrations of intravesical and intraabdominal pressures to observe detrusor overactivity (DO objectively as a core symptom of an overactive bladder. SHRs (n = 6 showed the features of overactive bladder syndrome during urodynamic study, especially DO during the filling phase. After injection of the nonselective sympathetic blocking agent labetalol, DO disappeared in 3 of 6 SHRs (50%. DO frequency decreased from 0.98 ± 0.22 min−1 to 0.28 ± 0.19 min−1 (p < 0.01, and DO pressure decreased from 3.82 ± 0.57 cm H2O to 1.90 ± 0.86 cm H2O (p < 0.05. This suggests that the DO originating from the overactive parasympathetic nervous system is attenuated by the nonselective blocking of the sympathetic nervous system. The detailed mechanism behind this result is still not known, but parasympathetic overactivity seems to require overactive sympathetic nervous system activity in a kind of balance between these two systems. These findings are consistent with recent clinical findings suggesting that patients with idiopathic overactive bladder may have ANS dysfunction, particularly a sympathetic dysfunction. The search for newer and better drugs than the current anticholinergic drugs as the mainstay for overactive bladder will be fueled by our research on these sympathetic mechanisms. Further studies of this principle are required.

  15. Clinical Efficacy of Electroacupuncture Regulating 3 Sacral Nerve for the Treatment of Detrusor Overactivity in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury and Urinary Incontinence%电针调节骶3神经治疗脊髓损伤患者逼尿肌过度活动及尿失禁的临床疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈燕颜; 刘德清; 杨幸华; 肖喜辉

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effect of detrusor in patients with spinal cord injury and excessive activity of urinary incontinence treated by electroacupuncture treatment of 3 sacral nerve regulation.Methods 30 cases of spinal cord injury detrusor excessive activity and urine incontinence patients from period of 2014.9-2015.12 clinical data in our hospital were retrospective analysis.Results 30 cases of patients after three courses of treatment,patients with maximum bladder capacity and bladder adaptation and filling stage detrusor pressure was significantly improved compared with before treatment.The number of urinary incontinence per week,24 hours of urination,24h urination frequency,the number of daily night urine and the number of urine pad were significantly improved compared with before treatment,the difference was statistically significant ( <0.05).Conclusion Electro acupuncture adjustment of sacral 3 nerve in the treatment of spinal cord injury,effectively improve the symptoms of patients with urinary incontinence. Reduce the number of patients with urinary incontinence,urgency frequency and urgency,patients are well tolerated,safe and effective.%目的:探讨脊髓损伤患者逼尿肌过度活动及尿失禁采用电针调节骶3神经治疗的临床效果。方法对我院2014年9月~2015年12月收治的30例脊髓损伤逼尿肌过度活动及尿失禁患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果30例患者经过三个疗程的治疗后,患者最大膀胱容量、膀胱顺应性及充盈末期逼尿肌压均较治疗前明显改善,患者每周尿失禁次数、24 h排尿量、24 h排尿次数、每日夜尿次数均较治疗前有明显改善,差异具有统计学意义(<0.05)。结论电针调节骶3神经治疗脊髓损伤,有效的改善了患者尿失禁的症状,减少了患者尿失禁的次数、排尿急迫次数及急迫程度,患者耐受性好,安全、有效。

  16. Randomized controlled trial of foot reflexology for patients with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Ho-Leung Jimmy; Cheon, Willy Cecilia; Wong, To; Liu, Yu Sun John; Tong, Wai Mei Anny

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether foot reflexology has beneficial effects on patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity. One hundred and nine women with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity were randomized into either foot reflexology treatment group or nonspecific foot massage control group. The primary outcome measure was the change in the diurnal micturition frequency. There was significant change in the number of daytime frequency in the reflexology group when compared with the massage group (-1.90 vs -0.55, p = 0.029). There was also a decrease in the 24-h micturition frequency in both groups, but the change was not statistically significant (-2.80 vs -1.04 p = 0.055). In the reflexology group, more patients believed to have received "true" reflexology (88.9 vs 67.4%, p = 0.012). This reflects the difficulty of blinding in trials of reflexology. Larger scale studies with a better-designed control group and an improved blinding are required to examine if reflexology is effective in improving patients' overall outcome.

  17. Chapter 4: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) and neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Arjun; Lucas, Malcolm

    2014-07-01

    This chapter focuses on the position of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment pathway for overactive bladder (OAB) and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction associated with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), and the recommendations of the major international guideline groups. Recommendations of different guideline groups may vary, especially when evidence is weak, often because of differences in methodology and panel composition. Relevant guidelines from the European Association of Urology, American Urological Association, and the UK National Institute for Care and Clinical Excellence were reviewed, and the recommendations that form the basis of the treatment algorithms have been discussed. Any differences between guidelines have been highlighted and special emphasis made on the position of botulinum toxin type A in these pathways. In all the reviewed guidelines, botulinum toxin type A is recommended, alongside sacral nerve neuromodulation, to treat OAB and NDO in patients who have failed oral therapy. The evidence base is consistent, but further evidence is required regarding optimal dosing regimens and injection technique.

  18. Detrusor overactivity does not predict bothersome storage symptoms after photoselective vaporization of the prostate with lithium triborate laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dybowski, B.A.; D'Ancona, F.C.H.; Langenhuijsen, J.F.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find out if detrusor overactivity (DO) is a predictor of moderate or severe storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) persisting 6 months after photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with bladder outlet obstruction proved by urodynamics who

  19. The novel β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron reduces carbachol-induced contractile activity in detrusor tissue from patients with bladder outflow obstruction with or without detrusor overactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalø, Julie; Nordling, Jørgen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    β(3)-Adrenoceptors are major players in detrusor relaxation and have been suggested as a new putative target for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. We determined the effects of mirabegron (YM178), a novel β(3)-adrenoceptor agonist, on carbachol-induced tone in isolated human detrusor......), respectively. The maximal relaxant effect of isoprenaline and mirabegron in the normal, BOO and BOO+DO detrusor was 37.7 ± 14.4% and 36.1 ± 23.3%, 14.4 ± 12.2% vs. 33.4 ± 21.0% and 18.3 ± 10.0% vs. 28.3 ± 12.2% (n=4, P>0.05), respectively. Mirabegron and isoprenaline reduced carbachol-induced tone in both...

  20. Prospective randomised controlled trial comparing trigone-sparing versus trigone-including intradetrusor injection of abobotulinumtoxinA for refractory idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manecksha, Rustom P

    2012-05-01

    Botulinum toxin A is effective for treatment of idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO). The trigone is generally spared because of the theoretical risk of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), although studies assessing injection sites are lacking.

  1. The role of muscarinic receptor subtypes on carbachol-induced contraction of normal human detrusor and overactive detrusor associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Yamanishi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of antimuscarinic antagonists on carbachol-induced contraction of normal human bladder and detrusor overactivity associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (DO/BPH. Samples of human bladder muscle were obtained from patients undergoing total cystectomy for bladder cancer (normal bladder, and those undergoing retropubic prostatectomy for BPH. All of the patients with DO/BPH had detrusor overactivity according to urodynamic studies. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 10-ml organ baths containing Krebs solution, and concentration–response curves for carbachol were obtained in the presence of antimuscarinic antagonists (4-DAMP, methoctramine, pirenzepine, tolterodine, solifenacin, trospium, propiverine, oxybutynin, and imidafenacin or vehicle. All antagonists competitively antagonized concentration–response curves to carbachol with high affinities in normal bladder. The rank order of mean pA2 values was as follows: trospium (10.1 > 4-DAMP (9.87, imidafenacin (9.3 > solifenacin (8.8 > tolterodine (8.6 > oxybutynin (8.3 > propiverine (7.7 > pirenzepine (7.4 > methoctramine (6.6. The effects of these antimuscarinic antagonists did not change when tested with DO/BPH bladder, suggesting that each antimuscarinic antagonist has a similar effect in this condition. Schild plots showed a slope corresponding to unity, except for propiverine with DO/BPH detrusor. In conclusion, M3-receptors mainly mediate contractions in human bladder strips with normal state and DO/BPH.

  2. Role of antimuscarinics in the treatment of nonneurogenic daytime urinary incontinence in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, RJM

    Idiopathic or "functional" urinary incontinence in children-incontinence with no known neurologic or anatomic cause-may take the form of urge incontinence, the most common type of incontinence, which is characterized by detrusor overactivity during the filling phase, or dysfunctional voiding. The

  3. Role of antimuscarinics in the treatment of nonneurogenic daytime urinary incontinence in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, RJM

    2004-01-01

    Idiopathic or "functional" urinary incontinence in children-incontinence with no known neurologic or anatomic cause-may take the form of urge incontinence, the most common type of incontinence, which is characterized by detrusor overactivity during the filling phase, or dysfunctional voiding. The la

  4. Multiple factors related to detrusor overactivity in Chinese patients with benign prostate hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ning; MAN Li-bo; HE Feng; HUANG Guang-lin; WANG Hai; LI Gui-zhong; WANG Jian-wei; L(U) Yan-wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Detrusor overactivity (DO) is a known cause of lower urinary tract symptoms and occurs in 50%-75% of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) patients.We sought to investigate the clinical and urodynamic factors that are associated with the presence of DO in Chinese BPH patients.Methods Two hundred and eighty-seven consecutive patients with clinical BPH were retrospectively evaluated in this study.Each patient underwent urodynamic evaluation and completed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS)and Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire.Patients with neurological symptoms or other diseases likely to affect detrusor functions were strictly excluded.The 184 BPH patients included in the study were divided into groups according to the presence of DO as shown in urodynamic tests.Univariate analysis of factors associated with the presence of DO were performed using Student's t-test and the Mann-Whitney test; multivariate analysis used stepwise Logistic regressions.The relationship between degree of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and DO was also investigated using a linear-by-linear association test.Results Of 184 BPH patients,DO was present in 76 (41.3%).On univariate analysis,patients with DO were older (P=0.000),and showed smaller maximal bladder capacity (MBC,P=0.000) and voided volume (P=0.000),higher maximal detrusor pressure (P=0.000) and projected isovolumetric pressure (PIP) (P=0.005),higher Abrams-Griffiths number (P=0.000) and degree of bladder outlet obstruction (P=0.000),higher IPSS (P=0.000) and irritative IPSS subscores (P=0.000).Stepwise Logistic regression analysis showed that PIP (OR=1.012,95% CI1.002-1.023,P=0.019),age (OR=1.030,95% CI 1.005-1.067,P=0.059),and MBC (OR=0.993,95% CI 0.990-0.996,P=0.000)were independent risk factors for DO in BPH patients.Linear-by-linear association tests indicated a positive linear association between DO and severity of BOO,with incidence of DO increasing with BOO grade (P=0.000).Conclusions In

  5. Association of overactive bladder and stress urinary incontinence in rats with pudendal nerve ligation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akira; Kita, Masafumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Egawa, Shin; Chancellor, Michael B; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) also suffer from urgency incontinence, which is one of the major symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Pudendal nerve injury has been recognized as a possible cause for both SUI and OAB. Therefore, we investigated the effects of pudendal nerve ligation (PNL) on bladder function and urinary continence in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Conscious cystometry with or without capsaicin pretreatment (125 mg/kg sc), leak point pressures (LPPs), contractile responses of bladder muscle strips to carbachol or phenylephrine, and levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and mRNA in the bladder were compared in sham and PNL rats 4 wk after the injury. Urinary frequency detected by a reduction in intercontraction intervals and voided volume was observed in PNL rats compared with sham rats, but it was not seen in PNL rats with capsaicin pretreatment that desensitizes C-fiber-afferent pathways. LPPs in PNL rats were significantly decreased compared with sham rats. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to phenylephrine, but not to carbachol, were significantly increased in PNL rats. The levels of NGF protein and mRNA in the bladder of PNL rats were significantly increased compared with sham rats. These results suggest that pudendal nerve neuropathy induced by PNL may be one of the potential risk factors for OAB, as well as SUI. Somato-visceral cross sensitization between somatic (pudendal) and visceral (bladder) sensory pathways that increases NGF expression and alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-mediated contractility in the bladder may be involved in this pathophysiological mechanism.

  6. Self-induced plantar-flexion objectively reduces wave amplitude of detrusor overactivity and subjectively improve urinary urgency: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stav, Kobi; Leibovici, Dan; Yoram, Siegel I; Ronny, Ohlgisser; Zisman, Amnon

    2014-11-01

    To estimate the effect of plantar-flexion on the wave amplitude of involuntary detrusor contraction and the severity of urinary urgency during filling cystometry in patients with detrusor overactivity (DO). Twenty-two consecutive patients with DO were enrolled. During urodynamics, the mean peak detrusor pressures of each contraction were documented and compared. At the beginning of the 2nd or 3rd wave, patients were asked to perform continuous plantar-flexion by pushing their tiptoes against the floor. Following each wave, patients were asked to grade the severity of the urgency by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The mean peak detrusor pressure without plantar-flexion was 58 cmH2 O (95% CI: 46.3-69.7) compared to 31 cmH2 O (95% CI: 23.1-38.9) with plantar-flexion (P < 0.001). All patients reported a reduced degree of urgency during plantar-flexion reflected in a significant reduction in mean VAS score from 9.3 (95% CI: 9-9.5) to 4.7 (95% CI: 3.9-5.4; P < 0.0001). Self-performed plantar-flexion maneuver might reduce the severity of urinary urgency and the magnitude of overactive detrusor contractions, which may have a role in the conservative therapy of detrusor overactivity. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Urodynamic study in women with pure stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdevenito, J P; Águila, F; Naser, M; Manríquez, V; Wenzel, C; Díaz, J P

    2015-03-01

    To describe the results of urodynamic study in women with pure stress urinary incontinence symptoms, including the characteristics of the overactive detrusor. No other clinical assessments were taken into account. A retrospective study in women with urinary incontinence consecutively evaluated by urodynamic study. From a total of 710 women, only 108 (15%) with pure stress urinary incontinence symptoms were selected. Women with prior urinary incontinence surgery, pelvic organ prolapse (stage ≥iii), pelvic radiotherapy, using medication active on the lower urinary tract and neurological diseases were excluded. Infusion rate was 70 ml/min. Detrusor overactivity was induced only by cough. A standardized cough stress test with progressive cough intensity was carried out. Reference urodynamic values for stress incontinent women are described. Urodynamic stress incontinence was observed in 79 women (73.1%), detrusor overactivity in 4 (3.7%) and mixed urodynamic diagnosis in 15 (13.8%). Test was inconclusive in 10 patients (9.2%). Two women had detrusor overactivity incontinence (1.9%). One patient had detrusor overactivity induced by cough without urodynamic stress incontinence (0.9%). There was an association between detrusor overactivity and nocturia ≥2 (P=.002; odds ratio: 3.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-11.39). One woman had a bladder outlet obstruction (0.9%). In women with pure stress urinary incontinence, without knowing the outcome of other clinical assessments, urodynamic study can provide useful information to define the proper therapy. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Intravesical resiniferatoxin for the treatment of storage lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with either interstitial cystitis or detrusor overactivity: a meta-analysis.

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    Changcheng Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While Resin-iferatoxin (RTX has been widely used for patients with storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, its clinical efficiency hasn't yet been well evaluated. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the exact roles of intravesical RTX for the treatment of storage LUTS in patients with either interstitial cystitis (IC or detrusor overactivity (DO. METHODS: A meta-analysis of RTX treatment was performed through a comprehensive search of the literature. In total, 2,332 records were initially recruited, 1,907 from Elsevier, 207 from Medline and 218 from the Web of Science. No records were retrieved from the Embase or Cochrane Library. Seven trials with 355 patients were included and one trial was excluded because of the lack of extractable data. The analyses were all performed using RevMan 5.1 and MIX 2.0. RESULTS: Bladder pain was significantly reduced after RTX therapy in patients with either IC or DO. The average decrease of the visual an alogue pain scale was 0.42 after RTX treatment (p = 0.02. The maximum cystometric capacity (MCC was significantly increased in patients with DO (MCC increase, 53.36 ml, p = 0.006 but not in those with IC (MCC increase, -19.1 ml, p = 0.35. No significant improvement in urinary frequency, nocturia, incontinence or the first involuntary detrusor contraction (FDC was noted after RTX therapy (p = 0.06, p = 0.52, p = 0.19 and p = 0.41, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: RTX could significantly reduce bladder pain in patients with either IC or DO, and increase MCC in patients with DO; however, no significant improvement was observed in frequency, nocturia, incontinence or FDC. Given the limitations in the small patient size and risk of bias in the included trials, great caution should be taken when intravesical RTX is used before a large, multicenter, well-designed random control trial with a long-term follow-up is carried out to further assess the clinical efficacy of RTX in in patients with storage LUTS.

  9. The effect of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder symptoms on quality of life in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, CH; de Leeuw, JRJ; Roovers, JPWR; Heintz, APM

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the consequences that the symptoms of urinary incontinence and an overactive bladder have on the quality of life in young, community-dwelling women. Subjects and methods A population-based, cross-sectional cohort study was conducted in women aged 20-45 years. Urogenital symptoms

  10. Fesoterodine for the treatment of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Pamela Ellsworth

    2009-01-01

    Pamela EllsworthThe Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent condition, affecting males and females. The prevalence increases with age. Behavioral therapy and antimuscarinic therapy remain the first-line therapies for management of OAB. Despite improvements in symptoms, persistence with antimuscarinic therapy has remained low. Multiple factors including patient expectations, adverse effects and cost may affect pe...

  11. Neuromodulation by surface electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves for reduction of detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury: A pilot study.

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    Ojha, Rajdeep; George, Jacob; Chandy, Bobeena R; Tharion, George; Devasahayam, Suresh R

    2015-03-01

    To demonstrate reduction in detrusor overactivity using surface electrical stimulation of posterior tibial nerve (PTN) or dorsal penile nerve (DPN) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Patients with SCI with symptoms of urinary urgency/leaks, with cystometrogram (CMG) proven detrusor overactivity were recruited in this study. Ten persons with observable F-wave from tibial nerve were included in the PTN group. Five persons who had F-wave absent but preserved bulbocavernosus reflex were included in the DPN group. Stimulation was given at 20 Hz, 10-40 mA for 20 minutes/session/day for 14 consecutive days. Detrusor overactivity was recorded using CMG on days 1 and 15. Rehabilitation Institute, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, TN, India. Patients with SCI. Surface stimulation of peripheral nerves for reduction of detrusor overactivity. Qualitative analysis using voiding diary data and quantitative analysis using CMG data comparing pre- and post-intervention. P value obtained from voiding chart was 0.021 for PTN and 0.062 for DPN. P value obtained from CMG data was not significant in both groups. In one subject, treatment was extended to 4 weeks and further improvement in voiding diary was seen. In this pilot study of 15 patients, voiding chart data showed statistically significant improvement following PTN stimulation and trend of improvement following DPN stimulation. However, the CMG data were not statistically significant in this sample population. Further studies with larger, appropriately powered sample size would be helpful to demonstrate the associations of symptoms with CMG data. Trial registration CTRI no.; CTRI/2012/12/003234; CMCH Approval no.: CMC/IRB/6735/2008/12/18.

  12. Fahr syndrome unknown complication: overactive bladder.

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    Tuglu, Devrim; Yuvanç, Ercan; Bal, Fatih; Türkel, Yakup; Dağ, Ersel; Yılmaz, Erdal; Batislam, Ertan

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient's medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome.

  13. Fahr Syndrome Unknown Complication: Overactive Bladder

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    Devrim Tuglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient’s medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome.

  14. OnabotulinumtoxinA is effective in patients with urinary incontinence due to neurogenic detrusor activity regardless of concomitant anticholinergic use or neurologic etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginsberg, D.; Cruz, F.; Herschorn, S.; Gousse, A.; Keppenne, V.; Aliotta, P.; Sievert, K.D.; Brin, M.F.; Jenkins, B.; Thompson, C.; Lam, W.; Heesakkers, J.P.; Haag-Molkenteller, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in subpopulations of etiology (multiple sclerosis [MS] or spinal cord injury [SCI]) and concomitant anticholinergics (use/non-use). METHODS: Data were pooled from two d

  15. Efficacy and tolerability of botulinum toxin type A in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity and without concomitant anticholinergic therapy: comparison of two doses.

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    Grise, Philippe; Ruffion, Alain; Denys, Pierre; Egon, Guy; Chartier Kastler, Emmanuel

    2010-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) has been reported to be effective for treatment of patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to anticholinergic agents. However, in most of the studies, the efficacy was associated with concomitant use of anticholinergics. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of BoNTA and compare two different doses in patients with NDO without concomitant anticholinergics. Between 2004 and 2006, adults with NDO refractory to anticholinergics or discontinued anticholinergics due to adverse events or contraindications from four different French clinical centres were included in a prospective, randomised, double-blind, comparative trial. Inclusion criteria were urinary incontinence (UI) resulting from NDO that could not be managed with anticholinergics. Patients with bladder cancer, lithiasis, or urinary infection were excluded. Patients were randomised to receive an intradetrusor injection of 500 U or 750 U of BoNTA. The initial evaluation (ie, clinical and urodynamic variables and quality of life [QoL]) was repeated at days 30, 90, 180, and 360. Primary outcome was complete continence rate at day 30. Secondary outcomes were cumulative incontinence rate, reappearance of leakages, pad usage, urodynamics, and QoL. Seventy-seven patients received 500 U (n=39) or 750 U (n=38) of BoNTA and were included in the full analysis set for efficacy analysis. Complete continence at day 30 was observed in 22 patients (56.4%) and 28 patients (73.7%) receiving 500 U or 750 U of BoNTA, respectively (p=0.056; one-sided χ(2) test to compare to α=0.025). The median delay in the reappearance of leakages was 168 d. Monotherapy of BoNTA significantly improved UI in patients with NDO. Although there was a trend towards a greater improvement with 750 U of BoNTA, no statistically significant differences in terms of clinical and urodynamic variables and QoL were found between the treatment groups. Tolerability was excellent and equivalent for

  16. Phasic or terminal detrusor overactivity in women: age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior relationships

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    Françoise A. Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To search for relationships between phasic (P and terminal (T DO with age, urodynamic findings and sphincter behavior during involuntary detrusor contraction in woman. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urodynamic studies (triple lumen catheter 7F, seated position of 164 successive women referred for LUTS with diagnosis of DO were reviewed. Patients were stratified in 4 sub-groups: pre- (18-44y, peri- (45-54 y, post-menopause (55-74 y and oldest old (≥ 75 y. The urethral sensor was positioned at the level of the maximum urethral closure pressure for sphincter behavior analysis. A variation of at least 5 cmH2O in pressure (detrusor or urethra was chosen to assert DO or sphincter response. Sphincter response was classified as relaxation (re before or during DO, or steady (st. RESULTS: Occurrence of P and TDO was similar: 77 P and 87 T. The PDO group was significantly younger (p = 0.0003. TDO was more frequent in patients with a history of neurological disease. The percentage of PDO remained almost constant in age groups, while that of TDO increased with age from 6.7% to 23.2% (p = 0.0013. Uninhibited contraction occurred at a smaller bladder volume in the P group: 149 ± 95 vs. 221 ± 113 mL (p < 0.0001. Steady sphincter predominated in the TDO subgroup: 45.9% vs. 32.1% and increased significantly in each DO sub-group of ³ 75y. CONCLUSION: Steady sphincter during both P and TDO, and occurrence of TDO appear as specific of aging. The last result could be related to structural changes in the detrusor muscle with aging.

  17. Fesoterodine for the treatment of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder

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    Pamela Ellsworth

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pamela EllsworthThe Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a highly prevalent condition, affecting males and females. The prevalence increases with age. Behavioral therapy and antimuscarinic therapy remain the first-line therapies for management of OAB. Despite improvements in symptoms, persistence with antimuscarinic therapy has remained low. Multiple factors including patient expectations, adverse effects and cost may affect persistence. Fesoterodine is one of the newest antimuscarinic agent approved for the management of OAB. It is unique in that it shares the same active metabolite as tolterodine, 5-hydoxymethyltolterodine (5-HMT; however, this conversion is established via ubiquitous esterases and not via the cytochrome P450 system, thus providing a faster and more efficient conversion to 5-HMT. Fesoterodine is available in 2 doses, 4 mg and 8 mg. Clinical trials have established a dose response relationship in efficacy parameters as well as improvements in quality of life. As with all antimuscarinics, dry mouth and constipation are the more common side effects. A combination of medical therapy and behavioral therapy improves the overall outcome in management of OAB. Dose flexibility may help improve efficacy outcomes and patient education on the management of common adverse effects may improve tolerability with these agents.Keywords: overactive bladder, antimuscarinic agent, esterase, 5-HMT, fesoterodine

  18. AB321. SPR-48 The effects of myrbetriq on detrusor overactivity associated with suprasacral spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jillene M.; Degoski, Danielle J.; Fraser, Matthew O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective β3-adrenoceptor agonists (BARA) represent a novel mechanism of action for direct relaxation of urinary bladder smooth muscle. Myrbetriq (MYR) is an FDA approved BARA developed by Astellas Pharma, and has proven to be very useful for treating overactive bladder. Preliminary data from this laboratory demonstrated a remarkable effect of a rat-specific BARA, CL-316,243 (CL), on the hallmark attributes of neurogenic bladder subsequent to spinal cord injury (SCI). This included an increase in true bladder capacity (TBC), a decrease in the number and amplitude of non-voiding contractions (NVC) and an increased filling compliance (C). The current report reflects a formalized preclinical study of both the rat specific BARA, CL, and MYR, in order to provide preclinical support for utilization of MYR in treating SCI patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Female rats (4 weeks post-SCI at T9–10, n=43, 10–11/group) were anesthetized with isoflurane and fitted with femoral vein, ureteral diversion and transvesical catheters. The animals were mounted in Ballman restraint cages to which they had been previously acclimated. Conscious cystometry was performed before and after 3 repeated vehicles (Veh 1–3) and 3 escalating 1/2 log doses of either CL or MYR, and their paired repeated vehicle controls (Veh 4–6) at 30-minute intervals. See figure for testing scheme protocol. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures. PNVC count, MYR decreased maximal NVC amplitude, and CL increased C, relative to their respective repeated vehicle controls. Conclusions The results of these studies support the use BARA for the treatment of NDO secondary to SCI, as at least one of the drugs tested was able to distinguish themselves from their repeated vehicle control groups as having a positive effect for each of the four measures. Funding Source(s) an IIR grant from Astellas

  19. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-04

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients.

  20. Female Functional Constipation Is Associated with Overactive Bladder Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence

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    Takahiro Maeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This noninterventional cross-sectional study aims to assess the association between functional constipation (FC and urinary symptoms in female patients with no treatment for urination and defecation. The Rome III criteria for evaluation of defecation, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS for evaluation of urinary symptoms, and clinical features were investigated in 145 female patients. Latent FC and moderate to severe overactive bladder (OAB were defined on the basis of positivity for two or more of the Rome III criteria and an OABSS ≥ 6 with OABSS Q3 ≥ 2, respectively. In 60 latent FC patients, the OABSS was higher (5.0 versus 3.2, p=0.001, and concurrent moderate to severe OAB symptoms and OAB with urinary incontinence were more frequent than those in 85 nonlatent FC patients (33.3 versus 10.6%, p=0.001, and 31.7 versus 7.1%, p<0.001. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that moderate to severe OAB symptoms were a significant associated factor of latent FC (odds ratio (OR = 4.125, p=0.005, while latent FC was the only associated factor of moderate to severe OAB and OAB with urinary incontinence (OR = 4.227, p=0.005 and OR = 4.753, p=0.004. In conclusion, moderate to severe OAB symptoms are correlated with FC. Moreover, FC is related to moderate to severe OAB symptoms and to OAB with urinary incontinence.

  1. Fesoterodine for the treatment of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent condition, affecting males and females. The prevalence increases with age. Behavioral therapy and antimuscarinic therapy remain the first-line therapies for management of OAB. Despite improvements in symptoms, persistence with antimuscarinic therapy has remained low. Multiple factors including patient expectations, adverse effects and cost may affect persistence. Fesoterodine is one of the newest antimuscarinic agent approved for the management of OAB. It is unique in that it shares the same active metabolite as tolterodine, 5-hydoxymethyltolterodine (5-HMT); however, this conversion is established via ubiquitous esterases and not via the cytochrome P450 system, thus providing a faster and more efficient conversion to 5-HMT. Fesoterodine is available in 2 doses, 4 mg and 8 mg. Clinical trials have established a dose response relationship in efficacy parameters as well as improvements in quality of life. As with all antimuscarinics, dry mouth and constipation are the more common side effects. A combination of medical therapy and behavioral therapy improves the overall outcome in management of OAB. Dose flexibility may help improve efficacy outcomes and patient education on the management of common adverse effects may improve tolerability with these agents. PMID:19956551

  2. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity is associated with decreased expression and function of the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels.

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    Kiril L Hristov

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from a variety of neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis often develop neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, which currently lacks a universally effective therapy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NDO is associated with changes in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM large conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BK channel expression and function. DSM tissue samples from 33 patients were obtained during open bladder surgeries. NDO patients were clinically characterized preoperatively with pressure-flow urodynamics demonstrating detrusor overactivity, in the setting of a clinically relevant neurological condition. Control patients did not have overactive bladder and did not have a clinically relevant neurological disease. We conducted quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR, perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology on freshly-isolated DSM cells, and functional studies on DSM contractility. qPCR experiments revealed that DSM samples from NDO patients showed decreased BK channel mRNA expression in comparison to controls. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated reduced whole cell and transient BK currents (TBKCs in freshly-isolated DSM cells from NDO patients. Functional studies on DSM contractility showed that spontaneous phasic contractions had a decreased sensitivity to iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, in DSM strips isolated from NDO patients. These results reveal the novel finding that NDO is associated with decreased DSM BK channel expression and function leading to increased DSM excitability and contractility. BK channel openers or BK channel gene transfer could be an alternative strategy to control NDO. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate the value of BK channel opening drugs or gene therapies for NDO treatment and to identify any possible adverse effects.

  3. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

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    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; Itil, Ismail Mete

    2012-01-01

    To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms.

  4. Propiverine: a review of its use in the treatment of adults and children with overactive bladder associated with idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity, and in men with lower urinary tract symptoms.

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    McKeage, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Propiverine is a well established antimuscarinic agent with a mixed mode of action in the treatment of symptoms associated with overactive bladder (OAB). As well as blocking muscarinic receptors in the detrusor muscle, the drug also inhibits cellular calcium influx, thereby diminishing muscle spasm. In patients with symptoms of OAB resulting from idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) or neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), propiverine demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy and tolerability, with adverse events consistent with those associated with all antimuscarinic agents. In adults with IDO, propiverine demonstrated similar efficacy to that of other antimuscarinic agents (including solifenacin, tolterodine, oxybutynin and imidafenacin) and, in adults with NDO, propiverine and oxybutynin demonstrated similar efficacy. Propiverine was generally well tolerated in these patient populations, with a lower incidence of dry mouth than that associated with oxybutynin. In men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and in whom the presence of benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) was implicated, propiverine administered as add-on therapy to an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist demonstrated similar or superior efficacy to that achieved with an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist alone, and combination therapy was particularly effective in patients with urinary storage symptoms. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated, but was associated with a higher incidence of adverse events than an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist alone. In children and adolescents with IDO/OAB or NDO, propiverine was generally more effective and better tolerated than oxybutynin. In conclusion, propiverine provides a valuable option for the treatment of adults and children with OAB associated with IDO or NDO, and in men with storage LUTS.

  5. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport® Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

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    Amélie Huynh Le Maux

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO. The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI. Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC. AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder.

  6. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport®) Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

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    Huynh Le Maux, Amélie; Pignol, Bernadette; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA) was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI). Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC). AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder. PMID:26694464

  7. Role of urodynamics in stress urinary incontinence: A critical appraisal

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    Shirish Dattatraya Yande

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Urodynamic study in SUI has a potential of giving much more information than demonstration of Detrusor Overactivity alone. The predominant symptom of urge urinary incontinence can predictably diagnose detrusor overactivity in these cases. However, the incidence of asymptomatic detrusor overactivity remains as high as 15% and may have implication in postoperative results. This study clearly shows that there is a definite incidence of significant voiding dysfunction, which cannot be reliably evaluated without properly conducted pressure flow study. This factor may govern the choice of correct treatment which also predicts the outcome more reliably. Preoperative urodynamic study thus adds a dimension of precision to evaluation of the patients of SUI and may also influence technique and outcome measures in this group of patients.

  8. Role of PKC and CaV1.2 in detrusor overactivity in a model of obesity associated with insulin resistance in mice.

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    Luiz O Leiria

    Full Text Available Obesity/metabolic syndrome are common risk factors for overactive bladder. This study aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM in high-fat insulin resistant obese mice, focusing on the role of protein kinase C (PKC and Ca(v1.2 in causing bladder dysfunction. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high-fat diet for 10 weeks. In vitro functional responses and cystometry, as well as PKC and Ca(v1.2 expression in bladder were evaluated. Obese mice exhibited higher body weight, epididymal fat mass, fasting glucose and insulin resistance. Carbachol (0.001-100 µM, α,β-methylene ATP (1-10 µM, KCl (1-300 mM, extracellular Ca(2+ (0.01-100 mM and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu; 0.001-3 µM all produced greater DSM contractions in obese mice, which were fully reversed by the Ca(v1.2 blocker amlodipine. Cystometry evidenced augmented frequency, non-void contractions and post-void pressure in obese mice that were also prevented by amlodipine. Metformin treatment improved the insulin sensitivity, and normalized the in vitro bladder hypercontractility and cystometric dysfunction in obese mice. The PKC inhibitor GF109203X (1 µM also reduced the carbachol induced contractions. PKC protein expression was markedly higher in bladder tissues from obese mice, which was normalized by metformin treatment. The Ca(v1.2 channel protein expression was not modified in any experimental group. Our findings show that Ca(v1.2 blockade and improvement of insulin sensitization restores the enhanced PKC protein expression in bladder tissues and normalizes the overactive detrusor. It is likely that insulin resistance importantly contributes for the pathophysiology of this urological disorder in obese mice.

  9. Early low-frequency stimulation of the pudendal nerve can inhibit detrusor overactivity and delay progress of bladder fibrosis in dogs with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Liao, L; Chen, G; Zhang, F; Tian, Y

    2013-09-01

    To determine the inhibitory effects of pudendal nerve stimulation (5 Hz) on bladder overactivity at the early stage of spinal cord injury (SCI) in dogs, and to explore the possible effects on delayed progression of bladder fibrosis after SCI. The study was performed using six dogs with spinal cord transection at the T9–T10 level. Group 1 (three dogs) under went low-frequency electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve 1 day after spinal cord transection. Group 2 (three dogs) underwent only spinal cord transection. All dogs underwent urodynamic examination at 1 and 3 months after SCI. The bladders were removed for histological examination of fibrosis at 3 months after SCI. Bladder capacity and compliance were significantly increased (Pstimulation in group 1 when compared with group 2 at 1 and 3 months after SCI. Non-voiding contractions (NVCs) were inhibited in group 1 compared with group 2. Collagen fibers were significantly increased and elastic fibers were significantly decreased (PEarly low-frequency pudendal nerve stimulation can inhibit detrusor overactivity (DO), increase bladder capacity and delay the progression of bladder fibrosis.

  10. Impact of daily number of urgency urinary incontinence episodes on overactive bladder patient reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J C; Brenes, F J; Lizarraga, I; Rejas, J; Trillo, S; Ochayta, D; Arumi, D

    2016-04-01

    To explore the impact of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) on well-being in non-institutionalized patients with overactive bladder (OAB) in a community sample. A cross-sectional web-based study was conducted in the general population, including males and females, >18 years of age. Patients with probable OAB were identified using a validated algorithm together with a score ≥8 on the OAB-V8 scale. Presence of coping behavior was considered determinant for the clinical diagnosis of OAB. Individual well-being was determined through a battery of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) measurements including assessment of health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), sleep disturbances (MOS Sleep), and life satisfaction (LISAT-8). Patients were grouped according to the number of daily UUI episodes (UUI severity): 0 (dry OAB),1, 2-3, or ≥4. Multivariate analysis to evaluate factors independently affecting quality of life was undertaken. A total of 396 patients (52.5% women, mean age: 55.3 [11.1] years, OAB-V8 mean score: 14.5 [7.9]) out of 2035 subjects participating from the general population met the criteria for OAB: 203 (51.3%) with 0episodes, 119 (30.1%) with 1, 52 (13.1%) with 2 or 3, and 22 (5.6%) with ≥4 episodes. A statistically significant linear adjusted association was found between number of UUI episodes and PRO scores. Participants with more episodes had poorer health profiles and self-evaluated quality of life, worse life satisfaction, and more sleep disturbances and fewer hours of sleep per night. Number of incontinence episodes was independent factor to affect quality of life using both LISAT-8 and MOS questionnaires. Severity of UUI was significantly associated with poorer individual well-being in subjects with OAB in a community sample in Spain. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. International Consultation on Incontinence-Research Society (ICI-RS) Report on Non-Invasive Urodynamics: The Need of Standardization of Ultrasound Bladder and Detrusor Wall Thickness Measurements to Quantify Bladder Wall Hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Oelke

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrasonic measurements of urinary bladders are suitable to quantify bladder wall hypertrophy due to bladder outlet obstruction, detrusor overactivity, or neurogenic bladder dysfunction in adult men or women and in children. Quantification of bladder wall hypertrophy seems to be useful

  12. [Male urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, TA de; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2008-01-01

    *Urinary incontinence in males is gaining increasingly more attention. *Male urinary incontinence can be classified as storage incontinence due to overactive bladder syndrome or stress incontinence due to urethral sphincter dysfunction. *Most patients benefit from the currently available treatment o

  13. Impact of Overactive Bladder Syndrome on Female Sexual Function

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    Serdar Toksöz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of female sexual dysfunction includes psychological, physiological and iatrogenic causes. Physiological and iatrogenic causes are abdominal surgery, menopause, smoking, spinal cord injuries and some antipsychotic, antihypertensive, and antidepressant drugs. When assessing sexual function, sexual function questionnaires, such as the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Sexual Function Questionnaire are used. The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction is 43% and it has been reported to increase depending on menopause and age. Estrogen, estrogen + testosterone and tibolone, PDE5, apomorphine, bupropion and flibanserin are used in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction. Overactive bladder is a disease affecting the quality of life and is characterized by urgency, frequency, nocturia and urge incontinence with especially filling phase of the bladder resulting from loss of detrusor muscle inhibition. The prevalence of overactive bladder in women in the United States has been reported to be 16.9%. Lower urinary tract symptoms and overactive bladder syndrome are not known how to cause female sexual dysfunction. Menopause and partner status were the most important predictors for female sexual dysfunction. It has been reported that overactive bladder syndrome and urinary incontinence provide prediction of development of female sexual dysfunction. Shame, fear of incontinence, and urinary incontinence as well as urge sensation during sexual intercourse in individuals with overactive bladder syndrome have been reported to be the main factors causing female sexual dysfunction. Pathophysiological relationship between the two disorders has not been elucidated and further clinical and experimental studies are needed in this regard.

  14. Hiperatividade do detrusor: comparação entre oxibutinina, eletroestimulação funcional do assoalho pélvico e exercícios perineais. Estudo randomizado Detrusor overactivity: comparative study among oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation and pelvic floor training. A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martins Arruda

    2007-09-01

    management of women with detrusor overactivity. METHODS: a total of 64 women, 35 to 80 years old, were enrolled in this randomized prospective trial. Patients were randomized in three groups: Oxybutynin (n=22, ES (n=21 and PFT (n=21. There were no statistical differences between the three groups with regards to race (p=0.948, age (p=0.747, hormonal status (p=0.813, time of symptomatology (p=0.789, previous surgery for urinary incontinence (p=0.993, or body mass index (p=0.897. Patients were assessed before and after treatment by urodynamic test, a seven-day voiding diary, and subjective response. The duration of the treatment was twelve weeks. For statistical analyses, the Pearson chi2, analysis of variance (ANOVA and the paired t-test were used. RESULTS: there was a decrease in the urge-incontinence episodes and in the number of pads required in all groups (p0.05. Urgency was resolved in 14 (63.6%, 11 (52.4% and 12 (57.1% patients of the Oxybutynin, ES and PFT Groups, respectively, without differences among the groups (p=0.754. Subjectively, 17 (77.3%, 11 (52.4% and 16 (76.2% women who had accomplished oxybutynin, ES and PFT, respectively, were satisfied, without differences among the groups (p = 0.142. Urodynamic was normal in 8 (36.4%, 12 (57.1% and 11 (52.4% patients of the Oxybutynin, ES and PFT Groups, respectively. This urodynamic analysis revealed no differences between the three groups (p=0.358. The reduction of urge-incontinence correlated with patient satisfaction (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: treatments were equally effective; reduction of urge-incontinence was correlated with patient satisfaction.

  15. Efficacy and safety of propiverine and terazosine combination for one year in male patients with luts and detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Can Sener

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the long term efficacy and safety of the use of propiverine and terazosine combination in patients with LUTS and DO by a placebo controlled study. Materials and Methods One hundred patients were enrolled in the study. They were randomized into two groups (each group consisted of 50 patients. Terazosine and placebo were administered to the patients in Group 1 and terazosine plus propiverine HCL was administered to Group 2. The patients were evaluated by international prostate symptom score (IPSS, the first four questions of IPSS (IPSS4, the 8th question of IPSS (quality of life-QoL, overactive bladder symptom score questionnaire (OAB-q V8, PSA test, urodynamic studies, post voiding residue (PVR. All patients were followed for one year and were reassessed for comparison. Results IPSS, IPSS4, OAB symptoms, QoL score, PVR, and Qmax scores of the groups did not differ. After one year treatment, there was significant improvement in IPSS, IPSS4, OAB symptoms, QoL and Qmax values in Group 2. No significant improvement was noted for the same parameters in Group 1. Conclusion This is the first study to show long term safety and efficacy of anticholinergic therapy for patients with LUTS. In patients with OAB or DO, long term anticholinergic treatment may be regarded as a treatment option.

  16. Cost effectiveness of fesoterodine and tolterodine for the treatment of overactive bladder with urge urinary incontinence in Spain and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Javier C; Valpas, Antti; Rejas, Javier; Linden, Kari; Kvasz, Marion; Snedecor, Sonya J

    2014-05-01

    Overactive bladder is a prevalent condition worldwide that is associated with a considerable burden, both on the patient and on society. Our objective was to assess the economic value of fesoterodine compared with tolterodine extended release (ER) for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with urge urinary incontinence (UUI) in Spain and Finland. A decision-tree economic model estimated the 52-week costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of OAB/UUI patients initiating treatment with fesoterodine 4 mg/day or tolterodine ER. Individuals were evaluated for treatment response (UUI fewer than one episode/day) and persistence at weeks 4, 12, and 24. Titration from fesoterodine 4 mg/day to 8 mg/day was permitted at week 4. At week 12, non-responders discontinued treatment permanently. Efficacy, discontinuation, and utility data were derived from four clinical trials of fesoterodine. OAB-related costs, including physician visits, laboratory tests, incontinence pads, and comorbidities (fracture, skin infection, urinary tract infections, depression, and nursing home) were also included. A total of 19.5 % and 18.0 % of fesoterodine and tolterodine ER patients remained on treatment until week 52, respectively. QALYs were higher with fesoterodine than tolterodine ER (0.762 vs. 0.760). In Spain, fesoterodine treatment had higher total costs than (generic) tolterodine ER (€6,697 vs. 6,597), resulting in a cost of €15,633/QALY gained. In Finland, fesoterodine was cost saving relative to (non-generic) tolterodine ER (€7,885 vs. 8,024). Sensitivity analysis confirmed that these findings were robust to the expected price decrease for generic tolterodine ER in Finland. Fesoterodine is cost effective or cost saving relative to tolterodine ER for the treatment of OAB with UUI in two European countries. Payers and prescribers should consider a broad scope of costs to make informed cost-conscious choices of antimuscarinic treatment.

  17. The analysis of incontinence episodes and other count data in patients with overactive bladder by Poisson and negative binomial regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, R; Kay, R; van Maanen, R; Ridder, A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies in overactive bladder have traditionally used analysis of covariance or nonparametric methods to analyse the number of incontinence episodes and other count data. It is known that if the underlying distributional assumptions of a particular parametric method do not hold, an alternative parametric method may be more efficient than a nonparametric one, which makes no assumptions regarding the underlying distribution of the data. Therefore, there are advantages in using methods based on the Poisson distribution or extensions of that method, which incorporate specific features that provide a modelling framework for count data. One challenge with count data is overdispersion, but methods are available that can account for this through the introduction of random effect terms in the modelling, and it is this modelling framework that leads to the negative binomial distribution. These models can also provide clinicians with a clearer and more appropriate interpretation of treatment effects in terms of rate ratios. In this paper, the previously used parametric and non-parametric approaches are contrasted with those based on Poisson regression and various extensions in trials evaluating solifenacin and mirabegron in patients with overactive bladder. In these applications, negative binomial models are seen to fit the data well.

  18. Pharmacologic management of overactive bladder

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    Sum Lam

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Sum Lam1,2, Olga Hilas1,31St. John’s University, College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Department of Clinical Pharmacy Practice, Queens, New York, USA; 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a prevalent and costly condition that can affect any age group. Typical symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. OAB occurs as a result of abnormal contractions of the bladder detrusor muscle caused by the stimulation of certain muscarinic receptors. Therefore, antimuscarinic agents have long been considered the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for OAB. Currently, there are five such agents approved for the management of OAB in the United States: oxybutynin, tolterodine, trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin. This article summarizes the efficacy, contraindications, precautions, dosing and common side effects of these agents. All available clinical trials on trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin were reviewed to determine its place in therapy.Keywords: overactive bladder, urinary incontinence, pharmacologic management, antimuscarinic agents, anticholinergics

  19. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

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    Po-Fan Hsieh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA and European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  20. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-02-29

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  1. Review of the efficacy and safety of fesoterodine for treating overactive bladder and urgency urinary incontinence in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagg, Adrian; Oelke, Matthias; Angulo, Javier C; Scholfield, David; Arumi, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition, with prevalence rates increasing with advancing age. Symptoms of OAB, including urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), are associated with various co-morbidities in elderly individuals (e.g., falls and fractures, functional impairment, and depression). The current mainstay of pharmacological therapy for OAB is antimuscarinic agents. Until recently, few studies had specifically evaluated the efficacy and safety of antimuscarinics in the treatment of OAB symptoms in elderly patients. This review summarises available evidence from the medical literature on the efficacy and safety of fesoterodine in elderly patients with OAB symptoms, including UUI. The data from unique placebo-controlled fesoterodine trials of elderly and vulnerable elderly patients, together with age-stratified data from post hoc analyses of fesoterodine trials, demonstrate that treatment with fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg results in statistically and clinically significant improvements in OAB symptoms and patient-reported outcomes in many elderly patients. The data indicate that the efficacy of fesoterodine in elderly patients is comparable with that in younger patients. Fesoterodine is generally well tolerated in elderly and vulnerable elderly patients, with low rates of urinary retention and little evidence of central nervous system events or impaired cognition. The data support a favourable benefit-to-risk ratio for fesoterodine in elderly and medically complex vulnerable elderly patients with OAB.

  2. Renal deterioration after spinal cord injury is associated with length of detrusor contractions during cystometry-A study with a median of 41 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmelund, Marlene; Klarskov, Niels; Bagi, Per;

    2017-01-01

    . Detrusor function, presence of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, maximum detrusor pressure, post-void residual volume, and cystometric bladder capacity were obtained. In patients with detrusor overactivity, a detrusor overactivity/cystometry ratio was calculated using duration of detrusor contraction......(s) during filling cystometry divided by total duration of filling cystometry. RESULTS: A total of 73 patients were included in the study, and the median follow-up time was 41 years after injury (range 24-56). Sixty-four patients (88%) used reflex triggering or bladder expression as bladder emptying method...... for the longest period after injury. During follow-up 60% changed to clean intermittent catheterization. The majority of the patients (68%) had neurogenic detrusor overactivity. In 35 patients, a detrusor-overactivity/cystometry ratio could be calculated and a detrusor overactivity/cystometry ratio > 0...

  3. Overactive bladder, differential diagnosis, and clinical utility of fesoterodine

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    Wyndaele J-J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Jacques WyndaeleDepartment of Urology, Antwerp University, Antwerp, BelgiumAbstract: Overactive bladder is a symptom syndrome with urgency, frequency and, in many cases, nocturia. Urge incontinence is not present in all. There is no direct correlation with detrusor overactivity, an objective finding during urodynamic testing where involuntary contractions can be noticed. In the pathophysiology, much more attention has been given to the afferent/sensory arm of the micturition reflex in the last decade. Anatomical and infectious causes have to be diagnosed or ruled out. Diagnosis of overactive bladder is made mostly by history-taking, but other tests can be necessary in specific patients. Treatment consists of behavioral measures, a good explanation of the condition, training, and pelvic floor physiotherapy. Drugs are often used. Until recently, antimuscarinic drugs have been the mainstay of pharmacological therapy. Fesoterodine is a newer antimuscarinic agent which is more pharmacodynamically stable then tolterodine. Fesoterodine has been extensively researched using different dosages and compared with placebo and tolterodine, in different age groups, and under different conditions. Fesoterodine is superior to placebo and to tolterodine in the short term and long term. Its safety is very acceptable.Keywords: overactive bladder, fesoterodine, incontinence, urgency, lower urinary tract

  4. Fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder syndrome: can the severity of baseline urgency urinary incontinence predict dosing requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Linda; Khullar, Vik; Wang, Joseph T; Guan, Zhonghong; Sand, Peter K

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether baseline urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes predict the need for increased doses of fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder (OAB), as clinicians would benefit from data that help to predict which patients require higher doses of antimuscarinics to manage UUI episodes. In this pooled analysis of data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, patients were randomized to placebo or fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg for 12 weeks and stratified into tertiles (>0- or =4) according to the number of UUI episodes/24 h as recorded in 3-day bladder diaries at baseline. The change in mean UUI episodes/24 h from baseline to end of study was assessed using analysis of covariance. In a post hoc analysis of data from two clinical trials, there were significant reductions from baseline in UUI episodes for fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg vs placebo in patients (n) with >0- or =4 (481) UUI episodes at baseline (all P or =4 UUI episodes at baseline, fesoterodine 8 mg gave significantly greater mean reductions (-1.92 and -4.17, respectively) vs fesoterodine 4 mg (-1.43 and -3.31) (P fesoterodine 4 mg, 19%; and 8 mg, 35%) and constipation (placebo, 2%; fesoterodine 4 mg, 5%; and 8 mg, 6%). Fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg significantly reduced UUI episodes vs placebo; this effect appeared to be greater with fesoterodine 8 mg in patients with > or =2 UUI episodes/24 h at baseline. Fesoterodine was well tolerated, although higher doses increased the incidence of adverse events. These findings might aid the clinical identification of patients with OAB who would most benefit from increasing the dose of fesoterodine from 4 to 8 mg.

  5. The evaluation and management of refractory neurogenic overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpad, Raj; Kennelly, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neurologic disease commonly develop overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms of urgency, frequency, and/or urge incontinence that remain bothersome despite oral pharmacologic therapy. Management of refractory OAB in the neurogenic population is a complex issue with no uniform treatment strategy. When treatment fails or patients generally are dissatisfied with the adverse effects of oral therapy, available options include sacral neuromodulation, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), botulinum toxin injections, and lower urinary tract reconstruction such as augmentation cystoplasty. A thorough knowledge and understanding of available and emerging treatment options for neurogenic detrusor overactivity is paramount to assisting clinicians in choosing an appropriate treatment. This article reviews the non-pharmacologic treatment options for neurogenic OAB, mainly botulinum toxin, neuromodulation, and lower urinary tract reconstruction, and discusses important relevant studies.

  6. Medical management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  7. Detection of intracellular bacteria in exfoliated urothelial cells from women with urge incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuoran; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Mukerjee, Chinmoy; Varettas, Kerry; Mansfield, Kylie J; Schembri, Mark A; Moore, Kate H

    2016-10-01

    The role of subclinical infection in patients with urge incontinence has been largely ignored. The aim of this study was to test for the presence of intracellular bacteria in exfoliated urothelial cells obtained from the urine of patients with detrusor overactivity or mixed incontinence +/- a history of UTI, and compare this to a control group of patients with stress incontinence and no history of infection. Bacterial cystitis was assessed by routine microbiology and compared to microscopic analysis of urine by Wright staining. Subsequent analysis of urothelial cells by confocal microscopy was performed to determine the existence of intracellular bacteria. Bacterial cystitis was seen in 13% of patients based on routine microbiology. Wright staining of concentrated urothelial cells demonstrated the presence of bacteria in 72% of samples. Filamentous bacterial cells were observed in 51% of patients and were significantly more common in patients with detrusor overactivity. Intracellular Escherichia coli were observed by confocal microscopy. This study supports the possibility that a subset of patients with urge incontinence may have unrecognised chronic bacterial colonisation, maintained via an intracellular reservoir. In patients with negative routine microbiology, application of the techniques used in this study revealed evidence of infection, providing further insights into the aetiology of urge incontinence.

  8. Pain during ice water test distinguishes clinical bladder hypersensitivity from overactivity disorders

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    Bountra Chas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bladder cooling reflex (BCR i.e. uninhibited detrusor contractions evoked by intravesical instillation of cold saline, is a segmental reflex believed to be triggered by menthol sensitive cold receptors in the bladder wall, with the afferent signals transmitted by C fibres. The BCR is a neonatal reflex that becomes suppressed by descending signals from higher centres at approximately the time when the child gains full voluntary control of voiding. It re-emerges in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity as a consequence of loss of central descending inhibition, resulting from conditions such as spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. We have recently shown an increase of nerve fibres expressing the cool and menthol receptor TRPM8 in both overactive (IDO and painful bladder syndrome (PBS, but its functional significance is unknown. We have therefore studied the bladder cooling reflex and associated sensory symptoms in patients with PBS and overactivity disorders. Methods The BCR, elicited by ice water test (IWT was performed in patients with painful bladder syndrome (PBS, n = 17, idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO, n = 22, neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, n = 4 and stress urinary incontinence (as controls, n = 21. The IWT was performed by intravesical instillation of cold saline (0 – 4°C. A positive IWT was defined as presence of uninhibited detrusor contraction evoked by cold saline, associated with urgency or with fluid expulsion. Patients were asked to report and rate any pain and cold sensation during the test. Results A positive IWT was observed in IDO (6/22, 27.3% and NDO (4/4, 100% patients, but was negative in all control and PBS patients. Thirteen (76.5% PBS patients reported pain during the IWT, with significantly higher pain scores during ice water instillation compared to the baseline (P = 0.0002, or equivalent amount of bladder filling (100 mls with saline at room temperature (P = 0.015. None

  9. Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicola; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition affecting millions of individuals in the United States. Anticholinergics are the mainstay of treatment. Bladder botulinum toxin injections have shown an improvement in symptoms of OAB equivalent to anticholinergic therapy. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation can decrease symptoms of urinary frequency and urge incontinence. Sacral neuromodulation for refractory patients has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of OAB, urge incontinence, and urinary retention. Few randomized, head-to-head comparisons of the different available alternatives exist; however, patients now have increasing options to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

  10. Prominent complaint: a guide to medical therapy of overactive bladder syndrome in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarabadi, Mina; Ghanbari, Zinat; Hashemi, Shahrzad; Nemati, Maryam; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Azimi Nekoo, Elham

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate Overactive bladder (OAB) with detrusor overactivity (DOA) following oxybutynin or tolterodine treatment in recommended doses at a four-week course. A total of 100 Iranian women 45 years or older with urgency that also showed idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) in the filling phase of their cystometry were included in the current study. In this double-blinded trial two parallel groups were randomized by using two kinds of the antimuscarinic drugs for a four- week course [oxybutinin 5mg, t.d.s. or Tolterodin 2mg, b.i.d.] in the same  packages. Data were collected from three-day frequency volume chart (FVC) one month before and after the treatment course. The effectiveness of each drug was compared using the paired, samples t-test. Patients' improvement regarding urinary urgency, frequency and urge incontinence after treatment in both groups was seen, but mean improvements in the terms of urgency and urge incontinence were larger in patients who were treated by oxybutynin. Night-time frequency was shown to be improved by a significantly larger score by tolterodine. Discontinuation of treatment due to adverse events had no significant difference in two groups. Four-week treatment with oxybutynin was better than tolterodine IR in improving urgency and urge incontinence, but there were not statistically significant difference between them. In planning a course of treatment especially in the elderly, the difference in the group of symptoms that reduce patients' quality of life should be considered. Physicians should consider the patient's prominent symptom in selection of anti-muscarinic drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome especially in elderly patients.

  11. Prominent complaint: a guide to medical therapy of overactive bladder syndrome in older women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Jafarabadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate Overactive bladder (OAB with detrusor overactivity (DOA following oxybutynin or tolterodine treatment in recommended doses at a four-week course. A total of 100 Iranian women 45 years or older with urgency that also showed idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO in the filling phase of their cystometry were included in the current study. In this double-blinded trial two parallel groups were randomized by using two kinds of the antimuscarinic drugs for a four- week course [oxybutinin 5mg, t.d.s. or Tolterodin 2mg, b.i.d.] in the same  packages. Data were collected from three-day frequency volume chart (FVC one month before and after the treatment course. The effectiveness of each drug was compared using the paired, samples t-test. Patients' improvement regarding urinary urgency, frequency and urge incontinence after treatment in both groups was seen, but mean improvements in the terms of urgency and urge incontinence were larger in patients who were treated by oxybutynin. Night-time frequency was shown to be improved by a significantly larger score by tolterodine. Discontinuation of treatment due to adverse events had no significant difference in two groups. Four-week treatment with oxybutynin was better than tolterodine IR in improving urgency and urge incontinence, but there were not statistically significant difference between them. In planning a course of treatment especially in the elderly, the difference in the group of symptoms that reduce patients' quality of life should be considered. Physicians should consider the patient's prominent symptom in selection of anti-muscarinic drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome especially in elderly patients.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection in Patients with Detrusor Hyperactivity and Impaired Contractility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Cheng Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the efficacy and safety of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injection in patients with detrusor hyperactivity and impaired contractility (DHIC. Twenty-one patients with urodynamically proven DHIC and 21 age-matched patients with overactive bladder (OAB with urodynamic detrusor overactivity were treated with intravesical injections of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA. The overactive bladder symptom score, urgency severity score, patient perception of bladder condition, global response assessment, voiding diary, and procedure-related adverse events (AE at baseline, two weeks, one, three, and six months after treatment were assessed. The results showed that the subjective symptom scores improved significantly in both groups, and the scores did not differ between the groups. The decrease in urgency episodes and urgency urinary incontinence were noted in OAB patients but not in DHIC patients. Although the incidence of AEs was comparable between the groups, the therapeutic efficacy lasted for a mean of 4.9 ± 4.8 months in DHIC patients and 7.2 ± 3.3 months in OAB patients (p = 0.03. We concluded that the efficacy of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injection for DHIC patients was limited and short-term. Nevertheless, AEs did not increase in DHIC. Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA might not be a good indication in patients with DHIC and high post-voiding residual urine. Physicians should inform patients of the potential benefits and risks of onabotulinumtoxinA injection for treatment of DHIC.

  13. Guidelines for the Treatment of Urinary Incontineence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guidelines for the Treatment of Urinary Incontineence and Overactive Bladder. ... more than 60% of persons with UI never mention their problem to a doctor or nurse. ... Keywords: urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, treatment, Muscarinic ...

  14. [Urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Incontinence is a common age-dependent and increasing problem in women that may mainly present as stress incontinence, overactive bladder, mixed incontinence or other forms. A thorough history, gynaecological and neurological examination and urinalysis as initial step will lead to the diagnosis and treatment. If midstream urine is difficult to receive, a catheter urine will be easy to obtain. Further investigations as urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasound may be required. As initial step, stress incontinence should be treated with physiotherapy and pelvic floor exercises, if not successful with operations as suburethral slings. Slings have good long-term success rates of approximately 85 % with a low morbidity and can even be inserted under local anaesthetic. The treatment of idiopathic overactive bladder consists of bladder training, a behavioural therapy, and mainly anticholinergics. Anticholinergics may cause side effects particularly in the elderly who are under several medications that may add anticholinergic effects as antidepressants, antibiotics or antihistaminics.

  15. Pelvic organ prolapse and overactive bladder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, T.A. de; Salvatore, S.; Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C.; Kelleher, C.; Kerrebroeck, P. van; Kirby, M.G.; Koelbl, H.; Espuna-Pons, M.; Milsom, I.; Tubaro, A.; Wagg, A.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: In this review we try to shed light on the following questions: *How frequently are symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) and is detrusor overactivity (DO) present in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and is there a difference from women without POP? *Does the presence of OAB symptoms

  16. Pelvic organ prolapse and overactive bladder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, T.A. de; Salvatore, S.; Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C.; Kelleher, C.; Kerrebroeck, P. van; Kirby, M.G.; Koelbl, H.; Espuna-Pons, M.; Milsom, I.; Tubaro, A.; Wagg, A.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: In this review we try to shed light on the following questions: *How frequently are symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) and is detrusor overactivity (DO) present in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and is there a difference from women without POP? *Does the presence of OAB symptoms d

  17. Testing and Treating Women after Unsuccessful Conservative Treatments for Overactive Bladder or Mixed Urinary Incontinence: A Model-Based Economic Evaluation Based on the BUS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Pelham; Middleton, Lee J.; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Daniels, Jane P.; Latthe, Pallavi; Coomarasamy, Arri; Rachaneni, Suneetha; McCooty, Shanteela; Verghese, Tina S.; Roberts, Tracy E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the cost-effectiveness of bladder ultrasonography, clinical history, and urodynamic testing in guiding treatment decisions in a secondary care setting for women failing first line conservative treatment for overactive bladder or urgency-predominant mixed urinary incontinence. Design Model-based economic evaluation from a UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective using data from the Bladder Ultrasound Study (BUS) and secondary sources. Methods Cost-effectiveness analysis using a decision tree and a 5-year time horizon based on the outcomes of cost per woman successfully treated and cost per Quality-Adjusted Life-Year (QALY). Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, and a value of information analysis are also undertaken. Results Bladder ultrasonography is more costly and less effective test-treat strategy than clinical history and urodynamics. Treatment on the basis of clinical history alone has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £491,100 per woman successfully treated and an ICER of £60,200 per QALY compared with the treatment of all women on the basis of urodynamics. Restricting the use of urodynamics to women with a clinical history of mixed urinary incontinence only is the optimal test-treat strategy on cost-effectiveness grounds with ICERs of £19,500 per woman successfully treated and £12,700 per QALY compared with the treatment of all women based upon urodynamics. Conclusions remained robust to sensitivity analyses, but subject to large uncertainties. Conclusions Treatment based upon urodynamics can be seen as a cost-effective strategy, and particularly when targeted at women with clinical history of mixed urinary incontinence only. Further research is needed to resolve current decision uncertainty. PMID:27513926

  18. Coital incontinence: what can we learn from urodynamic assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Chendrimada; Hashim, Hashim; Enki, Doyo; Yaasin, Musaab; Drake, Marcus

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the association of coital incontinence (CI) with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and to understand the pathophysiology of CI. A database of all women who underwent urodynamic testing in a tertiary referral center in the United Kingdom, from January 1991 to December 2009, was retrospectively analyzed. All women reporting CI were included in the study. Urodynamic testing and interpretation of results were performed in accordance with the recommendations of the International Continence Society. The prevalence of CI in women with LUTS undergoing urodynamics was 11.8%, and they were significantly younger (mean age = 45.3 years; P 30 kg/m(2)) and parity were significantly associated with CI (P <.001). Women reporting CI significantly smoked cigarettes and used antidepressants (P <.001). There were fewer postmenopausal women (P <.001) with CI, and previous hysterectomy had a negative association with CI (P = .005). The majority of women had overactive bladder symptoms and stress urinary incontinence (P <.001). CI was significantly associated with urodynamic stress incontinence (UDSI; odds ratio = 2.35) and detrusor overactivity (DO; odds ratio = 1.22) but not DO incontinence (P <.001). Parity, overactive bladder symptoms, and UDSI reached statistical significance when analysis was performed for age-matched controls. CI is not uncommon in women with LUTS, and they present earlier than women with LUTS and no CI. CI is significantly associated with risk factors like parity, obesity, cigarette smoking, and antidepressant usage. CI is multifactorial and associated with UDSI and DO but not DO incontinence. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Overactive bladder, differential diagnosis, and clinical utility of fesoterodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Overactive bladder is a symptom syndrome with urgency, frequency and, in many cases, nocturia. Urge incontinence is not present in all. There is no direct correlation with detrusor overactivity, an objective finding during urodynamic testing where involuntary contractions can be noticed. In the pathophysiology, much more attention has been given to the afferent/sensory arm of the micturition reflex in the last decade. Anatomical and infectious causes have to be diagnosed or ruled out. Diagnosis of overactive bladder is made mostly by history-taking, but other tests can be necessary in specific patients. Treatment consists of behavioral measures, a good explanation of the condition, training, and pelvic floor physiotherapy. Drugs are often used. Until recently, antimuscarinic drugs have been the mainstay of pharmacological therapy. Fesoterodine is a newer antimuscarinic agent which is more pharmacodynamically stable then tolterodine. Fesoterodine has been extensively researched using different dosages and compared with placebo and tolterodine, in different age groups, and under different conditions. Fesoterodine is superior to placebo and to tolterodine in the short term and long term. Its safety is very acceptable.

  20. Detrusor Arreflexia as an End Stage of Neurogenic Bladder in HAM/TSP?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Tannus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The HTLV-1 virus is a known agent involved in the development of HAM/TSP. Past studies have typically observed patients with autonomic dysfunction consisting of detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia, with the occasional observation of underactive detrusor or detrusor arreflexia. However, studies have not yet evaluated the progression of neurogenic bladder over time. In this paper, we describe a HAM/TSP patient with the initial development of overactive detrusor, and subsequent development of detrusor arreflexia. Given a paucity of studies characterizing the effects of HTLV-1 on the autonomic nervous system, particularly aspects controlling continence, this patient's clinical course may represent one type of end point for patients with HAM/TSP and neurogenic bladder. Further cohort or case-series studies, with particular emphasis on the progression of neurogenic bladder, are needed to evaluate the significance of this described case in relation to typical disease progression patterns.

  1. The relationships between preoperative urodynamic parameters and clinical outcomes in urinary stress incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Bozkurt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to evaluate the influence of urodynamic parameters on preoperative and postoperative clinical pictures in stress incontinence.Charts of patients, who were operated for stress incontinence using autologous rectus fascia sling between March 1999 and January 2005 in Tepecik Training and Research Hospital Urology Clinic, were evaluated retrospectively.A total of 41 patients were divided into two subgroups as, pure (10 patients and mixed stress incontinence (31 patients groups. Mean age of patients was 50.4 (33-70 years. Fifteen patients had intrinsic sphincter insufficiency (ISI. Mixed incontinence group had lower volume for first sensation and more detrusor overactivity than pure group. ISI did not alter the success of operation. Urodynamically no relationship was found between detrusor pressure and postoperative postvoiding residual urine (P>0.05.In conclusion, urodynamic evaluation before surgery was not related to preoperative and postoperative clinical picture of patients, but first sensation of bladder is only predictive for the success in fascial sling surgery.

  2. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Carlos Truzzi; Cristiano Mendes Gomes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Ivan Mauricio Plata; Jose Campos; Gustavo Luis Garrido; Almeida, Fernando G. [UNIFESP; Marcio Augusto Averbeck; Alexandre Fornari; Anibal Salazar; Arturo Dell’Oro; Caio Cintra; Carlos Alberto Ricetto Sacomani; Juan Pablo Tapia; Eduardo Brambila

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afferenc...

  3. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos [UNIFESP; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G. [UNIFESP; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro,Arturo; Cintra,Caio; Sacomani,Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the blad...

  4. Cost effectiveness analysis of fesoterodine compared to mirabegron in first-line therapy setting for overactive bladder with urge urinary incontinence, from the Spanish National Health System perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J C; Sánchez-Ballester, F; Peral, C; Rejas, J; Ramos, J; Snedecor, S J; Sudharshan, L; Liu, S; Luo, X

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of first-line treatment of Overactive Bladder (OAB) with fesoterodine relative to mirabegron, from the Spanish National Health System (NHS) perspective. A decision tree model was developed to represent a typical clinical process of 52-week of treatment for an OAB patient with urge urinary incontinence (UUI) initiating first-line therapy with fesoterodine 4mg, including optional titration to 8mg, vs.mirabegron 50mg. Efficacy data were obtained from a Bayesian indirect treatment meta-analysis. Patients with UUI of less than one episode/day were defined as treatment responder and persistence was assessed at weeks 4, 12 and 24. At week 12, non-responders discontinued treatment permanently. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated based on time spent in responder and non-responder states. OAB-related drug and medical care costs including physician visits, laboratory tests, incontinence pads, and comorbidities (fracture, skin infection, urinary tract infections and depression) were modeled and expressed in €2015. At week 52, the percentage of responders was 20.8% for patients starting on fesoterodine 4mg who optionally titrated to 8mg and 19.4% for patients treated with mirabegron. QALYs were slightly higher with fesoterodine than mirabegron (0.7703vs. 0.7668, difference=0.0035). Fesoterodine treatment also had slightly higher total costs than mirabegron (3,296€vs. 3,217, difference=79€), resulting in a cost of 22,523/QALY€ gained for fesoterodine versus mirabegron. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis confirmed the slight advantage of fesoterodine with a 61.1% probability of being cost-effective at the 30,000€ willingness-to-pay for 1QALY threshold. Given the relatively small 1-year cost difference between the two treatments, fesoterodine can be considered a cost-effective option relative to mirabegron for the first-line management of OAB with UUI in Spain. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S

  5. Economic impact of using fesoterodine for the treatment of overactive bladder with urge urinary incontinence in a vulnerable elderly population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Luo, Xuemei; Zou, Kelly H; Snedecor, Sonya J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the costs of treating overactive bladder (OAB) with fesoterodine compared to no OAB pharmacotherapy among vulnerable elderly from the US payer perspective. A decision analytic cost model was developed to estimate the 52-week costs of a cohort of vulnerable elderly with OAB initiating treatment with fesoterodine or no OAB pharmacotherapy. Vulnerable elderly OAB patients were defined as those aged ≥65 years with self-reported urge urinary incontinence (UUI) symptoms for ≥3 months, 2-15 UUI episodes/day, and at risk of deteriorating health by a score of ≥3 on the Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES)-13. Patients were evaluated for fesoterodine treatment response (defined as no UUI episodes) and persistence at weeks 12, 26, and 52. The model included a hypothetical health plan with 100,000 elderly members. A total of 7096 vulnerable elderly subjects were identified as the model target population based on the percentage of vulnerable elderly and annual prevalence of OAB among vulnerable elderly. OAB-related costs included fesoterodine drug acquisition costs, healthcare resource use (inpatient hospitalization, outpatient visits, and physician office visits), and OAB-related co-morbidities (falls/fractures, urinary tract infections, depression, and nursing home admissions). All costs were inflated to 2013 US$ using the medical care component of the consumer price index (CPI). When 7096 vulnerable elderly OAB patients were treated with fesoterodine, US healthcare payers could save $11,463,981 per year, or $1616 per patient vs no OAB pharmacotherapy. Univariate one-way sensitivity analyses supported the robustness of the findings and showed results were most sensitive to changes in fesoterodine efficacy followed by annual costs of inpatient hospitalization. From a US payer perspective, treating vulnerable elderly OAB patients with fesoterodine was cost-saving compared to no OAB pharmacotherapy.

  6. Efficacy of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Kaja; Srinivasan, Krishnamurthy Jayashree

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Overactive Bladder (OAB) accounts for 40-70% cases of incontinence. The etiology is unknown though detrusor instability is found in urodynamic evaluation of almost all cases. Detrusor instability or hyperreflexia can be inhibited by direct inhibition of impulses in the pre-ganglionic afferent neuron or by inhibition of bladder pre-ganglionic neurons of the efferent limb of micturition reflex. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is based on the gate control theory of abolishing the local micturition reflex arc. Aim To assess the effectiveness and safety of TENS in idiopathic OAB. Materials and Methods It is a prospective experimental study to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS v/s placebo in reducing OAB symptoms. (n1=20, n2 =20). Ten treatment sessions (5 sessions/week) of 30 minutes, were conducted. Results There was a significant improvement in Overactive Bladder Symptom Scores (OABSS) in TENS group and 2 patients were completely dry following TENS therapy. Conclusion In elderly women, patients with OAB where other co-medications have their own anticholinergic side effects and impairment of cognition is a concern, TENS can be a useful intervention. TENS units are safe, economical and easily commercially available. PMID:27891403

  7. Correlations among improvements in urgency urinary incontinence, health-related quality of life, and perception of bladder-related problems in incontinent subjects with overactive bladder treated with tolterodine or placebo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyne Karin S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies demonstrate that tolterodine extended release (ER significantly improves urgency urinary incontinence (UUI episodes. Instruments that measure patient-reported outcomes (PROs provide additional information that is valuable for assessing whether clinical improvements are meaningful to the patient. This study determined the correlation of changes in bladder diary variables and other PROs in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB. Methods Subjects with OAB, urinary frequency, and UUI were treated with 4 mg once-daily tolterodine ER or placebo for 12 weeks. Subjects completed 7-day bladder diaries, the Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC, and the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ at baseline and week 12. Only subjects who reported at least some minor bladder-related problems at baseline (PPBC score ≥ 3 were included in this analysis. Results Reductions in UUI episodes per week were significantly greater in the tolterodine ER group (n = 500 compared with the placebo group (n = 487 at week 12 (-71% vs -33%, P P P r = 0.35,P r = 0.16–0.32, P ≤ 0.0011. Changes in PPBC scores and all KHQ domains were significantly correlated (r = 0.13–0.38, P ≤ 0.009 in the tolterodine ER group. Correlations among endpoints in the placebo group were similar to those observed in the tolterodine ER group. Conclusion Improvement in UUI episodes after 12 weeks of treatment with tolterodine ER or placebo was correlated with improvements in patients' perception of their bladder-related problems and health-related quality of life. Correlations were moderate in magnitude but statistically significant, suggesting that PROs are important and relevant measures for evaluating OAB treatment.

  8. [Neurogenic urinary incontinence. Value of surgical management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzenberger, J

    2008-06-01

    Damage to the CNS, the cauda equina, and the pelvic nerval structures causes neurogenic bladder dysfunction with neurogenic urinary incontinence (NUI). The definitive diagnosis of NUI is made with urodynamic examination methods. The most frequent cause of NUI is neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The treatment concept must take into account the physical and emotional restrictions. The treatment of NUI due to NDO is a domain of conservative therapy, i.e., mostly antimuscarinics and intermittent catheterization (IC). In about 30%, there is a good chance for therapy failures. An advancement in therapy is the injection of BTX-A into the detrusor. The missing drug approval is a disadvantage.Operative treatments are considered if conservative and minimally invasive therapies are unsuccessful. Sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulator implantation (SARSI) are available as organ-preserving techniques only for paraplegics with NDO and reflex urinary incontinence and neuromodulation for the other forms of NDO provided that a successful percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test has previously taken place. Augmentation cystoplasty is indicated if SDAF and neuromodulation cannot be used and the bladder wall is damaged irreversibly by fibrosis. Kidney function of at least 25% and acceptance of IC are prerequisites. Myectomy (autoaugmentation) has an indication similar to augmentation cystoplasty but there must not be any fibrosis. Bladder neck insufficiency (BNI) caused by paralysis or iatrogenically can be treated by the implantation of an alloplastic sphincter high at the bladder neck. A stable reservoir function is required. If not all methods are possible, the ileum conduit or the suprapubic bladder fistula can be the last resort.

  9. [Urinary urgency and reflex incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madersbacher, H

    1991-07-01

    Urge and reflex incontinence are caused by detrusor dysfunction:urgency may be due to hyperactivity or hypersensitivity of the bladder. Neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor is called detrusor hyperreflexia: the neurogenic uninhibited bladder is caused by incomplete, and the so-called reflex bladder by complete, suprasacral lesions. The pathophysiology of symptomatic and idiopathic detrusor hyperactivity and the therapeutic armentarium are described. Bladder drill together with biofeedback and pharmacotherapy with spasmolytic drugs - several potent spasmolytic drugs with different modes of action are available - are the basis of treatment for hyperactivity and hypersensitivity of the detrusor. An alternative is electrostimulation: stimulation of the afferents of the pudendal nerve, via the pelvic floor (anal, vaginal), percutaneously (dorsal nerve of the penis, clitoric nerve) or by the implantation of electrodes results in inhibition of the detrusor. Most (80-90%) patients can be treated successfully by conservative means. Operative measurements comprise bladder denervation and bladder augmentation. The results of bladder denervation by transtrigonal phenolization of the pelvic plexus are highly controversial. In patients with uncontrollable hyperactivity of the detrusor, augmentation of the bladder (e.g. clam ileocystoplasty) is the method of choice, while for those with uncontrollable hypersensitivity of the detrusor, cystectomy followed by bladder substitution should be performed as a last resort. Treatment for urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia must be selected bearing in mind that bladder emptying is inadequate, in most cases because of dyssynergia between detrusor and external sphincter. Therapy is basically aimed at transforming hyperreflexia of the detrusor into hyporeflexia, primarily by potent spasmolytic drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Original Research: Combined model of bladder detrusor smooth muscle and interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Josef; Byrtus, Miroslav; Stengl, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Although patients with lower urinary tract symptoms constitute a large and still growing population, understanding of bladder detrusor muscle physiology remains limited. Understanding the interactions between the detrusor smooth muscle cells and other bladder cell types (e.g. interstitial cells, IC) that may significantly contribute to coordinating and modulating detrusor contractions represents a considerable challenge. Computer modeling could help to elucidate some properties that are difficult to address experimentally; therefore, we developed in silico models of detrusor smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells, coupled through gap junctions. The models include all of the major ion conductances and transporters described in smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells in the literature. The model of normal detrusor muscle (smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells coupled through gap junctions) completely reproduced the experimental results obtained with detrusor strips in the presence of several pharmacological interventions (ryanodine, caffeine, nimodipine), whereas the model of smooth muscle cell alone (without interstitial cells) failed to reproduce the experimental results. Next, a model of overactive bladder, a highly prevalent clinical condition in both men and women with increasing incidence at older ages, was produced by modifying several processes as reported previously: a reduction of Ca(2+)-release through ryanodine receptors and a reduction of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-conductance with augmented gap junctional coupling. This model was also able to reproduce the pharmacological modulation of overactive bladder. In conclusion, a model of bladder detrusor muscle was developed that reproduced experimental results obtained in both normal and overactive bladder preparations. The results indicate that the non-smooth muscle cells of the detrusor (interstitial cells) contribute significantly to the contractile behavior of bladder detrusor muscle and should not be

  11. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Lebl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Results: Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%, urgency incontinence (56.0%, urinary retention (8.0%, nocturnal enuresis (70.0%, urinary tract infections (62.0%, constipation (62.0%, and fecal incontinence (16.0% were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. Conclusions: This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment.

  12. Urodynamics post stroke in patients with urinary incontinence: Is there correlation between bladder type and site of lesion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Anupam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of bladder by urodynamic study (UDS in patients with urinary incontinence following stroke, and correlation with site of lesion. Study Design and Setting: Retrospective cross-sectional study in the neurological rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care institute. Materials and Methods: Forty patients (22 males with arterial or venous, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, with urinary incontinence in the acute phase following the event, underwent UDS. Seventeen patients had right hemiplegia, 18 had left hemiplegia, and five had posterior circulation stroke with brainstem/cerebellar features. Bladder type was correlated with age, side, and site of lesion. Results: The mean age was 46.80 ± 16.65 years (range: 18-80 years. Thirty-six patients had arterial stroke and four had cortical venous thrombosis. UDS was performed after a mean of 28.32 ± 10.27 days (range: 8-53 days after the stroke. All but one patient had neurogenic bladder dysfunction, with 36 patients (90% having overactive detrusor (OD and three having underactive/areflexic detrusor. Among the 36 patients with OD, 25 patients (62.5% had OD without detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy (DSD and 11 (27.5% had OD with DSD. Bladder management was advised based on the UDS findings. No significant correlation ( P > 0.05 was found between type of bladder and age or side and site of lesion. Conclusions: UDS is a useful tool to assess and manage the bladder following stroke with urinary incontinence. In this study, no significant correlation was found between UDS findings and site of lesion.

  13. Detrusor after-contraction: a new insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise A. Valentini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAims:Detrusor after-contractions (DAC are non-common in adults. Both definition (nothing in ICS reports and significance (artefact, link with detrusor overactivity (DO or bladder outlet obstruction (BOO remain discussed. Our purpose was to carry out an analysis of the urodynamic parameters during voidings with DAC and, using the VBN model, to simulate pathophysiological conditions able to explain both voiding phase and DAC.Materials and Methods:From large urodynamic database of patients referred for evaluation of lower urinary tract dysfunction, DAC were observed in 60 patients (5.7%. Criteria for DAC were post-void residual 10cmH2O. VBN model was used for analysis of both pressure and flow curves, and simulations of pathophysiological conditions.Results:Onset of DAC (ODAC occurred when Q=7.3±5.7mL/s and bladder volume=17.9±15.4mL. Urgency-frequency syndrome and urodynamic diagnosis of DO were the more frequent scenarios associated with DAC. ODAC was associated to an inversion of the slope of detrusor pressure curve without any perturbation in flow curve. Among tested pathophysiological hypothesis (great, abnormal, detrusor force, sphincter contraction, none allowed restoring all recorded curves (flow rate, voiding pressure and DAC.Conclusion:No urodynamic characteristic of the first part of voiding is an index of occurrence of DAC. ODAC is a significant phenomenon linked with the bladder collapse. DAC is not associated with BOO but more probably with DO and appears as the result of local conditions in an almost empty bladder (concentration of stresses around a transducer; thus DAC seems of weak clinical significance.

  14. Development of oxybutynin chloride topical gel for overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucente VR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vincent R Lucente1, David R Staskin2, Elise De31Institute of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Allentown, PA, USA; 2Division of Urology, St Elizabeth’s Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Urological Institute of Northeastern New York, Albany, NY, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is an age-related syndrome often associated with urinary incontinence. Symptoms of OAB, such as urgency, frequency, and nocturia, can be treated effectively with inhibitors of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Antimuscarinic agents promote relaxation of the detrusor muscle and may modulate afferent neuronal signals involved in the regulation of the micturition reflex. Despite the availability of an increasing number of oral antimuscarinic agents, treatment persistence among patients with OAB generally appears to be low. This may be attributed, at least in part, to the common occurrence of anticholinergic adverse effects, such as dry mouth, constipation, and dizziness. Oxybutynin is a well-established antimuscarinic agent that is available in a variety of formulations. Transdermal formulations have been developed to avoid the first-pass hepatic and gastrointestinal drug metabolism responsible for the anticholinergic adverse effects often observed with oral delivery of oxybutynin. Oxybutynin chloride topical gel (OTG is a formulation of oxybutynin that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in January 2009. OTG was the result of a systematic evidence-based effort to develop a formulation that preserves the efficacy of oral oxybutynin formulations while eliminating most of their anticholinergic adverse effects. Additional emphasis was put on creating a transdermal formulation with minimal potential for application-site skin reactions. The formulation and pharmacokinetic properties of OTG are reviewed in the context of recently published efficacy and tolerability data from a large multicenter, placebo

  15. Bladder contractility is modulated by Kv7 channels in pig detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalø, Julie; Bille, Michala; Parameswaran Theepakaran, Neeraja;

    2013-01-01

    Kv7 channels are involved in smooth muscle relaxation, and accordingly we believe that they constitute potential targets for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. We have therefore used myography to examine the function of Kv7 channels in detrusor, i.e. pig bladder, with a view...

  16. Surgical access for electrical stimulation of the pudendal and dorsal genital nerves in the overactive bladder: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The anatomy of the pudendal nerve and its nerve branches, especially the dorsal nerve of the penis and clitoris (dorsal genital nerves), and the clinical application of electrical stimulation of these nerves in patients with overactive bladder syndrome and detrusor overactivity are

  17. Does sacral pulsed electromagnetic field therapy have a better effect than transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with neurogenic overactive bladder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa A. Fergany

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The UDS showed that the effects of PEMFT in patients with neurogenic OAB secondary to suprasacral SCI was better than TENS for inducing an inhibitory effect on neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

  18. Darifenacin for the treatment of overactive bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.F.M. Blok (Bertil); T. Corcos

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDarifenacin hydrobromide is a muscarinic receptor antagonist for once-daily treatment of overactive bladder (urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, which may be associated with increased frequency of voiding and nocturia). Consistent with its high affinity for muscarinic M3

  19. [Conservative treatment in male urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2014-03-01

    Prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of urinary incontinence are well studied in women; however, studies on male urinary incontinence focus on incontinence following surgery of the bladder or prostate, predominantly incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Aging men suffer from incontinence, most frequently urge incontinence (overactive bladder, OAB), nearly as often as women do.The domain of conservative therapy of urinary stress incontinence in men is pelvic floor training. It remains unclear whether biofeedback procedures, electrostimulation therapy, or magnetic stimulation therapy can enhance pelvic floor training. There are data suggesting that an off-label therapy with Duloxetin®, a selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI), improves urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Antimuscarinic agents in combination with bladder training have been proven as safe and effective treatment in men with OAB. Data, however, suggest that men with OAB are far less frequently treated than women.

  20. Prevalence of "low-count" bacteriuria in female urinary incontinence versus continent female controls: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colin A; Siddins, Anne; Parkin, Katrina; Mukerjee, Chinmoy; Moore, Kate H

    2011-10-01

    Older studies suggesting an association between detrusor overactivity and bacteriuria used an outdated microbiological threshold. We hypothesised that bacteriuria ≥10(3) CFU/ml would be more prevalent in women with urinary incontinence than continent controls. A prospective, cross-sectional study of prevalence of bacteriuria ≥10(3) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml on catheter specimens. Sample estimates suggested 62 women per arm would yield 80% power. Multivariate regression analysis was performed using risk factors including, age, diabetes, menopausal status, sexual activity and cystocele. Among 213 participants, bacteriuria ≥10(3) CFU/ml was more prevalent in incontinent women than continent controls (odds ratio [OR] 4.06; p = 0.036). Two thirds of bacteriuric specimens grew "low-count" bacteriuria. On multivariate analysis, only cystocele ≥ grade II was independently associated with bacteriuria (p = 0.025). On sub-analysis by diagnosis, the only significant finding was with bladder oversensitivity (OR 13.8; p = 0.0017). Bacteriuria, including "low-count" bacteriuria, is more prevalent in urinary incontinence when compared to continent female controls.

  1. Stress Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress incontinence Overview Urinary incontinence is the unintentional loss of urine. Stress incontinence happens when physical movement or activity — such ... coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related ...

  2. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Truzzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder.

  3. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  4. Therapeutic effects of intermittent catheterization coupled with resiniferatoxin intravesical instillations in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity%CIC联合膀胱内灌注RTX治疗儿童神经源性膀胱并逼尿肌过度活动疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金华; 罗真东; 李忠民; 刘国昌; 张丽瑜; 龙旺军; 李京军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) coupled with resiniferatoxin (RTX) intravesical instillations in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DO).Methods A total of 38 patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were enrolled and randomly divided into experimental (n =20) and control (n =18) groups.The experimental group underwent CIC and 4 weekly intravesical instillations of 10 nmol/L resiniferatoxin while the control group CIC and 4 weekly intravesical instillations of 30% ethanol.The urodynamic parameters were assessed after 1 year follow-up.Results The resiniferatoxin treatment group had a significantly lower percent of DO compared to the control group (3 months:40% vs 94.4%; 12 months:10% vs 88.9%,P<0.01).Bladder capacity for the first DO [(107.8 ± 46.3)vs (68.2 ± 31.5)ml] and safety bladder capacity (SBC) [(206.8 ± 50.6) vs (166.3 ± 54.2) ml] significantly increased 12 months after treatment in the resiniferatoxin group than in the control group while the bladder compliance (BC)[(20.8 ± 11.5)vs (24 ± 15.4)ml/cmH2O]-and maximum flow rate (MFR) [(9.5 ± 5.1)ml/s vs (8.2 ± 3.2)ml/s] had no statistical significance between two groups (P>0.05).Conclusions Intermittent catheterization plus resiniferatoxin intravesical instillations can reduce DO in children with neurogenic bladder.%目的 探讨清洁间歇导尿(clean intermittent self-catheterization,CIC)联合膀胱灌注辣椒辣素类似物(resiniferatoxin,RTX)治疗儿童神经源性膀胱(neurogenic bladder,NB)并逼尿肌过度活动(detrusoroveractivity,DO)的疗效.方法 将NB并DO患儿38例,按随机数字表法分为CIC联合RTX灌注组(实验组,20例)和CIC联合30%乙醇灌注组(对照组,18例).采用前瞻性双盲平行对照试验,所有患儿在CIC期间每4周行1次灌注治疗,每3个月行尿动力学检查随访,治疗1年后对比两组患儿尿动力学参数异同.结果 治疗后3个月及12个月实验组

  5. Overactive bladder in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Sophie; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This condition is especially troublesome for pediatric patients and their families when associated with incontinence, since it negatively affects self-esteem and impairs children’s development. From the patient’s perspective, urgency and urge incontinence can have a significant impact, negatively affecting their quality of life. For a therapy to have true benefit, changes must not only be statistically significant, but must also be perceived as meaningful by the patient. A stepwise approach is favoured to treat this pathology, starting with behavioural therapy, followed by medical management, and eventually more invasive procedures. Antimuscarinic agents are the mainstay of medical treatment for OAB. Oxybutynin is the most commonly used antimuscarinic in the pediatric population. However, some patients have a suboptimal response to antimuscarinics and many experience bothersome side effects, which have been documented with all antimuscarinics to a significantly higher degree than placebo. Although there have been reports about the use of tolterodine, fesoterodine, trospium, propiverine, and solifenacin in children, to date, only oxybutynin has been officially approved for pediatric use by medical authorities in North America. This review will address alternative treatment options for pediatric patients presenting with OAB, from conservative measures to more invasive therapies. PMID:28265325

  6. Superiority of fesoterodine 8 mg vs 4 mg in reducing urgency urinary incontinence episodes in patients with overactive bladder: results of the randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled EIGHT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher; Schneider, Tim; Haab, François; Sun, Franklin; Whelan, Laurence; Scholfield, David; Dragon, Erika; Mangan, Erin

    2014-09-01

    To assess the superiority of fesoterodine 8 mg vs 4 mg for improvement in urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes and other diary variables, diary-dry rate (proportion of patients with >0 UUI episodes on baseline diary and 0 UUI episodes on post-baseline diary), and improvements in measures of symptom bother, health-related quality of life (HRQL), and other patient-reported outcomes (PROs). This was a 12-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational trial of men and women aged ≥18 years with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms including UUI (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01302067). Patients were randomised (2:2:1) to receive fesoterodine 8 mg, fesoterodine 4 mg, or placebo once daily; those randomised to fesoterodine 8 mg started with fesoterodine 4 mg once daily for 1 week, then 8 mg once daily for the remaining 11 weeks. Patients completed bladder diaries at baseline and weeks 4 and 12 and the Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC), Urgency Perception Scale (UPS), and Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) at baseline and week 12. The primary endpoint was change from baseline to week 12 in UUI episodes per 24 h. At week 12, patients receiving fesoterodine 8 mg (779 patients) had significantly greater reductions from baseline in UUI episodes, micturitions, and urgency episodes than patients receiving fesoterodine 4 mg (790) or placebo (386); diary-dry rate was significantly higher in the fesoterodine 8-mg group vs the fesoterodine 4-mg and placebo groups (all P fesoterodine 8 mg also had significantly greater improvements in scores on the PPBC, UPS, and all OAB-q scales and domains than patients receiving fesoterodine 4 mg or placebo (all P fesoterodine 4 mg had significantly greater improvements in UUI episodes, urgency episodes, and micturitions; significantly higher diary-dry rates; and significantly greater improvement in PPBC scores and OAB-q scores than patients receiving placebo (all P fesoterodine groups (placebo group, 3

  7. 胆碱能M受体:膀胱过度活动症治疗的关键%The muscarinic receptor:the keypoint of overactive bladder's therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑吉琼

    2012-01-01

    膀胱过度活动症(overactive bladder,OAB)是一种以尿急症状为特征的症候群,常伴有尿频和夜尿症状,可伴或不伴有急迫性尿失禁.存在于膀胱逼尿肌的胆碱能M受体是介导OAB发生的关键.抗胆碱能药物是目前临床治疗OAB最基本的药物,在抑制膀胱逼尿肌不自主收缩、改善OAB症状方面发挥了重要作用.本文从分子结构、受体选择性、药代动力学、临床特点和药物不良反应等方面对目前常用的5种商品化的抗胆碱能药物进行综述.%Overactive bladder (OAB) is defined as a syndrome which represented by the characteristics of urgency, usually with frequency and nocturia,and with or without urge urinary incontinence. The muscarinic receptor, which locates in the detrusor of bladder, has been considered to be a key mediator of OAB. As the first-line medication in the management of OAB, the antimuscarinic agent plays an important role in inhibiting involuntary contraction of detrusor and relieving OAB symptoms. We herein review the molecular structure, receptor selectivity, pharmacokinetics, clinical application and adverse event of the five antimuscarinic agents commercially available in the market.

  8. 舍尼亭联合α受体阻滞剂治疗BPH伴逼尿肌过度活动的临床研究%Tolterodine Tartrate combined with α-receptor blocker for benign prostatic hyperplasia with detrusor overactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘伟; 张少峰; 贾洪涛; 谢胜; 罗茂华; 李云飞

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tolterodine Tartrate combined with the α-receptor blocker in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia with detrusor overactivity (BPH-DO). Methods: A total of 113 patients with BPH-DO were randomly assigned to receive Tolterodine Tartrate combined with Cardura ( Group A) and Cardura alone ( Group B ), both for 12 weeks. Then we recorded and compared their average 24 h urinary frequency, IPSS and QOL score, maximum urinary flow rate,residual urine volume and urinary retention times before and after the treatment. Results: After the treatment, Group A showed significantly better improvement in the average 24 h urinary frequency and scores on IPSS and QOL than Group B. No significant differences were found between the two groups in the maximum urinary flow rate and residual urine volume. No acute urinary retention occurred in either group. Conclusion: The combined use of Tolterodine Tartrate and the c-receptor blocker can effectively relieve the symptoms of dysuria, urinary frequency and urinary urgency in patients with BPH-DO, with neither significant adverse effects on the maximum flow rate and residual urine volume nor increase in the incidence of acute urinary retention.%目的:评价舍尼亭联合α受体阻滞剂治疗良性前列腺增生伴逼尿肌过度活动的有效性及安全性.方法:将113例良性前列腺增生伴逼尿肌过度活动患者随机分为A、B两组,A组联合应用舍尼亭(4 mg,1次/d)及可多华(4 mg,1次/d);B组单独使用可多华,治疗时间为12周,记录并比较治疗前后两组患者平均24 h排尿次数、IPSS及QOL评分、最大尿流率、残余尿量及尿潴留次数.结果:治疗后A组平均24 h排尿次数、IPSS及QOL评分改善较B组明显[(3.9±1.25 vs 2.6±1.37)、(4.4±1.27 vs 2.2±0.91)、(1.8±1.04)its(0.5±0.26),P均<0.05];最大尿流率、残余尿量变化两组没有明显差异,两组病例均未发生尿潴留.结论:舍尼亭联合α受

  9. Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It may begin around the time of menopause. Urgency urinary incontinence happens when people have a sudden need ... urinary incontinence is a mix of stress and urgency urinary incontinence. You may leak urine with a laugh ...

  10. Urgency urinary incontinence and the interoceptive network: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketai, Loren H; Komesu, Yuko M; Dodd, Andrew B; Rogers, Rebecca G; Ling, Josef M; Mayer, Andrew R

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of urgency urinary incontinence has focused on pharmacologically treating detrusor overactivity. Recent recognition that altered perception of internal stimuli (interoception) plays a role in urgency urinary incontinence suggests that exploration of abnormalities of brain function in this disorder could lead to better understanding of urgency incontinence and its treatment. We sought to: (1) evaluate the relationship between bladder filling, perceived urgency, and activation at brain sites within the interoceptive network in urgency urinary incontinence; (2) identify coactivation of other brain networks that could affect interoception during bladder filling in urgency incontinence; and (3) demonstrate interaction between these sites prior to bladder filling by evaluating their resting-state connectivity. We performed an observational cohort study using functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare brain function in 53 women with urgency urinary incontinence and 20 controls. Whole-brain voxelwise analyses of covariance were performed to examine differences in functional brain activation between groups during a task consisting of bladder filling, hold (static volume), and withdrawal phases. The task was performed at 3 previously established levels of baseline bladder volume, the highest exceeding strong desire to void volume. All women continuously rated their urge on a 0- to 10-point Likert scale throughout the task and a mixed measures analysis of variance was used to test for differences in urge ratings. Empirically derived regions of interest from analysis of activation during the task were used as seeds for examining group differences in resting-state functional connectivity. In both urgency urinary incontinent participants and controls, changes in urge ratings were greatest during bladder filling initiated from a high baseline bladder volume and urgency incontinent participants' rating changes were greater than controls. During this bladder

  11. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the treatment of patients with poststroke urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo ZF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhui-feng Guo,1,* Yi Liu,2,* Guang-hui Hu,1 Huan Liu,1 Yun-fei Xu11Department of Urology, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: To investigate the therapeutic effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS on poststroke urinary incontinence (UI.Patients and methods: Sixty-one patients with poststroke UI were enrolled at the Neurology Department in the Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University between January 2010–January 2011 and were divided into treatment and control groups (n=32 and n=29, respectively. TENS was applied to the treatment group, while the control group received basic therapy. The therapeutic group completed the whole set of TENS therapy with a treatment frequency of 30 minutes once a day for 60 days. The positive electrode was placed on the second lumbar spinous process, and the negative electrodes were inside the middle and lower third of the junction between the posterior superior iliac spine and ischia node. The overactive bladder symptom score, Barthel Index, and urodynamics examination were estimated before and after therapy in both groups.Results: The daily micturition, nocturia, urgent urination, and urge UI in the treatment group significantly improved compared to the control group (P<0.05. The patients in the treatment group were superior in the self-care ability of daily living and also had an advantage over the indexes on maximum cystometry volume, flow rate, and the pressure of detrusor in the end of the filling phase.Conclusion: TENS improved incontinence symptoms, enhanced the quality of life, and decreased adverse effects; hence, it is recommended in treating poststroke UI.Keywords: stroke, urinary incontinence, OABSS, Barthel Index, urodynamics, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

  12. Mini-invasive collagen sling in the treatment of urinary incontinence due to sphincteric incompetence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo Taskinen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the technical feasibility of mini-invasive sling procedure and present preliminary results in the treatment of urinary incontinence due to sphincteric insufficiency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen patients (6 males, 7 females, 8 with myelomeningocele, 1 with tethered spinal cord, 3 with bladder exstrophy, 1 with epispadias underwent sling procedure with porcine dermis acellular collagen matrix (PelvilaceTM, Bard medical, UK. The median age was 15.5 (range 8.9-27.5 years. A suprapubic catheter was inserted for the measurement of leak point pressure during the operation. In females vaginal and in males perineal incision was used for sling insertion. The sling was introduced under cystoscopic control. The sling was not fixed with sutures. The outcomes were reviewed at 1, 6 and 12 month after the operation. RESULTS: The median leak point pressure increased from 21.5 (range 5-25 cm H2O to 85 (range 70-100 cm H2O. At 1 month 8 and at 6 months 3 out of 13 patients were dry. At 12 months, none out of 11 patients was completely dry. However, at 12 months some improvement in incontinence was detected in 9 out of 11 patients. Two patients had primary failures. One patient got sling erosion to urethra after a tightening attempt. In one patient detrusor overactivity increased after the sling procedure. CONCLUSIONS: PelvilaceTM sling is safe and easy to introduce in both males and females if pelvic floor anatomy is normal. Although immediate results were promising in neuropathic incontinence, the results seem to deteriorate to unacceptable low level already during the first year. In exstrophy patients the results are generally poor.

  13. Urinary incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Incontinence has about a 15 percent prevalence among elderly women. Some of the factors associated with incontinence are psychosocial implications of stigmatization, the decreased quality of life, and the economic considerations of nursing home costs. There are numerous, often misdiagnosed, reversible causes of incontinence, and many of the problems associated with aging may be alleviated if incontinence is treated symptomatically and controlled.

  14. Sacral nerve stimulation for urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. SACRAL NERVE STIMULATION Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is implanted in the abdomen or buttock to stimulate the sacral nerves in an

  15. Fesoterodine for the treatment of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzefos, Maria; Dolder, Christian; Olin, Jacqueline L

    2009-12-01

    To review pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety data for fesoterodine and determine its role in the treatment of overactive bladder. A MEDLINE search (1966-July 2009) was conducted using the key words fesoterodine, tolterodine, muscarinic receptor antagonist, anticholinergic, overactive bladder, urge incontinence, efficacy, safety, adverse effect, pharmacology, pharmacokinetic, and receptor binding. All articles written in English that were identified from the data sources were evaluated, prioritizing randomized, controlled trials with human data. The references of published articles that we identified were examined for any additional studies appropriate for the review. Fesoterodine, a competitive muscarinic receptor antagonist, is converted to its active metabolite, 5-hydroxymethyltolterodine, by nonspecific esterases, bypassing the cytochrome P450 system. Two randomized controlled Phase 3 trials examined the safety and efficacy of fesoterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder. Fesoterodine was found to produce significant improvements in the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms compared with placebo. Post hoc analysis of these trials demonstrated significant improvements in health-related quality of life in patients with overactive bladder. Only one study included tolterodine, and direct comparisons between fesoterodine and tolterodine were not conducted. The most common treatment-emergent adverse effects associated with fesoterodine included dry mouth, constipation, urinary tract infection, and headache. Fesoterodine appears to be effective and generally safe for the treatment of overactive bladder. The efficacy and safety of fesoterodine in overactive bladder treatment seem to be at least similar to that of tolterodine. Although additional comparative trials are needed, based on available data, it does not appear that fesoterodine provides a substantial advantage over extended-release tolterodine in either efficacy or safety.

  16. Chapter 2: Pathophysiology of neurogenic detrusor overactivity and the symptom complex of "overactive bladder".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    It is now clearly recognized that the function of the lower urinary tract represents a complex interaction between the bladder and its outlet, acting under the control of the central nervous system. While in the past attention has principally focused on the motor (efferent) control of the bladder, sensory (afferent) innervation is now known to be an important therapeutic target. This change in emphasis is strongly supported by both basic science and clinical evidence demonstrating the efficacy of therapy directed at the afferent system. This chapter summarizes the neurophysiological control mechanism that underpins normal lower urinary tract function, emphasizing the importance of the afferent system as a potential therapeutic target.

  17. Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you to restrict your activities and limit your social interactions Increase the risk of falls in older adults ... increase your risk of developing urinary incontinence include: Gender. Women are more likely to have stress incontinence. ...

  18. Dose-escalating study of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of fesoterodine in children with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Bimal; El-Tahtawy, Ahmed; Wang, Ellen Q; Darekar, Amanda; Cossons, Nandini; Crook, Tim J; Scholfield, David; Reddy, Pramod

    2012-08-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of fesoterodine, and assess the utility of 3-day bladder diaries (exploratory objective) in pediatric subjects with neurogenic detrusor overactivity or idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). In this 8-week open-label study, subjects (8-17 years, >25 kg) received fesoterodine 4 mg for 4 weeks, then 8 mg for 4 weeks. Blood samples were obtained at weeks 4 and 8. Of 21 subjects enrolled, 11 had neurogenic detrusor overactivity and 10 had idiopathic OAB; 1 discontinued (personal reasons). Mean age and weight were 13.2 years and 54.0 kg for boys (n = 12) and 13.1 years and 49.2 kg for girls (n = 9). 5-Hydroxy-methyltolterodine plasma concentrations did not differ by diagnosis and were consistent with predictions based on adult data. Treatment-related adverse events (all mild or moderate) included 1 event each of dry mouth, constipation, dry eyes and blurred vision, and 2 events each of nausea and increased post-void residual volume. Three-day bladder diaries proved feasible. Oral administration of fesoterodine in pediatric subjects (>25 kg) with idiopathic OAB or neurogenic detrusor overactivity produced steady-state plasma 5-hydroxy-methyltolterodine exposures similar to those in adults. The doses given were well tolerated. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurological aspects of urinary incontinence in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, and treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly. There is a high rate of urinary incontinence among the patients who have experienced stroke or suffer from dementia or other neurological diseases. The ideas on the pathogenesis and manifestations of overactive bladder, stress urinary incontinence are outlined. Currently available drugs (anticholinergics, antidepressants, botulinum toxin preparations, methods for behavioral therapy and physiotherapy, and skin care in urinary incontinence are discussed. The current treatment options can improve quality of life in the elderly and their milieu.

  20. [Electrostimulation of the pelvic floor muscles in urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjelum, K B; Lose, G; Abel, I; Pedersen, L M

    1994-04-11

    External electrical stimulation is a simple, noninvasive and inexpensive treatment modality, which is useful in the treatment of stress- and/or idiopathic urge incontinence. The mode of action arises from excitation of the pudendal nerves leading to direct and reflex contraction of pelvic floor muscles and a reflex inhibition of the detrusor. Treatment can be applied either as a weak long-term stimulation at home, as a short-term maximal stimulation in clinic, hospital or home treatment. Approximately 50%-75% of incontinent patients are either cured or improved and the adverse effects are sparse. Electrostimulation seems to be valuable in the treatment of incontinence.

  1. New drug treatments for urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Dudley; Cardozo, Linda

    2010-04-01

    Urinary incontinence remains a common and distressing condition affecting many women and is known to have a significant effect on quality of life (QoL). Whilst conservative and behavioural therapy are important in the management of women with both stress incontinence and overactive bladder (OAB) ultimately many may benefit from pharmacological therapy. Antimuscarinic drugs are the commonly used agents in the treatment of OAB although often compliance and persistence are affected by adverse effects. Consequently many newer agents remain under investigation. In addition duloxetine has recently been introduced for the management of women with stress incontinence and may offer an alternative to surgery in selected cases. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and new developments in the management of women with urinary incontinence as well as reviewing the role of oestrogen therapy in relation to lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  2. Detrusor underactivity and the underactive bladder: Symptoms, function, cause-what do we mean? ICI-RS think tank 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phillip P; Birder, Lori A; Abrams, Paul; Wein, Alan J; Chapple, Chris R

    2016-02-01

    Impaired bladder emptying is a well-recognized cause of lower urinary tract symptoms. However, the symptoms produced do not always relate to voiding, and may include frequency, urgency and incontinence. Conversely, the etiology of symptoms of disturbed voiding is not necessarily dependent upon objectively impaired voiding. Terms including underactive bladder, detrusor underactivity, and impaired contractility describe aspects of these problems, and have been used somewhat interchangeably. It is possible that the present lack of effective therapy in many cases relates to both etiologic and diagnostic uncertainty stemming from terminologic imprecision. Detrusor underactivity has a standardized definition, unlike underactive bladder and impaired contractility. The relationships of symptoms, function, and cause were the focus of a 2014 ICI-RS Think Tank entitled Does Detrusor Underactivity Exist, and if so it is neurogenic, myogenic, or both? This review presents a summary of the problem and the Think Tank conclusions. A terminologic hierarchy and specific research goals are presented.

  3. Influence of behavior modification on overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Kathryn L

    2002-11-01

    Behavioral interventions have been used for decades to treat urge incontinence and other symptoms of overactive bladder. Perhaps the earliest form of treatment was the bladder drill, an intensive intervention designed to increase the interval between voids to establish a normal frequency of urination and normalization of bladder function. Bladder training is a modification of bladder drill that is conducted more gradually on an outpatient basis and has resulted in significant reduction of incontinence in older, community-dwelling women. Multicomponent behavioral training is another form of behavioral treatment that includes pelvic floor muscle training and exercise. This intervention focuses less on voiding habits and more on altering the physiologic responses of the bladder and pelvic floor muscles. Using biofeedback or other teaching methods, patients learn strategies to inhibit bladder contraction using pelvic floor muscle contraction and other urge suppression strategies. Although behavioral and drug therapies are known to be highly effective for reducing urge incontinence, few patients are cured with either treatment alone. Thus, future research should explore ways to enhance the effectiveness of these conservative therapies. Although the mechanisms by which behavioral treatments work have not been established, there is some evidence that behavioral and drug interventions may operate by different mechanisms, suggesting that they may have additive effects and that combining them may result in better outcomes. Future research needs to examine the mechanisms by which these therapies reduce incontinence and whether combining behavioral and drug treatment will result in better outcomes than either therapy alone.

  4. Stress incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incontinence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000891.htm Stress urinary incontinence To use the ... irritation. Smoking also increases your risk for bladder cancer. Avoid alcohol ... keep the muscle around your urethra strong and working well. This may help keep ...

  5. Propiverine versus tolterodine: efficacy and tolerability in patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünemann, Klaus-Peter; Halaska, Michael; Rittstein, Tomas; Mürtz, Gerd; Schnabel, Frieder; Brünjes, Rainer; Nurkiewicz, Wojciech

    2005-09-01

    Propiverine and tolterodine were compared with respect to efficacy, tolerability and impact on the quality of life in the treatment of patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity. In a randomised, double-blind, multicentre clinical trial, patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity were treated with 15 mg propiverine twice daily or 2mg tolterodine twice daily over a period of 28 days. The maximum cystometric capacity was determined at baseline and after 4 weeks of therapy. The difference of both values was used as the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were voided volume per micturition, evaluation of efficacy (by the investigator), tolerability, post void residual urine, and quality of life. The mean maximum cystometric capacity increased significantly (p tolterodine group experienced adverse events. The most common adverse event, dry mouth, occurred in 20 patients in the propiverine group and in 19 patients in the tolterodine group. The scores for the quality of life improved comparably in both groups. The study demonstrates comparable efficacy, tolerability, and improvement in the quality of life of 15 mg propiverine twice-daily and 2mg tolterodine twice-daily in the treatment of the symptoms of idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

  6. Role of fesoterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Mansfield, Kylie J.

    2009-01-01

    Kylie J MansfieldGraduate School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Muscarinic receptors have long been the target receptors for treatment of patients with overactive bladder (OAB). These patients experience symptoms of urgency, urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urge incontinence (the involuntary leakage of urine associated with urge). Fesoterodine, a pro-drug, structurally and functionally related to tolterodine, is the newest agent developed for the...

  7. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Carlos Truzzi; Cristiano Mendes Gomes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Ivan Mauricio Plata; Jose Campos; Gustavo Luis Garrido; Almeida, Fernando G. [UNIFESP; Marcio Augusto Averbeck; Alexandre Fornari; Anibal Salazar; Arturo Dell'Oro; Caio Cintra; Carlos Alberto Ricetto Sacomani; Juan Pablo Tapia; Eduardo Brambila

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both gen...

  8. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    OpenAIRE

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos [UNIFESP; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G. [UNIFESP; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro,Arturo; Cintra,Caio; Sacomani,Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including bo...

  9. Clinical and urodynamic evaluation of women with detrusor instability before and after functional pelvic floor electrostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, R M; Castro, R A; Sartori, M G F; Takano, C C; Baracat, E C; Rodrigues de Lima, G; Girão, M J B C

    2003-01-01

    Detrusor instability is the second most frequent cause of female urinary incontinence. There are many therapeutic options, including non-invasive and surgical procedures. In this study, we evaluated the effects of pelvic floor vaginal electrostimulation using equipment designed in our institution, over three consecutive months, for treatment of 29 women with detrusor instability. After treatment 22 patients (76%) considered themselves cured or symptomatically improved; seven patients (24%) had no change in symptoms after therapy. There was objective cure and improvement in ten (34.5%) and in eight (27.5%) patients, respectively, and the urodynamic parameters did not change in 11 patients (38%). Electrical stimulation resulted in a gradual decrease in the number of urinary leakage episodes and increase in maximum cystometric capacity in first desire to void and in urinary volume.

  10. Update on duloxetine for the management of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Basu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Maya Basu, Jonathan RA DuckettDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medway Maritime Hospital, Gillingham, Kent, UKAbstract: Duloxetine is a relatively balanced serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI, which is the first drug with widely proven efficacy to have been licensed for the medical treatment of women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Despite favorable results from randomized controlled trials, surgical management continues to be the mainstay of treatment for SUI. In this review we explore the pharmacology of duloxetine in the nervous system and lower urinary tract, and the evidence for its use in the management of women with urinary incontinence.Keywords: duloxetine, stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder

  11. Conservative management for urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K H

    2000-04-01

    Gynaecologists have become increasingly aware of the need to offer conservative therapy for genuine stress incontinence. There is good objective evidence from randomized controlled trials to support the use of supervised pelvic floor exercises. The efficacy of biofeedback therapy, vaginal cone weights and electrostimulation therapy is variable and requires further study to identify those women who will benefit the most. The mainstay of therapy for detrusor instability/sensory urgency remains bladder training, which has proven objective efficacy, but new treatments such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) offer promise. Finally, for certain groups of women with mixed stress and urge leak, a new range of vaginal and urethral devices provide useful additional options. The specific requirements for future research are discussed.

  12. Neurophysiological modeling of bladder afferent activity in the rat overactive bladder model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choudhary, M. (Mahipal); E. van Asselt (Els); R. van Mastrigt (Ron); F. Clavica (Francesco)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome-based urinary dysfunction characterized by “urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia”. Earlier we developed a mathematical model of bladder nerve activity during voiding in anesthetized rats and found that

  13. Application of Purified Botulinum Type A Neurotoxin to Treat Experimental Trigeminal Neuropathy in Rats and Patients with Urinary Incontinence and Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshizo Matsuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type A neurotoxin (NTX of Clostridium botulinum was purified by a simple procedure using a lactose gel column. The toxicity of this purified toxin preparation was retained for at least 1 year at −30°C by supplementation with either 0.1% albumin or 0.05% albumin plus 1% trehalose. When purified NTX was used to treat 49 patients with urinary incontinence caused by either refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity, 36 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms. These beneficial effects were also observed in cases of prostatic hyperplasia. The results obtained with NTX were similar to that of Botox. The effects of NTX on trigeminal neuralgia induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC in rats were also studied. Trigeminal ganglion neurons from ipsilateral to IoNC exhibited significantly faster onset of FM4-64 release than sham-operated contralateral neurons. Intradermal injection of NTX in the area of IoNC alleviated IoNC-induced pain behavior and reduced the exaggerated FM4-64 release in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

  14. Argus T® versus Advance® Sling for postprostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, João Paulo Cunha; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Bezerra, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare the results of two slings, Argus T® and Advance®, for the treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI). Material and Methods: From December 2010 to December 2011, 22 patients with PPUI were randomized as follows: 11 (mean age 62.09(±5.30)) underwent treatment with Advance® and 11 (mean age 62.55(±8.54)) with Argus T®. All patients were evaluated preoperatively with urodynamic testing, quality of life questionnaire (ICIQ-SF), voiding diary and 24-hour pad test. Exclusion criteria were: neurological diseases, severe detrusor overactivity and urethral stenosis. Evaluation was performed at 6, 12 and 18 months after the surgery. After implantation of the Argus T® sling, patients who experienced urine leakage equal to or greater than the initial volume underwent adjustment of the sling tension. Results were statistically analyzed using the Fisher’s test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Friedman’s non-parametric test or the Mann-Whitney test. Results Significant improvement of the 24-hour pad test was observed with the Argus T® sling (p=0.038) , With regard to the other parameters, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Removal of the Argus T® device due to perineal pain was performed in one patient (9%). Despite non uniform results, both devices were considered useful to improve quality of life (ICIQ-SF): Argus T® (p=0.018) and Advance® (p=0.017). Conclusions Better results were observed in the 24h pad test and in levels of satisfaction with the Argus T® device. Both slings contributed to improve quality of life (ICIQ-SF), with acceptable side effects. PMID:27286117

  15. Overactive bladder and its effects on sexual dysfunction among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergenoglu, Ahmet M; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Itil, Ismail Mete; Askar, Niyazi; Meseri, Reci; Petri, Eckhard

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between overactive bladder (OAB) and sexual dysfunction in sexually active nurses without stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. Prospective, observational study. Tertiary care center. 200 nurses, under 49 years of age. Data were obtained with Turkish language-validated questionnaires between January 2011 and June 2011. OAB was diagnosed using the Overactive Bladder Awareness Tool (OAB AT). Scores on the Overactive Bladder Symptom and Health-related Quality of Life Questionnaire Short Form (OABq-SF), the Health-related Quality of Life Questionnaire Short Form (HRQOL), and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire Short Form (PISQ-12). Of the 127 enrolled volunteers, 51 were diagnosed with OAB. The mean age of the participants was 37.8 ± 7.3 years. After controlling for age, body mass index, and parity, OAB did not significantly affect PISQ-12 scores, but significantly worsened OABq-SF scores. No strong correlation was noted between the parts of the OABq-SF and the domains of the PISQ-12. OAB is a common problem among sexually active young women and significantly affects their quality of life. However, OAB-related sexual dysfunction plays a limited role among sexually active nurses. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. [Urinary incontinence and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, G; Fritel, X; Capmas, P; Pourcelot, A-G; Fernandez, H

    2012-06-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) more than or equal to 30kg/m(2), promotes pelvic floor disorders such as urinary incontinence (UI) and genital prolapse. Datas from cohort studies found an association between high BMI and the onset of UI. This association seems to be predominant with for mixed UI and stress UI. For the urge UI and overactive bladder syndrome, the analysis of the literature found a weaker association. The weight is therefore the only modifiable risk factor. Thus, the weight loss by a hypocaloric diet associated with pelvic floor muscle training should be the front line treatment in the obese patient suffering from UI. Bariatric surgery can be discussed in the most obese patient, even if the risk/benefit balance should be weighed because of significant morbidity of this surgery. The results of sub urethral sling (by retropubic tension-free vaginal tape or transobturator sling) in obese patients appear to be equivalent to those obtained in patients of normal weight. Datas on per- and postoperative complications for suburethral slings are reassuring.

  17. Role of fesoterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie J Mansfield

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Kylie J MansfieldGraduate School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Muscarinic receptors have long been the target receptors for treatment of patients with overactive bladder (OAB. These patients experience symptoms of urgency, urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urge incontinence (the involuntary leakage of urine associated with urge. Fesoterodine, a pro-drug, structurally and functionally related to tolterodine, is the newest agent developed for the treatment of OAB. Fesoterodine is broken down to the active metabolite, 5-hydroxy-methyl-tolterodine (5-HMT by non-specific esterases. This metabolism results in the complete breakdown of the parent compound and is responsible for dose related improvements in clinical efficacy and health related quality of life. Like other antimuscarinic agents including tolterodine, fesoterodine is associated with improvements in clinical variables related both to bladder filling (decreasing micturition frequency and increasing mean voided volume and urgency (urgency and urge incontinence episodes. Improvements in health related quality of life following treatment with fesoterodine is indicated by improvements in 7 of the 9 variables measured by the King’s Health Questionnaire. Also like other antimuscarinic agents, fesoterodine use is associated with adverse events including dry mouth. However the incidence of dry mouth is reduced with fesoterodine, compared to oxybutynin, due to the improved bladder selectivity of 5-HMT.Keywords: fesoterodine, 5-hydroxymethyl-tolterodine, muscarinic, overactive bladder, urgency, incontinence

  18. Sacral neuromodulation in overactive bladder: a review and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhu T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Troy Sukhu,1 Michael J Kennelly,2 Raj Kurpad1 1Department of Urology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 2Department of Urology, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA Abstract: Overactive bladder (OAB symptoms of urgency, frequency, and urge incontinence currently affect a substantial portion of the population, especially as age increases. Sacral neuromodulation has become a popular option for refractory OAB symptoms over the past 2 decades. Studies have demonstrated that it is an effective treatment for OAB and urge incontinence as indicated by decreased number of voids, increased bladder capacity, and fewer leakage events. In addition, the effects have proved to be durable to multiple years following implantation. These benefits come at the expense of a high rate of adverse events, although with comparable long-term cost-effectiveness to botulinum toxin A. We aimed to review the literature that demonstrates that sacral neuromodulation continues to be an efficacious treatment for refractory OAB wet and dry patients, with continuously expanding indications. Keywords: urge incontinence, sacral neuromodulation, overactive bladder, refractory, voiding dysfunction

  19. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years. PMID:27176184

  20. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Truzzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  1. Female stress and urge incontinence in family practice: insight into the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktrup, L

    2002-11-01

    As many as 25% of all women are affected by urinary incontinence, but only a few are treated. This frequent, often medically unrecognised, condition occurs in women of all ages. The continence mechanism is based on bladder detrusor control, intact anatomical structures in and around the urethra, correct positioning of the bladder neck and a comprehensive innervation of the lower urinary tract. Age and childbearing are established risk factors for the development of urinary incontinence, but other factors are currently suggested. The evaluation of urinary incontinence should include history, gynaecological examination, urine test, frequency-volume diary and a pad-weighing test. Female urinary incontinence can be treated in general practice by simple means, e.g. pelvic floor muscle training, bladder training, electrostimulation, drug therapy, or a combination of these approaches. This review updates the knowledge of the continence mechanism and summarises the epidemiology, risk factors, assessment and treatment of urinary incontinence in general practice.

  2. Onabotulinum toxin a (botox®) in the treatment of neurogenic bladder overactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrsted, Malene; Nordsten, Cecilie Bagi; Bagi, Per

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) is a potent presynaptic neuromuscular blocking agent which induces selective, reversible muscle weakness for months when injected intramuscularly. During recent years BT has revolutionized the treatment of previously intractable symptoms of detrusor overactivity. Based...... techniques and dosages were described. The onset of the effect usually appeared before 2 weeks, and reached a peak within 2-6 weeks, with the clinical effect being maintained for approximately 6-8 months, or even longer. Depending on the dose, a number of patients developed high residual volume and clean...

  3. A critical review of diagnostic criteria for evaluating patients with symptomatic stress urinary incontinence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapple, C.R.; Wein, A.J.; Artibani, W.; Brubaker, L.; Haab, F.; Heesakkers, J.P.; Lightner, D.

    2005-01-01

    The first paper in this section is a review by several highly respected authors of diagnostic criteria for evaluating patients with symptomatic stress urinary incontinence, and is followed by a review of the role of urgency and its measurement in the overactive bladder symptom syndrome, with emphasi

  4. Management of daytime urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Aniruddh V; Craig, Jonathan C; Smith, Grahame H H; Caldwell, Patrina H Y

    2012-02-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms, particularly urgency, frequency and incontinence are common in school-aged children but are often overlooked. They may cause considerable physical, social and psychological difficulties to children and their families, and usually are manifestations of underlying non-neurogenic voiding disorders. The differential diagnoses include overactive bladder syndrome, dysfunctional voiding and vaginal reflux as well as less common conditions like giggle incontinence, voiding postponement, pollakiuria and diabetes insipidus. In this paper, we discuss an evidence-based approach to the management of conditions causing daytime urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms in children from a general paediatrician's perspective.

  5. Does fesoterodine have a role in the treatment of poorly managed patients with overactive bladder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris V

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vikky Morris,1 Adrian Wagg21Geriatric Medicine, Taunton Hospital Somerset, UK; 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB, a clinically defined symptom complex comprising urinary urgency, usually accompanied by urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency incontinence, is common and has a markedly negative impact on the sufferer's quality of life. Following conservative and lifestyle management, the current pharmacological mainstay of treatment is antimuscarinic therapy. This review explores the role of fesoterodine, a relatively recently introduced antimuscarinic agent, in the treatment of patients who may have had a suboptimal response to initial therapy, who have switched treatment from tolterodine, or may be at risk of receiving poor treatment because of either multimorbidity or complex polypharmacy.Keywords: elderly, fesoterodine, overactive bladder, urgency incontinence

  6. Mirabegron, a breakthrough in overactive bladder syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Maestro Nombela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Overactive bladder syndrome is a condition with high prevalence, which has a negative impact on patients’ quality of life. A drug with a novel mechanism of action has been recently approved: mirabegron. The objective of this study is to review the scientific evidence available on mirabegron, with the aim to analyze its efficacy, safety and cost, and thus estimate its role within current pharmacotherapy. Methods: The effectiveness and safety of mirabegron were analyzed through an evaluation of scientific evidence. The cost of different pharmacological alternatives was calculated based on their Defined Daily Dose (DDD and their manufacturer’s sale price. Results: The use of mirabegron in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome is supported by three randomized clinical trials, controlled with placebo, at 12 weeks. All three share the same primary efficacy variables (number of incontinence episodes per 24 hours and number of micturitions per 24 hours. Long-term efficacy data are based on a 12-month study, where efficacy outcomes were measured as secondary variables. In all studies, mirabegron showed a significant but modest effect. Some of the most frequently detected adverse effects were: hypertension, increase of glucose in blood, headache, urinary tract infections, constipation and tachycardia. Special attention must be paid to cardiovascular events. Conclusions: The clinical efficacy of mirabegron is very modest and comparable to that achieved with the other drugs approved for this indication. Moreover, it is more expensive than other therapeutic options. Cardiac risks and urinary infections only allow to consider it as an alternative option to anticholinergic drugs, when these are contraindicated, show no clinical efficacy, or cause unacceptable adverse effects.

  7. Update on tolterodine extended-release for treatment of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tola Omotosho

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Tola Omotosho, Chi Chiung Grace ChenWomen’s Center for Pelvic Health, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder is a prevalent condition which negatively impacts quality of life and puts a significant economical burden on society. First-line therapy often includes pharmacotherapy with antimuscarinic medications, and numerous research studies have demonstrated that tolterodine extended-release (ER is an efficacious and tolerable formulation of this class of medication. This review provides an update on the clinical use of tolterodine ER, detailing the current literature on its efficacy, tolerability, adverse effects, and comparability with other commonly prescribed medications for the treatment of overactive bladder.Keywords: antimuscarinics, efficacy, quality of life, overactive bladder, tolterodine, urgency, urge urinary incontinence

  8. Simplified bladder training augments the effectiveness of tolterodine in patients with an overactive bladder.

    OpenAIRE

    Mattiasson, Anders; Blaakaer, J; Høye, K; Wein, A J

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the efficacy of tolterodine plus simplified bladder training (BT) with tolterodine alone in patients with an overactive bladder. PATIENTS AND METHODS In a multicentre, single-blind study at 51 Scandinavian centres, 505 patients aged >= 18 years with symptoms of urinary frequency (>= 8 micturitions/24 h) and urgency, with or without urge incontinence, were randomized to oral treatment with either tolterodine 2 mg twice daily plus simplified BT o...

  9. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rectum Vol. 44, No. 1 January 2001. FAQs Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Childbirth and Delivery Neurologic Disease or Injury Colorectal Cancer Other Contributing Factors Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's ...

  10. Fecal Incontinence in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children and teens in our Learning Center . FAQs Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Childbirth and Delivery Neurologic Disease or Injury Colorectal Cancer Other Contributing Factors Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's ...

  11. Symptoms of Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes in your bowel control, don’t let embarrassment and your lack of knowledge about treatment options ... Aging Managing Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories ...

  12. Intravesical capsaicin in patients with detrusor hyper-reflexia--a placebo-controlled cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T; Nielsen, J B; Schrøder, H D

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intravesical treatment with capsaicin could block detrusor hyper-reflexia (DH) and alter the substance P content, nerve fibres and mucosa of the bladder. Twelve patients with spinal cord disease with DH and urinary incontinence resistant to anticholi......The aim of this study was to determine whether intravesical treatment with capsaicin could block detrusor hyper-reflexia (DH) and alter the substance P content, nerve fibres and mucosa of the bladder. Twelve patients with spinal cord disease with DH and urinary incontinence resistant...... to anticholinergic treatment underwent intravesical administration of 50 ml 2% lignocaine. followed by either 100 ml 1 mmol/l capsaicin or 100 ml physiological saline for 30 min. Cross-over to the alternative treatment took place after 4 weeks. Varying degrees of burning sensation were experienced by all but one...... patient during the capsaicin treatment and precluded the possibility of conducting studies of this type in a blind manner. No preference for capsaicin treatment was found, and micturition and VAS scores were unchanged after treatment with capsaicin. The mean volume of the contents of the bladder at which...

  13. Fesoterodine for overactive bladder: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kanchan; Kaur, Kirandeep; Aulakh, Baldev Singh; Kaushal, Sandeep

    2010-10-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a chronic condition affecting both men and women, with prevalence increasing with age. Antimuscarinics form the cornerstone of treatment of OAB. Fesoterodine, a nonselective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in late 2008 for once daily, oral administration in the treatment of OAB to relieve the symptoms of urinary urge incontinence, urgency, and frequency. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the mechanism of action of and clinical trial data for fesoterodine, and to discuss the present status of fesoterodine in the management of OAB. The MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases were searched (June 1, 1999-December 1, 2009) using the terms fesoterodine, overactive bladder, and muscarinic antagonists. Full-text articles in English were selected for reference, and articles presenting the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, and data from clinical trials were included. The parameters measured were tolerability, efficacy, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Trials involving animals and Phase I studies were excluded. The initial literature search yielded 48 papers. A total of 20 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. In two 12-week, randomized, multicenter, Phase III clinical trials involving patients with increased micturition frequency and urgency and/or urinary urge incontinence (n = 836 and 1132 in each trial), both fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg were associated with significantly improved symptoms of OAB (frequency of micturition, urgency, and urge incontinence) compared with placebo (P fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg led to treatment satisfaction in ∼80% of patients (of 516 enrolled) who were initially unsatisfied with their previous treatment. A review of the literature suggests that fesoterodine is an efficacious and well-tolerated treatment option for patients with OAB.

  14. [PROSPECTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF IDIOPATHIC AND NEUROGENIC OVERACTIVE BLADDER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalov, A A; Korshunova, E S; Popov, G R; Khodyreva, L A; Dudareva, A A; Nizov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common problem in modern population. The main line of medical treatment of this condition is the use of M-cholinoblockers. Solifenacin has shown high selectivity for the bladder in preclinical studies. Data on the efficacy and safety of high-dose (10 mg/day) of solifenacin are insufficient. The study was aimed to the comparative evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of solifenacin at a dose of 5 and 10 mg/day. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men), mean age was 41.3±6.7 years. All patients were divided into two groups. In Group 1 included 12 patients with idiopathic overactive bladder, the Group 2 (n=16) - with neurogenic overactive bladder. Depending on the effect obtained, in some patients the dose was increased to 10 mg/day 1 month after starting treatment. The duration of treatment was 12 weeks. Application of solifenacin at a dose of 5 mg in patients with overactive bladder significantly reduces the severity of symptoms. Increasing the dose was required in 3 (25%) patients with idiopathic OAB and in 10 (62.5%) - with neurogenic OAB. Patients unsatisfied by therapy with solifenacin 5 mg/ day initially had more severe symptoms of the disease - significantly more urgency frequency, incontinence episodes, and nocturia. The use of high doses of solifenacin increased the effectiveness of treatment. Statistical significance was achieved for all parameters evaluated. Against the background of increasing doses, the number ofadverse effects may increase, but within a month of therapy in most cases they are reduced.

  15. Urodynamic investigation of cyclophosphamide-induced overactive bladder in conscious rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Feng; LIU Di; HAN Xiao-min; LI Wen-cheng; PANG Zi-li; LI Bing; ZHANG Xiao-ping; XIAO Ya-jun; ZENG Fu-qing

    2012-01-01

    Background Overactive bladder (OAB) can be caused by many factors such as inflammation,bladder outlet obstruction,neurogenic factors.We performed an intraperitoneal (ip) injection of cyclophosphamide to induce cystitis in rats,which causes their detrusors to overact,to provide a valuable disease model for discussing OAB pathogenesis and to study effective curing methods.Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats were induced to form cystitis by cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg,ip).The day after the injection,two catheters were inserted into each rat's bladder to study its urodynamics.The BL-410 model bio-function experimental system was used to monitor bladder pressure while the rats were conscious.Unstable detrusor contractions appear in the urine storage period as a standard to determine OAB,and the positive rate was calculated.Urodynamic parameters such as bladder basal pressure (BP),maximum voiding pressure (MVP),intercontraction interval (ICI),spontaneous activity (SA),maximum cystometric capacity (MCC),and bladder compliance (BC) were recorded in each group,and a light microscope was used to observe the pathological changes in the rat bladder tissue.Results The detrusor instability rate of the model group was 83.33%.The MVP,MCC and BC of rats in the model group were lower than the control group (P <0.01),and the BP,ICI and SA of the model group rats were higher than the control group (P <0.01).The difference between the control group and the model group is statistically significant.The model group rats' bladder walls swelled and bled,the submucosa thickened and leukocyte infiltration became serious.Conclusions Acute cystitis and OAB symptoms can be induced by ip injections of cyclophosphamide in rats.This can provide a valuable animal model to study OAB in human beings.

  16. Urinary incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Peggy; Brubaker, Linda

    2006-01-07

    Urinary incontinence is common in women, but is under-reported and under-treated. Urine storage and emptying is a complex coordination between the bladder and urethra, and disturbances in the system due to childbirth, aging, or other medical conditions can lead to urinary incontinence. The two main types of incontinence in women, stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence, can be evaluated by history and simple clinical assessment available to most primary care physicians. There is a wide range of therapeutic options, but the recent proliferation of new drug treatments and surgical devices for urinary incontinence have had mixed results; direct-to-consumer advertising has increased public awareness of the problem of urinary incontinence, but many new products are being introduced without long-term assessment of their safety and efficacy.

  17. Outcomes of intra-detrusor injections of botulinum toxin in patients with spina bifida: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascoet, Juliette; Manunta, Andrea; Brochard, Charlène; Arnaud, Alexis; Damphousse, Mireille; Menard, Hélène; Kerdraon, Jacques; Journel, Hubert; Bonan, Isabelle; Odent, Sylvie; Fremond, Benjamin; Siproudhis, Laurent; Gamé, Xavier; Peyronnet, Benoit

    2017-03-01

    Bladder management in spina bifida patients relies on clean intermittent catheterization and oral antimuscarinics with a significant failure rate. The efficacy of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin has been confirmed in patients with spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis but not in patients with myelomeningocele. To conduct a systematic review of current evidence regarding the efficacy of intra-detrusor injections of Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A) in spina bifida patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to antimuscarinics. A research has been conducted on Medline and Embase using the keywords: ("spina bifida" OR "myelomeningocele" OR "dysraphism") AND "toxin." The search strategy and studies selection were performed using the PICOS method according to the PRISMA statement. Twelve published series were included (n = 293 patients). All patients were spina bifida but this assumption is not supported by high level of evidence studies. There is no data available in adult patients. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:557-564, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO, a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO. PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM. We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ∼50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5' myosin heavy chain (MHC alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM increased 3-fold while 3' MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20% only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable

  19. Urinary Incontinence in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Neki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Incontinence (UI is dened any involuntary leakage of urine. It is twice as common in women as in men and affects at least 1 in 3 older women. It is not a normal result of aging. Rather it is a medical problem that is often curable and should be treated. Urine is stored in the bladder and emptied via the urethra. During urination, muscles of the bladder wall contract, forcing urine from the bladder into the urethra. Sphincter muscles surrounding the urethra relax thus releasing urine from the body. Incontinence occurs if bladder muscles suddenly contract or sphincter muscles are not strong enough to contain urine. The diagnosis of geriatric urinary incontinence includes evaluation for overow incontinence, functional incontinence and stress incontinence. The treatment goal should be realistic and aim to improve the patient's functional status and quality of life. Best treatment outcomes can only be achieved by a holistic treatment approach.

  20. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Home For Patients Search ... Stress Urinary Incontinence FAQ166, July 2014 PDF Format Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Special Procedures What is ...

  1. The effectiveness of foot reflexology and behavior treatment in patient with overactive bladder syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Aydın

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to determine the foot reflexology and activity of behavior therapy in the patients who have overactive bladder syndrome. In the study, behavior therapy (Bladder Training + Diet Modifications and foot reflexology were applied together. Foot reflexology treatment was performed for 12 sessions and each session took 45 to 60 minutes to complete. For data collection, a descriptive information form, The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7, Urinary Diaries and The 24 Hour Pad Test were administered. Assessments were done in two steps (prior to treatment and 3 months after treatment. The primary outcome measure was the change in the diurnal micturition frequency. It was found that urgency and urgency incontinence episodes were significantly lower after treatment.  According to study findings, foot reflexology, which was added to behavior therapy (Bladder Training + Diet Modifications, reduced most of urinary symptoms and affected quality of life positively in women with overactive bladder complaints.

  2. Fesoterodine: a new agent for treating overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Pamela; Berriman, Sandra J; Brodsky, Marina

    2009-03-01

    To review the efficacy and safety of fesoterodine, a new antimuscarinic for treating overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. Review of efficacy and safety data from the pivotal phase 3 trials of fesoterodine for the treatment of OAB. Although there were a number of additional end points, they were not included in the US prescribing information for fesoterodine and thus are not included in this article. OAB is a chronic condition affecting both men and women. The principal symptom is urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, with some patients experiencing increased daytime frequency and nocturia. In two 12-week, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trials, fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg administered once daily were significantly better than placebo in alleviating OAB symptoms, as determined by changes in bladder diary variables. Both doses of fesoterodine were well tolerated. Fesoterodine is an efficacious, well-tolerated treatment for OAB.

  3. Efficacy and tolerability of fesoterodine in women with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Peter K; Morrow, Jon D; Bavendam, Tamara; Creanga, Dana L; Nitti, Victor W

    2009-07-01

    We assessed fesoterodine efficacy and tolerability in women with overactive bladder (OAB). This post hoc analysis of pooled data from two clinical trials included 1,548 women with OAB randomized to placebo, fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg, or tolterodine extended release (ER) 4 mg (in 1 trial) for 12 weeks. Subjects completed 3-day bladder diaries at baseline and weeks 2 and 12 and rated Treatment Response at weeks 2 and 12. By weeks 2 and 12, all active-treatment groups showed significant improvements in all five bladder diary variables assessed and greater Treatment Response rates vs placebo. Fesoterodine 8 mg was significantly more efficacious than fesoterodine 4 mg and tolterodine ER in improving urgency urinary incontinence episodes and continent days per week. The most common adverse events were dry mouth and constipation, which were predominately mild or moderate. Fesoterodine is efficacious and well tolerated in women with OAB.

  4. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of Incontinence Diarrhea Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding a Doctor ...

  5. Predictors of Response to Intradetrusor Botulinum Toxin-A Injections in Patients with Idiopathic Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L. Cohen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate whether there are any demographic or urodynamic differences in patients with idiopathic overactive bladder (I-OAB that respond and do not respond to intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A. Methods. This represents a secondary analysis of data collected from an investigator initiated randomized trial designed to evaluate clinical differences in outcomes for 100 versus 150 U BTX-A in patients with I-OAB. Preinjection demographic and urodynamic data were collected. Patients were evaluated 12 weeks after injection and were determined to be responders or nonresponders as defined by our criteria. Statistical comparisons were made between groups. Results. In patients with overactive bladder without incontinence (OAB-Dry, there were no variables that could be used to predict response to BTX-A. On univariate analysis, younger patients with overactive bladder with incontinence (OAB-Wet were more likely to respond to BTX-A than older patients. However, this relationship was no longer statistically significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusions. We were unable to identify any preinjection demographic or urodynamic parameters that could aid in predicting which patients will achieve clinical response to BTX-A. Future studies are necessary to further evaluate this question.

  6. The effectiveness of foot reflexology and behavior treatment in patient with overactive bladder syndrome: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yasemin Aydın

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the foot reflexology and activity of behavior therapy in the patients who have overactive bladder syndrome. In the study, behavior therapy (Bladder Training + Diet Modifications) and foot reflexology were applied together. Foot reflexology treatment was performed for 12 sessions and each session took 45 to 60 minutes to complete. For data collection, a descriptive information form, The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7), Urinary Diarie...

  7. Efficacy and safety of tolterodine in subjects with symptoms of overactive bladder: An open label, noncomparative, prospective, multicentric study

    OpenAIRE

    Anant Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of Tolterodine 2 mg twice daily in Indian subjects with symptoms of overactive bladder including frequency, ur-gency with or without urge incontinence. Methods: This multicentric open-label, noncompara-tive, prospective study was conducted at 7 centers across India. Eligible patients were assigned to treatment with Tab. Tolterodine 2 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. Subjects were seen at visit ](day 3 to 10), visit 2 (day 1) and after 8...

  8. Effect of rehabilitation exercises on urinary function of incontinence after per urethra prostate opertation%康复训练改善经尿道前列腺手术后尿失禁患者排尿功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢小燕

    2002-01-01

    Background:Urinay incontience is complication following benign hyperlasia of prostate undergo endoscopic removal.Due to internal imbalance of micturition mechanism mainly,such as incompetence of posterior urethra or unstable detrusor.Urinary incontinence causes not only physiological,psychological disorder,but also family and social problems.

  9. Solifenacin in overactive bladder syndrome: pharmacoeconomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iannazzo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The overactive bladder (OAB syndrome can be treated with behavioural, surgical and/or pharmaceutical interventions, mainly represented by antimuscarinic drugs. Solifenacin is a new antimuscarinic with selectivity for the bladder and it demonstrated good effectiveness, safety and tolerability. Scope of the present study is to investigate the pharmacoeconomic performance of the treatment with solifenacin, when compared to tolterodine and placebo, in Italian patients with OAB. The economic evaluation is performed with a simulation model, based on a Markov chain. The time horizon of the simulation is 52 weeks, with a 1-week cycle. The model simulates the outcomes and costs of the treatment with solifenacin (5 mg/die, tolterodine ER (4 mg/die and no treatment in a cohort representative of the Italian population with OAB (estimated in about 1,400 thousands patients. The cost analysis is conducted mainly in the perspective of the patient, since drugs for the treatment of OAB are currently not included in the Italian reimbursement list. The results show that both treatments produce significative improvements in symptoms and quality of life, with an increase in costs of about 540-640 Euro/year with solifenacin and of 680-780 Euro/year with tolterodine. In the cost-utility analysis, solifenacin dominates tolterodine since it results more effective and less costly, and its cost cost-utility ratio with respect to no treatment is in the range 7,600-18,600 Euro/QALY. In the subgroup of patients incontinent at baseline and who best respond to the therapy (responders, the increase in costs with solifenacin results of about 100-400 Euro/year and the cost-utility ratio is 600-4,200 Euro/QALY. A supplementary scenario has been elaborated to explore the consequences of a hypothetical reimbursement decision by the Italian NHS. In this scenario, the NHS cost perspective is considered and the antimuscarinic drugs are assumed to be reimbursed at a half of the current

  10. Lack of association between the ICIQ-SF questionnaire and the urodynamic diagnosis in men with post radical prostatectomy incontinence Falta de associação entre o questionário ICIQ-SF e o diagnóstico nos homens portadores de incontinência urinária pós-prostatectomia radical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Borges dos Reis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the correlation between the "International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form" (ICIQ-UISF survey and the urodynamic findings in men with urinary incontinence (UI following radical prostatectomy (RP. METHODS: 88 men who presented post-RP UI for a minimum of 1 year were enrolled prospectively. All answered the ICIQ-UISF survey and underwent urodynamic testing. Patients were divided in 3 Groups according to their urodynamic diagnosis: Group 1, patients with sphincteric incontinence (SI alone; Group 2, patients with mixed UI (SI + Bladder Dysfunction (BD; and Group 3, patients with BD alone. Data were analyzed using SPSS v16.0 software. RESULTS: There were 51 men in Group 1 (57.9%; 30 in Group 2 (34%; and 7 (7.9% in Group 3. BD was found in 37/88 patients (42%, but it was the main cause of UI in only 14 patients (15.9%. There was no statistically significant difference among the mean ICIQ-UISFs values from groups 1, 2, or 3 (p>0.05. The symptoms of stress incontinence correlated with the urodynamic finding of SI (r = 0.59, and complaints of urinary urgency correlated with the presence of detrusor overactivity (DO (r = 0.37, but these complaints did not predict the main cause of UI. CONCLUSION: The etiology of UI following RP cannot be predicted by the ICIQ-UISF survey. Symptoms of stress and urge incontinence predict the findings of SI and DO on urodynamic tests, but they cannot ascertain the main cause of UI. Urodynamic testing remains the gold standard to assess the etiology of post-RP UI.OBJETIVO: Analisar a relação entre as queixas clínicas mensuradas pelo "International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form" (ICIQ-UISF e os achados urodinâmicos em homens com incontinência urinária (IU após a prostatectomia radical (PR. MÉTODOS: 88 homens que apresentavam IU por um período mínimo de 1 ano após a PR foram incluídos prospectivamente. Todos responderam o questinário "ICIQ-UISF" e

  11. Is the prevalence of overactive bladder overestimated? A population-based study in Finland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A O Tikkinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In earlier studies, one in six adults had overactive bladder which may impair quality of life. However, earlier studies have either not been population-based or have suffered from methodological limitations. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of overactive bladder symptoms, based on a representative study population and using consistent definitions and exclusions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the study was to assess the age-standardized prevalence of overactive bladder defined as urinary urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually with urinary frequency and nocturia in the absence of urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. In 2003-2004, a questionnaire was mailed to 6,000 randomly selected Finns aged 18-79 years who were identified from the Finnish Population Register Centre. Information on voiding symptoms was collected using the validated Danish Prostatic Symptom Score, with additional frequency and nocturia questions. Corrected prevalence was calculated with adjustment for selection bias due to non-response. The questionnaire also elicited co-morbidity and socio-demographic information. Of the 6,000 subjects, 62.4% participated. The prevalence of overactive bladder was 6.5% (95% CI, 5.5% to 7.6% for men and 9.3% (CI, 7.9% to 10.6% for women. Exclusion of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia reduced prevalence among men by approximately one percentage point (to 5.6% [CI, 4.5% to 6.6%]. Among subjects with overactive bladder, urgency incontinence, frequency, and nocturia were reported by 11%, 23%, and 56% of men and 27%, 38%, and 40% of women, respectively. However, only 31% of men and 35% of women with frequency, and 31% of subjects of both sexes with nocturia reported overactive bladder. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate a prevalence of overactive bladder as low as 8% suggesting that, in previous studies, occurrence has been overestimated due to vague criteria and selected study

  12. Hidden female urinary incontinence in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics in Turkey: what are the determinants of bothersome urinary incontinence and help-seeking behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinel, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Tarcan, Tufan; Yalcin, Onay; Kocak, Taner; Senocak, Mustafa; Itil, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of female urinary incontinence (UI) and risk factors of bothersomeness and help-seeking behavior of hidden female UI in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics. This multicentric and cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the Turkish Overactive Bladder Study. Female patients (n = 5,565) who were referred with complaints other than UI and overactive bladder symptoms were surveyed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) with supplementation of five more questions. The crude prevalence of UI was found to be 35.7%. The prevalence of frequent and severe incontinence was 8.2 and 6.8%, respectively. The mean age of incontinent patients was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed UI was 39.8, 24.8, and 28.9%, respectively. More than half (53%) of incontinent patients were not bothered by UI, and only 12% of incontinent patients had previously sought medical help for their problem. Frequency, severity, and type of UI were independent factors for predicting bothersome UI, while only bothersomeness increased help-seeking behavior. The ICIQ-SF score of 8 has been found to be the best cutoff value to delineate the bothersome UI. Although the crude prevalence of female UI was found to be high, bothersome UI was not so common. The majority of incontinent female patients did not seek medical help. Frequency, severity, and mixed type of UI were found to be the determinants of bothersome UI for which the ICIQ-SF cutoff score of 8 was obtained.

  13. Oxybutynin and tolterodine in a trial for treatment of overactive bladder in Iranian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aziminekoo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of Oxybutinin in comparison to tolterodine in treatment of overactive bladder (OAB with detrussor overactivity (DOA in Iranian women.One hundred Iranian old women with clinical symptoms of OAB who show IDO in the filling cystometry participated in this randomized double-blinded parallel-group by using two kinds of the drugs for 4- week course (2 mg tolterodine twice-daily, or oxybutinin 5 mg, three times a day in alike packages. We collected data from 3-day FVC before and after the treatment course. The effectiveness of each drug was studied using the paired t-test and improvement after treatment between two groups was compared by independent T-test.Positive changes in urinary urgency, Frequency and Urge incontinence after treatment in both groups were seen but mean improvements in the all were larger in the patients who treated by oxybutinin especially in terms of urgency and Urge incontinence. Dry mouth was the most common side-effect in two groups. Unlike other studies it was higher in the tolterodine group but the difference was not significant.Four week treatment with oxybutinin was better than tolterodine in improving urgency and urge incontinence but there were not statistically significance between them.

  14. Expressions of voltage-gated K+ channel 2.1 and 2.2 in rat bladder with detrusor hyperreflexia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Xiu-guo; AN Rui-hua; BAI Yu-feng; ZONG De-bin

    2008-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated K+channel(KV)plays a critical role in the modulation of detrusor contraction.This study was conducted to investigate the expressions of Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 in rat bladder with detrusor hyperreflexia(DH).Methods Thirty adult female Sprague-Dawley rats(200-220 g)were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group.The experimental group was subjected to spinal cord injury(SCI).In the controls,the surgical procedure was identical with the exception that dura and spinal cord were transected.Four weeks after SCI,in vivo cystometry and mechanical pulling tests of isolated detrusor strips were performed.mRNA was extracted from the detrusors of normal and DH rats for the detection of expression of Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 by RT.PCR.Differences in expression between normal and overactive detrusors were identified by gel imaging.Results Fourteen rats in the experimental group exhibited uninhibited bladder contraction(>8 cmH20)before voiding after SCl.One rat died from infection.The frequency of DH in the experimental group was significantly different from that in the control group with or without treatment with 4-aminopyridine(4-AP)(P<0.05),while the amplitude of DH did not change markedly.The rates of variation of the automatic contractile frequency and amplitude were(66.8-+1 2.4)%and (42.6±12.6)%respectively in the control group,and(38.4±9.8)%and(28.0±4.6)% respectively in the DH group.4-AP increased the automatic contractile frequency aDart from the automatic contractile amplitude in both the control and DH groups(P<0.05).4-AP increased the rate of variation of the automatic contractile frequency more markedly in the control group than in the DH group(P<0.05).Significant expression of Kv2.2 was not detected in bladders in the control group.Compared to the mRNA levels of 13-actin,the mRNA level of Kv2.1 was 1.26±0.12 in the control group and 0.66±0.08 in the DH group.SCI significantly reduced the mRNA level of Kv2.1 in rat bladders with

  15. Correlation between psychological stress levels and the severity of overactive bladder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Henry; Gardner, Vivien; Vetter, Joel; Andriole, Gerald L

    2015-03-08

    The relationship between psychological stress and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) has been well described. Even though there is some overlapping of symptoms between overactive bladder (OAB) and IC/BPS, there have been very few studies that specifically investigated the relationship between psychological stress and urinary symptoms in OAB patients who do not have pelvic pain. Here we examined the relationship between psychological stress levels and the severity of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. Patients diagnosed with OAB (n=51), IC/BPS (n=27), and age-matched healthy controls (n=30) participated in a case control study that inquired about their psychological stress levels using the perceived stress scale (PSS). PSS reported by the three patient groups were compared. Among OAB patients, their responses on the PSS was correlated to OAB symptoms using the following questionnaires: 1) international consultation on incontinence - urinary incontinence (ICIQ-UI), 2) international consultation on incontinence - overactive bladder (ICIQ-OAB), 3) OAB-q short form, 4) urogenital distress inventory (UDI-6), 5) incontinence impact questionnaire (IIQ-7), 6) urgency severity scale (USS), 7) numeric rating scales of urgency symptom, and 8) frequency symptom. Spearman's correlation tests were performed to examine the relationship between psychological stress levels and the severity of OAB symptoms. OAB patients reported psychological stress levels that were as high as IC/BPS patients (median 17.0 versus 18.0, p=0.818, Wilcoxon sum rank test), and significantly higher than healthy controls (17.0, versus 7.5, p=0.001). Among OAB patients, there was a positive correlation between perceived stress levels and urinary incontinence symptoms (ICIQ-UI, Spearman's correlation coefficient=0.39, p=0.007), and impacts on quality of life (UDI-6, IIQ-7, OAB-q quality of life subscale; Spearman's correlation coefficient=0.32, 0.31, 0.39, and p=0.028, 0.005, 0

  16. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-05-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  17. Fesoterodine dose response in subjects with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Vik; Rovner, Eric S; Dmochowski, Roger; Nitti, Victor; Wang, Joseph; Guan, Zhonghong

    2008-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of fesoterodine 4 mg versus 8 mg in treating subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. This is a pooled analysis of data from 2 randomized placebo (PBO)-controlled phase III trials. Eligible subjects with frequency and urgency or urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) were randomized to PBO or fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg for 12 weeks. Subjects assessed efficacy using 3-day bladder diaries recording the time of each void, urgency, and incontinence episode. Endpoints included treatment response (based on a 4-point Treatment Benefit scale) and change from baseline in micturitions, UUI episodes, mean volume voided, urgency episodes, and continent days. We assessed tolerability and safety by evaluating adverse events, residual urine volume, laboratory parameters, and treatment withdrawals. At the end of treatment, both doses of fesoterodine showed statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints versus PBO (P Fesoterodine 8 mg performed significantly better than fesoterodine 4 mg in improving all diary variables (P fesoterodine than with PBO included dry mouth, constipation, and urinary tract infection. Both fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg are effective in improving OAB symptoms. The higher 8-mg dose provides additional benefit compared with the lower dose in improving most bladder diary variables, thus offering the possibility of dose flexibility and titration.

  18. Role of fesoterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Kylie J

    2009-12-17

    Muscarinic receptors have long been the target receptors for treatment of patients with overactive bladder (OAB). These patients experience symptoms of urgency, urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urge incontinence (the involuntary leakage of urine associated with urge). Fesoterodine, a pro-drug, structurally and functionally related to tolterodine, is the newest agent developed for the treatment of OAB. Fesoterodine is broken down to the active metabolite, 5-hydroxy-methyl-tolterodine (5-HMT) by non-specific esterases. This metabolism results in the complete breakdown of the parent compound and is responsible for dose related improvements in clinical efficacy and health related quality of life. Like other antimuscarinic agents including tolterodine, fesoterodine is associated with improvements in clinical variables related both to bladder filling (decreasing micturition frequency and increasing mean voided volume) and urgency (urgency and urge incontinence episodes). Improvements in health related quality of life following treatment with fesoterodine is indicated by improvements in 7 of the 9 variables measured by the King's Health Questionnaire. Also like other antimuscarinic agents, fesoterodine use is associated with adverse events including dry mouth. However the incidence of dry mouth is reduced with fesoterodine, compared to oxybutynin, due to the improved bladder selectivity of 5-HMT.

  19. OnabotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of overactive bladder

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    Cox L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsey Cox, Anne P Cameron Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: OnabotulinumtoxinA injection is a safe and effective treatment for adults with refractory overactive bladder. There is sufficient level 1 evidence to support offering onabotulinumtoxinA injections as a second-line treatment to patients who have failed behavioral therapy and oral medications such as antimuscarinics and β3 agonists. An intradetrusor injection of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA is likely the optimal dose to balance risks and benefits, and this is the dose approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Improvement in urgency urinary incontinence episodes, as well as symptom scores and quality of life, were seen in around 60%–65% of patients, and were significantly improved compared with those on placebo. Most studies have reported a duration of symptom relief ranging from 6 to 12 months, with repeat injections being safe and efficacious. Overall, the risk of urinary retention was around 6% across the study populations. Keywords: urgency urinary incontinence, urinary retention, nocturia, frequency

  20. Does fesoterodine have a role in the treatment of poorly managed patients with overactive bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Vikky; Wagg, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB), a clinically defined symptom complex comprising urinary urgency, usually accompanied by urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency incontinence, is common and has a markedly negative impact on the sufferer's quality of life. Following conservative and lifestyle management, the current pharmacological mainstay of treatment is antimuscarinic therapy. This review explores the role of fesoterodine, a relatively recently introduced antimuscarinic agent, in the treatment of patients who may have had a suboptimal response to initial therapy, who have switched treatment from tolterodine, or may be at risk of receiving poor treatment because of either multimorbidity or complex polypharmacy.

  1. Multi-center randomized controlled trial of cognitive treatment, placebo, oxybutynin, bladder training, and pelvic floor training in children with functional urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Tamminen-Moebius, Tytti; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Hjalmas, Kelm; Jodal, Ulf; Bachmann, Hannsjoerg; Hoebeke, Piet; Vande Walle, Johan; Misselwitz, Joachim; John, Ulrike; Bael, An

    Objective Functional urinary incontinence causes considerable morbidity in 8.4% of school-age children, mainly girls. To compare oxybutynin, placebo, and bladder training in overactive bladder (OAB), and cognitive treatment and pelvic floor training in dysfunctional voiding (DV), a multi-center

  2. Urinary incontinence - collagen implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007373.htm Urinary incontinence - injectable implant To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to ...

  3. What is Urinary Incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will go away when the problem is treated. Kegel exercises and bladder training help some types of ... Medicine and surgery are other options.What are Kegel exercises?Stress incontinence can be treated with special ...

  4. The Pertinence of Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Zilhão

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I suggest a reconstruction of the traditional concepts of con-tinent and incontinent action. This reconstruction proceeds along the lines of a standpoint of bounded rationality. My suggestion agrees with some relevant aspects of Davidson’s treatment of this topic. One of these aspects is that incontinent action is typically signalled by the following two subjective experiences: a feeling of surprise towards one’s own action and a difficulty in understanding oneself; another is that incontinence cannot simply be disposed of in terms of some inability of the agent to avoid “succumbing to temptation”; still another is the view that inconti-nent action is common in real human affairs. But my suggestion dis-agrees with other relevant aspects of Davidson’s treatment of inconti-nence too. In particular, it avoids what I take to be its two major draw-backs. These are a view of continent action that falls prey to a com-pletely unrealistic concept of psychological rationality and the idea that incontinence necessarily involves a dimension of essential irrationality

  5. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence.

  6. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence. PMID:28124522

  7. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Glinski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS, have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or

  8. 经闭孔吊带手术治疗女性压力性尿失禁46例临床观察%TOT for surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence in 46 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晨曦; 丁俊; 李国波; 朱旭明; 陈国栋; 陈怡芳

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察经闭孔吊带( transobturator tape ,TOT)尿道中段悬吊术治疗女性压力性尿失禁( stress urinary inconti-nence,SUI)的近期疗效。方法女性SUI患者46例,采取TOT手术治疗,对比手术前后国际尿失禁咨询委员会尿失禁问卷(ICI-Q-SF)评分、1 h尿垫试验和最大尿流率变化,以判定疗效。结果随访6~18个月,治愈33例(71.7%),有效11例(23.9%),无效2例(4.3%)。 ICI-Q-SF评分、1 h尿垫试验显著优于术前,最大尿流率无变化。结论 TOT手术是治疗女性SUI安全、有效的微创手术方法。%Objective To evaluate the recent efficacy of applying outside-in transobturator tape ( TOT) tension-free mid-ure-thral suspension in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence ( SUI) .Methods A total of 46 female inpatients with SUI were enrolled using Italy Herniamesh sling .Preoperative and postoperative data were recorded and compared , including International Consulta-tion on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICI-Q-SF), 1-hour pad weight test and maximum urinary flow rates (Qmax).Results All patients have been followed up for 6 to 12 months.The cure, improvement and failure rates were 33 patients (71.7%), 11 (23.9%) and 2 (4.3%), respectively.The differences were significant when compared ICI-Q-SF and 1-hour pad weight test (P<0.05).Postop-erative complications included 2 cases of vulva hematoma , 1 case of dyspareunia , 2 cases of groin pain and 1 case of de novo detrusor overactivity .No case recorded with bladder perforation , urine retention and mesh erosion .Conclusion Transobturator tape procedure is an effective minimally invasive method for the surgical treatment of female SUI with low rate of complication and good primary outcome .

  9. Gaining Control Over Fecal Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gump, Kendra; Schmelzer, Marilee

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that improve the regularity and efficiency of defecation can eliminate or minimize episodes of fecal incontinence. The medical-surgical nurse's role in identifying patients with fecal incontinence is discussed, along with various treatments to control bowel elimination.

  10. [Conservative treatment of urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soljanik, I; Schorsch, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    Urinary incontinence can be treated with medicinal products in addition to active pelvic floor muscle training and electrostimulation. A local hormone therapy should be first discussed with the gynaecologist. The active substance duloxetine has been used for a few years for treating stress incontinence. Several older and newer active substances are available for treating irritable bladder and stress incontinence.

  11. [Postpartum incontinence. Narrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo; Alós, Rafael; Carceller, M Soledad; Solana, Amparo; Frangi, Andrés; Ruiz, M Dolores; Lozoya, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The development of fecal incontinence after childbirth is a common event. This incontinence responds to a multifactorial etiology in which the most common element is external anal sphincter injury. There are several risk factors, and it is very important to know and avoid them. Sphincter injury may result from perineal tear or sometimes by incorrectly performing an episiotomy. It is very important to recognize the injury when it occurs and repair it properly. Pudendal nerve trauma may contribute to the effect of direct sphincter injury. Persistence of incontinence is common, even after sphincter repair. Surgical sphincteroplasty is the standard treatment of obstetric sphincter injuries, however, sacral or tibial electric stimulation therapies are being applied in patients with sphincter injuries not repaired with promising results. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging fecal incontinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchsjaeger, Michael H. E-mail: michael.fuchsjaeger@univie.ac.at; Maier, Andrea G

    2003-08-01

    Fecal incontinence is the inability to defer release of gas or stool from the anus and rectum by mechanisms of voluntary control. It is an important medical disorder affecting the quality of life of up to 20% of the population above 65 years. The most common contributing factors include previous vaginal deliveries, pelvic or perineal trauma, previous anorectal surgery, and rectal prolapse. Many physicians lack experience and knowledge related to pelvic floor incontinence disorders, but advancing technology has improved this knowledge. Increased experience with endoanal ultrasound and endoanal magnetic resonance imaging have given us a better understanding not only of the anatomy of the anal canal but also of the underlying morphological defects in fecal incontinence. Current imaging methods are emphasized and recent literature is reviewed.

  13. Experience with pubovaginal slings for urinary incontinence at the University of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, E J; Bennett, C J; Konnak, J A; Sonda, L P; Savastano, J A

    1987-09-01

    In July 1983 pubovaginal slings were used first at our university to treat incontinence in female patients with poor urethral function. From then until July 1, 1986, 82 such procedures were performed on a diverse group of patients, including a male patient. Initial success occurred postoperatively in 67 patients, with 15 failures. Of these failures 7 were related to urethral dysfunction. Another sling procedure was done in 2 patients and they are continent, while 3 were treated with medication: 2 became dry and 1 remains wet. A total of 8 patients suffered detrusor-related incontinence postoperatively (2 required augmentation cystoplasty for poor bladder compliance). To date 78 patients (95 per cent) are continent. Of the patients 2 required periodic intermittent catheterization for more than a year postoperatively and 12 are managed by chronic intermittent self-catheterization on a planned basis for neurogenic vesical dysfunction.

  14. Reoperation for urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss Hansen, Margrethe; Lose, Gunnar; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    on a nationwide population. STUDY DESIGN: We used the Danish National Patient Registry to identify women who had surgery for urinary incontinence from 1998 through 2007 and the outcome was a reoperation within 5 years. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate the rate of reoperation for 6 types of surgery...

  15. Clinical utility of transdermal delivery of oxybutynin gel via a metered-dose pump in the management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagg A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Adrian WaggDepartment of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Oxybutynin is an efficacious treatment for overactive bladder, but its clinical utility is hampered by relative intolerability due to its side effect profile. Over the last few years, various attempts to enhance the tolerability of oxybutynin by varying the drug delivery mechanism have been introduced and have included extended release, rectal suppository, transdermal patch, and gel formulations. The recent introduction of a transdermal oxybutynin gel in a sachet form has been complemented by the administration of gel in a metered dose pump. This paper reviews the available evidence for transdermal oxybutynin gel and, where it exists, for the pump-based gel. The clinical utility of the pump-based gel is discussed.Keywords: urgency incontinence, overactive bladder, oxybutynin, transdermal

  16. Correlation between body mass index and overactive bladder symptoms in pre-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Palma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to establish a correlation between Overactive Bladder (OAB symptoms and Body Mass Index (BMI in women aged 20-45. Methods: We interviewed 1.050 women aged 20-45 in the area of Campinas, Brazil, to investigate the prevalence of overactive bladder symptoms. In this study, we used the ICIQ-OAB questionnaire (ICS standard, in its validated portuguese version and a specific questionnaire for the demographics, which includes information about BMI. Results: Overall, women with BMI ≥30 presented a significantly higher score than women with a lower BMI (18.5 - 24.9 (p=0.0066. In the analysis of individual symptoms, no significant differences were found regarding urinary frequency (p=0.5469. Women with BMI ≥30 presented more nocturia than women with BMI ranging between 18.5 and 24.9 (p=0.0154. Women in the group of BMI 25 - 29.9 presented more urgency than women with BMI 18.5 - 24.9 (p=0.0278. Significant difference was also found regarding urge-incontinence; women with BMI 25 - 29.9 presented a higher score than women in the group 18.5 - 24.9 (p= 0.0017. Analysis was also performed on the visual analogue scale regarding how much each symptom bothers the women (quality of life. There were no significant differences regarding frequency, nocturia or urgency but urgency incontinence bother was significant. Women with BMI 25 - 29.9 were more bothered by incontinence than women with BMI 18.5 - 24.9 (p=0.002. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study reinforces the correlation between BMI and OAB symptoms. Obese women present more OAB symptoms than non-obese women.

  17. Clinical Observation on Electroacupuncture Against Urinary Incontinence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文洁; 胡昌东; 王洁茹; 洪珏

    2009-01-01

    @@ Urinary incontinence is a common problem, usually classified as stress incontinence or urge incontinence[1]. With the development of medical science, people have got more and more profound knowledge towards urinary incontinence. We treated urinary incontinence with electroacupuncture since 2006, and now reported it as follows.

  18. Behavioral therapies for overactive bladder: making sense of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Jill L

    2008-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom-based syndrome characterized by the presence of urgency, which is defined as a sudden and compelling desire to void that cannot be postponed. OAB may significantly impact of quality of life. Numerous treatment options exist for OAB, including behavioral therapies such as pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation, bladder training, and dietary modification, as well as traditional therapies such as pharmacological therapy and neuromodulation. Behavioral therapies are considered the mainstay of treatment for urinary incontinence in general. However the efficacy of these noninvasive strategies for OAB treatment has not been well addressed in the literature. This article presents an overview of current evidence with attention to the clinical relevance of findings related to lifestyle modification, bladder training, and pelvic floor muscle training. Initial evidence suggests that obesity, smoking, and consumption of carbonated drinks are risk factors for OAB but there is less support for the contributory role of caffeine or the impact of caffeine reduction. The evidence supporting bladder training and pelvic floor muscle training is more consistent and a trend towards combining these therapies to treat OAB appears positive. Given the prevalence of OAB and growing support for the efficacy of behavioral treatments it is important and timely to augment existing evidence with well-designed multicenter trials.

  19. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  20. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  1. Protocol for the CUPIDO trials; multicenter randomized controlled trials to assess the value of combining prolapse surgery and incontinence surgery in patients with genital prolapse and evident stress incontinence (CUPIDO I and in patients with genital prolapse and occult stress incontinence (CUPIDO II

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    van der Vaart Huub

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 40% of all patients with genital prolapse report stress-incontinence. In about half of the 60% patients that do not report stress-incontinence, occult urinary stress-incontinence can be detected. In these patients stress-incontinence is masked due to kinking or compression of the urethra by the prolapse. In case surgical correction is indicated there are two strategies to manage patients with combined prolapse and (occult stress incontinence. This strategy is either (i a combination of prolapse surgery and stress-incontinence surgery or (ii to correct the prolapse first and evaluate afterwards whether additional stress-incontinence surgery is indicated. The advantage of combining prolapse and stress-incontinence surgery is that only few patients report stress-incontinence following such combination. However, this combination has been associated with an increased risk on complications, of which the development of obstructive micturition symptoms, overactive bladder symptoms and bladder retention are the most important ones. Furthermore, combining two procedures may be unnecessary as performing only prolapse surgery may cure stress-incontinence In the randomized CUPIDO trials both strategies are compared in patients with prolapse and evident stress incontinence (CUPIDO I trial and in patients with prolapse and occult stress incontinence (CUPIDO II trial. Methods/Design The CUPIDO trials are two multicenter randomized controlled trials in which women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI or occult stress urinary incontinence (OSUI are randomized to prolapse surgery combined with anti incontinence surgery (concomitant surgery or to prolapse surgery only. Patients with at least stage 2 POP are eligible, women with evident SUI are randomized in CUPIDO I. Patients without SUI are eligible for CUPIDO II and will have urodynamic evaluation or a standardized redression test. Women with OSUI are randomized, women without OSUI are

  2. Comparison of fesoterodine and tolterodine in patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher R; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip E; Jünemann, Klaus-Peter; Wang, Joseph T; Brodsky, Marina

    2008-11-01

    To compare, in a post hoc analysis of a phase III trial, the maximum recommended doses of fesoterodine (8 mg) and tolterodine (4 mg) for improving overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), as fesoterodine effectively reduces OAB symptoms vs placebo. Eligible patients with frequency (> or =eight voids/24 h) and either urgency (> or =six episodes over 3 days) or urgency urinary incontinence (UUI; > or =three episodes over 3 days) were randomized to placebo, fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg, or tolterodine extended-release (ER) 4 mg for 12 weeks; fesoterodine 4 mg data were published elsewhere. Patients completed a 3-day bladder diary in which they recorded the time of each void, voided volume (VV), and the severity of urgency. A post hoc inferential analysis was conducted on the primary endpoint (voids/24 h), the two co-primary endpoints (UUI episodes/24 h and treatment response), several secondary endpoints (severe urgency plus UUI per 24 h, mean VV (MVV)/void, and continent days/week), HRQoL, using the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), and self-reported bladder-related problems. A subanalysis also assessed all endpoints for patients who were incontinent at baseline. Tolerability and safety were assessed by evaluating adverse events, residual urine volume, laboratory variables and treatment withdrawals. By week 12, patients with OAB in both active-treatment groups showed significant improvements in most bladder diary variables and treatment response rates compared with placebo. Fesoterodine 8 mg was statistically significantly better than tolterodine ER 4 mg for improving UUI episodes, severe urgency plus UUI, mean VV, and number of continent days/week. In addition, the fesoterodine and tolterodine ER groups showed significantly greater improvements in HRQoL than the placebo group, with positive changes in most domains of the KHQ and an improvement in

  3. Effects of coffee and tea consumption on urinary incontinence in female twins

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    Tettamanti, G; Altman, D; Pedersen, NL; Bellocco, R; Milsom, I; Iliadou, AN

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of coffee and tea consumption on symptoms of urinary incontinence. Design Population based study Setting The Swedish Twin Register Population In 2005, all twins born between 1959–1985 in Sweden (n = 42 852) were invited to participate in a web-based survey to screen for common complex diseases and common exposures. The present study was limited to female twins with information about at least one urinary symptoms and coffee and tea consumption (n = 14 031). Main outcome measure The association between coffe and tea consumption and urinary incontinence, as well as, nocturia was estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Women with a high coffee intake were at lower risk of any urinary incontinence (OR 0.78, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.64-0.98) compared to women not drinking coffee. Coffee intake and incontinence subtypes showed no significant associations whereas high tea consumption was specifically associated with a risk for overactive bladder (OR 1.34, 95% CI 11.07-1.67) and nocturia (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38). Results from co-twin control analysis suggested that the associations observed in logistic regression were mainly due to familial effects. Conclusions This study suggests that coffee and tea consumption has a limited effect on urinary incontinence symptoms. Familial and genetic effects may have confounded the associations observed in previous studies. PMID:21401855

  4. A Content Incontinent: Report of Liposomal Bupivacaine Induced Fecal Incontinence

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    Emanuel A. Shapera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper surgical management of anal fistula demands sound clinical judgment and extraordinary care to prevent incontinence and adequate postoperative pain control and provide satisfactory resolution to optimize quality of life. Fecal incontinence can be a devastating complication of procedures performed for fistula in ano. We report a unique case in which temporary incontinence (for less than 4 days followed injection of liposomal bupivacaine for postoperative pain control after draining seton placement for fistula in ano. Patients and physicians should be aware as it may be mistaken for a more serious anatomical and permanent cause of fecal incontinence.

  5. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus tolterodine for overactive bladder in women: a randomised controlled trial.

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    Preyer, Oliver; Umek, Wolfgang; Laml, Thomas; Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Gabriel, Boris; Mittlboeck, Martina; Hanzal, Engelbert

    2015-08-01

    We performed a randomised controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) versus tolterodine for treating treatment naïve women with overactive bladder (OAB). 36 patients with symptoms of OAB were randomised to 3 months of treatment with weekly PTNS or tolterodine (2mg bid p.o.). The primary outcome measure was the difference of micturitions per 24h. The secondary outcome measure was the impact on quality of life (QoL) measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) between baseline and after 3 months of therapy. Micturition frequencies did not decline significantly (p=0.13) over time and there were no significant treatment differences (p=0.96). QoL was significantly dependent from its level at baseline (p=0.002) and showed improvement over time compared to baseline measurements but no significant differences between both treatment groups (p=0.07). Incontinence episodes per 24h depended significantly on the level at baseline (p=0.0001) and declined significantly (p=0.03) during 3 months of therapy in both therapy groups. However no significant treatment differences on the reduction of incontinence episodes in 24h could be shown between both therapy groups (p=0.89). PTNS had fewer side effects than tolterodine (p=0.04). PTNS and tolterodine were both effective in reducing incontinence episodes and improving QoL in patients with OAB but not micturition frequencies. PTNS had fewer side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Qualidade de vida em mulheres após tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço com fisioterapia Women's life quality after physical therapy treatment for stress urinary incontinence

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    Mariana Tirolli Rett

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETVO: comparar a qualidade de vida (QV antes e após tratamento fisioterápico de mulheres com incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE. MÉTODOS: ensaio clínico não controlado com 26 mulheres com queixa clínica predominantemente de IUE. Foram excluídas mulheres na pós-menopausa, com hiperatividade do detrusor, com cistocele grau II ou maior e tratamento cirúrgico/conservador anterior. O tratamento fisioterápico constituiu-se em 12 sessões individuais de cinesioterapia do assoalho pélvico associadas ao biofeedback eletromiográfico, e as mesmas realizavam 200 contrações divididas entre fásicas (rápidas e tônicas (lentas. Para avaliar a QV, todas responderam ao King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ, antes e após o tratamento. Os dados foram descritos em freqüências, médias e desvios-padrões, medianas, mínimos e máximos. Os escores do KHQ foram comparados pelo teste de Wilcoxon para amostras pareadas, com nível de significância de 0,05. RESULTADOS: houve uma diminuição dos sintomas urinários, particularmente da freqüência urinária, noctúria, urgência miccional e perdas urinárias aos esforços. Observou-se uma melhora significativa nos escores dos domínios do KHQ: percepção da saúde (49,0±24,0 versus 26,9±15,7; p=0,0015, impacto da incontinência (78,2±28,2 versus 32,1±30,5; p=0,001, limitações das atividades diárias (75,0±28,2 versus 13,5±22,6; pPURPOSE: to compare women's quality of life (QoL before and after physical therapy treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI. METHODS: an uncontrolled clinical trial of 26 women, who had mainly complaints of SUI. Post-menopausal women with overactive bladder, cystocele >grade II and previous surgical/conservative treatments were excluded from the study. The physiotherapy treatment relied on 12 individual pelvic floor exercises assisted by electromyographyc-biofeedback sessions. A total of 200 contractions were carried out, divided in phasic (quick and tonic

  7. Benefit-risk assessment of tolterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garely, Alan D; Burrows, Lara

    2004-01-01

    Overactive bladder is associated with symptoms of urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with daytime frequency and nocturia in the absence of local pathological factors. Muscarinic receptor antagonists (antimuscarinics) are the first-line pharmacotherapy. Tolterodine, a competitive, nonselective antimuscarinic specifically developed for the treatment of overactive bladder, demonstrated tissue selectivity for the bladder over the parotid gland in an animal model. As of March 5, 2003, the immediate-release (IR) formulation had been approved in 72 countries and the extended-release (ER) formulation had been approved in 28 countries, and tolterodine had been administered to 5 million patients. This review evaluates the benefit-risk profile of tolterodine in the treatment of adults with overactive bladder, summarising clinical trial and postmarketing surveillance data. Tolterodine has been found to significantly reduce micturition frequency, urgency perception and the number of episodes of urge incontinence and increase the volume voided per micturition. Dry mouth, an antimuscarinic class effect, is the most commonly reported adverse effect but is mostly mild to moderate in severity. Serious adverse effects are reported infrequently. Based on summary and review of postmarketing surveillance and clinical trial safety data received by the market authorization holder and contained in the Periodic Safety Update Reports for tolterodine, several monitored serious events of the gastrointestinal tract (e.g. ileus or haemorrhage), nervous system (e.g. syncope, convulsions and memory disorders) and cardiovascular system (e.g. ventricular arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, palpitations, bradycardia, transient ischaemic attacks and hypertension) were not considered related to tolterodine. QT or corrected QT (QTc) prolongation was not observed in any of the five cases of verified ventricular arrhythmia in patients administered tolterodine; there is insufficient evidence

  8. [Overactive bladder syndrome: etiology, pathogenesis, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, V H

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the causes of hyperactive detrusory contractions, considered etiopathogenesis and treatment of patients with overactive bladder syndrome (OBS). Two groups of patients with overactive bladder syndrome were examined, analyzed etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. A new method for increasing the threshold sensitivity of spinal centers under the OBS by using the local lesions of the mucous membrane of the bladder by electrical coagulation or local microwave hyperthermia of the prostate are proposed. The high efficiency of these methods in dealing with OBS is shown.

  9. Economic cost of fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao; Menees, Stacy B; Zochowski, Melissa K; Fenner, Dee E

    2012-05-01

    Despite its prevalence and deleterious impact on patients and families, fecal incontinence remains an understudied condition. Few data are available on its economic burden in the United States. The aim of this study was to quantify per patient annual economic costs associated with fecal incontinence. A mail survey of patients with fecal incontinence was conducted in 2010 to collect information on their sociodemographic characteristics, fecal incontinence symptoms, and utilization of medical and nonmedical resources for fecal incontinence. The analysis was conducted from a societal perspective and included both direct and indirect (ie, productivity loss) costs. Unit costs were determined based on standard Medicare reimbursement rates, national average wholesale prices of medications, and estimates from other relevant sources. All cost estimates were reported in 2010 US dollars. This study was conducted at a single tertiary care institution. The analysis included 332 adult patients who had fecal incontinence for more than a year with at least monthly leakage of solid, liquid, or mucous stool. The primary outcome measured was the per patient annual economic costs associated with fecal incontinence. The average annual total cost for fecal incontinence was $4110 per person (median = $1594; interquartile range, $517-$5164). Of these costs, direct medical and nonmedical costs averaged $2353 (median, $1176; interquartile range, $294-$2438) and $209 (median, $75; interquartile range, $17-$262), whereas the indirect cost associated with productivity loss averaged $1549 per patient annually (median, $0; interquartile range, $0-$813). Multivariate regression analyses suggested that greater fecal incontinence symptom severity was significantly associated with higher annual direct costs. This study was based on patient self-reported data, and the sample was derived from a single institution. Fecal incontinence is associated with substantial economic cost, calling for more

  10. Efficacy of botulinum toxin type A 100 units versus 200 units for treatment of refractory idiopathic overactive bladder

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    Osama Abdelwahab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single intra detrusor injection of BoNTA comparing two different doses (100 U or 200 U in patients with idiopathic overactive bladder. Materials and Methods: A randomized prospective study evaluated the efficacy of BoNTA in management of refractory idiopathic overactive bladder and included 80 patients. All patients were assessed initially by taking a history, a physical examination, overactive bladder symptom score, urine analysis, routine laboratory investigations, KUB and pelviabdominal. OABSS was adjusted on all patients postoperative at 1,3,6,9 months also Urodynamic was done for all patients preoperative and postoperative at 3, 6, 9 months. Results: The mean age was 30.22±8.37 and 31.35±7.61 in group I and II respectively. There was no statistically difference between both groups in all parameters all over the study except at 9 months after treatment. Hematuria was observed 6 and 9 patients in group I and II respectively. Dysuria was observed in 6 and 15 patients in group I and II respectively. UTI was detected in 3 and 7 patients in group I and II respectively. Conclusion: A single-injection procedure of 100 U or 200 U BoNTA is an effective and safe treatment for patients with IOAB who failed anticholinergic regimens. OABSS and QoL were improved for 6 months; 100 U injections seemed to have comparable results with 200 U. There was a significant difference at month 9 towards 200 U with more incidences of adverse events.

  11. Correlation between overactive bladder symptom score and neuropsychological parameters in Alzheimer’s disease patients with lower urinary tract symptom

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    Jung, Ha Bum; Choi, Don Kyoung; Lee, Seong Ho; Cho, Sung Tae; Na, Hae Ri; Park, Moon Ho

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To examine an association between the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) and neuropsychological parameters. Moreover, we investigate the factors that affect each item in the questionnaire. Materials and Methods A total of 376 patients (males: 184; females: 192) with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were recruited. Cognitive testing was conducted using the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale, Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), and Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Lower urinary tract symptom (LUTS) was assessed using OABSS and voiding diary. Results The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) (defined as OABSS ≥3 with an urgency score of ≥2) in patients with AD was 72.6%. Among the OAB subjects, the most common severity of symptom was moderate (72.6%), followed by mild (21.2%), and severe (5.8%). It was found that OABSS had a very high correlation with aging (r=0.75; p<0.001). When compared with neuropsychological parameters, it was found that OABSS was highly correlated with the CDR scores (r=0.446; p<0.001). However, no significant correlation was found between the changes in OABSS scores and those in other neuropsychological parameters. Based on the individual symptom scores, urgency incontinence was highly correlated with the CDR scores (r=0.43; p<0.001). Conclusions OABSS is a useful tool in assessing AD patients with LUTS. There was a consistent positive association between OABSS severity, including urgency incontinence, and CDR scores. PMID:27802001

  12. Urinary incontinence: the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, K L; Steidle, C P; Letizia, T M

    1995-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a widely prevalent problem that affects people of all ages and levels of physical health, both in healthcare settings and in the community. Contributing to the problem are that many practitioners remain uneducated about this condition, individuals are often too ashamed or embarrassed to seek professional help, and there are significant variations in diagnostic and treatment practices. Five types of UI are stress, urge, overflow, functional and manufactured incontinence. Stress, urge and overflow are caused by factors within the urinary tract and will be concentrated on in this article. To diagnose UI a three-part assessment should be conducted, including the patient history, physical examination, and urinalysis. A behavioral program should be designed which incorporates identification and education for both patient and clinician. Treatment options include pelvic floor exercises (Kegel), vaginal cones, bladder training (retraining), habit training (timed voiding), electrostimulation and biofeedback, clean intermittent catheterization, indwelling catheters, medications, collagen injections, surgery, and absorption products. Most patients can be helped dramatically or cured with the appropriate treatment.

  13. Benefit of pelvic floor muscle therapy in improving sexual function in women with stress urinary incontinence: a pretest-posttest intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serati, Maurizio; Braga, Andrea; Di Dedda, Maria Carmela; Sorice, Paola; Peano, Elena; Biroli, Antonella; Torella, Marco; Cromi, Antonella; Uccella, Stefano; Salvatore, Stefano; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Very few data are available on the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function in incontinent women. The authors used the Female Sexual Function Index to assess the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on female sexual function. Participants included women with stress urinary incontinence, without overactive bladder symptoms, who completed a 3-month pelvic floor muscle training. All patients completed the Female Sexual Function Index and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Thirty-four patients completed all of the questionnaires; 64.7% patients were referred with stress urinary incontinence without sexual disorders, while 35.3% complained of stress urinary incontinence and sexual symptoms. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form score significantly decreased after 3 months of pelvic floor muscle training (p =.01). The Female Sexual Function Index score significantly improved after pelvic floor muscle training even in women with sexual disorders (12.5 ± 9.5 vs. 29.7 ± 3.7; p pelvic floor muscle training may improve female sexual function in women with pure stress urinary incontinence.

  14. [New perspectives of treatment with fesoterodine fumarate in patients with overactive bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Baquero, R; Madurga, B; García, M V; Fernández, M A; Rosety, J M; Álvarez-Ossorio, J L

    2013-02-01

    Evaluate the effect of the treatment with fesoterodine fumarate in patients with overactive bladder, as an alternative in case of failure of the usual anticholinergic treatment, due to either lack of therapeutic efficacy or due to intolerance to side effects. A retrospective review of 158 patients with overactive bladder was carried out. The patients were divided into two groups; the first group; 56 patients where the anticholinergic treatment showed to be ineffective, and the second group; 102 patients who presented intolerance to anticholinergic side effects. For the first group where fesoterodine fumarate was used to improve effectiveness of the anticholinergics, improvement in the components of urinary urgency (p=0.001), insufficient emptying (p=0.001), incontinence (p=0.009), and in the number of pads/day (pfesoterodine fumarate was used as an alternative to anticholinergics to avoid side effects, a high reduction in the incidence of dry mouth (pFesoterodine fumarate is an optimal treatment option when the clinical response to anticholinergics has not been satisfactory, either by the lack of therapeutic action or by intolerance to side effects, and especially when the treatment is expected to be long. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Behavioral Intervention versus Pharmacotherapy or Their Combinations in the Management of Overactive Bladder Dysfunction

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    Khanh Tran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB refers to individuals with the following symptoms: urinary urgency, increased urinary frequency, and urge incontinence. These symptoms are not life threatening but can cause embarrassment and significantly impact quality of life. There are numerous treatment options for OAB, including behavioral therapy, traditional pharmacological therapy or a combination of the two. These options are considered the mainstay of treatment for OAB. We carried out a comprehensive systematic review of the available literature on the effectiveness of behavioral intervention, anticholinergic drugs, and their combination in the management of adults with overactive bladder, with emphasis on results from clinical trials and primary literature. Each treatment intervention is efficacious, and the choice should be based on the patient's severity of symptoms, tolerability, compliance and satisfaction with the treatment. Based on available literature, management of OAB using a combination of behavioral therapy and drug intervention is the most efficacious in terms of patient satisfaction, perceived improvement, and reduction of bladder symptoms. It is also the most practical and cost effective for optimal management of patients with OAB. Pharmacological treatment, in addition to behavioral therapy, remains important in the management of adults with OAB syndrome.

  16. Perspectives on mirabegron in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome: A new beta-3 adrenoceptor agonist

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    Chia-Hao Kuei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mirabegron, the first β3-adrenoceptor agonist introduced for use in clinical practice, differs from antimuscarinic agents in terms of mechanism of action. This review discusses various perspectives on mirabegron in terms of efficacy, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability for overactive bladder syndrome in studies conducted thus far. Mirabegron administered at daily doses of 25 mg, 50 mg, and 100 mg demonstrated significant improvements in micturition frequency, urgency incontinence, and mean volume voided/micturition as early as the first assessment, and these were maintained throughout the treatment course. Mirabegron seemed well tolerated. The most common adverse events observed with mirabegron in clinical trials were hypertension, nasopharyngitis, and urinary tract infection. The incidence of dry mouth was similar to that with placebo, between 3- and 5-fold lower than with 4 mg tolterodine extended release. Considering that dry mouth is the most bothersome adverse event associated with antimuscarinic drugs and often a reason for treatment discontinuation, mirabegron may be a valuable treatment option for these patients. The benefit of mirabegron (at doses of 50 mg and 100 mg was also evident in elderly patients and in both treatment-naive patients and those who previously discontinued antimuscarinic therapy. Mirabegron can also be used in combination with antimuscarinics or in addition to alpha blockers. Mirabegron may quickly become a standard treatment of overactive bladder syndrome.

  17. Oxybutynin extended release for the management of overactive bladder: a clinical review

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    AM Arisco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available AM Arisco, EK Brantly, SR KrausUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Urology, San Antonio, Texas, USAAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition which negatively impacts the quality of life of afflicted patients. This can result in alterations in social interactions at home, in the workplace and in the community, often leading to depression and poor self esteem as well as loss of productivity. Traditional mainstays of treatment include both behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy. Oxybutynin immediate release (IR represents the first such medication approved by the FDA specifically for treatment of OAB in 1975. Nevertheless, bothersome side effects in addition to thrice daily dosing often led to treatment cessation which raised the question that patients may actually prefer to live with their OAB symptoms rather than incur side effects or complex dosing schemes. Pharmacological advances ultimately led to development of a long-acting formulation of oxybutynin in the form of oxybutynin extended release (ER with the hope that this drug would maintain efficacy while decreasing bothersome side effects and improve compliance with the convenience of once daily dosing regimen. This paper will review the major clinical studies involving oxybutynin ER as well as its role in different patient populations and potential concerns with its use.Keywords: overactive bladder, urinary urge incontinence, antimuscarinic, oxybutynin 

  18. Subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve stimulation to treat urgency urinary incontinence, a pilot.

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    Hendrikje eVan Breda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesTo evaluate the effect of subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve stimulation on non-neurogenic urgency urinary incontinence in a domestic setting.Materials and MethodsNon-neurogenic patients >18 years with overactive bladder symptoms and urgency urinary incontinence were included. Exclusion criteria were mainly stress urinary incontinence. Patients underwent one week of subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve stimulation, delivered by a percutaneously placed electrode near the dorsal genital nerve connected to an external stimulator (pulse-rate 20 Hz, pulse-width 300 μs. Patients activated the stimulator when feeling the urge to void and stimulated for 30 s. The amplitude was set at the highest tolerable level. A bladder diary including a severity score of the urgency urinary incontinence episodes/void (scores: 0=none, 1=drops, 2=dashes, 3=soaks and a padtest was kept 3 days prior to, during, and 3 days after the test period. The subjective improvement was also scored.ResultsSeven patients (4 males / 3 females were enrolled, the mean age was 55 years (range 23-73. Six completed the test week. In the remaining patient the electrode migrated and was removed. 5/6 finalized the complete bladder diary, 1/6 recorded only the heavy incontinence episodes (score=3. 4/6 completed the padtest. In all patients who finalized the bladder diary the number of urgency urinary incontinence episodes decreased, in 3/5 with ≥60%. The heavy incontinence episodes (score=3 were resolved in 2/6 patients, and improved ≥ 80% in the other 4. The severity score of the urgency urinary incontinence episodes/void was improved with ≥60% in 3/5 patients. The mean subjective improvement was 73%. ConclusionThis feasibility study indicates that subject-controlled, on-demand dorsal genital nerve stimulation using a percutaneously placed electrode is possible over a longer time period, in a home setting, with a positive effect on non

  19. A short review of drug-food interactions of medicines treating overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paśko, Paweł; Rodacki, Tomasz; Domagała-Rodacka, Renata; Owczarek, Danuta

    2016-12-01

    Background Overactive bladder syndrome is a condition where one or more of the symptoms such as pollakiuria, urgent need to urinate, nocturia and urinary incontinence is observed. Its prevalence ranges between 7 and 27 % in men and 9-43 % in women. The role of a pharmacist is to educate the patient on medications administration scheme, and drug interactions with particular food or food components. Aim of the review To assess a potential impact of food and fruit juice on the pharmacokinetic and therapeutic effects of medications used in treating overactive bladder syndrome. This information will enhance pharmaceutical care and is vital and helpful for pharmacists counseling their patients. Method In order to gather information on interactions of medications employed in bladder dysfunctions, the English language reports published in the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane and CINAHL database over the years 1996-2015 were studied. Additionally, other resources, namely drugs.com, Medscape, UpToDate, Micromedex, Medical Letter, as well as Stockley Drugs Interaction electronic publication were included in the study. The analysis also covered product data sheets for particular medicinal products. Results Meals and the consumption of grapefruit juice were found to exert a diversified effect on the pharmacokinetics of drugs employed in overactive bladder syndrome therapy. Neither tolterodine, nor mirabegron interact with food and citrus fruit juice, whereas darifenacin, fesoterodine, oxybutynin and solifenacin do interact with grapefruit and others citrus fruit juice. The effects of such interactions may potentially be negative to patients. Trospium absorption is significantly decreased by food. Conclusion For selected medicines used in treating bladder dysfunctions food and grapefruit juice consumption may significantly affect efficacy and safety of the therapy. All information on the topic is likely to enhance the quality of pharmaceutical care.

  20. Factors Associated with Therapeutic Efficacy of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection for Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Mou Hsiao

    Full Text Available To analyze the predictors of therapeutic efficacy after intravesical botulinum toxin A injection for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB refractory to antimuscarinic therapy.All consecutively OAB patients, who visited the urologic outpatient clinics of a medical center and refractory to antimuscarinic treatment, were prospectively enrolled. All enrolled patients received intravesical injection of 100 U onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox. The Global Response Assessment (GRA score ≥ 2 at 3 months after Botox injection was defined as a successful treatment, otherwise failed.Overall, 89 patients received intravesical injection. Eighty patients, including 42 men and 38 women, had received follow-up at 3 months. The overall success rate was 63.8%. The global response assessment, urgency severity score, urgency, urgency urinary incontinence and frequency episodes, and functional bladder capacity improved after treatment. However, post-void residual volume (PVR increased, and voiding efficiency (VE decreased after treatment. Female gender (odds ratio = 3.75 was the only independent factor associated with the success. Female gender (coefficient = 0.74, low baseline overactive bladder symptoms score (coefficient = -0.12 and the presence of OAB-wet (coefficient = 0.79 were independent factors associated with therapeutic efficacy (i.e., GRA score. VE (odds ratio = 0.062 was the only predictor for a large PVR at 3 months. The optimum cutoff value of VE was <87% with the area under the ROC curve being 0.64 (sensitivity = 63.8%, specificity = 57.1%.The therapeutic effects of Botox can persist till 6 months after treatment. Female gender, low overactive bladder symptoms score and OAB-wet are associated better therapeutic efficacy, and low baseline VE is associated with large PVR. These findings can serve as an initial guide or assist in consultation regarding the treatment of OAB patients with Botox injection.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01657409.

  1. Early onset of fesoterodine efficacy in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Howard B; Morrow, Jon D; Gong, Jason; Tseng, Li-Jung; Schneider, Tim

    2011-02-01

    To assess the onset of efficacy of fesoterodine 4 mg once daily on overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms after 1 week of treatment. This was a prespecified analysis of data collected during the first week of a 12-week, open-label, single-arm, flexible-dose study of fesoterodine. Eligible subjects were adult men and women (aged ≥ 18 years) who reported urinary frequency (eight or more micturitions per 24 h) and urgency (three or more episodes per 24 h) in 5-day bladder diaries at baseline, and dissatisfaction with previous tolterodine or tolterodine extended-release treatment received within 2 years of screening. All subjects received fesoterodine 4 mg once daily during the first 4 weeks of treatment (with an optional dose increase to fesoterodine 8 mg after week 4). Early onset of efficacy of fesoterodine 4 mg was assessed based on changes from baseline to week 1 in variables recorded in 5-day bladder diaries, including total micturitions, urgency episodes, urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes and nocturnal micturitions. Urgency and severe urgency episodes were defined as those rated ≥ 3 and ≥ 4, respectively, on the five-point Urinary Sensation Scale (USS) (1 = no urgency, 5 = UUI); frequency-urgency sum (a combined measure of micturition frequency and urgency) was defined as the sum of all USS ratings. All bladder diary variables, including total and nocturnal micturitions, UUI episodes, urgency episodes, severe urgency episodes and frequency-urgency sum per 24 h, were significantly improved (all P fesoterodine 4 mg compared to baseline. The diary-dry rate at week 1 (i.e. subjects with at least one UUI episode at baseline who subsequently reported no UUI episodes on week 1 diary) was 38%. In this open-label study of subjects with OAB who had been previously treated and dissatisfied with tolterodine, fesoterodine 4 mg showed a rapid onset of efficacy at 1 week. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  2. Maternal Fructose Exposure Programs Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Bladder Overactivity in Young Adult Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Chia; Tain, You-Lin; Wu, Kay L. H.; Leu, Steve; Chan, Julie Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal fructose exposure (MFE) programs the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in young adult offspring. Epidemiological data indicate that MetS may increase the risks of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. However, it remains unknown whether MFE programs MetS-associated bladder dysfunction in adult offspring. Using Sprague-Dawley rats, we investigated the effects of MFE during pregnancy and lactation on developmental programming of MetS-associated bladder dysfunction. In addition, next generation sequencing technology was used to identify potential transcripts involved in the programmed bladder dysfunction in adult male offspring to MFE. We found that MFE programmed the MetS-associated OAB symptoms (i.e., an increase in micturition frequency and a shortened mean inter-contractile interval) in young adult male offspring, alongside significant alterations in bladder transcripts, including Chrm2, Chrm3, P2rx1, Trpv4, and Vipr2 gene expression. At protein level, the expressions of M2-, M3-muscarinic and P2X1 receptor proteins were upregulated in the MFE bladder. Functionally, the carbachol-induced detrusor contractility was reduced in the MFE offspring. These data suggest that alterations in the bladder transcripts and impairment of the bladder cholinergic pathways may underlie the pathophysiology of programmed bladder dysfunction in adult offspring to MFE. PMID:27703194

  3. CD34-positive interstitial cells of the human detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle; Hansen, Alastair; Smedts, Frank;

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are well described in the bowel wall. They are c-kit positive and play a role as pacemaker cells. Similar c-kit-positive cells have recently been described in the human bladder. The aim of this study was to characterize interstitial cells of the bladder detrusor...... using a panel of antibodies directed against CD117/c-kit, CD34, CD31, S100, tryptase, neurofilament, NSE, Factor-VIII and GFAP. A striking finding was an interstitial type of cell which is CD34 immunoreactive (CD34-ir) but CD117/c-kit negative. The cells have a tentacular morphology, enveloping...... and intermingling with individual muscle fasicles. Morphologically and immunohistochemically, they show no neurogenic, endothelial or mast cell differentiation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the presence of interstitial cells with a round-to-oval nucleus, sparse perinuclear cytoplasm and long...

  4. Idiopathic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in neurologically normal patients with voiding abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, T M; Djurhuus, J C; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding was vesico...

  5. Associated factors to urinary incontinence in women undergoing urodynamic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Pereira da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Analyzing factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI among women submitted to urodynamic testing. METHOD A cross-sectional study of 150 women attended at a urological center. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistics. RESULTS White women (79.3%, overweight (45.3%, menopausal (53.3%, who drink coffee (82.7%, sedentary (65.3%, who had vaginal birth (51.4%, with episiotomy (80%, and who underwent the Kristeller maneuver (69%. 60.7% had Urethral Hypermobility (UH. A statistical association was found between: weight change and UH (p = 0.024; menopause, Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency (ISD and Detrusor Instability (DI (p = 0.001; gynecological surgery, ISD and DI (p = 0.014; hysterectomy and all types of UI (p = 0.040; physical activity and mixed UI (p = 0.014. CONCLUSION Interventions and guidance on preventing UI and strengthening pelvic muscles should be directed at women who present weight changes, who are sedentary menopausal women, and those who have undergone hysterectomy or other gynecological surgery. Studies on pelvic strengthening methods are needed in order to take into account the profile of the needs presented by women.

  6. Detrusor instability in children with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Kristensen, E S; Nielsen, K K

    1986-01-01

    Forty-one children, aged 5-15 years, were referred because of recurrent urinary infections and/or enuresis. They were examined prospectively by means of cystometry. CO2 cystometry revealed detrusor instability in 18 children (44%), but if complete reproducibility were to be requested in repeated...... tests, only 7 children (17%) would have presented instability. Detrusor instability was not significantly related to definite pathological changes in the urinary tract or to irritative bladder symptoms....

  7. La incontinencia urinaria Urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Robles

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available La incontinencia urinaria, entendida como cualquier pérdida involuntaria de orina, constituye un problema médico y social importante. Puede clasificarse en incontinencia urinaria de esfuerzo, incontinencia urinaria de urgencia e incontinencia urinaria mixta, principalmente. Las proporciones de estos tres tipos principales de incontinencia urinaria son difíciles de establecer y varían notablemente según las fuentes, pero, podrían estar en torno a 40, 33 y 20%, respectivamente. Su diagnóstico requiere una correcta historia clínica y exploración física, junto con algunas exploraciones complementarias. El primer escalón terapéutico lo constituyen las medidas higiénico-dietéticas y las técnicas de modificación de la conducta. El tratamiento farmacológico es específico para cada tipo de incontinencia urinaria, utilizándose anticolinérgicos e inhibidores de la recaptación de serotonina. Por último, las diferentes técnicas quirúrgicas tienen su papel ante el fracaso de los tratamientos conservadores o frente a incontinencia urinaria severa.Urinary incontinence, understood as any involuntary loss of urine, constitutes an important medical and social problem. It can be classified as stress urinary incontinence, urgent urinary incontinence or mixed urinary incontinence. The proportions of these three types of urinary incontinence are difficult to establish and vary notably between sources, but they might be about 40, 33 and 20% respectively. Its diagnosis requires a correct clinical history and physical exploration, together with some complementary explorations. The first therapeutic step consists of hygienic-dietary measures and behaviour modification techniques. Pharmacological treatment is specific for each type of urinary incontinence, using anticholinergics and inhibitors of serotonin reuptake. Finally, different surgical techniques have a role in cases where conservative treatments fail or when dealing with severe urinary

  8. Effect of Anti-Cholinergics with Tamsulosin for Treating Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Patients with an Overactive Bladder: A Clinico-Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Deva T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Overactive bladder (OAB symptoms are due to detrusor over activity (DOA which is characterized by involuntary detrusor contractions during bladder filling. It may co-exist with BOO due to benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH in men. Hence, the study was designed to assess and compare the clinical efficacy of combination therapy of anti-muscarinics with α-blockers versus α-blockers monotherapy in BPH patients with OAB. Methods: This study was carried out in the urology department of a tertiary care hospital for a period of 4 months. Clinical and biochemistry reports of 90 patients were collected in designed case report forms. All statistical analyses were performed using IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences 17 and Graph Pad Prism 7.0. Results: The perceived change from baseline values was comparatively better in patients who received combination of tamsulosin with tolterodine than other two groups. All the three groups were effective in reducing the symptoms. Conclusion: Tamsulosin with tolterodine at a recommended dosage has shown to be clinically more effective than oxybutynin after 12 weeks of treatment for men with OAB in BPH. Patients with increased urinary retention risk should be carefully monitored during the course of treatment

  9. Urodynamics in a community-dwelling population of females 80 years or older: which motive? Which diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise A. Valentini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine why community-dwelling women aged 80 years or over were referred for urodynamic evaluation despite their advanced age and which urodynamic diagnosis was made. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred consecutive females (80-93 years were referred to our urodynamics outpatient clinic for evaluation of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS between 2005 and 2008. Clinical evaluation comprised of a previous history of LUTS, previous medical history of neurological disease or dementia, pelvic floor dysfunction or prior pelvic surgery. Exclusion criteria were complete retention and severe dementia involving failure to understand simple instructions. Assessed items were results of uroflows (free flow and intubated flow, cystometry and urethral pressure profilometry, and final urodynamic diagnosis. RESULTS: The main complaint evoked by the patients was incontinence (65.0% of which 61.5% was "complicated" and urgency was reported by 70.0%. Interpretable free flow at arrival was very low (44.0%. Prevalence of detrusor overactivity was high, found in 45 patients of whom 16 had detrusor hyperactivity with impaired detrusor contractility. Detrusor overactivity and urgency were strongly associated (p = 0.004. Twenty-five patients had intrinsic sphincteric deficiency alone and 15 detrusor underactivity. CONCLUSION: In this particular community-dwelling with an elderly female population, urodynamics is easily feasible. Incontinence, mainly "complicated" is the more frequent complaint and urgency the more frequent symptom. Urodynamic diagnosis underlines the high incidence of detrusor overactivity as well as impaired detrusor function.

  10. Urinary incontinence - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help with my urinary incontinence? What are Kegel exercises? What can I do when I want ... tape Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Self catheterization - ...

  11. Traditional suburethral sling operations for urinary incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Haroon; Bezerra, Carlos A; Bruschini, Homero; Cody, June D; Aluko, Patricia

    2017-07-26

    and less long-term voiding dysfunction. One study showed there was a 20% lower risk of bladder perforation with the sling procedure but a 50% increase in urinary tract infection with the sling procedure compared with colposuspension. Fewer women developed prolapse after slings (compared with after colposuspension) in two small trials but this did not reach statistical significance.Twelve trials addressed the comparison between traditional sling operations and minimally invasive sling operations. These seemed to be equally effective in the short term (RR for incontinence within first year 0.97, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.20) but minimally invasive slings had a shorter operating time, fewer peri-operative complications (other than bladder perforation) and some evidence of less post-operative voiding dysfunction and detrusor symptoms.Six trials compared one type of traditional sling with another. Materials included porcine dermis, lyophilised dura mater, fascia lata, vaginal wall, autologous dermis and rectus fascia. Participant-reported improvement rates within the first year favoured the traditional autologous material rectus fascia over other biological materials (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.98). There were more complications with the use of non-absorbable Gore-Tex in one trial.Data for comparison of bladder neck needle suspension with suburethral slings were inconclusive because they came from a single trial with a small specialised population.No trials compared traditional suburethral slings with anterior repair, laparoscopic retropubic colposuspension or artificial sphincters. Most trials did not distinguish between women having surgery for primary or recurrent incontinence when reporting participant characteristics.For most of the comparisons, clinically important differences could not be ruled out. Traditional slings seem to be as effective as minimally invasive slings, but had higher rates of adverse effects. This should be interpreted with some caution however, as the

  12. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  13. Undertreatment of urinary incontinence in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning-van Beest, F.J.A.; Sturkenboom, M.C.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.; Herings, R.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the urinary incontinence guidelines that are issued by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, treatment guidelines are related to the type of incontinence. It is unknown whether treatment of urinary incontinence in general practice complies with these guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To de

  14. [Stress incontinence in elderly women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertzer, H; Schneider, P

    2013-06-01

    Stress incontinence is one of the major challenges in geriatric medicine. This is becoming more apparent in routine urology practice with the demographic changes in the population. A thorough diagnosis for a correct treatment of stress incontinence is as important in elderly women as it is in younger patients. This includes assessing the risk factors of incontinence and obesity, parturition, pelvic surgery and changes in hormone levels are risk factors usually found in elderly women. These are the main reasons why this patient group is most frequently affected. Treatment options do not differ significantly from these of younger women. Lifestyle modification, weight loss and supervised pelvic floor training are the mainstays of conservative therapy and surgical treatment should only be considered after these options have been exhausted. In these cases minimally invasive surgical techniques offer clear advantages especially for elderly often multimorbid women.

  15. Changes in incontinence after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Anne Raabjerg; Jensen, Trine Dalsgaard; Lauszus, Finn Friis

    2017-01-01

    . Sample size calculation indicated that 102 women had to be included. The incontinence status was estimated by a Danish version of the ICIG questionnaire; further, visual analogue scale, dynamometer for hand grip, knee extension strength and balance were applied. Work capacity was measured ergometer cycle...... together with lean body mass by impedance. Quality of life was assessed using the SF-36 questionnaire. Patients were examined preoperatively and twice postoperatively. Results: In total 41 women improved their incontinence after hysterectomy and 10 women reported deterioration. Preoperative stress...... patients undergoing planned hysterectomy were compared pre- and postoperatively. In a sub-study of the prospective follow-up study the changes in incontinence, postoperative fatigue, quality of life, physical function, and body composition were evaluated preoperatively, 13 and 30 days postoperatively...

  16. Management of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, W; Corcos, J

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects 11.5 to 53.4 individuals per million of the population in developed countries each year. SCI is caused by trauma, although it can also result from myelopathy, myelitis, vascular disease or arteriovenous malformations and multiple sclerosis. Patients with complete lesions of the spinal cord between spinal cord level T6 and S2, after they recover from spinal shock, generally exhibit involuntary bladder contractions without sensation, smooth sphincter synergy, but with detrusor striated sphincter dyssynergia (DESD). Those with lesions above spinal cord level T6 may experience, in addition, smooth sphincter dyssynergia and autonomic hyperreflexia. DESD is a debilitating problem in patients with SCI. It carries a high risk of complications, and even life expectancy can be affected. Nearly half of the patients with untreated DESD will develop deleterious urologic complications, due to high intravesical pressures, resulting in urolithiasis, urinary tract infection (UTI), vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), hydronephrosis, obstructive uropathy, and renal failure. The mainstay of treatment is the use of antimuscarinics and catheterization, but in those for whom this is not possible external sphincterotomy has been a last resort option. External sphincterotomy is associated with significant risks, including haemorrhage; erectile dysfunction and the possibility of redo procedures. Over the last decade alternatives have been investigated, such as urethral stents and intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection. In this review, we will cover neurogenic DESD, with emphasis on definition, classifications, diagnosis and different therapeutic options available.

  17. You are what you eat: the impact of diet on overactive bladder and lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Dudley; Giarenis, Ilias; Cardozo, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a clinical syndrome describing the symptom complex of urgency, with or without urgency incontinence and is usually associated with frequency and nocturia. The symptoms associated with OAB are common and whilst not life threatening are known to have a significant impact on the quality of life (QoL). There is increasing evidence that diet may have a significant role in the development of OAB symptoms. Whilst fluid in-take is known to affect lower urinary tract function the effects of caffeine, carbonated drinks and artificial sweeteners are less well understood. Consequently the aim of this paper is to review the evidence and investigate the effect of diet on lower urinary tract function and dysfunction.

  18. The use of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of HTLV-1-associated overactive bladder refractory to conventional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Abraão Carneiro Neto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Urinary symptoms occur in 19% of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1-infected patients who do not fulfill criteria for HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP and in almost 100% of HAM/TSP patients. Few studies have evaluated therapies for overactive bladder (OAB caused by HTLV-1 infection. This case report describes the effect of onabotulinum toxin A on the urinary manifestations of three patients with HAM/TSP and OAB symptoms. The patients were intravesically administered 200 units of Botox®. Their incontinence episodes improved, and their OAB symptoms scores (OABSS reduced significantly. These data indicate that Botox® should be a treatment option for OAB associated with HTLV-1 infection.

  19. Menthol inhibits detrusor contractility independently of TRPM8 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Filho, Antonio Celso Saragossa; Shah, Ajay; Augusto, Taize Machado; Barbosa, Guilherme Oliveira; Leiria, Luiz Osorio; de Carvalho, Hernandes Faustino; Antunes, Edson; Grant, Andrew Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Agonists such as icilin and menthol can activate the cool temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8. However, biological responses to menthol may occur independently of TRPM8 activation. In the rodent urinary bladder, menthol facilitates the micturition reflex but inhibits muscarinic contractions of the detrusor smooth muscle. The site(s) of TRPM8 expression in the bladder are controversial. In this study we investigated the regulation of bladder contractility in vitro by menthol. Bladder strips from wild type and TRPM8 knockout male mice (25-30 g) were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. Isometric contractions to carbachol (1 nM-30 µM), CaCl2 (1 µM to 100 mM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 8, 16, 32 Hz) were measured. Strips from both groups contracted similarly in response to both carbachol and EFS. Menthol (300 µM) or nifedipine (1 µM) inhibited carbachol and EFS-induced contractions in both wild type and TRPM8 knockout bladder strips. Incubation with the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (1 µM), replacement of extracellular sodium with the impermeant cation N-Methyl-D-Glucamine, incubation with a cocktail of potassium channel inhibitors (100 nM charybdotoxin, 1 µM apamin, 10 µM glibenclamide and 1 µM tetraethylammonium) or removal of the urothelium did not affect the inhibitory actions of menthol. Contraction to CaCl2 was markedly inhibited by either menthol or nifedipine. In cultured bladder smooth muscle cells, menthol or nifedipine abrogated the carbachol or KCl-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. Intravesical administration of menthol increased voiding frequency while decreasing peak voiding pressure. We conclude that menthol inhibits muscarinic bladder contractions through blockade of L-type calcium channels, independently of TRPM8 activation.

  20. Beta adrenoreceptors in the rabbit bladder detrusor muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G.F.; Marks, B.H.

    1984-02-01

    This study examines the beta adrenergic receptors of the rabbit detrusor smooth muscle, employing (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as a ligand for the binding of beta adrenergic receptors. Saturation binding experiments on the isolated membrane fraction yielded a KD for ICYP of 14.7 pM and a maximum binding of 147.6 fmol/mg of protein. Displacement of labeled ICYP by a series of beta adrenergic agents yielded the following KD values for the combined high and low affinity binding sites: I-propranolol, 0.76 nM; ICI 118,551, 1.7 nM; zinterol, 38.0 nM; metoprolol, 3.5 microM; and practolol, 61.4 microM. When these displacement experimental results were compared to KD values from other reported binding studies with ICYP for beta adrenoreceptors, both the order of potency and the KD values indicated primarily beta-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes. Computer program Scatfit analysis of the displacement curves indicated a single slope and affinity constant for all five beta adrenergic agents. Hofstee plots for zinterol, ICI 118,551 and metoprolol, however, were not linear and indicated that minor populations of beta-1 adrenoreceptors were also present as both high and low affinity binding sites could be defined. It is concluded that the primary receptor population is beta-2 and that this tissue is heterogenous with a small population of beta-1 adrenoreceptors representing approximately 13 to 23% of the total beta adrenoreceptor population.

  1. Menthol inhibits detrusor contractility independently of TRPM8 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Celso Saragossa Ramos-Filho

    Full Text Available Agonists such as icilin and menthol can activate the cool temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8. However, biological responses to menthol may occur independently of TRPM8 activation. In the rodent urinary bladder, menthol facilitates the micturition reflex but inhibits muscarinic contractions of the detrusor smooth muscle. The site(s of TRPM8 expression in the bladder are controversial. In this study we investigated the regulation of bladder contractility in vitro by menthol. Bladder strips from wild type and TRPM8 knockout male mice (25-30 g were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. Isometric contractions to carbachol (1 nM-30 µM, CaCl2 (1 µM to 100 mM and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 8, 16, 32 Hz were measured. Strips from both groups contracted similarly in response to both carbachol and EFS. Menthol (300 µM or nifedipine (1 µM inhibited carbachol and EFS-induced contractions in both wild type and TRPM8 knockout bladder strips. Incubation with the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (1 µM, replacement of extracellular sodium with the impermeant cation N-Methyl-D-Glucamine, incubation with a cocktail of potassium channel inhibitors (100 nM charybdotoxin, 1 µM apamin, 10 µM glibenclamide and 1 µM tetraethylammonium or removal of the urothelium did not affect the inhibitory actions of menthol. Contraction to CaCl2 was markedly inhibited by either menthol or nifedipine. In cultured bladder smooth muscle cells, menthol or nifedipine abrogated the carbachol or KCl-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. Intravesical administration of menthol increased voiding frequency while decreasing peak voiding pressure. We conclude that menthol inhibits muscarinic bladder contractions through blockade of L-type calcium channels, independently of TRPM8 activation.

  2. Impact of Dry Mouth on Fluid Intake and Overactive Bladder Symptoms in Women taking Fesoterodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbart, Steven J; Lewis, Rusell; Smith, Ariana L; Harvie, Heidi S; Miller, Janis M; Arya, Lily A

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the long-term relationships between dry mouth, fluid intake and overactive bladder symptoms in women undergoing treatment with fesoterodine. We hypothesized that women who experienced dry mouth would increase their fluid intake and worsen their urinary symptoms. We conducted a prospective ancillary study to a 9-month open-label trial of fesoterodine for women with urgency urinary incontinence. Fluid intake was measured and compared according to reported dry mouth. Multivariable analysis was used to study the interaction between dry mouth, fluid intake and urinary symptoms. During the study 407 women without dry mouth significantly reduced their fluid intake (mean decrease 172.1 ml, median 118.3 ml, p = 0.02), while 91 women with dry mouth did not (mean decrease 95.8 ml, median 118.3 ml, p = 0.54). On univariable analysis a greater proportion of women who experienced dry mouth reported improvement in their urinary symptoms compared to women without dry mouth (60.5% vs 47.2%, p = 0.03). On multivariable analysis black women were less likely to report dry mouth (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9, p = 0.03) and older women were less likely to report improvement in urinary symptoms (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-0.99, p = 0.003). Factors not associated with improvement in urinary symptoms on multiple regression were dry mouth, baseline fluid intake volume, change in fluid intake volume and caffeine intake volume. In women with overactive bladder receiving fesoterodine dry mouth may prevent restriction of fluid intake but does not diminish treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling dose-response relationships of the effects of fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardozo Linda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic for the treatment of overactive bladder, a syndrome of urgency, with or without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI, usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia. Our objective was to develop predictive models to describe the dose response of fesoterodine. Methods Data from subjects enrolled in double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II and III trials were used for developing longitudinal dose-response models. Results The models predicted that clinically significant and near-maximum treatment effects would be seen within 3 to 4 weeks after treatment initiation. For a typical patient with 11 micturitions per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.2, -1.7, and -2.2 micturitions for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. For a typical patient with 2 UUI episodes per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.05, -1.26, and -1.43 UUI episodes for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Increase in mean voided volume was estimated at 9.7 mL for placebo, with an additional 14.2 mL and 28.4 mL for fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Conclusions A consistent dose response for fesoterodine was demonstrated for bladder diary endpoints in subjects with overactive bladder, a result that supports the greater efficacy seen with fesoterodine 8 mg in post hoc analyses of clinical trial data. The dose-response models can be used to predict outcomes for doses not studied or for patient subgroups underrepresented in clinical trials. Trial Registration The phase III trials used in this analysis have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00220363 and NCT00138723.

  4. The Impact of Dry Mouth on Fluid Intake and Overactive Bladder Symptoms in Women taking Fesoterodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbart, Steven J.; Lewis, Rusell; Smith, Ariana L; Harvie, Heidi H; Miller, Janis M; Arya, Lily A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the long-term relationships between dry mouth, fluid intake and overactive bladder symptoms in women undergoing treatment with fesoterodine. We hypothesize that women who experience dry mouth will increase their fluid intake and worsen their urinary symptoms. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective ancillary study to a 9 month open-label trial of fesoterodine for women with urgency urinary incontinence. Fluid intake was measured and compared according to reported dry mouth. Multivariable analysis was used to study the interaction between dry mouth, fluid intake and urinary symptoms. Results During the study, women without dry mouth (n=407) significantly reduced their fluid intake (mean decrease of 172.1 mL, median decrease of 118.3 mL, p= 0.02), while women with dry mouth (n=91) did not (mean decrease of 95.8 mL, median decrease of 118.3 mL, p=0.54). On univariable analysis, a greater proportion of women who experienced dry mouth reported improvement in their urinary symptoms compared to women without dry mouth (60.5% versus 47.2%, p=0.03). On multivariable analysis, Black/ African American women were less likely to report dry mouth (OR 0.4 95%CI 0.2–0.9, p=0.03) and older women were less likely to report improvement in urinary symptoms (OR 0.98 95%CI 0.96–0.99, p= 0.003). Factors not associated with improvement in urinary symptoms on multiple regression were dry mouth, baseline fluid intake volume, change in fluid intake volume, and caffeine intake volume. Conclusions In women with overactive bladder receiving fesoterodine, dry mouth may prevent women from restricting fluid intake, but does not diminish treatment efficacy. PMID:26682757

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of fesoterodine in older and younger subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Stephen R; Ruiz-Cerdá, José Luis; Martire, Diane; Wang, Joseph T; Wagg, Adrian S

    2010-12-01

    To assess the effect of age on fesoterodine efficacy and tolerability in subjects with an overactive bladder. The data from 2 randomized, 12-week studies of 1681 subjects treated with fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg or placebo were pooled and stratified by age. The subjects completed 3-day bladder diaries at baseline and weeks 2 and 12, the King's Health Questionnaire at baseline and week 12, and the Treatment Benefit Scale at week 12. Of the subjects aged fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg was associated with statistically significant improvements in the diary variables at week 12 versus placebo. Greater improvement in urgency urinary incontinence was seen with fesoterodine 8 mg versus 4 mg. For those aged ≥65 to fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg significantly improved all diary variables, except for the mean voided volume and micturition frequency, respectively, [corrected] versus placebo. In subjects aged ≥75 years, fesoterodine 8 mg significantly improved all diary variables, except for mean voided volume, versus placebo. No significant improvements were observed with fesoterodine 4 mg versus placebo. Fesoterodine significantly improved several King's Health Questionnaire domains versus placebo in all age groups. Fesoterodine 4 mg did not significantly improve any domains in subjects aged ≥75 years. In all age groups, the treatment response rates were significantly greater with both fesoterodine doses versus placebo. Dry mouth and constipation occurred more frequently in subjects aged ≥75 years receiving fesoterodine 8 mg than in those receiving fesoterodine 4 mg or placebo, although the discontinuation rates because of dry mouth and constipation were not increased. Fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg effectively treated overactive bladder symptoms in subjects aged Fesoterodine 8 mg was effective in subjects aged ≥75 years. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adherence to fesoterodine in women with overactive bladder in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, M; Porta, O; Pubill, J; Castillo, M T; Mora, I; Huguet, E; Ortega, J A; Martínez, E

    2015-05-01

    To assess the short-term compliance with fesoterodine treatment and to identify the reasons for lack of adherence and discontinuation in routine clinical practice. The secondary aim was to estimate the patient-reported outcomes. This was an observational retrospective, multicenter study conducted in a sample of women with overactive bladder on fesoterodine treatment for at least three months. Adherence to medication was assessed using the Morisky-Green test. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF), Overactive Bladder Questionnaire Short Form (OAB-qSF), and Treatment Benefit Scale (TBS). One hundred and twenty women with a mean age [standard deviation (SD)] of 62.2 (12.0) years with severe OAB [mean (SD) ICIQ-SF score 13.2 (4.0)] were included. 42.1% of the patients were considered compliant with fesoterodine treatment. The main causes for non-compliance/discontinuation stated by the remaining 57.9% of the patients were adverse events (62.2%) and lack of clinical benefits (20.0%). The illness status as well as the patient-perceived bother occasioned by the OAB symptoms and their impact on the quality of life improved significantly after three months on fesoterodine treatment (pfesoterodine and perceived the benefit that the treatment provided them three months after starting treatment. However, more than half of the study population failed to comply or discontinued the treatment mainly due to intolerance or lack of efficacy. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of fesoterodine on nocturia and quality of sleep in Asian patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Osamu; Hiro, Shintaro; Hotta, Shinichi; Mogami, Satoru; Yamagami, Hidetomi

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the efficacy of fesoterodine vs placebo on nocturia, sleep disturbance, and sleep-related quality of life (QoL) in patients with overactive bladder and nocturia. This posthoc analysis used data from a 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg per day in Asian adults reporting ≥8 micturitions and ≥1 urgency urinary incontinence episodes per 24 hours at baseline. Patients who reported ≥1 nocturnal micturition/24 h were included in this analysis. Efficacy variables included change from baseline to week 12/end of treatment in nocturnal micturitions/24 h, nocturnal voided volume/micturition, and hours of undisturbed sleep. Sleep-related QoL was assessed using King's Health Questionnaire Sleep/Energy domain. Treatment comparisons were made using analysis of covariance. Among 555 patients, reductions in nocturnal micturitions with fesoterodine 4 mg (-0.63) and 8 mg (-0.77) were numerically greater vs placebo (-0.56), but differences were not significant (P >.05). When patients with a nocturnal polyuria index >33% were excluded, the decrease in nocturnal micturitions was significantly greater with fesoterodine 8 mg vs placebo (-0.24; P = .031). Increases in nocturnal voided volume/micturition were significantly greater with fesoterodine 4 (38.07 mL; P = .013) and 8 mg (42.05 mL; P fesoterodine 4 mg vs placebo (80 vs 54 minutes; P = .032); improvement in King's Health Questionnaire Sleep/Energy scores was significantly greater with fesoterodine 4 (P = .034) and 8 mg (P = .019) vs placebo. These results suggest that fesoterodine may reduce nocturnal micturitions and improve sleep quality and QoL in overactive bladder patients with nocturia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of Tadalafil once daily versus Fesoterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Atti, L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (5-PDEi) show a potential therapeutic use in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) and male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The aim of this study was to evaluating the efficacy on OAB symptoms, impact on quality of life and sexual function of tadalafil 5mg once daily in older patients versus fesoterodine 8 mg. 108 consecutive patients diagnosed with OAB were divided into 2 groups: Group A: 56 patients treated with tadalafil 5 mg once daily; Group B: 52 patients treated with fesoterodine 8 mg, both groups treated for a period of 12 weeks. Eligible patients were men aged ≥ 65 years with OAB symptoms, including urgency and increased frequency during a period of ≥ 1 year and urgency urinary incontinence during a period of ≥ 6 months before enrolment. Patients were asked to complete the 3-day voiding diary prior each scheduled visit at weeks 0, 4 and 12. During these visits, they were administered: Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and Quality of life (QoL). Not statistically significant differences emerged between the two groups at baseline, both patient groups had similar age and BMI; in each treatment group, the proportion of men ≥ 75 years was approximately 65%. From the results of our study, we can say that a treatment once a day with tadalafil improves not only significantly: micturition/24 hours (p fesoterodine treatment, but also the quality of life (p fesoterodine 8 mg is efficacious in the treatment of the symptoms of OAB in older adults, improving also the quality of life and sexual and social life.

  9. Modeling dose-response relationships of the effects of fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Linda; Khullar, Vik; El-Tahtawy, Ahmed; Guan, Zhonghong; Malhotra, Bimal; Staskin, David

    2010-08-19

    Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic for the treatment of overactive bladder, a syndrome of urgency, with or without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia. Our objective was to develop predictive models to describe the dose response of fesoterodine. Data from subjects enrolled in double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II and III trials were used for developing longitudinal dose-response models. The models predicted that clinically significant and near-maximum treatment effects would be seen within 3 to 4 weeks after treatment initiation. For a typical patient with 11 micturitions per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.2, -1.7, and -2.2 micturitions for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. For a typical patient with 2 UUI episodes per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.05, -1.26, and -1.43 UUI episodes for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Increase in mean voided volume was estimated at 9.7 mL for placebo, with an additional 14.2 mL and 28.4 mL for fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. A consistent dose response for fesoterodine was demonstrated for bladder diary endpoints in subjects with overactive bladder, a result that supports the greater efficacy seen with fesoterodine 8 mg in post hoc analyses of clinical trial data. The dose-response models can be used to predict outcomes for doses not studied or for patient subgroups underrepresented in clinical trials. The phase III trials used in this analysis have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00220363 and NCT00138723).

  10. Incontinência urinária após gonadectomia em fêmeas caninas Urinary incontinence after gonadectomy in female dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Azevedo Voorwald

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A incontinência urinária adquirida é uma condição debilitante e, muitas vezes, incurável que acomete fêmeas castradas e raramente fêmeas inteiras ou machos. A manifestação clínica pode ocorrer em qualquer momento após a gonadectomia e resulta em graves problemas no manejo do paciente. Os mecanismos que desencadeiam a incontinência após ovariectomia envolvem decréscimo na pressão de fechamento uretral, alterações hormonais, aumento na deposição de colágeno na musculatura lisa da bexiga, diminuição na contratilidade do músculo detrusor e redução na resposta aos estímulos elétricos e ao carbachol. O diagnóstico é realizado pelo histórico do animal, pelo exame físico, pelos exames laboratoriais, pelo perfil de pressão uretral, pela ultrassonografia e pelas radiografias abdominais. O tratamento clínico envolve utilização de fármacos -adrenérgicos, estrógenos, análogos de GnRH e agentes antidepressivos. As técnicas cirúrgicas recomendadas correspondem à uretropexia, cistouretropexia, aplicação de colágeno na uretra e colpossuspensão. Melhor compreensão da etiologia, da fisiopatologia, dos métodos de diagnóstico e tratamentos é fundamental em razão do pouco conhecimento e da identificação dessa condição no Brasil.Acquired urinary incontinence is a debilitating, incurable condition, prevalent in spayed bitches and rarely seen in entire bitches or males. In bitches, acquired urinary incontinence can occur anytime from one week after neutering and is associated with severe management problems. Incontinence in neutered bitches can be associated with a decrease in maximal urethral closure pressure, hormonal changes and increase in the percentage of collagen in the bladder wall. It's also associated to a reduced contractility of the detrusor muscle, decrease in the magnitude of response of the bladder wall to both carbachol and eletrical field stimulation, and there are risk factors involved. The

  11. Effects of flexible-dose fesoterodine on overactive bladder symptoms and treatment satisfaction: an open-label study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndaele, J-J; Goldfischer, E R; Morrow, J D; Gong, J; Tseng, L-J; Guan, Z; Choo, M-S

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of flexible-dose fesoterodine in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) who were dissatisfied with previous tolterodine treatment. Methods: This was a 12-week, open-label, flexible-dose study of adults with OAB (≥ 8 micturitions and ≥ 3 urgency episodes per 24 h) who had been treated with tolterodine (immediate- or extended-release) for OAB within 2 years of screening and reported dissatisfaction with tolterodine treatment. Subjects received fesoterodine 4 mg once daily for 4 weeks; thereafter, daily dosage was maintained at 4 mg or increased to 8 mg based on the subject’s and physician’s subjective assessment of efficacy and tolerability. Subjects completed 5-day diaries, the Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC) and the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) at baseline and week 12 and rated treatment satisfaction at week 12 using the Treatment Satisfaction Question (TSQ). Safety and tolerability were assessed. Results: Among 516 subjects treated, approximately 50% opted for dose escalation to 8 mg at week 4. Significant improvements from baseline to week 12 were observed in micturitions, urgency urinary incontinence episodes, micturition-related urgency episodes and severe micturition-related urgency episodes per 24 h (all pfesoterodine significantly improved OAB symptoms, HRQL, and rates of treatment satisfaction and was well tolerated in subjects with OAB who were dissatisfied with prior tolterodine therapy. PMID:19348029

  12. Effectiveness and safety of solifenacin succinate in treatment of overactive bladder%琥珀酸索利那新治疗膀胱过度活动症的有效性及安全性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗笛; 廖利民

    2015-01-01

    膀胱过度活动症( OAB )是一组以尿急症状为特征的症候群,严重影响患者的生活质量。琥珀酸索利那新为新一代毒蕈碱型乙酰胆碱受体(M受体)拮抗剂,对于膀胱逼尿肌具有高选择性,可明显缓解OAB患者尿急、尿失禁症状,增加其每次排尿量、减少其排尿次数;可改善输尿管支架植入术后患者的下尿路症状。M受体拮抗剂的主要不良反应为口干、认知功能损害和尿潴留。与奥昔布宁、托特罗定等M受体拮抗剂比较,琥珀酸索利那新的口干和尿潴留发生率低,对认知功能的影响小,但对于存在高危因素(如联用其他抗胆碱药、基础疾病造成血脑屏障通透性改变等)或既往有不同程度认知损害的老年患者则存在诱发或加重认知功能损害的风险。服用琥珀酸索利那新的第1个月应密切关注患者残余尿量的变化,以降低急性尿潴留的风险。%Overactive bladder is a group of syndromes characterized by symptoms of urinary urgency,seriously affecting the quality of life of patients. Solifenacin succinate is a new generation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor( M receptor)antagonist with high selectivity for detrusor,and it can not only obviously relieve the symptoms of urgency and incontinence,increase urination and reduce micturition frequency,but also improve lower urinary tract symptoms for patients after implantation of ureteral stents. The main adverse reactions of M receptor antagonist are dry mouth,cognitive impairment and urinary retention. Compared with oxybutynin and tolterodine,the incidences of dry mouth and urinary retention caused by solifenacin succinate are low,and it also has less effect on cognitive function. But for the patient with high risk factors( such as combined use of other anticholinergic drugs and changes of blood brain barrier caused by primary diseases)and elderly patients with a history of cognitive impairment can

  13. [Bacterial ecology and resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic overactive bladder treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J; Le Breton, F; Jousse, M; Haddad, R; Verollet, D; Guinet-Lacoste, A; Amarenco, G

    2014-10-01

    For the last ten years, botulinum neurotoxin type A has become the gold standard for the treatment of neurogenic overactive detrusor. Bacterial colonization is common for these patients using clean intermittent self-catheterization, and toxin injections are at risk of urinary tract infections. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of different germs and their resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic bladder, treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections. This epidemiologic study took place from September to October 2012 in a urodynamic and neurourology unit in a teaching hospital in Paris, France. Eighty patients with a valid urine culture according to our protocol, were included. Fourty-four culture were positive with 45 bacteria. We found an Escherichia coli in 42.5%, a Klebsiella pneumoniae in 7.5%, a Citrobacter freundii and an enterococcus in 2.5%, and a Staphylococcus aureus in 1.25%. Penicillin resistance were found in 51.11%, 3rd generation cephalosporins in 8.89%, quinolones in 28.89% and sulfamids in 24.44%. None were resistant to fosfomycin. E. coli was the most frequent bacterium. No resistance to fosfomycin was found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Longitudinal urethral sling with prepubic and retropubic fixation for male urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H. Schaal

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Description and early results of a new urethral sling technique for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence, which combines efficacy, low cost and technical simplicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From May 2003 to April 2004, 30 patients with moderate or total urinary incontinence, following radical prostatectomy or endoscopic resection of the prostate, underwent the new technique. The technique is based on the placement of a longitudinal-shaped sling in the bulbar urethra, measuring 4 cm in length by 1.8 cm in width, made of Dacron or polypropylene mesh, fixed by 4 sutures on each side, with 2 sutures passed with Stamey-Pereira needle by retropubic approach and 2 by prepubic approach, which are then tied over the pubis. Pressure control was determined by interrupting the loss of infused water through a suprapubic cystostomy 60 cm from the pubis level. RESULTS: Pre-operative assessment excluded vesical instability, urethral stenosis and urinary infection. Suprapubic cystostomy was removed when the patient was able to satisfactorily void with urinary residue lower than 100 mL, which occurred in 29 of the 30 cases. In 2 cases, there was infection of the prosthesis, requiring its removal. In 3 cases, there was the need to adjust the sling (increasing the tension, due to failure of the urinary continence. Overall, 20 of 30 (66.7% operated patients became totally continent, and did not require any kind of pads. Four of 30 (13.3% patients achieved partial improvement, requiring 1 to 2 pads daily and 6 of 30 (20% patients had minimal or no improvement. There was no case of urethral erosion. CONCLUSION: This new sling technique has shown highly encouraging preliminary results. Its major advantage over other surgical techniques for treatment of moderate or severe stress urinary incontinence is the simplicity for its execution and low cost. A long-term assessment, addressing maintenance of continence, detrusor function and preservation

  15. Biofeedback therapy for fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, D A; Hodges, K; Hershe, T; Jinich, H

    1980-10-01

    Operant conditioning offers a new therapeutic modality for fecal incontinence. Our experience with biofeedback therapy in six male and six female patients (ages 12-78 years) is presented. Incontinence was associated with a surgical procedure in six patients and with a medical condition in six patients. Rectosphincteric manometry was performed using a three balloon technic, with one balloon positioned in the rectum as a distending stimulus and the others at the internal and external sphinchters. Pressure responses to measured volumes of rectal distention were displayed on a polygraph. Rectosphincteric reflexes and sensory thresholds for rectal distention were determined. Patients were then encouraged to elevate sphinchter pressures while observing their manometric responses. Follow-up of 10-96 weeks showed ten patients had good responses, with complete continence in six patients. Nine of 10 responders required only one treatment session. Operant conditioning is a valuable technic in properly selected patients with an 80% probability of success.

  16. The menopause and urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, Søren

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to study the possible role of the menopause in adult female urinary incontinence (UI) etiology, using a cross-sectional population study comprising a random sample of adult females and self-reported data based on postal questionnaires. The study group comprised 915 women who...... prevalence in 1987 of episodes of stress and urge urinary incontinence; prevalence of menopause and exposure to childbirth, gynecologic surgery, cystitis and obesity as indicated by body mass index more than 29; prevalence relative risks, as indicated by odds ratio of UI conditional on menopause and other...... the year of final menstruation. The findings suggest perimenopausal processes rather than the menopause in general to be responsible for an increased risk of developing UI. The elevation of UI prevalence in the perimenopause may reflect the adjustment of the female continence mechanism to function...

  17. EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thüroff, Joachim W; Abrams, Paul; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Artibani, Walter; Chapple, Christopher R; Drake, Marcus J; Hampel, Christian; Neisius, Andreas; Schröder, Annette; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    The first European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on incontinence were published in 2001. These guidelines were periodically updated in past years. The aim of this paper is to present a summary of the 2009 update of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence (UI). The EAU working panel was part of the 4th International Consultation on Incontinence (ICI) and, with permission of the ICI, extracted the relevant data. The methodology of the 4th ICI was a comprehensive literature review by international experts and consensus formation. In addition, level of evidence was rated according to a modified Oxford system and grades of recommendation were given accordingly. A full version of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence is available as a printed document (extended and short form) and as a CD-ROM from the EAU office or online from the EAU Web site (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The extent and invasiveness of assessment of UI depends on severity and/or complexity of symptoms and clinical signs and is different for men, women, frail older persons, children, and patients with neuropathy. At the level of initial management, basic diagnostic tests are applied to exclude an underlying disease or condition such as urinary tract infection. Treatment is mostly conservative (lifestyle interventions, physiotherapy, physical therapy, pharmacotherapy) and is of an empirical nature. At the level of specialised management (when primary therapy failed, diagnosis is unclear, or symptoms and/or signs are complex/severe), more elaborate assessment is generally required, including imaging, endoscopy, and urodynamics. Treatment options include invasive interventions and surgery. Treatment options for UI are rapidly expanding. These EAU guidelines provide ratings of the evidence (guided by evidence-based medicine) and graded recommendations for the appropriate assessment and according treatment options and put them into clinical perspective. Copyright

  18. [EAU Guidelines on Urinary Incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thüroff, J W; Abrams, P; Andersson, K-E; Artibani, W; Chapple, C R; Drake, M J; Hampel, C; Neisius, A; Schröder, A; Tubaro, A

    2011-01-01

    The first European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on incontinence were published in 2001. These guidelines were periodically updated in past years. The aim of this paper is to present a summary of the 2009 update of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence (UI). The EAU working panel was part of the 4th International Consultation on Incontinence (ICI) and, with permission of the ICI, extracted the relevant data. The methodology of the 4th ICI was a comprehensive literature review by international experts and consensus formation. In addition, level of evidence was rated according to a modified Oxford system and grades of recommendation were given accordingly. A full version of the EAU guidelines on urinary incontinence is available as a printed document (extended and short form) and as a CD-ROM from the EAU office or online from the EAU Web site (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The extent and invasiveness of assessment of UI depends on severity and/or complexity of symptoms and clinical signs and is different for men, women, frail older persons, children, and patients with neuropathy. At the level of initial management, basic diagnostic tests are applied to exclude an underlying disease or condition such as urinary tract infection. Treatment is mostly conservative (lifestyle interventions, physiotherapy, physical therapy, pharmacotherapy) and is of an empirical nature. At the level of specialised management (when primary therapy failed, diagnosis is unclear, or symptoms and/or signs are complex/severe),more elaborate assessment is generally required, including imaging, endoscopy, and urodynamics. Treatment options include invasive interventions and surgery. Treatment options for UI are rapidly expanding. These EAU guidelines provide ratings of the evidence (guided by evidence-based medicine) and graded recommendations for the appropriate assessment and according treatment options and put them into clinical perspective. Copyright

  19. Translating overactive bladder questionnaires in 14 languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquadro, Catherine; Kopp, Zoe; Coyne, Karin S; Corcos, Jacques; Tubaro, Andrea; Choo, Myung-Soo; Oh, Seung June

    2006-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) affects millions of people worldwide. Identifying patients and measuring OAB's impact on symptom severity and patients' health-related quality-of-life is necessary to ensure proper treatment and facilitate communication among patients, clinicians, and caregivers. To accomplish this, the Overactive Bladder questionnaire (OAB-q) and its subsets instruments, the OAB-q Short-Form and the OAB-V8, were developed in U.S. English. To measure the impact of OAB cross-culturally, we performed the linguistic validation of these instruments in Danish, English (Canada), French (Canada and France), Italian (Switzerland), German (Switzerland), Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Romanian, Swedish, and Turkish. The linguistic validation was conducted following a rigorous method to ensure conceptual equivalence between the original and its translations. In each country, a specialist monitored the process, which included six steps: (1) two forward translations; (2) comparison and reconciliation of the translations; (3) back-translation; (4) comparison of the source and back-translation; (5) review by one urologist or gynecologist; and (6) a comprehension test using patients. The translation of symptom-related adjectives such as "uncomfortable," "sudden," "accidental," "uncontrollable" proved challenging. The subtle differences in the meaning of symptomatic items increased the difficulties to find equivalents. Issues regarding the appropriateness of certain concepts and idiomatic terms emerged during cognitive debriefing. The terms "urge," "desire," "urination," "commute," "drowsy," and "escape routes" were not retained literally and were replaced by colloquial expressions. The 14 versions of the OAB-q, OAB-q Short-Form, and OAB-V8 were successfully validated linguistically to facilitate data collection cross-culturally and the international comparison of symptom bother and health-related quality of life in patients with OAB.

  20. Urethral sensitivity in incontinent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinn, A-C; Nilsson, B Y

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain whether frequent voiding and urge incontinence are associated with supersensitivity to electrical stimulation in the posterior urethra. Current perception thresholds (CPT) were tested at four stimulus frequencies (1, 3, 20, and 100 Hz; duration 0.5 ms) using a square-wave constant current electrical stimulator connected to ring electrodes on a urethral catheter. The strength of the current at the first tingling sensation was regarded as the CPT. CPT analysis and cystometry were performed on 61 women (ages 28-89 years). CPTs were significantly higher at lower than at elevated stimulus frequencies, and they were also generally higher in old than in younger patients. Seven women repeated the CPT test after two months, and the thresholds were unchanged. There were no significant differences in sensitivity between patient groups with stress incontinence, urge, or mixed symptoms. Moreover, CPT was not significantly related to bladder volume at first sensation of filling. Measuring CPT is an easy and reproducible method of testing urethral sensibility, but our results do not support the suspicion that urethral hypersensitivity is involved in increased voiding frequency and urge incontinence.

  1. Evaluation and treatment of the overactive bladder Avaliação e tratamento da bexiga hiperativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Rovner

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The overactive bladder is characterized by symptoms of frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence, substantially affecting the quality of life of millions of people throughout the world. The symptoms are associated with significant social, psychological, occupational, domestic, physical, and sexual problems. Despite the considerable impact of this condition on quality of life, sufferers are often unwilling to discuss their problem with family members or health care professionals. This situation is unfortunate, for much can be done to alleviate the symptoms of this distressing condition. It is therefore of utmost importance that medical education about symptoms of the overactive bladder and other related problems be improved to help health care professionals identify and treat patients who will benefit from therapy. This article reviews current thinking regarding definition, epidemiology, quality of life effects, evaluation, and management of the overactive bladder.A bexiga hiperativa é caracterizada pelos sintomas de freqüência, urgência e urge-incontinência e afeta de forma significativa o estilo de vida de milhões de pessoas em todo o mundo. Os sintomas são responsáveis por problemas nas esferas social, psicológica, ocupacional, doméstica, física e sexual dos pacientes. Apesar do considerável impacto desta condição sobre a qualidade de vida, grande parte dos pacientes reluta em discutir o problema com membros da família ou profissionais de saúde. Esta situação é lamentável, já que existem muitas maneiras de aliviar os sintomas da hiperatividade vesical. Por essa razão, é fundamental que se aprimore a educação médica sobre os sintomas de hiperatividade vesical e outros problemas relacionados, de modo a preparar os profissionais de saúde a identificar e tratar os pacientes com esta condição. Este artigo é uma revisão dos conceitos atuais, definição, epidemiologia, efeitos sobre a qualidade de vida, avaliação e

  2. Detrusor instability in children with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Nielsen, K K; Kristensen, E S

    1986-01-01

    Of 41 children, aged 5-15 years, referred consecutively because of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and/or enuresis, 18 (44%) showed detrusor instability (DI) in at least 2 of 6 CO2 cystometries. One child was excluded from the study because of lack of follow-up. Four children with less...

  3. The inflammatory and normal transcriptome of mouse bladder detrusor and mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyer David W

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An organ such as the bladder consists of complex, interacting set of tissues and cells. Inflammation has been implicated in every major disease of the bladder, including cancer, interstitial cystitis, and infection. However, scanty is the information about individual detrusor and urothelium transcriptomes in response to inflammation. Here, we used suppression subtractive hybridizations (SSH to determine bladder tissue- and disease-specific genes and transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs. Unique TREs and genes were assembled into putative networks. Results It was found that the control bladder mucosa presented regulatory elements driving genes such as myosin light chain phosphatase and calponin 1 that influence the smooth muscle phenotype. In the control detrusor network the Pax-3 TRE was significantly over-represented. During development, the Pax-3 transcription factor (TF maintains progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state whereas, during inflammation, Pax-3 was suppressed and genes involved in neuronal development (synapsin I were up-regulated. Therefore, during inflammation, an increased maturation of neural progenitor cells in the muscle may underlie detrusor instability. NF-κB was specifically over-represented in the inflamed mucosa regulatory network. When the inflamed detrusor was compared to control, two major pathways were found, one encoding synapsin I, a neuron-specific phosphoprotein, and the other an important apoptotic protein, siva. In response to LPS-induced inflammation, the liver X receptor was over-represented in both mucosa and detrusor regulatory networks confirming a role for this nuclear receptor in LPS-induced gene expression. Conclusion A new approach for understanding bladder muscle-urothelium interaction was developed by assembling SSH, real time PCR, and TRE analysis results into regulatory networks. Interestingly, some of the TREs and their downstream transcripts originally involved in

  4. Deletion of Dicer in smooth muscle affects voiding pattern and reduces detrusor contractility and neuroeffector transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardjaneh Karbalaei Sadegh

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulators of smooth muscle phenotype and may play important roles in pathogenesis of various smooth muscle related disease states. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs for urinary bladder function. We used an inducible and smooth muscle specific Dicer knockout (KO mouse which resulted in significantly reduced levels of miRNAs, including miR-145, miR-143, miR-22, miR125b-5p and miR-27a, from detrusor preparations without mucosa. Deletion of Dicer resulted in a disturbed micturition pattern in vivo and reduced depolarization-induced pressure development in the isolated detrusor. Furthermore, electrical field stimulation revealed a decreased cholinergic but maintained purinergic component of neurogenic activation in Dicer KO bladder strips. The ultrastructure of detrusor smooth muscle cells was well maintained, and the density of nerve terminals was similar. Western blotting demonstrated reduced contents of calponin and desmin. Smooth muscle α-actin, SM22α and myocardin were unchanged. Activation of strips with exogenous agonists showed that depolarization-induced contraction was preferentially reduced; ATP- and calyculin A-induced contractions were unchanged. Quantitative real time PCR and western blotting demonstrated reduced expression of Cav1.2 (Cacna1c. It is concluded that smooth muscle miRNAs play an important role for detrusor contractility and voiding pattern of unrestrained mice. This is mediated in part via effects on expression of smooth muscle differentiation markers and L-type Ca(2+ channels in the detrusor.

  5. Incontinence in persons with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander; Equit, Monika; Medoff, David; Wagner, Catharina; Curfs, Leopold

    2017-08-01

    To assess the rates of incontinence and associated psychological problems in children, adolescents and adults with Down Syndrome, a genetic syndrome caused by partial or complete triplication (trisomy) of chromosome 21 and characterized by typical facial features, a physical growth delay and mild or moderate intellectual disability. Three hundred and seventeen persons with Down Syndrome (4-51 years) were recruited through a German parent support group (59.6% male, mean age 19.2 years). The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the Incontinence Questionnaire-Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC) for parents or for adults were filled out by parents or care-givers. 17.2% of the sample had nocturnal enuresis, 15.9% had daytime urinary incontinence, and 14.2% had fecal incontinence. Incontinence was present in 64.0% of young children (4-12 years), 10.3% of teens (13-17 years), 12.8% of young adults (18-30 years) and in 22.4% of older adults (>30 years). 13.6% of children and 8.4% of adults had a DBC score in the clinical range. 19.5% of children and 27.8% of adults with incontinence had behavioral problems. There was a significant association between nocturnal enuresis, daytime urinary incontinence and clinical DBC scores in adults. Incontinence in Down Syndrome is mainly present in young children and increases in older adults. Behavioral comorbidity is associated with incontinence only in adults with Down Syndrome. Screening and treatment of incontinence in individuals with Down Syndrome is recommended. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Efficacy of fesoterodine over 24 hours in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staskin, David; Michel, Martin C; Nitti, Victor; Morrow, Jon D; Wang, Joseph; Guan, Zhonghong

    2010-04-01

    Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic agent indicated for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fesoterodine versus placebo over selected intervals during a 24-hour period in subjects with OAB. In a post hoc analysis, data were analyzed from two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 12-week phase III trials in which subjects with a history of OAB symptoms for >or=6 months were treated with morning doses of fesoterodine 4 mg, fesoterodine 8 mg, or placebo. These trials are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00220363 and NCT00138723). Changes were evaluated in number of micturitions, urgency episodes, urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes, and mean voided volume (MVV) divided into three 8-hour intervals: 08:00-15:59 (daytime), 16:00-23:59 (evening), and 00:00-07:59 (nighttime). Comparisons with placebo were made using analysis of covariance (for least squares mean changes) and Wilcoxon rank sum test (for median percent changes); differences were considered significant at p fesoterodine 4 mg and fesoterodine 8 mg compared with placebo during each 8-hour time interval (all p fesoterodine doses compared with placebo during all time intervals (all p Fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg given once daily demonstrated efficacy over placebo for OAB symptoms during all three 8-hour intervals of a 24-hour period, thus providing clinical support for once-daily dosing. Limitations include that this was a post hoc analysis.

  7. Clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of once-daily fesoterodine in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip; Tubaro, Andrea; Haag-Molkenteller, Cornelia; Forst, Hans-Theo; Massow, Ute; Wang, Joseph; Brodsky, Marina

    2007-10-01

    To determine the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of fesoterodine in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB). This was a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled trial with tolterodine extended release (ER) to assess the efficacy and safety of fesoterodine. Eligible subjects (> or =18 yr) with increased micturition frequency and urgency and/or urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) were randomised to placebo, fesoterodine 4 mg, fesoterodine 8 mg, or tolterodine ER 4 mg for 12 wk. The primary efficacy variable was a change from baseline to week 12 in micturitions per 24 h. Co-primary end points included change from baseline to week 12 in UUI episodes per 24 h and Treatment Response ("yes" or "no," based on four-point treatment benefit scale). Secondary efficacy variables included mean volume voided per micturition, continent days per week, and number of urgency episodes. At the end of treatment, subjects taking fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg had significant (pfesoterodine 8 mg at most end points. Both doses of fesoterodine were significantly better than placebo in improving the symptoms of OAB and produced a significantly greater Treatment Response versus placebo. Efficacy was more pronounced with fesoterodine 8 mg compared with the other treatments. Active treatments were well tolerated.

  8. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  9. Endoluminal magnetic resonance imaging in fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Rociu (Elena)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractFecal incontinence is a chronic disability, has serious emotional impact and increased risk for social isolation. Imaging has become important in the diagnostic work-up of fecal incontinence. The research described in this thesis continues the line of efforts to improve the quality and t

  10. Urinary incontinence: the role of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trutnovsky, Gerda; Rojas, Rodrigo Guzman; Mann, Kristy Pamela; Dietz, Hans P

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of menopause and hormone therapy on the symptoms and signs of stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. Records of women who attended a tertiary urogynecological unit were reviewed retrospectively. A standardized interview included evaluations of symptoms, menopause age (ie, time since last menstrual period or onset of menopausal symptoms), current or previous hormone use, and visual analogue scales for bother. Multichannel urodynamics, including urethral pressure profilometry and determination of abdominal leak point pressure, was performed. Of 382 women seen during the inclusion period, 62% were postmenopausal. Current systemic or local hormone use was reported by 7% and 6%, respectively. Two hundred eighty-eight women (76%) reported symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 5.7, and 273 women (72%) reported symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 6.4. On univariate analysis, symptoms and bother of urge incontinence were significantly related to menopause age, whereas this relationship was not found for stress incontinence. After calendar age was controlled for, length of menopause showed no significant relationship with any symptom or sign of urinary incontinence. Hormone deficiency after menopause is unlikely to play a major role in urinary incontinence.

  11. Advance in the effect of bladder outlet obstruction(BOO)on the signal transduction pathway in the detrusor cell%膀胱出口梗阻(BOO)与逼尿肌细胞力信号转导通路相关性的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨渊峰; 王杭

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia(BPH)is one of the reasons which cause bladder outlet obstruction(BOO)in older men.BOO can cause changes in detrusor structure and function,such as bladder hypertrophy,detrusor overactivity,the occurrence of lower urinary tract symptom(LUTS)and a series of bladder dysfunction.In the urodynamics of bladder,trigger signal of overload mechanical tension cause these reactions.Further study showed that the mechanical tension signal might be provided by the susceptor of the mechanical induction in the detrusor cells.The induction had corresponding with force signal transduction pathway and turned the physical stimuli into cellular biochemical reactions.%良性前列腺增生(benign prostatic hyperplasia,BPH)是引起老年男性膀胱出口梗阻(bladder outletobstruction,BOO)的原因之一.BOO会导致逼尿肌结构和功能的改变,表现为膀胱逼尿肌代偿性肥大和过度活动,发生下尿路症状(lower urinary tract symptom,LUTS)及一系列膀胱的功能异常.在膀胱的尿动力学中,超负荷机械张力触发信号导致这些反应.进一步研究表明,机械张力信号可能通过逼尿肌细胞的机械性感受器感应,并与相应的力信号转导通路相关联,将物理刺激转变为细胞的生物化学反应.

  12. [Conservative treatment of female urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdraon, Jacques; Denys, Pierre; Amarenco, Gérard

    2011-09-01

    Female urinary incontinence can be improved by nonsurgical pharmacologic as well as non-pharmacologic treatments. Hygiene and dietary rules apply to all forms of incontinence. If overweight, weight loss improves stress urinary incontinence. There are levels of evidence to show that pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy improve incontinence. Duloxetine is better than placebo for improvement of quality of life and for the impression of an improvement, but its place is still not determined in the algorithm of conservative treatments. The effects of vaginal electrostimulation and oestrogen are inconsistent or inhomogeneous. In case of urgency incontinence, anticholinergics remain the first line treatment and the place of stimulation of posterieur tibial nerve is still to be defined.

  13. Adult female urinary incontinence and childhood bedwetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, S.

    1994-01-01

    A cross-sectional random population sample of women 30 to 59 years old was sent a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and, among other things, childhood bedwetting. Among 2,613 responders 17.0% reported prevalent urinary incontinence (14.7% stress provoked, 8.3% associated with urge, 6.8% stress...... and urge overlap, 2.2% occurring especially during sleep and 3.9% occurring especially when anxious), and 6.5% reported childhood bedwetting after age 5 years and 3.3% after age 10 years. Childhood bedwetting was associated with prevalent urge urinary incontinence (p incontinence occurring...... during sleep (p urinary incontinence occurring in situations of anxiety (p

  14. Influence of bladder outlet obstruction and detrusor contractility on residual urine in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 武治津; 高居忠

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between the degree of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), detrusor contractility and residual urine in patients suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).Methods In 181 patients with BPH, degree of BOO, detrusor contractility, residual urine caculated from cathetering combined with the difference between the filling and the voiding were recorded and analysized statistically using urodynamic technique.Results Residual urine increased when the detusor contractility was weakened (F=12.134, P=0.001). In patients wih severe BOO, there was no significant difference in residual urine (F=2.386, P=0.071).Conclusions Increased residual urine is mainly resulted from decreased detrusor contractility. BOO has no significant influence on residual urine. Some patients with normal or weakened detrusor contractility may have more residual urine

  15. A simple, rapid, and efficient method for isolating detrusor for the culture of bladder smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhi; Xie, Hua; Huang, Yichen; Lv, Yiqing; Yang, Ganggang; Chen, Yan; Sun, Huizhen; Zhou, Junmei; Chen, Fang

    2016-01-01

    To establish a simple and rapid method to remove serosa and mucosa from detrusor for the culture of bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Fourteen New Zealand rabbits were randomly allocated to two groups. In the first group, pure bladder detrusor was directly obtained from bladder wall using novel method characterized by subserous injection of normal saline. In the second group, full thickness bladder wall sample was cut down, and then, mucosa and serosa were trimmed off detrusor ex vivo. Twelve detrusor samples from two groups were manually minced and enzymatically digested, respectively, to form dissociated cells whose livability was detected by trypan blue exclusion. Proliferative ability of primary culture cells was detected by CCK-8 kit, and purity of second-passage SMCs was detected by flow cytometric analyses. Another two detrusor samples from two groups were used for histological examination. Subserous injection of normal saline combined with blunt dissection can remove mucosa and serosa from detrusor layer easily and quickly. Statistical analysis revealed the first group possessed higher cell livability, shorter primary culture cell doubling time, and higher purity of SMCs than the second group (P cell livability as compared to traditional method.

  16. The use of ultrasound-estimated bladder weight in diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction and detrusor overactivity in men with lower urinary tract symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Housami

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Measurement of bladder weight using ultrasound estimates of bladder wall thickness and bladder volume is an emerging clinical measurement technique that may have a role in the diagnosis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. We have reviewed available literature on this technique to assess current clinical status. Methods: A systematic literature search was carried out within PubMed and MedLine to identify relevant publications. These were then screened for relevance. Preliminary results from our clinical experiments using the technique are also included. Results: We identified 17 published papers concerning the technique which covered clinical studies relating ultrasound-estimated bladder wall thickness to urodynamic diagnosis in men, women, and children together with change in response to treatment of bladder outlet obstruction. The original manual technique has been challenged by a commercially available automated technique. Conclusion: Ultrasound-estimated bladder weight is a promising non-invasive technique for the categorization of storage and voiding disorders in both men and women. Further studies are needed to validate the technique and assess accuracy of diagnosis.

  17. NETUPITANT, A POTENT AND HIGHLY SELECTIVE NK1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST, ALLEVIATES ACETIC ACID-INDUCED BLADDER OVERACTIVITY IN ANESTHETIZED GUINEA-PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palea

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tachykinins potently contract the isolated urinary bladder from a number of animal species and play an important role in the regulation of the micturition reflex. On the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder we examined the effects of a new potent and selective NK1 receptor antagonist (netupitant on the contractions induced by a selective NK1 receptor agonist, SP-methylester (SP-OMe. Moreover, the effects of netupitant and another selective NK1 antagonist (L-733,060 were studied in anesthetized guinea-pigs using two experimental models, the isovolumetric bladder contractions and a model of bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of acetic acid (AA. Methods and Results. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 5 mL organ baths and isometric contractions to cumulative concentrations of SP-OME were recorded before and after incubation with increasing concentrations of netupitant. In anesthetized female guinea-pigs, reflex bladder activity was examined under isovolumetric conditions with the bladder distended with saline or during cystometry using intravesical infusion of acetic acid (AA. After a 30 min stabilization period, netupitant (0.1-3 mg/kg, i.v. or L-733,060 (3-10 mg/kg, i.v. were administered. In the detrusor muscle, netupitant produced a concentration-dependent inhibition (mean pKB = 9.24 of the responses to SP-OMe. Under isovolumetric conditions, netupitant or L-733,060 reduced bladder contraction frequency in a dose-dependent manner, but neither drug changed bladder contraction amplitude. In the AA model, netupitant dose-dependently increased intercontraction interval (ICI but had no effect on the amplitude of micturition (AM. L-733,060 dose-dependently increased ICI also but this effect was paralleled by a significant reduction of AM. Conclusion. Netupitant decreases the frequency of reflex bladder contractions without altering their amplitude, suggesting that this drug targets the afferent limb of the

  18. Study of myogenic spontaneous contractile activities in the detrusor instability rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hai-hong; WEN Qian-jun; SONG Bo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore a myogenic basis of the spontaneous contractions on the rat bladder smooth muscle strip in a detrusor instability (DI) model in vitro, and to study a nerve blocker's cocktail affecting the spontaneous contractions as well as electrical stimulated contractile response. Methods: DI model rats were made by partial bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and confirmed by the filling cystometry. Detrusor strip was dissected from fresh bladder, fixed for an isometric tension trial. The contractions were recorded during electrical stimulation or exposure to some agents. Results: The cocktail diminished the nerve-mediated contractile response effectively in DI preparation. DI's spontaneous contractions remained during the presence of the cocktail with a significant change in its contractile amplitude. Conclusion: With the local nerve-concerned factors abolishment by the cocktail, the DI bladder preparations still have the spontaneous contractions, indicating a myogenic basis from themselves.

  19. Social networks lack useful content for incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Goldman, Howard B

    2011-10-01

    To assess the incontinence resources readily available for patients among social networks. Social networks allow users to connect with each other and share content and are a widely popular resource on the Internet. These sites attract millions of users; however, social media are underused in the healthcare industry. A search for "incontinence" was performed on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube in September 2010. The first 30 results were reviewed for each. The results were evaluated as useful or not useful and additionally catalogued as healthcare professionals, commercial products, or complementary and alternative medicine resources. On Facebook, 4 results (13%) were informative, 12 (40%) advertised commercial incontinence products, and 14 (47%) had no usable information. Of the live "tweets" reviewed on Twitter, 18 (60%) linked to incontinence-related healthcare information (none were from, or referred one to, healthcare professionals), 9 (30%) advertised for commercial incontinence products, 1 (3%) advertised complementary and alternative medicine resources, and 2 (7%) were humorous. Of 4 Twitter user results, 1 was comic, 1 provided incontinence-related health information, and 2 were incontinence medical supply companies. There were 14 (47%) informational YouTube videos, of which 9 came from healthcare professionals or professional organizations. Of the remainder, 12 (40%) were commercial, 1 (3%) advertised complementary and alternative medicine resources, and the remaining 3 (10%) were not useful. The results of our study show that social networks have insufficient useful incontinence content, especially from healthcare professionals and incontinence organizations. Medical professionals and societies should target these avenues to reach and educate patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A 4-year-old boy presenting with persistent urinary incontinence: Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenswijk, Werner; Walle, Johan Vande

    2017-05-01

    A 4-year-old boy was referred to the nephrologist with daytime urinary incontinence and suspicion of an overactive bladder. At the age of 17 months he had been referred to the pediatric endocrinologist because of polyuria and polydipsia in order to exclude diabetes insipidus. Repeated water deprivation tests and a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain were normal. Diabetes insipidus was excluded, and primary polydipsia was thought to be most likely since diabetes mellitus also had been excluded. At the current presentation, he drank up to 3 L a day and quite often had wet diapers. He also seemed to pass stools infrequently and with difficulty. Curiously his grandmother had similar symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia since childhood and had been diagnosed with primary polydipsia. The physical examination of our pediatric patient was normal. In the differential diagnosis we included diabetes insipidus but also contemplated other possibilities, such as nephronophthisis, tubulopathies and hypercalciuria. Laboratory results including urinalysis and an ultrasound of the kidney did not show any abnormalities, making a tubulopathy or hypercalciuria unlikely. A desmopressin test by the intravenous route came back completely normal, pointing to another cause than diabetes insipidus. Genetic testing for the nephronophthisis came back negative but was positive for a missense mutation in the AVPR2 gene (p.Arg104Cys) associated with partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. He was started on daily desmopressin. Within 3 days the urinary incontinence resolved as did the polyuria and faecal incontinence. His grandmother was referred to the geneticist and eventually the adult nephrologist. This case highlights the importance of being thorough when confronted with a difficult diagnosis. It also emphasizes that a test result does not necessarily equate to the presence or absence of a condition since the test with 100 % sensitivity and specificity has yet to be discovered.

  1. Obesity-Related Metabolic Syndrome: Mechanisms of Sympathetic Overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Canale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome has increased worldwide over the past few years. Sympathetic nervous system overactivity is a key mechanism leading to hypertension in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Sympathetic activation can be triggered by reflex mechanisms as arterial baroreceptor impairment, by metabolic factors as insulin resistance, and by dysregulated adipokine production and secretion from visceral fat with a mainly permissive role of leptin and antagonist role of adiponectin. Chronic sympathetic nervous system overactivity contributes to a further decline of insulin sensitivity and creates a vicious circle that may contribute to the development of hypertension and of the metabolic syndrome and favor cardiovascular and kidney disease. Selective renal denervation is an emerging area of interest in the clinical management of obesity-related hypertension. This review focuses on current understanding of some mechanisms through which sympathetic overactivity may be interlaced to the metabolic syndrome, with particular regard to the role of insulin resistance and of some adipokines.

  2. Structural alterations of the bladder induced by detrusor instability: experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao L. Amaro

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the histopathological and immunohistochemical alterations induced by detrusor instability in the bladder of rabbits submitted to partial bladder outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty male Norfolk rabbits were divided into 2 groups, a clinical control and a group with detrusor instability. Urine culture, cystometric study, histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis were performed in all animals prior to surgery (M1 and 4 weeks after-surgery (M2. RESULTS: Partial obstruction (G2 resulted in a 2.5 fold increment (p < 0.05 in bladder weight when compared to control (G1. Four weeks after surgery, 93% of animals in G2 developed cystitis. Partial obstruction resulted in detrusor instability at M2 and bladder capacity was significantly increased (p < 0.05 from M1 to M2. The incidence of mild to moderate mucosal and adventitious fibrosis at M2 was higher in G2 (p < 0.05 when compared to G1. Inflammatory reaction at M2 was statistically higher (p < 0.05 in G2. There was no difference in muscular hypertrophy between M1 and M2 in G1. However, 67% of G2 bladders showed a moderate to intense muscular hypertrophy at M2. Hyperplasia of the epithelium was also increased in G2 when M1 and M2 were compared (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Detrusor instability induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction caused significant histopathological and immunohistochemical alterations in the bladder of rabbits.

  3. Phentolamine-induced rhythmic contractions in bladder detrusor muscle of guinea-pig.

    OpenAIRE

    Satake, N; Shibata, S.; Ueda, S.

    1984-01-01

    Phentolamine caused a rhythmic contraction concentration-dependently without affecting resting tone in the detrusor muscle. Prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol, noradrenaline, clonidine or isoprenaline failed to cause the rhythmic contraction. These agents did not modify the response to phentolamine suggesting no involvement of alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors in the response to phentolamine. Chlorpheniramine, cimetidine, methysergide, SK&F 83566, atropine, bretylium, hemicholinium or tetrodotoxin f...

  4. Obesity and female stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David James; Strain, Matthew; Gomelsky, Alex; Rothschild, Jennifer; Dmochowski, Roger

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for stress urinary incontinence in the obese female patient and draw conclusions regarding the optimal treatment of this condition in this unique patient population. Obesity results in increased intra-abdominal pressure and this leads to weakening of the pelvic floor innervation and musculature. Weight loss through lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery improves stress urinary incontinence. Success of stress urinary incontinence surgery in obese women is similar to nonobese patients. Obese women should not be excluded from potentially curative surgery based on their body mass index (BMI) alone.

  5. Sacral neuromodulation of nociceptive bladder overactivity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaocun; Bandari, Jathin; Bansal, Utsav; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Lamm, Vladimir; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of electrical stimulation of sacral dorsal/ventral roots on irritation-induced bladder overactivity, reveal possible different mechanisms under nociceptive bladder conditions, and establish a large animal model of sacral neuromodulation. Intravesical infusion of 0.5% acetic acid (AA) was used to irritate the bladder and induce bladder overactivity in cats under α-chloralose anesthesia. Electrical stimulation (5, 15, or 30 Hz) was applied to individual S1-S3 dorsal or ventral roots at or below motor threshold intensity. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed with/without the stimulation to determine the inhibition of bladder overactivity. AA irritation induced bladder overactivity and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder capacity to 62.6 ± 11.7% of control capacity measured during saline CMGs. At threshold intensity for inducing reflex twitching of the anal sphincter or toe, S1/S2 dorsal root stimulation at 5 Hz but not at 15 or 30 Hz inhibited bladder overactivity and significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 187.3 ± 41.6% and 155.5 ± 9.7% respectively, of AA control capacity. Stimulation of S3 dorsal root or S1-S3 ventral roots was not effective. Repeated stimulation of S1-S3 dorsal root did not induced a post-stimulation inhibition. This study established a cat model of sacral neuromodualation of nociceptive bladder overactivity. The results revealed that the mechanisms underlying sacral neuromodulation are different for nociceptive and non-nociceptive bladder activity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Efficacy of fesoterodine compared with extended-release tolterodine in men and women with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, David; Schneider, Tim; Kelleher, Con; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip; Swift, Steven; Creanga, Dana; Martire, Diane L

    2013-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of fesoterodine 8 mg vs extended-release (ER) tolterodine 4 mg for overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in terms of patient-reported outcomes in women and in men. Pooled data from two 12-week, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy studies were analysed. Participants eligible for the studies were ≥18 years old, had self-reported OAB symptoms for ≥3 months in 3-day baseline diaries and had ≥8 micturitions and ≥1 urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episode per 24 h. Individuals were randomized to fesoterodine (4 mg for 1 week then 8 mg for 11 weeks), ER tolterodine (4 mg), or placebo. Changes from baseline in 3-day bladder diary variables and scores from the Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC), Urgency Perception Scale (UPS), and Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q), were assessed, as was the 'diary-dry' rate (the proportion of subjects with >0 UUI episodes according to baseline diary and no UUI episodes according to post-baseline diary). The primary endpoint was the change from baseline to week 12 in UUI episodes. At week 12, women showed significantly greater improvement with fesoterodine 8 mg (n = 1374) than with ER tolterodine 4 mg (n = 1382) and placebo (n = 679) in UUI episodes (primary endpoint), micturition frequency, urgency episodes, and all other diary endpoints (except nocturnal micturitions versus ER tolterodine), and also in scores on the PPBC, UPS, and all OAB-q scales and domains (all P fesoterodine (63%) than with tolterodine (57%; P = 0.002) or placebo (48%; P fesoterodine 8 mg (n = 265) than with ER tolterodine (n = 275) for severe urgency and the OAB-q Symptom Bother domain and were also significantly greater with fesoterodine than with placebo (n = 133) for micturition frequency, urgency episodes, severe urgency episodes, PPBC responses and scores on all OAB-q scales and domains at week 12 (all P fesoterodine, 29%; ER tolterodine, 15%; placebo, 6%; men: fesoterodine, 21%; ER

  7. Avaliação ultra-sonográfica e urodinâmica em pacientes com incontinência urinária Ultrasonographic and urodynamic evaluation of patients with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marair Gracio Ferreira Sartori

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: avaliar a concordância entre os diagnósticos urodinâmico e ultra-sonográfico de incontinência urinária, bem como correlacionar as variáveis de ambos os exames. Metodologia: Foram selecionadas 381 pacientes com perda de urina, entre as atendidas no Setor de Uroginecologia e Cirurgia Vaginal da Disciplina de Ginecologia da Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo. Todas foram submetidas a estudo urodinâmico, seguindo a padronização da Sociedade Internacional de Continência, e ultra-sonografia do colo vesical, com transdutor endovaginal de 6 MHz. No estudo urodinâmico, medimos a pressão máxima de fechamento uretral (PMFU e obtivemos o diagnóstico etiológico da perda de urina. As mulheres foram agrupadas segundo o diagnóstico urodinâmico em incontinência urinária de esforço, instabilidade do detrusor e incontinência urinária mista. Na ultra-sonografia, foram avaliados a posição do colo vesical em relação à borda inferior da sínfise púbica e sua mobilidade e os diâmetros da uretra e do colo vesical. Resultados: 1 o colo vesical, quando em repouso, esteve mais freqüentemente acima da borda inferior da sínfise púbica e, durante o esforço, abaixo ou na sua altura nos três grupos; 2 a mobilidade do colo vesical foi semelhante nos grupos; 3 não houve correlação significante entre PMFU e diâmetro da uretra e do colo vesical, tanto em repouso quanto ao esforço. Conclusão: a ultra-sonografia do colo vesical é sempre complementar à avaliação clínica e ao estudo urodinâmico.Purpose: to evaluate the agreement between the urodynamic and ultrasonography diagnoses of urinary incontinence, as well as to correlate the variables of both examinations. Methodology: three hundred eighty-one patients with urine loss were selected, from the Sectior of Urogynecology and Vaginal Surgery of the Division of Gynecology, Escola Paulista de Medicina - Federal University of São Paulo. All of them

  8. Treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer-Rasmussen, W

    1990-01-01

    is unlikely to offer more than a placebo effect. Studies of a single surgical procedure usually report high cure rates. In making the appropriate choice of operation the best guidelines are the cure rates from comparative or prospective randomized reports. From such studies an abdominal retropubic suspension......This review presents reported cure and improvement rates of stress urinary incontinence in women obtained by different treatment modalities. Apart from the urodynamic findings, histological and histochemical changes of the pelvic floor may be clinically relevant to treatment in the future. Long......-term cure and improvement rates achieved by non-surgical treatment (physiotherapy, biofeedback, bladder training, electrostimulation) are commented on. These rates range from 40-60% for physiotherapy and electrostimulation but are considerably less after biofeedback and bladder training. Pharmacotherapy...

  9. OnabotulinumtoxinA in urinary incontinence: Prospective Study of a Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martínez, A; Fernández-Mederos, A; García-Hernández, J Á

    2017-09-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of a single intravesical injection of onabotulinumtoxinA (OnaBTA) for treating urge urinary incontinence (UUI) in women. We performed a prospective case-series study of consecutive patients with refractory UUI treated with an intravesical injection of OnaBTA. The patients were administered 100 units of OnaBTA injected into the bladder wall following 4 weeks of flushing with anticholinergic agents or beta 3 agonists. The urodynamic and clinical endpoints were evaluated before and 6 months after the injection of OnaBTA. The primary study endpoint was the number of episodes of urinary leakage. A total of 204 of the 210 selected patients conducted a valid visit 6 months after the therapeutic application. At 6 months of treatment with OnaBTA, 110 (53.9%) patients remained continent and were considered a success. However, 57 (27.9%) patients experienced one episode of urinary leakage per day, and 37 (18.2%) had 2 or more. In terms of the urodynamic parameters, we observed the following changes: increase in maximum bladder capacity (P<.0001) and reduced maximum pressure of the detrusor (P<.0001). In terms of the safety profile, 8 (3.9%) patients had self-limiting haematuria during the procedure, which resolved spontaneously, and 9 (4.4%) patients had acute urinary retention that required intermittent catheterisation. This study supports the use of OnabotulinumtoxinA in patients with urge urinary incontinence that does not respond to medical treatment. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Overactive bladder symptom score to evaluate efficacy of solifenacin for the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ming; Wang Jianye; Yang Yong; An Ruihua; Wen Jianguo; Guan Zhichen; Zheng Shaobin

    2014-01-01

    Background Overactive bladder (OAB) is a series of symptoms with high prevalence in elderly people.This study was conducted using the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) to evaluate the efficacy of solifenacin succinate for the treatment of OAB.Methods This was a prospective,multicenter,single-arm,12-week study that enrolled 241 OAB patients.The patients received 5-10 mg/day solifenacin.Changes in OABSS,symptoms from voiding diary,perception of bladder condition (PPBC) score,international prostate symptom score (IPSS) and quality of life (QOL) were evaluated at weeks 0,4,and 12.The relationship between OABSS and PPBC score or parameters of voiding diary was also evaluated.Results At baseline,the mean OABSS for all patients was 9.41±2.40,and was reduced significantly at week 12 (-3.76 points; 61.21%,P <0.0001).The OABSS subscore,PPBC score,IPSS,and QOL were also significantly reduced during the study (P <0.0001).The overall incidence of adverse events was 19.91% (44 cases).The gastrointestinal system was the most commonly affected (11.31%).Around 5.88% of the cases had adverse events related to the genitourinary system.There was a strong correlation between OABSS and urinary symptoms that was recorded in the 3-day voiding dairy.Conclusions We showed that solifenacin was clinically effective for relieving OAB symptoms,considering the balance between efficacy,patients' well-being,and tolerability.OABSS integrates four OAB symptoms into a single score and can be a useful tool for research and clinical practice.

  11. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaldazza, Carlo Vecchioli; Morosetti, Carolina; Giampieretti, Rosita; Lorenzetti, Rossana; Baroni, Marinella

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction This study compared percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training (ES + PFMT) in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Materials and Methods 60 women with OAB were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. In group A, women underwent ES with PFMT, in group B women underwent PTNS. Results A statistically significant reduction in the number of daily micturitions, episodes of nocturia and urge incontinence was found in the two groups but the difference was more substantial in women treated with PTNS; voided volume increased in both groups. Quality of life improved in both groups, whereas patient perception of urgency improved only in women treated with PTNS. Global impression of improvement revealed a greater satisfaction in patients treated with PTNS. Conclusion This study demonstrates the effectiveness of PTNS and ES with PFMT in women with OAB, but greater improvements were found with PTNS.

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of fesoterodine in men with overactive bladder: a pooled analysis of 2 phase III studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschorn, Sender; Jones, J Stephen; Oelke, Matthias; MacDiarmid, Scott; Wang, Joseph T; Guan, Zhonghong

    2010-05-01

    To assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg in men with overactive bladder. This was a subanalysis of pooled data from 358 men enrolled in 2 double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trials. Subjects with frequency and urgency or urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) were randomized to fesoterodine 4 mg, fesoterodine 8 mg, or placebo for 12 weeks. Efficacy endpoints included bladder diary variables and subject-reported treatment response. By week 12, men treated with fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg had significantly greater median percentage improvements in micturition frequency, urgency episodes, and UUI episodes versus placebo and significantly greater percentages reported a treatment response versus placebo. Significant increases in mean voided volume (MVV) per micturition versus placebo occurred with fesoterodine 8 mg only. At week 12, fesoterodine 8 mg was significantly more efficacious than fesoterodine 4 mg in improving UUI episodes and MVV per micturition. The most commonly reported adverse events with fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg were dry mouth (12.5% and 37.7% vs 5.6% with placebo) and constipation (2.5% and 8.8% vs 0.8% with placebo). Symptoms suggestive of urinary retention were reported in 0.8%, 0.8%, and 5.3% of men in the placebo, fesoterodine 4 mg, and fesoterodine 8 mg groups, respectively; only 1 subject, in the fesoterodine 8 mg group, was catheterized. Fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg are generally safe, efficacious, and well tolerated for the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms in men. The 8 mg dose provides additional benefit and allows for treatment individualization. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parezanović-Ilić Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is an involuntary release of urine through the urethra during the increase of abdominal pressure in the absence of m. detrusor contraction. The exercise of pelvic floor muscles is recommended as the first line of cure. It is the least invasive and the only method without any undesirable side effects, which leads to either improvement or complete cure of SUI in 80-85% of cases. Objective. The aim of this study was to establish whether the strengthening of pelvic floor muscles using proprioceptive neural facilitation (PNF spiral dynamic technique was more efficient in comparison to classical Kegel exercise. Methods. The research was carried out at the Centre for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Centre Kragujevac. Sixty-six female patients with the symptoms of SUI were monitored in the period of two years. Thirty-four patients did pelvic floor muscle exercises twice a day, in the morning and in the evening, with 15-20 contractions. Thirty-two patients used PNF spiral dynamic technique for strengthening pelvic floor muscles. The patients who used the spiral dynamic technique also did some exercises from the program; they exercised twice a day, in the morning and in the evening, following the prescribed schedule. Treatment outcome was assessed by measuring the pelvic floor muscles by a vaginal dynamometer. Results. The values of the pelvic floor muscle force that were measured using the vaginal dynamometer in both examined groups (PNF spiral dynamic technique or Kegel exercise were statistically significantly higher after the implemented exercise program (t-test; p=0.000. No statistically significant difference in pelvic floor muscle values was found between the patients who applied PNF spiral dynamic technique and those who did Kegel exercise either before or after the exercise (two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measurements, factor of exercise type; p=0.899. Conclusion

  14. The Endoscopic Morphological Features of Congenital Posterior Urethral Obstructions in Boys with Refractory Daytime Urinary Incontinence and Nocturnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Hyuga, Taiju; Kawai, Shina; Kubo, Taro; Nakai, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study aims to evaluate the endoscopic morphological features of congenital posterior urethral obstructions in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis. Patients and Methods A total of 54 consecutive patients underwent endoscopy and were diagnosed with a posterior urethral valve (PUV) (types 1-4). PUV type 1 was classified as severe, moderate, or mild. A transurethral incision (TUI) was mainly performed for anterior wall lesions of the PUV. Voiding cystourethrography and pressure flow studies (PFS) were performed before and 3 to 4 months after TUI. Clinical symptoms were evaluated 6 months after TUI, and outcomes were assessed according to PFS waveform pattern groups (synergic pattern [SP] and dyssynergic pattern [DP]). Results All patients had PUV type 1 and/or 3 (i.e., n = 34 type 1, 7 type 3, and 13 types 1 and 3). There were severe (n = 1), moderate (n = 21), and mild (n = 25) cases of PUV type 1. According to PFS, SP and DP were present in 43 and 11 patients, respectively. TUI was effective in the SP group and symptoms improved in 77.4 and 69.3% of patients with daytime incontinence and nocturnal enuresis, respectively. Almost no effect was observed in the DP group. A significant decrease in the detrusor pressure was observed at maximum flow rate using PFS in the SP group. Conclusions PUV type 1 encompassed lesions with a spectrum of obstructions ranging from severe to mild, with mild types whose main obstructive lesion existed at the anterior wall of urethra occurring most frequently in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis.

  15. Selecting appropriate absorbent products to treat urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Drew

    2015-11-01

    Urinary incontinence can have a significant negative effect on a person's life, especially if left unmanaged and untreated. Continence assessment, often carried out by community nurses, is an important element in the management of a person's urinary incontinence, and so is the selection of appropriate absorbent incontinence pads. This article reviews: the causes and effects of urinary incontinence; how to derive the most appropriate information from a continence assessment; strategies for selecting incontinence pads for a person, on the basis of the results of the continence assessment; and some of the problems and risks associated with the use of incontinence pads.

  16. Sustained improvement in patient-reported outcomes during long-term fesoterodine treatment for overactive bladder symptoms: pooled analysis of two open-label extension studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Con J; Dmochowski, Roger R; Berriman, Sandra; Kopp, Zoe S; Carlsson, Martin

    2012-08-01

    • To evaluate the effects of long-term fesoterodine treatment on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and treatment satisfaction in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. • To determine the impact of gender and age on these effects. • This is a post hoc analysis of data pooled from identically designed open-label extensions of two randomized, double-blind, 12-week fesoterodine studies. • Initial treatment was once-daily fesoterodine 8 mg; subjects had the opportunity to receive open-label fesoterodine for ≥24 months. • After 1 month, subjects could elect dose reduction to 4 mg and subsequent re-escalation to 8 mg; dose reduction and re-escalation were each allowed once annually. • Changes in scores on the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) and a Likert scale evaluating severity of bladder-related problems were assessed at open-label baseline and months 12 and 24; treatment satisfaction was assessed at open-label baseline and at months 4, 12 and 24. • A total of 864 enrolled subjects were included (men, n= 182; women, n= 682; aged fesoterodine treatment was associated with sustained improvement in measures of health-related quality of life and bladder-related problems and with high treatment satisfaction in subjects with overactive bladder symptoms. • Effects of gender and age were minimal. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  17. Fesoterodine, its active metabolite, and tolterodine bind selectively to muscarinic receptors in human bladder mucosa and detrusor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akira; Fuchihata, Yusuke; Kuraoka, Shiori; Osano, Ayaka; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ozono, Seiichiro; Takeda, Masayuki; Masuyama, Keisuke; Araki, Isao; Yamada, Shizuo

    2013-04-01

    To comparatively characterize the binding activity of fesoterodine, its active metabolite (5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine [5-HMT]), and tolterodine in the human bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland. Muscarinic receptors in the homogenates of human bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland were measured by a radioligand binding assay using [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride. Fesoterodine, 5-HMT, and tolterodine competed with [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride for binding sites in the bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland in a concentration-dependent manner. The affinity for muscarinic receptors of these agents was significantly greater in the bladder than in the parotid gland, suggesting pharmacologic selectivity for the bladder over the parotid gland. The bladder selectivity was larger for fesoterodine and 5-HMT than for tolterodine. Fesoterodine, 5-HMT, and tolterodine resulted in significantly increased (two- to five-fold) values of the apparent dissociation constant for specific [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride binding in the detrusor muscle and parotid gland, with little effect on the corresponding values of the maximal number of binding sites. This finding indicates that these agents bind to the human muscarinic receptors in a competitive and reversible manner. Fesoterodine and 5-HMT bind to the muscarinic receptors with greater affinity in the human bladder mucosa and detrusor muscle than in the parotid gland in a competitive and reversible manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Associated factors to urinary incontinence in women undergoing urodynamic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Juliana Cristina Pereira da; Soler, Zaida Aurora Sperli Geraldes; DominguesWysocki, Anneliese

    2017-04-03

    Analyzing factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) among women submitted to urodynamic testing. A cross-sectional study of 150 women attended at a urological center. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistics. White women (79.3%), overweight (45.3%), menopausal (53.3%), who drink coffee (82.7%), sedentary (65.3%), who had vaginal birth (51.4%), with episiotomy (80%), and who underwent the Kristeller maneuver (69%). 60.7% had Urethral Hypermobility (UH). A statistical association was found between: weight change and UH (p = 0.024); menopause, Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency (ISD) and Detrusor Instability (DI) (p = 0.001); gynecological surgery, ISD and DI (p = 0.014); hysterectomy and all types of UI (p = 0.040); physical activity and mixed UI (p = 0.014). Interventions and guidance on preventing UI and strengthening pelvic muscles should be directed at women who present weight changes, who are sedentary menopausal women, and those who have undergone hysterectomy or other gynecological surgery. Studies on pelvic strengthening methods are needed in order to take into account the profile of the needs presented by women. Analisar os fatores associados à Incontinência Urinária (IU) entre mulheres submetidas a estudo urodinâmico. Estudo transversal realizado com 150 mulheres atendidas em um centro urológico. Os dados foram analisados por meio de estatística uni e multivariada. Mulheres brancas (79,3%), com sobrepeso (45,3%), na menopausa (53,3%), que ingeriam café (82,7%), sedentárias (65,3%), que fizeram parto normal (51,4%), com episiotomia (80%), que sofreram Manobra de Kristeller (69%). 60,7% apresentavam HipermobilidadeUretral (HU).Houve associação estatística entre: mudança de peso e HU (p=0,024); menopausa,Deficiência Esfincteriana Intrínseca (DEI) e Instabilidade Detrusora (ID) (p=0,001); cirurgia ginecológica, DEI e ID (p=0,014); histerectomia etodos os tipos de IU (p=0,040); realização de atividade física eIU mista

  19. Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Fesoterodine in Asian Patients with Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu; Takeda, Masayuki; Yoshida, Masaki; Choo, Myung-Soo; Gu Lee, Jeong; Tong-Long Lin, Alex; Lin, Ho-Hsiung; Andrew Yip, Wai-Chun; Isowa, Hitoshi; Hiro, Shintaro

    2011-04-01

    To assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg once daily (QD) compared with placebo in Asian subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) after 12 weeks of treatment. This phase II, dose-finding study consisted of a 2-week placebo run-in period followed by a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, treatment period. Eligible subjects were aged ≥20 years with ≥8 micturitions per 24 h and ≥1 urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes per 24 h reported in a 3-day diary. The subjects were randomized to receive placebo, fesoterodine 4 mg, or fesoterodine 8 mg QD for 12 weeks. Of 1232 subjects who entered the placebo run-in period, 951 received double-blind treatment. The mean number of UUI episodes per 24 h at baseline was 2.2 among the three treatment groups. The two fesoterodine groups showed statistically significant decreases from baseline in the mean number of UUI episodes per 24 h at week 12 (primary endpoint) compared with placebo. Most all-causality adverse events (e.g. dry mouth and constipation) were mild or moderate. The percentage of subjects with severe adverse events was low and similar among the treatment groups (placebo, 1.3%; fesoterodine 4 mg, 1.9%; fesoterodine 8 mg, 1.0%). Fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg QD were significantly better than placebo in improving OAB symptoms. Overall, the two fesoterodine dosing regimens were well tolerated. These results suggest that fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg QD are effective and well-tolerated treatments for OAB in Asian subjects. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Adverse event assessment of antimuscarinics for treating overactive bladder: a network meta-analytic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Kessler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder (OAB affects the lives of millions of people worldwide and antimuscarinics are the pharmacological treatment of choice. Meta-analyses of all currently used antimuscarinics for treating OAB found similar efficacy, making the choice dependent on their adverse event profiles. However, conventional meta-analyses often fail to quantify and compare adverse events across different drugs, dosages, formulations, and routes of administration. In addition, the assessment of the broad variety of adverse events is dissatisfying. Our aim was to compare adverse events of antimuscarinics using a network meta-analytic approach that overcomes shortcomings of conventional analyses. METHODS: Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialized Trials Register, previous systematic reviews, conference abstracts, book chapters, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials comparing at least one antimuscarinic for treating OAB with placebo or with another antimuscarinic, and adverse events as outcome measures. Two authors independently extracted data. A network meta-analytic approach was applied allowing for joint assessment of all adverse events of all currently used antimuscarinics while fully maintaining randomization. RESULTS: 69 trials enrolling 26'229 patients were included. Similar overall adverse event profiles were found for darifenacin, fesoterodine, transdermal oxybutynin, propiverine, solifenacin, tolterodine, and trospium chloride but not for oxybutynin orally administered when currently used starting dosages were compared. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed generally applicable transparent network meta-analytic approach summarizes adverse events in an easy to grasp way allowing straightforward benchmarking of antimuscarinics for treating OAB in clinical practice. Most currently used antimuscarinics seem to be equivalent first choice drugs to start the treatment of OAB except for

  1. Adverse Event Assessment of Antimuscarinics for Treating Overactive Bladder: A Network Meta-Analytic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Thomas M.; Bachmann, Lucas M.; Minder, Christoph; Löhrer, David; Umbehr, Martin; Schünemann, Holger J.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Overactive bladder (OAB) affects the lives of millions of people worldwide and antimuscarinics are the pharmacological treatment of choice. Meta-analyses of all currently used antimuscarinics for treating OAB found similar efficacy, making the choice dependent on their adverse event profiles. However, conventional meta-analyses often fail to quantify and compare adverse events across different drugs, dosages, formulations, and routes of administration. In addition, the assessment of the broad variety of adverse events is dissatisfying. Our aim was to compare adverse events of antimuscarinics using a network meta-analytic approach that overcomes shortcomings of conventional analyses. Methods Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialized Trials Register, previous systematic reviews, conference abstracts, book chapters, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials comparing at least one antimuscarinic for treating OAB with placebo or with another antimuscarinic, and adverse events as outcome measures. Two authors independently extracted data. A network meta-analytic approach was applied allowing for joint assessment of all adverse events of all currently used antimuscarinics while fully maintaining randomization. Results 69 trials enrolling 26′229 patients were included. Similar overall adverse event profiles were found for darifenacin, fesoterodine, transdermal oxybutynin, propiverine, solifenacin, tolterodine, and trospium chloride but not for oxybutynin orally administered when currently used starting dosages were compared. Conclusions The proposed generally applicable transparent network meta-analytic approach summarizes adverse events in an easy to grasp way allowing straightforward benchmarking of antimuscarinics for treating OAB in clinical practice. Most currently used antimuscarinics seem to be equivalent first choice drugs to start the treatment of OAB except for oral oxybutynin dosages

  2. Effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitcomb EL

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Emily L Whitcomb1, Leslee L Subak21Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Orange County-Irvine Medical Center, Irvine, CA, USA; 2University of California San Francisco, UCSF Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, and Urology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, SF Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: The purpose of this research was review the epidemiology of the association of obesity and urinary incontinence, and to summarize the published data on the effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence.Methods: A literature review of the association between urinary incontinence and overweight/obesity in women was performed. Case series and clinical trials reporting the effect of surgical, behavioral, and/or pharmacological weight loss on urinary incontinence are summarized.Results: Epidemiological studies demonstrate that obesity is a strong and independent risk factor for prevalent and incident urinary incontinence. There is a clear dose-response effect of weight on urinary incontinence, with each 5-unit increase in body mass index associated with a 20%–70% increase in risk of urinary incontinence. The maximum effect of weight on urinary incontinence has an odds ratio of 4–5. The odds of incident urinary incontinence over 5–10 years increase by approximately 30%–60% for each 5-unit increase in body mass index. There appears to be a stronger association between increasing weight and prevalent and incident stress incontinence (including mixed incontinence than for urge incontinence. Weight loss studies indicate that both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss leads to significant improvements in prevalence, frequency, and/or symptoms of urinary incontinence.Conclusion: Epidemiological studies document overweight and obesity as important risk factors for urinary incontinence. Weight loss by both surgical and more conservative

  3. Mirabegron for the treatment of overactive bladder: cost-effectiveness from US commercial health-plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielage, Ronald C; Perk, Sinem; Campbell, Noll L; Klein, Timothy M; Posta, Linda M; Yuran, Thomas; Klein, Robert W; Ng, Daniel B

    2016-12-01

    The first class of oral pharmacologic treatments for overactive bladder (OAB) are antimuscarinics that are associated with poor persistence, anticholinergic adverse events, and increased anticholinergic burden (ACB) with risk of cognitive impairment. Mirabegron, a β3-adrenoceptor agonist, is an oral treatment that does not contribute to ACB and has early evidence of improved persistence. The objective of the analysis was to assess the cost-effectiveness of mirabegron for OAB vs six antimuscarinics in the US. A Markov state-transition model assessed US commercial health-plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives over a 3-year time horizon in an OAB patient population. Transition probabilities between five micturition and five incontinence severity states were derived from a network meta-analysis of 44 trials of oral OAB treatments. Therapy beginning with an oral OAB agent could discontinue or switch to another oral agent and could be followed by tibial nerve stimulation, sacral neuromodulation, or onabotulinumtoxinA. The primary outcome was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Utilities were mapped from incontinence and micturition frequencies as well as demographics. Based on analysis of data from a large healthcare system, elevated ACB was associated with increased healthcare utilization and probability of cognitive impairment. From both commercial and Medicare Advantage perspectives, mirabegron was the most clinically effective treatment, while oxybutynin was the least expensive. Tolterodine immediate release (IR) was also on the cost-effectiveness frontier. The analysis estimated costs per QALY of $59,690 and $66,347 for mirabegron from commercial health plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives, respectively, compared to tolterodine IR. Other antimuscarinics were dominated. This analysis estimated that mirabegron is a cost-effective treatment for OAB from US commercial health plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives, due to fewer projected adverse events

  4. Noninvasive 2-dimensional monitoring of strain in the detrusor muscle in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms using ultrasound strain imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idzenga, T.; Farag, F.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Feitz, W.; Korte, C.L. de

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pressure flow studies and filling cystometry are currently the standard diagnostic urodynamic tests for lower urinary tract symptoms. A noninvasive ultrasound based method for 2-dimensional monitoring of deformation (or strain) in the detrusor muscle may provide insight into detrusor muscle

  5. [The treatment of fecal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, G; Bianco, F; Espodito, P

    2003-12-01

    The treatment of faecal incontinence includes: the education of the patient, medical therapy, biofeedback and sphincteric exercises, surgical therapy. Conservative, non-surgical treatment is almost always the initial therapeutic approach, except in those cases in which an evident defect of the sphincter muscle is present. Surgical treatment has seen a noteworthy increase in the last fifteen years as a consequence of the development of new surgical techniques. These techniques include: external anal sphincter plasty, pelvic floor plasties, sacral neuromodulation, muscular transpositions with or without electrostimulation, artificial anal sphincter. These procedures may be employed as first or second level treatment depending on the type of pathology considered and its aetiology. The 1st results achieved by surgical treatment authorise us to believe that reconversion with artificial sphincter is a valid alternative to graciloplasty, notwithstanding the fact that its costs are higher. Attentive pre- operative assessment of patients is important. Patients must be strongly motivated and able to manage the new condition. Although further studies are necessary, the degree of satisfactory of the 1st patients operated is the best stimulus for pursuing the development of this technique.

  6. Treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Rasmussen, W

    1990-12-01

    This review presents reported cure and improvement rates of stress urinary incontinence in women obtained by different treatment modalities. Apart from the urodynamic findings, histological and histochemical changes of the pelvic floor may be clinically relevant to treatment in the future. Long-term cure and improvement rates achieved by non-surgical treatment (physiotherapy, biofeedback, bladder training, electrostimulation) are commented on. These rates range from 40-60% for physiotherapy and electrostimulation but are considerably less after biofeedback and bladder training. Pharmacotherapy is unlikely to offer more than a placebo effect. Studies of a single surgical procedure usually report high cure rates. In making the appropriate choice of operation the best guidelines are the cure rates from comparative or prospective randomized reports. From such studies an abdominal retropubic suspension operation (cure rates after five years 57-78 %) is more likely to help the patient than an anterior colporrhaphy (cure rates 31-70 %) or a transvaginal needle bladder neck suspension (cure rates 39-61 %). In selected patients sling procedures or the use of artificial sphincters may produce excellent results (70-80 %). To estimate the results of different treatments urine loss should be assessed objectively and physical restrictions and hygienic and social implications taken into account. A method of pre- and post-treatment "performance scores" should be developed.

  7. Transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation for the treatment of urinary urgency or urge-incontinence in children and adolescents: a Phase II clinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Amanda Carolina Almeida de; Mello, Maria Júlia Gonçalves de; Costa e Silva, Eduardo Just da; Silva, Bárbara Bernardo Rinaldo da; Ribeiro Neto, José Pacheco Martins

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of 20 twice-weekly sessions of parasacral transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (TENS) for treatment of urinary urgency and urge-incontinence in children and adolescents. A Phase II clinical trial was carried out with patients with urinary urgency or urge-incontinence aged between 5 and 14 years. Twenty TENS sessions were conducted, twice weekly, using a Quark® Dualpex 961 apparatus. The variables analyzed were daily micturition, dynamics ultrasonography of the lower urinary tract pre-and post-treatment and responses to a questionnaire on urinary leakage applied during each session. The mean age of the 25 children participating in the study was 7.80 ± 2.22 years, most were female (92%) and had urge-incontinence (92%). The difference in urinary leakage pre- and post-treatment was statistically significant ( p = 0.04); a decline in the symptom of urinary leakage was reported by all caregivers in children who completed the 20th session; the ultrasound parameters, although not statistically significant, showed a reduction in the percentage of children with detrusor contractions (from 62.5% to 43.5%); and a more adequate pre-micturition bladder volume of 4.2% post-treatment compared with 19.0% prior to treatment. The electro-stimulation carried out during the twice weekly sessions appeared to be effective and urinary incontinence declined in half of the patients from the 12th session onwards. However, there is a need for a study involving a larger number of patients to confirm the results obtained.

  8. Staying Trim, Strong May Cut Risk of Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequency over time, but not with changes in urgency urinary incontinence frequency over time," said the study's lead ... pressure (i.e., coughing, laughing, sneezing)," she explained. "Urgency urinary incontinence is involuntary leakage of urine accompanied or ...

  9. Botox Beats Implant for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Botox Beats Implant for Urinary Incontinence in Women But both have side effects that may affect ... 2016 TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with bladder incontinence who haven't been helped ...

  10. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  11. Factors Associated with Urinary Stress Incontinence in Primiparas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling Chou

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: For primiparas who underwent vaginal delivery, an increase in age was associated with increased risk of development of stress incontinence. Increased vulnerability of the pelvic floor with age might explain this finding. Pelvic floor exercise had a protective effect against postpartum stress incontinence in primiparas who underwent cesarean section. This reflects the fact that pregnancy per se carries a risk of stress incontinence. We recommend that primiparas perform pelvic floor exercises to prevent the development of postpartum stress incontinence.

  12. Overactive bladder is a negative predictor of achieving continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuta; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Toru; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Homma, Yukio

    2017-10-01

    To investigate predictors of continence outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Clinical records of 272 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were investigated. Preoperative Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, International Prostate Symptom Score and clinicopathological factors were investigated, and relationships between factors and recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were assessed. The presence of overactive bladder was defined as having urgency for more than once a week and having ≥3 points according to the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score. Age (≤66 years) was significantly associated with continence within 6 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (P = 0.033). The absence of overactive bladder and lower Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, Kaplan-Meier curves showed earlier recovery in "age ≤66 years," "prostate weight ≤40 g" and "overactive bladder symptom score robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  14. Urinary incontinence after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensen, E.J.M.; Withagen, M.I.J.; Kluivers, K.B.; Milani, A.L.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: This study focused on the changes in urinary incontinence (UI) rates pre- and postoperatively and identified risk factors which predict the presence of symptoms of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) or stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) without conc

  15. [Fecal incontinence--a treatable problem!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmen, Friederike; Dindo, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Faecal incontinence has an enormous negative impact on patients' quality of life. Although the causes for faecal incontinence may vary (idiopatic, neurogenic, due to pregnancy, birth trauma or anorectal surgery), nowadays different therapies are available to cure or support patients after failure of conservative treatment. During the past decade, sacral nerve stimulation has shown to provide major improvement to patients with faecal incontinence. Regardless of the underlying disease (sphincter defect, diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis or idiopathic) the success rate of SNS lies over 80 %. The operation is performed under local anaesthesia and has a low morbidity rate. Not only its good long time results but also its cost effectiveness is based on scientific evidence.

  16. Teflon injections in post-prostatectomy incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Røhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five males with post-prostatectomy incontinence due to sphincter damage underwent transperineal or transurethral Teflon injections. The results were classified into three grades: good, moderate, and poor. Good or moderate results were obtained in 24%. No major immediate complications...... or longterm side-effects were observed. This intervention is associated with a minimum of discomfort for the patient and hospitalization can be limited to 48-72 hours. The results are not so good as those obtained in female incontinence, and the procedure cannot be recommended as first choice treatment...... in patients with post-prostatectomy incontinence, but because of the simplicity of the procedure, it is considered to be a valuable alternative in patients not suitable for prosthetic surgery....

  17. Managing passive incontinence and incomplete evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brigitte; Norton, Christine

    Both passive faecal incontinence and evacuation difficulty are distressing and demoralising conditions, resulting in physical and psychological problems including social restrictions, loss of self-esteem, altered body image and loss of skin integrity. Conservative management and biofeedback therapy has been shown to help most patients with faecal incontinence and evacuation difficulty by creating a manageable situation that can significantly improve quality of life. However, some patients may not improve their symptoms and require alternative measures. This article reports an audit of the use of the Qufora mini irrigation system in 50 patients (48 female, 2 male) with passive faecal incontinence and/or evacuation difficulty who had failed to respond to conventional biofeedback. Seventy percent found the irrigation comfortable and 74% rated the system as good or acceptable. Two-thirds believed symptoms were improved and would wish to continue using the system. Prospective studies are needed to confirm which patients are most suitable and respond well to the irrigation.

  18. Is the Prevalence of Overactive Bladder Overestimated? A Population-Based Study in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In earlier studies, one in six adults had overactive bladder which may impair quality of life. However, earlier studies have either not been population-based or have suffered from methodological limitations. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of overactive bladder symptoms, based on a representative study population and using consistent definitions and exclusions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the study was to assess the age-standardized prevalence of overactive bla...

  19. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of flexible-dose fesoterodine in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, Roger R; Peters, Kenneth M; Morrow, Jon D; Guan, Zhonghong; Gong, Jason; Sun, Franklin; Siami, Paul; Staskin, David R

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of flexible-dose fesoterodine vs placebo in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB). In a 12-week double-blind trial, subjects were randomized to fesoterodine 4 mg or placebo once daily, taken within 4 hours of bedtime. At week 2, subjects could increase the fesoterodine dose to 8 mg (sham escalation for placebo). Subjects completed 3-day bladder diaries, Patient Perception of Bladder Condition, and Urgency Perception Scale at baseline and weeks 2, 6, and 12 as well as OAB Questionnaire at baseline and week 12. Of 883 subjects, 63% and 73% of the fesoterodine (n = 438) and placebo (n = 445) groups, respectively, opted for dose escalation. Week 12 improvements from baseline in total micturitions, urgency episodes, urgency urinary incontinence episodes, frequency-urgency sum, and all OAB Questionnaire scales and domains, but not nocturnal micturitions or nocturnal urgency episodes, were significantly greater with fesoterodine than placebo (all P fesoterodine had improved Patient Perception of Bladder Condition and Urgency Perception Scale scores at weeks 2, 6, and 12 (P fesoterodine, 26%; placebo, 8%) and constipation (fesoterodine, 11%; placebo, 6%) were the most common adverse events. In both groups, 87% of the subjects completed the trial; 8% and 5% of the fesoterodine and placebo groups, respectively, discontinued because of an adverse event. Flexible-dose fesoterodine was efficacious and generally well tolerated for treatment of OAB symptoms. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary and secondary overacting inferior oblique muscles: an ultrastructural study.

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, E.; Ludatscher, R. M.; Zonis, S

    1984-01-01

    Biopsy material from primary and secondary overacting inferior oblique muscles were examined by light and electron microscopy. Most muscle fibres were in different stages of atrophy. A high variation of alterations was encountered in all muscles. The most striking abnormalities were huge accumulations of mitochondria and muscle vacuolisation related mainly to the enlargement of the tubules of sarcoplasmic reticulum. The mitochondrial aggregates and vacuolisation occupied more muscle surface i...

  1. The surgical management of the refractory overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Vasdev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The refractory overactive bladder is a clinically challenging entity to manage and affects millions of people worldwide. Current surgical treatment options include botulinum toxin type A, sacral neuromodulation, and bladder reconstruction surgery all of which require careful attention to the individual patients needs and circumstances. In our paper we present a detailed up-to-date review on all the above mentioned surgical techniques from current literature and briefly describe our units experience with sacral neuromodulation.

  2. Luminal DMSO: Effects on Detrusor and Urothelial/Lamina Propria Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DMSO is used as a treatment for interstitial cystitis and this study examined the effects of luminal DMSO treatment on bladder function and histology. Porcine bladder was incubated without (controls or with DMSO (50% applied to the luminal surface and the release of ATP, acetylcholine, and LDH assessed during incubation and in tissues strips after DMSO incubation. Luminally applied DMSO caused ATP, Ach, and LDH release from the urothelial surface during treatment, with loss of urothelial layers also evident histologically. In strips of urothelium/lamina propria from DMSO pretreated bladders the release of both ATP and Ach was depressed, while contractile responses to carbachol were enhanced. Detrusor muscle contractile responses to carbachol were not affected by DMSO pretreatment, but neurogenic responses to electrical field stimulation were enhanced. The presence of an intact urothelium/lamina propria inhibited detrusor contraction to carbachol by 53% and this inhibition was significantly reduced in DMSO pretreated tissues. Detection of LDH in the treatment medium suggests that DMSO permeabilised urothelial membranes causing leakage of cytosolic contents including ATP and Ach rather than enhancing release of these mediators. The increase in contractile response and high levels of ATP are consistent with initial flare up in IC/PBS symptoms after DMSO treatment.

  3. Effects of imidazolines on neurogenic contraction in isolated urinary bladder detrusor strips from rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Mei; Ren, Lei-Ming; Tian, He-Lin; Lu, Hai-Gang; Zhao, Ding

    2012-02-01

    Moxonidine and clonidine, which are imidazoline compounds, are sympathetic modulators used as centrally acting antihypertensive drugs. Moxonidine, clonidine, and agmatine produce extensive effects in mammalian tissues via imidazoline recognition sites (or receptors) or α(2)-adrenoceptors. To investigate the effects of imidazolines on the function of the urinary bladder, we tested the effects of moxonidine, clonidine, and agmatine on the neurogenic contraction induced by electric field stimulation, and on the post-synaptic receptors in isolated urinary bladder detrusor strips from rabbit. Both moxonidine at 1.0-10.0 µmol/L and clonidine at 0.1-10.0 µmol/L inhibited electric-field-stimulation-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner, but not agmatine (10.0-1000.0 µmol/L). Both moxonidine and clonidine failed to affect carbachol or adenosine-triphosphate-induced contractions; however, 1000.0 µmol/L agmatine significantly increased these contractions. Our study indicates that (i) moxonidine and clonidine produce a concentration-dependent inhibition of the neurogenic contractile responses to electric field stimulation in isolated detrusor strips from male New Zealand rabbits; (ii) post-synaptic muscarinic receptor and purinergic receptor stimulation are not involved in the responses of moxinidine and clonidine in this study; (iii) the inhibitory effects of these agents are probably not mediated by presynaptic imidazoline receptors.

  4. Uninhibited Detrusor Contraction in Children:a Report of 55 Cases%小儿逼尿肌的非抑制性收缩(附55例报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文建国; 童尔昌

    1991-01-01

    本文对189例小儿膀胱测压中发现的55例逼尿肌非抑制性收缩(UDC)进行了分析,发现中枢神经发育不良、病变或支配膀胱的神经损害能引起UDC.根据逼尿肌压力曲线变化,可将UDC分为缓慢收缩型、混合型、剧烈收缩型和激发型.讨论了UDC和不稳定性膀胱产生的原因、临床表现及治疗方法.%An analysis was made on 55 cases of uninhibited detrusor contraction (UDC) discovered in 198 pediatric urodynamic studies.The clinical features varied as the urinary frequency,urgency,incontinence and/or enuresis.The clinical characteristics,etiology,urodynamic changes and treatment were discussed.

  5. A randomised, double-blind, parallel design, multi-institutional, non-inferiority phase IV trial of imidafenacin versus fesoterodine for overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K-S; Park, B; Kim, J H; Kim, H G; Seo, J T; Lee, J G; Jang, Y; Choo, M-S

    2013-12-01

    Our objective was to compare the efficacy and safety of imidafenacin over fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). This study is a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, fesoterodine-controlled study in patients with continuous OAB symptoms for ≥ 3 months, daily mean voiding frequency (DMVF) ≥ 8, and daily mean urgency or urgency incontinence frequency ≥ 2. A twice-daily 0.1 mg imidafenacin with placebo, or once-daily 4 mg fesoterodine with placebo were administered for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy end-point was the difference in DMVF at 12 weeks. The secondary efficacy end-points were differences in daily mean: (i) voiding frequency at 4 and 8 weeks; (ii) urgency frequency; (iii) urgency incontinence frequency; (iv) incontinence frequency; (v) nocturia frequency; and (vi) quality of life score. The variables for safety analysis were adverse events, vital signs, residual urine volume and clinical laboratory tests. An efficacy analysis was conducted in per-protocol patients and the safety analysis was conducted in all randomised patients. The differences in DMVF at 12 weeks were -3.38 ± 3.63 and -2.45 ± 3.73 in the imidafenacin and fesoterodine groups, respectively, and the difference was not significant between the two groups. Imidafenacin was non-inferior to fesoterodine, and the lower limit of 95% two-sided confidence intervals was -0.53. The other six secondary end-points and variables for safety analysis showed no difference between the two groups. Imidafenacin was non-inferior to fesoterodine in terms of efficacy, and showed no significant difference in terms of safety. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sympathetic Overactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Consequences and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, with more than 26 million people suffering from CKD in the United States alone. More patients with CKD die of cardiovascular complications than progress to dialysis. Over 80% of CKD patients have hypertension, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another common, perhaps underappreciated, feature of CKD is an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA not only contributes to hypertension but also plays a detrimental role in the progression of CKD independent of any increase in blood pressure. Indeed, high SNA is associated with poor prognosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of its effect on blood pressure. This brief review will discuss some of the consequences of sympathetic overactivity and highlight some of the potential pathways contributing to chronically elevated SNA in CKD. Mechanisms leading to chronic sympathoexcitation in CKD are complex, multifactorial and to date, not completely understood. Identification of the mechanisms and/or signals leading to sympathetic overactivity in CKD are crucial for development of effective therapeutic targets to reduce the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient group.

  7. Neurogenic modulation of micturition: the relation between stimulation intensity and the maximum shortening velocity of the guinea pig detrusor muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Groen (Jan); R. van Mastrigt (Ron); J.L.H.R. Bosch (Ruud)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe course of micturition depends on bladder contractility and urethral resistance. The former is determined by geometrical, muscular and neurogenic factors. The muscular aspects of bladder contractility can be characterized by the parameters Pisv, the isovolumetric detrusor pressure, an

  8. Bladder Dysfunction and Urinary Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. faizi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nIn the name of God. Dear colleagues, ladies and gentlemen, it is a great honor to be here. Bladder dysfunction is serious enough to seek serious help. If you may know I am working in a private clinic which it is impossible to follow the patients so this lecture is based on unusual and rare cases who came to me. Bladder dysfunction (BD is common among 30% of young and old people who are suffering from it, however it is more common in old ages. According to a research, women are more involved as in men which prostate has a role is more common. The usual cases were: "n1. A young girl, aged 20, who had to wake up five times during the night to micturate. "n2. Also a lady said when I roll in bed I wet myself. "n3. A young lady who always had to use a pad. "n4. A man said I can’t use underground. "n5. I cannot go out since I have to micturate every hour. "n6. One said I have to wake up every hour at night. "n7. Young people say we have to micturate 3-4 times at night. "n8. A young man said as soon as I feel to micturate I empty my bladder before I’ve reached the WC and I wet myself to the ankle, how could I have a job? "n9. Some women wet themselves when they cough. "nIn order to know and diagnosis, the physiology of bladder function must be known. "nThe bladder is divided into two parts: "nThe Dom, which is innervated by Beta-Adrenergic. It relaxes the bladder in order to comply the urine. "nFrom the orifice of the urether and posterior ridge of the trigon to the bladder neck or internal sphincter. The prostatic urethra plays a major role in conti- nence. It has two parts,   "n1: From the bladder neck to V.M. this is enclaved by extension of detrusor muscles like a sleeve. These muscles contract during ejaculation to prevent retrograde ejaculation. "nDistal urethra from V.M. to the external sphincter which is covered by voluntary muscles. "nThe internal pressure of the urethra is higher than the bladder. If the pressure of the bladder rises

  9. Transcutaneus electrical nerve stimulation for overactive bladder increases rectal motor activity in children: a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Iben; Hagstrøm, Søren; Siggaard, Charlotte

    Transcutaneus electrical nerve stimulation for overactive bladder increases rectal motor activity in children: a randomized controlled study......Transcutaneus electrical nerve stimulation for overactive bladder increases rectal motor activity in children: a randomized controlled study...

  10. [Biofeedback effectiveness in patients with fecal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Mora, José Raúl; Buenrostro-Acebes, José María; Erciga-Vergara, Nancy; Zubieta-O'Farrill, Gregorio; Castillo-Calcáneo, Juan de Dios; Mosqueda, Maria Elena; Monroy-Argumedo, Montserrat; González-Alvarado, Carlos; Villanueva-Saenz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is defined as an involuntary bowel movement through the anal canal in inadequate time and place. There are different types of therapies for the management of fecal incontinence, being biofeedback therapy one of the most effective techniques. The aim of this study was to evaluate the necessary number of sessions of biofeedback electromyographyc therapy to achieve the maximum sphincteric complex contraction. Descriptive, retrospective and longitudinal study. 65 patients with fecal incontinence were included. Weekly electromyographyc biofeedback therapies were applied, with a maximum of 6, in which the sphincteric complex contraction was measured. A two ways Friedman analysis was made to determine the significant differences between the sessions. A total of 65 patients were evaluated for fecal incontinence. The values for pelvic floor contraction were significantly higher in the third session, and did not show any significant difference in posterior sessions. The maximum contraction of the sphicnteric complex was achieved in the third weekly biofeedback session, without any significant differences in the posterior sessions.

  11. Cough-induced electrostimulation in incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, R L; Sansen, W; VanNuland, T; Dhaene, P

    1994-01-01

    A new method for treatment of urinary stress incontinence is described. Through a vaginal plug the pelvic floor muscles receive a series of electric stimulations which are triggered by an increase of abdominal pressure, detected by an inbuilt pressure sensor. In this study the best parameters for the stimuli are determined during three successive coughs, which are the most common course of urine loss.

  12. Prolene (mesh bulbourethral sling in male incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kapoor

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : We present our preliminary results of bulbar urethral sling (single bolster in treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI. Materials and Methods: From May 2003 to June 2005, six patients with postprostatectomy urinary incontinence (transurethral resection of prostate in five patients and after open prostatectomy in one patient underwent prolene mesh bulbar urethral sling surgery. Preoperative evaluation included physical examination, neurological assessment, stress cystogram and urethrocystoscopy. Urodynamic evaluation was done in all patients for abdominal leak point pressure and ruling out bladder pathology. Results : Urodynamic studies did not demonstrate bladder instability in any patient. Mean abdominal leak point pressure was 43cm of water (range 26-80 cm of water. Mean duration of hospital stay was 3.2 days. Follow-up ranged from 6-22 months. Four patients out of six patients were completely dry till their last follow-up. One patient developed mild stress incontinence after one year of the surgery and required use of one to two pads per day. Mean pad use after surgery was 0.6 pads per day in comparison to mean pad usage of 6.4 pads per day preoperatively. One patient was over-continent after the procedure and required clean intermittent catheterization till last follow-up (six months. Mean cost of the procedure was $ 350+15. Conclusion: Prolene bulbar urethral sling (single bolster is an economically effective option in patients with postprostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  13. Electrokinetic properties of incontinence nonwoven devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    An understanding of the water transport properties of nonwoven incontinence devices is a prerequisite to the design of cotton-based nonwovens. A complete understanding of the interfacial moisture movement which occurs between the layers of coverstock, acquisition layer, distribution layer, absorbent...

  14. Sexual Experiences of Men with Incontinent Partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Milou D.; Beck, Jacky J. H.; Putter, Hein; van Driel, Mels F.; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrordus; Nijeholt, Guus A. B. Lycklama A.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies show that urinary incontinence (UI) impairs women's sexual functioning and sexual satisfaction. However, there is no scientific knowledge about the effects of UI on sexual functioning of the male partners. Aim. To analyze sexual functioning of the male partners of femal

  15. Lower urinary tract symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson disease, and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransmayr, G N; Holliger, S; Schletterer, K; Heidler, H; Deibl, M; Poewe, W; Madersbacher, H; Kiss, G

    2008-01-22

    The present study sought to investigate lower urinary tract symptoms and urodynamic and cystometric findings in Parkinson disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Included were patients with frequency, urgency, incontinence, and nocturia, without major bladder outflow obstruction. The protocol comprised physical examination, urine analysis, prostate specific antigen, 24-hours frequency of micturition, mean voided volume (MVV), free flow before instrumentation (Qmax(before)), post-void residual volume (PVR), and cystometry. Fifteen patients with DLB and PD and 16 patients with AD were examined. MVV, PVR, Qmax(before) and with transurethral catheter, cystometric bladder capacity, and detrusor pressor at maximum flow were similar in the three groups and corresponded to values of the general elderly population. Urge episodes and urge incontinence were observed in 93 and 53% of the patients with DLB, 53 and 27% of the patients with PD, and 19 and 12% of the patients with AD, and detrusor overactivity in 92% of the patients with DLB, 46% of the patients with PD, and 40% of the patients with AD. Urgency and urge incontinence suggest detrusor overactivity, which was more prevalent in dementia with Lewy bodies than in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease, whereas mean voided volume, free flow, cystometric bladder capacity, and detrusor pressor were similar in the groups. Frequency of micturition could not be reliably assessed in patients with dementia.

  16. Introital ultrasonography in female urinary incontinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weon, Young Cheol; Cho, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Jin Seong; Choi, Sang Hee; Kim, Keon Seok; Choo, Myung Soo [Ulsan Univ. Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of introital ultrasonography in the assessment of female urinary incontinence. Introital ultrasonography was performed in fifteen with stress urinary incontinence(mean age 50) and six patients without symptoms of incontinence(mean age 37). Using a sagittal section of the anterior pelvis in the plane of the symphysis pubis the posterior urethrovesical angle, the pubourethral distance and the pubo-yregrak abgle were measured at rest and during stress(Valsalva's maneuver state). The student T-test and the ANOVA test were used in statistical analysis. The posterior urethrovesical angles of the controls were 125.3 deg ({+-}10.9) at rest and 125.7 deg ({+-}7.6) during stress. In the patients, the corresponding angles were 135.3 deg ({+-}11.3) and 139.6 deg({+-}10.8). The posterior urethrovesical angles increased 0.3 deg ({+-}4.7) in the controls and 5.6 deg ({+-}4.0) in the patients(p=0.018). In the controls, the pubo-urethral distances were 21.8 mm({+-}5.8) at rest and 18.2 mm({+-}7.1) during stress, while in the patients these distances were 18.4 mm({+-}3.9) and 12.6 mm({+-}4.4). The pubo-urethral distance decreased 3.5 mm ({+-}1.5) in the controls and 5.8 mm ({+-}2.3) in the patients(p=0.039). In the patients with mild incontinence(Grade I), the posterior urethrovesical angles increased 3.4 deg ({+-}2.8) : 132.3 deg ({+-}12.5) at rest and 135.6 deg (12.8) during stress. In the patients with moderate incontinence(Grade II), the angles increased 8.1 deg({+-}3.8) : 136.0 deg({+-}6.5) at rest and 144.1 deg({+-}5.9) during stress. The change of the posterior urethrovesical angle was related to the grade of urinary incontinence in the patients(p<0.05). There was no statistical significancy in the pubo-urethral angle (p=0.315). Introital ultrasonography may be useful for assessment of stress urinary incontinence.

  17. St Luke's Home, Castle Road, Mahon, Cork.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Golabek, Tomasz

    2013-07-22

    To compare urodynamic characteristics in patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) with those of an age matched cohort with diabetes mellitus (DM) and detrusor overactivity (DO). Secondly, to determine whether urodynamic features could help distinguish these two groups of patients.

  18. Ultrastructure of Cajal-like interstitial cells in the human detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle; Rumessen, Jüri J; Hansen, Alastair

    2009-01-01

    of interstitial cells were identified by TEM: ICC-L and fibroblast-like cells (FLC). ICC-L were bipolar with slender (0.04 microm) flattened dendritic-like processes, frequently forming a branching labyrinth network. Caveolae and short membrane-associated dense bands were present. Mitochondria, rough endoplasmic......The aim of this ultrastructural study was to examine the human detrusor for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC)-like cells (ICC-L) by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immuno-transmission electron microscopy (I-TEM) with antibodies directed towards CD117 and CD34. Two main types...... reticulum and Golgi apparatus were observed in the cell somata and cytoplasmic processes. Intermediate filaments were abundant but no thick filaments were found. ICC-L were interconnected by close appositions, gap junctions and peg-and-socket junctions (PSJ) but no specialised contacts to smooth muscle...

  19. Kommunikation zwischen glatten Muskelzellen von normalem und überkativem Detrusor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Die exakte Pathophysiologie der überaktiven Blase ist unklar. Myogene, neurogene und idiopathische Ursachen werden diskutiert. Gap junctions könnten in der interzellulären Kommunikation eine wichtige Rolle spielen. Wir untersuchten deshalb das Auftreten von Gap junctions und deren Strukturprotein Connexin (Cx 45 im normalen Detrusor und in Patienten mit überaktiven Harnblasen (ÜAB ohne Harninkontinenz. Elektronenmikroskopisch und im Gefrierbruchverfahren konnten Gap junctions nachgewiesen werden. Die Cx45-Expression wurde durch RT-PCR, mittels In-situ-Hybridisation und immunhistochemisch dargestellt. Patienten mit ÜAB ohne Inkontinenz zeigten keine signifikante Differenz der Expression von Cx45. Wir können jedoch nicht ausschließen, daß die Gap-junction-Kommunikation in hyperaktiven Blasen mit Detrusorinstabilität trotzdem eine wichtige Rolle spielen könnten.

  20. Predictors of female urinary incontinence at midlife and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, M; Pereira, M; Hextall, A

    2010-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is an important middle age health issue and approximately 20% of women over 40 years of age have problems with continence. Urinary incontinence poses a significant negative impact on social functioning and quality of life to many individuals. It is estimated that around three million people are regularly incontinent in the UK with a prevalence of about 40 per 1000 adults. There are various factors which can cause incontinence such as pregnancy, childbirth, obesity, menopause, or just inherent connective-tissue weakness. All of these factors can cause pathophysiology changes in the muscular and fascial structures of the pelvic floor and lead to pelvic support defects and possibly pelvic floor dysfunction. We aim with this review article to highlight predictors or predisposing factors of incontinence; in order to help clinicians during their decisions and put in place a policy of a preventive strategy to decrease the incontinence rate in the general population.

  1. Urinary incontinence nursing diagnoses in patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Alteniza Leandro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Identifying the prevalence of Stress urinary incontinence (SUI, Urge urinary incontinence (UUI, Functional urinary incontinence (FUI, Overflow urinary incontinence (OUI and Reflex urinary incontinence (RUI nursing diagnoses and their defining characteristics in stroke patients. METHOD A cross-sectional study with 156 patients treated in a neurological clinic. Data were collected through interviews and forwarded to nurses for diagnostic inference. RESULTS 92.3% of the patients had at least one of the studied diagnoses; OUI showed the highest prevalence (72.4%, followed by FUI (53.2%, RUI (50.0%, UUI (41.0% and SUI (37.8%. Overdistended bladder and reports of inability to reach the toilet in time to avoid urine loss were the most prevalent defining characteristics. A statistically significant association of the defining characteristics with the studied diagnosis was verified. CONCLUSION The five incontinence diagnoses were identified in the evaluated patients, with different prevalence.

  2. Insulin relaxes bladder via PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway activation in mucosa: unfolded protein response-dependent insulin resistance as a cause of obesity-associated overactive bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiria, Luiz O; Sollon, Carolina; Báu, Fernando R; Mónica, Fabíola Z; D’Ancona, Carlos L; De Nucci, Gilberto; Grant, Andrew D; Anhê, Gabriel F; Antunes, Edson

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of insulin in the bladder and its relevance for the development of overactive bladder (OAB) in insulin-resistant obese mice. Bladders from male individuals who were involved in multiple organ donations were used. C57BL6/J mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 10 weeks to induce insulin-resistant obesity. Concentration–response curves to insulin were performed in human and mouse isolated mucosa-intact and mucosa-denuded bladders. Cystometric study was performed in terminally anaesthetized mice. Western blot was performed in bladders to detect phosphorylated endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177) and the phosphorylated protein kinase AKT (Ser473), as well as the unfolded protein response (UPR) markers TRIB3, CHOP and ATF4. Insulin (1–100 nm) produced concentration-dependent mouse and human bladder relaxations that were markedly reduced by mucosal removal or inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway. In mouse bladders, insulin produced a 3.0-fold increase in cGMP levels (P insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT and eNOS in bladder mucosa. Obese mice showed greater voiding frequency and non-voiding contractions, indicating overactive detrusor smooth muscle. Insulin failed to relax the bladder or to increase cGMP in the obese group. Insulin-stimulated AKT and eNOS phosphorylation in mucosa was also impaired in obese mice. The UPR markers TRIB3, CHOP and ATF4 were increased in the mucosa of obese mice. The UPR inhibitor 4-phenyl butyric acid normalized all the functional and molecular parameters in obese mice. Our data show that insulin relaxes human and mouse bladder via activation of the PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway in the bladder mucosa. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-dependent insulin resistance in bladder contributes to OAB in obese mice. PMID:23478138

  3. Long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of fesoterodine treatment in subjects with overactive bladder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kerrebroeck, P E V; Heesakkers, J; Berriman, S; Padmanabhan Aiyer, L; Carlsson, M; Guan, Z

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of fesoterodine treatment in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. This was an open-label extension study of a 12-week, double-blind fesoterodine study. During open-label treatment, all subjects received fesoterodine 8 mg for an initial 4 weeks, after which subjects could elect dose reduction to 4 mg or subsequent reescalation to 8 mg during clinic visits (dose reduction and reescalation each permitted once annually). The maximum allowable duration of open-label fesoterodine treatment ranged from 24 to 32 months across study sites. Safety and tolerability were evaluated via discontinuations, fesoterodine exposure, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and subject-reported treatment tolerance. Three-day bladder diaries and other patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were assessed during the first 24 months of open-label treatment. PROs included evaluations of health-related quality of life [HRQL; King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF)], severity of bladder-related problems and treatment satisfaction. Subjects completed 3-day diaries before open-label baseline and months 1, 4, 8, 12 and 24; the ICIQ-SF and measures of bladder-related problems and treatment satisfaction at open-label baseline and months 4, 12 and 24; and the KHQ at open-label baseline and months 12 and 24. Of the 417 eligible subjects who enrolled in the open-label extension, 61% continued fesoterodine treatment for > or = 24 months and 71% elected to maintain the fesoterodine 8-mg dose throughout treatment. No unexpected safety signals were observed. Most subjects rated treatment tolerance as at least 'good' throughout the study (> or = 88%). Dry mouth was the most commonly reported TEAE (34%) during open-label treatment, resulting in discontinuation in 2% of subjects (n = 8). Improvements from open-label baseline in OAB symptoms

  4. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Decision Aids > Urinary Incontinence > What is UI? Taking Control: Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in ... 0 Page 2 What is urinary incontinence (UI)? Taking Control (5-minute video) Click on the video above ...

  5. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0445 TITLE: An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in...Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew O. Fraser, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Institute for Medical... Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0445

  6. Mixed Incontinence: How Best to Manage It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porena, Massimo; Costantini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Although common in women, mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is under-reported and under-treated. It is linked to concomitant disturbances, which may be due to childbirth, ageing, or other medical conditions, in the complex bladder-urethra coordinated system of urine storage and emptying. Primary care physicians can evaluate MUI through history and simple clinical assessment or they can avail of more complex device and tools, such as urodynamic assessment. There is a wide range of therapeutic options. The recent proliferation of new drug treatments and surgical devices for urinary incontinence offers innovative strategies for therapy but products risk being introduced without long-term safety and efficacy assessment. Direct-to-consumer advertising has increased public awareness of MUI.

  7. Faecal incontinence following radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Høyer, Morten; Lundby, Lilli;

    2011-01-01

    for this review. The incidence of faecal incontinence following radiotherapy for prostate cancer varied from 1.6% to 58%. The mechanism of faecal incontinence was not entirely clear but it is most likely due to injury to the nerve plexus of the rectal muscular layer. Correlation between rectal dose...... the spatial distribution of radiation to the rectum may identify a more direct linkage between radiation damage and faecal incontinence....

  8. [Causes and diagnosis of female urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorsch, I; Soljanik, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    The primary cause of stress incontinence is birth traumata. However, obesity, asthma, chronic constipation or hard physical work can also overtax the pelvic floor and lead to injury of the connective tissue and a slackening of the ligamentous apparatus. Pelvic floor defects are initially diagnosed simply through a thorough urogynaecological examination. To predict the success of a surgical treatment, the functions can be tested by performing simulated operations.

  9. [risk Factors For Urinary Incontinence In Women].

    OpenAIRE

    Higa,Rosângela; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes; dos Reis, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to conduct a review of the main papers published between 1983 and 2003 on the main risk factors for urinary incontinence (UI) in women. Thirty-eight publications in English and Portuguese were analyzed using the MEDLINE and LILACS databases as well as through research in libraries. There is evidence that the main risk factors are age, pelvic floor trauma, hereditary factors, race, menopausal status, obesity, chronic diseases, use of some sympathomimetics and parasym...

  10. Re: Prospective Pilot Study of Mirabegron in Pediatric Patients with Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinharib Çitgez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available EDITORIAL COMMENT Overactive bladder (OAB is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This event negatively affects and impairs children’s development. Antimuscarinics are the mainstay pharmacological management of OAB, but their side effects profile limits their use. Mirabegron, a new molecule with a distinct mechanism of action (b3-adrenoreceptor agonist, was recently approved as monotherapy for idiopathic OAB in adults but has not been studied in the pediatric population. Blais et al. have evaluated the efficacy and safety of mirabegron in the treatment of urinary incontinence in children with idiopathic OAB who were refractory to and/or intolerant of antimuscarinics. This prospective off-label study, using an adjusted-dose regimen of mirabegron (25-50 mg, included pediatric patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to OAB. Patients without symptom improvement or with partial response under intensive behavioral protocol and medical therapy (at least two different antimuscarinic agents were included in the study. Their primary outcome was better reported efficacy than with the use of prior anticholinergic medication. Secondary end points were tolerability and safety. Families were questioned for continence, side effects, compliance, and Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC questionnaire. A total of 58 patients (14 girls, 44 boys were enrolled in a mirabegron open-label trial. The median age at initiation of mirabegron was 10.1 years [interquartile range (IQR: 8.8-13.5]. The median duration of treatment was 11.5 months (IQR: 6.0-15.0. The median bladder capacity improved from 150 ml to 200 ml (p<0.001. Continence improved in 52 of 58, with 13 being completely dry. The median PPBC score improved from 4.0 to 2.0 (p<0.001. The authors also assessed the safety of mirabegron. All electrocardiogram and blood tests remained normal. No significant change in blood pressure (<5 mmHg and heart rate (fewer than five beats

  11. [Sport and urinary incontinence in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousquy, R; Jean-Baptiste, J; Barranger, E; Hermieux, J-F

    2014-09-01

    Women are more attentive to their physical appearance and a quarter of French women use to practice a regular physical activity. Benefits of sport on general health are recognized. However, sport may be the cause of various diseases when it is poorly chosen or improperly performed. In literature, intensive exercise is a risk factor for urinary incontinence, defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine". It is essentially stress urinary incontinence, occurring because of the phenomenon of intrabdominal hyperpressure, inherent with certain activities, and excess capacity of sphincters. Some sports are more risky than others, and high-level sportswomen are the most exposed. Health professionals must invest in information, screening, prevention, counseling and treatment track athletes So, the general practitioner and the doctor of sports play a vital role in informing, screening, prevention, therapeutic and monitoring of sportswomen. Better information is needed because according to the severity of incontinence and its impact, there are simple, effective, more or less invasive treatment options. The aim of this study was to establish an inventory of scientific knowledge and to improve the management of these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Urinary stress incontinence: rehabilitation treatment of the pelvic floor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braccini, S; Toniazzi, P

    1995-11-01

    The authors inspected 112 patients with diagnostic urogynecologic and urodynamic criteria. They suffered from urinary stress incontinence. Forty patients effected rehabilitative therapy of the pelvic floor with visits twice weekly with a method which included: pelvic muscle exercises, biofeedback and functional electrostimulation. The patients were divided into two groups in accordance with the kind of urinary stress incontinence: in the first group there were patients with genuine urinary stress incontinence, in the second group patients with mixed urinary stress incontinence. The results at the end of treatment reported a proportion of success of 66% in the first group and of 54% in the second group.

  13. [Treatment of stress and urge incontinence in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavind, K; Mouritsen, A L; Lose, G

    1998-01-01

    Urinary incontinence has a great impact on the quality of life in many patients. This article gives simple regulations and advice which can improve the situation. The treatment of stress- and urge incontinence is discussed. In stress incontinence conservative treatment in the form of pelvic floor muscle exercise should always be the first choice of treatment. This treatment can be aided by biofeedback, cones or electrostimulation. Mechanical devices and pharmacological treatment is another option. Different surgical methods are discussed. Urge incontinence can be treated with bladder drill, biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, pharmacological treatment electrostimulation or rarely surgery. Any treatment should consider the expectations and motivation of the patient and the need for treatment.

  14. Bacteriuria is associated with urge urinary incontinence in older women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhe, Nils; Englund, Lars; Mölstad, Sigvard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between bacteriuria and frequency and type of urinary incontinence in elderly people living in the community. Bacteriuria and urinary incontinence are common conditions and often coexisting in this population; the authors have previously reported the prevalence of bacteriuria to be 22.4% in women and 9.4% in men. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The catchment area of a primary healthcare centre in a Swedish middle-sized town. Subjects Residents, except for those in nursing homes, aged 80 and over. Participation rate: 80.3% (431/537). Main outcome measures Urinary cultures and questionnaire data on urinary incontinence. Results In women the OR for having bacteriuria increased with increasing frequency of urinary incontinence; the OR was 2.83 (95% CI 1.35–5.94) for women who were incontinent daily as compared with continent women. Reporting urge urinary incontinence increased the risk of having bacteriuria: 3.36 (95% CI 1.49–7.58) in comparison with continent women while there was no significant association between stress urinary incontinence and bacteriuria. The prevalence of bacteriuria among men was too low to make any meaningful calculations about the association between bacteriuria and frequency and type of incontinence. Conclusion Bacteriuria is associated with more frequent leakage and predominantly with urge urinary incontinence. The causes of this association and their clinical implications remain unclear. There might be some individuals who would benefit from antibiotic treatment, but further studies are warranted. PMID:18297561

  15. Contractures and involuntary muscle overactivity in severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan; Rockstroh, Günter; Rückriem, Stefan; Koch, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of contractures with an increase or reduction of non-spastic muscle overactivity due to severe cerebral damage. Forty-five patients with tetraparesis after severe cerebral damage were investigated. Three groups were defined based on the presence of spasticity (revealed as resistance to passive stretch (= hypertonia)), and the presence of contracture of the relevant knee joint: Group(s) (17 patients with hypertonia without contracture), Group(s+c) (20 patients with hypertonia and contracture), and Group(c) (eight patients without hypertonia and with contracture). In all groups spontaneous involuntary muscle activity was assessed continuously over a 12-hour period through isometric measurement of knee joint flexion torque. A mathematical algorithm differentiated an hourly muscle activity spectrum (PI(h)). The frequency of peaks (peaks(h)) from the activity spectrum was determined. We revealed that Group(s) had higher PI(h) and more frequent peaks(h) compared with Group(s+c) and Group(c) (p0.05). The presence of contractures was associated with lower involuntary muscle overactivity in terms of lower PI(h) and less frequent peaks(h), indicating that contractures may be associated with reduced non-spastic positive features of the upper motor neurone syndrome in patients with severe brain damage.

  16. Incontinence Symptom Index-Pediatric: development and initial validation of a urinary incontinence instrument for the older pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Caleb P; Park, John M; Bloom, David A; Wan, Julian; Dunn, Rodney L; Wei, John T

    2007-10-01

    Although urinary incontinence is common in children, no validated pediatric instruments exist for measuring urinary incontinence symptoms and bother. We developed and validated a patient reported pediatric survey for urinary incontinence measurement. The Incontinence Symptom Index-Pediatric is an 11-item instrument comprising 2 domains, that is 1) impairment and 2) symptom severity, including subdomains for stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, insensate urinary incontinence, nocturnal urinary incontinence and pad use. The survey was self-administered twice, 2 weeks apart, to boys and girls ages 11 to 17 years. Children completed the survey independently. Cases consisted of patients presenting to pediatric urology clinic with the chief complaint of urinary incontinence. Controls consisted of healthy children presenting for evaluation up at a general pediatric practice. Formal validation analysis was performed. A total of 19 subjects per arm completed at least 1 survey. Internal consistency was good with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.84 for the complete instrument. Item-scale correlations were greater than 0.60 for all except 1 item. Test-retest reliability was also good (r = 0.97, p <0.0001). Discriminative validity was good with a total severity scale score of 9.3 in wet children and 0.7 in controls (p <0.0001). Impairment scale scores differed by 2.2 points (p <0.0001). Mean scores differed significantly between subscales for all domains except pad use. The most dramatic difference was in the urge urinary incontinence domain, which differed by a mean of 3.6 points (p = 0.0002). This pilot study provides initial validation of a survey instrument for urinary incontinence in children and adolescents. This instrument can be used in children ages 11 to 17 years to objectively and reproducibly measure patient reported urinary incontinence.

  17. Frequency of the superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in unilateral fourth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Andrea; Ugrin, Maria Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Superior oblique palsy is accompanied in most cases by overaction of the muscle's ipsilateral antagonist, the inferior oblique muscle. Overaction and contracture of the ipsilateral superior rectus muscle in patients with unilateral fourth (trochlear) nerve palsy is seldom discussed in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency of superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy. The records of 198 patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy examined by the authors between July 1987 and July 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent complete eye examination with measurement of the deviation in the 9 positions of gaze and with the head tilted to both sides in all cooperative patients. Selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in these patients were as follows: vertical deviation of 15(Delta) or larger in primary position, equal or larger hypertropia with the ipsilateral forced tilt test than with the eyes looking straight ahead, more than 5(Delta) hypertropia of the affected eye in horizontal gaze to the same side, hypertropia in all upgazes, and overaction of the contralateral superior oblique muscle. Of 198 patients, 33 (16.6%) met the selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome. Superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome frequently occurs in unilateral superior oblique palsy.

  18. Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radstaake, Maartje; Didden, Robert; Giesbers, Sanne; Korzilius, Hubert; Peters-Scheffer, Nienke; Lang, Russell; von Gontard, Alexander; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2013-11-01

    Frequency and type of incontinence and variables associated with incontinence were assessed in individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS; n=71) and in a matched control group (n=69) consisting of individuals with non-specific intellectual disability (ID). A Dutch version of the "Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence" (Beetz, von Gontard, & Lettgen, 1994) was administered and information on primary caretakers' perspectives regarding each individual's incontinence was gathered. Results show that diurnal incontinence and fecal incontinence during the day more frequently occurred in the control group than in the AS group. In both groups, nocturnal enuresis was the most common form of incontinence. More incontinence was seen in individuals with AS who were younger, had a lower level of adaptive functioning and/or had epilepsy. Individuals with AS were able to stay dry for longer periods of time than the controls and often showed both in-toilet urination and urinary accidents during the day, whereas accidents and correct voids during the day were more set apart in the control group. Also, persons with AS had a lower micturition frequency implying possible voiding postponement. Both groups showed high rates of LUTS (lower urinary tract symptoms) possibly indicative of functional bladder disorders such as voiding postponement, dysfunctional voiding, or even an underactive bladder. In general, most primary caretakers reported severe intellectual disability as the main cause for urinary incontinence. Based on these results incontinence does not appear to be part of the behavioral phenotype of Angelman syndrome. Therefore, pediatric or urologic diagnostics and treatment are recommended for all persons with incontinence and intellectual disability. Further implications for practice and research are given. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective Factors on Urinary Incontinence in Natural Menopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence are common urogenital problems affecting 7 - 10% of menopausal women. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to quantify effective factors on urinary incontinence in a cohort of menopausal women. Patients and Methods A sample of 150 menopausal women (natural menopause for at least 12 months were recruited from 13 healthcare centers in Ilam, Iran. Data regarding diagnosis, medical history and clinical symptoms were collected using a structured questionnaire and screening patient medical records. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between urinary incontinence and other variables. Results Multiple atrophic urogenital changes were identified including vaginal dryness (42%, decreased libido (41.3%, dyspareunia (16%, vaginal itching (11.3% and vaginal discharge and burning (10.7%. The prevalence of urinary frequency, stress urinary incontinence, nocturia and urge urinary incontinence were 33.3%, 28.7%, 22.7% and 17.3%, respectively. A multivariate logistic model found that urinary infection (OR 5.6; 95% CI: 2.6 - 11.58, cystocele (OR 1.73; 95% CI: 1.29 - 2.33 and rectocele (OR 1.47; 95% CI: 1.20 - 1.80 were potential risk factors for incontinence. A significant association was observed between marital status and vaginal atrophy, body mass index and urinary incontinence and parity type and urinary incontinence (P < 0.05 for all. Conclusions Multiple associations existed between atrophic urogenital changes and urinary incontinence. The most significant interaction was between urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence in menopausal women, with urinary tract infections increasing the risk of incontinence by 5.6 fold. We recommend health professionals to focus on early screening of these issues and implement educational programs for women as part of standard practice.

  20. Using Intestinal Muscle with Mucosa Stripped off to Strengthen the Detrusor for Neurogenic Bladder%去粘膜肠管平滑肌加强膀胱逼尿肌治疗无反射性神经性膀胱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雨历; 张学衡; 谭国华; 周源

    1990-01-01

    Between July 1986 and February 1989,21 patients,age ranged from 5 to 13 years,were operated upon for areflexic or hyporeflexic bladder with urinary incontinence.17 followed operations for myelomeningocele and 4were cases of sacral agenesis.Some of them have been treated conservatively but failed.The detrusor of bladder was strengthened by covering with smooth muscle from a segment of ileum about 20-25 cm long.18 patients were followed up for three months to 21/2 years,and 13 obtained satisfactory results.Urodynamic evaluation was done in all cases preand post-operatively,that the non-myelinated nerves of the intestinal wall grew into the detrusor of the bladder was observed in animal experiments.The postoperative feeling of a special abdominal pain could be experienced as a sensation of bladder distention and urinary urgency,which might be resulted from the stretching of the intestinal smooth muscle.The failures of the operation were also discussed.%在1986年7月至1989年2月间收治21例无反射或低反射性神经性膀胱,表现为尿失禁,年龄5~13岁,其中17例为脊膜膨出术后,4例骶骨发育不全,部分病例经药物治疗和尿道扩张术无效.手术用20~25厘米长的去粘膜回肠段包绕在膀胱外以加强膀胱逼尿肌.18例随访时间自3月至2年6个月,其中13例治疗效果明显.

  1. Testosterone Modifies Alterations to Detrusor Muscle after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Juvenile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Flum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to posterior urethral valves (PUV arise in boys during adolescence. The reasons for this have previously been attributed to increased urine output as boys experience increased growth. Additionally, there are few choices for clinicians to effectively treat these complications. We formed the new hypothesis that increased androgen levels at this time of childhood development could play a role at the cellular level in obstructed bladders. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of testosterone on bladder detrusor muscle following injury from partial bladder outlet obstruction (PO in mice. A PO model was surgically created in juvenile male mice. A group of mice were castrated by bilateral orchiectomy at time of obstruction (CPO. Testosterone cypionate was administered to a group of castrated, obstructed mice (CPOT. Bladder function was assessed by voiding stain on paper (VSOP. Bladders were analyzed at 7 and 28 days by weight and histology. Detrusor collagen to smooth muscle ratio (Col/SM was calculated using Masson’s trichrome stain. All obstructed groups had lower max voided volumes (MVV than sham mice at 1 day. Hormonally intact mice (PO continued to have lower MVV at 7 and 28 days while CPO mice improved to sham levels at both time points. In accordance, PO mice had higher bladder-to-body weight ratios than CPO and sham mice demonstrating greater bladder hypertrophy. Histologically, Col/SM was lower in sham and CPO mice. When testosterone was restored in CPOT mice, MVV remained low at 7 and 28 days compared to CPO and bladder-to-body weight ratios were also greater than CPO. Histologic changes were also seen in CPOT mice with higher Col/SM than sham and CPO mice. In conclusion, our findings support a role for testosterone in the fibrotic changes that occur after obstruction in male mice. This suggests that while other changes may occur in adolescent boys that cause complication in boys

  2. Testosterone Modifies Alterations to Detrusor Muscle after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Juvenile Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flum, Andrew S; Firmiss, Paula R; Bowen, Diana K; Kukulka, Natalie; Delos Santos, Grace B; Dettman, Robert W; Gong, Edward M

    2017-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to posterior urethral valves (PUV) arise in boys during adolescence. The reasons for this have previously been attributed to increased urine output as boys experience increased growth. Additionally, there are few choices for clinicians to effectively treat these complications. We formed the new hypothesis that increased androgen levels at this time of childhood development could play a role at the cellular level in obstructed bladders. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of testosterone on bladder detrusor muscle following injury from partial bladder outlet obstruction (PO) in mice. A PO model was surgically created in juvenile male mice. A group of mice were castrated by bilateral orchiectomy at time of obstruction (CPO). Testosterone cypionate was administered to a group of castrated, obstructed mice (CPOT). Bladder function was assessed by voiding stain on paper (VSOP). Bladders were analyzed at 7 and 28 days by weight and histology. Detrusor collagen to smooth muscle ratio (Col/SM) was calculated using Masson's trichrome stain. All obstructed groups had lower max voided volumes (MVV) than sham mice at 1 day. Hormonally intact mice (PO) continued to have lower MVV at 7 and 28 days while CPO mice improved to sham levels at both time points. In accordance, PO mice had higher bladder-to-body weight ratios than CPO and sham mice demonstrating greater bladder hypertrophy. Histologically, Col/SM was lower in sham and CPO mice. When testosterone was restored in CPOT mice, MVV remained low at 7 and 28 days compared to CPO and bladder-to-body weight ratios were also greater than CPO. Histologic changes were also seen in CPOT mice with higher Col/SM than sham and CPO mice. In conclusion, our findings support a role for testosterone in the fibrotic changes that occur after obstruction in male mice. This suggests that while other changes may occur in adolescent boys that cause complication in boys with PUV, the

  3. Urodinâmica convencional versus cistometria simplificada para caracterização da incontinência urinária feminina Conventional urodynamics versus simplified cystometry for characterization of female urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Kawano

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a concordância dos diferentes parâmetros urodinâmicos comparados à cistometria simplificada, permitindo uma diminuição na relação custo-benefício no diagnóstico da incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE na mulher. MÉTODOS: foram coletadas e avaliadas retrospectivamente as informações contidas dos prontuários de trinta pacientes acompanhadas, no período de janeiro de 2000 a março de 2001. Todas foram submetidas a exame físico geral e ginecológico. O estudo urodinâmico foi realizado pela técnica convencional, utilizando-se aparelho Dynograph Recorder R-611. A cistometria simplificada foi realizada com auxílio de um equipo em "Y" de PVC (pressão venosa central, conectado a um sonda de Foley 14 F, que permitia tanto a infusão de soro fisiológico como a captação da pressão intra-vesical. Foram analisados os parâmetros: volume residual, capacidade vesical, complacência, presença de contrações involuntárias do detrusor e perdas urinárias aos esforços. Para determinação da proporção de concordância entre os métodos foram utilizados o teste de concordância de Pearson e o teste de Wilcoxon, para amostras relacionadas. RESULTADOS: a média de idade foi de 50 anos, com extremos variando de 28 a 70 anos. O índice de concordância entre os estudos, na demonstração das perdas urinárias aos esforços, foi de 67%. Para a detecção das contrações involuntárias do detrusor, a proporção de concordância foi de 90%. A média do volume residual encontrado na cistometria simplificada foi de 16,8 ml contra 2 ml da urodinâmica convencional, com diferença significativa (p OBJECTIVE: to assess the concordance of different urodynamic parameters with simplified cystometry, thus improving the cost-benefit relationship for stress urinary incontinence (SUI diagnosis in woman. METHODS: we evaluated retrospectively the medical records of thirty patients treated, from January 2000 to March 2001. All

  4. Fesoterodine clinical efficacy and safety for the treatment of overactive bladder in relation to patient profiles: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher; Oelke, Matthias; Kaplan, Steven A; Scholfield, David; Arumi, Daniel; Wagg, Adrian S

    2015-06-01

    To summarize published evidence on the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of fesoterodine for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in relation to patient clinical and demographic profiles. A systematic review of published articles on fesoterodine was conducted via a PubMed search. Articles were identified using the search term fesoterodine, with limits of human species and abstract available. Review and meta-analysis articles, validation studies, articles focused on treatment compliance/adherence, meeting abstracts, and articles not focused on oral fesoterodine administration in human subjects were excluded. Data from retained articles were summarized descriptively. Of 137 articles identified, 61 (15 articles on the pharmacology and 46 articles on the efficacy and/or safety of fesoterodine) met inclusion criteria. Superiority trials demonstrated the additional efficacy of fesoterodine 8 mg versus fesoterodine 4 mg and tolterodine extended release 4 mg in treating OAB. Prospective trials in specific patient populations indicated beneficial effects of fesoterodine in elderly patients, vulnerable elderly patients, patients dissatisfied with or with a suboptimal response to previous antimuscarinic therapy, patients with urge urinary incontinence (UUI) or nocturnal urgency, and men with persistent LUTS during alpha-blocker treatment. With two effective doses, the fesoterodine dose can be adjusted to achieve optimal efficacy and tolerability in individual patients. The most common adverse events during fesoterodine treatment are dry mouth and constipation. Extensive evidence demonstrates the efficacy and safety of fesoterodine in relieving OAB symptoms, including urgency, urinary frequency, UUI, and nocturnal urgency, in patients with various clinical and demographic profiles. Trial results provide valuable information on fesoterodine treatment in specific patient populations, including both elderly and vulnerable elderly patients. Potential

  5. Long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of extended-release tolterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreder, K; Mayne, C; Jonas, U

    2002-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of tolterodine extended-release (ER) in patients who had completed 12 weeks' treatment in a randomised, double-blind study comparing tolterodine ER 4 mg once daily (qd), tolterodine immediate-release (IR) 2mg twice daily and placebo. Of the 1377 patients completing the 12-week study, a total of 1077 (78%) chose to continue with 12 months' open-label treatment with tolterodine ER 4 mg once daily, irrespective of their previous treatment. Safety was assessed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months' treatment in the study. Efficacy was evaluated from micturition diary variables and patients' perception of bladder condition and urgency following 3 and 12 months' treatment. 71% of patients completed the 12-month study. Tolterodine ER was safe and well tolerated. Adverse events of the general (14.5%), autonomic (13.2%), gastrointestinal (11.4%), respiratory (9.8%) and urinary (9.1%) systems were the most frequently reported. Dry mouth was the most common event, occurring in 12.9% of patients, and was generally mild in severity. Other adverse events occurred in less than 5% of patients. There was no increase in the frequency of adverse events with long-term relative to short-term treatment. The efficacy of tolterodine was maintained over the 12-month treatment period; relative to baseline there were reductions in the number of incontinence episodes per week (median change -83%) and micturitions per 24 hours (median change -21%) and an increase in volume voided (median change +25%) after 12 months' treatment. An improvement in patient perception of their bladder condition was found in 75% of patients completing the study, and 51% had an improvement in patient perception of urgency. Tolterodine ER 4mg qd displayed a favourable safety, tolerability and efficacy profile during 12 months' treatment of patients with overactive bladder.

  6. Incontinence in Individuals with Rett Syndrome: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, S.A.H.; Didden, H.C.M.; Radstaake, M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Gontard, A. von; Lang, R.; Smeets, E.E.J.; Curfs, L.M.G

    2012-01-01

    Frequency and type of incontinence and its association with other variables were assessed in females with Rett Syndrome (RS) (n = 63), using an adapted Dutch version of the ‘Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence’ (Beetz et al. 1994). Also, incontinence in RS was compared to a control

  7. Incontinence in individuals with Angelman syndrome: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radstaake, M.; Didden, H.C.M.; Giesbers, S.A.H.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Peters-Scheffer, N.C.; Lang, R.; Gontard, A. von; Curfs, L.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency and type of incontinence and variables associated with incontinence were assessed in individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS; n=71) and in a matched control group (n=69) consisting of individuals with non-specific intellectual disability (ID). A Dutch version of the "Parental Questionnaire:

  8. Prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis: literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeckman, D.; Schoonhoven, L.J.; Verhaeghe, S.; Heyneman, A.; Defloor, T.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: This paper is a report of a review conducted to describe the current evidence about the prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis and to formulate recommendations for clinical practice and research. BACKGROUND: Incontinence-associated dermatitis is a common problem in

  9. Female urinary stress incontinence treated with Teflon injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Røhl, H

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-six women with urinary stress incontinence underwent transperineal or transurethral Teflon injections. The results were classified into three grades (good, moderate, and poor). Good or moderate results were obtained in 50%. No major immediate complications or long-term side-effects were...... for urinary incontinence should this prove necessary....

  10. The Management of Urinary Incontinence by Community-Living Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteness, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Explored ways elderly people (N=30) manage urinary incontinence. Subjects tended to dismiss their urinary incontinence as a normal part of aging and used various behavioral and psychological strategies to maintain their independence, usually without any assistance from the health professions. Management strategies commonly involved some degree of…

  11. Towards patient centered care in female stress urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focussed on the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. It comprises the results of the PORTRET study (Physiotherapy OR Tvt Effectiveness Trial). Currently, pelvic floor muscle training is advised as initial treatment for all women with stress urinary incontinence. We question

  12. The risk of anal incontinence in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Daniel; Falconer, Christian; Rossner, Stephan; Melin, Ingela

    2007-11-01

    The objectives of this study was to estimate the risk of anal incontinence in morbidly obese women and to identify risk factors associated with anal incontinence in an obese population sample. A case-control study based on the registry of a university hospital obesity unit. A consecutive sample of women with body mass index > or = 35 (obesity class II) was randomly matched by age, gender and residential county to control subjects using the computerised Register of the Total Population. Data were collected by a self-reported postal survey including detailed questions on medical and obstetrical history, obesity history, socioeconomic indices, life style factors and the validated Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The questionnaire was returned by 131/179 (73%) of the cases and 453/892 (51%) of the control subjects. Compared to the control group, obese women reported a significantly increased defecation frequency (p flatus and faeces (p flatus incontinence (p flatus incontinence in morbidly obese women was 1.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.1]. A history of obstetric sphincter injury was independently associated with an increased risk of flatus incontinence (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 2.0-9.2) and incontinence of loose stools (OR, 6.6; 95% CI, 1.4-31.4). Other medical and life style interactions did not remain at significant levels in an adjusted multivariable analysis. Obese women are at increased risk for mild to moderate flatus incontinence.

  13. [Conservative therapy of female urinary incontinence--potential and effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horcicka, L; Chmel, R; Novácková, M

    2005-01-01

    Non-surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence is not as effective as surgical methods but it is very successful in indicated cases. Rehabilitation of the pelvic floor muscles (Kegel exercises, vaginal cones, and electrostimulation of the pelvic floor muscles), drug treatment (alfa-mimetics, tricyclic antidepressives, estrogens, duloxetin), pessarotherapy and uretral obturator devices represent possibilities of conservative therapy of the stress incontinence. Conservative therapy is the method of choice in the treatment of urge incontinence. The most successful are anticholinergic drugs but they have very frequent serious side effects (dryness of the mucous membranes, accommodation disorders, constipation). Spasmolytics, estrogens and tricyclic antidepressives are the other popular used drugs. Life style modification, bladder training and electrostimulation represent very important parts of the conservative treatment. Effectiveness of the non-surgical treatment of both urge and stress urinary incontinence can not reach 100 percent but it helps very much in the quality of life improvement of incontinent women.

  14. Evaluation of a simple, non-surgical concept for management of urinary incontinence (minimal care) in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, P; Mouritsen, L; Andersen, J T

    2000-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate a new concept for assessment and treatment of urinary incontinence in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic. A standardized program for investigation and treatment of incontinence was based on minimal relevant investigations, primarily non-surgical tr......Our objective was to evaluate a new concept for assessment and treatment of urinary incontinence in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic. A standardized program for investigation and treatment of incontinence was based on minimal relevant investigations, primarily non....... The minimal care program and interdisciplinary structure in the incontinence clinic offer effective and low cost treatment for urinary incontinence. The open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic model is recommended. Neurourol. Urodynam. 18:9-17, 2000....

  15. Evaluation of a simple, non-surgical concept for management of urinary incontinence (minimal care) in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, P; Mouritsen, L; Andersen, J T

    2000-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate a new concept for assessment and treatment of urinary incontinence in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic. A standardized program for investigation and treatment of incontinence was based on minimal relevant investigations, primarily non-surgical tr......Our objective was to evaluate a new concept for assessment and treatment of urinary incontinence in an open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic. A standardized program for investigation and treatment of incontinence was based on minimal relevant investigations, primarily non....... The minimal care program and interdisciplinary structure in the incontinence clinic offer effective and low cost treatment for urinary incontinence. The open-access, interdisciplinary incontinence clinic model is recommended. Neurourol. Urodynam. 18:9-17, 2000....

  16. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY OF SOLIFENACIN AND TOLTERODINE IN OVERACTIVE BLADDER

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayarangan; Rajaram; Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the efficacy and tolerability of solifenacin and tolterodine in overactive bladder. MATERIALS & METHODS It is an open label, comparative, randomised, parallel group and prospective study. 30 patients suffering from overactive bladder were divided into two groups. They were randomised to receive either solifenacin (5 mg once daily) or tolterodine (2 mg twice daily) for 4 weeks. At baseline, 2 weeks and 4 weeks they were assessed for average number of micturition...

  17. Patient Reported Outcomes Tools in an Observational Study of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vaart, Huub; Falconer, Christian; Quail, Deborah; Timlin, Louise; Manning, Martina; Tincello, Douglas; Tunn, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To determine which patient characteristics, incontinence and non-incontinence related, are associated with the symptom severity scores of the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI) and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence (ICIQ-UI); and to determine th

  18. Surgical Management of Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthi Satyanarayan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI is a common and significant issue that can affect the quality of life in men who are undergoing treatment for prostate cancer. While some patients opt for conservative management of their incontinence, many elect to undergo surgical treatment as a result of the significant impact to quality of life. The most commonly employed surgical techniques to address PPI are placement of a male sling or artificial urinary sphincter (AUS. Currently, the AUS continues to serve as the gold standard for management, with robust data concerning longitudinal outcomes available. However, in recent years, the various methods to place the male sling have emerged as viable, less complex alternatives that avoid the need for pump manipulation. In the present review, we discuss these main surgical treatment modalities for PPI, and focus on the selection criteria that may influence appropriate operative stratification of PPI patients. Indeed, an individualised, comprehensive assessment of baseline urinary function, age, radiation, prior surgeries, functional status, and other comorbidities must be considered in the context of shared decision-making between the treatment provider and the patient in determining the optimal approach to managing PPI.

  19. [Diagnostics and conservative treatment of anal incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geile, Dorothea; Osterholzer, Georg; Rosenberg, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Anal incontinence is diagnosed primarily by clinical and proctologic examination. Etiological factors of the disease are found in 85% of the patients by additional examinations. Motility dysfunction of colon and rectum has to be excluded (stenosis, dyschezia, internal hernias). Because anal incontinence is a multifactorial disease as a rule, the single compounds have to be diagnosed and have to undergo therapy. Accordingly, useful investigations are: endorectal ultrasound (defect of muscle, inflammatory or tumour infiltration), manometry (alteration of either anal resting pressure and/or anal squeezing pressure) and surface electromyography (ability of contraction, duration of contraction, strength). Neurophysiological examinations are: needle electromyography, pudendal nerve latency time measurement (PNLT). The occurrence of nerve damage determines the outcome of operative intervention! Conservative treatment is indicated in 80 to 90% of all patients, even higher when one includes all patients in the perioperative period. Possible therapy modalities are: nutrition consultation, physiotherapy, pelvic floor training, biofeedback training of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles, electrostimulation and the combination of both (EMG-triggered electrostimulation). Short-term results are satisfying in up to 85% of patients, but later, successful results depend on the patient's willingness or ability to continue training, and on his/her age.

  20. Effect of a vaginal device on quality of life with urinary stress incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, P; Thyssen, H; Lose, G;

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a vaginal device (Continence Guard) on urine leakage and quality of life. METHODS: Fifty-five women with stress incontinence participated in a 3-month study. They were assessed by the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, two incontinence-related quality-of-life qu...... of urinary stress incontinence. An incontinence-specific, rather than a generic, quality-of-life questionnaire was important in assessing treatment outcomes.......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a vaginal device (Continence Guard) on urine leakage and quality of life. METHODS: Fifty-five women with stress incontinence participated in a 3-month study. They were assessed by the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, two incontinence-related quality...... months. The quality of life measured by the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire showed highly significant improvement, and the results of the two incontinence-related quality of life questions also showed significant improvement. Responses to the Short Form-36 general health questionnaire showed...

  1. [Transobturator slings for female stress urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana; Jesus, André; Carvalho, Maria; Carvalho, Giselda; Marques, João; Falcão, Francisco; Torgal, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A incontinência urinária de esforço afeta 20 a 40% das mulheres. Os slings colocados sob a uretra média, aplicados por via transobturadora, são a terapêutica consensualmente aceite na atualidade. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a eficácia e possíveis complicações associadas à aplicação dos slings colocados por via transobturadora no tratamento da incontinência urinária de esforço. Material e Métodos: Avaliaram-se retrospetivamente 363 doentes submetidas a cirurgia de incontinência urinária de esforço por via transobturadora, nos Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra do Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, no período de 1 Janeiro de 2008 a 1 Julho de 2010. Resultados: A média das idades das doentes foi de 56 anos [28-86]. Além da correção da incontinência urinária de esforço, em 13,5% das mulheres foi associada outra cirurgia vaginal. A maioria (95,3%) das mulheres apresentou hipermobilidade da uretra. Ocorreram complicações per-operatórias em 0,8%, complicações pós-operatórias imediatas em 5,2% e complicações pós-operatórias tardias em 15,7%. A taxa de sucesso global foi de 93,7%. A taxa de sucesso nas doentes com uretra fixa foi 77,8%, verificando-se melhores resultados (94,5%) naquelas com hipermobilidade da uretra (p = 0,02). A taxa de sucesso foi comparável nas doentes com e sem cirurgias vaginais associadas. Discussão: As técnicas transobturadoras têm taxas de sucesso elevadas, tendo-se tornado o tratamento de primeira linha para as doentes com IUE, independentemente se tratadas pela técnica outside-in (TOT®) ou pela inside-out (TVT-O®). Ambas as técnicas foram concebidas com o intuito de evitar a passagem no espaço retropúbico, reduzindo assim o número de complicações. Conclusão: As taxas de cura para as abordagens transobturadoras oscilam entre 80 e 95%. A taxa de cura aumenta quando o mecanismo responsável pela incontinência urinária de esforço é a hipermobilidade da uretra

  2. Safety and efficacy of fesoterodine fumarate in patients with overactive bladder: results of a post-marketing surveillance study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Heon; Lee, Sang Eun; Lee, Hahn-Ey; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of fesoterodine fumarate (fesoterodine; Toviaz ) in Korean patients with overactive bladder (OAB) in routine clinical practice. This was an open-label, non-interventional, prospective, post-marketing surveillance study submitted to the Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety. A total of 3109 patients aged ≥18 years with OAB symptoms were prescribed flexible doses of fesoterodine at the investigator's discretion. Safety was assessed based upon the reporting of adverse events (AEs). Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of patient self-assessment using a bladder diary as well as on the basis of investigator assessment in terms of overall clinical efficacy. A final analysis was performed on 3107 (99.9%) and 2978 (95.8%) patients for safety and efficacy analysis, respectively. The mean treatment duration of fesoterodine was 83.2 days. The incidence of AEs was 8.5% (265/3107). Common AEs that accounted for more than 1.0% of the total AE incidence included dry mouth (5.4%, 168/3107), constipation (1.5%, 48/3107) and micturition disorder (1.1%, 35/3107). Mean episodes of urinary frequency, urgency, and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) per 24 hours decreased by 4.0, 2.4, and 0.8, respectively (all p fesoterodine is a well tolerated and effective treatment for Korean patients with OAB in routine clinical practice.

  3. Effects of voluntary dose escalation in a placebo-controlled, flexible-dose trial of fesoterodine in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staskin, David; Khullar, Vik; Michel, Martin C; Morrow, Jon D; Sun, Franklin; Guan, Zhonghong; Dmochowski, Roger

    2011-11-01

    To characterize the response to fesoterodine treatment for overactive bladder (OAB) in subjects who did or did not choose to dose escalate in a flexible-dose study. Subjects were randomized to fesoterodine 4  mg or placebo. At week 2, subjects could remain on 4  mg (non-escalators) or choose to increase to 8  mg (escalators) for the remaining 10 weeks (sham escalation for placebo). Subjects completed 3-day bladder diaries at baseline, week 2 and week 12 noting micturitions, urgency episodes, and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes. Sixty-three per cent of 438 subjects randomized to fesoterodine and 73% of 445 randomized to placebo dose escalated. At baseline, fesoterodine escalators had significantly more micturitions and urgency episodes than fesoterodine non-escalators (P fesoterodine non-escalators versus escalators (P fesoterodine non-escalators and escalators (P > 0.05). The placebo escalator group did not demonstrate a similar response over placebo non-escalators following the dose escalation decision point. A rapid and robust response to fesoterodine 4  mg was demonstrated in non-escalators. Subjects who chose to dose escalate to fesoterodine 8  mg at week 2 showed significant improvement by week 12 versus baseline and week 2 (prior to escalation), as well as versus placebo. Dose escalation to 8  mg fesoterodine provided subjects with efficacy and tolerability similar to those who were satisfied with the 4-mg dose. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Total urgency and frequency score as a measure of urgency and frequency in overactive bladder and storage lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher R; Drake, Marcus J; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip; Cardozo, Linda; Drogendijk, Ted; Klaver, Monique; Van Charldorp, Karin; Hakimi, Zalmai; Compion, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    The term lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) encompasses a range of urinary symptoms, including storage symptoms (e.g. overactive bladder [OAB]) as well as voiding and post-micturition symptoms. Although treatment of male LUTS tends to focus on voiding symptoms, patients typically find storage symptoms the most bothersome. The core storage symptom is urgency, which drives the other main storage symptoms of increased daytime frequency, nocturia and incontinence. Although several validated questionnaires have been widely used to study urgency, few measure the two important storage parameters, urgency and frequency, in a single assessment. The total urgency and frequency score (TUFS) is a new validated tool that captures both variables and is derived from the Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale, which has been validated in patients with OAB and LUTS. The TUFS was first validated in OAB in the phase IIa BLOSSOM study, which was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of mirabegron, a β3 -adrenoceptor agonist, in 260 patients. The responsiveness of the TUFS to treatment has been confirmed in a further three large-scale randomized controlled trials of solifenacin in patients with OAB or LUTS. Changes in TUFS from baseline to end of treatment were consistent with changes in micturition diary variables in all four studies. Furthermore, the TUFS was significantly correlated with several health-related quality-of-life variables in the phase III NEPTUNE study. Thus, the TUFS appears to be useful for assessing improvements in major storage symptoms (urgency and frequency) in clinical trials.

  5. Re: Comparative Effectiveness of Combined Low- and Standart-Dose Trospium and Solifenacin for Moderate Overactive Bladder Symptoms in Elderly Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill V. Kosilov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB treatment is also a problem in elderly people. Treatment alternatives are limited especially in elderly patients who were resistant to standart antimuscarinic treatments. In this study, the authors examined a group of elderly patients with OAB, who had an episode of incontinence (EI three or less a day and unsatisfied with the treatment, and low dose (Trospium 15mg/day+Solifenacin 5 mg/day versus standart dose (Trospium 30mg/day+Solifenacin 10 mg/day trospium+solifenacin treatments were evaluated. The assignment of patients was random and blind in this placebo-controlled study. Urodynamic study, ICIQ-SF questionnaires and bladder diaries were used. Significant improvement in symptoms and urodynamic parameters were seen in both treatment groups. The frequency of EI in both of the main groups decreased by almost 2-fold compared to the initial data. Side effects were more in standart dose group. They concluded that, as the treatment efficacy of both groups was similiar, combination of these drugs in standart doses for such patients is excessive. Also the authors discussed that synergistic effects of combination of antimuscarinics were more effective than high doses. Search for non-invasive tretment alternatives in antimuscarinic resistant OAB is ongoing

  6. Skin care in the frail, elderly, dependent, incontinent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeter, K F; Lutz, J B

    1996-01-01

    Despite a plethora of recommendations, protocols and dictums in the nursing literature, no research studies have defined the basic elements of preventive skin care for incontinent patients, and the prevalence of skin problems associated with incontinence is unknown. Yet the importance of skin care for incontinent elderly or immobilized patients has long been acknowledged. This literature review sought to determine current practices and principles for skin care of frail, elderly, dependent, incontinent patients. Protocols vary widely. And although there is mounting evidence that incontinence, particularly fecal incontinence, is a primary risk factor for pressure ulcer development, most preventive efforts focus on pressure relief, repositioning, and nutrition, rather than incontinence care. More clinical trials are needed in this area. The design and analysis of these trials should take into account the frequency and manner in which skin is cleansed, products used for skin care, risks and benefits of absorbent products and devices, the presence of infection, and patients' concomitant medical conditions and degree of immobility.

  7. Prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeckman, Dimitri; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Heyneman, Alexander; Defloor, Tom

    2009-06-01

    This paper is a report of a review conducted to describe the current evidence about the prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis and to formulate recommendations for clinical practice and research. Incontinence-associated dermatitis is a common problem in patients with incontinence. It is a daily challenge for healthcare professionals to maintain a healthy skin in patients with incontinence. PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, reference lists and conference proceedings were explored up to September 2008. Publications were included if they reported research on the prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis. As little consensus about terminology was found, a very sensitive filter was developed. Study design was not used as a selection criterion due to the explorative character of the review and the scarce literature. Thirty-six publications, dealing with 25 different studies, were included. The implementation of a structured perineal skin care programme including skin cleansing and the use of a moisturizer is suggested. A skin protectant is recommended for patients considered at risk of incontinence-associated dermatitis development. Perineal skin cleansers are preferable to using water and soap. Skin care is suggested after each incontinence episode, particularly if faeces are present. The quality of methods in the included studies was low. Incontinence-associated dermatitis can be prevented and healed with timely and appropriate skin cleansing and skin protection. Prevention and treatment should also focus on a proper use of incontinence containment materials. Further research is required to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of various interventions.

  8. Steinert's syndrome presenting as anal incontinence: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzum Ayse

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Myotonic dystrophy (MD or Steinert's syndrome is a rare cause of chronic diarrhea and anal incontinence. In the presence of chronic diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness, neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 45-year-old Turkish man with Steinert's syndrome, who was not diagnosed until the age of 45. Conclusions In clinical practice, the persistence of diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness should suggest that the physician perform an anal manometric study and electromyography. Neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  9. Urinary incontinence: hospital-based prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Nojomi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in women aged 30 to 70 years, who were attending to a gynecologic hospital.
    • METHODS: During 2006, married women (aged 30-70 years attending to a teaching gynecological hospital were assessed during their visits for any gynecologic diseases. We used a questionnaire with interview for collecting data. The potential risk factors were measured; i.e., the demographics, menopausal status, urinary symptoms (frequency, nocturia and urgency, urinary incontinence, (urgency, stress and mixed, body mass index, medical history (type of delivery, parity, gravidity, chronic illnesses, medication use, pelvic surgery and seeking medical care for their problem.
    • RESULTS: The mean age was 46.5 (± 8.4 years. The mean parity was 5.1 ± 1.5. 27% of the participants reported urinary incontinence. Out of 111 women with urinary incontinence, 77 (18.7%, CI: 14.7-22.7%, 17 (4.1%, CI: 2.2-5.8% and 17 (4.1%, CI: 2.2-5.8% were classified as having stress, urge and mixed urinary incontinence, respectively. The overall prevalence of urinary incontinence was 18.9% (34 subjects in women aged 30-44 years, 30.9% (46 subjects in those aged 45-54 years and 37.8% (31 subjects in those aged 55 years and older. Out of 117 menopause women, 39 (33.3% were incontinent. On average, women reported 4.4 (± 1.06 diurnal and 0.55 (± 0.66 nocturnal voidings in 24 hours. Diurnal and nocturnal frequencies were different between continent and incontinent women. The high parity, excessive birth weight, pelvic trauma, constipation, chronic illnesses (specially diabetes and gynecologic and other pelvic surgeries were known as risk factors for urinary incontinence.>
    • CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant association between urinary incontinence and high parity, excessive birth weight, pelvic

    • Expert system for management of urinary incontinence in women.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gorman, R.

      1995-01-01

      The purpose of this nursing informatics and outcomes research study was to determine the effectiveness of an expert system for disseminating knowledge to ambulatory women health care consumers with urinary incontinence. Clinical knowledge from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) patient guideline for urinary incontinence and research literature for behavioral treatments provided the knowledge base for the expert system. Two experimental groups (booklet and expert system) and one control group were utilized. Study results suggest the use of an expert system as one effective communication means for disseminating clinical information in an advisory capacity to ambulatory women with urinary incontinence. PMID:8563340

    • Obesity, overweight, and eating problems in children with incontinence.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wagner, Catharina; Equit, Monika; Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander

      2015-08-01

      The aim was to analyze the prevalence of eating problems and specific associations between overweight, obesity, and eating behavior in children with incontinence. Forty-three consecutively presented children with incontinence, diagnosed to International Children's Continence Society standards, and 44 matched continent controls were examined prospectively. All children received a physical examination, sonography, and a one-dimensional intelligence test. Child psychopathology was measured with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/4-18). Eating problems were assessed with the German version of the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire for Children (DEBQ-C) and a 40-item-parental questionnaire referring to atypical eating problems. Of the 43 children with incontinence, 23.3% had nocturnal enuresis (NE) only, 37.2% had any form of daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) (isolated or combined with NE) and 39.5% had fecal incontinence (FI) (isolated or combined with NE and/or DUI). Incontinent children showed significantly more CBCL externalizing symptoms (35.7% vs. 6.8%) and total problems (46.3% vs. 6.8%) in the clinical range (>90th percentile), as well as significantly lower mean IQ (105.5 vs. 120.6) than continent controls. Of the children with incontinence, 16.9% were affected by obesity (≥95th body mass index [BMI] percentile) compared with none of the continent controls. Especially in children with FI, the rate of obesity was significantly increased (23.5%). In addition, 46.5% of incontinent children, but none of the controls, had constipation. Again, children with FI (82.4%) had the highest rate of constipation (>DUI: 25% > NE only: 20%). "Food refusal" (FR) and "intense fear of gaining weight" (GW), but not other eating problems, were significantly more common among incontinent children (FR mean score 7.3; GW mean score 1.4) than in controls (FR mean score 5.6; GW mean score 0.7). After controlling for BMI percentiles, FR still was significantly higher in

    • External urethral sphincter pressure measurement: an accurate method for the diagnosis of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia?

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Carlos H Suzuki Bellucci

      Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combined pelvic floor electromyography (EMG and videocystourethrography (VCUG during urodynamic investigation are the most acceptable and widely agreed methods for diagnosing detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia (DESD. Theoretically, external urethral sphincter pressure (EUSP measurement would provide enough information for the diagnosis of DESD and could simplify the urodynamic investigation replacing combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUG. Thus, we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of EUSP measurement for DESD. PATIENTS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; METHODS: A consecutive series of 72 patients (36 women, 36 men with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction able to void spontaneously was prospectively evaluated at a single university spinal cord injury center. Diagnosis of DESD using EUSP measurement (index test versus combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUG (reference standard was assessed according to the recommendations of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Initiative. RESULTS: Using EUSP measurement (index test and combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUR (reference standard, DESD was diagnosed in 10 (14% and in 41 (57% patients, respectively. More than half of the patients presented discordant diagnosis between the index test and the reference standard. Among 41 patients with DESD diagnosed by combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUR, EUSP measurement identified only 6 patients. EUSP measurement had a sensitivity of 15% (95% CI 5%-25%, specificity of 87% (95% CI 76%-98%, positive predictive value of 60% (95% CI 30%-90%, and negative predictive value of 56% (95% CI 44%-68% for the diagnosis of DESD. CONCLUSIONS: For diagnosis of DESD, EUSP measurement is inaccurate and cannot replace combined pelvic floor EMG and VCUR.

    • [The artificial sphincter: therapy for faecal incontinence].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Baumgartner, U

      2012-08-01

      Faecal incontinence (FI) challenges a patient's professional, social and sexual life. Often the patient becomes depressive and socially isolated. If able to break open for therapy the patient should receive as first line a conservative treatment (like dietary measures, pelvic re-education, biofeedback, bulking agents, irrigation). When is the time to implant an artificial anal sphincter? If conservative therapy fails as well as surgical options (like a sphincteroplasty - if indicated a reconstruction of the pelvic floor if insufficient, or a sacral nerve stimulation) an ultimo surgical procedure should be offered to appropriate and compliant patients: an artificial anal sphincter. Worldwide, there are two established devices on the market: the artificial bowel sphincter® (ABS) from A. M. S. (Minnetonka, MN, USA) and the soft anal band® from A. M. I. (Feldkirch, Austria). How to implant the artificial anal sphincter? Both devices consist of a silicon cuff which can be filled with fluid. Under absolute aseptic conditions this cuff is placed in the lithotomy position by perianal incisions around the anal canal below the pelvic floor. A silicon tube connects the anal cuff with a reservoir (containing fluid) which is placed either behind the pubis bone in front of the bladder (ABS) or below the costal arch (anal band). With a pump placed in the scrotum/labia (ABS) or by pressing the balloon (anal band) in both types operated by the patient the fluid is shifted forth and back between the anal cuff and the reservoir closing or opening the anal canal. Both systems are placed completely subcutaneously. Both devices improve significantly the anal continence. Both systems have a high rate of reoperations. However, the causes for the redos are different. The ABS is associated with high infection and anal penetration rates of the cuff leading to an explantation rate to up to 60 % of the implants. This kind of complication seems to be much lower with the anal band. The major

    • The sexual function and influence of urinary incontinence questionnaire (SF-IUIQ) - assessing sexual function of urinary incontinent women in south Africa

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Lambrechtsen, F. A. C. P.; van Rensburg, J. A.; Steyn, P. S.; Grove, D.

      2007-01-01

      Objective. To develop and psychometrically validate a questionnaire that assesses sexual function of urinary incontinent women in South Africa and the influence of incontinence on their sexual function. Design. A prospective descriptive study. Setting. Urogynaecology and gynaecology outpatient clini

    • Correlation of transrectal ultrasonographic findings of the prostate with the occurrence of detrusor instability in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Tong, Y C; Lin, Y M; Yang, W H; Tzai, T S; Lin, J S

      1995-01-01

      Forty patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were evaluated with urodynamics and transrectal ultrasonography. Seventeen patients were found to have detrusor instability while the remaining 23 did not. No significant differences were noted during ultrasonography in the estimated prostatic volume, the presumed circle area ratio and the incidence of finding prostatic calcification between these two groups. However, the incidence of detecting intravesical protrusion of the prostate is significantly higher in patients with instability than in patients with stable bladder (53 vs. 13%, p prostate and alter the stability status of the urinary bladder.

    • The Functional Effects of Cigarette Smoking in Women on the Lower Urinary Tract.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Madhu, Chendrimada; Enki, Doyo; Drake, Marcus J; Hashim, Hashim

      2015-01-01

      The aim of the study was to evaluate the urodynamic findings in women who smoke cigarettes, with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms, to help develop an understanding of potential impact of smoking on the lower urinary tract function. A database of 11,678 women who underwent urodynamic testing in a tertiary referral centre in the United Kingdom, from January 1991 to December 2009 was retrospectively analysed. All women reporting cigarette smoking were included in the study group. Urodynamic testing and interpretation of results were done in accordance with the recommendations of the International Continence Society. Overall, 2,476 (21.2%) women reported smoking cigarettes. Overactive bladder symptoms (OAB) were more common in smokers (OR 1.14, p = 0.006). Female smokers significantly complained of secondary nocturnal enuresis (OR 2.26, p < 0.001) and coital incontinence (CI; OR 1.14, p < 0.001). Detrusor overactivity (DO; OR 1.42, p < 0.001) and detrusor overactivity incontinence (DOI; OR 1.42, p < 0.001) were the most significant urodynamic findings. Smoking was not shown to be significantly associated with SUI (OR 1.08, p = 0.213) or urodynamic stress incontinence (OR 0.86, p = 0.001). Cigarette smoking is associated with OAB, secondary nocturnal enuresis and CI. DO and DOI are the most significant urodynamic findings. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

    • Efficacy and postoperative complication of tension-free vaginal tape-Secur for female stress urinary incontinence

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      CHEN Ying-he; WANG Yi-jun; LI Fei-ping; WANG Qian

      2011-01-01

      Background As the third-generation tension-free tape for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), tension-free vaginal tape (TVT)-Secur has decreased the common complications associated with TVT and tension-free vaginal tape-transobturator (TVT-O), such as bladder perforation and obstruction of the bladder outlet; but its efficacy and persistence were still controversial. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate and compare the postoperative efficacy and complication at different follow-up time.Methods Patients with SUI, who underwent lVT-Secur treatment in two hospitals from October 2008 to October 2009,were selected. By analyzing preoperative and intraoperative data and postoperative complications, the therapeutic effect and satisfaction at different follow-up stages were evaluated.Results A total of 30 female patients participated in this study. Patients were scheduled for follow-up at the 1st month,3rd month, 6th month and 12th month, while the cure rate was 83.3% (25 patients), 66.7% (20 patients), 63.3% (19patients) and 60.0% (18 patients) respectively and the overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms appeared in 11 patients (36.7%), 10 patients (33.3%), 6 patients (20%) and 7 patients (23.3%) respectively.Conclusion With the follow-up time becoming longer, TVT-Secur has a high recurrence rate of SUI, the therapeutic effect from the 3rd month to the 12th month is relatively persistent.

    • The Effect of Pelvic Muscle Exercises on Urinary Incontinency and Self-Esteem of Elderly Females With Stress Urinary Incontinency, 2013

      OpenAIRE

      Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Talebizadeh, Malihe; Mirzaei, Maryam

      2014-01-01

      Introduction: Millions of women are afflicted with stress urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is mentioned as one of the geriatric syndromes, together with pressure ulcers, functional decline, falls, and low self-esteem. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of pelvic muscle exercises on urinary incontinency and self- esteem of elderly females with stress urinary incontinency in Shiraz, Iran, 2013. Material and Method: In this interventional study, 50 old females age...

    • Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

      2010-01-01

      possible, existing evidence was assessed and a level of recommendation was developed according to the Oxford system of classification. Results: The consultation decided to refer to the condition as "bladder pain syndrome" (BPS) because the designation is more descriptive of the clinical condition......Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature......, taxonomy, epidemiology, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, symptom scales, outcome assessment, principles of management, specific therapies, and future directions in research. Study Design, Materials, Methods: The emphasis was on new information developed since the last consultation 4 years previously. Where...

    • Managing faecal retention and incontinence in neurodisability.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Pierce, E; Cowan, P; Stokes, M

      The large number of patients with faecal retention and/or incontinence in continuing care wards and rehabilitation units presents a considerable challenge. In order to maintain dignity and minimize the unpleasant odour so commonly associated with these wards and units, effective bowel management should be planned for individual patients. For an effective bowel management regime a team approach should be adopted, involving, where possible, the patient and carer as well as all the health professionals administering the care. Two case studies illustrate the use of assessment and management of bowel problems in patients with severe complex neurodisability. Bowel dysfunction in this patient population, in general, is poorly covered in the literature. The present article, by relating theory to practice, offers information and guidance for nurses working with patients who have bowel-related problems.

  1. Correlates of urinary incontinence in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidman, Lone; Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    for the nulliparous and the primiparous, respectively. The present data suggest pregnancy UI not to be provoked by the mere onset of pregnancy, but by increasing hormonal concentrations or local tissue changes caused by hormones, whereas there was no support for a theory based on increasing pressure on the bladder......In a population sample, the period prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy was found to be 19.9% and 24.1% among 352 nulliparous and 290 primiparous women, respectively. The first UI episode ever was experienced by 16.7% and 7.0% during the two last trimesters of the first...... and second pregnancies, respectively. None of the pregnancy-specific risk factors, such as emesis and birthweight, was significantly associated with UI during pregnancy. Previous UI was a significant risk factor for period prevalent UI during pregnancy, explaining 34% and 83% of pregnancy UI...

  2. Preventing urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    : women should be advised not to smoke before or during pregnancy (grade B), aim at normal weight before pregnancy (grade B), and aim at regaining prepregnancy weight postpartum (grade B). Occasional low-intensity training should be advocated (grade B), and constipation should be avoided during pregnancy......Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common condition in association with pregnancy. Incident UI in pregnancy or postpartum are significant risk factors for UI later in life. Epidemiological studies on UI during pregnancy and postpartum list numerous variables associated with UI. For women, the main...... (grade B) and postpartum (grade C). Women should be advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy and postpartum (grade A) and to use perineal warm packs during delivery (grade B). Cesarean section to prevent UI cannot be recommended (grade D). If lifestyle recommendations...

  3. Risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia da Silva Leroy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence (UI and its characteristics. METHOD: This was a case-control study with 344 puerperal women (77 cases and 267 controls with up to 90 days postpartum. In a single session, participants were given a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical data and two others that assessed urine leakage, leakage situations, and type of UI. RESULTS: Stress UI was present in 45.5% of the women, incidents of urine leakage several times a day in 44.2%, of which 71.4% were in small amounts and 57.1% when coughing or sneezing. In 70.1% of cases, UI began during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. After running a binary logistic regression model, the following factors remained in the final model: UI during pregnancy (OR 12.82, CI 95% 6.94 - 23.81, p<0.0001, multiparity (OR 2.26, CI 95% 1.22 - 4.19, p=0.009, gestational age at birth greater or equal to 37 weeks (OR 2.52, CI 95% 1.16 - 5.46, p=0.02 and constipation (OR 1.94, CI 95% 1.05 - 5.46, p=0.035. CONCLUSION: Most often, UI first appeared during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy, multiparity, gestational age at birth greater or equal to 37 weeks, and constipation were presented as risk factors. In the studied group, stress UI was more frequent.

  4. Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Male Sling

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Virtue® Male Sling Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Consider Acupuncture for Incontinence, Not Certain Infertility Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166898.html Consider Acupuncture for Incontinence, Not Certain Infertility Cases Research yields ... 27, 2017 TUESDAY, June 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture, a 3,000-year-old healing technique, received ...

  6. High prevalence of urinary incontinence and poor knowledge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-12-02

    Dec 2, 2010 ... In 1998, the World Health Organization's first International. Consultation on Incontinence classified UI as a disease, made recommendations on its assessment and treatment, and advocated ... S Knight, MB BCh, FCPHM (SA).

  7. Urinary incontinence in the prediction of falls in hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cristina de Almeida Abreu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the effect of urinary incontinence as a predictor of the incidence of falls among hospitalized elderly. Method Concurrent cohort study where 221 elderly inpatients were followed from the date of admission until discharge, death or fall. The Kaplan-Meier methods, the incidence density and the Cox regression model were used for the survival analysis and the assessment of the association between the exposure variable and the other variables. Results Urinary incontinence was a strong predictor of falls in the surveyed elderly, and was associated with shorter time until the occurrence of event. Urinary incontinence, concomitant with gait and balance dysfunction and use of antipsychotics was associated with falls. Conclusion Measures to prevent the risk of falls specific to hospitalized elderly patients who have urinary incontinence are necessary.

  8. Urinary incontinence in the prediction of falls in hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cristina de Almeida Abreu

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the effect of urinary incontinence as a predictor of the incidence of falls among hospitalized elderly. Method Concurrent cohort study where 221 elderly inpatients were followed from the date of admission until discharge, death or fall. The Kaplan-Meier methods, the incidence density and the Cox regression model were used for the survival analysis and the assessment of the association between the exposure variable and the other variables. Results Urinary incontinence was a strong predictor of falls in the surveyed elderly, and was associated with shorter time until the occurrence of event. Urinary incontinence, concomitant with gait and balance dysfunction and use of antipsychotics was associated with falls. Conclusion Measures to prevent the risk of falls specific to hospitalized elderly patients who have urinary incontinence are necessary.

  9. Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Male Sling

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Advanced Procedures in Male Incontinence: The Virtue® Male Sling Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The psychosocial impact of urinary incontinence on women aged 25 to 45 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerius, A J

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe the relationship between symptoms of urinary incontinence and their impact on daily activities, and the degree of incontinence-related distress perceived by 25- to 45-year-old women. A second purpose was to identify differences, if any, in impact on daily life and degree of incontinence-related distress perceived among women with stress, urge, and mixed incontinence. Guided by Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) Stress, Appraisal and Coping Theory, a descriptive correlational prospective study (N = 35) was conducted using the Urogenital Distress Inventory and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire. A significant moderate (r = 0.5701, p = 0.000) correlation was found between urinary incontinence symptoms and their impact on travel, social, physical, and emotional activities. No significant differences were found among women with stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence and the impact of incontinence symptoms on their daily activities or with their perceived degree of incontinence-related distress.

  11. Pathophysiology of pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal D Patel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although they may present with significant morbidity, pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence are mainly afflicitions that affect quality of life. To appropiately treat these entities, comprehension of the various theories of pathophysiology is paramount. Utilizing a Medline search, this article reviews recent data concerning intrinsic (i.e., genetics, postmenopausal status and extrinsic factors (i.e., previous hysterectomy, childbirth leading to organ prolapse or stress incontinence

  12. Stem cells for stress urinary incontinence: the adipose promise

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Régis; Festy, Franck; Fritel, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of incontinence in women, is a frequent and costly ailment responsible for an alteration in the quality of life. Although medical treatment gives some rather deceiving results, surgical techniques that include colposuspension or tension-free vaginal tape, employed in cases of urethral support defect, give a 5-year cure rate of more than 80%. However, these techniques could lead to complications or recurrence of symptoms. Recentl...

  13. [Sleep and nocturnal incontinence in hospital or institutional care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Eliane; Schwartz, Chantal; Hidot, Nathalie; Mazin, Véronique; Pochon, Sandrine; Renaux-Bouttier, Valérie; Guyon, Anne; Greusard, Claire; Wenger, Isabelle

    A survey carried out in 2004 studied the link between quality of sleep and the nocturnal management of incontinence. This same survey was repeated 10 years later. The results reveal the impact on quality of sleep, the deteriorating management of incontinence with the lenghtening of waiting time and the causes of waking. This discussion process on the quality of sleep must continue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Improving diaper design to address incontinence associated dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zöllner Petra; Homann Vanessa; Souchon Sandrine; Hallet-Lezy Anne-Marie; Guihaire Claudine; Malaquin-Pavan Evelyne; Beguin Anne-Marie; Swerev Maximilian; Kesselmeier Rüdiger; Hornung Fridmann; Smola Hans

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) is an inflammatory skin disease mainly triggered by prolonged skin contact with urine, feces but also liberal detergent use when cleansing the skin. To minimize the epidermal barrier challenge we optimized the design of adult incontinence briefs. In the fluid absorption area we interposed a special type of acidic, curled-type of cellulose between the top sheet in contact with the skin and the absorption core beneath containing the p...

  15. Complete Pelvic Floor Repair in Treating Fecal Incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Patrick Y. H.; Steele, Scott R

    2005-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is associated with 20 to 40% of the patients with pelvic floor prolapse. Successful management of fecal incontinence requires not only an understanding of anorectal function but also a thorough understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and how pelvic floor prolapse affects fecal continence. Imaging techniques have been instrumental in visualizing pelvic floor prolapse and have helped correlate surgical findings. Stabilization of the perineal body appears to be a key component t...

  16. Tolterodine Tartrate Proniosomal Gel Transdermal Delivery for Overactive Bladder

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    Rajan Rajabalaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to formulate and evaluate side effects of transdermal delivery of proniosomal gel compared to oral tolterodine tartrate (TT for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB. Proniosomal gels are surfactants, lipids and soy lecithin, prepared by coacervation phase separation. Formulations were analyzed for drug entrapment efficiency (EE, vesicle size, surface morphology, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, in vitro skin permeation, and in vivo effects. The EE was 44.87%–91.68% and vesicle size was 253–845 nm for Span formulations and morphology showed a loose structure. The stability and skin irritancy test were also carried out for the optimized formulations. Span formulations with cholesterol-containing formulation S1 and glyceryl distearate as well as lecithin containing S3 formulation showed higher cumulative percent of permeation such as 42% and 35%, respectively. In the in vivo salivary secretion model, S1 proniosomal gel had faster recovery, less cholinergic side effect on the salivary gland compared with that of oral TT. Histologically, bladder of rats treated with the proniosomal gel formulation S1 showed morphological improvements greater than those treated with S3. This study demonstrates the potential of proniosomal vesicles for transdermal delivery of TT to treat OAB.

  17. Magnitude-range brightness variations of overactive K giants

    CERN Document Server

    Oláh, K; Kővári, Zs; Granzer, T; Strassmeier, K G; Kriskovics, L; Vida, K

    2014-01-01

    We study three representative, overactive spotted K giants (IL Hya, XX Tri, and DM UMa) known to exhibit V-band light variations between 0.65-1.05 mags. Our aim is to find the origin of their large brightness variation. We employ long-term phase-resolved multicolor photometry, mostly from automatic telescopes, covering 42 yr for IL Hya, 28 yr for XX Tri, and 34 yr for DM UMa. For one target, IL Hya, we present a new Doppler image from NSO data taken in late 1996. Effective temperatures for our targets are determined from all well-sampled observing epochs and are based on a V-I_C color-index calibration. The effective temperature change between the extrema of the rotational modulation for IL Hya and XX Tri is in the range 50-200 K. The bolometric flux during maximum of the rotational modulation, i.e., the least spotted states, varied by up to 39% in IL Hya and up to 54% in XX Tri over the course of our observations. We emphasize that for IL Hya this is just about half of the total luminosity variation that can...

  18. The relationship between overactive bladder and sexual activity in women

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    Patel Ankur S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We assessed the relationships between bladder symptoms, demographic, and medical history variables and sexual dysfunction in women with overactive bladder (OAB disorder. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight women diagnosed with OAB completed self-administered questionnaires related to overall heath status, bladder function, and sexual function. Data were compiled for questionnaire responses, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of sexual dysfunction. RESULTS: Bothersome bladder symptoms were reported by superscript three 60% of the sample. Sixty-percent of the sample was sexually active in the past month. Difficulty with sexual arousal, orgasm, and sexual enjoyment were reported by about 25% of the women. Sexual partner status was the best predictor of sexual arousal, orgasm, and sexual enjoyment. Menopausal status emerged as an important predictor of arousal and sexual enjoyment. CONCLUSION: The majority of women with symptoms of OAB viewed these symptoms as bothersome. However, the extent of symptom bother did not predict aspects of female sexual dysfunction (FSD. Instead, menopausal and partner status emerged as the best predictors of FSD in our sample.

  19. Irritation induced bladder overactivity is suppressed by tibial nerve stimulation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Changfeng; Chen, Mang; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of tibial nerve stimulation on bladder overactivity induced by acetic acid irritation. Cystometry was performed in 10 α-chloralose anesthetized female cats by infusing saline or acetic acid through a urethral catheter that was secured by a ligature around the urethra. Intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder and induce bladder overactivity. Multiple cystometrograms were done before, during and after tibial nerve stimulation to determine the inhibitory effect on the micturition reflex. Infusion of 0.25% acetic acid irritated the bladder, induced bladder overactivity and significantly decreased bladder capacity to about 20% of control capacity measured during saline infusion. Tibial nerve stimulation at low (5 Hz) or high (30 Hz) frequency significantly increased bladder capacity to about 40% of saline control capacity when it was applied during acetic acid infusion cystometrogram. Bladder contraction amplitude was smaller during acetic acid irritation than during saline distention due to significantly smaller bladder capacity. Tibial nerve stimulation at 5 Hz increased bladder capacity and bladder contraction amplitude. Activation of somatic afferents in the tibial nerve of cats can partially reverse the bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of a chemical irritant that activates C-fiber afferent nerves. These data are consistent with clinical studies showing that tibial nerve neuromodulation is effective treatment for overactive bladder symptoms. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of Physiotherapy for Urinary Incontinence following Prostate Cancer Surgery

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    Elżbieta Rajkowska-Labon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study enrolled 81 with urinary incontinence following radical prostate-only prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups. The patients in Group I were additionally subdivided into two subgroups with respect to the physiotherapeutic method used. The patients of subgroup IA received a rehabilitation program consisting of three parts. The patients of subgroup IB rehabilitation program consist of two parts. Group II, a control group, had reported for therapy for persistent urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy but had not entered therapy for personal reasons. For estimating the level of incontinence, a 1-hour and 24-hour urinary pad tests, the miction diary, and incontinence questionnaire were used, and for recording the measurements of pelvic floor muscles tension, the sEMG (surface electromyography was applied. The therapy duration depended on the level of incontinence and it continued for not longer than 12 months. Superior continence outcomes were obtained in Group I versus Group II and the difference was statistically significant. The odds ratio for regaining continence was greater in the rehabilitated Group I and smaller in the group II without the rehabilitation. A comparison of continence outcomes revealed a statistically significant difference between Subgroups IA versus IB. The physiotherapeutic procedures applied on patients with urine incontinence after prostatectomy, for most of them, proved to be an effective way of acting, which is supported by the obtained results.

  1. Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos Alivizatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy remains the treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer in age-appropriate and health-appropriate men. Although cancer control is the most important aspect of a radical prostatectomy, minimization of postoperative morbidity, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, is becoming a greater concern. We reviewed recent data available on Medline regarding the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of incontinence and sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. Health-related quality of life issues have been specifically addressed. Although low incidences of incontinence and erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy have been reported in the hands of experienced surgeons, the literature review revealed a great variety, with incontinence rates ranging from 0.3–65.6% and potency rates ranging from 11–87%. Several factors contribute to this wide difference, the most important being the application of a meticulous surgical technique. General and cancer-specific health-related quality of life is not being affected after radical prostatectomy. The incidence of incontinence and erectile dysfunction is higher after radical prostatectomy when compared to the incidence observed when other therapies for localized prostate cancer are applied. However, the majority of the patients undergoing radical prostatectomy would vote for the operation again. Today, avoidance of major complications after radical prostatectomy depends mostly on a high-quality surgical technique. When incontinence or erectile dysfunction persists after radical prostatectomy, the majority of the treated patients can be managed effectively by various methods.

  2. Stereological study of collagen and elastic system in the detrusor muscle of bladders from controls and patients with infravesical obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Rubinstein

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Compare detrusor muscle of normal and patients with infravesical obstruction, quantifying the collagen and elastic system fibers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied samples taken from bladders of 10 patients whose ages ranged from 45 to 75 years (mean = 60 years, who underwent transvesical prostatectomy for treatment of BPH. Control material was composed of 10 vesical specimens, removed during autopsies performed in cadavers of accident victims, with ages between 18 and 35 years (mean = 26 years. RESULTS: The results of collagen and elastic fibers quantification (volumetric density demonstrated the following results in percentage (mean +/- standard deviation: collagen in BPH patients = 4.89 +/- 2.64 and 2.32 +/- 1.25 in controls (p < 0.0001, elastin in BPH patients = 10.63% +/- 2.00 and 8.94% +/- 1.19 in controls (p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: We found that the components of connective tissue, collagen and elastic system fibers are increased in the detrusor muscle of patients with infravesical obstruction, when compared to controls.

  3. Role of liposome in treatment of overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ya Hung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical (local therapy of agents has been effective in delaying or preventing recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. This route of drug administration has also shown tremendous promise in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS and overactive bladder without systemic side effects. Liposomes are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core. They can incorporate drug molecules, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, and show greater uptake into cells via endocytosis. Intravesical liposomes have therapeutic effects on IC/PBS patients, mainly because of their ability to form a protective lipid film on the urothelial surface. Recent studies have shown the sustained efficacy and safety of intravesical instillation of botulinum toxin formulated with liposomes (lipo-BoNT for the treatment of refractory overactive bladder This review considers the current status of intravesical liposomes or liposomal mediated drug delivery for the treatment of IC/PBS and overactive bladder.

  4. Inhibition of bladder overactivity by a combination of tibial neuromodulation and tramadol treatment in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Mally, Abhijith D.; Ogagan, P. Dafe; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Our recent study in cats revealed that inhibition of bladder overactivity by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) depends on the activation of opioid receptors. TNS is a minimally invasive treatment for overactive bladder (OAB), but its efficacy is low. Tramadol (an opioid receptor agonist) is effective in treating OAB but elicits significant adverse effects. This study was to determine if a low dose of tramadol (expected to produce fewer adverse effects) can enhance the TNS inhibition of bladder overactivity. Bladder overactivity was induced in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats by an intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid (AA) during repeated cystometrograms (CMGs). TNS (5 Hz) at two to four times the threshold intensity for inducing toe movement was applied during CMGs before and after tramadol (0.3–7 mg/kg iv) to examine the interaction between the two treatments. AA irritation significantly reduced bladder capacity to 24.8 ± 3.3% of the capacity measured during saline infusion. TNS alone reversibly inhibited bladder overactivity and significantly increased bladder capacity to 50–60% of the saline control capacity. Tramadol administered alone in low doses (0.3–1 mg/kg) did not significantly change bladder capacity, whereas larger doses (3–7 mg/kg) increased bladder capacity (50–60%). TNS in combination with tramadol (3–7 mg/kg) completely reversed the effect of AA. Tramadol also unmasked a prolonged (>2 h) TNS inhibition of bladder overactivity that persisted after termination of the stimulation. The results suggest a novel treatment strategy for OAB by combining tibial neuromodulation with a low dose of tramadol, which is minimally invasive with a potentially high efficacy and fewer adverse effects. PMID:22496406

  5. Incontinência urinária no idoso Urinary incontinence in the elderly

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    Rodolfo Borges dos Reis

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A prevalência da incontinência urinária no idoso varia de 8 a 34% segundo o critério ou método de avaliação. A principais causas são: alterações teciduais da senilidade que comprometem o trato urinário inferior e o assoalho pélvico, do sistema nervoso central e periférico, alterações hormonais como a menopausa, poliúria noturna, alterações psicológicas, hiperplasia prostática benigna, doenças concomitantes e efeitos colaterais de medicamentos. A incontinência pode ser transitória ou permanente. Além da anamnese cuidadosa para caracterização das perdas urinárias, a busca de causas associadas ou concomitantes e o diário miccional, recorre-se com freqüência a exames especializados como a urodinâmica. O diagnóstico preciso é importante para o manejo adequado que pode requerer apenas medidas conservadoras baseadas em orientações e mudanças de hábitos, como o uso de medicamentos, ou então métodos invasivos que incluem procedimentos cirúrgicos específicos.The prevalence of urinary incontinence in the elderly varies from 8 to 34% according to the criteria or method of investigation. The etiology or main associated factors are: aging tissular degeneration that compromise the lower urinary tract and pelvic floor, changes of peripheric and central nervous system, hormonal alterations such as menopause, nocturnal polyuria, benign prostate hyperplasia, concomitant diseases and side effects of medical drugs. The incontinence may be transitory or permanent. Besides a criterious medical history for a better characterization of the urinary loss, a search for associated or concomitant causes and the miccional diary, one oftenly may rely on specialized exams such as urodynamics. A specific diagnosis is of utmost value for correct management that may require only conservative measures based on changes of behaviour or counceiling, drugs prescription, or invasive methods including surgical procedures.

  6. Oxybutynin and Tolterodine in a Trial for Treatment of Overactive Bladder in Iranian Women

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Aziminekoo; Zinat Ghanbari; Shahrzad Hashemi; Maryam Nemati; Fedyeh Haghollahi; Nasim Shokuhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of Oxybutinin in comparison to tolterodine in treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with detrussor overactivity (DOA) in Iranian women. Materials and methods One hundred Iranian old women with clinical symptoms of OAB who show IDO in the filling cystometry participated in this randomized double-blinded parallel-group by using two kinds of the drugs for 4- week course (2 mg tolterodine twice-daily, or oxybutinin 5 mg, three times a day) in al...

  7. Comparison of solifenacin and fesoterodine in treatment of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Önder; Köstü, Bülent; Bakacak, Murat; Aytaç-Tohma, Yusuf; Çoşkun, Bora; Avcı, Fazıl; Efe, Erkan

    2015-10-01

    To compare the use of solifenacin and fesoterodine in treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). This prospective study was conducted on patients diagnosed with OAB who presenting to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology, School of Medicine, Kahramanmaraş Sütçü İmam University, Kahramanmaraş, Turkey between October 2013 and August 2014. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 (n=60) received 5 mg solifenacin per day, while Group 2 (n=59) received 4 mg fesoterodine per day. All the patients' OAB symptom scores (OABSS) in weeks 0, 4, and 12 were recorded. In addition, treatment costs and side effects of the drugs were evaluated. Average OABSS (score 1) was determined as: 9.5 ± 2.8 for Group 1 and 10.7 ± 1.8 for Group 2 at week 0; 2.2 ± 1.2 (Group 1) and 2.4 ± 1.3 (Group 2) at week 4 (score 2); and 1.3 ± 0.5 for Group 1 and 1.3 ± 0.6 for Group 2 at week 12 (score 3). In addition, no statistically significant difference was found between the scores (p=0.062 (score 1), p=0.464 (score 2), and p=0.527 (score 3). The discontinuation rate of medication due to its side effects was 0 (0%) for Group 1, and 6 (10.2%) for Group 2. Intragroup changes in the scores 1-2, 1-3, and 2-3 values was statistically significant in both groups (p less than 0.001). No significant difference was found between the OABSS of these 2 drugs. However, discontinuation of drugs due to side effects was more frequent in fesoterodine.

  8. Gabapentin for overactive bladder and nocturia after anticholinergic failure

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    Yong T. Kim

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We reviewed our experience with the use of gabapentin to treat symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB and nocturia in patients who have failed conventional anticholinergic therapy. METHODS: Thirty-one patients referred to us with refractory (OAB and/or nocturia were treated with oral gabapentin. All the patients had tried or remained on antimuscarinic drugs during treatment. Twenty-four of 31 complained of bothersome symptoms during day and night and the other seven had primary complaints of nocturia. Initial gabapentin doses ranged from 100-300 mg at bedtime. Dose was slowly titrated up to 3,000 mg based on patients' symptomatology and tolerability. RESULTS:The mean age was 51 years old (range 27-78. There were 13 men and 18 women. The median steady state dose chosen by the patient after initial titration was 600 mg/day. Fourteen of 31 patients reported subjective improvement of their frequency and 8 have been on the medication for over 12 months with persistent efficacy. For the 14 improved patients, mean frequency/24 hours decreased from 14.1 ± 2.2 to10.0 + 2.1. Three patients with primary nocturia reported improvement from a mean of 4.0 ± 1.3 to 1.0 ± 0.3 episodes/night. Six patients stopped taking the drug within one month due to side effects mostly described as drowsiness or lethargy. CONCLUSION: Fourteen of 31 patients with refractory (OAB and nocturia improved with oral gabapentin. Gabapentin was generally well tolerated and can be considered in selective patients when conventional modalities have failed.

  9. Readability analysis of online health information about overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin; Shee, Kevin; Yap, Ronald L

    2017-09-01

    Despite the prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) and the widespread accessibility of patient education information on the Internet, the readability of this information and its potential impact on patient decision-making are not known. This study evaluates the readability of OAB material online in the context of website ownership and the Health on the Net standard for information reliability. Three Internet search platforms were queried daily with OAB-related keywords for 30 days. Readability analysis was performed using the SMOG test, Dale-Chall readability formula, and Fry readability graph. Websites were stratified by ownership type and Health on the Net certification to compare readability metrics. After 270 total searches, 57 websites were analyzed. Mean SMOG reading grade was 10.7 (SD = 1.6) and 10.1 in an adjusted calculation to reduce overestimation from medical jargon. Mean Dale-Chall score was 9.2 (SD = 0.9), or grade 13-15. Mean Fry graph coordinates (177 syllables, 5.9 sentences) corresponded to grade 15. Only seven sites (12%) were predicted to be readable by the average adult with an eighth-grade reading level. Mean reading grades were not significantly different between academic versus commercial sites and Health on the Net-certified versus non-certified sites. A large majority of online information about OAB treatment exceeds the reading ability of most adults. Neither websites sponsored by academic institutions nor those certified by the Health on the Net standard have easier readability. The readability of health information online may be distinct from reliability in the context of urological literacy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

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    Jundt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12% to after childbirth (21 and 28% in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women.

  11. Usage results of a mobile app for managing urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Jeff; Zhang, Amy; Li, Rui; Wang, Xiao Hui

    2015-04-01

    Slight changes in urinary incontinence severity may be difficult to notice, so that even high functioning patients are unable to detect if urinary incontinence is improving or worsening. We describe a recently released free software app, iDry®, that enables individuals with urinary incontinence to document incontinence symptoms, view progress, evaluate effectiveness of interventions and report status to their health care provider. After 2 field trials, iDry was published as a free download from the Apple® App Store and was downloaded 1,231 times in the first 19 months. iDry also collects large quantities of anonymized usage data for research purposes. Data analysis shows that long-term users had significantly more severe urinary incontinence symptoms (p ≤ 0.01) than short-term users. Short-term users reduced pad use by 20% but long-term users' pad use remaining unchanged. Average leakage was reduced 14.6 mg per day for short-term vs 4.5 mg per day for long-term users, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.93) due to high data variability (SD 611). There was no significant difference between long-term and short-term users in severity of self-reported stress and urge incontinence. Bladder training positively correlated with a reduction in pad use (p=0.03) and leakage amount (p=0.02). Overall our findings suggest that iDry is a useful, accessible and convenient tool to document urinary incontinence symptoms and improvement, but controlled studies are needed to assess its effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of fesoterodine treatment in men and women with overactive bladder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpero, Harriette; Sand, Peter K; Kelleher, Con J; Berriman, Sandra; Bavendam, Tamara; Carlsson, Martin

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of fesoterodine for men and women with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. This was a post hoc analysis of data pooled from two open-label extensions (NCT00220402, NCT00220376) of double-blind studies. All subjects began open-label treatment with fesoterodine 8 mg once daily, with voluntary dose reduction to 4 mg and re-escalation to 8 mg each permitted once annually. Maximum allowable duration of open-label treatment ranged from 24 to 36 months. Safety and discontinuations were assessed throughout treatment; subject-reported treatment tolerability and 3-day bladder diaries were evaluated at open-label baseline and months 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24. A total of 185 men and 705 women enrolled; 83 men (45%) and 356 women (50%) continued open-label treatment for ≥ 24 months. Most men (84%) and women (75%) remained on fesoterodine 8 mg throughout open-label treatment. No new or unexpected safety signals were observed. Dry mouth was the most common treatment-emergent adverse event (men, 24%; women, 32%), rates of discontinuation due to dry mouth were low (men, 1%; women, 2%). Most men and women (≥ 91%) reported at least 'good' tolerance. For men and women, statistically significant improvements in urgency urinary incontinence episodes, micturitions, urgency episodes, and mean voided volume per micturition achieved between double-blind baseline and open-label baseline were sustained or further improved through month 24; significant improvements in most OAB symptoms were observed between double-blind baseline and month 24 when subjects were stratified by double-blind treatment (placebo, tolterodine extended release 4 mg, fesoterodine 4 mg, fesoterodine 8 mg). Limitations include the lack of a placebo control and that subjects completing double-blind treatment may have been more likely to tolerate or respond to long-term fesoterodine treatment. Long-term fesoterodine treatment was well tolerated and associated with

  13. Risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Lígia da Silva; Lúcio, Adélia; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the risk factors for postpartum urinary incontinence (UI) and its characteristics. This was a case-control study with 344 puerperal women (77 cases and 267 controls) with up to 90 days postpartum. In a single session, participants were given a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical data and two others that assessed urine leakage, leakage situations, and type of UI. Stress UI was present in 45.5% of the women, incidents of urine leakage several times a day in 44.2%, of which 71.4% were in small amounts and 57.1% when coughing or sneezing. In 70.1% of cases, UI began during pregnancy and remained through the postpartum period. After running a binary logistic regression model, the following factors remained in the final model: UI during pregnancy (OR 12.82, CI 95% 6.94 - 23.81, pmodelo de regressão logística binária, apenas IU na gestação (OR 12,82, IC 95% 6,94 - 23,81, pmodelo final. A IU iniciou-se frequentemente na gestação e permaneceu no puerpério. A presença de IU na gestação, multiparidade, idade gestacional no parto maior ou igual a 37 semanas e constipação foram fatores de risco. No grupo estudado a IU de esforço foi a mais frequente.

  14. Protocol for Physiotherapy OR Tvt Randomised Efficacy Trial (PORTRET: a multicentre randomised controlled trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of the tension free vaginal tape versus pelvic floor muscle training in women with symptomatic moderate to severe stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buskens Eric

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress urinary incontinence is a common condition affecting approximately 20% of adult women causing substantial individual (quality of life and economic (119 million Euro/year spent on incontinence pads in the Netherlands burden. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT is regarded as first line treatment, but only 15-25% of women will be completely cured. Approximately 65% will report that their condition improved, but long term adherence to treatment is problematic. In addition, at longer term (2-15 years follow-up 30-50% of patients will end up having surgery. From 1996 a minimal invasive surgical procedure, the Tension-free Vaginal Tape (TVT has rapidly become the gold standard in surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. With TVT 65-95% of women are cured. However, approximately 3-6% of women will develop symptoms of an overactive bladder, resulting in reduced quality of life. Because of its efficacy the TVT appears to be preferable over PFMT but both treatments and their costs have not been compared head-to-head in a randomised clinical trial. Methods/Design A multi-centre randomised controlled trial will be performed for women between 35 - 80 years old with moderate to severe, predominantly stress, urinary incontinence, who have not received specialised PFMT or previous anti-incontinence surgery. Women will be assigned to either PFMT by a specialised physiotherapist for a standard of 9-18 session in a period of 6 months, or TVT(O surgery. The main endpoint of the study is the subjective improvement of urinary incontinence. As secondary outcome the objective cure will be assessed from history and clinical parameters. Subjective improvement in quality of life will be measured by generic (EQ-5D and disease-specific (Urinary Distress Inventory and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire quality of life instruments. The economical endpoint is short term (1 year incremental cost-effectiveness in terms of costs per additional

  15. MR imaging of pelvic floor in stress urinary incontinence=20

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    Lee, Young Rae; Park, Heung Jae; Kook, Shin Ho; Chung, Eun Chul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    To demonstrate the anatomy of the female pelvic floor and to determine the anatomic differences between normal controls and women with stress urinary incontinence, using MRI. Five healthy, young, nulliparous women and 12 with stress urinary incontinence underwent MR imaging. We obtained FSE T2-weighted axial images, 3mm thick, of the region extending from the urethroversical junction to the perineal membrane. The following parameters were determined : angle, asymmetry and signal intensity of the levator ani muscles, the distance between the urethra and symphysis, and the presence, shape and angulation of urethropelvic ligament. In contrast to normal controls, frequent findings in women with stress incontinence were as follows : increased angle (43%), asymmetry (43%) and higher signal intensity (67%) of the levator ani muscles; increased distance between the urethra and symphysis; loss (43%), discontinuity (60%) and dorsal angulation (43%) of the urethropelvic ligament. In women with stress urinary incontinence, MRI clearly demonstrates the anatomy of the female pelvic floor, changes in the levator ani muscles, the distance between the urethra and symphysis, and the urethropelvic ligament. The modality can therefore be used to evaluate the anatomical changes occurring in cases of stress urinary incontinence. (author)

  16. Studies on risk factors for urinary incontinence in Swedish female twins

    OpenAIRE

    Tettamanti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Approximately half of all women in industrialized countries will experience urinary incontinence during their lifetime. Even though urinary incontinence is not a life threatening disease, it often has severe implications for daily function, social interactions, sexuality and psychological well-being. Moreover, urinary incontinence has a major impact on health economy and is increasingly recognized as a global health burden. Hence, identifying risk factors for urinary incontinence is of import...

  17. Safety, Efficacy, and Persistence of Long-Term Mirabegron Treatment for Overactive Bladder in the Daily Clinical Setting: Interim (1-Year) Report from a Japanese Post-Marketing Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daisuke; Tabuchi, Hiromi; Uno, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    To report interim 1-year results from a 3-year surveillance study evaluating safety, efficacy, and persistence of long-term mirabegron for overactive bladder (OAB). Patients starting treatment with mirabegron for urinary urgency, daytime frequency, and urgency incontinence associated with OAB were registered and followed up for 3 years. Data were collected on adverse drug reactions (ADR), changes in OAB symptoms, changes in Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), and treatment discontinuations. Treatment persistence rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Eighty-one ADR were observed in 72/1139 patients (6.3%) through 1 year of mirabegron treatment, with the incidence highest during the first month. No significant change in residual urine volume was observed at any observation point up to 1 year of mirabegron treatment. Mirabegron was deemed "effective" in 883/1091 patients (80.9%) at 1 year/discontinuation. Total OABSS was decreased with statistical significance at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year, or at discontinuation (P < 0.001 at each time point). Kaplan-Meier treatment persistence rates were 84.8% at 3 months, 77.6% at 6 months, and 66.0% at 1 year. Treatment persistence rates were similar for male and female patients but significantly higher for patients aged ≥65 years (67.3%; n = 908) compared with those aged <65 years (59.8%; n = 231; log-rank test: P = 0.032). Long-term OAB treatment with mirabegron was well-tolerated, with effectiveness maintained through 1 year. Mirabegron treatment persistence was higher than has been previously reported, and was greater in patients aged ≥65 years compared with those aged <65 years. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Relationship between overactive bladder and irritable bowel syndrome: a large-scale internet survey in Japan using the overactive bladder symptom score and Rome III criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Seiji; Hashizume, Kazumi; Wada, Naoki; Hori, Jyunichi; Tamaki, Gaku; Kita, Masafumi; Iwata, Tatsuya; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2013-04-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: There is known to be an association between overactive bladder (OAB) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The study investigates the association between OAB and IBS using an internet-based survey in Japan. It is the first to investigate the prevalence and severity of OAB in the general population using the OAB symptom score questionnaire. To investigate the association between overactive bladder (OAB) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by using an internet-based survey in Japan. Questionnaires were sent via the internet to Japanese adults. The overactive bladder symptom score was used for screening OAB, and the Japanese version of the Rome III criteria for the diagnosis of IBS was used for screening this syndrome. The overall prevalence of OAB and IBS was 9.3% and 21.2%, respectively. Among the subjects with OAB, 33.3% had concurrent IBS. The prevalence of OAB among men was 9.7% and among women it was 8.9%, while 18.6% of men and 23.9% of women had IBS. Concurrent IBS was noted in 32.0% of men and 34.8% of women with OAB. Taking into account a high rate of concurrent IBS in patients with OAB, it seems to be important for physicians to assess the defaecation habits of patients when diagnosing and treating OAB. © 2012 The Authors. BJU International © 2012 BJU International.

  19. Application of tissue engineering in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiao-fei; FU Qiang; XU Yue-min

    2009-01-01

    @@ Stress urinary incontinence is one of the most common diseases in urology. The main treatments for stress urinary incontinence are pharmacotherapy, physico-behavioral therapy and surgery.1 However, the results of present methods are not satisfactory. Tissue engineering is a newly emerging technology that may provide a novel method for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.2

  20. Prevalence of double incontinence, risks and influence on quality of life in a general female population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slieker-ten Hove, M.C.; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Eijkemans, M.J.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.; Burger, C.W.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) and anal incontinence (AI) are complaints with impact on quality of life (QOL). Few data are available on prevalence of double incontinence (DI) in the general female population. OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence of UI, AI, and DI, their associations with age,

  1. [Overactive muscles: it can be more serious than common myalgia or cramp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.P.F.; Snoeck, M.M.; Voermans, N.C.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Positive muscle phenomena are due to muscle overactivity. Examples are cramp, myalgia, and stiffness. These manifestations have mostly acquired causes, e.g. side-effects of medication, metabolic disorders, vitamin deficiency, excessive caffeine intake or neurogenic disorders. We report on three

  2. Long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of fesoterodine treatment in subjects with overactive bladder symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerrebroeck, P.E.V.A. van; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Berriman, S.; Padmanabhan Aiyer, L.; Carlsson, M.; Guan, Z.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of fesoterodine treatment in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. METHODS: This was an open-label extension study of a 12-week, double-blind fesoterodine study. During open-label treatment, all

  3. Association of Urinary Urgency and Delay Time of Micturition in Women With Overactive Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung Kgi; Huh, Jung Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Accurately measuring urinary urgency is important for diagnosing overactive bladder (OAB) and quantifying improvements in treatment outcome. Various methods have been recommended for evaluating urinary urgency, but these methods assess individual perceptions and preferences. To overcome the subjectivity in measuring urinary urgency, we evaluated the relationship between uroflowmetric parameters and urinary urgency in women with OAB. Methods Consecutive female patients with lower urina...

  4. Predictive factors for overactive bladder symptoms after pelvic organ prolapse surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, T.A. de; Kluivers, K.B.; Withagen, M.I.J.; Milani, A.L.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: This study focussed on the factors which predict the presence of symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP). METHODS: Consecutive women who underwent POP surgery with or without the use of vaginal mesh materials in the years 2004-2

  5. Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of Solifenacin in Children and Adolescents with Overactive Bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newgreen, Donald; Bosman, Brigitte; Hollestein-Havelaar, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term safety and efficacy of once-daily oral solifenacin suspension in children (aged 5-<12 years) and adolescents (aged 12-<18 years) with overactive bladder. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 40-week, open-label extension of a 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. OUTCOM...

  6. Lumbosacral spinal segmental contributions to tibial and pudendal neuromodulation of bladder overactivity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Utsav; Fuller, Thomas W; Jiang, Xuewen; Bandari, Jathin; Zhang, Zhaocun; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-08-01

    To determine the spinal segmental afferent contributions to tibial and pudendal inhibition of bladder overactivity. Intravesical infusion of 0.5% acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder and induce bladder overactivity in anesthetized cats. Tibial or pudendal nerve stimulation was used to suppress the bladder overactivity and increase bladder capacity during cystometry. L5-S3 dorsal roots ipsilateral to the stimulation were exposed by a laminectomy and transected sequentially during the experiments to determine the role of individual dorsal roots in tibial or pudendal neuromodulation. Transection of L5 dorsal root had no effect. Transection of L6 dorsal root in four cats produced an average 18% reduction in tibial inhibition, which is not a significant change when averaged in the group of 10 cats. Transection of L7 dorsal root completely removed the tibial inhibition without changing reflex bladder activity or pudendal inhibition. Transection of S1 dorsal root reduced the pudendal inhibition, after which transection of S2 dorsal root completely removed the pudendal inhibition. Transection of S3 dorsal root had no effect. The control bladder capacity was increased only by transection of S2 dorsal root. This study in cats revealed that tibial and pudendal neuromodulation of reflex bladder overactivity depends on activation of primary afferent pathways that project into different spinal segments. This difference may be related to the recent observation in cats that the two types of neuromodulation have different mechanisms of action. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Overactive bladder: Is there a link to the metabolic syndrome in men?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirby, M.G.; Wagg, A.; Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C.; Castro-Diaz, D.; Ridder, D. de; Espuna-Pons, M.; Haab, F.; Kelleher, C.; Kolbl, H.; Milsom, I.; Kerrebroeck, P. van; Vierhout, M.E.; Salvatore, S.; Tubaro, A.

    2010-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that a variety of metabolic, cardiovascular, and endocrine factors contribute to male pelvic health. In particular, a growing body of evidence suggests a relationship between lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia, overactive bladder, erectile dy

  8. PHYSICAL TREATMENT OF THE STRESS URINARY INCONTINENCE IN WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jugoslav Stojiljković

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents various methods of the physical treatment used in healing women with the stress urinary incontinence. It is emphasized that the exercises for strengthening the pelvic floor are effective in curing the stress incontinence but the most efficient exercise program has not been determined yet. Likewise, it is pointed out that the biofeedback application, along with the exercise, is no more efficient than the application of the exercises only but, still, much better results are achieved by applying the biofeedback at the beginning of the treatment. In order to evaluate the effects of the vaginal coni, electric and magnetic simulations in treating women with the stress urinary incontinence further explorations are necessary.

  9. Psychocultural meanings of urinary incontinence in women: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Rosângela; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Mores; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify and analyze studies in health literature about the psychocultural meanings reported by women who experience urinary incontinence (UI). A bibliographical search was executed in the following databases: Lilacs, Medline, Pubmed and Medscape. The present review showed that studies note several meanings. The articles were grouped in three categories defined as significant: according to age experiences, cultural-religious experiences and experiences in self-care. The studies revealed that the degree of anguish and the range of the difficulties experienced are related both with age, ethnic group or religion and with the perception each individual has of her incontinence, which will lead to different levels of emotional disorders and to seeking (or not seeking) treatment. Besides, barriers regarding self-care are perceived. It is concluded that the UI may cause suffering and incontinent women have difficulties to deal with this problem.

  10. The UCLA surgical approach to sphincteric incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, E S; Ginsberg, D A; Raz, S

    1997-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the female may be treated by a variety of non-surgical and surgical therapies. However, once the patient has chosen to undergo operative repair the ideal procedure is based on three considerations: the degree of anterior vaginal wall prolapse, the degree of incontinence and associated anatomic abnormalities requiring surgical repair. In the vast majority of cases vaginal wall sling is our procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of SUI in the female. Vaginal wall sling is based on sound anatomic principles, may be performed as an outpatient procedure and is equally efficacious for the treatment of SUI due to anatomic incontinence (urethral hypermobility) and intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Since vaginal wall sling is performed through a transvaginal approach, other associated manifestations of pelvic floor prolapse such as rectocele can be addressed and repaired simultaneously. When necessary the vaginal wall sling can be easily modified to repair large grade cystoceles.

  11. Flexible-dose fesoterodine in elderly adults with overactive bladder: results of the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of fesoterodine in an aging population trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagg, Adrian; Khullar, Vik; Marschall-Kehrel, Daniela; Michel, Martin C; Oelke, Matthias; Darekar, Amanda; Bitoun, Caty E; Weinstein, David; Osterloh, Ian

    2013-02-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of flexible-dose fesoterodine in elderly adults with overactive bladder (OAB). Twelve-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-one outpatient clinics in Europe, Israel, and Turkey. Seven hundred ninety-four individuals aged 65 and older (47% male) with OAB symptoms for 3 months or longer, mean of eight or more micturitions and three or more urgency episodes per 24 hours, at least some moderate problems on Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 20 or greater. Participants were randomized to fesoterodine or placebo for 12 weeks, with stratification according to age (>75 vs ≤ 75) and dosing time (morning vs evening). Participants receiving fesoterodine started on 4 mg and could increase to 8 mg at week 4 or 8 and de-escalate to 4 mg at week 8 (sham escalation for placebo). Changes from baseline in bladder-diary variables (primary endpoint, urgency episodes) and patient-reported outcomes including OAB Questionnaire, Treatment Benefit Scale (TBS), PPBC, Urgency Perception Scale (UPS), and OAB Satisfaction Questionnaire (OAB-S); all observed or reported adverse events. By week 8, 64% of fesoterodine-treated and 71% of placebo-treated participants opted for dose escalation. At week 12, the fesoterodine group had statistically significantly greater improvement than the placebo group in urgency episodes, micturitions, nocturnal micturitions, incontinence pad use, and OAB Questionnaire scores but not urgency urinary incontinence episodes. Responder rates on TBS, PPBC, UPS, and OAB-S were statistically significantly higher with fesoterodine. Improvements in most diary variables and participant-reported outcomes were greater with fesoterodine than placebo in participants in both age groups and when administered in the morning and evening. Rates of dry mouth and constipation were 34% and 9% with fesoterodine and 5% and 3% with placebo, respectively. Rates of

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antimuscarinics in the treatment of patients with overactive bladder in Spain: A decision-tree model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Fesoterodine, a new once daily antimuscarinic, has proven to be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated treatment in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). To date, no analysis has evaluated the economic costs and benefits associated with fesoterodine, compared to antimuscarinics in Spain. The purpose of this analysis was to assess the economic value of OAB treatment with fesoterodine relative to extended release tolterodine and solifenacin, from the societal perspective. Methods The economic model was based on data from two 12-week, randomized, double-blind, and multicenter trials comparing fesoterodine and tolterodine extended released (ER). Treatment response rates for solifenacin were extracted from the published literature. Discontinuation and efficacy were based on the results of a 12-week multinational randomized clinical trial extrapolated to 52 weeks. Changes in health related quality of life were assessed with the King's Health Questionnaire, which was transformed into preference-based utility values. Medical costs included (expressed in € 2010) were antimuscarinics, physician visits, laboratory tests, incontinence pads and the costs of OAB-related comorbidities, fractures, skin infections, urinary tract infections, depression, and nursing home admissions associated with incontinence. Time lost from work was also considered. Univariate sensitivity analyses were also performed. Results At week 12, continents accounted for 50.6%, 40.6% and 47.2% of patients in the fesoterodine, tolterodine, and solifenacin groups, respectively. By week 52, the projected proportions of patients remaining on therapy were 33.1%, 26.5% and 30.8%, respectively. The projected quality- adjusted life years (QALY) gain (compared to baseline) over the 52-week simulation period were 0.01014, 0.00846 and 0.00957, respectively. The overall treatment cost was estimated at €1,937, €2,089 and €1,960 for fesoterodine, tolterodine and solifenacin, respectively. Therefore

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antimuscarinics in the treatment of patients with overactive bladder in Spain: A decision-tree model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trocio Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fesoterodine, a new once daily antimuscarinic, has proven to be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated treatment in patients with overactive bladder (OAB. To date, no analysis has evaluated the economic costs and benefits associated with fesoterodine, compared to antimuscarinics in Spain. The purpose of this analysis was to assess the economic value of OAB treatment with fesoterodine relative to extended release tolterodine and solifenacin, from the societal perspective. Methods The economic model was based on data from two 12-week, randomized, double-blind, and multicenter trials comparing fesoterodine and tolterodine extended released (ER. Treatment response rates for solifenacin were extracted from the published literature. Discontinuation and efficacy were based on the results of a 12-week multinational randomized clinical trial extrapolated to 52 weeks. Changes in health related quality of life were assessed with the King's Health Questionnaire, which was transformed into preference-based utility values. Medical costs included (expressed in € 2010 were antimuscarinics, physician visits, laboratory tests, incontinence pads and the costs of OAB-related comorbidities, fractures, skin infections, urinary tract infections, depression, and nursing home admissions associated with incontinence. Time lost from work was also considered. Univariate sensitivity analyses were also performed. Results At week 12, continents accounted for 50.6%, 40.6% and 47.2% of patients in the fesoterodine, tolterodine, and solifenacin groups, respectively. By week 52, the projected proportions of patients remaining on therapy were 33.1%, 26.5% and 30.8%, respectively. The projected quality- adjusted life years (QALY gain (compared to baseline over the 52-week simulation period were 0.01014, 0.00846 and 0.00957, respectively. The overall treatment cost was estimated at €1,937, €2,089 and €1,960 for fesoterodine, tolterodine and solifenacin

  14. Avaliação da qualidade de vida e da perda urinária de mulheres com bexiga hiperativa tratadas com eletroestimulação transvaginal ou do nervo tibial Evaluation of quality of life and loss urine of women with overactive bladder treated with intravaginal or tibial nerve electro stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra de Menezes Franco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um ensaio clínico prospectivo comparativo que objetivou comparar os efeitos do tratamento com eletroestimulação transvaginal (ET e do nervo tibial (ENT sobre a qualidade de vida (QV e queixas de perda urinária em mulheres com bexiga hiperativa. Participaram 42 pacientes com bexiga hiperativa ou incontinência urinária (IU mista e foram divididas para tratamento com ET ou ENT. A QV foi avaliada pelo questionário de QV genérico, o Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 e um questionário específico para IU, o Incontinence Quality of Life Instrument (I-QOL. Os relatos de perdas urinárias e incômodos ocasionados foram avaliados, respectivamente, por meio do diário miccional de 24 horas e Escala Visual Analógica (EVA. O tratamento foi realizado uma vez por semana, totalizando doze semanas. O grupo da ENT teve melhora significativa em três domínios do I-QOL, na EVA, que avaliou o grau de incômodo causado pela IU e em quatro aspectos do diário miccional. No grupo de ET houve melhora significativa de dois domínios do SF-36, três domínios do I-QOL, na EVA e em quatro aspectos do diário. Houve melhora da QV em ambos os grupos, assim como uma diminuição das queixas de perda urinária, entretanto, o grupo que recebeu ET obteve melhora nos escores em dois domínios do questionário de QV genérico após o tratamento, que teve limitação por aspectos físicos e limitação por aspectos emocionais. O que não ocorreu com o grupo de ENT.This is a prospective comparative clinical study. This study aimed to compare the effects of intravaginal electrical stimulation therapy (IS and the tibial nerve (TNS on quality of life (QOL and complaints of urinary incontinence in women with overactive bladder. Participants 42 patients with overactive bladder or urinary incontinence (UI mix and were divided for treatment with IS or TNS. To assess QOL we used a generic QOL questionnaire, the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 and

  15. [Update on current care guidelines: urinary incontinence (female)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Female urinary incontinence (UI) is divided into stress (SUI), urgency (UUI), mixed (MUI) and overflow incontinence (chronic retention). Advanced age, obesity and pregnancy are the most important risk factors. Standardised questionnaires are used in diagnosis. The pad test, cough stress test and bladder diary are objective tools. A gynaecological examination includes pelvic floor muscle palpation and residual urine measurement. Urodynamics, cystoscopy and ultrasonography are complementary tools. Guided pelvic floor-muscle training is the first-line therapy. UUI can be treated with anticholinergic medicines. If conservative treatments are ineffective, SUI and MUI can be treated surgically with mid-urethral slings (TVT TOT and TVT-0).

  16. Reusables get high marks in adult incontinence care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison-Rossman, J

    1992-11-01

    The adult incontinence care market is coming of age. As environmental concerns gradually erode the popularity of disposables, nursing homes and hospitals are looking at reusables in a new light. In addition, the aging of the U.S. population is expected to increase the demand for incontinence care products. A recent study found that the sales of reusable cloth diapers and pads accounted for $385 million annually. All of these factors add up to a lucrative market for textile rental companies that can supply these products.

  17. Complete pelvic floor repair in treating fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patrick Y H; Steele, Scott R

    2005-02-01

    Fecal incontinence is associated with 20 to 40% of the patients with pelvic floor prolapse. Successful management of fecal incontinence requires not only an understanding of anorectal function but also a thorough understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and how pelvic floor prolapse affects fecal continence. Imaging techniques have been instrumental in visualizing pelvic floor prolapse and have helped correlate surgical findings. Stabilization of the perineal body appears to be a key component to the success of pelvic floor repair and fecal continence, but the optimal repair is far from being established.

  18. The patient perspective on overactive bladder: a mixed-methods needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipetto, Frank A; Fulda, Kimberly G; Holthusen, Amy E; McKeithen, Thomas M; McFadden, Pam

    2014-05-14

    While overactive bladder is often managed in the primary care setting, a number of barriers including embarrassment, poor communication, and low patient adherence contribute to the under-treatment of patients with burdensome urinary symptoms. In order to address these challenges, it is crucial to have a fundamental understanding of patient perspectives toward OAB and urinary symptoms. To meet this aim, researchers designed and conducted a study to identify patients' knowledge, experiences and attitudes, barriers to treatment adherence, and desires and tendencies regarding patient/clinician communications. A mixed-methods qualitative/quantitative needs assessment of patients with overactive bladder and/or urinary symptoms. Researchers conducted in-depth qualitative interviews via telephone with 40 patients. Interview results informed the design and dissemination of a quantitative survey, which was completed by 200 self-selected respondents who had previously identified themselves as having overactive bladder or bladder problems. Statistical and qualitative analysis of results were conducted. Among survey respondents, an average of 3.5 years elapsed between symptom onset and seeking diagnosis by a physician. In the long term most patients do not experience improvement in symptoms. Medication non-adherence is common and is related to therapy effectiveness and adverse effects. Patients clearly indicate that communication and patient/physician relationships are important to them and they would prefer the clinician initiate the conversation on overactive bladder. Patient experiences, perspectives, and attitudes toward their bladder symptoms differ in many ways from clinicians' assumptions. The significant time gap between symptom onset and diagnosis indicates ongoing need for screening and diagnosis of overactive bladder. Contrary to guideline recommendations, urinalysis and physical examination are not widely used in clinical practice. Many patients experience no

  19. 膀胱过度活动症患者症状发作的环境诱因%Environmental Provocative Factors of Onset of Symptoms in Patients with Overactive Bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜丽媚; 蔡雪跃

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨膀胱过度活动症(overactive bladder ,OAB)患者症状发作时的环境诱因。方法便利抽取2013年1月至2014年3月在温州医科大学附属第二医院门诊诊治的76例O AB患者为研究对象,应用自行设计的半结构式问卷调查该组患者发生尿急和尿失禁时的环境诱因,并量化每个患者面对某个诱因时OAB发作的频率(很少=1,有时=2,经常=3,通常=4,总是=5)。结果所有患者(100%)均报告至少1个因素与尿急相关,921.%的患者(n=70)报告至少1个因素与尿失禁相关;尿急或尿失禁关系最为密切的环境因素有去洗手间的路上、早晨醒来、外出回家开门时、感觉到寒冷时、由卧位站起、看见自来水、想到要去洗手间和因其他原因(除小便)在洗手间时。结论几乎所有的OAB患者均存在某一环境诱因能够诱发尿急或尿失禁发作,条件反射可能与症状发作有关。%Objective To explore the environmental provocative factors for onset of symptoms in patients with overactive bladder (OAB) .Methods By convenience sampling ,76 cases of OAB patients were selected and investigated by using self-designed semi-structured questionnaire of the provocative factors of urinary urgency and incontinence .The frequency of OAB was quantified in each patients (rarely=1 ,sometimes=2 , frequently=3 ,often=4 ,always=5) .Results All 100% of patients reported at least one factor associated with urinary urgency ,92 1.% (n=70) reported at least one factor associated with urinary incontinence .The several environmental factors most closely associated with urinary urgency or incontinence were on the way to the bathroom ,waking up in the morning ,opening the front door ,feeling the cold weather ,standing up from the supine ,seeing running water ,thinking of going to the bathroom ,in the bathroom for another rea-son besides urinating .Conclusion Almost all OAB patients have

  20. Comparison of fesoterodine and tolterodine extended release for the treatment of overactive bladder: a head-to-head placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschorn, Sender; Swift, Steven; Guan, Zhonghong; Carlsson, Martin; Morrow, Jon D; Brodsky, Marina; Gong, Jason

    2010-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and tolerability of fesoterodine 8 mg with tolterodine extended-release (ER) 4 mg and placebo in a randomized clinical trial of patients with an overactive bladder (OAB). In this 12-week double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, eligible patients reported OAB symptoms for > or = 3 months and recorded > or = 8 voids and > or = 1 urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episode per 24 h in 3-day bladder diaries at baseline. Patients were randomized in a 2:2:1 ratio to fesoterodine (4 mg for 1 week then 8 mg for 11 weeks); tolterodine ER 4 mg; or placebo (with sham dose escalation for tolterodine ER and placebo). Endpoints were changes from baseline to week 12 in UUI episodes (primary endpoint), total and nocturnal voids, urgency episodes, severe urgency episodes, and frequency-urgency sum per 24 h; mean voided volume per void (MVV); and the OAB questionnaire (OAB-q), Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC), and Urgency Perception Scale (UPS). Safety and tolerability were assessed and summarized over the 12-week study period. Fesoterodine (636 patients) significantly improved UUI episodes at week 12 (primary endpoint) compared with tolterodine ER (641 patients; P = 0.017) and placebo (313 patients; P Fesoterodine also produced significantly greater improvements than tolterodine ER in MVV (P = 0.005). Fesoterodine significantly improved all diary endpoints compared with placebo (P fesoterodine (64%) than with tolterodine ER (57%; P = 0.015) and placebo (45%; P fesoterodine than placebo (all P fesoterodine group, 16% and 4% in the tolterodine ER group, and 6% and 3% with placebo, respectively. Discontinuations due to treatment-emergent adverse events were 6%, 4% and 2% in the fesoterodine, tolterodine ER, and placebo groups, respectively. In patients with OAB, fesoterodine 8 mg showed superior efficacy over tolterodine ER 4 mg and placebo in reducing UUI episodes (primary endpoint) and in improving most patient

  1. Effect of fesoterodine 4 mg on bladder diary and patient-reported outcomes during the first week of treatment in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcos, Jacques; Angulo, Javier C; Garely, Alan D; Carlsson, Martin; Gong, Jason; Guan, Zhonghong

    2011-05-01

    To assess the onset of efficacy of fesoterodine 4 mg versus placebo in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. Subjects who reported OAB symptoms for ≥ 3 months and recorded ≥ 8 micturitions and ≥ 1 urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episode per 24 hours in 3-day baseline diaries were randomized to fesoterodine 4 mg, tolterodine extended release (ER) 4 mg, or placebo. This is an analysis of first week data from a 12-week, double-blind trial. ClinicalTrials.gov unique ID: NCT00444925. Baseline to week 1 changes in 3-day bladder diary variables, Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC), and Urgency Perception Scale (UPS) scores reported by subjects receiving fesoterodine 4 mg or placebo. By week 1, fesoterodine 4 mg (n = 679) was associated with significantly greater improvements compared with placebo (n = 334) in micturitions, urgency, severe urgency and UUI episodes, frequency-urgency sum, and MVV per 24 hours and 3-day diary-dry rate (all p fesoterodine 4 mg versus placebo (p = 0.0143); changes in UPS scores were not significantly different (p = 0.077). The results provide evidence that patients receiving fesoterodine 4 mg for their OAB symptoms may expect to experience a response as early as 1 week after initiating treatment. One limitation is that, although 65% of subjects had received treatment with antimuscarinics before the study, whether subjects were dissatisfied with previous treatment and reasons for dissatisfaction were not collected. This might affect the magnitude of outcome improvements. Also, it is not known whether the UPS is sensitive enough to detect treatment differences as early as week 1.

  2. Incontinência do choro e infarto protuberancial unilateral Incontinence of crying and unilateral pontine infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo trata do caso de um paciente que apresentou incontinência do choro e hemiplegia direita por infarto ventroprotuberancial paramediano detectado pela RNM. O caráter circunscrito da lesão foi endossado pela normalidade dos potenciais evocados sômato-sensitivos e auditivos de curta-latência. Os episódios de choro desapareceram poucos dias depois do início do tratamento com doses baixas de imipramina. Discutimos o choro e riso patológicos como forma de incontinência da mímica resultante de desconexão límbico-motora, enfatizando a impropriedade de incluí-los na síndrome pseudobulbar, uma vez que dependem de correlatos anatômicos e funcionais distintos.A 64-year-old man presented with pathologic crying and right hemiplegia due to a unilateral pontine infarct from probable branch disease of the basilar artery. The circumscribed nature of the lesion was supported by MRI and short-latency evoked potentials. The weeping spells ceased after a few days of imipramine in low doses. Pathologic laughing and crying can be viewed as a limbic-motor disconnection syndrome, in which the faciovocal motor system is released from forebrain afferents carrying information of emotional content. The inclusion of pathologic laughing and crying in the syndrome pseudobulbar palsy is inaccurate and misleading, since each is related to distinct functional and anatomic systems intrinsic to the human brainstem.

  3. Urodynamics in women from menopause to oldest age: what motive? what diagnosis?

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    Françoise A. Valentini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze age-associated changes as a motive for urodynamics and urodynamic diagnosis in community-dwelling menopausal women and to discuss the role of menopause and ageing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hundred and forty nine consecutive menopausal women referred for urodynamic evaluation of lower urinary tract (LUT symptoms, met the inclusion criteria and were stratified into 3 age groups: 55-64 years (A, 65-74 years (B, and 75-93 years (C. Comprehensive assessment included previous medical history and clinical examination. Studied items were motive for urodynamics, results of uroflows (free flow and intubated flow and cystometry, urethral pressure profilometry, and final urodynamic diagnosis. RESULTS: The main motive was incontinence (66.3% with significant increase of mixed incontinence in group C (p = 0.028. Detrusor function significantly deteriorated in the oldest group, mainly in absence of neurological disease (overactivity p = 0.019; impaired contractility p = 0.028. In the entire population, underactivity predominated in group C (p = 0.0024. A progressive decrease of maximum urethral closure pressure occurred with ageing. In subjects with no detrusor overactivity there was a decrease with age of detrusor pressure at opening and at maximum flow, and of maximum flow while post void residual increased only in the C group. CONCLUSION: In our population of community-dwelling menopausal women, incontinence was the main motive for urodynamics increasing with ageing. A brisk change in LUT function of women older than 75 years underlined deterioration in bladder function with a high incidence of detrusor hyperactivity with or without impaired contractility while change in urethral function was progressive. Effect of ageing appears to be predominant compared to menopause.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for urinary and fecal incontinence four months after vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydock, Sandra A; Flood, Catherine; Schulz, Jane A; MacDonald, Dianna; Esau, Deborah; Jones, Sandra; Hiltz, Craig B

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for urinary and fecal incontinence four months after vaginal delivery. All patients who had vaginal deliveries at a tertiary care hospital over a three-month period were approached during their postpartum hospital stay regarding participation in the study. Participants underwent a telephone interview at four months after their delivery to determine the presence and type of any incontinence. Of 632 patients, 145 (23%) had stress incontinence, 77 (12%) had urge incontinence, 181 (29%) had any urinary incontinence and 23 (4%) had fecal incontinence. In univariate analysis, stress incontinence was found to be increased in patients>or=30 years of age (26.2%) compared with patientsor=30 years (34.1%) compared to or=30 years (P<0.01) and forceps delivery (P<0.01). There were no identified risk factors for fecal incontinence. Urinary incontinence is common in women at four months post partum. Fecal incontinence is less common. Maternal age and forceps assisted delivery were risk factors for urinary incontinence.

  5. The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in women studying nursing and related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Józef; Czerwińska-Opara, Wioletta Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Urinary incontinence is a growing problem that affects millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women studying nursing. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing urinary incontinence, severity of symptoms and quality of life. Short forms to assess symptoms of distress for urinary incontinence and quality of life: UDI-6 and IIQ-7 have been used. The study's conclusions are as follows: 1) among the 113 interviewed women, stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was observed in 25% of respondents; this prevalence is similar to the age-matched population; 2) among the triggering factors mentioned in stress urinary incontinence the most frequent were: coughing, laughing and sneezing; 3) moderate impact of incontinence on quality of life has been shown, but this effect was not statistically significant.

  6. Urinary incontinence and overactive bladder in patients attending the family practice physicians office: a pan-Slovenian cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey

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    Igor But

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: Both, UI and OAB represent a significant problem among patients attending the family practice physician office. It seems that the knowledge of both dysfunctions is satisfactory among physicians. The majority of patients would tell their doctors about UI and OAB and would also receive appropriate instructions regarding the bladder training and PFMT, both methods being very important for the prevention and treatment of these dysfunctions.

  7. Skin vasomotor hemiparesis followed by overactivity: characteristic thermography findings in a patient with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We present a 21-year-old female with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction. In this patient, infrared thermography revealed a hemibody skin temperature increase followed by excessive focal decreases, indicating skin vasomotor hemiparesis and overactivity.

  8. [Urinary incontinence: neither men nor women should be forgotten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaunin-Stalder, N.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women, but up to 40% of elderly men suffer from it. It is very important for care givers to search actively for this problem, because only half of the patients, mostly men, will seek help specifically for this symptom. The patients, who do not ask

  9. Urinary incontinence in persons with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gontard, A. von; Didden, H.C.M.; Sinnema, M.; Curfs, L.M.G

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess and identify the frequency and type of urinary incontinence (UI), as well as associated symptoms in persons with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). PWS is characterized by mental retardation, short stature, obesity and hypogonadism. The behavioural phenotype includes eating problems,

  10. Transanal irrigation is effective in functional fecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Cecilie Siggaard; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Modin, Line

    2017-01-01

    and 35% (n = 25) were titrated to daily sessions. Of the 63 children who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of constipation, 46 (73%) showed full response with complete remission of incontinence episodes. Eleven (17%) showed partial response (≥50% reduction). Of nine children with FNRFI, four (44%) showed...

  11. The meanings of silence in Brazilian women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Rosângela; Chvatal, Vera Lucia Soares; de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    We explored the meanings of silence for Brazilian women with urinary incontinence (UI). The sample consisted of 8 women, aged 30 to 45 years. Respondents worked as housekeepers or cleaning staff and were from lower social, economic, and educational strata. Their years of formal education varied from 0 to 8 years and they earned up to 4.5 times the Brazilian minimum wage, which is equivalent to US$900. A qualitative method using semistructured interviews was employed to gather data. Individual semistructured interviews were recorded and subsequently transcribed, including researchers' observations of subjects' nonverbal behaviors. The interviews began with the question: "Can you tell me about your experience with urinary incontinence?" Data were analyzed using a content analysis technique. Respondents avoided discussing UI and initially resisted labeling themselves as incontinent, but their nonverbal behaviors provided clues to the psychosocial distress caused by urinary leakage. Results suggest that respondents' underprivileged social, economic, and cultural situation may aggravate their limitations when expressing their feelings. We found that the women employed silence as a means to contain the psychosocial distress created by their UI, and that the silence itself should be interpreted as an expression of distress associated with UI. The silence of Brazilian women with UI is an essential element of communication about incontinence. We believe that the silence used by these women expresses the pain and anxiety they experienced, and it acts as an adaptive psychosocial mechanism.

  12. [Therapy of urine incontinence by electro-stimulation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, W; Schwock, G; Festge, O A; Estel, S

    1982-01-01

    The most common cause of urine incontinence in childhood is a neurogenic disturbed micturition in cases of myelo-dysplasia. Of decisive significance for the diagnosis and choice of therapy are urodynamic examinations. A report is given on the effectiveness of the author's own examinations using transurethral electro-stimulation.

  13. Cystitis as a correlate of female urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommsen, S.; Foldspang, Anders; Elving, Lisbeth Bach

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the research were to study the association between prevalent urge and stress urinary incontinence (UI) and a history of cystitis in adult females. A cross-section of the adult female population, aged 30–59 years, in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark, was studied, using self-re...

  14. High-resolution endovaginal MR imaging in stress urinary incontinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Johan S. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rociu, Elena [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bosch, J.L.H. Ruud [Department of Urology, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Messelink, Embert J. [Department of Urology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Urology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, 1091 HA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der [Department of Radiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, 1091 HA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groenendijk, Annette G. [Department of Gynecology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, 1091 HA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eijkemans, Marinus J.C. [Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2003-08-01

    The causes of stress urinary incontinence are not completely known. Recent papers have stressed the importance of more anatomical information, which may help to elucidate the mechanism of stress urinary incontinence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of lesions of the urethral support mechanism and lesions (defects and scars, thinning) of levator ani muscle with endovaginal MRI in a case-control study. Forty women (median age 52 years, age range 40-65 years) - 20 patients with stress urinary incontinence (cases) and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers (controls) - underwent endovaginal MRI: axial, coronal, and sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin echo. The examinations were evaluated for the presence of lesions of urethral supporting structures and levator ani and scar tissue of the levator ani. The thickness of the levator ani muscle was measured. Lesions of the urethral support system and levator ani were significantly more prevalent in cases than in controls (p<0.01). Median levator ani thickness in patients was significantly lower than in healthy controls [2.5 mm (range 0.9-4.1 mm) vs 3.9 mm (range 1.4-7 mm)] (p<0.01). This study indicates a relationship between stress urine incontinence and the presence of lesions of the urethral support and levator ani and levator ani thinning. (orig.)

  15. ProACT for stress urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Lampe, M.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stress urinary incontinence is a bothersome complication of radical prostatectomy. Surgical treatment consists of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), the male sling and bulk injections. This study presents the results of the first series of implantations of ProACT in the Netherland

  16. [Urinary incontinence: neither men nor women should be forgotten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaunin-Stalder, N.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women, but up to 40% of elderly men suffer from it. It is very important for care givers to search actively for this problem, because only half of the patients, mostly men, will seek help specifically for this symptom. The patients, who do not ask

  17. Treatment seeking behavior for urinary incontinence among north Indian women

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    Kumari Santosh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary incontinence is a common but neglected problem of women. Aims: To ascertain the treatment seeking behavior of north Indian women having urinary incontinence (UI. Setting: Two residential colonies of Chandigarh. DESIGN: Cross-sectional face-to-face interview based study. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted by a trained nurse during April 2005-July 2005 among women aged 18 years and above. Women with UI were identified in a screening survey. They were interviewed individually regarding their treatment seeking behavior and socio-demographic data. Statistical Analysis Used: Percentage, mean, standard deviation, chi-square test. Results: Of the 220 enlisted incontinent women 20% (44 women consulted some health agency. Only 8.6% (19 women had heard about pelvic floor muscle exercises. Seventy-two percent (158 cases had UI for more than one year. The most common reason quoted for not seeking treatment was, ′UI was considered as ′normal′, ′did not take it seriously′ and ′shyness.′ Many (153;70% women reported that UI affected their daily routine as well as social activities like shopping and visiting friends. Conclusion: Urinary incontinence seriously affected the quality of life of women. Still, consultation rate for UI was low in the north Indian women.

  18. Electrokinetic profiles of nonowoven cotton for absorbent incontinence material

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses recent work on cotton/synthetic nonwovens, their electrokinetic analysis, and their potential use in incontinence materials. Electrokinetic analysis is useful in exploring fiber surface polarity properties, and it is a useful tool to render a snap shot of the role of fiber char...

  19. Urinary incontinence in persons with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gontard, A. von; Didden, H.C.M.; Sinnema, M.; Curfs, L.M.G

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess and identify the frequency and type of urinary incontinence (UI), as well as associated symptoms in persons with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). PWS is characterized by mental retardation, short stature, obesity and hypogonadism. The behavioural phenotype includes eating problems, t

  20. ProACT for stress urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Lampe, M.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stress urinary incontinence is a bothersome complication of radical prostatectomy. Surgical treatment consists of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), the male sling and bulk injections. This study presents the results of the first series of implantations of ProACT in the Netherland