WorldWideScience

Sample records for deterministic effects propagation

  1. Deterministic simulation of UWB indoor propagation channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yang; Zhang Naitong; Zhang Qinyu; Zhang Zhongzhao

    2008-01-01

    A site-specific model of UWB pulse propagation in indoor environment is addressed. The simulation utilizes the principles of geometrical optics (GO) for direct and reflected paths' tracing and the time domain technique for describing the transient electromagnetic field reflected from wall, floor, ceiling, and objects. The polarization of the received waveform is determined by taking into account the radiation pattern of the transmitting and receiving antennas, as well as the polarization changes owing to every reflection. The model provides more intrinsical interpretations for UWB pulse propagation in realistic indoor environment.

  2. A new model for waveguide light propagation and applications: tuning light distribution in elliptical waveguide arrays and a compact deterministic 50:50 PBS

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, Santiago Rojas; Naether, Uta; Xavier, Guilherme B; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Vicencio, Rodrigo A; Lima, Gustavo; Delgado, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    We study the polarization properties of elliptical femtosecond-laser-written waveguides arrays. A new analytical model is presented to explain the asymmetry of the spatial transverse profiles of linearly polarized modes in these waveguides. This asymmetry produces a polarization dependent coupling coeffcient, between adjacent waveguides, which strongly affects the propagation of light in a lattice. Our analysis explains how this effect can be exploited to tune the final intensity distribution of light propagated through the array. Then, we show how a compact, balanced, and deterministic polarizing beam splitter can be constructed in integrated circuits.

  3. A Deterministic and Random Propagation Study with the Design of an Open Path 320 GHz to 340 GHz Transmissometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, Lawrence J.

    This program was implemented by Lawrence J. Scally for a Ph.D. under the EECE department at the University of Colorado at Boulder with most funding provided by the U.S. Army. Professor Gasiewski is the advisor and guider for the entire program; he has a strong history decades ago in this type of program. This program is developing a more advanced than previous years transmissometer, called Terahertz Atmospheric and Ionospheric Propagation, Absorption and Scattering System (TAIPAS), on an open path between the University of Colorado EE building roof and the mesa on owned by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); NIST has invested money, location and support for the program. Besides designing and building the transmissometer, that has never be accomplished at this level, the system also analyzes the atmospheric propagation of frequencies by scanning between 320 GHz and 340 GHz, which includes the peak absorption frequency at 325.1529 GHz due to water absorption. The processing and characterization of the deterministic and random propagation characteristics of the atmosphere in the real world was significantly started; this will be executed with varies aerosols for decades on the permanently mounted system that is accessible 24/7 via a network over the CU Virtual Private Network (VPN).

  4. Combined effects of deterministic and statistical structure on high-frequency regional seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Christopher J.; Cormier, Vernon F.; Fitzpatrick, Michele

    2017-08-01

    Radiative transport modelling can combine the effects of both large-scale (deterministic) and the small-scale (statistical) structure on the coda envelopes of high-frequency regional seismograms. We describe a computer code to implement radiative transport modelling that propagates packets of seismic body wave energy along ray paths through large-scale deterministic 3-D structure, including the effects of velocity gradients, intrinsic attenuation, source radiation pattern and multiple scattering by layer boundaries and small-scale heterogeneities specified by a heterogeneity spectrum. The spatial distribution of these energy packets can be displayed as time snapshots to aid in the understanding of regional phase propagation or displayed as a coda envelope by summing at receiver bins. These techniques are applied to earthquakes and explosions recorded in the Lop Nor, China region to model observed narrow band passed seismic codas in the 1-4 Hz band. We predict that source discriminants in this region based on P/Lg amplitude ratios will best separate earthquake and explosion populations at frequencies 2 Hz and higher.

  5. Deterministic influences exceed dispersal effects on hydrologically-connected microbiomes: Deterministic assembly of hyporheic microbiomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Emily B. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Crump, Alex R. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Resch, Charles T. [Geochemistry Department, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Fansler, Sarah [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Arntzen, Evan [Environmental Compliance and Emergency Preparation, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Kennedy, David W. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Fredrickson, Jim K. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Stegen, James C. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-03-28

    Subsurface zones of groundwater and surface water mixing (hyporheic zones) are regions of enhanced rates of biogeochemical cycling, yet ecological processes governing hyporheic microbiome composition and function through space and time remain unknown. We sampled attached and planktonic microbiomes in the Columbia River hyporheic zone across seasonal hydrologic change, and employed statistical null models to infer mechanisms generating temporal changes in microbiomes within three hydrologically-connected, physicochemically-distinct geographic zones (inland, nearshore, river). We reveal that microbiomes remain dissimilar through time across all zones and habitat types (attached vs. planktonic) and that deterministic assembly processes regulate microbiome composition in all data subsets. The consistent presence of heterotrophic taxa and members of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) superphylum nonetheless suggests common selective pressures for physiologies represented in these groups. Further, co-occurrence networks were used to provide insight into taxa most affected by deterministic assembly processes. We identified network clusters to represent groups of organisms that correlated with seasonal and physicochemical change. Extended network analyses identified keystone taxa within each cluster that we propose are central in microbiome composition and function. Finally, the abundance of one network cluster of nearshore organisms exhibited a seasonal shift from heterotrophic to autotrophic metabolisms and correlated with microbial metabolism, possibly indicating an ecological role for these organisms as foundational species in driving biogeochemical reactions within the hyporheic zone. Taken together, our research demonstrates a predominant role for deterministic assembly across highly-connected environments and provides insight into niche dynamics associated with seasonal changes in hyporheic microbiome composition and metabolism.

  6. Confined Crystal Growth in Space. Deterministic vs Stochastic Vibroconvective Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Xavier; Bitlloch, Pau; Ramirez-Piscina, Laureano; Casademunt, Jaume

    The analysis of the correlations between characteristics of the acceleration environment and the quality of the crystalline materials grown in microgravity remains an open and interesting question. Acceleration disturbances in space environments usually give rise to effective gravity pulses, gravity pulse trains of finite duration, quasi-steady accelerations or g-jitters. To quantify these disturbances, deterministic translational plane polarized signals have largely been used in the literature [1]. In the present work, we take an alternative approach which models g-jitters in terms of a stochastic process in the form of the so-called narrow-band noise, which is designed to capture the main statistical properties of realistic g-jitters. In particular we compare their effects so single-frequency disturbances. The crystalline quality has been characterized, following previous analyses, in terms of two parameters, the longitudinal and the radial segregation coefficients. The first one averages transversally the dopant distribution, providing continuous longitudinal information of the degree of segregation along the growth process. The radial segregation characterizes the degree of lateral non-uniformity of the dopant in the solid-liquid interface at each instant of growth. In order to complete the description, and because the heat flux fluctuations at the interface have a direct impact on the crystal growth quality -growth striations -the time dependence of a Nusselt number associated to the growing interface has also been monitored. For realistic g-jitters acting orthogonally to the thermal gradient, the longitudinal segregation remains practically unperturbed in all simulated cases. Also, the Nusselt number is not significantly affected by the noise. On the other hand, radial segregation, despite its low magnitude, exhibits a peculiar low-frequency response in all realizations. [1] X. Ruiz, "Modelling of the influence of residual gravity on the segregation in

  7. Effects of random and deterministic discrete scale invariance on the critical behavior of the Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceau, Pascal

    2012-12-01

    The effects of disorder on the critical behavior of the q-state Potts model in noninteger dimensions are studied by comparison of deterministic and random fractals sharing the same dimensions in the framework of a discrete scale invariance. We carried out intensive Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of a fractal dimension slightly smaller than two d(f) ~/= 1.974636, we give evidence that the disorder structured by discrete scale invariance does not change the first order transition associated with the deterministic case when q = 7. Furthermore the study of the high value q = 14 shows that the transition is a second order one both for deterministic and random scale invariance, but that their behavior belongs to different university classes.

  8. Expansion or extinction: deterministic and stochastic two-patch models with Allee effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yun

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the impact of Allee effect and dispersal on the long-term evolution of a population in a patchy environment, focusing on whether a population already established in one patch either successfully invades an adjacent empty patch or undergoes a global in-all-patch extinction. Our study is based on the combination of analytical and numerical results for both a deterministic two-patch model and its stochastic analog. The deterministic model has either two or four attractors. In the presence of weak dispersal, the analysis of the deterministic model shows that a high-density and a low-density populations can coexist at equilibrium in nearby patches, whereas the analysis of the stochastic model indicates that this equilibrium is metastable, thus leading after a large random time to either an in-all-patch expansion or an in-all-patch extinction. Up to some critical dispersal, increasing the intensity of the interactions leads to an increase of both the basin of attraction of the in-all-patch extinction...

  9. Effect of Soliton Propagation in Fiber Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of optical solitons in fiber amplifiers is discussed by considering a model that includes linear high order dispersion, two-photon absorption, nonlinear high-order dispersion, self-induced Ramam and five-order nonlinear effects. Based on travelling wave method, the solutions of the nonlinear Schrdinger equations, and the influence on soliton propagation as well as high-order effect in the fiber amplifier are discussed in detail. It is found that because of existing five-order nonlinear effect, the solution is not of secant hyperbola type, but shows high gain state of the fiber amplifier which is very favourable to the propagation of solitons.

  10. Negative propagation effect in nonparaxial Airy beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2012-11-19

    Negative propagation is an unusual effect concerning the local sign change in the Poynting vector components of an optical beam under free propagation. We report this effect for finite-energy Airy beams in a subwavelength nonparaxial regime. This effect is due to a coupling process between propagating and evanescent plane waves forming the beam in the spectral domain and it is demonstrated for a single TE or TM mode. This is contrary to what happens for vector Bessel beams and vector X-waves, for which a complex superposition of TE and TM modes is mandatory. We also show that evanescent waves cannot contribute to the energy flux density by themselves such that a pure evanescent Airy beam is not physically realizable. The break of the shape-preserving and diffraction-free properties of Airy beams in a nonparaxial regime is exclusively caused by the propagating waves. The negative propagation effect in subwavelength nonparaxial Airy beams opens new capabilities in optical traps and tweezers, optical detection of invisibility cloacks and selective on-chip manipulation of nanoparticles.

  11. Monte Carlo and deterministic computational methods for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng; Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2013-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction β plays an important role in kinetics and static analysis of the reactor physics experiments. It is used as reactivity unit referred to as "dollar". Usually, it is obtained by computer simulation due to the difficulty in measuring it experimentally. In 1965, Keepin proposed a method, widely used in the literature, for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction β. This method requires calculation of the adjoint neutron flux as a weighting function of the phase space inner products and is easy to implement by deterministic codes. With Monte Carlo codes, the solution of the adjoint neutron transport equation is much more difficult because of the continuous-energy treatment of nuclear data. Consequently, alternative methods, which do not require the explicit calculation of the adjoint neutron flux, have been proposed. In 1997, Bretscher introduced the k-ratio method for calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction; this method is based on calculating the multiplication factor of a nuclear reactor core with and without the contribution of delayed neutrons. The multiplication factor set by the delayed neutrons (the delayed multiplication factor) is obtained as the difference between the total and the prompt multiplication factors. Using Monte Carlo calculation Bretscher evaluated the β as the ratio between the delayed and total multiplication factors (therefore the method is often referred to as the k-ratio method). In the present work, the k-ratio method is applied by Monte Carlo (MCNPX) and deterministic (PARTISN) codes. In the latter case, the ENDF/B nuclear data library of the fuel isotopes (235U and 238U) has been processed by the NJOY code with and without the delayed neutron data to prepare multi-group WIMSD neutron libraries for the lattice physics code DRAGON, which was used to generate the PARTISN macroscopic cross sections. In recent years Meulekamp and van der Marck in 2006 and Nauchi and Kameyama

  12. Effect of noise on deterministic joint remote preparation of an arbitrary two-qubit state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jin-Guang

    2017-05-01

    Quantum communication has attracted much attention in recent years. Deterministic joint remote state preparation (DJRSP) is an important branch of quantum secure communication which could securely transmit a quantum state with 100% success probability. In this paper, we study DJRSP of an arbitrary two-qubit state in noisy environment. Taking a GHZ based DJRSP scheme of a two-qubit state as an example, we study how the scheme is influenced by all types of noise usually encountered in real-world implementations of quantum communication protocols, i.e., the bit-flip, phase-flip (phase-damping), depolarizing, and amplitude-damping noise. We demonstrate that there are four different output states in the amplitude-damping noise, while there is the same output state in each of the other three types of noise. The state-independent average fidelity is presented to measure the effect of noise, and it is shown that the depolarizing noise has the worst effect on the DJRSP scheme, while the amplitude-damping noise or the phase-flip has the slightest effect depending on the noise rate. Our results are also suitable for JRSP and RSP.

  13. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  14. MIRD Commentary: Proposed Name for a Dosimetry Unit Applicable to Deterministic Biological Effects-The Barendsen (Bd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, George; Howell, R. W.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2009-03-02

    The fundamental physical quantity for relating all biologic effects to radiation exposure is the absorbed dose, the energy imparted per unit mass of tissue. Absorbed dose is expressed in units of joules per kilogram (J/kg) and is given the special name gray (Gy). Exposure to ionizing radiation may cause both deterministic and stochastic biologic effects. To account for the relative effect per unit absorbed dose that has been observed for different types of radiation, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has established radiation weighting factors for stochastic effects. The product of absorbed dose in Gy and the radiation weighting factor is defined as the equivalent dose. Equivalent dose values are designated by a special named unit, the sievert (Sv). Unlike the situation for stochastic effects, no well-defined formalism and associated special named quantities have been widely adopted for deterministic effects. The therapeutic application of radionuclides and, specifically, -particle emitters in nuclear medicine has brought to the forefront the need for a well-defined dosimetry formalism applicable to deterministic effects that is accompanied by corresponding special named quantities. This commentary reviews recent proposals related to this issue and concludes with a recommendation to establish a new named quantity.

  15. JCCRER Project 2.3 -- Deterministic effects of occupational exposure to radiation. Phase 1: Feasibility study; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okladnikova, N.; Pesternikova, V.; Sumina, M. [Inst. of Biophysics, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Phase 1 of Project 2.3, a short-term collaborative Feasibility Study, was funded for 12 months starting on 1 February 1996. The overall aim of the study was to determine the practical feasibility of using the dosimetric and clinical data on the MAYAK worker population to study the deterministic effects of exposure to external gamma radiation and to internal alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium. Phase 1 efforts were limited to the period of greatest worker exposure (1948--1954) and focused on collaboratively: assessing the comprehensiveness, availability, quality, and suitability of the Russian clinical and dosimetric data for the study of deterministic effects; creating an electronic data base containing complete clinical and dosimetric data on a small, representative sample of MAYAK workers; developing computer software for the testing of a currently used health risk model of hematopoietic effects; and familiarizing the US team with the Russian diagnostic criteria and techniques used in the identification of Chronic Radiation Sickness.

  16. Scattering effect on entanglement propagation in RCFTs

    CERN Document Server

    Numasawa, Tokiro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the scattering effect on entanglement propagation in RCFTs. In our setup, we consider the time evolution of excited states created by the insertion of many local operators. Our results show that because of the finiteness of quantum dimension, entanglement is not changed after the scattering in RCFTs. In this mean, entanglement is conserved after the scattering event in RCFTs, which reflects the integrability of the system. Our results are also consistent with the free quasiparticle picture after the global quenches.

  17. Effective propagation in a perturbed periodic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Agnès; Pagneux, Vincent

    2008-08-01

    In a recent paper [D. Torrent, A. Hakansson, F. Cervera, and J. Sánchez-Dehesa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 204302 (2006)] inspected the effective parameters of a cluster containing an ensemble of scatterers with a periodic or a weakly disordered arrangement. A small amount of disorder is shown to have a small influence on the characteristics of the acoustic wave propagation with respect to the periodic case. In this Brief Report, we inspect further the effect of a deviation in the scatterer distribution from the periodic distribution. The quasicrystalline approximation is shown to be an efficient tool to quantify this effect. An analytical formula for the effective wave number is obtained in one-dimensional acoustic medium and is compared with the Berryman result in the low-frequency limit. Direct numerical calculations show a good agreement with the analytical predictions.

  18. The effect of duct surface character on methane explosion propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Bai-quan; YE Qing; JIAN Cong-guang; WU Hai-jin

    2007-01-01

    The effect of duct surface character on methane explosion propagation was experimentally studied and theoretically analyzed. The roughness has effect on methane explosion propagation. The flame propagation velocity and the peak value pressure of methane explosion in rough duct are larger than the parameters in smooth duct. The heat exchange of the surface has effect on methane explosion propagation. The propagation velocity of flame and strength of explosion wave in the duct covered by heat insulation material are larger than those in duct with good heat transmittability.

  19. Effect of Microscopic Noise on Front Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Éric; Derrida, Bernard

    2001-04-01

    We study the effect of the noise due to microscopic fluctuations on the position of a one dimensional front propagating from a stable to an unstable region in the "linearly marginal stability case." By simulating a very simple system for which the effective number N of particles can be as large as N=10150, we measure the N dependence of the diffusion constant DN of the front and the shift of its velocity vN. Our results indicate that DN˜(log N)-3. They also confirm our recent claim that the shift of velocity scales like vmin-vN≃K(log N)-2 and indicate that the numerical value of K is very close to the analytical expression Kapprox obtained in our previous work using a simple cut-off approximation.

  20. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Spokes are azimuthally propagating perturbations in the plasma discharge of Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) that travel in the E x B direction and have been observed in many different systems. The propagation of azimuthal spokes are investigated in a 6 kW HET known as the H6 using ultra-fast imaging and azimuthally spaced probes. A spoke surface is a 2-D plot of azimuthal light intensity evolution over time calculated from 87,500 frames/s videos. The spoke velocity has been determined using three methods with similar results: manual fitting of diagonal lines on the spoke surface, linear cross-correlation between azimuthal locations and an approximated dispersion relation. The spoke velocity for three discharge voltages (300, 400 and 450 V) and three anode mass flow rates (14.7, 19.5 and 25.2 mg/s) yielded spoke velocities between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of normalized magnetic field settings. The spoke velocity was inversely dependent on magnetic field strength for low B-field settings and asymptoted at B-field higher values. The velocities and frequencies are compared to standard drifts and plasma waves such as E x B drift, electrostatic ion cyclotron, magnetosonic and various drift waves. The empirically approximated dispersion relation yielded a characteristic velocity that matched the ion acoustic speed for 5 eV electrons that exist in the near-anode and near-field plume regions of the discharge channel based on internal measurements. Thruster performance has been linked to operating mode where thrust-to-power is maximized when azimuthal spokes are present so investigating the underlying mechanism of spokes will benefit thruster operation.

  1. Dependence of Quark Effective Mass on Gluon Propagators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiao-Rong; ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on Dyson-Schwinger Equations (DSEs) in the "rainbow" approximation, the dependence of quark effective mass on gluon propagator is investigated by use of three different phenomenological gluon propagators with two parameters, the strength parameter x and range parameter △. Our theoretical calculations for the quark effective mass Mf(p2), defined by the self-energy functions Af(p2) and Bf(p2) of the DSEs, show that the dynamically running quark effective mass is strongly dependent on gluon propagator. Therefore, because gluon propagator is completely unknown,the quark effective mass cannot be exactly determined theoretically.

  2. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  3. Spin Hall effect mediated current-induced deterministic switching in all-metallic perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Pt trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    P, Vineeth Mohanan; Ganesh, K. R.; Kumar, P. S. Anil

    2017-09-01

    A magnetic field free current-induced deterministic switching is demonstrated in a perpendicularly magnetized all-metallic Pt/Co/Pt thin film system with a small tilt in anisotropy axis. We realized this in devices where the ultrathin Co layer was grown using an oblique angle sputter deposition technique that had resulted in a small tilt of magnetic anisotropy from the film normal. By performing out-of-plane magnetization hysteresis measurements under bias magnetic field applied along various in-plane directions the tilt angle was estimated to be around 3 .3∘ (±0 .3∘ ). A deterministic current-induced magnetization switching could be achieved when the in-plane current was applied perpendicular to the anisotropy tilt axis, but the switching was stochastic when the current was applied in the direction of the tilt (in the tilt plane). By preparing Pt/Co/Pt stacks with unequal top and bottom Pt thickness, sufficient spin-orbit torque (SOT) could be applied to switch the magnetization of the Co layer at current densities as low as 1.5 ×107 A/cm2. The switching phase diagram (SPD) constructed by plotting the critical current density versus applied in-plane magnetic field (HxIB) confirms spin Hall effect based SOT mechanism to be responsible for the magnetization switching. The asymmetry observed in the SPD (about HxIB=0 ) is in agreement with the macrospin simulations and it suggests that the tilt in the magnetic anisotropy from the film normal makes the switching deterministic even without an in-plane magnetic field bias.

  4. Effect of Wind on Long Range Propagation in Shallow Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Long range acoustic propagation in isothermal conditions is considered, involving multiple reflections from the sea surface. If the sea is calm there is almost perfect reflection and hence low loss. The effect of wind is to increase propagation loss due to the interaction with near-surface bubble cl

  5. Modeling the Combined Effects of Deterministic and Statistical Structure for Optimization of Regional Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    detailed pictures of energy propagation can be constructed. One of the first visualization tools developed was a GNU Octave script to produce videos...placement of virtual seismometers along any surface designated as a collection surface. Whenever a phonon interacts with a collection surface...Scattering of elastic waves in geomeu·ically anisou·opic media and its implication to sounding of heterogeneity in Erui h ’s deep interior, Geophys. J Int

  6. Lunar Surface Propagation Modeling and Effects on Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the lunar terrain effects on the signal propagation of the planned NASA lunar wireless communication and sensor systems. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate that the terrain geometry, antenna location, and lunar surface material are important factors determining the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless communication systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, operating frequency, and surface material. The analysis results from this paper are important for the lunar communication link margin analysis in determining the limits on the reliable communication range and radio frequency coverage performance at planned lunar base worksites. Key Words lunar, multipath, path loss, propagation, wireless.

  7. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...... games and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm for computing an equilibrium of such a game. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  8. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    to bk. The cross-correlation function is17 Rjk = lim T→∞ 1 T ∫ T 0 bj (t) bk (t + τ)dt (2) Signal delays for non -frequency dispersive propagation can...During the neutral replenishment period within the discharge channel, slight perturbations or azimuthal non - uniformities in electron density, electron...electron thermal velocity is the average of an assumed Maxwellian distribution37 vthe = √ 8qTe/(πme) with Te in eV. The region from 0.16 < z/Lchnl

  9. Design Change Model for Effective Scheduling Change Propagation Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Zhu; Ding, Guo-Fu; Li, Rong; Qin, Sheng-Feng; Yan, Kai-Yin

    2017-09-01

    Changes in requirements may result in the increasing of product development project cost and lead time, therefore, it is important to understand how requirement changes propagate in the design of complex product systems and be able to select best options to guide design. Currently, a most approach for design change is lack of take the multi-disciplinary coupling relationships and the number of parameters into account integrally. A new design change model is presented to systematically analyze and search change propagation paths. Firstly, a PDS-Behavior-Structure-based design change model is established to describe requirement changes causing the design change propagation in behavior and structure domains. Secondly, a multi-disciplinary oriented behavior matrix is utilized to support change propagation analysis of complex product systems, and the interaction relationships of the matrix elements are used to obtain an initial set of change paths. Finally, a rough set-based propagation space reducing tool is developed to assist in narrowing change propagation paths by computing the importance of the design change parameters. The proposed new design change model and its associated tools have been demonstrated by the scheduling change propagation paths of high speed train's bogie to show its feasibility and effectiveness. This model is not only supportive to response quickly to diversified market requirements, but also helpful to satisfy customer requirements and reduce product development lead time. The proposed new design change model can be applied in a wide range of engineering systems design with improved efficiency.

  10. Uniform deterministic dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the well-known family of multiplicative hash functions, and improved deterministic algorithms for selecting “good” hash functions. The main motivation is realization of deterministic dictionaries with fast lookups and reasonably fast updates. The model of computation...

  11. Deterministic Walks with Choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeler, Katy E.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Cooper, Joshua N.; Hunter, Meagan N.; Barr, Peter S.

    2014-01-10

    This paper studies deterministic movement over toroidal grids, integrating local information, bounded memory and choice at individual nodes. The research is motivated by recent work on deterministic random walks, and applications in multi-agent systems. Several results regarding passing tokens through toroidal grids are discussed, as well as some open questions.

  12. Intraband effects on ultrafast pulse propagation in semiconductor optical amplifier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Hussain; S K Varshney; P K Datta

    2010-11-01

    High bit-rate (>10 Gb/s) signals are composed of very short pulses and propagation of such pulses through a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) requires consideration of intraband phenomena. Due to the intraband effects, the propagating pulse sees a fast recovering nonlinear gain which introduces less distortion in the pulse shape and spectrum of the output pulse but introduces a positive chirping at the trailing edge of the pulse.

  13. Inferring deterministic causal relations

    CERN Document Server

    Daniusis, Povilas; Mooij, Joris; Zscheischler, Jakob; Steudel, Bastian; Zhang, Kun; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We consider two variables that are related to each other by an invertible function. While it has previously been shown that the dependence structure of the noise can provide hints to determine which of the two variables is the cause, we presently show that even in the deterministic (noise-free) case, there are asymmetries that can be exploited for causal inference. Our method is based on the idea that if the function and the probability density of the cause are chosen independently, then the distribution of the effect will, in a certain sense, depend on the function. We provide a theoretical analysis of this method, showing that it also works in the low noise regime, and link it to information geometry. We report strong empirical results on various real-world data sets from different domains.

  14. Deterministic Brownian motion: The effects of perturbing a dynamical system by a chaotic semi-dynamical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Michael C. [Departments of Physiology, Physics and Mathematics and Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC, H3G 1Y6 (Canada)]. E-mail: mackey@cnd.mcgill.ca; Tyran-Kaminska, Marta [Institute of Mathematics, Silesian University, ul. Bankowa 14, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)]. E-mail: mtyran@us.edu.pl

    2006-01-15

    Here we review and extend central limit theorems for chaotic deterministic semi-dynamical discrete time systems. We then apply these results to show how Brownian motion-like behavior can be recovered and how an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be constructed within a totally deterministic framework. These results illustrate that under certain circumstances the contamination of experimental data by 'noise' may be alternately interpreted as the signature of an underlying chaotic process.

  15. Effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure influences fatigue crack growth rate and must be included in the design of components. Plasticity induced crack closure is intimately linked with the crack tip plastic deformation, which becomes residual as the crack propagates. The objective here is to study numerically the effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields. The transient effect observed at the beginning of crack propagation is linked to the hardening behavior of material. The effect of mesh refinement is studied, and a singular behavior is evident, which is explained by the sharp crack associated with mesh topology, composed of a regular pattern of square elements. The plastic zone size measured perpendicularly to crack flank in the residual plastic wake is quantified and compared with literature models. Finally, the removal of material at the first node behind crack tip with load cycling was observed for plane strain state and some hardening models in plane stress state.

  16. Towards a deterministic single-photon source by Rydberg FWM effect in a thermal microcell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Ripka, Fabian; Löw, Robert; Pfau, Tilman

    2015-05-01

    The generation and manipulation of single photons are the key ingredients for the photonic-based quantum security communication and information processing. One promising candidate to realize the on-demand single-photon source is based on the combination of four-wave-mixing (FWM) and Rydberg blockade effects in a micrometer scale thermal microcell. Similar to our past studies of coherent Rydberg dynamics and van-der Waals interaction in a three-level system, we implement a pulsed FWM scheme to observe both coherent dynamics and effects of dephasing due to Rydberg-Rydberg interaction. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of the excitation volume by use of low- and high- NA optics and spatial confinement. We discuss prospects for the generation of non-classical light. AvH; ERC; BMBF.

  17. Integrating the effects of forest cover on slope stability in a deterministic landslide susceptibility model (TRIGRS 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieher, T.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; Meissl, G.; Geitner, C.

    2014-12-01

    The potentially stabilizing effects of forest cover in respect of slope stability have been the subject of many studies in the recent past. Hence, the effects of trees are also considered in many deterministic landslide susceptibility models. TRIGRS 2.0 (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability; USGS) is a dynamic, physically-based model designed to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility in space and time. In the original version the effects of forest cover are not considered. As for further studies in Vorarlberg (Austria) TRIGRS 2.0 is intended to be applied in selected catchments that are densely forested, the effects of trees on slope stability were implemented in the model. Besides hydrological impacts such as interception or transpiration by tree canopies and stems, root cohesion directly influences the stability of slopes especially in case of shallow landslides while the additional weight superimposed by trees is of minor relevance. Detailed data on tree positions and further attributes such as tree height and diameter at breast height were derived throughout the study area (52 km²) from high-resolution airborne laser scanning data. Different scenarios were computed for spruce (Picea abies) in the study area. Root cohesion was estimated area-wide based on published correlations between root reinforcement and distance to tree stems depending on the stem diameter at breast height. In order to account for decreasing root cohesion with depth an exponential distribution was assumed and implemented in the model. Preliminary modelling results show that forest cover can have positive effects on slope stability yet strongly depending on tree age and stand structure. This work has been conducted within C3S-ISLS, which is funded by the Austrian Climate and Energy Fund, 5th ACRP Program.

  18. Effects of Topological Randomness on Cooperation in a Deterministic Prisoner's Dilemma Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mei; YANG Jun-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we consider an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game on a homogeneous random network with the richest-following strategy adoption rule. By constructing homogeneous random networks from a regular ring graph,we investigate the effects of topological randomness on cooperation. In contrast to the ordinary view that the presence of small amount of shortcuts in ring graphs favors cooperation, we find the cooperation inhibition by weak topological randomness. The explanations on the observations are presented.

  19. Analysis of Photonic Quantum Nodes Based on Deterministic Single-Photon Raman Passage

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenblum, Serge

    2014-01-01

    The long-standing goal of deterministically controlling a single photon using another was recently realized in various experimental settings. Among these, a particularly attractive demonstration relied on deterministic single-photon Raman passage in a three-level Lambda system coupled to a single-mode waveguide. Beyond the ability to control the direction of propagation of one photon by the direction of another photon, this scheme can also perform as a passive quantum memory and a universal quantum gate. Relying on interference, this all-optical, coherent scheme requires no additional control fields, and can therefore form the basis for scalable quantum networks composed of passive quantum nodes that interact with each other only with single photon pulses. Here we present an analytical and numerical study of deterministic single-photon Raman passage, and characterise its limitations and the parameters for optimal operation. Specifically, we study the effect of losses and the presence of multiple excited state...

  20. Long-range interaction effects on calcium-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation of calcium waves in a network of cells coupled together by a paracrine signaling is investigated. The model takes into account the long-range interaction between cells due to the action of extracellular messengers, which provide links between first-neighbor cells, but also on cells located far away from the excited cell. When considering bidirectional coupling, the long-range interaction influences neither the frequency nor the amplitude of oscillations, contrary to one-directional coupling. The long-range interaction influences the speed of propagation of Ca2+ waves in the network and induces enlargement of the transition zone before the steady regime of propagation is attained. We also investigate the long-range effects on the colonization of a given niche by a pathogenic microorganism signal on calcium wave propagation in the network.

  1. Effects of Fieldline Topology on Energy Propagation in the Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Candelaresi, Simon; Hornig, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of photospheric footpoint motions on magnetic field structures containing magnetic nulls. The footpoint motions are prescribed on the photospheric boundary as a velocity field which entangles the magnetic field. We investigate the propagation of the injected energy, the conversion of energy, emergence of current layers and other consequences of the non-trivial magnetic field topology in this situation. These boundary motions lead initially to an increase in magnetic and kinetic energy. Following this, the energy input from the photosphere is partially dissipated and partially transported out of the domain through the Poynting flux. The presence of separatrix layers and magnetic null-points fundamentally alters the propagation behavior of disturbances from the photosphere into the corona. Depending on the field line topology close to the photosphere, the energy is either trapped or free to propagate into the corona.

  2. Deterministic earthquake scenario for the Basel area: Simulating strong motions and site effects for Basel, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    OpršAl, Ivo; FäH, Donat; Mai, P. Martin; Giardini, Domenico

    2005-04-01

    The Basel earthquake of 18 October 1356 is considered one of the most serious earthquakes in Europe in recent centuries (I0 = IX, M ≈ 6.5-6.9). In this paper we present ground motion simulations for earthquake scenarios for the city of Basel and its vicinity. The numerical modeling combines the finite extent pseudodynamic and kinematic source models with complex local structure in a two-step hybrid three-dimensional (3-D) finite difference (FD) method. The synthetic seismograms are accurate in the frequency band 0-2.2 Hz. The 3-D FD is a linear explicit displacement formulation using an irregular rectangular grid including topography. The finite extent rupture model is adjacent to the free surface because the fault has been recognized through trenching on the Reinach fault. We test two source models reminiscent of past earthquakes (the 1999 Athens and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake) to represent Mw ≈ 5.9 and Mw ≈ 6.5 events that occur approximately to the south of Basel. To compare the effect of the same wave field arriving at the site from other directions, we considered the same sources placed east and west of the city. The local structural model is determined from the area's recently established P and S wave velocity structure and includes topography. The selected earthquake scenarios show strong ground motion amplification with respect to a bedrock site, which is in contrast to previous 2-D simulations for the same area. In particular, we found that the edge effects from the 3-D structural model depend strongly on the position of the earthquake source within the modeling domain.

  3. The Effect of Coherence in the Propagation through Periodic Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertolotti, M.; Hoenders, B.; Mandatori, A.; Sibilia, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the coherence properties of light beams propagating through periodic structures are discussed. In particular, spatial coherence may influence the transmitted field. Some 2D structures which give transmittances strongly influenced by the coherence of the incoming field are discussed.

  4. Measuring the Deviation from the Linear and Deterministic Bias through Cosmic Gravitational Lensing Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Z H

    2003-01-01

    Since gravitational lensing effects directly probe inhomogeneities of dark matter, lensing-galaxy cross-correlations can provide us important information on the relation between dark matter and galaxy distributions, i.e., the bias. In this paper, we propose a method to measure the stochasticity/nonlinearity of the galaxy bias through correlation studies of the cosmic shear and galaxy number fluctuations. Specifically, we employ the aperture mass statistics $M_{ap}$ to describe the cosmic shear. We divide the foreground galaxy redshift $z_f^2/$ for each redshift bin. Then the ratio of the summation of $^2/$ over the bins to $$ gives a measure of the nonlinear/stochastic bias. Here $N_g(z_f)$ is the projected surface number density fluctuation of foreground galaxies at redshift $z_f$, and $M_{ap}$ is the aperture mass from the cosmic-shear analysis. We estimate that for a moderately deep weak-lensing survey with $z_s=1$, source galaxy surface number density $n_b=30 \\hbox {gal}/\\hbox {arcmin}^2$ and a survey are...

  5. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2016-05-01

    Sills are an integral part of the formation and development of larger plutons and magma reservoirs. Thus sills are essential for both the transport and the storage of magma in the Earth's crust. However, although cooling and solidification are central to magmatism, their effects on sills have been so far poorly studied. Here, the effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment and systematically varied between each experiment, in order to vary and quantify the amount of solidification between each experiments. The oil is injected directly at the interface between the two gelatine layers. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps of surface-area creation interspersed with periods of momentary arrest. The morphology of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of area creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the area of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. The morphology of sills, such as lobate structures (interpretation of 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basin) and ropy flow structures (field observations) can be related to solidification during emplacement. Moreover, a non-continuous morphology

  6. Effects of fear factors in disease propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yubo; Wong, Limsoon; Fu, Xiuju; Ma, Stefan; Cheng, Tee Hiang; 10.1088/1751-8113/44/35/355101

    2011-01-01

    Upon an outbreak of a dangerous infectious disease, people generally tend to reduce their contacts with others in fear of getting infected. Such typical actions apparently help slow down the spreading of infection. Thanks to today's broad public media coverage, the fear factor may even contribute to prevent an outbreak from happening. We are motivated to study such effects by adopting a complex network approach. Firstly we evaluate the simple case where connections between individuals are randomly removed due to fear factor. Then we consider a different case where each individual keeps at least a few connections after contact reduction. Such a case is arguably more realistic since people may choose to keep a few social contacts, e.g., with their family members and closest friends, at any cost. Finally a study is conducted on the case where connection removals are carried out dynamically while the infection is spreading out. Analytical and simulation results show that the fear factor may not easily prevent an ...

  7. Effects of fear factors in disease propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubo; Xiao, Gaoxi; Wong, Limsoon; Fu, Xiuju; Ma, Stefan; Hiang Cheng, Tee

    2011-09-01

    Upon an outbreak of a dangerous infectious disease, people generally tend to reduce their contacts with others in fear of getting infected. Such typical actions apparently help slow down the spreading of infection. Thanks to today's broad public media coverage, the fear factor may even contribute to preventing an outbreak from happening. We are motivated to study such effects by adopting a complex network approach. First we evaluate the simple case where connections between individuals are randomly removed due to the fear factor. Then we consider a different case where each individual keeps at least a few connections after contact reduction. Such a case is arguably more realistic since people may choose to keep a few social contacts, e.g., with their family members and closest friends, at any cost. Finally, a study is conducted on the case where connection removals are carried out dynamically while the infection is spreading out. Analytical and simulation results show that the fear factor may not easily prevent an epidemic outbreak from happening in scale-free networks. However, it significantly reduces the fraction of the nodes ever getting infected during the outbreak.

  8. A sonic boom propagation model including mean flow atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joe; Sparrow, Victor W.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a time domain formulation of nonlinear lossy propagation in onedimension that also includes the effects of non-collinear mean flow in the acoustic medium. The model equation utilized is an augmented Burgers equation that includes the effects of nonlinearity, geometric spreading, atmospheric stratification, and also absorption and dispersion due to thermoviscous and molecular relaxation effects. All elements of the propagation are implemented in the time domain and the effects of non-collinear mean flow are accounted for in each term of the model equation. Previous authors have presented methods limited to showing the effects of wind on ray tracing and/or using an effective speed of sound in their model equation. The present work includes the effects of mean flow for all terms included in the augmented Burgers equation with all of the calculations performed in the time-domain. The capability to include the effects of mean flow in the acoustic medium allows one to make predictions more representative of real-world atmospheric conditions. Examples are presented for nonlinear propagation of N-waves and shaped sonic booms. [Work supported by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation.

  9. Nucleon propagation through nuclear matter in chiral effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, S; Mishra, Hiranmaya

    2007-01-01

    We treat the propagation of nucleon in nuclear matter by evaluating the ensemble average of the two-point function of nucleon currents in the framework of the chiral effective field theory. We first derive the effective parameters of nucleon to one loop. The resulting formula for the effective mass was known previously and gives an absurd value at normal nuclear density. We then modify it following Weinberg's method for the two-nucleon system in the effective theory. Our results for the effective mass and the width of nucleon are compared with those in the literature.

  10. Nucleon propagation through nuclear matter in chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Mishra, H. [Physical Research Laboratory, Theory Divison, Ahmedabad (India)

    2007-05-15

    We treat the propagation of a nucleon in nuclear matter by evaluating the ensemble average of the two-point function of the nucleon currents in the framework of chiral effective field theory. We first derive the effective parameters of the nucleon to one loop. The resulting formula for the effective mass has been known since before and gives an absurd value at normal nuclear density. We then modify it following Weinberg's method for the two-nucleon system in the effective theory. Our results for the effective mass and the width of the nucleon are compared with those in the literature. (orig.)

  11. Nucleon propagation through nuclear matter in chiral effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, S.; Mishra, H.

    2007-05-01

    We treat the propagation of a nucleon in nuclear matter by evaluating the ensemble average of the two-point function of the nucleon currents in the framework of chiral effective field theory. We first derive the effective parameters of the nucleon to one loop. The resulting formula for the effective mass has been known since before and gives an absurd value at normal nuclear density. We then modify it following Weinberg’s method for the two-nucleon system in the effective theory. Our results for the effective mass and the width of the nucleon are compared with those in the literature.

  12. Probabilistic versus deterministic hazard assessment in liquefaction susceptible zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daminelli, Rosastella; Gerosa, Daniele; Marcellini, Alberto; Tento, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), usually adopted in the framework of seismic codes redaction, is based on Poissonian description of the temporal occurrence, negative exponential distribution of magnitude and attenuation relationship with log-normal distribution of PGA or response spectrum. The main positive aspect of this approach stems into the fact that is presently a standard for the majority of countries, but there are weak points in particular regarding the physical description of the earthquake phenomenon. Factors like site effects, source characteristics like duration of the strong motion and directivity that could significantly influence the expected motion at the site are not taken into account by PSHA. Deterministic models can better evaluate the ground motion at a site from a physical point of view, but its prediction reliability depends on the degree of knowledge of the source, wave propagation and soil parameters. We compare these two approaches in selected sites affected by the May 2012 Emilia-Romagna and Lombardia earthquake, that caused widespread liquefaction phenomena unusually for magnitude less than 6. We focus on sites liquefiable because of their soil mechanical parameters and water table level. Our analysis shows that the choice between deterministic and probabilistic hazard analysis is strongly dependent on site conditions. The looser the soil and the higher the liquefaction potential, the more suitable is the deterministic approach. Source characteristics, in particular the duration of strong ground motion, have long since recognized as relevant to induce liquefaction; unfortunately a quantitative prediction of these parameters appears very unlikely, dramatically reducing the possibility of their adoption in hazard assessment. Last but not least, the economic factors are relevant in the choice of the approach. The case history of 2012 Emilia-Romagna and Lombardia earthquake, with an officially estimated cost of 6 billions

  13. Deterministic Discrepancy Minimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bansal, N.; Spencer, J.

    2013-01-01

    We derandomize a recent algorithmic approach due to Bansal (Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS, pp. 3–10, 2010) to efficiently compute low discrepancy colorings for several problems, for which only existential results were previously known. In particular, we give an efficient deterministic algori

  14. Spurious deterministic seasonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); S. Hylleberg; H.S. Lee (Hahn)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIt is sometimes assumed that the R2 of a regression of a first-order differenced time series on seasonal dummy variables reflects the amount of seasonal fluctuations that can be explained by deterministic variation in the series. In this paper we show that neglecting the presence of seas

  15. Effects of moisture on ultrasound propagation in cement mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Taeho; Li, Shuaili; Achenbach, Jan; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    In concrete structures, moisture is often a major cause of chemically related degradations such as alkaline-silica reaction. To develop ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques for monitoring such chemical degradations, it is necessary to understand how moisture affects the propagation of ultrasound in concrete. To this end, the objective of this paper is to experimentally determine the correlation between the moisture content in cement mortar and ultrasonic wave propagation. Specifically, effects of moisture on the ultrasonic phase velocity and attenuation are examined. It is found that, for the cement mortar samples considered in this study, moisture has negligible effect on the ultrasonic phase velocity. However, moisture can significantly increase the attenuation of ultrasound in cement mortar even in the sub-MHz frequency range.

  16. Effect of surface losses on soliton propagation in Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, A.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Pagano, S.

    1986-01-01

    We have explored numerically the effects on soliton propagation of a third order damping term in the modified sine-Gordon equation. In Josephson tunnel junctions such a term corresponds physically to quasiparticle losses within the metal electrodes of the junction. We find that this loss term pla...... the dominant role in determining the shape and stability of the soliton at high velocity. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics.......We have explored numerically the effects on soliton propagation of a third order damping term in the modified sine-Gordon equation. In Josephson tunnel junctions such a term corresponds physically to quasiparticle losses within the metal electrodes of the junction. We find that this loss term plays...

  17. Effect of Electric Field on Outwardly Propagating Spherical Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Mannaa, Ossama

    2012-06-01

    The thesis comprises effects of electric fields on a fundamental study of spheri­cal premixed flame propagation.Outwardly-propagating spherical laminar premixed flames have been investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel by applying au uni-directional electric potential.Direct photography and schlieren techniques have been adopted and captured images were analyzed through image processing. Unstretched laminar burning velocities under the influence of electric fields and their associated Markstein length scales have been determined from outwardly prop­agating spherical flame at a constant pressure. Methane and propane fuels have been tested to assess the effect of electric fields on the differential diffusion of the two fuels.The effects of varying equivalence ratios and applied voltages have been in­vestigated, while the frequency of AC was fixed at 1 KHz. Directional propagating characteristics were analyzed to identify the electric filed effect. The flame morphology varied appreciably under the influence of electric fields which in turn affected the burning rate of mixtures.The flame front was found to propagate much faster toward to the electrode at which the electric fields were supplied while the flame speeds in the other direction were minimally influenced. When the voltage was above 7 KV the combustion is markedly enhanced in the downward direction since intense turbulence is generated and as a result the mixing process or rather the heat and mass transfer within the flame front will be enhanced.The com­bustion pressure for the cases with electric fields increased rapidly during the initial stage of combustion and was relatively higher since the flame front was lengthened in the downward direction.

  18. Effects of light propagation in middle intensity atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiubua YUAN; Dexiu HUANG; Bangxu LI

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an experimental study of the effects of light propagation through atmospheric turbulence.Free space optical communication is a line-of-sight technology that transmits a modulated beam of visible light through the atmosphere for broadband communication.The fundamental limitations of free space optical communications arise from the environment through which it propagates.However these systems are vulnerable to atmospheric turbulence, such as attenuation and scintillation, Scintillation is due to the air index variation under the temperature effects.These factors cause an attenuated receiver signal and lead to higher bit error rate (BER).An experiment of laser propagation was carried out to characterize the light intensity through turbulent air in the laboratory environment.The experimental results agree with the calculation based on Rytov for the case of weak to intermediate turbulence.Also, we show the characteristics of irradiance scintillation, intensity distribution and atmospheric turbulence strength.By means of laboratory simulated turbulence, the turbulence box is constructed with the following measurements: 0.5 m wide, 2m long and 0.5m high.The simulation box consists of three electric heaters and is well described for understanding the experimental set up.The fans and heaters are used to increase the homogeneity of turbulence and to create different scintillation indices.The received intensity scintillation and atmosphere turbulence strength were obtained and the variation of refractive index, with its corresponding structure parameter, is calculated from the experimental results.

  19. Effect of fuel stratification on detonation wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselot, Damien; Fievet, Romain; Raman, Venkat

    2016-11-01

    Rotating detonation engines (RDEs) form a class of pressure-gain combustion systems of higher efficiency compared to conventional gas turbine engines. One of the key features of the design is the injection system, as reactants need to be continuously provided to the detonation wave to sustain its propagation speed. As inhomogeneities in the reactant mixture can perturb the detonation wave front, premixed fuel jet injectors might seem like the most stable solution. However, this introduces the risk of the detonation wave propagating through the injector, causing catastrophic failure. On the other hand, non-premixed fuel injection will tend to quench the detonation wave near the injectors, reducing the likelihood of such failure. Still, the effects of such non-premixing and flow inhomogeneities ahead of a detonation wave have yet to be fully understood and are the object of this study. A 3D channel filled with O2 diluted in an inert gas with circular H2 injectors is simulated as a detonation wave propagates through the system. The impact of key parameters such as injector spacing, injector size, mixture composition and time variations will be discussed. PhD Candidate.

  20. Light propagation on quantum curved spacetime and back reaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozameh, Carlos; Parisi, Florencia [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2007-09-07

    We study the electromagnetic field equations on an arbitrary quantum curved background in the semiclassical approximation of loop quantum gravity. The effective interaction Hamiltonian for the Maxwell and gravitational fields is obtained and the corresponding field equations, which can be expressed as a modified wave equation for the Maxwell potential, are derived. We use these results to analyze electromagnetic wave propagation on a quantum Robertson-Walker spacetime and show that Lorentz invariance is not preserved. The formalism developed can be applied to the case where back reaction effects on the metric due to the electromagnetic field are taken into account, leading to non-covariant field equations.

  1. A finite time-horizon deterministic EOQ model with stock-dependent demand, effects of inflation and time value of money with shortages in all cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy T.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite time-horizon deterministic inventory model is developed, taking the demand rate at any instant to be a function of the on-hand inventory (stock-level at that instant. Shortages in inventory are allowed. The effects of inflation and time value of money are considered. Two separate inflation rates: namely, the internal (company and the external (general economy are introduced. A numerical example of the model is discussed. A sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution with respect to the parameters of the model is examined.

  2. The noise propagator in an optical system using EDFAs and its effect on system performance: accurate evaluation based on linear perturbation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhongxi; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2012-01-01

    For optical systems amplified by EDFAs, we present a new approach to obtain the noise propagator from the accurate linearized noise equation (LNE) proposed by Holzlohner et al . With the help of fourth-order Runge-Kutta in the interaction picture (RK4IP) method, we solve both the accurate LNE and nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE) for the noise-free signal simultaneously. The noise propagator matrix thus obtained dose not need the jitter separation required by the covariance matrix method (CMM). Based on this new approach, the calculated BERs in a DPSK system agree well with the CMM results. By introducing a deterministic phase shift induced by Gordon-Mollenauer noise effect, our numerical results also agree well with the experimental data of multi-span DPSK systems.

  3. Numerically Solving Quark-Loop Effects on Dressed Gluon Propagator in Chiral Limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiao-Ying; WANG Jing; Alatancang; SHI Yuan-Mei; HOU Feng-Yao; SUN Wei-Min; ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun

    2008-01-01

    We do a numerical calculation on the quark-loop effects on the dressed gluon propagator in the chiral limit. It is found that the quark-loop effects on the dressed gluon propagator are significant in solving the quark propagator in the rainbow approximation of the Dyson-Schwinger equation. The approach we used here is quite general and can also be used to calculate both the chemical potential and current quark mass dependence of the dressed gluon propagator.

  4. Deterministic Global Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This monograph deals with a general class of solution approaches in deterministic global optimization, namely the geometric branch-and-bound methods which are popular algorithms, for instance, in Lipschitzian optimization, d.c. programming, and interval analysis.It also introduces a new concept for the rate of convergence and analyzes several bounding operations reported in the literature, from the theoretical as well as from the empirical point of view. Furthermore, extensions of the prototype algorithm for multicriteria global optimization problems as well as mixed combinatorial optimization

  5. Generalized Deterministic Traffic Rules

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, H; Fuks, Henryk; Boccara, Nino

    1997-01-01

    We study a family of deterministic models for highway traffic flow which generalize cellular automaton rule 184. This family is parametrized by the speed limit $m$ and another parameter $k$ that represents a ``degree of aggressiveness'' in driving, strictly related to the distance between two consecutive cars. We compare two driving strategies with identical maximum throughput: ``conservative'' driving with high speed limit and ``aggressive'' driving with low speed limit. Those two strategies are evaluated in terms of accident probability. We also discuss fundamental diagrams of generalized traffic rules and examine limitations of maximum achievable throughput. Possible modifications of the model are considered.

  6. Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Noutsos, A; Kondratiev, V I; Weltevrede, P; Verbiest, J P W; Karastergiou, A; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Alexov, A; Breton, R P; Bilous, A V; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Hessels, J W T; Keane, E F; Osłowski, S; Pilia, M; Serylak, M; Stappers, B W; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Zagkouris, K; Anderson, K; Bähren, L; Bell, M; Broderick, J; Carbone, D; Cendes, Y; Coenen, T; Corbel, S; Eislöffel, J; Fender, R; Garsden, H; Jonker, P; Law, C; Marko, S; Masters, J; Miller-Jones, J; Molenaar, G; Osten, R; Pietka, M; Rol, E; Rowlinson, A; Scheers, B; Spreeuw, H; Staley, T; Stewart, A; Swinbank, J; Wijers, R; Wijnands, R; Wise, M; Zarka, P; van der Horst, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects resulting from the propagation of polarised emission in the pulsar magnetosphere and the interstellar medium. The predictions of magnetospheric birefringence in pulsars have been tested using spectra of the pulse width and fractional polarisation from multifrequency data. The derived spectra offer only partial support for the expected effects of birefringence on the polarisation properties, with only about half of our sample being consistent with the model's predictions. It is noted that for some pulsars these measurements are contaminated by the effects of interstellar scattering. For a number of pulsars in our sample, we have observed significant variations in the amount of Faraday rotation as a function of pulse phase, which is possi...

  7. Above Bonneville Passage and Propagation Cost Effectiveness Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, C.M.; Hyman, J.B.; Wernstedt, K.

    1993-05-01

    We have developed several models to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies to mitigate hydrosystem impacts on salmon and steelhead, and applied these models to areas of the Columbia River Basin. Our latest application evaluates the cost-effectiveness of proposed strategies that target mainstem survival (e.g., predator control, increases in water velocity) and subbasin propagation (e.g., habitat improvements, screening, hatchery production increases) for chinook salmon and steelhead stocks, in the portion of the Columbia Basin bounded by Bonneville, Chief Joseph, Dworshak, and Hells Canyon darns. At its core the analysis primarily considers financial cost and biological effectiveness, but we have included other attributes which may be of concern to the region.

  8. Effects of wind turbine wake on atmospheric sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the sound propagation from a wind turbine considering the effects of wake-induced velocity deficit and turbulence. In order to address this issue, an advanced approach was developed in which both scalar and vector parabolic equations in two dimensions are solved. Flow...... field input was obtained using the actuator line (AL) technique with Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to model the wind turbine and its wake and from an analytical wake model. The effect of incoming wind speed and atmospheric stability was investigated with the analytical wake input using a single point...... source. Unsteady acoustic simulations were carried out with the AL/LES input for three cases with different incoming turbulence intensity, and a moving source approach to mimic the rotating turbine blades. The results show a non-negligible effect of the wake on far-field noise prediction. Particularly...

  9. Effective field theory for coherent optical pulse propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Q H; Park, Q Han

    1996-01-01

    Hidden nonabelian symmetries in nonlinear interactions of radiation with matter are clarified. In terms of a nonabelian potential variable, we construct an effective field theory of self-induced transparency, a phenomenon of lossless coherent pulse propagation, in association with Hermitian symmetric spaces G/H. Various new properties of self-induced transparency, e.g. soliton numbers, effective potential energy, gauge symmetry and discrete symmetries, modified pulse area, conserved U(1)-charge etc. are addressed and elaborated in the nondegenerate two-level case where G/H = SU(2)/U(1). Using the U(1)-charge conservation, a new type of analysis on pulse stability is given which agrees with earlier numerical results.

  10. Effective action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we study a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well-known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasma...

  11. Quantum Gravity Effects in Scalar, Vector and Tensor Field Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anindita

    Quantum theory of gravity deals with the physics of the gravitational field at Planck length scale (10-35 m). Even though it is experimentally hard to reach the Planck length scale, on can look for evidence of quantum gravity that is detectable in astrophysics. In this thesis, we try to find effects of loop quantum gravity corrections on observable phenomena. We show that the quantum fluctuation strain for LIGO data would be 10 -125 on the Earth. Th correction is, however, substantial near the black hole horizon. We discuss the effect of this for scalar field propagation followed by vector and tensor fields. For the scalar field, the correction introduces a new asymmetry; for the vector field, we found a new perturbation solution and for the tensor field, we found the corrected Einstein equations which are yet to solve. These will affect phenomena like Hawking radiation, black hole entropy and gravitational waves.

  12. The effect of source's shape for seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Onishi, K.; Kasahara, J.; Kuroda, T.

    2009-12-01

    In conventional simulation of seismic wave propagation, the source which generates signals is usually given by a point force or by a particle velocity at a point. In practice, seismic wave is generated by signal generators with finite volume and width. Since seismic lines span a distance up to hundreds meter to several kilometers, many people conducted seismic survey and data processing with the assumption that the size of signal generator is negligible compared with survey scale. However, there are no studies that tells how the size of baseplate influences generated seismic waves. Such estimations, therefore, are meaningful to consider the scale of generator. In this sense, current seismic processing might require a theoretical background about the seismic source for further detailed analysis. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of seismic source’s shape to resultant wave properties, and then estimate how effective the consideration about the scale of signal generator is for analyzing the seismic data. To evaluate source’s scale effect, we performed finite element analysis with the 3D model including the baseplate of source and the heterogeneous ground medium. We adopted a finite element method (FEM) and chose the code named “MD Nastran” (MSC Software Ver.2008) to calculate seismic wave propagation. To verify the reliability of calculation, we compared the result of FEM and that of finite-difference method (FDM) with wave propagating simulation of isotropic and homogeneous model with a point source. The amplitude and phase of those two were nearly equal each other. We considered the calculation of FEM is accurate enough and can be performed in the following calculations. As the first step, we developed a simple point source model and a baseplate model. The point source model contains only the ground represented by an elastic medium. The force generating the signal is given at the nodal point of the surface in this case. On the other

  13. Schemes for Deterministic Polynomial Factoring

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanyos, Gábor; Saxena, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    In this work we relate the deterministic complexity of factoring polynomials (over finite fields) to certain combinatorial objects we call m-schemes. We extend the known conditional deterministic subexponential time polynomial factoring algorithm for finite fields to get an underlying m-scheme. We demonstrate how the properties of m-schemes relate to improvements in the deterministic complexity of factoring polynomials over finite fields assuming the generalized Riemann Hypothesis (GRH). In particular, we give the first deterministic polynomial time algorithm (assuming GRH) to find a nontrivial factor of a polynomial of prime degree n where (n-1) is a smooth number.

  14. Exploiting Deterministic TPG for Path Delay Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓维

    2000-01-01

    Detection of path delay faults requires two-pattern tests. BIST technique provides a low-cost test solution. This paper proposes an approach to designing a cost-effective deterministic test pattern generator (TPG) for path delay testing. Given a set of pre-generated test-pairs with pre-determined fault coverage, a deterministic TPG is synthesized to apply the given test-pair set in a limited test time. To achieve this objective, configurable linear feedback shift register (LFSR) structures are used. Techniques are developed to synthesize such a TPG, which is used to generate an unordered deterministic test-pair set. The resulting TPG is very efficient in terms of hardware size and speed performance. Simulation of academic benchmark circuits has given good results when compared to alternative solutions.

  15. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2012-01-01

    Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them......, such as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm...... for finding optimal strategies in such games. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  16. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2012-01-01

    Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them......, such as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm...... for finding optimal strategies in such games. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  17. Effect of quantum noise on deterministic joint remote state preparation of a qubit state via a GHZ channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Qu, Zhi-Guo

    2016-08-01

    Quantum secure communication brings a new direction for information security. As an important component of quantum secure communication, deterministic joint remote state preparation (DJRSP) could securely transmit a quantum state with 100 % success probability. In this paper, we study how the efficiency of DJRSP is affected when qubits involved in the protocol are subjected to noise or decoherence. Taking a GHZ-based DJRSP scheme as an example, we study all types of noise usually encountered in real-world implementations of quantum communication protocols, i.e., the bit-flip, phase-flip (phase-damping), depolarizing and amplitude-damping noise. Our study shows that the fidelity of the output state depends on the phase factor, the amplitude factor and the noise parameter in the bit-flip noise, while the fidelity only depends on the amplitude factor and the noise parameter in the other three types of noise. And the receiver will get different output states depending on the first preparer's measurement result in the amplitude-damping noise. Our results will be helpful for improving quantum secure communication in real implementation.

  18. Effect of quantum noise on deterministic joint remote state preparation of a qubit state via a GHZ channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Qu, Zhi-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Quantum secure communication brings a new direction for information security. As an important component of quantum secure communication, deterministic joint remote state preparation (DJRSP) could securely transmit a quantum state with 100 % success probability. In this paper, we study how the efficiency of DJRSP is affected when qubits involved in the protocol are subjected to noise or decoherence. Taking a GHZ-based DJRSP scheme as an example, we study all types of noise usually encountered in real-world implementations of quantum communication protocols, i.e., the bit-flip, phase-flip (phase-damping), depolarizing and amplitude-damping noise. Our study shows that the fidelity of the output state depends on the phase factor, the amplitude factor and the noise parameter in the bit-flip noise, while the fidelity only depends on the amplitude factor and the noise parameter in the other three types of noise. And the receiver will get different output states depending on the first preparer's measurement result in the amplitude-damping noise. Our results will be helpful for improving quantum secure communication in real implementation.

  19. Deterministic behavioural models for concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sassone, Vladimiro; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1993-01-01

    This paper offers three candidates for a deterministic, noninterleaving, behaviour model which generalizes Hoare traces to the noninterleaving situation. The three models are all proved equivalent in the rather strong sense of being equivalent as categories. The models are: deterministic labelled...

  20. Propagation effects handbook for satellite systems design. A summary of propagation impairments on 10 to 100 GHz satellite links with techniques for system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Louis J.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Effects Handbook for Satellite Systems Design provides a systematic compilation of the major propagation effects experienced on space-Earth paths in the 10 to 100 GHz frequency band region. It provides both a detailed description of the propagation phenomenon and a summary of the impact of the effect on the communications system design and performance. Chapter 2 through 5 describe the propagation effects, prediction models, and available experimental data bases. In Chapter 6, design techniques and prediction methods available for evaluating propagation effects on space-Earth communication systems are presented. Chapter 7 addresses the system design process and how the effects of propagation on system design and performance should be considered and how that can be mitigated. Examples of operational and planned Ku, Ka, and EHF satellite communications systems are given.

  1. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  2. Surface wave propagation effects on buried segmented pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Shi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with surface wave propagation (WP effects on buried segmented pipelines. Both simplified analytical model and finite element (FE model are developed for estimating the axial joint pullout movement of jointed concrete cylinder pipelines (JCCPs of which the joints have a brittle tensile failure mode under the surface WP effects. The models account for the effects of peak ground velocity (PGV, WP velocity, predominant period of seismic excitation, shear transfer between soil and pipelines, axial stiffness of pipelines, joint characteristics, and cracking strain of concrete mortar. FE simulation of the JCCP interaction with surface waves recorded during the 1985 Michoacan earthquake results in joint pullout movement, which is consistent with the field observations. The models are expanded to estimate the joint axial pullout movement of cast iron (CI pipelines of which the joints have a ductile tensile failure mode. Simplified analytical equation and FE model are developed for estimating the joint pullout movement of CI pipelines. The joint pullout movement of the CI pipelines is mainly affected by the variability of the joint tensile capacity and accumulates at local weak joints in the pipeline.

  3. Submicroscopic Deterministic Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnoholovets, V

    2002-01-01

    So-called hidden variables introduced in quantum mechanics by de Broglie and Bohm have changed their initial enigmatic meanings and acquired quite reasonable outlines of real and measurable characteristics. The start viewpoint was the following: All the phenomena, which we observe in the quantum world, should reflect structural properties of the real space. Thus the scale 10^{-28} cm at which three fundamental interactions (electromagnetic, weak, and strong) intersect has been treated as the size of a building block of the space. The appearance of a massive particle is associated with a local deformation of the cellular space, i.e. deformation of a cell. The mechanics of a moving particle that has been constructed is deterministic by its nature and shows that the particle interacts with cells of the space creating elementary excitations called "inertons". The further study has disclosed that inertons are a substructure of the matter waves which are described by the orthodox wave \\psi-function formalism. The c...

  4. Analysis of 3-D Propagation Effects Due to Environmental Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    presence of 3-D environmental variations, especially shelf break canyons . Work was also performed in support of 2-D propagation in shallow water to...propagation in the Monterey Bay Canyon . This was motivated by observations of highly variable directional features in measured acoustic vector data...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 the Monterey Bay Canyon were used as inputs to the model, and broadband calculations were performed

  5. Unquenching effects in the quark and gluon propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamleh, Waseem; Bowman, Patrick O.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.; Zhang, Jianbo

    2007-11-01

    In this work we examine the fat-link irrelevant clover (FLIC) overlap quark propagator and the gluon propagator on both dynamical and quenched lattices. The tadpole-improved Luscher-Weisz gauge action is used in both cases. The dynamical gauge fields use the FLIC fermion action for the sea quark contribution. We observe that the presence of sea quarks causes a suppression of the mass function, quark renormalization function, and gluon dressing function in the infrared. The ultraviolet physics is unaffected.

  6. Effects of Geometric Details on Slat Noise Generation and Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockard, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of geometric details to the generation and propagation of noise from leading-edge slats is considered. Typically, such details are omitted in computational simulations and model-scale experiments thereby creating ambiguities in comparisons with acoustic results from flight tests. The current study uses two-dimensional, computational simulations in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) solver to investigate the effects of previously neglected slat "bulb" and "blade" seals on the local flow field and the associated acoustic radiation. The computations show that the presence of the "blade" seal at the cusp in the simulated geometry significantly changes the slat cove flow dynamics, reduces the amplitudes of the radiated sound, and to a lesser extent, alters the directivity beneath the airfoil. Furthermore, the computations suggest that a modest extension of the baseline "blade" seal further enhances the suppression of slat noise. As a side issue, the utility and equivalence of FW-H methodology for calculating far-field noise as opposed to a more direct approach is examined and demonstrated.

  7. An effective absorbing boundary algorithm for acoustical wave propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, Berenger's perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition for electromagnetic waves is introduced as the truncation area of the computational domain to absorb one-dimensional acoustic wave for the scheme of acoustical wave propagator (AWP). To guarantee the efficiency of the AWP algorithm, a regulated propagator matrix is derived in the PML medium.Numerical simulations of a Gaussian wave packet propagating in one-dimensional duct are carried out to illustraze the efficiency of the combination of PML and AWP. Compared with the traditional smoothing truncation windows technique of AWP, this scheme shows high computational accuracy in absorbing acoustic wave when the acoustical wave arrives at the computational edges. Optimal coefficients of the PML configurations are also discussed.

  8. Particle propagation and effective space-time in gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Remo; Mandanici, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results obtained in our previous study on gravity’s rainbow, we determine the quantum corrections to the space-time metric for the Schwarzschild and the de Sitter background, respectively. We analyze how quantum fluctuations alter these metrics, inducing modifications on the propagation of test particles. Significantly enough, we find that quantum corrections can become relevant not only for particles approaching the Planck energy but, due to the one-loop contribution, even for low-energy particles as far as Planckian length scales are considered. We briefly compare our results with others obtained in similar studies and with the recent experimental OPERA announcement of superluminal neutrino propagation.

  9. Particle propagation and effective space-time in Gravity's Rainbow

    CERN Document Server

    Garattini, Remo

    2011-01-01

    Basing on the results obtained in a our previous study on Gravity's Rainbow, we determine the quantum corrections to the space-time metric for the Schwarzschild and the de Sitter background, respectively. We analyze how quantum fluctuations alter these metrics inducing modifications on the propagation of test particles. Significantly enough we find that quantum corrections can become relevant not only for particles approaching the Planck energy but, due to the one loop contribution, even for low-energy particles as far as Planckian length scales are considered. We briefly compare our results with others obtained in similar studies and with the recent experimental OPERA announcement of superluminal neutrino propagation.

  10. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated. PMID:27694953

  11. Quark Loop Effects on Dressed Gluon Propagator in Framework of Global Color Symmetry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; SUN Wei-Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the global color symmetry model (GCM), a method for obtaining the quark loop effects on the dressed gluon propagator in GCM is developed. In the chiral limit, it is found that the dressed gluon propagator containing the quark loop effects in the Nambu-Goldstone and Wigner phases are quite different. In solving the quark self-energy functions in the two different phases and subsequent study of bag constant one should use the above dressed gluon propagator as input. The above approach for obtaining the current quark mass effects on the dressed gluon propagator is quite general and can also be used to calculate the chemical potential dependence of the dressed gluon propagator.

  12. Quantifying the Effects of Propagation on Classification of Cetacean Vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Acoustic Measurements, Kos, Greece, (2011). [8] Stefan Murphy and Paul C. Hines, “Examining the robustness of automated aural classification of active ... Classification of Cetacean Vocalizations Paul C. Hines Dalhousie University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 5269 Morris St. Morray...a classification system capable of operating in many environments one must understand the role of propagation on the classifier. A prototype aural

  13. Effect of spatial discretization of energy on detonation wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Mi, XiaoCheng; Higgins, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Detonation propagation in the limit of highly spatially discretized energy sources is investigated. The model of this problem begins with a medium consisting of a calorically perfect gas with a prescribed energy release per unit mass. The energy release is collected into sheet-like sources that are now embedded in an inert gas that fills the spaces between them. The release of energy in the first sheet results in a planar blast wave that propagates to the next source, which is triggered after a prescribed delay, generating a new blast, and so forth. The resulting wave dynamics as the front passes through hundreds of such sources is computationally simulated by numerically solving the governing one-dimensional Euler equations in the lab-fixed reference frame. The average wave speed for each simulation is measured once the wave propagation has reached a quasi-periodic solution. Velocities in excess of the CJ speed are found as the sources are made increasingly discrete, with the deviation above CJ being as grea...

  14. Accomplishing Deterministic XML Query Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dun-Ren Che

    2005-01-01

    As the popularity of XML (eXtensible Markup Language) keeps growing rapidly, the management of XML compliant structured-document databases has become a very interesting and compelling research area. Query optimization for XML structured-documents stands out as one of the most challenging research issues in this area because of the much enlarged optimization (search) space, which is a consequence of the intrinsic complexity of the underlying data model of XML data. We therefore propose to apply deterministic transformations on query expressions to most aggressively prune the search space and fast achieve a sufficiently improved alternative (if not the optimal) for each incoming query expression. This idea is not just exciting but practically attainable. This paper first provides an overview of our optimization strategy, and then focuses on the key implementation issues of our rule-based transformation system for XML query optimization in a database environment. The performance results we obtained from experimentation show that our approach is a valid and effective one.

  15. Deterministic Pattern Classifier Based on Genetic Programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-wu; LI Min-qiang; KOU Ji-song

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a supervised training-test method with Genetic Programming (GP) for pattern classification. Compared and contrasted with traditional methods with regard to deterministic pattern classifiers, this method is true for both linear separable problems and linear non-separable problems. For specific training samples, it can formulate the expression of discriminate function well without any prior knowledge. At last, an experiment is conducted, and the result reveals that this system is effective and practical.

  16. Traffic chaotic dynamics modeling and analysis of deterministic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Huang, Ning; Wu, Zhitao

    2016-07-01

    Network traffic is an important and direct acting factor of network reliability and performance. To understand the behaviors of network traffic, chaotic dynamics models were proposed and helped to analyze nondeterministic network a lot. The previous research thought that the chaotic dynamics behavior was caused by random factors, and the deterministic networks would not exhibit chaotic dynamics behavior because of lacking of random factors. In this paper, we first adopted chaos theory to analyze traffic data collected from a typical deterministic network testbed — avionics full duplex switched Ethernet (AFDX, a typical deterministic network) testbed, and found that the chaotic dynamics behavior also existed in deterministic network. Then in order to explore the chaos generating mechanism, we applied the mean field theory to construct the traffic dynamics equation (TDE) for deterministic network traffic modeling without any network random factors. Through studying the derived TDE, we proposed that chaotic dynamics was one of the nature properties of network traffic, and it also could be looked as the action effect of TDE control parameters. A network simulation was performed and the results verified that the network congestion resulted in the chaotic dynamics for a deterministic network, which was identical with expectation of TDE. Our research will be helpful to analyze the traffic complicated dynamics behavior for deterministic network and contribute to network reliability designing and analysis.

  17. Variability order of the latent and the infectious periods in a deterministic SEIR epidemic model and evaluation of control effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Feng, Zhilan

    2010-03-01

    We use distribution theory and ordering of non-negative random variables to study the Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Removed (SEIR) model with two control measures, quarantine and isolation, to reduce the spread of an infectious disease. We identify that the probability distributions of the latent period and the infectious period are primary features of the SEIR model to formulate the epidemic threshold and to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention measures. If the primary features are changed, the conclusions will be altered in an importantly different way. For the latent and infectious periods with known mean values, it is the dilation, a generalization of variance, of their distributions that ranks the effectiveness of these control measures. We further propose ways to set quarantine and isolation targets to reduce the controlled reproduction number below the threshold using observed initial growth rate from outbreak data. If both quarantine and isolation are 100% effective, one can directly use the observed growth rate for setting control targets. If they are not 100% effective, some further knowledge of the distributions is required.

  18. Modeling deterministic effects in hematopoietic system caused by chronic exposure to ionizing radiation in large human cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akushevich, Igor V; Veremeyeva, Galina A; Dimov, Georgy P; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Akleyev, Alexander V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2010-09-01

    A new model of the hematopoietic system for humans chronically exposed to ionizing radiation allows for quantitative description of the initial hematopoiesis inhibition and subsequent increase in the risks of late stochastic effects such as leukemia. This model describes the dynamics of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as well as the dynamics of each of the three blood cell types (leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets). The model parameters are estimated from the results of other experiments. They include the steady-state numbers of hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral blood cell lines for an unexposed organism, amplification parameters for each blood cell line, parameters describing the proliferation and apoptosis, parameters of feedback functions regulating the steady-state numbers, and characteristics of radiosensitivity in respect to cell death and non-lethal cell damages. The dynamic model of hematopoiesis is applied to the data on a subcohort of the Techa River residents with hematological measurements (e.g., blood counts) performed in 1950-1956 (which totals to about 3,500 exposed individuals). Among well-described effects observed in these data are the slope values of the dose-effect curves describing the hematopoietic inhibition and the dose rate patterns of the fractions of cytopenic states (e.g., leukopenia, thrombocytopenia). The model has been further generalized by inclusion of the component describing the risk of late stochastic effects. The risks of the development of late effects (such as leukemia) in population groups with specific patterns of early reactions in hematopoiesis (such as leukopenia induced by ionizing radiation) are investigated using simulation studies and compared to data.

  19. Modeling of deterministic chaotic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Mathematics, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Grebogi, C. [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Grebogi, C.; Kurths, J. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Universitaet Potsdam, Postfach 601553, D-14415 Potsdam (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    The success of deterministic modeling of a physical system relies on whether the solution of the model would approximate the dynamics of the actual system. When the system is chaotic, situations can arise where periodic orbits embedded in the chaotic set have distinct number of unstable directions and, as a consequence, no model of the system produces reasonably long trajectories that are realized by nature. We argue and present physical examples indicating that, in such a case, though the model is deterministic and low dimensional, statistical quantities can still be reliably computed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Interference Decoding for Deterministic Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Bandemer, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    An inner bound to the capacity region of a class of three user pair deterministic interference channels is presented. The key idea is to simultaneously decode the combined interference signal and the intended message at each receiver. It is shown that this interference decoding inner bound is strictly larger than the inner bound obtained by treating interference as noise, which includes interference alignment for deterministic channels. The gain comes from judicious analysis of the number of combined interference sequences in different regimes of input distributions and message rates.

  1. Deterministic joint remote state preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Nguyen Ba, E-mail: nban@iop.vast.ac.vn [Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Bich, Cao Thi [Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Physics Department, University of Education No. 1, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Don, Nung Van [Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Physics Department, Hanoi National University, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2011-09-26

    We put forward a new nontrivial three-step strategy to execute joint remote state preparation via Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs deterministically. At variance with all existing protocols, in ours the receiver contributes actively in both preparation and reconstruction steps, although he knows nothing about the quantum state to be prepared. -- Highlights: → Deterministic joint remote state preparation via EPR pairs is proposed. → Both general single- and two-qubit states are studied. → Differently from all existing protocols, in ours the receiver participates actively. → This is for the first time such a strategy is adopted.

  2. Effect of a Small Current Quark Mass on Dressed Gluon and Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Feng-Yao; GU Jian-Zhong; ZONG Hong-Shi; L(U)Xiao-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Dyson-Schwinger approach, a method for obtaining the small current quark mass effect on the dressed gluon and quark propagator is developed. A comparison with the results of the previous approach is given.

  3. A mechanistic model of environmental oxygen influence on the deterministic effects to human skin from space radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-McLaughlin, John

    During human spaceflight missions, controlled variation of atmospheric pressure and oxygen concentration from a sea-level based normal to hyperoxic levels may occur as part of operational procedure. This activity is of interest because it provides the relevant radiation exposure and dynamic oxygen concentration parameters that may lead to varying radiation sensitivity in the skin and other organs. Tumor hypoxia has been indicated as a primary factor in the decrease in efficacy of radiation therapy. These oxygen concentration effects have been largely demonstrated with low-LET radiations and to a lesser degree with high-LET primary radiations such as protons and heavy ions common in space exposure. In order to analyze the variation of oxygen concentration in human skin from spaceflight activities, a mathematical model of oxygen transport through the human cardiorespiratory system with pulmonary and cutaneous intake was implemented. Oxygen concentration was simulated at the various skin layers, from dermis to epidermis. Skin surface radiation doses and spectra from relatively high flux Solar Particle Events (SPEs) were calculated by the PHITS radiation transport code over a range of spacecraft and spacesuit thicknesses in terms of aluminum equivalence. A series of anatomical skin and shielding thicknesses were chosen to encompass the scope of radiation exposure levels as indicated by existing NASA skin phantom studies. To model the influence of oxygen with radiation exposure, microdosimetric oxygen fixation simulations were implemented using the Monte-Carlo-Damage-Simulation (MCDS) code. From these outputs, occurrence of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and relative biological effect (RBE) from radiation exposure with oxygen concentration dependence was established and correlated to spaceflight activities. It was determined that minimal but observable oxygen concentration transients occur in skin during environmental oxygen changes in spaceflight. The most significant

  4. Moment method, Higher order dispersion map and other effects in optical pulse propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Basanti; Chowdhury, A. Roy.

    2005-01-01

    Analytical and numerical procedures are applied to show that both third and second order dispersion maps can be explicitly constructed and their mutual effects on the optical pulse propagation are analysed. In these connection it is also shown how the other important features such as amplification, intra-channel Raman Scattering(IRS), fibre loss, centre frequency of the pulse spectrum effect the propagation of pulse. Due to the presence of IRS, moment method is adopted which is easily reduced...

  5. Effects of a general set of interactions on neutrino propagation in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, E

    2000-01-01

    This talk is based on the article hep-ph/9903517 written in collaborationwith Sven Bergmann and Yuval Grossman. An analysis of the effective potentialfor neutrino propagation in matter, assuming a generic set of Lorentz invariantnon-derivative interactions is presented. In addition to vector and axialvector couplings, also tensor interactions can give coherent effects if themedium is polarized, and the components of a tensor potential transverse to thedirection of neutrino propagation can induce a neutrino spin-flip.

  6. Effect of gravitational stratification on the propagation of a CME

    CERN Document Server

    Pagano, Paolo; Poedts, Stefaan

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to study the role of gravitational stratification on the propagation of CMEs. In particular, we assess how it influences the speed and shape of CMEs and under what conditions the flux rope ejection becomes a CME or when it is quenched. We ran a set of MHD simulations that adopt an eruptive initial magnetic configuration that has already been shown to be suitable for a flux rope ejection. We varied the temperature of the backgroud corona and the intensity of the initial magnetic field to tune the gravitational stratification and the amount of ejected magnetic flux. We used an automatic technique to track the expansion and the propagation of the magnetic flux rope in the MHD simulations. From the analysis of the parameter space, we evaluate the role of gravitational stratification on the CME speed and expansion. Our study shows that gravitational stratification plays a significant role in determining whether the flux rope ejection will turn into a full CME or whether the magnetic flux rope will stop ...

  7. Small Current Quark Mass Effects on Dressed-Quark Propagator in an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; WU Xiao-Hua; SUN Wei-Min; ZHAO En-Guang; WANG Fan

    2003-01-01

    A method for obtaining the smallcurrent quark mass dependence of the dressed quark propagator froman effective quark-quark interaction model is developed. Within this approach the small current quark mass effects ondressed-quark propagator have been studied. A comparison with previous results is given.

  8. Crevice corrosion {ampersand} pitting of high-level waste containers: the integration of deterministic {ampersand} probabilistic models (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in crevices on the initiation and propagation of pits. A deterministic calculation is used to estimate the accumulation of hydrogen ions (pH suppression) in the crevice solution due to the hydrolysis of dissolved metals. Pit initiation and growth within the crevice is then dealt with by either a probabilistic model, or an equivalent deterministic model. Ultimately, the role of intergranular corrosion will have to be considered. While the strategy presented here is very promising, the integrated model is not yet ready for precise quantitative predictions. Empirical expressions for the rate of penetration based upon experimental crevice corrosion data can be used in the interim period, until the integrated model can be refined. Bounding calculations based upon such empirical expressions can provide important insight into worst-case scenarios.

  9. Height-Deterministic Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowotka, Dirk; Srba, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    of regular languages and still closed under boolean language operations, are considered. Several of such language classes have been described in the literature. Here, we suggest a natural and intuitive model that subsumes all the formalisms proposed so far by employing height-deterministic pushdown automata...

  10. Deterministic indexing for packed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Skjoldjensen, Frederik Rye

    2017-01-01

    Given a string S of length n, the classic string indexing problem is to preprocess S into a compact data structure that supports efficient subsequent pattern queries. In the deterministic variant the goal is to solve the string indexing problem without any randomization (at preprocessing time...... or query time). In the packed variant the strings are stored with several character in a single word, giving us the opportunity to read multiple characters simultaneously. Our main result is a new string index in the deterministic and packed setting. Given a packed string S of length n over an alphabet σ......, we show how to preprocess S in O(n) (deterministic) time and space O(n) such that given a packed pattern string of length m we can support queries in (deterministic) time O (m/α + log m + log log σ), where α = w/log σ is the number of characters packed in a word of size w = θ(log n). Our query time...

  11. Experimental study on interference effect of rarefaction wave on laminar propagating flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jinhua; LIU Yi; WANG Qingsong; CHEN Peng

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the interference effect of rarefaction wave on the laminar flame propagating structure and pressure characteristics of methane-air mixture, a small scale combustion chamber has been built. The techniques of high speed Schlieren photograph, pressure measurement and so on, are used to study the influence of rarefaction wave on the laminar flame propagating through methane-air mixture. The results show that, after the rarefaction wave acts on the propagation laminar flame, the laminar combustion is fully transformed into turbulent combustion just during several milliseconds, which leads to a sharp increase in the burning surface area and the pressure rise rate.

  12. Effect of a sloping bottom on sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenko, A. N.; Kozitskii, S. B.; Manul'chev, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of field measurements of acoustic fields generated in autumn hydrological conditions of the Sea of Japan shelf by a TON-320Hz autonomous signal emitter, moored in the sea at a depth of 34 m, as well as by a low-frequency pulsed pneumoemitter lowered from from a ship to a horizon of 10 m. Reception was via a hydrophone moored at a depth of 41 m from a digital radio-hydroacoustic buoy and the hydrophone of an autonomous acoustic recorder lowered together with an autonomous hydrological sonde from a drifting ship. Sound propagation from these sources was simulated by a wide-angle parabolic equation taking into account the elastic properties of rocks making up the bottom, as well as by a 3-D mode parabolic equation in the adiabatic approximation for a "fluid" bottom.

  13. Guided propagation in a step-index, multi-mode fiber: effect of index difference variation on allowable TM propagation constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Todd R.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Passian, Ali; Wig, Andrew; Ferrell, Thomas L.

    1999-11-01

    The effect of variation of core and cladding index difference, Δ n= ncore- ncladding, on allowable values for the guided mode transverse magnetic propagation constants within a step-index, multi-mode optical fiber is investigated. We use a iterative computational technique to calculate the propagation constants for modes inside and outside the core that satisfy the boundary conditions contained within the characteristic eigen-equation for the TM field components. Evidence of a strong dependence of the allowable propagation constants on changes of Δ n is shown.

  14. Is there possibility of radioinduced deterministic effect during procedures of cardiac catheterism in patients?; Existe a possibilidade de inducao de efeito deterministico da radiacao ionizante durante procedimentos de cateterismo cardiaco em pacientes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Rogerio Fachel de; Bacelar, Alexandre; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe [Hospital das Clinicas, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Engenharia Biomedica. Grupo de Pesquisa e Pos-graduacao

    2001-07-01

    In this work were presented 22 cases of radiation deterministic effect in patients submitted to catheterism procedures by means of X-fluoroscope. Evaluation of the results suggest that the most of patients receive potential skin entrance doses over 2 Gy and some of them may have received doses over 12 Gy. At these doses, radiation induced erythema, ulceration and necrosis are all possible complications if the same entrance skin surface is exposed for the duration of the procedure.

  15. Exploration of Possible Quantum Gravity Effects with Neutrinos II Lorentz Violation in Neutrino Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakharov, Alexander; Harries, Nicholas; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Rubbia, André

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that the interactions of energetic particles with the foamy structure of space-time thought to be generated by quantum-gravitational (QG) effects might violate Lorentz invariance, so that they do not propagate at a universal speed of light. We consider the limits that may be set on a linear or quadratic violation of Lorentz invariance in the propagation of energetic neutrinos, v/c=[1 +- (E/M_\

  16. Range-Dependent Acoustic Propagation in Shallow Water with Elastic Bottom Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    naturally occurring, ubiquitous in the ocean, and a significant source of very low (~10Hz) noise in the ocean. They are excited by seismic activity in and...around the ocean basins. An important step in understanding them is a proper representation of the seismic sources in the sound propagation models...studying effects of propagation at low frequency bottom-interacting sound . PUBLICATIONS FY15 Frank, S., J. Collis, and R.I. Odom, “Elastic parabolic

  17. Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore in micropolar elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunita Deswal; Sushil K Tomar; Rajneesh Kumar

    2000-10-01

    Wave propagation in a cylindrical bore filled with viscous liquid and situated in a micropolar elastic medium of infinite extent is studied. Frequency equation for surface wave propagation near the surface of the cylindrical bore is obtained and the effect of viscosity and micropolarity on dispersion curves is observed. The earlier problems of Biot and of Banerji and Sengupta have been reduced as a special case of our problem.

  18. Deterministic extraction from weak random sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gabizon, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    In this research monograph, the author constructs deterministic extractors for several types of sources, using a methodology of recycling randomness which enables increasing the output length of deterministic extractors to near optimal length.

  19. Effect of material parameters on stress wave propagation during fast upsetting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-jin; CHENG Li-dong

    2008-01-01

    Based'on a dynamic analysis method and an explicit algorithm, a dynamic explicit finite element code was developed for modeling the fast upsetting process of block under drop hammer impact, in which the hammer velocity during the deformation was calculated by energy conservation law according to the operating principle of hammer equipment. The stress wave propagation and its effect on the deformation were analyzed by the stress and strain distributions. Industrial pure lead, oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper and 7039 aluminum alloy were chosen to investigate the effect of material parameters on the stress wave propagation. The results show that the stress wave propagates from top to bottom of block, and then reflects back when it reaches the bottom surface. After that, stress wave propagates and reflects repeatedly between the upper surface and bottom surface. The stress wave propagation has a significant effect on the deformation at the initial stage, and then becomes weak at the middle-final stage. When the ratio of elastic modulus or the slope of stress-strain curve to mass density becomes larger, the velocity of stress wave propagation increases, and the influence of stress wave on the deformation becomes small.

  20. The effect of subionospheric propagation on whistlers recorded by the DEMETER satellite – observation and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lefeuvre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available During a routine analysis of whistlers on the wide-band VLF recording of the DEMETER satellite, a specific signal structure of numerous fractional-hop whistlers, termed the "Spiky Whistler" (SpW was identified. These signals appear to be composed of a conventional whistler combined by the compound mode-patterns of guided wave propagation, suggesting a whistler excited by a lightning "tweek" spheric. Rigorous, full-wave modelling of tweeks, formed by the long subionospheric guided spheric propagation and of the impulse propagation across an arbitrarily inhomogeneous ionosphere, gave an accurate description of the SpW signals. The electromagnetic impulses excited by vertical, preferably CG lightning discharge, exhibited the effects of guided behaviour and of the dispersive ionospheric plasma along their paths. This modelling and interpretation provides a consistent way to determine the generation and propagation characteristics of the recorded SpW signals, as well as to describe the traversed medium.

  1. 3DEC modeling on effect of joints and interlayer on wave propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-hua; LI Xi-bing; ZUO Yu-jun; ZHOU Zi-long; ZHANG Yi-ping

    2006-01-01

    Firstly, studies on propagation of one-dimensional normally incident wave in rock mass containing no joint, a single joint and two parallel joints were conducted by Three Dimensional Distinct Element Codes(3DEC). By comparison of the modeling results with the theoretical solutions, it has been found that a good agreement between them has been achieved. It is verified that the 3DEC is capable of modeling wave propagation in rock masses. Secondly, propagation of normally incident P-wave across two parallel joints was studied. The modeling results show that transmission coefficient increases with the increasing ratio of joint spacing to wavelength at first, then decreases with the increasing ratio of joint spacing to wavelength, lastly keeps constant. Finally,effect of interlayer on wave propagation is investigated. It is shown that interlayer results in marked attenuation and leading phase,and that attenuation increases with the increasing frequency and the increasing thickness of interlayer.

  2. Effects of pore fluids in the subsurface on ultrasonic wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, Patricia Katharina [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This thesis investigates ultrasonic wave propagation in unconsolidated sands in the presence of different pore fluids. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in the sub-MHz range using quartz sand fully saturated with one or two liquids. Elastic wave propagation in unconsolidated granular material is computed with different numerical models: in one-dimension a scattering model based on an analytical propagator solution, in two dimensions a numerical approach using the boundary integral equation method, in three dimensions the local flow model (LFM), the combined Biot and squirt flow theory (BISQ) and the dynamic composite elastic medium theory (DYCEM). The combination of theoretical and experimental analysis yields a better understanding of how wave propagation in unconsolidated sand is affected by (a) homogeneous phase distribution; (b) inhomogeneous phase distribution, (fingering, gas inclusions); (c) pore fluids of different viscosity; (d) wettabilities of a porous medium. The first study reveals that the main ultrasonic P-wave signatures, as a function of the fraction on nonaqueous-phase liquids in initially water-saturated sand samples, can be explained by a 1-D scattering model. The next study investigates effects of pore fluid viscosity on elastic wave propagation, in laboratory experiments conducted with sand samples saturated with fluids of different viscosities. The last study concentrates on the wettability of the grains and its effect on elastic wave propagation and electrical resistivity.

  3. Analysis of FBC deterministic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has recently been discovered that the performance of a number of fossil energy conversion devices such as fluidized beds, pulsed combustors, steady combustors, and internal combustion engines are affected by deterministic chaos. It is now recognized that understanding and controlling the chaotic elements of these devices can lead to significantly improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. Application of these techniques to key fossil energy processes are expected to provide important competitive advantages for U.S. industry.

  4. Effect of environment on the propagation of electromagnetic waves in GRC 408E digital radiorelay devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojkan M. Radonjić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality transmission of digital signals from a transmitting radio-relay device to a receiving one depends on the impact of environmental effects on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. In this paper some of the most important effects are explained and modeled, especially those characteristic for the frequency range within which the GRC 408E operates. The modeling resulted in the conclusions about the quality of transmission of digital signals in the GRC 408E radio-relay equipment. Propagation of electromagnetic waves A radio-relay link is achieved by direct electromagnetic waves, provided there is a line of sight between the transmitting and receiving antenna of a radio-relay device. Electromagnetic waves on the road are exposed to various environmental influences causing phenomena such as bending, reflection, refraction, absorption and multiple propagation. Due to these environmental effects, the quality of information transmission is not satisfactory and a radio-relay link is not reliable. The approach to the analysis of the quality of links in digital radiorelay devices is different from the one in analog radio-relay devices. Therefore, the quality is seen through errors in the received bit ( BER , the propagation conditions are taken into account, a reservation for the fading is determined by other means, etc.. Phenomena which accompany the propagation of electromagnetic waves in digital radio-relay links The propagation of direct EM waves is followed by the following phenomena: - attenuation due to propagation, - diffraction (changing table, - refraction (refraction, - reflection (refusing, - absorption (absorption and - multiple wave propagation. Each of these has a negative effect on the quality of the received signal at the receiving antenna of the radio-relay device. Attenuation due to propagation of electromagnetic waves The main parameter for evaluating the quality of radio-relay links is the level of the field at the reception

  5. The influence of edge effects on crack propagation in snow stability tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Bair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Propagation tests are used to assess the likelihood of crack propagation in a snowpack, yet little is known about how test length affects propagation. Guidelines suggest beams with lengths around 1 m for Extended Column Tests (ECTs and Propagation Saw Tests (PSTs. To examine how test length affects propagation, we performed 163 ECTs and PSTs 1 to 10 m long. On days with full crack propagation in 1.0 to 1.5 m tests, we then made videos of tests 2 to 10 m long. We inserted markers for particle tracking to measure collapse amplitude, collapse wave speed, and wavelength. We also used a finite element model to simulate the strain energy release rate at fixed crack lengths. We find that: (1 the proportion of tests with full propagation decreased with test length; (2 collapse was greater at the ends of the beams than in the centers; (3 collapse amplitudes in the longer tests were consistent with the shorter tests and did not reach a constant value; (4 collapse wavelengths in the longer tests were around 3 m, 2 × greater than what is predicted by the anticrack model. Based on our field tests and FE models, we conclude that the shorter tests fully propagated more frequently because of increased stress concentration from the far edge. The FE model suggests this edge effect occurs for PSTs up to 2 m long or a crack to beam length ratio ≥ 0.20. Our results suggest that ECT and PST length guidelines may need to be revisited.

  6. Evaluating a linearized Euler equations model for strong turbulence effects on sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Loïc; Cheinet, Sylvain; Juvé, Daniel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Sound propagation outdoors is strongly affected by atmospheric turbulence. Under strongly perturbed conditions or long propagation paths, the sound fluctuations reach their asymptotic behavior, e.g., the intensity variance progressively saturates. The present study evaluates the ability of a numerical propagation model based on the finite-difference time-domain solving of the linearized Euler equations in quantitatively reproducing the wave statistics under strong and saturated intensity fluctuations. It is the continuation of a previous study where weak intensity fluctuations were considered. The numerical propagation model is presented and tested with two-dimensional harmonic sound propagation over long paths and strong atmospheric perturbations. The results are compared to quantitative theoretical or numerical predictions available on the wave statistics, including the log-amplitude variance and the probability density functions of the complex acoustic pressure. The match is excellent for the evaluated source frequencies and all sound fluctuations strengths. Hence, this model captures these many aspects of strong atmospheric turbulence effects on sound propagation. Finally, the model results for the intensity probability density function are compared with a standard fit by a generalized gamma function.

  7. Capturing atmospheric effects on 3D millimeter wave radar propagation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Richard D.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Keefer, Kevin J.; Stringer, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Traditional radar propagation modeling is done using a path transmittance with little to no input for weather and atmospheric conditions. As radar advances into the millimeter wave (MMW) regime, atmospheric effects such as attenuation and refraction become more pronounced than at traditional radar wavelengths. The DoD High Energy Laser Joint Technology Offices High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) in combination with the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) code have shown great promise simulating atmospheric effects on laser propagation. Indeed, the LEEDR radiative transfer code has been validated in the UV through RF. Our research attempts to apply these models to characterize the far field radar pattern in three dimensions as a signal propagates from an antenna towards a point in space. Furthermore, we do so using realistic three dimensional atmospheric profiles. The results from these simulations are compared to those from traditional radar propagation software packages. In summary, a fast running method has been investigated which can be incorporated into computational models to enhance understanding and prediction of MMW propagation through various atmospheric and weather conditions.

  8. Nonlinear effects in propagation of radiation of X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear effects accompanying the propagation of high-intensity beams of X-ray free-electron lasers are considered. It is shown that the X-ray wave field in the crystal significantly changes due to the formation of "hollow" atomic shells as a result of the photoelectric effect.

  9. On modelling of physical effects accompanying the propagation of action potentials in nerve fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri; Tamm, Kert; Laasmaa, Martin; Vendelin, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The recent theoretical and experimental studies have revealed many details of signal propagation in nervous systems. In this paper an attempt is made to unify various mathematical models which describe the signal propagation in nerve fibres. The analysis of existing single models permits to select the leading physiological effects. As a result, a more general mathematical model is described based on the coupling of action potentials with mechanical waves in a nerve fibre. The crucial issue is how to model coupling effects which are strongly linked to the ion currents through biomembranes.

  10. General investigation for longitudinal wave propagation under magnetic field effect via nonlocal elasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    U.GÜVEN

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the propagation of longitudinal stress waves under a longitu-dinal magnetic field is addressed using a unified nonlocal elasticity model with two scale coefficients. The analysis of wave motion is mainly based on the Love rod model. The effect of shear is also taken into account in the framework of Bishop’s correction. This analysis shows that the classical theory is not sufficient for this subject. However, this unified nonlocal elasticity model solely used in the present study reflects in a manner fairly realistic for the effect of the longitudinal magnetic field on the longitudinal wave propagation.

  11. Regulatory effects on the population dynamics and wave propagation in a cell lineage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mao-Xiang; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2016-03-21

    We consider the interplay of cell proliferation, cell differentiation (and de-differentiation), cell movement, and the effect of feedback regulations on the population and propagation dynamics of different cell types in a cell lineage model. Cells are assumed to secrete and respond to negative feedback molecules which act as a control on the cell lineage. The cell densities are described by coupled reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and the propagating wave front solutions in one dimension are investigated analytically and by numerical solutions. In particular, wavefront propagation speeds are obtained analytically and verified by numerical solutions of the equations. The emphasis is on the effects of the feedback regulations on different stages in the cell lineage. It is found that when the progenitor cell is negatively regulated, the populations of the cell lineage are strongly down-regulated with the steady growth rate of the progenitor cell being driven to zero beyond a critical regulatory strength. An analytic expression for the critical regulation strength in terms of the model parameters is derived and verified by numerical solutions. On the other hand, if the inhibition is acting on the differentiated cells, the change in the population dynamics and wave propagation speed is small. In addition, it is found that only the propagating speed of the progenitor cells is affected by the regulation when the diffusion of the differentiated cells is large. In the presence of de-differentiation, the effect on down-regulating the progenitor population is weakened and there is no effect on the propagation speed due to regulation, suggesting that the effect of regulatory control is diminished by de-differentiation pathways.

  12. Quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior and the crack morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Chen

    Full Text Available In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the "energy conversion factor" is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris.

  13. Effects of water temperature inversion layer on underwater sound propagation in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Kim, Eung; Choi, Bok Kyoung; Kim, Dong Sun

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a water temperature inversion layer on the propagation of acoustic waves in the western coastal sea of Jeju Island in April 2015. When the acoustic source and receiver are simultaneously located within the water temperature inversion layer depth, the long-range propagation of acoustic waves is confirmed by numerical modeling. This is caused by the duct effect due to the water temperature inversion phenomenon. For the experimental area without the water temperature inversion layer, when the acoustic source and receiver are simultaneously located below thermocline depth, the long-range propagation of acoustic waves is also confirmed. This is generally caused by the seasonal water temperature profile.

  14. Inclusion size effect on the fatigue crack propagation mechanism and fracture mechanics of a superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Takeshi; Bretz, Perter L.; Tien, John K.

    1992-02-01

    Low cycle fatigue life of nickel-base superalloys is enhanced as a consequence of inclusion reduction in the melt process; however, the functional dependencies between fatigue characteristics and inclusions have not been well investigated. In this study, the propagation mechanism of the fatigue crack initiated from inclusions is examined in fine-grained IN718, which is a representative turbine disc material for jet engines. There is a faceted-striated crack transition on the fracture surfaces. This faceted-striated transition also appears in the da/dN vs crack length curves. It is observed that the faceted crack propagation time can be more than 50 pct of total lifetime in the low cycle fatigue test. The significance of inclusion size effect is explained on the premise that the faceted fatigue crack propagation time scales with the inclusion size, which is taken as the initial crack length. A predictive protocol for determining inclusion size effect is given.

  15. Modelling and mitigating refractive propagation effects in precision pulsar timing observations

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M

    2016-01-01

    To obtain the most accurate pulse arrival times from radio pulsars, it is necessary to correct or mitigate the effects of the propagation of radio waves through the warm and ionised interstellar medium. We examine both the strength of propagation effects associated with large-scale electron-density variations and the methodology used to estimate infinite-frequency arrival times. Using simulations of two-dimensional phase-varying screens, we assess the strength and non-stationarity of timing perturbations associated with large-scale density variations. We identify additional contributions to arrival times that are stochastic in both radio frequency and time and therefore not amenable to correction solely using times of arrival. We attribute this to the frequency dependence of the trajectories of the propagating radio waves. We find that this limits the efficacy of low-frequency (metre-wavelength) observations. Incorporating low-frequency pulsar observations into precision timing campaigns is increasingly probl...

  16. USING POTATOES IN PROPAGATION TESTS FOR NONTARGET PLANT EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current tests required for pesticide registration under the FIFRA only investigate seedling emergence and early growth. Previous research with sulfonylurea (SU) herbicides has shown that significant impacts can occur to plant reproduction with little or no visible effect on vege...

  17. Deterministic Circular Self Test Path

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Ke; HU Yu; LI Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Circular self test path (CSTP) is an attractive technique for testing digital integrated circuits(IC) in the nanometer era, because it can easily provide at-speed test with small test data volume and short test application time. However, CSTP cannot reliably attain high fault coverage because of difficulty of testing random-pattern-resistant faults. This paper presents a deterministic CSTP (DCSTP) structure that consists of a DCSTP chain and jumping logic, to attain high fault coverage with low area overhead. Experimental results on ISCAS'89 benchmarks show that 100% fault coverage can be obtained with low area overhead and CPU time, especially for large circuits.

  18. A deterministic width function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Puente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of a deterministic fractal-multifractal (FM geometric method to model width functions of natural river networks, as derived distributions of simple multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions, is reported. It is first demonstrated that the FM procedure may be used to simulate natural width functions, preserving their most relevant features like their overall shape and texture and their observed power-law scaling on their power spectra. It is then shown, via two natural river networks (Racoon and Brushy creeks in the United States, that the FM approach may also be used to closely approximate existing width functions.

  19. Acoustic wave propagation and stochastic effects in metamaterial absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Willatzen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    We show how stochastic variations of the effective parameters of anisotropic structured metamaterials can lead to increased absorption of sound. For this, we derive an analytical model based on the Bourret approximation and illustrate the immediate connection between material disorder and attenua...

  20. Effective poroelastic model for one-dimensional wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudarova, A.; Van Dalen, K.N.; Drijkoningen, G.G.

    2013-01-01

    An effective poroelastic model is proposed that describes seismic attenuation and dispersion in periodically layeredmedia. In this model, the layers represent mesoscopic-scale heterogeneities (larger than the grain and pore sizes but smaller than the wavelength) that can occur both in fluid and soli

  1. Wave propagation phenomena in metamaterials for retrieving of effective parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Ha, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the talk we give an overview of the developed restoration procedures and discuss their pros and cons in connection of assigning effective parameters (EP) to metamaterials (MMs). There are plenty of notorious physical phenomena preserving the unambiguous retrieving of EP, like strong coupling...

  2. Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noutsos, A.; Sobey, C.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Weltevrede, P.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Karastergiou, A.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Alexov, A.; Breton, R.P.; Bilous, A.V.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.M.; Hassall, T.E.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Keane, E.F.; Osłowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B.W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zagkouris, K.; Anderson, K.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M.; Broderick, J.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Coenen, T.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fender, R.; Garsden, H.; Jonker, P.; Law, C.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; Miller-Jones, J.; Molenaar, G.; Osten, R.; Pietka, M.; Rol, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Scheers, B.; Spreeuw, H.; Staley, T.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Wijers, R.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M.; Zarka, P.; van der Horst, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects resulting from t

  3. Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noutsos, A.; Sobey, C.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Weltevrede, P.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Karastergiou, A.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Alexov, A.; Breton, R.P.; Bilous, A.V.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T.E.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Keane, E.F.; Oslowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B.W.; Veen, S. ter; Leeuwen, J. van; Zagkouris, K.; Anderson, K.; Baehren, L.; Bell, M.E.; Broderick, J.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Coenen, T.; Corbel, S.; Eisloeffel, J.; Fender, R.P.; Garsden, H.; Jonker, P.; Law, C.J.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Molenaar, G.; Osten, R.; Pietka, M.; Rol, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Scheers, L.H.A.; Spreeuw, H.; Staley, T.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M.W.; Zarka, P.; Horst, A. van der

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects resulting from t

  4. Signal Propagation in the Human Visual Pathways: An Effective Connectivity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Prasad, Girijesh; Fagan, Andrew J; Reilly, Richard B; Martens, Sven; Meaney, James F; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2015-09-30

    Although the visual system has been extensively investigated, an integrated account of the spatiotemporal dynamics of long-range signal propagation along the human visual pathways is not completely known or validated. In this work, we used dynamic causal modeling approach to provide insights into the underlying neural circuit dynamics of pattern reversal visual-evoked potentials extracted from concurrent EEG-fMRI data. A recurrent forward-backward connectivity model, consisting of multiple interacting brain regions identified by EEG source localization aided by fMRI spatial priors, best accounted for the data dynamics. Sources were first identified in the thalamic area, primary visual cortex, as well as higher cortical areas along the ventral and dorsal visual processing streams. Consistent with hierarchical early visual processing, the model disclosed and quantified the neural temporal dynamics across the identified activity sources. This signal propagation is dominated by a feedforward process, but we also found weaker effective feedback connectivity. Using effective connectivity analysis, the optimal dynamic causal modeling revealed enhanced connectivity along the dorsal pathway but slightly suppressed connectivity along the ventral pathway. A bias was also found in favor of the right hemisphere consistent with functional attentional asymmetry. This study validates, for the first time, the long-range signal propagation timing in the human visual pathways. A similar modeling approach can potentially be used to understand other cognitive processes and dysfunctions in signal propagation in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Significance statement: An integrated account of long-range visual signal propagation in the human brain is currently incomplete. Using computational neural modeling on our acquired concurrent EEG-fMRI data under a visual evoked task, we found not only a substantial forward propagation toward "higher-order" brain regions but also a

  5. Effective Propagation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons on Graphene-Protected Single-Crystalline Silver Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun Young; Ha, Jeong Sook; Lee, Sang-Soo; Park, Jong Hyuk

    2017-02-08

    Silver (Ag) is a promising material for manipulation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), due to its optical and electrical properties; however, the intrinsic properties are easily degraded by surface corrosion under atmospheric conditions, restricting its applications in plasmonics. Here, we address this issue via single-crystalline Ag films protected with graphene layers and demonstrate effective propagation of SPPs on the graphene-protected Ag films. Single-crystalline Ag films with atomically flat surfaces are prepared by epitaxial growth; graphene layers are then transferred onto the Ag films. The propagation lengths of SPPs on the graphene-protected Ag films are measured, and their variations under corrosive conditions are investigated. The initial SPP propagation lengths for the bare Ag films are very long (about 50 μm in the wavelength range 550-700 nm). However, the values decrease significantly (11-13 μm) under corrosive conditions. On the contrary, the double-layer-graphene-protected Ag films exhibit SPP propagation lengths of about 23 μm and retain over 90% (21-23 μm) of the propagation lengths even after exposure to corrosive conditions, guaranteeing the reliability of Ag plasmonic devices. This approach can encourage extending the application of the graphene-metal hybrid structure and thus developing Ag plasmonic devices.

  6. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  7. Exploration of possible quantum gravity effects with neutrinos II: Lorentz violation in neutrino propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov, Alexander; Ellis, John; Harries, Nicholas; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Rubbia, André

    2009-06-01

    It has been suggested that the interactions of energetic particles with the foamy structure of space-time thought to be generated by quantum-gravitational (QG) effects might violate Lorentz invariance, so that they do not propagate at a universal speed of light. We consider the limits that may be set on a linear or quadratic violation of Lorentz invariance in the propagation of energetic neutrinos, v/c = [1 ± (E/MvQG1)] or [1 ± (E/MvQG2)2], using data from supernova explosions and the OPERA long-baseline neutrino experiment.

  8. A simple and effective method for vegetative propagation of an endangered medicinal plant Salacia oblonga Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, K G K; Suneetha, G; Surekha, Ch

    2016-01-01

    Salacia oblonga Wall. is an endangered medicinal plant whose conservation is urgently needed, as it is extensively used in the Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine to treat diabetes mellitus. This study shows an easy, effective and simple method of conserving genetic identity and producing elite clones of S. oblonga through vegetative propagation. Vegetative propagation was achieved using roots (R), stems with leaves (SL) and stems without leaves (S) with different concentrations (0-500 ppm) of indole butyric acid (IBA). Explants S and SL showed maximum shooting response with 300 ppm IBA and explant R showed maximum response with 200 ppm IBA.

  9. Effects of constant voltage on time evolution of propagating concentration polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangle, Thomas A; Mani, Ali; Santiago, Juan G

    2010-04-15

    We extend the analytical theory of propagating concentration polarization (CP) to describe and compare the effects of constant-voltage versus constant-current conditions on the transient development of CP enrichment and depletion zones. We support our analysis with computational and experimental results. We find that at constant voltage, enrichment and depletion regions spread as t(1/2) as opposed to the previously observed t(1) scaling for constant current conditions. At low, constant voltages, the growth and propagation of CP zones can easily be misinterpreted as nonpropagating behavior.

  10. Effect of CH4–Air Ratios on Gas Explosion Flame Microstructure and Propagation Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the inner mechanism of gas explosion dynamic behavior affected by gas equivalent concentration, a high speed Schlieren image system and flow field measurement technology was applied to record the gas explosion flame propagation and flame structure transition. The results show that a flame front structure transition occurs, followed by a flame accelerating propagation process. The laminar to turbulence transition was the essential cause of the flame structure changes. The laminar flame propagation behavior was influenced mainly by gas expansion and fore-compressive wave effect, while the turbulent flame speed mostly depended on turbulence intensity, which also played an important role in peak value of the explosive pressure and flame speed. On the condition that the laminar-turbulent transition was easier to form, the conclusion was drawn that, the lowest CH4 concentration for maximum overpressure can be obtained, which was the essential reason why the ideal explosive concentration differs under different test conditions.

  11. Spatial Damping of Propagating Kink Waves Due to Resonant Absorption: Effect of Background Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Observations show the ubiquitous presence of propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves in the solar atmosphere. Waves and flows are often observed simultaneously. Due to plasma inhomogeneity in the perpendicular direction to the magnetic field, kink waves are spatially damped by resonant absorption. The presence of flow may affect the wave spatial damping. Here, we investigate the effect of longitudinal background flow on the propagation and spatial damping of resonant kink waves in transversely nonuniform magnetic flux tubes. We combine approximate analytical theory with numerical investigation. The analytical theory uses the thin tube (TT) and thin boundary (TB) approximations to obtain expressions for the wavelength and the damping length. Numerically, we verify the previously obtained analytical expressions by means of the full solution of the resistive MHD eigenvalue problem beyond the TT and TB approximations. We find that the backward and forward propagating waves have different wavelengths and ...

  12. Effect of an energy reservoir on the atmospheric propagation of laser-plasma filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Shmuel; Peñano, Joseph; Sprangle, Phillip; Zigler, Arie

    2008-04-18

    The ability to select and stabilize a single filament during propagation of an ultrashort, high-intensity laser pulse in air makes it possible to examine the longitudinal structure of the plasma channel left in its wake. We present the first detailed measurements and numerical 3-D simulations of the longitudinal plasma density variation in a laser-plasma filament after it passes through an iris that blocks the surrounding energy reservoir. Since no compensation is available from the surrounding background energy, filament propagation is terminated after a few centimeters. For this experiment, simulations indicate that filament propagation is terminated by plasma defocusing and ionization loss, which reduces the pulse power below the effective self-focusing power. With no blockage, a plasma filament length of over a few meters was observed.

  13. Wave propagation in metamaterials and effective parameters retrieving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Ha, S.; Sukhorukov, A.;

    2011-01-01

    of the determined effective parameters and applicability to thin slabs only. The other methods based, for example, on the eigenfunctions calculations [Menzel], or analytical calculations [Simovski] require advanced skills either in numerical methods and programming or in analytical derivations and maybe considered...... applicable to relatively thick slab when we can neglect the reflection from the rear interface [2]. Then phase and amplitude dependencies versus coordinates (cell number) allow the refractive index retrieving. Getting the input (Bloch) impedance from the reflection on the input interface serves to determine...

  14. Geodetic refraction effects of electromagnetic wave propagation through the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    With very few exceptions, geodetic measurements use electro­ magnetic radiation in order to measure directions, distances, time delays, and Doppler frequency shifts, to name the main ter­ restrial and space observables. Depending on the wavelength of the radiation and the purpose of the measurements, the follow­ ing parameters of the electromagnetic wave are measured: ampli­ tude, phase, angle-of-arrival, polarisation and frequency. Ac­ curate corrections have to be applied to the measurements in order to take into account the effects of the intervening medium between transmitter and receiver. The known solutions use at­ mospheric models, special observation programs, remote sensing techniques and instrumental methods. It has been shown that the effects of the earth's atmospheric envelope present a fundamental limitation to the accuracy and precision of geodetic measurements. This applies equally to ter­ restrial and space applications. Instrumental accuracies are al­ ready below the atmospherically i...

  15. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed-Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun; SUN Wei-Min; CHANG Chao-Hsi; WANG Fan

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagatorfrom an effective quark-quark interaction model. Within this approach we explore the chemical potential dependenceof the dressed-quark propagator, which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinementorder parameters. A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  16. Crack Closure Effects on Fatigue Crack Propagation Rates: Application of a Proposed Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. F. O. Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural design taking into account fatigue damage requires a thorough knowledge of the behaviour of materials. In addition to the monotonic behaviour of the materials, it is also important to assess their cyclic response and fatigue crack propagation behaviour under constant and variable amplitude loading. Materials whenever subjected to fatigue cracking may exhibit mean stress effects as well as crack closure effects. In this paper, a theoretical model based on the same initial assumptions of the analytical models proposed by Hudak and Davidson and Ellyin is proposed to estimate the influence of the crack closure effects. This proposal based further on Walker’s propagation law was applied to the P355NL1 steel using an inverse analysis (back-extrapolation of experimental fatigue crack propagation results. Based on this proposed model it is possible to estimate the crack opening stress intensity factor, Kop, the relationship between U=ΔKeff/ΔK quantity and the stress intensity factor, the crack length, and the stress ratio. This allows the evaluation of the influence of the crack closure effects for different stress ratio levels, in the fatigue crack propagation rates. Finally, a good agreement is found between the proposed theoretical model and the analytical models presented in the literature.

  17. Wave propagation method as an accurate technique for effective refractive index retrieving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    An effective parameters retrieval method based on the wave propagation simulation is proposed and compared with the standard S-parameter procedure. The method is free from possible mistakes originated by the multiple branching of solutions in the S-parameter procedure and shows high accuracy. The...

  18. Numerical Investigation of Statistical Turbulence Effects on Beam Propagation through 2-D Shear Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    describe turbulence effects on optical beam propagation. [6] Toselli et al summarized recent experimental results that did not agree with analytical...Tennekes, H. and J. L. Lumley. A First Course in Turbulence. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, First edition, 1972. [18] Toselli , Italo, Larry C. Andrews

  19. Simulation of Broadband Time Histories Combining Deterministic and Stochastic Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, R. W.; Pitarka, A.

    2003-12-01

    We present a methodology for generating broadband (0 - 10 Hz) ground motion time histories using a hybrid technique that combines a stochastic approach at high frequencies with a deterministic approach at low frequencies. Currently, the methodology is being developed for moderate and larger crustal earthquakes, although the technique can theoretically be applied to other classes of events as well. The broadband response is obtained by summing the separate responses in the time domain using matched butterworth filters centered at 1 Hz. We use a kinematic description of fault rupture, incorporating spatial heterogeneity in slip, rupture velocity and rise time by discretizing an extended finite-fault into a number of smaller subfaults. The stochastic approach sums the response for each subfault assuming a random phase, an omega-squared source spectrum and simplified Green's functions (Boore, 1983). Gross impedance effects are incorporated using quarter wavelength theory (Boore and Joyner, 1997) to bring the response to a generic baserock level (e.g., Vs = 1000 m/s). The deterministic approach sums the response for many point sources distributed across each subfault. Wave propagation is modeled using a 3D viscoelastic finite difference algorithm with the minimum shear wave velocity set at 620 m/s. Short- and mid-period amplification factors provided by Borcherdt (1994) are used to develop frequency dependent site amplification functions. The amplification functions are applied to the stochastic and determinsitic responses separately since these may have different (computational) reference site velocities. The site velocity is taken as the measured or estimated value of {Vs}30. The use of these amplification factors is attractive because they account for non-linear response by considering the input acceleration level. We note that although these design factors are strictly defined for response spectra, we have applied them to the Fourier amplitude spectra of our

  20. Elliptic nozzle aspect ratio effect on controlled jet propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindh Kumar, S. M.; Rathakrishnan, Ethirajan

    2017-04-01

    The present study deals with the control of a Mach 2 elliptic jet from a convergent-divergent elliptic nozzle of aspect ratio 4 using tabs at the nozzle exit. The experiments were carried out for rectangular and triangular tabs of the same blockage, placed along the major and minor axes of the nozzle exit, at different levels of nozzle expansion. The triangular tabs along the minor axis promoted superior mixing compared to the other controlled jets and caused substantial core length reduction at all the nozzle pressure ratios studied. The rectangular tabs along the minor axis caused core length reduction at all pressure ratios, but the values were minimal compared to that of triangular tabs along the minor axis. For all the test conditions, the mixing promotion caused by tabs along the major axis was inferior to that of tabs along the minor axis. The waves present in the core of controlled jets were visualized using a shadowgraph. Comparison of the present results with the results of a controlled Mach 2 elliptic jet of aspect ratio 2 (Aravindh Kumar and Sathakrishnan 2016 J. Propulsion Power 32 121-33, Aravindh Kumar and Rathakrishnan 2016 J. Aerospace Eng. at press (doi:10.1177/0954410016652921)) show that for all levels of expansion, the mixing effectiveness of triangular tabs along the minor axis of an aspect ratio 4 nozzle is better than rectangular or triangular tabs along the minor axis of an aspect ratio 2 nozzle.

  1. The effect of endodontic procedures on apical crack initiation and propagation ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, C G; Yoshioka, T; Jindan, P; Kobayashi, C; Suda, H

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the potential effects of endodontic procedures (instrumentation and filling) on crack initiation and propagation in apical dentine. Forty extracted single-rooted premolars with two canals were selected, 1.5 mm of the apex was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth and the surface polished. The specimens were divided into 4 groups. The buccal canals of groups A, B and C were enlarged to size 40 with manual K-files. Group A was filled with gutta-percha using lateral condensation and vertical compaction without sealer. Group B was filled with the same method as group A except only lateral condensation was used. Group C was left unfilled, while group D was left unprepared and unfilled. Images of the resected surface were taken after resection (baseline), after canal preparation, after filling and after 4-week storage. The images were then inspected for cracks originating from the canal. A significant effect of preparation on crack initiation (P  0.05) or 4-week storage on crack initiation (P > 0.05) was found (logistic regression). Fisher's exact test revealed a significant effect of filling on crack propagation (P propagation (P > 0.05). Root canal procedures can potentially initiate and propagate cracks from within the root canal in the apical region. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effect of segregations on mechanical properties and crack propagation in spring steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Žužek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Considerable efforts have been made over the last decades to improve performance of spring steels, which would increase the service time of springs and also allow vehicles weight reduction. There are different possibilities of improving properties of spring steels, from modifying the chemical composition of steels to optimizing the deformation process and changing the heat treatment parameters. Another way of improving steel properties is through refining the microstructure and reducing amount of inclusions. Therefore, the focus of the current investigation was to determine the effect of more uniform and cleaner microstructure obtained through electro-slag remelting (ESR of steel on the mechanical and dynamic properties of spring steel, with special focus on the resistance to fatigue crack propagation. Effect of the microstructure refinement was evaluated in terms of tensile strength, elongation, fracture and impact toughness, and fatigue resistance under bending and tensile loading. After the mechanical tests the fracture surfaces of samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and the influence of microstructure properties on the crack propagation and crack propagation resistance was studied. Investigation was performed on hot rolled, soft annealed and vacuum heat treated 51CrV4 spring steel produced by conventional continuous casting and compared with steel additional refined through ESR. Results shows that elimination of segregations and microstructure refinement using additional ESR process gives some improvement in terms of better repeatability and reduced scattering, but on the other hand it has negative effect on crack propagation resistance and fatigue properties of the spring steel.

  3. Viscothermal wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, Marten Jozef Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the accuracy, efficiency and range of applicability of various (approximate) models for viscothermal wave propagation are investigated. Models for viscothermal wave propagation describe thewave behavior of fluids including viscous and thermal effects. Cases where viscothermal effects a

  4. Terahertz Wave Propagation in a Nanotube Conveying Fluid Taking into Account Surface Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In nanoscale structure sizes, the surface-to-bulk energy ratio is high and the surface effects must be taken into account. Surface effect plays a key role in accurately predicting the vibration behavior of nanostructures. In this paper, the wave behaviors of a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT conveying fluid are studied. The nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory is used and the surface effect is taken into account. It is found that the fluid can flow at a very high flow velocity and the wave propagates in the terahertz frequency range. The surface effects can significantly enhance the propagating frequency. This finding is different from the classical model where the surface effect is neglected.

  5. Averaging for a Fully-Coupled Piecewise Deterministic Markov Process in Infinite Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Genadot, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the generalized Hodgkin-Huxley model introduced by Austin in \\cite{Austin}. This model describes the propagation of an action potential along the axon of a neuron at the scale of ion channels. Mathematically, this model is a fully-coupled Piecewise Deterministic Markov Process (PDMP) in infinite dimension. We introduce two time scales in this model in considering that some ion channels open and close at faster jump rates than others. We perform a slow-fast analysis of this model and prove that asymptotically this two time scales model reduces to the so called averaged model which is still a PDMP in infinite dimension for which we provide effective evolution equations and jump rates.

  6. Strange Attractors in Multipath propagation Detection and characterisation

    CERN Document Server

    Tannous, C; Angus, A G

    2001-01-01

    Multipath propagation of radio waves in indoor/outdoor environments shows a highly irregular behavior as a function of time. Typical modeling of this phenomenon assumes the received signal is a stochastic process composed of the superposition of various altered replicas of the transmitted one, their amplitudes and phases being drawn from specific probability densities. We set out to explore the hypothesis of the presence of deterministic chaos in signals propagating inside various buildings at the University of Calgary. The correlation dimension versus embedding dimension saturates to a value between 3 and 4 for various antenna polarizations. The full Liapunov spectrum calculated contains two positive exponents and yields through the Kaplan-Yorke conjecture the same dimension obtained from the correlation sum. The presence of strange attractors in multipath propagation hints to better ways to predict the behaviour of the signal and better methods to counter the effects of interference. The use of Neural Netwo...

  7. ANALYSIS ON CHARACTERISTICS OF ATMOSPHERIC DUCT AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE PROPAGATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚展予; 赵柏林; 李万彪; 朱元竞; 杜金林; 戴福山

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of introducing the basic categories of atmospheric refraction and their existing conditions, the forming processes of three kinds of atmospheric duets are expounded. Several main characteristics of atmospheric duct are summarized and analyzed, and field sounding data from the WEstern North-Pacific cloud-radiation EXperiment (WENPEX) and meteorological data around the Xisha sea area are used to validate these characteristics. Meanwhile the sensitivities of the evaporation duct height to the variations of atmospheric humidity, the air-sea temperature difference, and horizontal wind speed are examined. With the analysis of the effect of atmospheric duct on the propagation of electromagnetic wave, the maximum trapped-wavelength and the critical emitting angle of elevation for electromagnetic wave which can form duct propagation are derived.At the same time the four kinds of necessary conditions for electromagnetic wave to form duct propagation are brought forward. The effects of atmospheric duct on ultrashort wave propagation,radar observation, short wave communication etc. are also discussed.

  8. Estimating the epidemic threshold on networks by deterministic connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kezan, E-mail: lkzzr@sohu.com; Zhu, Guanghu [School of Mathematics and Computing Science, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Fu, Xinchu [Department of Mathematics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Small, Michael [School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    For many epidemic networks some connections between nodes are treated as deterministic, while the remainder are random and have different connection probabilities. By applying spectral analysis to several constructed models, we find that one can estimate the epidemic thresholds of these networks by investigating information from only the deterministic connections. Nonetheless, in these models, generic nonuniform stochastic connections and heterogeneous community structure are also considered. The estimation of epidemic thresholds is achieved via inequalities with upper and lower bounds, which are found to be in very good agreement with numerical simulations. Since these deterministic connections are easier to detect than those stochastic connections, this work provides a feasible and effective method to estimate the epidemic thresholds in real epidemic networks.

  9. Deterministic and stochastic evolution equations for fully dispersive and weakly nonlinear waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldeberky, Y.; Madsen, Per A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new and more accurate set of deterministic evolution equations for the propagation of fully dispersive, weakly nonlinear, irregular, multidirectional waves. The equations are derived directly from the Laplace equation with leading order nonlinearity in the surface boundary c...

  10. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures.

  11. Deterministic approaches for noncoherent communications with chaotic carriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiongying; Qiu Shuisheng; Francis. C. M. Lau

    2005-01-01

    Two problems are proposed. The first one is the noise decontamination of chaotic carriers using a deterministic approach to reconstruct pseudo trajectories, the second is the design of communications schemes with chaotic carriers. After presenting our deterministic noise decontamination algorithm, conventional chaos shift keying (CSK) communication system is applied. The difference of Euclidean distance between noisy trajectory and decontaminated trajectory in phase space could be utilized to non-coherently detect the sent symbol simply and effectively. It is shown that this detection method can achieve the bit error rate performance comparable to other non-coherent systems.

  12. In-medium covariant propagator of baryons under a strong magnetic field: Effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, R.M.; Paoli, A.L. de [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, and IFLP, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    We obtain the covariant propagator at finite temperature for interacting baryons immersed in a strong magnetic field. The effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments on the Green function are fully taken into account. We make an expansion in terms of eigenfunctions of a Dirac field, which leads us to a compact form of its propagator. We present some simple applications of these propagators, where the statistical averages of nuclear currents and energy density are evaluated. (orig.)

  13. In-medium covariant propagator of baryons under a strong magnetic field: Effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, R. M.; De Paoli, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    We obtain the covariant propagator at finite temperature for interacting baryons immersed in a strong magnetic field. The effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments on the Green function are fully taken into account. We make an expansion in terms of eigenfunctions of a Dirac field, which leads us to a compact form of its propagator. We present some simple applications of these propagators, where the statistical averages of nuclear currents and energy density are evaluated.

  14. Crevice corrosion and pitting of high-level waste containers: a first step towards the integration of deterministic and probabilistic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J. C., LLNL

    1997-07-01

    An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in crevices on pit initiation and propagation. A deterministic calculation is used to estimate the accumulation of hydrogen ions in the crevice solution due to equilibrium hydrolysis reactions of dissolved metal. Pit initiation and growth within the crevice is dealt with by either a stochastic probability model, or an equivalent deterministic model. While the strategy presented here is very promising, the integrated model is not yet ready for accurate quantitative predictions. Empirical expressions for the rate of penetration based upon experimental crevice corrosion data should be used in the interim period, until the integrated model can be refined. Both approaches are discussed.

  15. Memory Effects in Turbulent Dynamo Generation and Propagation of Large Scale Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, S; Zubarev, A; Fedotov, Sergei; Ivanov, Alexey; Zubarev, Andrey

    2001-01-01

    We are concerned with large scale magnetic field dynamo generation and propagation of magnetic fronts in turbulent electrically conducting fluids. An effective equation for the large scale magnetic field is developed here that takes into account the finite correlation times of the turbulent flow. This equation involves the memory integrals corresponding to the dynamo source term describing the alpha-effect and turbulent transport of magnetic field. We find that the memory effects can drastically change the dynamo growth rate, in particular, non-local turbulent transport might increase the growth rate several times compared to the conventional gradient transport expression. Moreover, the integral turbulent transport term leads to a large decrease of the speed of magnetic front propagation.

  16. Analytic properties of the quark propagator from an effective infrared interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windisch, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, I investigate the analytic properties of the quark propagator Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) in the Landau gauge. In the quark self-energy, the combined gluon propagator and quark-gluon vertex is modeled by an effective interaction (the so-called Maris-Tandy interaction), where the ultraviolet term is neglected. This renders the loop integrand of the quark self-energy analytic on the cut plane -π Supplemental Material, which can be used to parametrize solutions of the complex quark propagator for a wide range of bare mass values and for large bound-state masses. This study is a first step towards an extension of previous work on the analytic continuation of perturbative one-loop integrals, with the long-term goal of establishing a framework that allows for the numerical extraction of the analytic properties of the quark propagator with a truncation that extends beyond the rainbow by making adequate adjustments in the contour of the radial integration of the quark self-energy.

  17. Effects of initial frequency chirp on the linear propagation characteristics of the exponential optical pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Hong-Jun; Liu Shan-Liang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the linear propagation characteristics of the exponential optical pulse with initial linear and nonlinear frequency chirp are numerically studied in a single mode fibre for β2< 0. It can be found that the temporal full width at half maximum and time-bandwidth product of exponential pulse monotonically increase with the increase of propagation distance and decrease with the increase of linear chirp C for C < 0.5, go through an initial decreasing stage near ζ = 1, then increase with the increase of propagation distance and linear chirp C for C ≥ 0.5. The broadening of pulses with negative chirp is faster than that with positive chirp. The exponential pulse with linear chirp gradually evolves into a near-Gaussian pulse. The effect of nonlinear chirp on waveform of the pulse is much greater than that of linear chirp. The temporal waveform breaking of exponential pulse with nonlinear chirp is first observed in linear propagation. Furthermore, the expressions of the spectral width and time-bandwidth product of the exponential optical pulse with the frequency chirp are given by use of the numerical analysis method.

  18. Effect of Turbulence on Flame Propagation in Cornstarch Dust-Air Mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuangfeng WANG; Yikang PU; Fu JIA; Artur GUTKOWSKI

    2006-01-01

    Following the quantitative determination of dust cloud parameters, this study investigated the flame propagation through cornstarch dust clouds in a vertical duct of 780 mm height and 160×160 mm square cross section, and gave particular attention to the effect of turbulence on flame characteristics. The turbulence induced by dust dispersion process was measured using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Upward propagating dust flames were visualized with direct light and shadow photography. The results show that a critical value of the turbulence intensity can be specified below which laminar flame propagation would be established. This transition condition is about 10 cm/s. Themeasured propagation speed of laminar flames appears to be in the range of 0.45-0.56 m/s, consistent with the measurements reported in the literature. For the present experimental conditions, the flame speed is little sensitive to the variations in dust concentration. Some information on the flame structure was revealed from the shadow records, showing the typical heterogeneous feature of dust combustion process.

  19. The effect of temperature and humidity on dengue virus propagation in Aedes aegypti mosquitos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, H M; Aye, K M; Thein, S

    1998-06-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on dengue virus propagation in the mosquito as one of the possible contributing factors to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreaks was studied. Ae. aegypti mosquitos were reared under standard conditions and inoculated intrathoracically with dengue virus. Virus propagation in the mosquitos was determined at the temperature and relative humidity of all 3 seasons of Yangon and for the simulated temperature and relative humidity of Singapore. The virus propagation was detected by direct fluorescent antibody technique (DFAT) with mosquito head squash and the virus titer was determined by plaque forming unit test (PFUT) in baby hamster kidney-21 cells. The results show that the infected mosquitos kept under the conditions of the rainy season and under the simulated conditions of Singapore had a significantly higher virus titer (p=<0.05) when compared with the other 2 seasons of Yangon. So it is thought that the temperature and relative humidity of the rainy season of Yangon and that of Singapore favors dengue virus propagation in the mosquito and is one of the contributing factors to the occurence of DHF outbreaks.

  20. Experimental verification of effect of horizontal inhomogeneity of evaporation duct on electromagnetic wave propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史阳; 杨坤德; 杨益新; 马远良

    2015-01-01

    The evaporation duct which forms above the ocean surface has a significant influence on electromagnetic wave prop-agation above 2 GHz over the ocean. The effects of horizontal inhomogeneity of evaporation duct on electromagnetic wave propagation are investigated, both in numerical simulation and experimental observation methods, in this paper. Firstly, the features of the horizontal inhomogeneity of the evaporation duct are discussed. Then, two typical inhomogeneous cases are simulated and compared with the homogeneous case. The result shows that path loss is significantly higher than that in the homogeneous case when the evaporation duct height (EDH) at the receiver is lower than that at the transmitter. It is also concluded that the horizontal inhomogeneity of the evaporation duct has a significant influence when the EDH is low or when the electromagnetic wave frequency is lower than 13 GHz. Finally, experimental data collected on a 149-km long propagation path in the South China Sea in 2013 are used to verify the conclusion. The experimental results are consis-tent with the simulation results. The horizontal inhomogeneity of evaporation duct should be considered when modeling electromagnetic wave propagation over the ocean.

  1. Reverse-feeding effect of epidemic by propagators in two-layered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayu, Wu; Yanping, Zhao; Muhua, Zheng; Jie, Zhou; Zonghua, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Epidemic spreading has been studied for a long time and is currently focused on the spreading of multiple pathogens, especially in multiplex networks. However, little attention has been paid to the case where the mutual influence between different pathogens comes from a fraction of epidemic propagators, such as bisexual people in two separated groups of heterosexual and homosexual people. We here study this topic by presenting a network model of two layers connected by impulsive links, in contrast to the persistent links in each layer. We let each layer have a distinct pathogen and their interactive infection is implemented by a fraction of propagators jumping between the corresponding pairs of nodes in the two layers. By this model we show that (i) the propagators take the key role to transmit pathogens from one layer to the other, which significantly influences the stabilized epidemics; (ii) the epidemic thresholds will be changed by the propagators; and (iii) a reverse-feeding effect can be expected when the infective rate is smaller than its threshold of isolated spreading. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the numerical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11135001, 11375066, and 11405059) and the National Basic Key Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100).

  2. Deterministic Tripartite Controlled Remote State Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ming-huang; Nie, Yi-you

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate that a seven-qubit entangled state can be used to realize the deterministic tripartite controlled remote state preparation by performing only Pauli operations and single-qubit measurements. In our scheme, three distant senders can simultaneously and deterministically exchange their quantum state with the other senders under the control of the supervisor.

  3. Piecewise deterministic Markov processes : an analytic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkurdi, Taleb Salameh Odeh

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this thesis, piecewise deterministic Markov processes, an analytic approach, is on the border between analysis and probability theory. Such processes can either be viewed as random perturbations of deterministic dynamical systems in an impulsive fashion, or as a particular kind of

  4. Comparative Study on Prediction Effects of Short Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate by Two Different Calculation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Liao, Zhen; Qin, Yahang; Wu, Yayun; Liang, Sai; Xiao, Shoune; Yang, Guangwu; Zhu, Tao

    2017-05-01

    To describe the complicated nonlinear process of the fatigue short crack evolution behavior, especially the change of the crack propagation rate, two different calculation methods are applied. The dominant effective short fatigue crack propagation rates are calculated based on the replica fatigue short crack test with nine smooth funnel-shaped specimens and the observation of the replica films according to the effective short fatigue cracks principle. Due to the fast decay and the nonlinear approximation ability of wavelet analysis, the self-learning ability of neural network, and the macroscopic searching and global optimization of genetic algorithm, the genetic wavelet neural network can reflect the implicit complex nonlinear relationship when considering multi-influencing factors synthetically. The effective short fatigue cracks and the dominant effective short fatigue crack are simulated and compared by the Genetic Wavelet Neural Network. The simulation results show that Genetic Wavelet Neural Network is a rational and available method for studying the evolution behavior of fatigue short crack propagation rate. Meanwhile, a traditional data fitting method for a short crack growth model is also utilized for fitting the test data. It is reasonable and applicable for predicting the growth rate. Finally, the reason for the difference between the prediction effects by these two methods is interpreted.

  5. Effects of hydrogen gas environment on non-propagation phenomena of a type 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Y.; Matsuyama, T.; Oda, Y.; Noguchi, H.; Higashida, K. [Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    In order to investigate the hydrogen gas effect on non-propagation phenomena of a type 304 austenitic stainless steel, fatigue tests with in-situ observation using a Scanning Laser Microscope were performed in air, in 0.18 MPa hydrogen gas and in 0.18 MPa nitrogen gas. A non-propagating crack was observed during the fatigue test in air. At almost the same stress level of non-propagating in air, non-propagating cracks were also observed in fatigue tests in hydrogen and in nitrogen. Stress level of the non-propagation is not sufficiently different in the three environments. However, the process up to non-propagation differs from each other, for example, the crack path and debris. (orig.)

  6. Deterministic polarization chaos from a laser diode

    CERN Document Server

    Virte, Martin; Thienpont, Hugo; Sciamanna, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years after the invention of the laser diode and fourty years after the report of the butterfly effect - i.e. the unpredictability of deterministic chaos, it is said that a laser diode behaves like a damped nonlinear oscillator. Hence no chaos can be generated unless with additional forcing or parameter modulation. Here we report the first counter-example of a free-running laser diode generating chaos. The underlying physics is a nonlinear coupling between two elliptically polarized modes in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. We identify chaos in experimental time-series and show theoretically the bifurcations leading to single- and double-scroll attractors with characteristics similar to Lorenz chaos. The reported polarization chaos resembles at first sight a noise-driven mode hopping but shows opposite statistical properties. Our findings open up new research areas that combine the high speed performances of microcavity lasers with controllable and integrated sources of optical chaos.

  7. Space-Bounded Complexity Classes and Iterated Deterministic Substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asveld, P.R.J.

    1979-01-01

    We investigate the effect on the space complexity when a language family $K$ is extended by means of iterated $\\lambda$-free deterministic substitution to a family $\\eta(K)$. If each language in $K$ is accepted by a one-way nondeterministic multi-tape Turing machine within space $S(n)$ for some mono

  8. Space-Bounded Complexity Classes and Iterated Deterministic Substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asveld, P.R.J.

    1980-01-01

    We investigate the effect on the space complexity when a language family $K$ is extended by means of $\\lambda$-free deterministic substitution to the family $\\eta(K)$. If each language in $K$ is accepted by a one-way nondeterministic multi-tape Turing-machine within space $S(n)$ for some monotonic s

  9. Empirical and deterministic accuracies of across-population genomic prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Y.C.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Bijma, P.; Bovenhuis, H.; Schrooten, C.; Calus, M.P.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Differences in linkage disequilibrium and in allele substitution effects of QTL (quantitative trait loci) may hinder genomic prediction across populations. Our objective was to develop a deterministic formula to estimate the accuracy of across-population genomic prediction, for which

  10. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mayao; Gao, Xing; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Li, Simin; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Riedel, Christoph; Busse, Björn; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control), young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM) was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the lowest.

  11. Numerical Investigation into the Effect of Natural Fracture Density on Hydraulic Fracture Network Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Chong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is an important method to enhance permeability in oil and gas exploitation projects and weaken hard roofs of coal seams to reduce dynamic disasters, for example, rock burst. It is necessary to fully understand the mechanism of the initiation, propagation, and coalescence of hydraulic fracture network (HFN caused by fluid flow in rock formations. In this study, a coupled hydro-mechanical model was built based on synthetic rock mass (SRM method to investigate the effects of natural fracture (NF density on HFN propagation. Firstly, the geometrical structures of NF obtained from borehole images at the field scale were applied to the model. Secondly, the micro-parameters of the proposed model were validated against the interaction between NF and hydraulic fracture (HF in physical experiments. Finally, a series of numerical simulations were performed to study the mechanism of HFN propagation. In addition, confining pressure ratio (CPR and injection rate were also taken into consideration. The results suggested that the increase of NF density drives the growth of stimulated reservoir volume (SRV, concentration area of injection pressure (CAIP, and the number of cracks caused by NF. The number of tensile cracks caused by rock matrix decrease gradually with the increase of NF density, and the number of shear cracks caused by rock matrix are almost immune to the change of NF density. The propagation orientation of HFN and the breakdown pressure in rock formations are mainly controlled by CPR. Different injection rates would result in a relatively big difference in the gradient of injection pressure, but this difference would be gradually narrowed with the increase of NF density. Natural fracture density is the key factor that influences the percentages of different crack types in HFN, regardless of the value of CPR and injection rate. The proposed model may help predict HFN propagation and optimize fracturing treatment designs in

  12. Effects of calcium spikes in the layer 5 pyramidal neuron on coincidence detection and activity propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansong Chua

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be stabilized by increasing network inhibition or introducing short term depression in the excitatory synapses, but the signal to noise ration remains low. Our results

  13. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation. II. Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L.; Nie, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-12-01

    One of the distinguishable features of plasma jets compared with the traditional streamers is their repeatable propagation. As an initial objective, the effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of plasma plume propagation is investigated numerically. Besides residual electrons left from previous pulses, the electrons detached from O2 - ions could also be a significant source of the seed electrons to affect the repeatability of plasma plume propagation when an electronegative gas admixture is presented. In this investigation, a global plasma chemical kinetics model is developed to investigate the temporal evolution of the electron and O2 - ions in the afterglow of a plasma plume driven by microsecond pulse direct current voltages, at a total gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa or 4 × 103 Pa in helium or helium-oxygen mixtures with an air impurity of 0.025%. In addition, a Monte Carlo technique has been applied to calculate the O2 - detachment rate coefficient. Accordingly, the seed electron density due to detachment from O2 - ions for different percentages of oxygen is obtained. Finally, the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullets to propagate in a repeatable mode is obtained according to the critical frequency from the experiments. It is found that the order of minimum seed electron number density required for repeatable propagation mode is independent of oxygen concentrations in the helium-oxygen mixture. It is 10 8 cm - 3 for 20 kPa and 10 7 cm - 3 for 4 kPa. Furthermore, for the helium with an air impurity of 0.025%, the residual electrons left over from previous discharges are the main source of seed electrons. On the other hand, when 0.5% of O2 is added, the detachment of O2 - is the main source of the seed electrons.

  14. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Mayao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control, young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the

  15. Simultaneous quasi-one-dimensional propagation and tuning of upconversion luminescence through waveguide effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dangli; Tian, Dongping; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gao, Wei

    2016-02-29

    Luminescence-based waveguide is widely investigated as a promising alternative to conquer the difficulties of efficiently coupling light into a waveguide. But applications have been still limited due to employing blue or ultraviolet light as excitation source with the lower penetration depth leading to a weak guided light. Here, we show a quasi-one-dimensional propagation of luminescence and then resulting in a strong luminescence output from the top end of a single NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) microtube under near infrared light excitation. The mechanism of upconversion propagation, based on the optical waveguide effect accompanied with energy migration, is proposed. The efficiency of luminescence output is highly dependent on the concentration of dopant ions, excitation power, morphology, and crystallinity of tube as an indirect evidence of the existence of the optical actived waveguide effect. These findings provide the possibility for the construction of upconversion fiber laser.

  16. Simultaneous quasi-one-dimensional propagation and tuning of upconversion luminescence through waveguide effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dangli; Tian, Dongping; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gao, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Luminescence-based waveguide is widely investigated as a promising alternative to conquer the difficulties of efficiently coupling light into a waveguide. But applications have been still limited due to employing blue or ultraviolet light as excitation source with the lower penetration depth leading to a weak guided light. Here, we show a quasi-one-dimensional propagation of luminescence and then resulting in a strong luminescence output from the top end of a single NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ microtube under near infrared light excitation. The mechanism of upconversion propagation, based on the optical waveguide effect accompanied with energy migration, is proposed. The efficiency of luminescence output is highly dependent on the concentration of dopant ions, excitation power, morphology, and crystallinity of tube as an indirect evidence of the existence of the optical actived waveguide effect. These findings provide the possibility for the construction of upconversion fiber laser.

  17. Effect of constraint on crack propagation behavior in BGA soldered joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 王国忠; 方洪渊; 钱乙余

    2001-01-01

    The effects of stress triaxiality on crack propagation behavior in the BGA soldered joint were analyzed using FEM method. The computation results verified that stress triaxiality factor has an important effect on crack growth behavior. Crack growth rate increased with increasing stress triaxiality at the near-tip region, which is caused by increasing crack lengths or decreasing solder joint heights. Solder joint deformation is subjected to constraint effect provided by its surrounding rigid ceramic substrate, the constraint can be scaled by stress triaxiality near crack tip region. Therefore, it can be concluded that crack growth rate increased when the constraint effect increases.

  18. The effects of nonlinear wave propagation on the stability of inertial cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the context of forecasting temperature and pressure fields in high-intensity focussed ultrasound, the accuracy of predictive models is critical for the safety and efficacy of treatment. In such fields inertial cavitation is often observed. Classically, estimations of cavitation thresholds have been based on the assumption that the incident wave at the surface of a bubble was the same as in the far-field, neglecting the effect of nonlinear wave propagation. By modelling the incident wave as...

  19. Computer animation as a tool to visualize effects of seismic wave propagation inside heterogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caserta, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Rome (Italy); Lanucara, P. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Consorzio per le Applicazioni di Supercalcolo per Universita' e Ricerca

    2000-02-01

    A technique to make computer animations representing the propagation of anti plane shear waves in heterogeneous dissipative media is presented. The aim is to develop a useful tool to better investigate the physics of site effects in the 2D approximation. Particular attention is devoted to the representation of simulated ground motion in sediment-filled basins under resonance conditions. Problems related to color scales and frame normalization are analysed and discussed.

  20. Brillouin precursor waveforms pertaining to UWB noise radar signals propagating through dispersive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, M.; Alejos, A. V.

    2011-06-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) waves propagating through causal, linear, and lossy dispersive media (soil, foliage, plasma, water, biological tissue, etc.), experience frequency-dependent attenuation and phase distortion. This has assumed significant importance for systems operating with ultrawideband (UWB) spectrum. This paper analyzes the dynamical evolution of UWB noise radar signals through dispersive media. The effects on the signal propagation due to the evolution of the Brillouin precursor through dispersive media are discussed. The evolving waveforms are then compared with the Brillouin precursor due to rectangular sine-modulated deterministic signals. The advantages of random noise waveforms through dispersive media are also discussed.

  1. Deterministic patterns in cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Ido; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-12-01

    Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.

  2. Effects of external magnetic field on oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal wave in nonextensive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhad Kiyaei, Forough; Dorranian, Davoud

    2017-01-01

    Effects of the obliqueness and the strength of external magnetic field on the ion acoustic (IA) cnoidal wave in a nonextensive plasma are investigated. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the corresponding KdV equation for the IA wave. Sagdeev potential is extracted, and the condition of generation of IA waves in the form of cnoidal waves or solitons is discussed in detail. In this work, the domain of allowable values of nonextensivity parameter q for generation of the IA cnoidal wave in the plasma medium is considered. The results show that only the compressive IA wave may generate and propagate in the plasma medium. Increasing the strength of external magnetic field will increase the frequency of the wave and decrease its amplitude, while increasing the angle of propagation will decrease the frequency of the wave and increase its amplitude.

  3. Effect of defect length on rolling contact fatigue crack propagation in high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makino

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to clarify the effect of defect length in depth direction on rolling contact fatigue (RCF crack propagation in high strength steel. RCF test and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR micro CT imaging were conducted. In the case of the defect with the 15 m diameter, flaking life decreased with increasing defect length. In a comparison of the CT image and the SEM view, the shapes of defects and the locations of the horizontal cracks were almost the same respectively. The mechanism of RCF crack propagation was discussed by finite element (FE analysis. Defects led to higher tensile residual stress than that without defects in the region where the defect exists. The shear stress range at 0.1 mm in depth on the middle line of the defect and the range of mode II stress intensity factor at the bottom of a vertical crack increased with increasing defect length.

  4. Unquenched Effects and Quark Mass Dependence of Lattice Gluon Propagator in Infrared Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-Bin; PING Jia-Lun; LU Xiao-Fu; ZONG Hong-Shi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the gluon propagator in Landau gauge has been studied on a lattice,including the quenched and the unquenehed one.The small geometry size of lattice we use is 163×32,and the big one is 203×64.For the quenched approximation,we fit the numerical results and give a little different fitting values.We also obtain unquenched effects by comparing the gluon propagator resulting from the quenched and unquenehed configurations,for both the two-flavor and three-flavor cases.For the unquenched configurations,an obvious quark mass dependence has not been found in the small quark mass case,but is found in the three-flavor case when the quark mass is big.

  5. The effect of nitrogen on biogas flame propagation characteristic in premix combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, Willyanto; Suprianto, Fandi D.; Hartanto, Tan Ivan; Purnomo, Kenny; Wijaya, Tubagus P.

    2016-03-01

    Biogas is one of alternative energy and categorized as renewable energy. The main sources of biogas come from animal waste, garbage, and household waste that are organic waste. Primarily, over 50% of this energy contains methane (CH4). The other substances or inhibitors are nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Previously, carbon dioxide effect on biogas combustion is already experimented. The result shows that carbon dioxide reduces the flame propagation speed of biogas combustion. Then, nitrogen as an inhibitor obviously also brings some effects to the biogas combustion, flame propagation speed, and flame characteristics. Spark ignited cylinder is used for the premixed biogas combustion research. An acrylic glass is used as the material of this transparent cylinder chamber. The cylinder is filled with methane (CH4), oxygen (O2), and nitrogen (N2) with particular percentage. In this experiment, the nitrogen composition are set to 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%. The result shows that the flame propagation speed is reduced in regard to the increased level of nitrogen. It can also be implied that nitrogen can decrease the biogas combustion rate.

  6. Geometrical and electromagnetic effects on arc propagation in a railplug ignitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekici, O; Matthews, R D; Ezekoye, O A [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-106 (United States)

    2007-12-21

    Three-dimensional simulation of arc motion is presented for conditions representative of those for a railplug ignitor. A railplug ignitor is a miniature rail-gun used to deliver an arc ignition source for internal combustion engine applications. Computations explored the influence of the railplug geometry, effects of an external magnetic field, and impact of the circuit current on arc velocity. One underlying question about arc motion in railplug systems has been the influence of the expansion velocity associated with energy deposition on arc motion. A single open end muzzle would result in higher velocities if the expansion effects are dominant. This was tested by simulating two types of geometries, single open end and double open end muzzles. The double open end configuration was shown to have faster arc propagation velocities. A discussion of the mechanisms is presented. A simple scaling analysis was found to explain the increased arc propagation velocity associated with application of an external magnetic field. Increasing the circuit current was found to increase the final arc propagation velocity, although the early time velocities were slower for larger currents.

  7. Modelling and mitigating refractive propagation effects in precision pulsar timing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    To obtain the most accurate pulse arrival times from radio pulsars, it is necessary to correct or mitigate the effects of the propagation of radio waves through the warm and ionized interstellar medium. We examine both the strength of propagation effects associated with large-scale electron-density variations and the methodology used to estimate infinite frequency arrival times. Using simulations of two-dimensional phase-varying screens, we assess the strength and non-stationarity of timing perturbations associated with large-scale density variations. We identify additional contributions to arrival times that are stochastic in both radio frequency and time and therefore not amenable to correction solely using times of arrival. We attribute this to the frequency dependence of the trajectories of the propagating radio waves. We find that this limits the efficacy of low-frequency (metre-wavelength) observations. Incorporating low-frequency pulsar observations into precision timing campaigns is increasingly problematic for pulsars with larger dispersion measures.

  8. Geometrical and electromagnetic effects on arc propagation in a railplug ignitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, O.; Matthews, R. D.; Ezekoye, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulation of arc motion is presented for conditions representative of those for a railplug ignitor. A railplug ignitor is a miniature rail-gun used to deliver an arc ignition source for internal combustion engine applications. Computations explored the influence of the railplug geometry, effects of an external magnetic field, and impact of the circuit current on arc velocity. One underlying question about arc motion in railplug systems has been the influence of the expansion velocity associated with energy deposition on arc motion. A single open end muzzle would result in higher velocities if the expansion effects are dominant. This was tested by simulating two types of geometries, single open end and double open end muzzles. The double open end configuration was shown to have faster arc propagation velocities. A discussion of the mechanisms is presented. A simple scaling analysis was found to explain the increased arc propagation velocity associated with application of an external magnetic field. Increasing the circuit current was found to increase the final arc propagation velocity, although the early time velocities were slower for larger currents.

  9. Atmospheric infrasound propagation modelling using the reflectivity method with a direct formulation of the wind effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Valerie; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Schweitzer, Johannes; Gibbons, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    We recently advocated using the reflectivity method, also known as the wavenumber integration method or fast-field program, to model atmospheric infrasound propagation at regional distances. The advantage of the reflectivity method is its ability to model the full wavefield, including diffractive effects with head waves and shadow zone arrivals, in a broad frequency range but still at a relatively low computational cost. Attenuation can easily be included, giving the possibility to analyse relative amplitudes and frequency content of the different arrivals. It has clear advantages compared with ray theory in terms of predicting phases considering the particular frequent occurrence of shadow zone arrivals in infrasound observations. Its main limitation, at least in the traditional form of the method, lies in the fact that it can only handle range-independent models. We presented earlier some reflectivity method simulations of an observed accidental explosion in Norway. Wind intensity and direction are non-negligible parameters for infrasound propagation and these are appropriately taken into account in most infrasound ray-tracing codes. On the other hand, in the previous reflectivity simulations wind was taken into account only through the effective sound speed approximation where the horizontal projection of the wind field is added to the adiabatic sound speed profiles. This approximation is appropriate for dominantly horizontal propagation but can give incorrect arrival times and shadow zone locations for waves which have a significant portion of their propagation path at more vertical incidence, like thermospheric arrivals. We present here how we have modified the original reflectivity algorithm in order to take the wind into account in a more correct fashion, and how this improvement influences the synthetics.

  10. Effect of Chamber Pressurization Rate on Combustion and Propagation of Solid Propellant Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei-Lan; Wei, Shen; Yuan, Shu-Shen

    2002-01-01

    area of the propellant grain satisfies the designed value. But cracks in propellant grain can be generated during manufacture, storage, handing and so on. The cracks can provide additional surface area for combustion. The additional combustion may significantly deviate the performance of the rocket motor from the designed conditions, even lead to explosive catastrophe. Therefore a thorough study on the combustion, propagation and fracture of solid propellant cracks must be conducted. This paper takes an isolated propellant crack as the object and studies the effect of chamber pressurization rate on the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack by experiment and theoretical calculation. deformable, the burning inside a solid propellant crack is a coupling of solid mechanics and combustion dynamics. In this paper, a theoretical model describing the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack was formulated and solved numerically. The interaction of structural deformation and combustion process was included in the theoretical model. The conservation equations for compressible fluid flow, the equation of state for perfect gas, the heat conducting equation for the solid-phase, constitutive equation for propellant, J-integral fracture criterion and so on are used in the model. The convective burning inside the crack and the propagation and fracture of the crack were numerically studied by solving the set of nonlinear, inhomogeneous gas-phase governing equations and solid-phase equations. On the other hand, the combustion experiments for propellant specimens with a precut crack were conducted by RTR system. Predicted results are in good agreement with experimental data, which validates the reasonableness of the theoretical model. Both theoretical and experimental results indicate that the chamber pressurization rate has strong effects on the convective burning in the crack, crack fracture initiation and fracture pattern.

  11. Effects of high-order dispersions on dark-bright vector soliton propagation and interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Dongning Wang

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method. The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction. These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions. Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.%@@ The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method.The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction.These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions.Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.

  12. Deterministic quantitative risk assessment development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Jane; Colquhoun, Iain [PII Pipeline Solutions Business of GE Oil and Gas, Cramlington Northumberland (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Current risk assessment practice in pipeline integrity management is to use a semi-quantitative index-based or model based methodology. This approach has been found to be very flexible and provide useful results for identifying high risk areas and for prioritizing physical integrity assessments. However, as pipeline operators progressively adopt an operating strategy of continual risk reduction with a view to minimizing total expenditures within safety, environmental, and reliability constraints, the need for quantitative assessments of risk levels is becoming evident. Whereas reliability based quantitative risk assessments can be and are routinely carried out on a site-specific basis, they require significant amounts of quantitative data for the results to be meaningful. This need for detailed and reliable data tends to make these methods unwieldy for system-wide risk k assessment applications. This paper describes methods for estimating risk quantitatively through the calibration of semi-quantitative estimates to failure rates for peer pipeline systems. The methods involve the analysis of the failure rate distribution, and techniques for mapping the rate to the distribution of likelihoods available from currently available semi-quantitative programs. By applying point value probabilities to the failure rates, deterministic quantitative risk assessment (QRA) provides greater rigor and objectivity than can usually be achieved through the implementation of semi-quantitative risk assessment results. The method permits a fully quantitative approach or a mixture of QRA and semi-QRA to suit the operator's data availability and quality, and analysis needs. For example, consequence analysis can be quantitative or can address qualitative ranges for consequence categories. Likewise, failure likelihoods can be output as classical probabilities or as expected failure frequencies as required. (author)

  13. Controllability of deterministic networks with the identical degree sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Ma

    Full Text Available Controlling complex network is an essential problem in network science and engineering. Recent advances indicate that the controllability of complex network is dependent on the network's topology. Liu and Barabási, et.al speculated that the degree distribution was one of the most important factors affecting controllability for arbitrary complex directed network with random link weights. In this paper, we analysed the effect of degree distribution to the controllability for the deterministic networks with unweighted and undirected. We introduce a class of deterministic networks with identical degree sequence, called (x,y-flower. We analysed controllability of the two deterministic networks ((1, 3-flower and (2, 2-flower by exact controllability theory in detail and give accurate results of the minimum number of driver nodes for the two networks. In simulation, we compare the controllability of (x,y-flower networks. Our results show that the family of (x,y-flower networks have the same degree sequence, but their controllability is totally different. So the degree distribution itself is not sufficient to characterize the controllability of deterministic networks with unweighted and undirected.

  14. Controllability of deterministic networks with the identical degree sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiujuan; Zhao, Haixing; Wang, Binghong

    2015-01-01

    Controlling complex network is an essential problem in network science and engineering. Recent advances indicate that the controllability of complex network is dependent on the network's topology. Liu and Barabási, et.al speculated that the degree distribution was one of the most important factors affecting controllability for arbitrary complex directed network with random link weights. In this paper, we analysed the effect of degree distribution to the controllability for the deterministic networks with unweighted and undirected. We introduce a class of deterministic networks with identical degree sequence, called (x,y)-flower. We analysed controllability of the two deterministic networks ((1, 3)-flower and (2, 2)-flower) by exact controllability theory in detail and give accurate results of the minimum number of driver nodes for the two networks. In simulation, we compare the controllability of (x,y)-flower networks. Our results show that the family of (x,y)-flower networks have the same degree sequence, but their controllability is totally different. So the degree distribution itself is not sufficient to characterize the controllability of deterministic networks with unweighted and undirected.

  15. Mesh Size Effect in Numerical Simulation of Blast Wave Propagation and Interaction with Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yanchao; LI Zhongxian; HAO Hong

    2008-01-01

    Numerical method is popular in analysing the blast wave propagation and interaction with structures.However, because of the extremely short duration of blast wave and energy transmission between different grids, the numerical results are sensitive to the finite element mesh size.Previous numerical simulations show that a mesh size acceptable to one blast scenario might not be proper for another case, even though the difference between the two scenarios is very small,indicating a simple numerical mesh size convergence test might not be enough to guarantee accurate numerical results.Therefore, both coarse mesh and fine mesh were used in different blast scenarios to investigate the mesh size effect on numerical results of blast wave propagation and interaction with structures.Based on the numerical results and their comparison with field test results and the design charts in TM5-1300, a numerical modification method was proposed to correct the influence of the mesh size on the simulated results.It can be easily used to improve the accuracy of the numerical results of blast wave propagation and blast loads on structures.

  16. Effects of Water Intrusion on Mechanical Properties of and Crack Propagation in Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiangling; Chen, Tian; Ju, Minghe; Liang, Shun; Liu, Yapeng; Li, Xuehua

    2016-12-01

    Studying the mechanical properties of and crack propagation in coal after water intrusion is necessary to tackle a number of geological engineering problems such as those associated with underground water storage in collieries and support for underground roadways in coal mines. To study the mechanical properties and crack development, 12 coal samples with moisture contents of 0, 2.37, 3.78 and 5.29 % were prepared for acoustic emission tests under uniaxial compression. Over about 6 days, the coal samples absorbed moisture from a humidifier in three different phases. In this period, uniaxial tests show that the peak stress, elastic modulus, strain softening modulus and post-peak modulus decreased with rising moisture content in the samples while the peak strain increased. It was further found that, by analysing the relationship between the stiffness and stress and the accumulated acoustic emission counts, all the phases of crack development can be evaluated. This is useful for studying the effect of water intrusion on crack propagation and for calculating the mechanical properties of the coal such as the elastic modulus. This investigation also quantifies the percentage of the stress thresholds for crack closure, crack initiation, and crack damage that constitutes the peak stress. These stress thresholds do not change with moisture content. Our results are of great significance for water storage in coal mines, for determination of pillar dimensions in coal mines, and for expanding the knowledge base of the mechanical properties of coal and the characteristics of crack propagation.

  17. Effect of BaSO4 on the fatigue crack propagation rate of PMMA bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, L N; Topoleski, L D

    1996-05-01

    To determine the effect of BaSO4 on the fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN = C(delta K)n, of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement, radiopaque bone cement, radiolucent bone cement, and commercial PMMA (Plexiglas) were tested using a methodology based on ASTM E647. The crack growth rate of radiopaque bone cement was one order of magnitude less than that of radiolucent. Fractographic analysis showed that the regions of rapid catastrophic fracture were smooth for all materials tested. The radiopaque fatigue surface was rough and characterized by ragged-edged stacked plateaus, a morphology consistent with the model of crack propagation through the interbead matrix. Voids were visible in the interbead matrix on the order of the size of BaSO4 particles. The fatigue surface of radiolucent bone cement was relatively smooth, a morphology consistent with crack propagation through both the PMMA beads and interbead matrix. Fatigue striations were visible, and their spacing correlated well with crack propagation rates. The striations indicated an increased crack growth rate through the PMMA beads.

  18. Effects of charged sand on electromagnetic wave propagation and its scattering field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Qinshu; ZHOU; Youhe; ZHENG; Xiaojing

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Rayleigh's scattering theory, the effects of sandstorms on the propagation of electromagnetic wave with different visibilities are presented by solving the scattering field of charged sand particles. Because of the electric charges on the sand surface, the theoretical attenuation will be large enough to match the measured value under certain conditions. And the results show that the effect of sand with electric charges all over its surface on electromagnetic wave attenuation is the same as that of sand without charge, which proves that electric charges distribute on partial surface of the sand in fact.

  19. The surface effect on axisymmetric wave propagation in piezoelectric cylindrical shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunying Zhou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the surface piezoelectricity theory and first-order shear deformation theory, the surface effect on the axisymmetric wave propagating in piezoelectric cylindrical shells is analyzed. The Gurtin–Murdoch theory is utilized to get the nontraditional boundary conditions and constitutive equations of the surface, in company with classical governing equations of the bulk, from which the basic formulations are obtained. Numerical results show that the surface layer has a profound effect on wave characteristics in nanostructure at a higher mode.

  20. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF THE GEZHOUBA PROJECT ON FLOOD PROPAGATION IN THE YANGTZE RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaohua DONG; Ruilan YIN

    2001-01-01

    Based on hydrographs of "81.7" flood and topographies of 1980 and 1993, a 1-D mathematical model of flood is developed to study the effects of the Gezhouba Project on flood propagation along the Yichang-Jianli river reaches in the Yangtze River. Calculations and analysis show that, after 13 years' operation of the Gezhouba Project, the flood peak stages have been lowered, the flood curves of stage-discharge relationship have been moved, however, the effects on the flood discharges and storages can be neglected relatively.

  1. Vertex and Propagator in $\\Phi^{4}$ Theory from 4PI Effective Action in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Carrington, M E

    2012-01-01

    A set of self-consistent nonlinear integral equations for the four-point vertex and the propagator are derived from the 4-loop 4PI effective action for scalar field theories. This set of integral equations are solved in two dimensions through numerical lattice calculations. We compare the calculated results with those of perturbation theories. We find that the 4PI calculations are well consistent with the perturbation ones in perturbative regions. Non-perturbative results are also obtained in the 4PI formalism when the interacting strength becomes large. Furthermore, the full-momentum dependence of the four-point vertex is easily obtained in the 4PI effective action theories.

  2. Effect of deformation and dielectric filling on electromagnetic propagation through waveguides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajay Chaudhari

    2003-12-01

    The effect of depression and protrusion of vertical walls and dielectric filling on electromagnetic propagation through -band rectangular waveguides is studied using the finite element method. The effect of these deformations and dielectric filling on TE10, TE20 mode cutoff frequencies and passband is studied. The results are compared with those of -band rectangular waveguides with depression and protrusion with air medium. TE10, TE20 mode cutoff frequencies for waveguides with depression and protrusion and filled with dielectric medium are less than that for air medium. However, the bandwidth in some cases of dielectric medium is larger than that for air medium.

  3. Averaged model for probabilistic coalescence avalanches in two-dimensional emulsions: Insights into uncertainty propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danny Raj, M.; Rengaswamy, R.

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional concentrated emulsion exhibits spontaneous rapid destabilization through an avalanche of coalescence events which propagate through the assembly stochastically. We propose a deterministic model to explain the average dynamics of the avalanching process. The dynamics of the avalanche phenomenon is studied as a function of a composite parameter, the decay time ratio, which characterizes the ratio of the propensity of coalescence to cease propagation to that of propagation. When this ratio is small, the avalanche grows autocatalytically to destabilize the emulsion. Using a scaling analysis, we unravel the relation between a local characteristic of the system and a global system wide effect. The anisotropic nature of local coalescence results in a system size dependent transition from nonautocatalytic to autocatalytic behavior. By incorporating uncertainty into the parameters in the model, several possible realizations of the coalescence avalanche are generated. The results are compared with the Monte Carlo simulations to derive insights into how the uncertainty propagates in the system.

  4. Effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Siavash; Berbyuk, Viktor; Boström, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Effects of temperature on guided waves propagating in composite materials is a well-known problem which has been investigated in many studies. The majority of the studies is focused on effects of high temperature. Understanding the effects of low temperature has major importance in composite structures and components which are operating in cold climate conditions such as e.g. wind turbines operating in cold climate regions. In this study first the effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in a composite plate is investigated experimentally in a cold climate chamber. The material is a common material used to manufacture rotor blades of wind turbines. The temperature range is 25°C to -25°C and effects of temperature variations on amplitude and phase shift of the received signal are investigated. In order to apply the effects of lowering the temperature on the received signal, the Baseline Signal Stretch (BSS) method is modified and used. The modification is based on decomposing the signal into symmetric and asymmetric modes and applying two different stretch factors on each of them. Finally the results obtained based on the new method is compared with the results of application of BSS with one stretch factor and experimental measurements. Comparisons show that an improvement is obtained using the BSS with the mode decomposition method at temperature variations of more than 25°C.

  5. A Deterministic and Polynomial Modified Perceptron Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Barr

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct a modified perceptron algorithm that is deterministic, polynomial and also as fast as previous known algorithms. The algorithm runs in time O(mn3lognlog(1/ρ, where m is the number of examples, n the number of dimensions and ρ is approximately the size of the margin. We also construct a non-deterministic modified perceptron algorithm running in timeO(mn2lognlog(1/ρ.

  6. Optimal Deterministic Auctions with Correlated Priors

    OpenAIRE

    Papadimitriou, Christos; Pierrakos, George

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the problem of designing the profit-maximizing single-item auction, solved by Myerson in his seminal paper for the case in which bidder valuations are independently distributed. We focus on general joint distributions, seeking the optimal deterministic incentive compatible auction. We give a geometric characterization of the optimal auction, resulting in a duality theorem and an efficient algorithm for finding the optimal deterministic auction in the two-bidder case and an NP-compl...

  7. Experimental study and theoretical analysis on the effect of electric field on gas explosion and its propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Qing; LIN Bai-quan; JIAN Cong-guang; JIA Zhen-zhen

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the electric field with different intensity on explosion wave pressure and flame propagation velocity of gas explosion was experimentally studied, and the effect of electric field on gas explosion and its propagation was theoretically analyzed from heat transportation, mass transportation, and reaction process of gas explosion. The results show that the electric field can affect gas explosion by enhancing explosion intensity and explosion pressure, thus increasing flame velocity. The electric field can offer energy to the gas explosion reaction; the effect of the electric field on gas explosion increases with the increase of electric field intensity. The electric field can increase mass transfer action, heat transfer action, convection effects, diffusion coefficient, and the reaction system entropy, which make the turbulence of gas explosion in electric field increase; therefore, the electric field can improve flame combustion velocity and flame propagation velocity, release more energy, increase shock wave energy, and then promote the gas explosion and its propagation.

  8. Surface/interface effects on the effective propagation constants of coherent waves in composites with random parallel nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhi; Wei, Peijun; Jiao, Fengyu

    2016-07-01

    The effective propagation constants of elastic waves in an inhomogeneous medium with randomly distributed parallel cylindrical nanofibers are studied. First, the surface energy theory proposed by Huang and Wang (Handbook of Micromechanics and Nanomechanics, 2013) is used to derive the nontraditional boundary conditions on the surfaces of the nanoholes and the interfaces between the nanofibers and the host. Then, the scattering matrix of individual scatterer (cylindrical hole or nanofiber) is derived from the nontraditional boundary condition. The total wave field is obtained by considering the multiple scattering processes among the dispersive scatterers. The configuration average of the total wave field results in the coherent waves or the averaged waves. By using the corrected Linton-Martin formula, the effective propagation constants (effective speed and effective attenuation) of the coherent waves are estimated. The in-plane waves (P and SV waves) and the anti-plane waves (SH wave) are considered, respectively, and the numerical results are shown graphically. Apart from the effects of surface elasticity, the effects of inertia of surface/interface and the effects of residual surface tension (which are often ignored in the previous literature) are also considered. Moreover, the influences of the nonsymmetric parts of in-plane surface stress and the out-of-plane parts of the surface stress are both discussed first based on the numerical examples. These investigations show the underestimation and overestimation of effective propagation constants caused by various simplifications.

  9. Human gait recognition via deterministic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Wang, Cong

    2012-11-01

    Recognition of temporal/dynamical patterns is among the most difficult pattern recognition tasks. Human gait recognition is a typical difficulty in the area of dynamical pattern recognition. It classifies and identifies individuals by their time-varying gait signature data. Recently, a new dynamical pattern recognition method based on deterministic learning theory was presented, in which a time-varying dynamical pattern can be effectively represented in a time-invariant manner and can be rapidly recognized. In this paper, we present a new model-based approach for human gait recognition via the aforementioned method, specifically for recognizing people by gait. The approach consists of two phases: a training (learning) phase and a test (recognition) phase. In the training phase, side silhouette lower limb joint angles and angular velocities are selected as gait features. A five-link biped model for human gait locomotion is employed to demonstrate that functions containing joint angle and angular velocity state vectors characterize the gait system dynamics. Due to the quasi-periodic and symmetrical characteristics of human gait, the gait system dynamics can be simplified to be described by functions of joint angles and angular velocities of one side of the human body, thus the feature dimension is effectively reduced. Locally-accurate identification of the gait system dynamics is achieved by using radial basis function (RBF) neural networks (NNs) through deterministic learning. The obtained knowledge of the approximated gait system dynamics is stored in constant RBF networks. A gait signature is then derived from the extracted gait system dynamics along the phase portrait of joint angles versus angular velocities. A bank of estimators is constructed using constant RBF networks to represent the training gait patterns. In the test phase, by comparing the set of estimators with the test gait pattern, a set of recognition errors are generated, and the average L(1) norms

  10. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  11. On low-energy quantum gravity induced effects on the propagation of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleiser, Reinaldo J; Kozameh, Carlos N; Parisi, Florencia [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria (5000) Cordoba (Argentina)

    2003-10-21

    Present models describing the interaction of quantum Maxwell and gravitational fields predict a breakdown of Lorentz invariance and a non-standard dispersion relation in the semiclassical approximation. Comparison with observational data, however, does not support their predictions. In this work we introduce a different set of ab initio assumptions in the canonical approach, namely that the homogeneous Maxwell equations are valid in the semiclassical approximation, and find that the resulting field equations are Lorentz invariant in the semiclassical limit. We also include a phenomenological analysis of possible effects on the propagation of light, and their dependence on energy, in a cosmological context.

  12. Diffraction effects in microwave propagation at the origin of superluminal behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Ricci, A.M. [Istituto per le Telecomunicazioni e l' Elettronica della Marina Militare ' Giancarlo Vallauri' (Mariteleradar), Viale Italia 72, 57100 Livorno (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: rocco.ruggeri@isc.cnr.it; Agresti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)

    2008-10-27

    Superluminal behaviors, as evidenced by the presence of forerunners, in advanced position with respect to the main luminal peak, have been revealed in microwave propagation experiments by using a radar technique. The results are interpreted on the basis of (fast) complex waves, usually considered only in the near-field region, but still surviving beyond this limit. Consideration of further diffraction effects, as due to geometrical limitations of the experimental set-up, allows for the obtainment of a plausible description of the results.

  13. Numerical Study of Shock Waves Propagating in an Elbow : Effects of Elbow Angle

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the shock wave propagating in an elbow and the transient flow induced by the shock were investigated numerically in order to clarify how the shock wave transmitted past the elbow is stabilized to uniformity by the effects of the elbow angle. Computations were carried out by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations using the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. Calculations were performed for six elbow angles between 5° to 120°, and the flow fields w...

  14. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  15. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  16. Meteorological effects on the 3D sound propagation inside an inhomogeneous forest area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Ziemann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of trees on sound propagation is currently discussed to reduce the sound exposure near transport infrastructure or industrial areas. This influence is direct due to reflection and scattering at the trees themselves as well as indirect through meteorological and ground effects modified by the trees. Previous investigations provide a mixed picture of sound attenuation within forested areas, in particular for the temporally and spatially variable meteorological influence. Thus, a three-dimensional model chain of atmospheric and acoustic models was adapted and applied to special meteorological and vegetation-specific conditions. A meteorological mesoscale model was applied to simulate temperature and wind fields within an inhomogeneous forest site. The meteorological quantities are used as diurnally variable input data for the acoustic FDTD (finite-difference time-domain-model to simulate the sound propagation. Thereby, the effects of vegetation elements, impedance ground surface, and sound refraction are considered. The simulations are related to outdoor measurements, which were performed in early autumn 2011 near Dresden (Germany. The sound propagation of artificial signals was measured along sound paths of up to 190 m length through a clearing as well as through an old spruce stand. Results of the comparison between measurement and model simulations are presented and possible applications of these results with regard to noise protection aspects are discussed. The model results confirm the measured diurnal cycle of sound levels at the receiver positions. Simulations with and without trees suggest an excess attenuation of the trees by about 4 dB per 100 m already for low frequencies.

  17. Effect of a thick inverted sedimentary package on seismic wave propagation in the lower crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Chowdhury, K.; Dobreflection Working Group

    2003-04-01

    High quality seismic deep reflection data was acquired across the Donbas inverted basin in The Ukraine during the summer of 2000. The 80-fold (nominal) vibrator operation supported by lower-fold explosive acquisition resulted in a good data quality. Detailed analysis of the shallower (basin) part of the wave-field - not reported here - has produced a good 2-D velocity model for the thick sedimentary cover overlying the middle and the lower crust in this area. The sedimentary structures show the effects of large-scale tectonic disturbances involving folding and both normal- and thrust- faulting. Seismic waves propagating on their way to- and from- the lower crustal region interact with this shallower medium and undergo complex interaction involving scattering, focussing and defocussing. This effect will be studied by analysing the lower-crustal signals for coherent arrivals with/without the effect of the overburden. An attempt will be made to quantify the effect using an empirical technique.

  18. Effect of non-uniform mean flow field on acoustic propagation problems in computational aeroacoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, Haiqing; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in the presence of a non-uniform mean flow is studied numerically by using two different acoustic propagating models, which solve linearized Euler equations (LEE) and acoustic perturbation equations (APE). As noise induced by turbulent flows often propagates from near field t...

  19. Effects of selected water chemistry variables on copper pitting propagation in potable water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha Hung, E-mail: hmh2n@virginia.edu [Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Taxen, Claes [SWEREA-KIMAB, Stockholm (Sweden); Williams, Keith [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Scully, John [Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: > The effects of water composition on pit propagation kinetics on Cu were separated from pit initiation and stabilization using the artificial pit method in a range of dilute HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}-containing waters. > The effective polarization and Ohmic resistance of pits were lower in SO4{sup 2-}-containing solutions and greater in Cl{sup -}-containing solutions. > Relationship between the solution composition and the corrosion product identity and morphology were found. > These, in turn controlled the corrosion product Ohmic resistance and subsequently the pit growth rate. - Abstract: The pit propagation behavior of copper (UNS C11000) was investigated from an electrochemical perspective using the artificial pit method. Pit growth was studied systematically in a range of HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -} containing-waters at various concentrations. Pit propagation was mediated by the nature of the corrosion products formed both inside and over the pit mouth (i.e., cap). Certain water chemistry concentrations such as those high in sulfate were found to promote fast pitting that could be sustained over long times at a fixed applied potential but gradually stifled in all but the lowest concentration solutions. In contrast, Cl{sup -} containing waters without sulfate ions resulted in slower pit growth and eventual repassivation. These observations were interpreted through understanding of the identity, amount and porosity of corrosion products formed inside and over pits. These factors controlled their resistive nature as characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A finite element model (FEM) was developed which included copper oxidation kinetics, transport by migration and diffusion, Cu(I) and Cu(II) solid corrosion product formation and porosity governed by equilibrium thermodynamics and a saturation index, as well as pit current and depth of penetration. The findings of the modeling were

  20. Nonlinear effects in propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in gold strip waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical studies of nonlinear propagation of a long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) in gold strip waveguides. The plasmonic waveguides are fabricated in house, and contain a gold layer, tantalum pentoxide adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. The optical characterization was performed using a high power picosecond laser at 1064 nm. The experiments reveal two nonlinear optical effects: nonlinear power transmission and spectral broadening of the LRSPP mode in the waveguides. Both nonlinear optical effects depend on the gold layer thickness. The theoretical model of these effects is based on the third-order susceptibility of the constituent materials. The linear and nonlinear parameters of the LRSPP mode are obtained, and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is solved. The dispersion length is much larger than the waveguides length, and the chromatic dispersion does not affect the propagation of the plasmonic mode. We find that the third-order susceptibility of the gold layer has a dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the LRSPP mode. The real part of the effective third-order susceptibility leads to the observed spectral broadening through the self-phase modulation effect, and its imaginary part determines the nonlinear absorption parameter and leads to the observed nonlinear power transmission. The experimental values of the third-order susceptibility of the gold layers are obtained. They indicate an effective enhancement of the third-order susceptibility for the gold layers, comparing to the bulk gold values. This enhancement is explained in terms of the change of the electrons motion.

  1. The effect of initial stress on the propagation behavior of SH waves in piezoelectric coupled plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myung Seob; Kang, Yeon June

    2011-05-01

    This study analytically investigates the propagation of shear waves (SH waves) in a coupled plate consisting of a piezoelectric layer and an elastic layer with initial stress. The piezoelectric material is polarized in z-axis direction and perfectly bonded to an elastic layer. The mechanical displacement and electrical potential function are derived for the piezoelectric coupled plates by solving the electromechanical field equations. The effects of the thickness ratio and the initial stress on the dispersion relations and the phase and group velocities are obtained for electrically open and mechanically free situations. The numerical examples are provided to illustrate graphically the variations of the phase and group velocities versus the wave number for the different layers comparatively. It is seen that the phase velocity of SH waves decreases with the increase of the magnitude of the initial compression stress, while it increases with the increase of the magnitude of the initial tensile stress. The initial stress has a great effect on the propagation of SH waves with the decrease of the thickness ratio. This research is theoretically useful for the design of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with high performance.

  2. Effects of nonlinear sound propagation on the characteristic timbres of brass instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Arnold; Pyle, Robert W; Gilbert, Joël; Campbell, D Murray; Chick, John P; Logie, Shona

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of a brass instrument to generate sounds with strong high-frequency components is dependent on the extent to which its bore profile supports nonlinear sound propagation. At high dynamic levels some instruments are readily sounded in a "cuivré" (brassy) manner: this phenomenon is due to the nonlinear propagation of sound in ducts of the proportions typical of labrosones (lip-reed aerophones). The effect is also evident at lower dynamic levels and contributes to the overall tonal character of the various kinds of brass instrument. This paper defines a brassiness potential parameter derived from the bore geometries of brass instruments. The correlation of the brassiness potential parameter with spectral enrichment as measured by the spectral centroid of the radiated sound is examined in playing tests using musicians, experiments using sine-wave excitation of instruments, and simulations using a computational tool. The complementary effects of absolute bore size on spectral enrichment are investigated using sine-wave excitation of cylindrical tubes and of instruments, establishing the existence of a trade-off between bore size and brassiness potential. The utility of the brassiness potential parameter in characterizing labrosones is established, and the graphical presentation of results in a 2D space defined by bore size and brassiness potential demonstrated.

  3. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained. - Highlights: • High frequency electrostatic wave propagation is investigated in a dense semi-bounded quantum plasma. • The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. • The quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. • The frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave. • The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  4. The Effect of Refractivity on Propagation at UHF and VHF Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is using weather parameters to investigate the effect of refractivity on propagation in the first kilometer of the atmosphere over the English Channel for a long transhorizon path of 140 km. Different refractivity profiles are constructed based on meteorological data taken from the UK Meteorological Office in order to investigate the effects of refractivity on propagation. The analysis is made for the hourly experimental path loss between the transmitter and receiver obtained from the experimental setup comprised of two communication links. The frequency of operation of the first link is 2015 MHz and that of the second link is 240 MHz. Parabolic equation method is modelled to get an hourly modelled path loss corresponding to each hourly experimental path loss to be analyzed for the said communication links. The correlation between the modelled path loss and experimental path loss is computed for refractivity distribution recommended by the ITU and predicted profiles. It is inferred from the simulated and experimental results that little or no influence exists by the evaporation duct upon path loss at 2015 MHz specifically for a long path of 140 km over the sea.

  5. Effects of propagation conditions on radar beam-ground interaction: impact on data quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fornasiero

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the research in the radar meteorology is devoted to the evaluation of the radar data quality and to the radar data processing. Even when, a set of absolute quality indexes can be produced (like as ground clutter presence, beam blockage rate, distance from radar, etc., the final product quality has to be determined as a function of the task and of all the processing steps. In this paper the emphasis lies on the estimate of the rainfall at the ground level taking extra care for the correction for ground clutter and beam blockage, that are two main problems affecting radar reflectivity data in complex orography. In this work a combined algorithm is presented that avoids and/or corrects for these two effects. To achieve this existing methods are modified and integrated with the analysis of radar signal propagation in different atmospheric conditions. The atmospheric refractivity profile is retrieved from the nearest in space and time radiosounding. This measured profile is then used to define the `dynamic map' used as a declutter base-field. Then beam blockage correction is applied to the data at the scan elevations computed from this map. Two case studies are used to illustrate the proposed algorithm. One is a summer event with anomalous propagation conditions and the other one is a winter event. The new algorithm is compared to a previous method of clutter removal based only on static maps of clear air and vertical reflectivity continuity test. The improvement in rain estimate is evaluated applying statistical analysis and using rain gauges data. The better scores are related mostly to the ``optimum" choice of the elevation maps, introduced by the more accurate description of the signal propagation. Finally, a data quality indicator is introduced as an output of this scheme. This indicator has been obtained from the general scheme, which takes into account all radar data processing steps.

  6. Physics based model of D-region variability related to VLF propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, S. C.

    2012-07-01

    D-region (~60-85 km) electron density profiles measured using large number of sounding rocket experiments carried out from two Indian low latitude stations show large variations with solar zenith angle, season and solar activity. Similarly the ground based multi frequency radio wave absorption technique has provided continuous data on the morphology of the hourly electron density variations. However suitable models of the D-region electron density profile variations both during quiet and disturbed solar conditions over the Indian region are lacking. The renewed interest in the study of the VLF/LF propagation anomalies taking place through perturbations in the D-region electron densities due to various geophysical phenomena requires the availability of a baseline D-region model over low latitudes. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the physical processes of D-region production and loss of free electrons, dynamical coupling due to variety of vertically propagating atmospheric waves, sudden changes brought about by the solar energetic events like CMEs and different categories of X-ray flares. Low latitude region is not likely to be affected by the PMSE or PCA type of events but the changes due to lightning induced mesospheric red sprites and LEPs need to be considered. Based on this analysis, a preliminary low latitude D-region electron density profile model development is proposed. Sample results would illustrate key requirements from such a model in terms of its effectiveness to simulate the low latitude observations of VLF/LF amplitude and phase variations using waveguide propagation models like LWPC.

  7. Interference effects of two scalar boson propagators on the LHC search for the singlet fermion DM

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P

    2016-01-01

    A gauge invariant UV-completion for singlet fermion DM interacting with the standard model (SM) particles involves a new singlet scalar. Therefore the model contains two scalar mediators, mixtures of the SM Higgs boson and a singlet scalar boson. Collider phenomenology of the interference effect between these two scalar propagators is studied in this work. This interference effect can be either constructive or destructive in the DM production cross section depending on both singlet scalar and DM masses, and it will soften the final state jets in the full mass region. Applying the CMS mono-jet search to our model, we find the interference effect plays a very important role in the DM search sensitivity, and the DM production cross section of our model is more than one order of magnitude below the LHC sensitivity at current stage.

  8. Interference effects of two scalar boson propagators on the LHC search for the singlet fermion DM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, P.; Li, Jinmian

    2017-02-01

    A gauge invariant UV-completion for singlet fermion DM interacting with the standard model (SM) particles involves a new singlet scalar. Therefore the model contains two scalar mediators, mixtures of the SM Higgs boson and a singlet scalar boson. Collider phenomenology of the interference effect between these two scalar propagators is studied in this work. This interference effect can be either constructive or destructive in the DM production cross section depending on both singlet scalar and DM masses, and it will soften the final state jets in the full mass region. Applying the CMS mono-jet search to our model, we find the interference effect plays a very important role in the DM search sensitivity, and the DM production cross section of our model is more than one order of magnitude below the LHC sensitivity at current stage.

  9. Deterministic Modeling of the High Temperature Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortensi, J.; Cogliati, J. J.; Pope, M. A.; Ferrer, R. M.; Ougouag, A. M.

    2010-06-01

    control rods were adjusted to maintain criticality, whereas in the model, the rod positions were fixed. In addition, this work includes a brief study of a cross section generation approach that seeks to decouple the domain in order to account for neighbor effects. This spectral interpenetration is a dominant effect in annular HTR physics. This analysis methodology should be further explored in order to reduce the error that is systematically propagated in the traditional generation of cross sections.

  10. Nonhydrostatic effects of nonlinear internal wave propagation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Fringer, O. B.

    2007-05-01

    It is well known that internal tides are generated over steep topography at the Luzon Strait on the eastern boundary of the South China Sea. These internal tides propagate westward and steepen into trains of weakly nonlinear internal waves that propagate relatively free of dissipation until they interact with the continental shelf on the western side of the South China Sea, some 350 km from their generation point. The rate at which the internal tide transforms into trains of nonlinear waves depends on the Froude number at the generation site, which is defined as the ratio of the barotropic current speed to the local internal wave speed. Large Froude numbers lead to rapid evolution of wave trains while low Froude numbers generate internal tides that may not evolve into wave trains before reaching the continental shelf. Although the evolution into trains of weakly nonlinear waves results from the delicate interplay between nonlinear steepening and nonhydrostatic dispersion, the steepening process is represented quite well, at least from a qualitative standpoint, by hydrostatic models, which contain no explicit nonhydrostatic dispersion. Furthermore, hydrostatic models predict the propagation speed of the leading wave in wave trains extremely well, indicating that its propagation speed depends very weakly on nonlinear or dispersive effects. In order to examine how hydrostatic models introduce dispersion that leads to the formation of wave trains, we simulate the generation and evolution of nonlinear waves in the South China Sea with and without the hydrostatic approximation using the nonhydrostatic model SUNTANS, which can be run in either hydrostatic or nonhydrostatic mode. We show that the dispersion leading to the formation of wave trains in the hydrostatic model results from numerically-induced dispersion that is implicit in the numerical formulation of the advection terms. While the speed of the leading wave in the wave trains is correct, the amplitude and number

  11. Spirally polarized beams for polarimetry measurements of deterministic and homogeneous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sande, Juan Carlos González; Santarsiero, Massimo; Piquero, Gemma

    2017-04-01

    The use of spirally polarized beams (SPBs) in polarimetric measurements of homogeneous and deterministic samples is proposed. Since across any transverse plane such beams present all possible linearly polarized states at once, the complete Mueller matrix of deterministic samples can be recovered with a reduced number of measurements and small errors. Furthermore, SPBs present the same polarization pattern across any transverse plane during propagation, and the same happens for the field propagated after the sample, so that both the sample plane and the plane where the polarization of the field is measured can be chosen at will. Experimental results are presented for the particular case of an azimuthally polarized beam and samples consisting of rotated retardation plates and linear polarizers.

  12. Propagation and effects of monsoonal seasonally intense rainfall signal in river strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.

    2014-12-01

    Climatic forcing signals in river systems tend to be modified on different temporal and spatial scales due to inherent signal buffering, re-routing, and a complex mixing of multiple autogenic and allogenic signals. Thus climate forcing response is generally assumed inherently non-linear with significant hysteresis effects. This paper explores propagation and effects of monsoonal, seasonally intense rainfall signal in river strata in the monsoonal and bordering subtropical domains. Some such rivers occur completely within the monsoon climate zone. Others have parts of their drainages in temperate climate zones, or on high elevations and receive some of their water discharge from other sources. Yet others, have their upstream drainages in the tropical monsoon climates, but flow through bordering subtropical drylands. Yet, all these rivers characteristically experience seasonal high magnitude floods as the effect of intense monsoon precipitation. Many rivers in the bordering subtropical zone receive monsoon rain and transmit discharge only during abnormal or strengthened monsoon seasons and associated cyclonic flow. Field datasets, comparison to modern river deposits and a literature review of monsoonal and bordering subtropical domain rivers reveal that the effects of the intense seasonal monsoon rain and the resultant flooding are readily recognizable in modern and ancient fluvial strata. This paper argues that this distinct and dominant climate signal propagation occurs because it is the monsoon discharge that is commonly responsible for up to 100% of sediment erosion, transport and deposition, creating a system wide flushing or splash effect on a single season to multi-million year time scale. The distinct monsoon flood deposits are interbedded with other types of fluvial strata in systems where significant deposition also occurs from low-magnitude flood or non-flood discharges.

  13. Baroclinic Effects on Tidal Propagation and Estuarine Circulation: an Idealized Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Z.; Olabarrieta, M.

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates the baroclinic effects on the propagation of a semidiurnal tide and on the estuarine circulation by applying a three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to an idealized estuary. Different riverine flows and tidal amplitudes are considered to generate various types of estuaries (from strongly stratified to well mixed) in the estuarine parameter space, which is based on the freshwater Froude number (Fr) and mixing number (M). Two groups of scenarios, with and without density difference between riverine flow and ocean water, are carried out. Tidal wave characteristics and residual currents of each scenario are investigated. In strongly stratified estuaries, the baroclinic effects result in a typical bidirectional estuarine circulation, with the surface water flowing downstream and bottom water flowing upstream; if no density variations are considered, the residual current will flow downstream. In well mixed estuaries, surface water goes upstream due to Stokes Drift and bottom water goes downstream as a compensating flow, which can be found in both barotropic and baroclinic simulations. In partially mixed estuaries, without considering the density variations, the estuarine circulation patterns are similar to those in well mixed estuaries; the baroclinic effects will generate a triple-directional estuarine circulation, characterized by a downstream flow below the tidal wave trough and an upstream flow close to the bottom; between the wave crest and trough the residual current is directed upstream due to the Stokes Drift. Tidal amplitude is increasingly amplified from estuary mouth to head in all scenarios, and the intensity of this amplification is larger in baroclinic simulations. The strongest baroclinic effects on the tidal propagation occur in partially mixed estuaries, where the tidal amplitude can increase up to 30% due to baroclinic effects.

  14. Deterministic chaos in government debt dynamics with mechanistic primary balance rules

    CERN Document Server

    Lindgren, Jussi Ilmari

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that with mechanistic primary budget rules and with some simple assumptions on interest rates the well-known debt dynamics equation transforms into the infamous logistic map. The logistic map has very peculiar and rich nonlinear behaviour and it can exhibit deterministic chaos with certain parameter regimes. Deterministic chaos means the existence of the butterfly effect which in turn is qualitatively very important, as it shows that even deterministic budget rules produce unpredictable behaviour of the debt-to-GDP ratio, as chaotic systems are extremely sensitive to initial conditions.

  15. Effects of the local resonance on the wave propagation in periodic frame structures: generalized Newtonian mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Céline; Boutin, Claude; Hans, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the wave propagation in infinite two-dimensional structures made up of the periodic repetition of frames. Such materials are highly anisotropic and, because of lack of bracing, can present a large contrast between the shear and compression deformabilities. Moreover, when the thickness to length ratio of the frame elements is small, these elements can resonate in bending at low frequencies when compressional waves propagate in the structure. The frame size being small compared to the wavelength of the compressional waves, the homogenization method of periodic discrete media is extended to situations with local resonance, and it is applied to identify the macroscopic behavior at the leading order. In particular, the local resonance in bending leads to an effective mass different from the real mass and to the generalization of the Newtonian mechanics at the macroscopic scale. Consequently, compressional waves become dispersive and frequency bandgaps occur. The physical origin of these phenomena at the microscopic scale is also presented. Finally, a method is proposed for the design of such materials.

  16. A Laboratory Study of the Effects of Interbeds on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation in Shale Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiheng Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate how the characteristics of interbeds affect hydraulic fracture propagation in the continental shale formation, a series of 300 mm × 300 mm × 300 mm concrete blocks with varying interbeds, based on outcrop observation and core measurement of Chang 7-2 shale formation, were prepared to conduct the hydraulic fracturing experiments. The results reveal that the breakdown pressure increases with the rise of thickness and strength of interbeds under the same in-situ field stress and injection rate. In addition, for the model blocks with thick and high strength interbeds, the hydraulic fracture has difficulty crossing the interbeds and is prone to divert along the bedding faces, and the fracturing effectiveness is not good. However, for the model blocks with thin and low strength interbeds, more long branches are generated along the main fracture, which is beneficial to the formation of the fracture network. What is more, combining the macroscopic descriptions with microscopic observations, the blocks with thinner and lower strength interbeds tend to generate more micro-fractures, and the width of the fractures is relatively larger on the main fracture planes. Based on the experiments, it is indicated that the propagation of hydraulic fractures is strongly influenced by the characteristics of interbeds, and the results are instructive to the understanding and evaluation of the fracability in the continental shale formation.

  17. Effects of wind shear and temperature inversion on sound propagation from wind turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, Henk de [Golder Associates (Canada)], email: Henk_deHaan@golder.com

    2011-07-01

    Noise impact assessment of wind turbines usually takes into account sound speed and propagation at ground level, and those are influenced by wind shear and atmospheric temperature changes. This paper focuses on a week-long monitoring study and presents the observed and anticipated effects of wind shear and temperature on the level of ground sound emitted from a 65m high wind turbine. Working with anemometers at ground level and turbine height, it is shown that wind shear can influence sound propagation, and that atmospheric stability must be taken into account for accurate wind speed calculations to be made. Temperature must also be addressed and the heating of the earth by solar radiation and the re-radiation of that heat in a day-night cycle, resulting in temperature inversion in the atmosphere, must be taken into account. Observations of temperature changes over a week can then yield sound speed and sound power levels with respect to altitude, and show that sound power levels are higher at ground levels during the night.

  18. Direct and Propagated Effects of Small Molecules on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Cesa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs link all aspects of cellular biology. Dysfunction in the assembly or dynamics of PPI networks is a hallmark of human disease, and as such, there is growing interest in the discovery of small molecules that either promote or inhibit PPIs. Protein-protein interactions were once considered undruggable because of their relatively large buried surface areas and difficult topologies. Despite these challenges, recent advances in chemical screening methodologies, combined with improvements in structural and computational biology have made some of these targets more tractable. In this review, we highlight developments that have opened the door to potent chemical modulators. We focus on how allostery is being used to produce surprisingly robust changes in PPIs, even for the most challenging targets. We also discuss how interfering with one PPI can propagate changes through the broader web of interactions. Through this analysis, it is becoming clear that a combination of direct and propagated effects on PPI networks is ultimately how small molecules re-shape biology.

  19. Nonlinear Bubble Dynamics And The Effects On Propagation Through Near-Surface Bubble Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Timothy G.

    2004-11-01

    Nonlinear bubble dynamics are often viewed as the unfortunate consequence of having to use high acoustic pressure amplitudes when the void fraction in the near-surface oceanic bubble layer is great enough to cause severe attenuation (e.g. >50 dB/m). This is seen as unfortunate since existing models for acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids are based on linear bubble dynamics. However, the development of nonlinear models does more than just allow quantification of the errors associated with the use of linear models. It also offers the possibility of propagation modeling and acoustic inversions which appropriately incorporate the bubble nonlinearity. Furthermore, it allows exploration and quantification of possible nonlinear effects which may be exploited. As a result, high acoustic pressure amplitudes may be desirable even in low void fractions, because they offer opportunities to gain information about the bubble cloud from the nonlinearities, and options to exploit the nonlinearities to enhance communication and sonar in bubbly waters. This paper presents a method for calculating the nonlinear acoustic cross-sections, scatter, attenuations and sound speeds from bubble clouds which may be inhomogeneous. The method allows prediction of the time dependency of these quantities, both because the cloud may vary and because the incident acoustic pulse may have finite and arbitrary time history. The method can be readily adapted for bubbles in other environments (e.g. clouds of interacting bubbles, sediments, structures, in vivo, reverberant conditions etc.). The possible exploitation of bubble acoustics by marine mammals, and for sonar enhancement, is explored.

  20. The effect of applying different water levels and irrigation frequencies in propagating rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Giovanni Álvarez Herrera

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Rosemary seedlings are obtained by vegetative propagation because the seeds present low viability. Despite being an expanding crop, there is little information on water consumption during the propagation stage. Water levels and irrigation frequencies were therefore applied using a completely randomised design having a 4 x 2 factorial arrangement. The first factor concerned irrigation frequency (4 and 8 days and the second concerned water level (0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 evaporation inside the greenhouse. A 1.0 coefficient combined with 4-day irrigation frequency presented the best results regarding height (39.3 cm, fresh weight, dry weight and branch length (146 cm. Water level affected the fresh and dry weight of leaves regardless of frequency. Relative water content in leaves did not present differences due to environmental conditions minimising treatment effect. Rooting percent- tage showed no significant differences regarding irrigation frequency or water level. Irrigation frequency did not affect rosemary growing pattern because sphagnum retains high moisture content. The best branch number (34 was obtained with 1.0 coefficient and 4-day frequency, this being important from the production point of view because this is the material which is sold. Water management changes photoassimilate distribution in rosemary plants.

  1. Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise Including Propagation Effects Originating NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven; Morris, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed based on the Euler equations for broadband shock-associated noise (BBSAN) that directly incorporates the vector Green s function of the linearized Euler equations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution (SRANS) to describe the mean flow. The vector Green s function allows the BBSAN propagation through the jet shear layer to be determined. The large-scale coherent turbulence is modeled by two-point second order velocity cross-correlations. Turbulent length and time scales are related to the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. An adjoint vector Green s function solver is implemented to determine the vector Green s function based on a locally parallel mean flow at different streamwise locations. The newly developed acoustic analogy can be simplified to one that uses the Green s function associated with the Helmholtz equation, which is consistent with a previous formulation by the authors. A large number of predictions are generated using three different nozzles over a wide range of fully-expanded jet Mach numbers and jet stagnation temperatures. These predictions are compared with experimental data from multiple jet noise experimental facilities. In addition, two models for the so-called fine-scale mixing noise are included in the comparisons. Improved BBSAN predictions are obtained relative to other models that do not include propagation effects.

  2. Studying the effect of cracks on the ultrasonic wave propagation in a two dimensional gearbox finite element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozevin, Didem; Fazel, Hossein; Cox, Justin; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth S.; Timmons, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Gearbox components of aerospace structures are typically made of brittle materials with high fracture toughness, but susceptible to fatigue failure due to continuous cyclic loading. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) methods are used to monitor the crack growth in gearbox components. Damage detection methodologies developed in laboratory-scale experiments may not represent the actual gearbox structural configuration, and are usually not applicable to real application as the vibration and wave properties depend on the material, structural layers and thicknesses. Also, the sensor types and locations are key factors for frequency content of ultrasonic waves, which are essential features for pattern recognition algorithm development in noisy environments. Therefore, a deterministic damage detection methodology that considers all the variables influencing the waveform signature should be considered in the preliminary computation before any experimental test matrix. In order to achieve this goal, we developed two dimensional finite element models of a gearbox cross section from front view and shaft section. The cross section model consists of steel revolving teeth, a thin layer of oil, and retention plate. An ultrasonic wave up to 1 MHz frequency is generated, and waveform histories along the gearbox are recorded. The received waveforms under pristine and cracked conditions are compared in order to analyze the crack influence on the wave propagation in gearbox, which can be utilized by both active and passive SHM methods.

  3. Deterministic mediated superdense coding with linear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavičić, Mladen, E-mail: mpavicic@physik.hu-berlin.de [Department of Physics—Nanooptics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Humboldt University of Berlin (Germany); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials and Sensing Devices (CEMS), Photonics and Quantum Optics Unit, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2016-02-22

    We present a scheme of deterministic mediated superdense coding of entangled photon states employing only linear-optics elements. Ideally, we are able to deterministically transfer four messages by manipulating just one of the photons. Two degrees of freedom, polarization and spatial, are used. A new kind of source of heralded down-converted photon pairs conditioned on detection of another pair with an efficiency of 92% is proposed. Realistic probabilistic experimental verification of the scheme with such a source of preselected pairs is feasible with today's technology. We obtain the channel capacity of 1.78 bits for a full-fledged implementation. - Highlights: • Deterministic linear optics mediated superdense coding is proposed. • Two degrees of freedom, polarization and spatial, are used. • Heralded source of conditioned entangled photon pairs, 92% efficient, is proposed.

  4. Effect of an imperfect interface on the SH wave propagating in a cylindrical piezoelectric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Dong; Yong Lee, Kang

    2010-04-01

    Under harsh in situ conditions, the interface in piezoelectric sensors may be damaged mechanically and/or electrically. The damaged interface would in turn affect the electromechanical behaviors of the sensors. The purpose of the present work is to study the effect of the imperfect interface on SH wave propagating in a cylindrical piezoelectric sensor. The dispersion relations of SH wave are derived analytically and the phase velocity are obtained numerically. Parametric studies on the phase velocity indicate that the mechanical imperfection may reduce the phase velocity under certain circumstances; however, the electrical imperfection has no obvious effect on the phase velocity in any cases; with the thickness of the piezoelectric layer increasing, the phase velocity may increase, decrease or keep unchanged, depending on the combination of the values of the wave number and the mechanical imperfection parameter.

  5. The Effect of Noise on the Propagating Speed of Pre-mixed Laminar Flame Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of thermal noise on the propagation speed of a planar flame. We show that this out of equilibrium greatly amplifies the effect of thermal noise to yield macroscopic reductions in the flame speed over what is predicted by the noise-free model. Computations show that noise slows the flame significantly. The flame is modeled using Navier Stokes equations with appropriate diffusive transport terms and chemical kinetic mechanism of hydrogen/oxygen. Thermal noise is modeled within the continuum framework using a system of stochastic partial differential equations, with transport noise from fluctuating hydrodynamics and reaction noise from a poisson model. We use a full chemical kinetics model in order to get quantitatively meaningful results. We compute steady and dynamic flames using an operator split finite volume scheme. New characteristic boundary conditions avoid non-physical boundary layers at computational boundaries. New limiters prevent stochastic terms from introducing non-physical neg...

  6. Effect of pulse propagation on the two-dimensional photon echo spectrum of multilevel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keusters, Dorine; Warren, Warren S.

    2003-08-01

    The effect of pulse propagation on the two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) spectrum of multilevel systems is investigated using a perturbative method. At high optical densities (OD) peak profiles are broadened asymmetrically, in most cases more strongly along the ω2 direction than along the ω1 direction. The amount of broadening is determined both by the OD and by the dynamics of the system. In addition, especially if the different transitions in the system are of unequal strength, the relative intensity of the peaks changes with OD. But even if the transition strengths are the same, the behavior of the cross peaks is different from the diagonal peaks. Since peak shape and relative intensity are important parameters in the interpretation of 2DPE spectra, such OD effects should be taken into account.

  7. The effect of initial pressure on detonation propagation across a mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Chung Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study determines the effect of the initial pressure on the propagation of a Chapman–Jouguet detonation wave from a stoichiometric C3H8/O2 mixture (donor to a stoichiometric C3H8/air mixture (acceptor. Depending on the initial pressure ratio in the donor and the acceptor, the result can be a smooth transmission, a re-initiated detonation wave, or a transmitted shock wave. When the donor is divided into a driver donor and a driven donor, the degree of overdrive in a driven donor varies with the donor pressure ratio. There must be a greater degree of overdrive in the driven donor for re-initiation of a detonation wave in the acceptor, particularly if the initial pressure in the driven donor is lower than the Chapman–Jouguet pressure in the acceptor. The bi-dimensional effect is also another major factor.

  8. Stress-ratio effect on mode II propagation of interlaminar fatigue cracks in graphite/epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the stress ratio on the propagation behavior of Mode II interlaminar fatigue cracks was studied with unidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates, Toray T800H/{number_sign}3631. End-notched flexure (ENF) specimens were used for fatigue tests under the stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.6; and end-loaded split (ELS) specimens were used for tests under R = {minus}1.0, {minus}0.5, and 0.2. For each stress ratio, the crack propagation rate was given by a power function of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11}, in the region of rates above 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle. Below this region, there exists the threshold for fatigue crack propagation. The threshold condition is given by a constant value of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11th} = 1.8 MPa{radical}m. The crack propagation rate is determined by {Delta}K{sub 11} near the threshold, while by the maximum stress identity factor, K{sub 11max}, at high rates. A fracture mechanics equation is proposed for predicting the propagation rate of Mode II fatigue cracks under various stress ratios. The effect of the stress ratio on the micromechanism of Mode II fatigue crack propagation was discussed on the basis of the microscopic observations of fracture surfaces and near-crack-tip regions.

  9. Deterministic error correction for nonlocal spatial-polarization hyperentanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Guan-Yu; Deng, Fu-Guo; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-02-10

    Hyperentanglement is an effective quantum source for quantum communication network due to its high capacity, low loss rate, and its unusual character in teleportation of quantum particle fully. Here we present a deterministic error-correction scheme for nonlocal spatial-polarization hyperentangled photon pairs over collective-noise channels. In our scheme, the spatial-polarization hyperentanglement is first encoded into a spatial-defined time-bin entanglement with identical polarization before it is transmitted over collective-noise channels, which leads to the error rejection of the spatial entanglement during the transmission. The polarization noise affecting the polarization entanglement can be corrected with a proper one-step decoding procedure. The two parties in quantum communication can, in principle, obtain a nonlocal maximally entangled spatial-polarization hyperentanglement in a deterministic way, which makes our protocol more convenient than others in long-distance quantum communication.

  10. GCR Environmental Models III: GCR Model Validation and Propagated Uncertainties in Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Xu, Xiaojing; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the last of three papers focused on quantifying the uncertainty associated with galactic cosmic rays (GCR) models used for space radiation shielding applications. In the first paper, it was found that GCR ions with Z>2 and boundary energy below 500 MeV/nucleon induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. This is an important finding since GCR model development and validation have been heavily biased toward Advanced Composition Explorer/Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer measurements below 500 MeV/nucleon. Weights were also developed that quantify the relative contribution of defined GCR energy and charge groups to effective dose behind shielding. In the second paper, it was shown that these weights could be used to efficiently propagate GCR model uncertainties into effective dose behind shielding. In this work, uncertainties are quantified for a few commonly used GCR models. A validation metric is developed that accounts for measurements uncertainty, and the metric is coupled to the fast uncertainty propagation method. For this work, the Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) 2010 and 2011 and the Matthia GCR models are compared to an extensive measurement database. It is shown that BON2011 systematically overestimates heavy ion fluxes in the range 0.5-4 GeV/nucleon. The BON2010 and BON2011 also show moderate and large errors in reproducing past solar activity near the 2000 solar maximum and 2010 solar minimum. It is found that all three models induce relative errors in effective dose in the interval [-20%, 20%] at a 68% confidence level. The BON2010 and Matthia models are found to have similar overall uncertainty estimates and are preferred for space radiation shielding applications.

  11. Driven polymer translocation in good and bad solvent: Effects of hydrodynamics and tension propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisio, J E; Piili, J; Linna, R P

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the driven polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore in the presence and absence of hydrodynamics both in good and bad solvent. We present our results on tension propagating along the polymer segment on the cis side that is measured for the first time using our method that works also in the presence of hydrodynamics. For simulations we use stochastic rotation dynamics, also called multiparticle collision dynamics. We find that in the good solvent the tension propagates very similarly whether hydrodynamics is included or not. Only the tensed segment is by a constant factor shorter in the presence of hydrodynamics. The shorter tensed segment and the hydrodynamic interactions contribute to a smaller friction for the translocating polymer when hydrodynamics is included, which shows as smaller waiting times and a smaller exponent in the scaling of the translocation time with the polymer length. In the bad solvent hydrodynamics has a minimal effect on polymer translocation, in contrast to the good solvent, where it speeds up translocation. We find that under bad-solvent conditions tension does not spread appreciably along the polymer. Consequently, translocation time does not scale with the polymer length. By measuring the effective friction in a setup where a polymer in free solvent is pulled by a constant force at the end, we find that hydrodynamics does speed up collective polymer motion in the bad solvent even more effectively than in the good solvent. However, hydrodynamics has a negligible effect on the motion of individual monomers within the highly correlated globular conformation on the cis side and hence on the entire driven translocation under bad-solvent conditions.

  12. Optimal Deterministic Investment Strategies for Insurers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Rieder

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider an insurance company whose risk reserve is given by a Brownian motion with drift and which is able to invest the money into a Black–Scholes financial market. As optimization criteria, we treat mean-variance problems, problems with other risk measures, exponential utility and the probability of ruin. Following recent research, we assume that investment strategies have to be deterministic. This leads to deterministic control problems, which are quite easy to solve. Moreover, it turns out that there are some interesting links between the optimal investment strategies of these problems. Finally, we also show that this approach works in the Lévy process framework.

  13. Neutron noise computation using panda deterministic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbert, Ph. [CEA Bruyeres le Chatel (France)

    2003-07-01

    PANDA is a general purpose discrete ordinates neutron transport code with deterministic and non deterministic applications. In this paper we consider the adaptation of PANDA to stochastic neutron counting problems. More specifically we consider the first two moments of the count number probability distribution. In a first part we will recall the equations for the single neutron and source induced count number moments with the corresponding expression for the excess of relative variance or Feynman function. In a second part we discuss the numerical solution of these inhomogeneous adjoint time dependent transport coupled equations with discrete ordinate methods. Finally, numerical applications are presented in the third part. (author)

  14. Stochastic versus deterministic systems of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ladde, G S

    2003-01-01

    This peerless reference/text unfurls a unified and systematic study of the two types of mathematical models of dynamic processes-stochastic and deterministic-as placed in the context of systems of stochastic differential equations. Using the tools of variational comparison, generalized variation of constants, and probability distribution as its methodological backbone, Stochastic Versus Deterministic Systems of Differential Equations addresses questions relating to the need for a stochastic mathematical model and the between-model contrast that arises in the absence of random disturbances/flu

  15. Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J. [Purdue University

    2013-04-27

    Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a sub-porosity within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The sub-porosity may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in

  16. Effects of hot water treatments on dormant grapevine propagation materials used for grafted vine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltekin Oguzhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium vitis is responsible for the crown gall disease of grapevine which breaks the grapevine trunk vascular system. Nutrient flow is prevented by crown gall and it leads to weak growth and death of the plants. It can be destructive disease often encountered in vineyards and it can be spread in cuttings for propagation. Thermotherapy treatment is an alternative method for eradicating A. vitis from grapevine cuttings but effects of thermotherapy treatments on dormant vine tissue, bud vitality, rooting and shooting of the propagation materials are not yet fully understood. In this research, it is aimed to determine the effects of thermotherapy treatment (Hot water treatment on callus formation (at the basal part and grafting point, grafted vine quality (shoot length, shoot width, root number, shooting and rooting development, fresh and dry weight of shoots and roots and final take in the grafted vine production. Experiment was conducted in the nursery of Manisa Viticultural Research Institute. Rootstocks (Kober 5BB, Couderc 1613 and 41B and scions (Sultan 7 and Manisa sultanı were hot-water treated at 50∘C for 30 minutes which is the most common technique against Agrobacterium vitis. After thermotherapy treatment, all rootstocks were grafted with Sultan 7 and Manisa sultanıvarieties. They were kept for 22 days in callusing room for callus development and then they were planted in polyethlyene bags for rooting. At the end of the study, significant treatment x rootstock interaction were observed for the final take of Sultan 7 variety. Thermotherapy treated of 1613C/Sultan 7 combinations had more final take than the control (untreated group. For instance, hot water treated cuttings of 1613C/Sultan 7 combinations had 75% final take while the control group had the 70%. Also there were not observed any adverse effects of HWT on bud and tissue vitality.

  17. A General Mechanism for the Propagation of Mutational Effects in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Nandakumar; Suresh, Swaathiratna; Gopi, Soundhararajan; Raman, Karthik; Naganathan, Athi N

    2017-01-10

    Mutations in the hydrophobic interior of proteins are generally thought to weaken the interactions only in their immediate neighborhood. This forms the basis of protein engineering-based studies of folding mechanism and function. However, mutational work on diverse proteins has shown that distant residues are thermodynamically coupled, with the network of interactions within the protein acting as signal conduits, thus raising an intriguing paradox. Are mutational effects localized, and if not, is there a general rule for the extent of percolation and the functional form of this propagation? We explore these questions from multiple perspectives in this work. Perturbation analysis of interaction networks within proteins and microsecond long molecular dynamics simulations of several aliphatic mutants of ubiquitin reveal strong evidence of the distinct alteration of distal residue-residue communication networks. We find that mutational effects consistently propagate into the second shell of the altered site (even up to 15-20 Å) in proportion to the perturbation magnitude and dissipate exponentially with a decay distance constant of ∼4-5 Å. We also report evidence for this phenomenon from published experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data that strikingly resemble predictions from network theory and molecular dynamics simulations. Reformulating these observations onto a statistical mechanical model, we reproduce the stability changes of 375 mutations from 19 single-domain proteins. Our work thus reveals a robust energy dissipation-cum-signaling mechanism in the interaction network within proteins, quantifies the partitioning of destabilization energetics around the mutation neighborhood, and presents a simple theoretical framework for modeling the allosteric effects of point mutations.

  18. Weak-field approximation of a scalar theory of gravitation and some remarks on the propagation effects of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Arminjon, M

    2002-01-01

    A simple example is given of the implementation of the usual method of asymptotic expansions for weak gravitational fields. A scalar, preferred-frame theory of gravitation is considered, but the method is general. The version used allows to account for propagation effects, also in the zone occupied by the system of bodies. As an application, it is shown that the retardation due to propagation at speed c has no dynamical effect below the second order, i.e., below the order 1/c^2; and that it does have dynamical effects at this order.

  19. Effect of the acoustic boundary layer on the wave propagation in ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the wave propagation in two-dimensional and circular lined ducts taking into account the effects of viscosity in both the mean and the acoustic problems. The method of composite expansions is used to express each acoustic flow quantity as the sum of an inviscid part and a boundary layer part insignificant outside a thin layer next to the wall. The problem is reduced to solving a second-order ordinary differential equation for the pressure perturbation as in the inviscid acoustic case but with a modified specific wall admittance. An analytic expression is presented for the variation of the modified admittance with the wall and flow parameters, such as the acoustic boundary layer thickness, the mean velocity and temperature gradients at the wall, the frequency of oscillation, and the wavelength.

  20. Ionospheric propagation effects for UHE neutrino detection with the lunar Cherenkov technique

    CERN Document Server

    McFadden, Rebecca; Bray, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Cherenkov experiments aim to detect nanosecond pulses of Cherenkov emission produced during UHE cosmic ray or neutrino interactions in the lunar regolith. Pulses from these interactions are dispersed, and therefore reduced in amplitude, during propagation through the Earth's ionosphere. Pulse dispersion must therefore be corrected to maximise the received signal to noise ratio and subsequent chances of detection. The pulse dispersion characteristic may also provide a powerful signature to determine the lunar origin of a pulse and discriminate against pulses of terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI). This characteristic is parameterised by the instantaneous Total Electron Content (TEC) of the ionosphere and therefore an accurate knowledge of the ionospheric TEC provides an experimental advantage for the detection and identification of lunar Cherenkov pulses. We present a new method to calibrate the dispersive effect of the ionosphere on lunar Cherenkov pulses using lunar Faraday rotation measurem...

  1. Nonlinear continuous-wave optical propagation in nematic liquid crystals: Interplay between reorientational and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Laudyn, Urszula A.; Piccardi, Armando; Kwasny, Michał; Klus, Bartlomiej; Karpierz, Mirosław A.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-07-01

    We investigate nonlinear optical propagation of continuous-wave (CW) beams in bulk nematic liquid crystals. We thoroughly analyze the competing roles of reorientational and thermal nonlinearity with reference to self-focusing/defocusing and, eventually, the formation of nonlinear diffraction-free wavepackets, the so-called spatial optical solitons. To this extent we refer to dye-doped nematic liquid crystals in planar cells excited by a single CW beam in the highly nonlocal limit. To adjust the relative weight between the two nonlinear responses, we employ two distinct wavelengths, inside and outside the absorption band of the dye, respectively. Different concentrations of the dye are considered in order to enhance the thermal effect. The theoretical analysis is complemented by numerical simulations in the highly nonlocal approximation based on a semi-analytic approach. Theoretical results are finally compared to experimental results in the Nematic Liquid Crystals (NLC) 4-trans-4'-n-hexylcyclohexylisothiocyanatobenzene (6CHBT) doped with Sudan Blue dye.

  2. Driven polymer translocation in good and bad solvent: effects of hydrodynamics and tension propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Moisio, Jaakko E; Linna, Riku P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the driven polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore in the presence and absence of hydrodynamics both in good and bad solvent. We measure tension of the polymer segment on the {\\it cis} side of the pore in the course of translocations simulated using stochastic rotation dynamics, also called multi-particle collision dynamics. We find that in the good solvent the tension propagates similarly whether hydrodynamics is included or not. Only the tensed segment is by a constant factor shorter in the presence of hydrodynamics. The shorter tensed segment and the hydrodynamic interactions contribute to a smaller friction for the translocating polymer when hydrodynamics is included, which shows as smaller waiting times and a smaller exponent in the scaling of the translocation time with the polymer length. Hydrodynamics speeds up translocation in the good solvent, whereas it has a minimal effect on polymer translocation in the bad solvent. Under bad-solvent conditions tension does not spread ...

  3. Effects of wave propagation anisotropy on the wave focusing by negative refractive sonic crystal flat lenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Alagoz

    2012-01-01

    In this study,wave propagation anisotropy in a triangular lattice crystal structure and its associated waveform shaping in a crystal structure are investigated theoretically.A directional variation in wave velocity inside a crystal structure is shown to cause bending wave envelopes.The authors report that a triangular lattice sonic crystal possesses six numbers of a high symmetry direction,which leads to a wave convergence caused by wave velocity anisotropy inside the crystal.However,two of them are utilized mostly in wave focusing by an acoustic flat lens.Based on wave velocity anisotropy,the pseudo ideal imaging effect obtained in the second band of the flat lens is discussed.

  4. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis.

  5. Quantification of optical turbulence in the ocean and its effects on beam propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nootz, Gero; Jarosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser R; Hou, Weilin

    2016-11-01

    The influence of optically active turbulence on the propagation of laser beams is investigated in clear ocean water over a path length of 8.75 m. The measurement apparatus is described and the effects of optical turbulence on the laser beam are presented. The index of refraction structure constant is extracted from the beam deflection and the results are compared to independently made measures of the turbulence strength (Cn2) by a vertical microstructure profiler. Here we present values of Cn2 taken from aboard the R/V Walton Smith during the Bahamas optical turbulence exercise (BOTEX) in the Tongue of the Ocean between June 30 and July 12, 2011, spanning a range from 10-14 to 10-10  m-2/3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such measurements are reported for the ocean.

  6. Effect of deep native defects on ultrasound propagation in TlInS2 layered crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu.; Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Odrinsky, Andrei P.; Kırbaş, Cafer

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated p-type semiconductor-ferroelectric TlInS2 by means of Photo-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy (PICTS) technique in the temperature range 77-350 K for the detection of native deep defect levels in TlInS2. Five native deep defect levels were detected and their energy levels and capture cross sections were evaluated. Focusing on these data, the influence of these defects on the longitudinal and transverse ultrasound waves propagation as well as the effect of electric field on ultrasound waves were studied at different temperatures. The acoustic properties were investigated by the pulse-echo method. The direct contribution of thermally activated charged defects to the acoustic properties of TlInS2 was demonstrated. The key role of charged native deep level defects in elastic properties of TlInS2 was shown.

  7. Modified Redundancy based Technique—a New Approach to Combat Error Propagation Effect of AES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, B.; Bhunia, C. T.; Maulik, U.

    2012-06-01

    Advanced encryption standard (AES) is a great research challenge. It has been developed to replace the data encryption standard (DES). AES suffers from a major limitation of error propagation effect. To tackle this limitation, two methods are available. One is redundancy based technique and the other one is bite based parity technique. The first one has a significant advantage of correcting any error on definite term over the second one but at the cost of higher level of overhead and hence lowering the processing speed. In this paper, a new approach based on the redundancy based technique is proposed that would certainly speed up the process of reliable encryption and hence the secured communication.

  8. An alternative view on the role of the β-effect in the Rossby wave propagation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Heifetz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of the β-effect in the Rossby wave propagation mechanism is examined in the linearised shallow water equations directly in momentum–height variables, without recourse to potential vorticity (PV. Rigorous asymptotic expansion of the equations, with respect to the small non-dimensionalised β parameter, reveals in detail how the Coriolis force acting on the small ageostrophic terms translates the geostrophic leading-order solution to propagate westward in concert. This information cannot be obtained directly from the conventional PV perspective on the propagation mechanism. Furthermore, a comparison between the β-effect in planetary Rossby waves and the sloping-bottom effect in promoting topographic Rossby waves shows that the ageostrophic terms play different roles in the two cases. This is despite the fact that from the PV viewpoint whether the advection of mean PV gradient is set up by changes in planetary vorticity or by mean depth is inconsequential.

  9. The mathematical basis for deterministic quantum mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    2006-01-01

    If there exists a classical, i.e. deterministic theory underlying quantum mechanics, an explanation must be found of the fact that the Hamiltonian, which is defined to be the operator that generates evolution in time, is bounded from below. The mechanism that can produce exactly such a constraint

  10. The mathematical basis for deterministic quantum mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    2007-01-01

    If there exists a classical, i.e. deterministic theory underlying quantum mechanics, an explanation must be found of the fact that the Hamiltonian, which is defined to be the operator that generates evolution in time, is bounded from below. The mechanism that can produce exactly such a constraint is

  11. DETERMINISTIC HOMOGENIZATION OF QUASILINEAR DAMPED HYPERBOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriel Nguetseng; Hubert Nnang; Nils Svanstedt

    2011-01-01

    Deterministic homogenization is studied for quasilinear monotone hyperbolic problems with a linear damping term.It is shown by the sigma-convergence method that the sequence of solutions to a class of multi-scale highly oscillatory hyperbolic problems converges to the solution to a homogenized quasilinear hyperbolic problem.

  12. Deterministic Kalman filtering in a behavioral framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fagnani, F; Willems, JC

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to obtain a deterministic version of the Kalman filtering equations. We will use a behavioral description of the plant, specifically, an image representation. The resulting algorithm requires a matrix spectral factorization. We also show that the filter can be implemente

  13. A Gap Property of Deterministic Tree Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niwinski, Damian; Walukiewicz, Igor

    2003-01-01

    We show that a tree language recognized by a deterministic parity automaton is either hard for the co-Büchi level and therefore cannot be recognized by a weak alternating automaton, or is on a very low evel in the hierarchy of weak alternating automata. A topological counterpart of this property...

  14. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (˜10-6 to 10-2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) III and ΔKIII is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity Γ III, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces. The latter effect is found to be dependent upon the mode of applied loading (i.e., the presence of superimposed axial loads) and the crack length and torque level. Mechanistically, high-torque surfaces were transverse, macroscopically flat, and smeared. Lower torques showed additional axial cracks (longitudinal shear cracking) perpendicular to the main transverse surface. A micro-mechanical model for the main radi l Mode III growth, based on the premise that crack advance results from Mode II coalescence of microcracks initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front, is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔΓIII if local Mode II growth rates are

  15. Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis Effective Potential for Quark Propagator in Real-Time Thermal Field Theory and Landau Gauge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We complete the derivation of the Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis effective potential for quark propagator at finite temperature and finite quark chemical potential in the real-time formalism of thermal field theory and in Landau gauge. In the approximation that the function A(p2) in inverse quark propagator is replaced by unity, by means of the running gauge coupling and the quark mass function invariant under the renormalization group in zero temperature Quantum Chromadynamics (QCD), we obtain a calculable expression for the thermal effective potential, which will be a useful means to research chiral phase transition in QCD in the real-time formalism.

  16. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed—Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark—Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONGHong-Shi; PINGJia-Lun; 等

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagator from the dressed-quark propagator,which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinement order parameters.A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  17. Light propagation in optical crystal powders: effects of particle size and volume filling factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GarcIa-Ramiro, B [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Illarramendi, M A [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Aramburu, I [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Fernandez, J [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Balda, R [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Al-Saleh, M [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2007-11-14

    In this work, we analyse the light propagation in some laser and nonlinear crystal powders. In particular, we study the dependence of the diffusive absorption lengths and the transport lengths on particle size and volume filling factor. The theoretical calculations have been made by assuming a diffusive propagation of light in these materials.

  18. GNSS-Reflectometry aboard ISS with GEROS: Investigation of atmospheric propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zus, F.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Semmling, M.

    2015-12-01

    GEROS-ISS (GNSS rEflectometry Radio Occultation and Scatterometry) is an ESA mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The main mission goals are the determination of the sea surface height and surface winds. Secondary goals are monitoring of land surface parameters and atmosphere sounding using GNSS radio occultation measurements. The international scientific study GARCA (GNSS-Reflectometry Assessment of Requirements and Consolidation of Retrieval Algorithms), funded by ESA, is part of the preparations for GEROS-ISS. Major goals of GARCA are the development of an end2end Simulator for the GEROS-ISS measurements (GEROS-SIM) and the evaluation of the error budget of the GNSS reflectometry measurements. In this presentation we introduce some of the GARCA activities to quantify the influence of the ionized and neutral atmosphere on the altimetric measurements, which is a major error source for GEROS-ISS. At first, we analyse, to which extend the standard linear combination of interferometric paths at different carrier frequencies can be used to correct for the ionospheric propagation effects. Second, we make use of the tangent-linear version of our ray-trace algorithm to propagate the uncertainty of the underlying refractivity profile into the uncertainty of the interferometric path. For comparison the sensitivity of the interferometric path with respect to the sea surface height is computed. Though our calculations are based on a number of simplifying assumptions (the Earth is a sphere, the atmosphere is spherically layered and the ISS and GNSS satellite orbits are circular) some general conclusions can be drawn. In essence, for elevation angles above -5° at the ISS the higher-order ionospheric errors and the uncertaintiy of the inteferometric path due to the uncertainty of the underlying refractivity profile are small enough to distinguish a sea surface height of ± 0.5 m.

  19. The Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise Including Propagation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven; Morris, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed based on the Euler equations for broadband shock- associated noise (BBSAN) that directly incorporates the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution (SRANS) as the mean flow. The vector Green's function allows the BBSAN propagation through the jet shear layer to be determined. The large-scale coherent turbulence is modeled by two-point second order velocity cross-correlations. Turbulent length and time scales are related to the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. An adjoint vector Green's function solver is implemented to determine the vector Green's function based on a locally parallel mean flow at streamwise locations of the SRANS solution. However, the developed acoustic analogy could easily be based on any adjoint vector Green's function solver, such as one that makes no assumptions about the mean flow. The newly developed acoustic analogy can be simplified to one that uses the Green's function associated with the Helmholtz equation, which is consistent with the formulation of Morris and Miller (AIAAJ 2010). A large number of predictions are generated using three different nozzles over a wide range of fully expanded Mach numbers and jet stagnation temperatures. These predictions are compared with experimental data from multiple jet noise labs. In addition, two models for the so-called 'fine-scale' mixing noise are included in the comparisons. Improved BBSAN predictions are obtained relative to other models that do not include the propagation effects, especially in the upstream direction of the jet.

  20. Deterministic chaos in RL-diode circuits and its application in metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucheruk, Volodymyr; Katsyv, Samuil; Glushko, Mykhailo; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zyska, Tomasz; Taissariyeva, Kyrmyzy; Mussabekov, Kanat

    2016-09-01

    The paper investigated the possibility of measuring the resistive physical quantity generator using deterministic chaos based RL-diode circuit. A generalized structure of the measuring device using a deterministic chaos signal generator. To separate the useful component of the measurement signal of amplitude detector is proposed to use. Mathematical modeling of the RL-diode circuit, which showed a significant effect of the barrier and diffusion capacity of the diode on the occurrence of deterministic chaotic oscillations in this circuit. It is shown that this type deterministic chaos signal generator has a high sensitivity to a change in output voltage resistance in the range of 250 Ohms, which can be used to create the measuring devices based on it.

  1. A first principles atmospheric propagation & characterization tool: the laser environmental effects definition and reference (LEEDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Steven T.; Bartell, Richard J.; Krizo, Matthew J.; Caylor, Gregory L.; Moore, Kenneth P.; Harris, Thomas R.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.

    2008-02-01

    The Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy (AFIT/CDE) has developed a first principles atmospheric propagation and characterization model called the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference or LEEDR. This package enables the creation of profiles of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, optical turbulence, and atmospheric particulates and hydrometeors as they relate to line-by-line layer extinction coefficient magnitude at wavelengths from the UV to the RF. Worldwide seasonal, diurnal, and geographical variability in these parameters is accessed from probability density function (PDF) databases using a variety of recently available resources to include the Extreme and Percentile Environmental Reference Tables (ExPERT), the Master Database for Optical Turbulence Research in Support of the Airborne Laser, and the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). GADS provides aerosol constituent number densities on a 5° x 5° grid worldwide. ExPERT mapping software allows the LEEDR operator to choose from specific site or regional upper air data to characterize correlated molecular absorption, aerosol absorption and scattering by percentile. The integration of the Surface Marine Gridded Climatology database, the Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM), and the Navy Surface Layer Optical Turbulence (NSLOT) model provides worldwide coverage over all ocean regions on a 1° x 1° grid. Molecular scattering is computed based on Rayleigh theory. Molecular absorption effects are computed for the top 13 absorbing species using line strength information from the HITRAN 2004 database in conjunction with a community standard molecular absorption continuum code. Aerosol scattering and absorption are computed with the Wiscombe Mie model. Each atmospheric particulate/hydrometeor is evaluated based on its wavelength-dependent forward and off-axis scattering characteristics and absorption effects on laser energy delivered at any wavelength from 0.355 μm to 8.6 m

  2. Quantum dynamics via a time propagator in Wigner's phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    that the simple classical deterministic motion breaks down surprisingly fast in an anharmonic potential. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using the scheme as a useful approach to quantum dynamics in many dimensions. To that end we present a Monte Carlo integration scheme using the norm of the propagator......We derive an expression for a short-time phase space propagator. We use it in a new propagation scheme and demonstrate that it works for a Morse potential. The propagation scheme is used to propagate classical distributions which do not obey the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. It is shown...

  3. From LTL and Limit-Deterministic B\\"uchi Automata to Deterministic Parity Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Esparza, Javier; Křetínský, Jan; Raskin, Jean-François; Sickert, Salomon

    2017-01-01

    Controller synthesis for general linear temporal logic (LTL) objectives is a challenging task. The standard approach involves translating the LTL objective into a deterministic parity automaton (DPA) by means of the Safra-Piterman construction. One of the challenges is the size of the DPA, which often grows very fast in practice, and can reach double exponential size in the length of the LTL formula. In this paper we describe a single exponential translation from limit-deterministic B\\"uchi a...

  4. Joint effect of polarization and the propagation path of a light beam on its intrinsic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Sarkew; Kundikova, Nataliya

    2016-08-22

    The well-known effects of the spin-orbit interactions of light are manifestations of the pair's mutual influence of the three types of angular momentum (AM) of light, namely, the spin AM, the extrinsic orbital AM and the intrinsic orbital AM. Here we propose a convenient classification of the effects of the spin-orbit interactions of light and we observe one of the new effects in the frame of this classification, which is determined by the joint influence of two types of the AM on the third type of the AM, namely, the influence of the spin AM and the extrinsic orbital AM on the intrinsic orbital AM. We experimentally studied the propagation of circularly polarized light through an optical fiber coiled into a helix. We have found that the spin AM and the helix parameters affect the spatial structure of the radiation transmitted through the optical fiber. We found out that the structure of the light field rotates when changing the sign of circular polarization. The angle of rotation depends on the parameters of the helix. The results can be used to develop the general theory of spinning particles and can find application in metrology methods and nanooptics devices.

  5. Joint effect of polarization and the propagation path of a light beam on its intrinsic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Abdulkareem, Sarkew

    2016-01-01

    The well-known effects of the spin-orbit interaction of light are manifestations of pair mutual influence of the three types of the angular momentum of light, namely, the spin angular momentum, the extrinsic orbital angular momentum and the intrinsic orbital angular momentum. Here we propose the convenient classification of the effects of the spin-orbit interaction of light and we observe one of the new effects in the frame of this classification, which is determined by the joint influence of two types of the angular momentum on the third type of the angular momentum, namely, the influence of the spin angular momentum and the extrinsic orbital angular momentum on the intrinsic orbital angular momentum. We experimentally studied the propagation of circularly polarized light through an optical fiber coiled into a helix. We have found that the spin angular momentum and the helix parameters affect the spatial structure of the radiation transmitted through the optical fiber. We found out that the structure of the ...

  6. Front Propagation in Stochastic Neural Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic multiplicative noise on front propagation in a scalar neural field with excitatory connections. Using a separation of time scales, we represent the fluctuating front in terms of a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the front from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the front profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. One major result of our analysis is a comparison between freely propagating fronts and fronts locked to an externally moving stimulus. We show that the latter are much more robust to noise, since the stochastic wandering of the mean front profile is described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process rather than a Wiener process, so that the variance in front position saturates in the long time limit rather than increasing linearly with time. Finally, we consider a stochastic neural field that supports a pulled front in the deterministic limit, and show that the wandering of such a front is now subdiffusive. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  7. Influence of Deterministic Attachments for Large Unifying Hybrid Network Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Large unifying hybrid network model (LUHPM) introduced the deterministic mixing ratio fd on the basis of the harmonious unification hybrid preferential model, to describe the influence of deterministic attachment to the network topology characteristics,

  8. Cellular non-deterministic automata and partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, D.; Müller, J.; Wever, U.

    2015-09-01

    We define cellular non-deterministic automata (CNDA) in the spirit of non-deterministic automata theory. They are different from the well-known stochastic automata. We propose the concept of deterministic superautomata to analyze the dynamical behavior of a CNDA and show especially that a CNDA can be embedded in a deterministic cellular automaton. As an application we discuss a connection between certain partial differential equations and CNDA.

  9. The Effects on the Cutting Propagation of Cinnamomum micranthum in Different Seasons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bihua; CHEN; Shaohua; HUANG; Meifang; XIE; Juan; ZHANG; Liuying; CHEN; Xiaohan; SHE; Huihua; FAN; Qianzhen; LI

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamomum micranthum is one of China Third-class Endangered Tree Species. The seedlings of C. micranthum are difficult to obtain. It is important to study the cutting propagation of C. micranthum in different seasons to improve the rooting rate for providing seedling propagation technique for the afforestation industry. In this study,the optimal season for the cutting propagation of C. micranthum was summer( May),providing 80. 6% rooting rate. The rooting rate in Summer was 33. 4% higher than that in Spring( March). This technique is important to make the best use of rare C. micranthum resources and to provide plenty of seedlings for afforestation and greening industry.

  10. Effect of the ratio of transition dipole moments on few-cycle pulse propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Tan; Yanling Yang; Dianmin Tong; Xijun Fan

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of a few-cycle laser pulses in a dense V-type three-level atomic medium is investigated based on full-wave Maxwell-Bloch equations by taking the near dipole-dipole (NDD) interaction into account. We find that the ratio, γ, of the transition dipole moments has strong influence on the time evolution and split of the pulse: when γ≤ 1, the NDD interaction delays propagation and split of the pulse, and this phenomenon is more obvious when the value of γ is smaller; when γ = 2, the NDD interaction accelerates propagation and split of the pulse.

  11. Clonal Propagation of Khaya senegalensis: The Effects of Stem Length, Leaf Area, Auxins, Smoke Solution, and Stockplant Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Ky-Dembele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Khaya senegalensis is a multipurpose African timber species. The development of clonal propagation could improve plantation establishment, which is currently impeded by mahogany shoot borer. To examine its potential for clonal propagation, the effects of cutting length, leaf area, stockplant maturation, auxin, and smoke solution treatments were investigated. Leafy cuttings rooted well (up to 80% compared to leafless cuttings (0%. Cuttings taken from seedlings rooted well (at least 95%, but cuttings obtained from older trees rooted poorly (5% maximum. The rooting ability of cuttings collected from older trees was improved (16% maximum by pollarding. Auxin application enhanced root length and the number of roots while smoke solution did not improve cuttings' rooting ability. These results indicate that juvenile K. senegalensis is amenable to clonal propagation, but further work is required to improve the rooting of cuttings from mature trees.

  12. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren; Sun, Jian-An; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-07-01

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Effect of Water on Explosive Wave Propagation in Tunnels and Surrounding Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Chang-jing; SONG Zhen-duo; TIAN Lu-lu; LIU Hong-bin; WANG Lu; WU Xiao-fang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the application of practical engineering, propagation processes of explosive waves in rock with water well and tunnel are simulated by ANSYS/LS-DYNA software. The evolution of damage in rock is presented. The effect of water on the damage of the concrete slab in a tunnel is compared with damage inflicted without water. The numerical simulation illustrates that water plays an important role in the evolution of damage of the concrete slab in a mine tunnel. In the presence of water in the rock the concrete slab is damaged more severely than without water in rock. The effect of water location in the rock is also considered. It is found that the concrete slab in the tunnel shows various degrees of damage as a function of the different locations of water. Attenuation laws of stress waves over time-space in rock with water are also obtained. Numerical results indicate that, under blast loading, there are three zones in the rock: a crushed zone nearby the explosive charge, a damaged zone and an elastic zone. The conclusions of numerical analysis may provide references for blasting designs and structure protection.

  14. Ground-Wave Propagation Effects on Transmission Lines through Error Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe-Campos Felipe Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic transient calculation of overhead transmission lines is strongly influenced by the natural resistivity of the ground. This varies from 1-10K (Ω·m depending on several media factors and on the physical composition of the ground. The accuracy on the calculation of a system transient response depends in part in the ground return model, which should consider the line geometry, the electrical resistivity and the frequency dependence of the power source. Up to date, there are only a few reports on the specialized literature about analyzing the effects produced by the presence of an imperfectly conducting ground of transmission lines in a transient state. A broad range analysis of three of the most often used ground-return models for calculating electromagnetic transients of overhead transmission lines is performed in this paper. The behavior of modal propagation in ground is analyzed here into effects of first and second order. Finally, a numerical tool based on relative error images is proposed in this paper as an aid for the analyst engineer to estimate the incurred error by using approximate ground-return models when calculating transients of overhead transmission lines.

  15. Effects of boundary layer on flame propagation generated by forced ignition behind an incident shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, S.; Tamura, S.; Ishii, K.; Kataoka, H.

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of the boundary layer on the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process, the mixture behind an incident shock wave was ignited using laser breakdown. Ignition timing was controlled so that the interaction of the resulting flame with a laminar or turbulent boundary layer could be examined. In the case of the interaction with a laminar boundary layer, wrinkling of the flame was observed after the flame reached the corner of the channel. On the other hand, interaction with the turbulent boundary layer distorted the flame front and increased the spreading rate of the flame followed by prompt DDT. The inner structure of the turbulent boundary layer plays an important role in the DDT process. The region that distorted the flame within the turbulent boundary layer was found to be the intermediate region 0.01DDT was independent of the ignition position. The effect of the boundary layer on the propagating flame, thus, became relatively small after the accelerating flame was generated.

  16. Effective-action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we give two examples: a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasmas are cold. These waves account for cyclotron absorption features observed in spectra of x-ray pulsars. Moreover, cutoff frequencies of the two nondegenerate electromagnetic waves are red-shifted by different amounts. These corrections need to be taken into account in order to correctly interpret diagnostic results in laser plasma experiments.

  17. Effect of a functionally graded soft middle layer on Love waves propagating in layered piezoelectric systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Issam; Ben Amor, Morched; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2015-08-01

    Numerical examples for wave propagation in a three-layer structure have been investigated for both electrically open and shorted cases. The first order differential equations are solved by both methods ODE and Stiffness matrix. The solutions are used to study the effects of thickness and gradient coefficient of soft middle layer on the phase velocity and on the electromechanical coupling factor. We demonstrate that the electromechanical coupling factor is substantially increased when the equivalent thickness is in the order of the wavelength. The effects of gradient coefficients are plotted for the first mode when electrical and mechanical gradient variations are applied separately and altogether. The obtained deviations in comparison with the ungraded homogenous film are plotted with respect to the dimensionless wavenumber. The impact related to the gradient coefficient of the soft middle layer, on the mechanical displacement and the Poynting vector, is carried out. The numericals results are illustrated by a set of appropriate curves related to various profiles. The obtained results set guidelines not only for the design of high-performance surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, but also for the measurement of material properties in a functionally graded piezoelectric layered system using Love waves.

  18. Importance of quantification of local site effects based on wave propagation in seismic microzonation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kumar; J P Narayan

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the three most important aspects of seismic microzonation namely prediction of fundamental frequency (F0) of soil deposit, aggravation factor (aggravation factor is simply the extra spectral amplification due to complex 2D site effects over the 1D response of the soil column) and the spatial variability of the ground motion caused by the basin-edge induced Love waves. The predicted F0 of single, double and three-soil-layered models revealed that the available empirical relations to predict the F0 of layered soil deposits are inadequate. We recommend the use of analytical or numerical methods to predict such an important parameter based on wave propagation effects. An increase of amplitude of Love wave, strain level and average aggravation factor (AAF) with increase of impedance contrast was obtained. Based on the trend of rate of decrease of AAF and maximum strain with offset from the basin-edge, we can qualitatively infer that the effects of induced Love wave may reduce to a negligible value after a traveled distance of 6.5–10.0 (where is the wavelength corresponding to the 0 of soil layer). The obtained increase of strain level with the decrease of distance between two receiver points used for the computation of strain reflects that structures having spatial extent smaller than the may suffer damage due to the basin-edge induced surface waves. The fast rate of decrease of strain with the offset from the strong lateral discontinuity (SLD)/basin-edge may be attributed to the dispersive nature of Love wave. We can incorporate the increased spectral amplification due to the induced surface waves in the form of aggravation factor but till date we have no effective way to incorporate the effects of developed strain by induced surface waves in seismic microzonation or in building codes.

  19. Deterministic Real-time Thread Scheduling

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Heechul; Sha, Lui

    2011-01-01

    Race condition is a timing sensitive problem. A significant source of timing variation comes from nondeterministic hardware interactions such as cache misses. While data race detectors and model checkers can check races, the enormous state space of complex software makes it difficult to identify all of the races and those residual implementation errors still remain a big challenge. In this paper, we propose deterministic real-time scheduling methods to address scheduling nondeterminism in uniprocessor systems. The main idea is to use timing insensitive deterministic events, e.g, an instruction counter, in conjunction with a real-time clock to schedule threads. By introducing the concept of Worst Case Executable Instructions (WCEI), we guarantee both determinism and real-time performance.

  20. Dynamic optimization deterministic and stochastic models

    CERN Document Server

    Hinderer, Karl; Stieglitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book explores discrete-time dynamic optimization and provides a detailed introduction to both deterministic and stochastic models. Covering problems with finite and infinite horizon, as well as Markov renewal programs, Bayesian control models and partially observable processes, the book focuses on the precise modelling of applications in a variety of areas, including operations research, computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering, economics and finance. Dynamic Optimization is a carefully presented textbook which starts with discrete-time deterministic dynamic optimization problems, providing readers with the tools for sequential decision-making, before proceeding to the more complicated stochastic models. The authors present complete and simple proofs and illustrate the main results with numerous examples and exercises (without solutions). With relevant material covered in four appendices, this book is completely self-contained.

  1. [Deterministic and stochastic identification of neurophysiologic systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatigorskiĭ, B Ia; Kostiukov, A I; Chinarov, V A; Cherkasskiĭ, V L

    1984-01-01

    The paper deals with deterministic and stochastic identification methods applied to the concrete neurophysiological systems. The deterministic identification was carried out for the system: efferent fibres-muscle. The obtained transition characteristics demonstrated dynamic nonlinearity of the system. Identification of the neuronal model and the "afferent fibres-synapses-neuron" system in mollusc Planorbis corneus was carried out using the stochastic methods. For these purpose the Wiener method of stochastic identification was expanded for the case of pulse trains as input and output signals. The weight of the nonlinear component in the Wiener model and accuracy of the model prediction were quantitatively estimated. The results obtained proves the possibility of using these identification methods for various neurophysiological systems.

  2. Advances in stochastic and deterministic global optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Zhigljavsky, Anatoly; Žilinskas, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Current research results in stochastic and deterministic global optimization including single and multiple objectives are explored and presented in this book by leading specialists from various fields. Contributions include applications to multidimensional data visualization, regression, survey calibration, inventory management, timetabling, chemical engineering, energy systems, and competitive facility location. Graduate students, researchers, and scientists in computer science, numerical analysis, optimization, and applied mathematics will be fascinated by the theoretical, computational, and application-oriented aspects of stochastic and deterministic global optimization explored in this book. This volume is dedicated to the 70th birthday of Antanas Žilinskas who is a leading world expert in global optimization. Professor Žilinskas's research has concentrated on studying models for the objective function, the development and implementation of efficient algorithms for global optimization with single and mu...

  3. Bayesian Uncertainty Analyses Via Deterministic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzysztofowicz, R.

    2001-05-01

    Rational decision-making requires that the total uncertainty about a variate of interest (a predictand) be quantified in terms of a probability distribution, conditional on all available information and knowledge. Suppose the state-of-knowledge is embodied in a deterministic model, which is imperfect and outputs only an estimate of the predictand. Fundamentals are presented of three Bayesian approaches to producing a probability distribution of the predictand via any deterministic model. The Bayesian Processor of Output (BPO) quantifies the total uncertainty in terms of a posterior distribution, conditional on model output. The Bayesian Processor of Ensemble (BPE) quantifies the total uncertainty in terms of a posterior distribution, conditional on an ensemble of model output. The Bayesian Forecasting System (BFS) decomposes the total uncertainty into input uncertainty and model uncertainty, which are characterized independently and then integrated into a predictive distribution.

  4. Microscopy with a Deterministic Single Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, Georg; Wolf, Sebastian; Ulm, Stefan; Couturier, Luc; Dawkins, Samuel T; Poschinger, Ulrich G; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Singer, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    We realize a single particle microscope by using deterministically extracted laser cooled $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions from a Paul trap as probe particles for transmission imaging. We demonstrate focusing of the ions with a resolution of 5.8$\\;\\pm\\;$1.0$\\,$nm and a minimum two-sample deviation of the beam position of 1.5$\\,$nm in the focal plane. The deterministic source, even when used in combination with an imperfect detector, gives rise to much higher signal to noise ratios as compared with conventional Poissonian sources. Gating of the detector signal by the extraction event suppresses dark counts by 6 orders of magnitude. We implement a Bayes experimental design approach to microscopy in order to maximize the gain in spatial information. We demonstrate this method by determining the position of a 1$\\,\\mu$m circular hole structure to an accuracy of 2.7$\\,$nm using only 579 probe particles.

  5. Deterministic nonlinear systems a short course

    CERN Document Server

    Anishchenko, Vadim S; Strelkova, Galina I

    2014-01-01

    This text is a short yet complete course on nonlinear dynamics of deterministic systems. Conceived as a modular set of 15 concise lectures it reflects the many years of teaching experience by the authors. The lectures treat in turn the fundamental aspects of the theory of dynamical systems, aspects of stability and bifurcations, the theory of deterministic chaos and attractor dimensions, as well as the elements of the theory of Poincare recurrences.Particular attention is paid to the analysis of the generation of periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic self-sustained oscillations and to the issue of synchronization in such systems.  This book is aimed at graduate students and non-specialist researchers with a background in physics, applied mathematics and engineering wishing to enter this exciting field of research.

  6. Piecewise deterministic processes in biological models

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnicki, Ryszard

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a concise introduction to piecewise deterministic Markov processes (PDMPs), with particular emphasis on their applications to biological models. Further, it presents examples of biological phenomena, such as gene activity and population growth, where different types of PDMPs appear: continuous time Markov chains, deterministic processes with jumps, processes with switching dynamics, and point processes. Subsequent chapters present the necessary tools from the theory of stochastic processes and semigroups of linear operators, as well as theoretical results concerning the long-time behaviour of stochastic semigroups induced by PDMPs and their applications to biological models. As such, the book offers a valuable resource for mathematicians and biologists alike. The first group will find new biological models that lead to interesting and often new mathematical questions, while the second can observe how to include seemingly disparate biological processes into a unified mathematical theory, and...

  7. Deterministic Leader Election Among Disoriented Anonymous Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    dieudonné, Yoann; Petit, Franck; Villain, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We address the Leader Election (LE) problem in networks of anonymous sensors sharing no kind of common coordinate system. Leader Election is a fundamental symmetry breaking problem in distributed computing. Its goal is to assign value 1 (leader) to one of the entities and value 0 (non-leader) to all others. In this paper, assuming n > 1 disoriented anonymous sensors, we provide a complete charac- terization on the sensors positions to deterministically elect a leader, provided that all the sensors' positions are known by every sensor. More precisely, our contribution is twofold: First, assuming n anonymous sensors agreeing on a common handedness (chirality) of their own coordinate system, we provide a complete characterization on the sensors positions to deterministically elect a leader. Second, we also provide such a complete chararacterization for sensors devoided of a common handedness. Both characterizations rely on a particular object from combinatorics on words, namely the Lyndon Words.

  8. Effect of roughness, deterministic and random errors in film thickness on the reflecting properties of aperiodic mirrors for the EUV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikovich, P. K.; Polkovnikov, V. N.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Chkhalo, N. I.; Schäfers, F.; Sokolov, A.

    2016-05-01

    By the example of three aperiodic multilayer Mo/Si mirrors (AMM) for the wavelength ranges 17-21 nm, 24-29 nm, and 28-33 nm we have studied numerically the effect of the linearly determinisctic and random fluctuations of the film thickness and the interlayer roughness on the spectral dependences of the reflection coefficient. The simulation results are used to solve the inverse problem of reconstructing the interlayer roughness and the thickness of individual films from the measured dependences of the extreme UV radiation reflection coefficients. It is shown that the 'asymmetry' of the boundaries affects the magnitude and slope of the reflection coefficient plateau. Random fluctuations of the film thickness with the variance of 1%-2% weakly influence the reflection characteristics of AMMs and allow reliable reconstruction of the thickness of individual films. The fluctuations with the variance 8%-10% allow the estimation of individual thicknesses, but the reflection curve in this case strongly differs from the desirable one. Larger fluctuations do not allow the reconstruction of the AMM structure. The basic criteria for high-quality AMM synthesis are formulated.

  9. Laboratory measurements of the effect of internal waves on sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.; Lin, Ying-Tsong

    2016-11-01

    The fidelity of acoustic signals used in communication and imaging in the oceans is limited by density fluctuations arising from many sources, particularly from internal waves. We present results from laboratory experiments on sound propagation through an internal wave field produced by a wave generator consisting of multiple oscillating plates. The fluid density as a function of height is measured and used to determine the sound speed as a function of the height. Sound pulses from a transducer propagate through the fluctuating stratified density field and are detected to determine sound refraction, pulse arrival time, and sound signal distortion. The results are compared with sound ray model and numerical models of underwater sound propagation. The laboratory experiments can explore the parameter dependence by varying the fluid density profile, the sound pulse signal, and the internal wave amplitude and frequency. The results lead to a better understanding of sound propagation through and scattered by internal waves.

  10. Deterministic nanoassembly: Neutral or plasma route?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2006-07-01

    It is shown that, owing to selective delivery of ionic and neutral building blocks directly from the ionized gas phase and via surface migration, plasma environments offer a better deal of deterministic synthesis of ordered nanoassemblies compared to thermal chemical vapor deposition. The results of hybrid Monte Carlo (gas phase) and adatom self-organization (surface) simulation suggest that higher aspect ratios and better size and pattern uniformity of carbon nanotip microemitters can be achieved via the plasma route.

  11. Introducing Synchronisation in Deterministic Network Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Henrik; Jessen, Jan Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Frederik D.;

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses performance analysis for distributed real time systems through deterministic network modelling. Its main contribution is the introduction and analysis of models for synchronisation between tasks and/or network elements. Typical patterns of synchronisation are presented leading....... The suggested models are intended for incorporation into an existing analysis tool a.k.a. CyNC based on the MATLAB/SimuLink framework for graphical system analysis and design....

  12. Deterministic definition of the capital risk

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Szczypinska; Piotrowski, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a look at the capital risk problem inspired by deterministic, known from classical mechanics, problem of juggling. We propose capital equivalents to the Newton's laws of motion and on this basis we determine the most secure form of credit repayment with regard to maximisation of profit. Then we extend the Newton's laws to models in linear spaces of arbitrary dimension with the help of matrix rates of return. The matrix rates describe the evolution of multidimensional ...

  13. Schroedinger difference equation with deterministic ergodic potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Suto, Andras

    2012-01-01

    We review the recent developments in the theory of the one-dimensional tight-binding Schr\\"odinger equation for a class of deterministic ergodic potentials. In the typical examples the potentials are generated by substitutional sequences, like the Fibonacci or the Thue-Morse sequence. We concentrate on rigorous results which will be explained rather than proved. The necessary mathematical background is provided in the text.

  14. Effect of LOS/NLOS Propagation on 5G Ultra-Dense Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiotto, Carlo; Pratas, Nuno; Doyle, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The combined presence of Line-of-Sight (LOS) and Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) components in the radio propagation environment can severely degrade the Ultra-Dense Networks (UDNs) performance. Backed by a stochastic geometry model, we show that when the LOS/NLOS propagation components are taken into a...... and to take advantage of extreme cell densification in the upcoming 5G wireless networks....

  15. Compression Stress Effect on Dislocations Movement and Crack propagation in Cubic Crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Suprijadi; Ely, Aprilia; Meiqorry, Yusfi

    2011-01-01

    Fracture material is seriously problem in daily life, and it has connection with mechanical properties itself. The mechanical properties is belief depend on dislocation movement and crack propagation in the crystal. Information about this is very important to characterize the material. In FCC crystal structure the competition between crack propagation and dislocation wake is very interesting, in a ductile material like copper (Cu) dislocation can be seen in room temperature, but in a brittle ...

  16. Ground return effect on wave propagation parameters of overhead power cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo Machado, V.M.; Brandao Faria, J.A.; Borges da Silva, J.F. (Centro de Electrotecnia da Univ. Tecnia de Lisboa, Inst. Superior Tecnico, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, 1096 Lisboa Codex (PT))

    1990-04-01

    The propagation properties of overhead three-phase cables are usually analyzed assuming that the pipe conductor establishes a perfect shielding between the inner conductor set and any outer conductor, i.e., the power cable is assumed as an isolated system. The influence of a lossy ground plane in the neighborhood of the cable is examined in this paper. The propagation parameters for both approaches are compared---significative differences being found to exist, in the zero mode, at low working frequencies.

  17. Closed-form and Numerical Reverberation and Propagation: Inclusion of Convergence Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    mailbox.nurc.nato.int LONG-TERM GOALS The flux formulation of propagation has already been used to calculate bistatic , range-dependent reverberation...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 10 19a...propagation and bistatic reverberation theory has been extended to range-dependent environments. This has been incorporated in a version of Artemis

  18. Propagation Effect of Hollow Gaussian Beams Passing through a Misaligned Optical System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Cheng-Liang; WANG Li-Gang; LU Xuan-Hui; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2006-01-01

    @@ A generalized formula of hollow Gaussian beams through the first-order misaligned ABCD systems is derived by using the generalized diffraction integral formula. It is shown that the hollow Gaussian beam passing through the misaligned system becomes a decentred hollow Gaussian beam. The propagation properties of the output beam are investigated when it propagates through a simple misaligned lens system. These results provide a powerful theoretical tool for applications of optical traps.

  19. Effects of dynamical FLIC fermions in the quark and gluon propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamleh, W.; Bowman, P. O.; Leinweber, D. B.; Williams, A. G.; Zhang, J.-B.

    2006-11-01

    In this work we examine the FLIC overlap quark propagator and the gluon propagator on both dynamical and quenched lattices. The tadpole improved Luscher-Weisz gauge action is used in both cases. The dynamical gauge fields use the FLIC fermion action for the sea quark contribution. We observe that the presence of sea quarks causes a suppression of the mass function, quark renormalisation function and gluon dressing function in the infrared. The ultraviolet physics is unaffected.

  20. Wireless Network Information Flow: A Deterministic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Avestimehr, Salman; Tse, David

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to wireline networks, not much is known about the flow of information over wireless networks. The main barrier is the complexity of the signal interaction in wireless channels in addition to the noise in the channel. A widely accepted model is the the additive Gaussian channel model, and for this model, the capacity of even a network with a single relay node is open for 30 years. In this paper, we present a deterministic approach to this problem by focusing on the signal interaction rather than the noise. To this end, we propose a deterministic channel model which is analytically simpler than the Gaussian model but still captures two key wireless channel properties of broadcast and superposition. We consider a model for a wireless relay network with nodes connected by such deterministic channels, and present an exact characterization of the end-to-end capacity when there is a single source and one or more destinations (all interested in the same information) and an arbitrary number of relay nodes....

  1. Deterministic Mean-Field Ensemble Kalman Filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Kody J. H.

    2016-05-03

    The proof of convergence of the standard ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) from Le Gland, Monbet, and Tran [Large sample asymptotics for the ensemble Kalman filter, in The Oxford Handbook of Nonlinear Filtering, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 2011, pp. 598--631] is extended to non-Gaussian state-space models. A density-based deterministic approximation of the mean-field limit EnKF (DMFEnKF) is proposed, consisting of a PDE solver and a quadrature rule. Given a certain minimal order of convergence k between the two, this extends to the deterministic filter approximation, which is therefore asymptotically superior to standard EnKF for dimension d<2k. The fidelity of approximation of the true distribution is also established using an extension of the total variation metric to random measures. This is limited by a Gaussian bias term arising from nonlinearity/non-Gaussianity of the model, which arises in both deterministic and standard EnKF. Numerical results support and extend the theory.

  2. Wave damping by MHD turbulence and its effect upon cosmic ray propagation in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, A J; Farmer, Alison J.; Goldreich, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic rays scatter off magnetic irregularities (Alfven waves) with which they are resonant, that is waves of wavelength comparable to their gyroradii. These waves may be generated either by the cosmic rays themselves, if they stream faster than the Alfven speed, or by sources of MHD turbulence. Waves excited by streaming cosmic rays are ideally shaped for scattering, whereas the scattering efficiency of MHD turbulence is severely diminished by its anisotropy. We show that MHD turbulence has an indirect effect on cosmic ray propagation by acting as a damping mechanism for cosmic ray generated waves. The hot (``coronal'') phase of the interstellar medium is the best candidate location for cosmic ray confinement by scattering from self-generated waves. We relate the streaming velocity of cosmic rays to the rate of turbulent dissipation in this medium, for the case in which turbulent damping is the dominant damping mechanism. We conclude that cosmic rays with up to 10^2 GeV could not stream much faster than the ...

  3. ANALYSIS OF ELECTRIC BOUNDARY CONDITION EFFECTS ON CRACK PROPAGATION IN PIEZOELECTRIC CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐航; 方岱宁; 姚振汉

    2001-01-01

    There are three types of cracks: impermeable crack, permeable crack and conducting crack, with different electric boundary conditions on faces of cracks in piezoelectric ceramics, which poses difficulties in the analysis of piezoelectric fracture problems. In this paper, in contrast to our previous FEM formulation, the numerical analysis is based on the use of exact electric boundary conditions at the crack faces, thus the common assumption of electric impermeability in the FEM analysis is avoided. The crack behavior and elasto-electric fields near a crack tip in a PZT-5piezoelectric ceramic under mechanical, electrical and coupled mechanical-electrical loads with different electric boundary conditions on crack faces are investigated. It is found that the dielectric medium between the crack faces will reduce the singularity of stress and electric displacement. Furthermore, when the permittivity of the dielectric medium in the crack gap is of the same order as that of the piezoelectric ceramic, the crack becomes a conducting crack, the applied electric field has no effect on the crack propagation.

  4. Preliminary study on the effect of stiffness on lamb wave propagation in bovine corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yin, Yin; Guo, Yan-Rong; Diao, Xian-Fen; Chen, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of human cornea could provide valuable information for various clinical applications. Particularly, it will be helpful to achieve a patient-specific biomechanical optimization in LASIK refractive surgery, early detection of corneal ecstatic disease or improved accuracy of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement. However, there are few techniques that are capable of accurately assessing the corneal elasticity in situ in a nondestructive fashion. In order to develop a quantitative method for assessing both elasticity and viscosity of the cornea, we use ultrasound radiation force to excite Lamb waves in cornea, and a pulse echo transducer to track the tissue vibration. The fresh postmortem bovine eyes were treated via collagen cross-linking to make the cornea stiff. The effect of stiffness was studied by comparing the propagation of Lamb waves in normal and treated corneas. It was found that the waveform of generated Lamb waves changed significantly due to the increase in higher modes in treated corneas. This result indicated that the generated waveform was a complex of multiple harmonics and the varied stiffness will affect the energy distribution over different components. Therefore, it is important for assessing the viscoelastic properties of the cornea to know the components of Lamb wave and calculate the phase velocity appropriately.

  5. The effect of magnetic field induced aggregates on ultrasound propagation in aqueous magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in the aqueous magnetic fluid is investigated for different particle concentrations. The sound velocity decreases while acoustic impedance increases with increasing concentrations. The velocity anisotropy is observed upon application of magnetic field. The velocity anisotropy fits with Tarapov's theory suggests the presence of aggregates in the system. We report that these aggregates are thermodynamically unstable and the length of aggregate changes continuously with increasing concentration and, or magnetic field and resulted in a decrease in effective magnetic moment. The Taketomi's theory fits well with the experimental data suggesting that the particle clusters are aligned in the direction of the magnetic field. The radius of cluster found to increase with increasing concentration, and then decreases whereas the elastic force constant increases and then becomes constant. The increase in cluster radius indicates elongation of aggregate length due to tip-to-tip interaction of aggregates whereas for higher concentration, the lateral alignment is more favorable than tip-to-tip alignment of aggregates which reduces the cluster radius making elastic force constant to raise. Optical images show that the chains are fluctuating and confirming the lateral alignment of chains at higher fields.

  6. Effect of partial ionization on wave propagation in solar magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, R; Ballester, J L; Goossens, M

    2013-01-01

    Observations show that waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere and may play an important role for plasma heating. The study of waves in the solar corona is usually based on linear ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for a fully ionized plasma. However, the plasma in the photosphere and the chromosphere is only partially ionized. Here we investigate theoretically the impact of partial ionization on MHD wave propagation in cylindrical flux tubes in the two-fluid model. We derive the general dispersion relation that takes into account the effects of neutral-ion collisions and the neutral gas pressure. We take the neutral-ion collision frequency as an arbitrary parameter. Particular results for transverse kink modes and slow magnetoacoustic modes are shown. We find that the wave frequencies only depend on the properties of the ionized fluid when the neutral-ion collision frequency is much lower that the wave frequency. For high collision frequencies realistic of the solar atmosphere ions and neutrals behave as ...

  7. AN EFFECTIVE WAY TO CARRY OUT MASS IN VITRO PROPAGATION OF POTENTILLA ALBA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Tikhomirova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the plant’s extensive area of distribution, Potentilla alba L. natural resources are scarce and cannot meet the modern needs of the pharmaceutical industry. Because of the mass preparation of medical raw materials by using P. alba, it entered into the list of rare and endangered species plants of the Red Data Book of the Republic of Belarus. This plant is not represented in the wild flora of Western Siberia, but there is a great need for developing a method for the mass propagation of P. alba using in vitro culture in order to obtain a high-quality planting material. At the explant stage, the technique of the P. alba introduction into in vitro culture is developed. This paper reveals the morphogenetic features of the development of P. alba explants of different types and the regenerative capacity of the tissue culture. At the micropropagation stage, the optimum culture media and the growth conditions for the regenerated plants are selected. At the stage of test-tube plants rooting and transferring them into ex vitro conditions, the most effective means of adaptation to non-sterile conditions in hydroponics are proposed.

  8. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  9. A method for compensation of the temperature effect disturbing Lamb waves propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Magda, Przemysław; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz; Dragan, Krzysztof

    2014-02-01

    Variations of environmental conditions, such as temperature, affect propagation of Lamb waves, which can severely limit their use for damage detection in SHM systems. Two approaches can be used to handle this effect in order to improve robustness of SHM systems, optimal baseline selection (OBS) and baseline signal stretch (BSS). The OBS techniques require collection of signals and considerable amount of memory for data storage. Here, we present a novel technique which can be classified as a BSS approach. The proposed technique requires a single baseline only for compensation of temperature influence on Lamb waves' snapshots. The proposed scheme consists of two steps: first, the instantaneous phase of the snapshot is estimated and it is aligned with that of the baseline in the second step. Since the snapshots are generally nonstationary due to medium dispersion, wavelet transform is used for the estimation of their instantaneous phase. After phase alignment the waveform is stretched and the temperature influence is compensated. The phase-compensated snapshots can be subsequently analyzed using classical damage indices which results in damage indices insensitive to temperature variation.

  10. Effect of Bohm quantum potential in the propagation of ion-acoustic waves in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. M.; Hossen, M. A.; Rafat, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical investigation has been carried out on the propagation of the ion-acoustic (IA) waves in a relativistic degenerate plasma containing relativistic degenerate electron and positron fluids in the presence of inertial non-relativistic light ion fluid. The Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), modified K-dV (mK-dV), and mixed mK-dV (mmK-dV) equations are derived by adopting the reductive perturbation method. In order to analyze the basic features (phase speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of the IA solitary waves (SWs), the SWs solutions of the K-dV, mK-dV, and mmK-dV are numerically analyzed. It is found that the degenerate pressure, inclusion of the new phenomena like the Fermi temperatures and quantum mechanical effects (arising due to the quantum diffraction) of both electrons and positrons, number densities, etc., of the plasma species remarkably change the basic characteristics of the IA SWs which are found to be formed either with positive or negative potential. The implication of our results in explaining different nonlinear phenomena in astrophysical compact objects, e.g., white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc., and laboratory plasmas like intense laser-solid matter interaction experiments, etc., are mentioned.

  11. Wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes with surface and nonlocal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Ya-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the transverse wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes is investigated based on nonlocal elasticity theory with consideration of surface effect. The governing equation is formulated utilizing nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Kelvin-Voigt model. Explicit wave dispersion relation is developed and wave phase velocities and frequencies are obtained. The effect of the fluid flow velocity, structural damping, surface effect, small scale effects and tube diameter on the wave propagation properties are discussed with different wave numbers. The wave frequency increases with the increase of fluid flow velocity, but decreases with the increases of tube diameter and wave number. The effect of surface elasticity and residual surface tension is more significant for small wave number and tube diameter. For larger values of wave number and nonlocal parameters, the real part of frequency ratio raises.

  12. Tunneling nanotubes: an alternate route for propagation of the bystander effect following oncolytic viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Ady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs are ultrafine, filamentous actin-based cytoplasmic extensions which form spontaneously to connect cells at short and long-range distances. We have previously described long-range intercellular communication via TNTs connecting mesothelioma cells in vitro and demonstrated TNTs in intact tumors from patients with mesothelioma. Here, we investigate the ability of TNTs to mediate a viral thymidine kinase based bystander effect after oncolytic viral infection and administration of the nucleoside analog ganciclovir. Using confocal microscopy we assessed the ability of TNTs to propagate enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, which is encoded by the herpes simplex virus NV1066, from infected to uninfected recipient cells. Using time-lapse imaging, we observed eGFP expressed in infected cells being transferred via TNTs to noninfected cells; additionally, increasing fluorescent activity in recipient cells indicated cell-to-cell transmission of the eGFP-expressing NV1066 virus had also occurred. TNTs mediated cell death as a form of direct cell-to-cell transfer following viral thymidine kinase mediated activation of ganciclovir, inducing a unique long-range form of the bystander effect through transmission of activated ganciclovir to nonvirus-infected cells. Thus, we provide proof-of-principle demonstration of a previously unknown and alternative mechanism for inducing apoptosis in noninfected recipient cells. The conceptual advance of this work is that TNTs can be harnessed for delivery of oncolytic viruses and of viral thymidine kinase activated drugs to amplify the bystander effect between cancer cells over long distances in stroma-rich tumor microenvironments.

  13. Single Ion Implantation and Deterministic Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, Thomas

    2010-06-11

    The presence of single atoms, e.g. dopant atoms, in sub-100 nm scale electronic devices can affect the device characteristics, such as the threshold voltage of transistors, or the sub-threshold currents. Fluctuations of the number of dopant atoms thus poses a complication for transistor scaling. In a complementary view, new opportunities emerge when novel functionality can be implemented in devices deterministically doped with single atoms. The grand price of the latter might be a large scale quantum computer, where quantum bits (qubits) are encoded e.g. in the spin states of electrons and nuclei of single dopant atoms in silicon, or in color centers in diamond. Both the possible detrimental effects of dopant fluctuations and single atom device ideas motivate the development of reliable single atom doping techniques which are the subject of this chapter. Single atom doping can be approached with top down and bottom up techniques. Top down refers to the placement of dopant atoms into a more or less structured matrix environment, like a transistor in silicon. Bottom up refers to approaches to introduce single dopant atoms during the growth of the host matrix e.g. by directed self-assembly and scanning probe assisted lithography. Bottom up approaches are discussed in Chapter XYZ. Since the late 1960's, ion implantation has been a widely used technique to introduce dopant atoms into silicon and other materials in order to modify their electronic properties. It works particularly well in silicon since the damage to the crystal lattice that is induced by ion implantation can be repaired by thermal annealing. In addition, the introduced dopant atoms can be incorporated with high efficiency into lattice position in the silicon host crystal which makes them electrically active. This is not the case for e.g. diamond, which makes ion implantation doping to engineer the electrical properties of diamond, especially for n-type doping much harder then for silicon. Ion

  14. Deterministic Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchets driven by chaotic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lock Yue

    2012-01-01

    We have elucidated the effect of statistical asymmetry on the directed current in Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchets driven by chaotic noise. Based on the inhomogeneous Smoluchowski equation and its generalized version, we arrive at analytical expressions of the directed current that includes a source term. The source term indicates that statistical asymmetry can drive the system further away from thermodynamic equilibrium, as exemplified by the constant flashing, the state-dependent, and the tilted deterministic Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchets, with the consequence of an enhancement in the directed current.

  15. Deterministic multidimensional growth model for small-world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Aoyuan

    2011-01-01

    We proposed a deterministic multidimensional growth model for small-world networks. The model can characterize the distinguishing properties of many real-life networks with geometric space structure. Our results show the model possesses small-world effect: larger clustering coefficient and smaller characteristic path length. We also obtain some accurate results for its properties including degree distribution, clustering coefficient and network diameter and discuss them. It is also worth noting that we get an accurate analytical expression for calculating the characteristic path length. We verify numerically and experimentally these main features.

  16. A Study on Push and Pull Price Promotion with Deterministic Effects%基于确定性效应的推式和拉式价格促销研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁冬寒; 李刚; 孙林岩

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the performances of the pull and push promotions in seasonal product sales. We study the pull and push promtion through a Manufacturer-led Stackelberg game, on the basis of the different impacts of the two types of price promotion on the market demand. By solving the equilibrium strategies of the manufacturer and the retailer, we find that the pull and push promotion are substituable with deterministic price effects. In other words, deterministic price effects do not demonstrate the main difference the pull and push promotion. Moreover, the paper suggests that price promotion neither significantly changes the original profit-spliting policy nor benefits the retailer. Finally, the analysis reveals that complete demand information enables the manufacturer to distiguish between the quantities sold in the regular period from those in the promotional period, so the retailer would not be over compensated and the pass-through rate exceeds 100 percent.%针对推式促销和拉式促销在季节性商品销售中的作用绩效问题,基于推式促销和拉式促销对需求曲线的不同影响机制,本文构建了制造商领导的Stackelberg博弈模型,求解制造商和零售商在正价销售期和促销期各自的均衡策略.通过分析和比较两种价格促销方式的效率和性质,发现对于确定性的价格效应,推式促销和拉式促销是可完全替代的,因而确定性的价格效应并不能解释二者的差异.本文进一步研究了实施价格促销前后供应链上下游间的利润分配格局,发现制造商获得了大部分利润,高于零售商获得的利润,而且实施价格促销并不能显著的改变供应链的利润分配格局.最后,通过分析推式促销的性质,指出完善的需求信息有利于制造商分辨正价销售期和促销期的需求,避免过度补偿零售商,从而部分解释了供应链的价格传递效应高于1的现象.

  17. Estimate of tsunami source using optimized unit sources and including dispersion effects during tsunami propagation: The 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Mulia, Iyan Eka; Satake, Kenji; Watada, Shingo; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Sheehan, Anne F.

    2016-09-01

    We apply a genetic algorithm to find the optimized unit sources using dispersive tsunami synthetics to estimate the tsunami source of the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake. The optimal number and distribution of unit sources gives the sea surface elevation similar to that from our previous slip distribution on a fault using tsunami data, but different from that using seismic data. The difference is possibly due to submarine mass failure in the source region. Dispersion effects during tsunami propagation reduce the maximum amplitudes by up to 20% of conventional linear longwave propagation model. Dispersion effects also increase tsunami travel time by approximately 1 min per 1300 km on average. The dispersion effects on amplitudes depend on the azimuth from the tsunami source reflecting the directivity of tsunami source, while the effects on travel times depend only on the distance from the source.

  18. Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laserna, J J; Reyes, R Fernández; González, R; Tobaria, L; Lucena, P

    2009-06-08

    We report on an experimental study of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. The characteristics of the atmosphere dictate specific performance constraints to this technology. Unlike classical laboratory LIBS systems where the distance to the sample is well known and characterized, LIBS systems working at several tens of meters to the target have specific atmospheric propagation conditions that cause the quality of the LIBS signals to be affected to a significant extent. Using a new LIBS based sensor system fitted with a nanosecond laser emitting at 1064 nm, propagation effects at distances of up to 120 m were investigated. The effects observed include wander and scintillation in the outgoing laser beam and in the return atomic emission signal. Plasmas were formed on aluminium targets. Average signal levels and signal fluctuations are measured so the effect of atmospheric turbulence on LIBS measurements is quantified.

  19. Propagation of ULF waves through the ionosphere: Inductive effect for oblique magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Sciffer

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Solutions for ultra-low frequency (ULF wave fields in the frequency range 1–100mHz that interact with the Earth's ionosphere in the presence of oblique background magnetic fields are described. Analytic expressions for the electric and magnetic wave fields in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere are derived within the context of an inductive ionosphere. The inductive shielding effect (ISE arises from the generation of an "inductive" rotational current by the induced part of the divergent electric field in the ionosphere which reduces the wave amplitude detected on the ground. The inductive response of the ionosphere is described by Faraday's law and the ISE depends on the horizontal scale size of the ULF disturbance, its frequency and the ionosphere conductivities. The ISE for ULF waves in a vertical background magnetic field is limited in application to high latitudes. In this paper we examine the ISE within the context of oblique background magnetic fields, extending studies of an inductive ionosphere and the associated shielding of ULF waves to lower latitudes. It is found that the dip angle of the background magnetic field has a significant effect on signals detected at the ground. For incident shear Alfvén mode waves and oblique background magnetic fields, the horizontal component of the field-aligned current contributes to the signal detected at the ground. At low latitudes, the ISE is larger at smaller conductivity values compared with high latitudes.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; electric fields and currents; wave propagation

  20. The effect of holes in the dispersion relation of propagative surface plasmon modes of nanoperforated semitransparent metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kekesi, R., E-mail: renata.kekesi@csic.es; Meneses-Rodríguez, D.; García-Pérez, F.; González, M. U.; García-Martín, A.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G., E-mail: gaspar@imm.cnm.csic.es [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-07

    We have analysed the effect that holes have on the properties of propagative surface plasmon modes in semitransparent nanoperforated Au films. The modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration. Contrary to continuous films, where only one mode is excited, two modes are observed in Au nanohole array. The origin of this different behavior is discussed using effective optical properties for the nanoperforated films. The presence of the holes affects the effective optical constants of the membranes in two ways: it changes the contribution of the free electrons, and it gives rise to a localized transition due to a hole induced plasmon resonance. This localized transition interacts with the propagative surface plasmon modes, originating the two detected modes.

  1. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren, E-mail: hxr_nwnu@163.com; Sun, Jian-An, E-mail: sunja@nwnu.edu.cn; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-07-12

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam. - Highlights: • Some behaviors for Gaussian laser are also found for q-Gaussian one. • The parameter regions corresponding to different laser behaviors are given. • Influence of q on the laser propagation behavior is obvious. • The q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than the Gaussian one.

  2. Effects of phase conjugation on electromagnetic optical fields propagating in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanseri, Bhaskar

    2017-03-01

    By using the property of phase conjugation, we demonstrate that the inverse of van Cittert–Zernike theorem holds for electromagnetic (EM) fields propagating in free space. This essentially implies that spatially incoherent partially polarized field distributions can be generated from spatially coherent partially polarized optical fields. We further utilize phase conjugation with a polarization rotator to swap the spatial coherence properties of orthogonal polarization components of EM fields on propagation, at least in free space. This study suggests that the method of phase conjugation could be potentially useful in arbitrarily manipulating spatial coherence properties of vector optical fields in the field plane.

  3. Modeling the effects of Multi-path propagation and scintillation on GPS signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash Krause, L.; Wilson, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    GPS signals traveling through the earth's ionosphere are affected by charged particles that often disrupt the signal and the information it carries due to "scintillation", which resembles an extra noise source on the signal. These signals are also affected by weather changes, tropospheric scattering, and absorption from objects due to multi-path propagation of the signal. These obstacles cause distortion within information and fading of the signal, which ultimately results in phase locking errors and noise in messages. In this work, we attempted to replicate the distortion that occurs in GPS signals using a signal processing simulation model. We wanted to be able to create and identify scintillated signals so we could better understand the environment that caused it to become scintillated. Then, under controlled conditions, we simulated the receiver's ability to suppress scintillation in a signal. We developed a code in MATLAB that was programmed to: 1. Create a carrier wave and then plant noise (four different frequencies) on the carrier wave, 2. Compute a Fourier transform on the four different frequencies to find the frequency content of a signal, 3. Use a filter and apply it to the Fourier transform of the four frequencies and then compute a Signal-to-noise ratio to evaluate the power (in Decibels) of the filtered signal, and 4.Plot each of these components into graphs. To test the code's validity, we used user input and data from an AM transmitter. We determined that the amplitude modulated signal or AM signal would be the best type of signal to test the accuracy of the MATLAB code due to its simplicity. This code is basic to give students the ability to change and use it to determine the environment and effects of noise on different AM signals and their carrier waves. Overall, we were able to manipulate a scenario of a noisy signal and interpret its behavior and change due to its noisy components: amplitude, frequency, and phase shift.

  4. Deterministic properties of mine tremor aftershocks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgarume, TE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available on Deep and High Stress Mining, 6-8 October 2010, Santiago CHILE Deterministic properties of mine tremor aftershocks T.E. Kgarume CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation and University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa S.M. Spottiswoode Consultant, South... : Dyke 7 7 : Span Figure 1 Simplified mine plan showing the main elements of stopes in South African gold mines 5th International Seminar on Deep and High Stress Mining, 6-8 October 2010, Santiago CHILE Table 1 Datasets used in the analysis...

  5. Enhanced piecewise regression based on deterministic annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JiangShe; YANG YuQian; CHEN XiaoWen; ZHOU ChengHu

    2008-01-01

    Regression is one of the important problems in statistical learning theory. This paper proves the global convergence of the piecewise regression algorithm based on deterministic annealing and continuity of global minimum of free energy w.r.t temperature, and derives a new simplified formula to compute the initial critical temperature. A new enhanced piecewise regression algorithm by using "migration of prototypes" is proposed to eliminate "empty cell" in the annealing process. Numerical experiments on several benchmark datasets show that the new algo-rithm can remove redundancy and improve generalization of the piecewise regres-sion model.

  6. Explicit Protocol for Deterministic Entanglement Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yong-Jian; GAO Peng; GUO Guang-Can

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present an explicit protocol for extraction of an EPR pair from two partially entangled pairs in a deterministic fashion via local operations and classical communication. This protocol is constituted by a local measurement described by a positive operator-valued measure (POVM), one-way classical communication, and a corresponding local unitary operation or a choice between the two pairs. We explicitly construct the required POVM by the analysis of the doubly stochastic matrix connecting the initial and the final states. Our scheme might be useful in future quantum communication.

  7. Deterministic Thinning of Finite Poisson Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Angel, Omer; Soo, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Let Pi and Gamma be homogeneous Poisson point processes on a fixed set of finite volume. We prove a necessary and sufficient condition on the two intensities for the existence of a coupling of Pi and Gamma such that Gamma is a deterministic function of Pi, and all points of Gamma are points of Pi. The condition exhibits a surprising lack of monotonicity. However, in the limit of large intensities, the coupling exists if and only if the expected number of points is at least one greater in Pi than in Gamma.

  8. Experimental Demonstration of Deterministic Entanglement Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Geng; XU Jin-Shi; LI Chuan-Feng; GONG Ming; CHEN Lei; GUO Guang-Can

    2009-01-01

    According to Nielsen's theorem [Phys.Rev.Lett.83 (1999) 436]and as a proof of principle,we demonstrate the deterministic transformation from a maximum entangled state to an arbitrary nonmaximum entangled pure state with local operation and classical communication in an optical system.The output states are verified with a quantum tomography process.We further test the violation of Bell-like inequality to demonstrate the quantum nonlocality of the state we generated.Our results may be useful in quantum information processing.

  9. Improving ground-penetrating radar data in sedimentary rocks using deterministic deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Franseen, E.K.; Miller, R.D.; Weis, T.V.; Byrnes, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Resolution is key to confidently identifying unique geologic features using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. Source wavelet "ringing" (related to bandwidth) in a GPR section limits resolution because of wavelet interference, and can smear reflections in time and/or space. The resultant potential for misinterpretation limits the usefulness of GPR. Deconvolution offers the ability to compress the source wavelet and improve temporal resolution. Unlike statistical deconvolution, deterministic deconvolution is mathematically simple and stable while providing the highest possible resolution because it uses the source wavelet unique to the specific radar equipment. Source wavelets generated in, transmitted through and acquired from air allow successful application of deterministic approaches to wavelet suppression. We demonstrate the validity of using a source wavelet acquired in air as the operator for deterministic deconvolution in a field application using "400-MHz" antennas at a quarry site characterized by interbedded carbonates with shale partings. We collected GPR data on a bench adjacent to cleanly exposed quarry faces in which we placed conductive rods to provide conclusive groundtruth for this approach to deconvolution. The best deconvolution results, which are confirmed by the conductive rods for the 400-MHz antenna tests, were observed for wavelets acquired when the transmitter and receiver were separated by 0.3 m. Applying deterministic deconvolution to GPR data collected in sedimentary strata at our study site resulted in an improvement in resolution (50%) and improved spatial location (0.10-0.15 m) of geologic features compared to the same data processed without deterministic deconvolution. The effectiveness of deterministic deconvolution for increased resolution and spatial accuracy of specific geologic features is further demonstrated by comparing results of deconvolved data with nondeconvolved data acquired along a 30-m transect immediately adjacent

  10. Solute Transport in a Heterogeneous Aquifer: A Nonlinear Deterministic Dynamical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, B.; Harter, T.; Zhang, H.

    2003-04-01

    Stochastic approaches are widely used for modeling and prediction of uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport processes. An important reason for this is our belief that the dynamics of the seemingly complex and highly irregular subsurface processes are essentially random in nature. However, the discovery of nonlinear deterministic dynamical theory has revealed that random-looking behavior could also be the result of simple deterministic mechanisms influenced by only a few nonlinear interdependent variables. The purpose of the present study is to introduce this theory to subsurface solute transport process, in an attempt to investigate the possibility of understanding the transport dynamics in a much simpler, deterministic, manner. To this effect, salt transport process in a heterogeneous aquifer medium is studied. Specifically, time series of arrival time of salt particles are analyzed. These time series are obtained by integrating a geostatistical (transition probability/Markov chain) model with a groundwater flow model (MODFLOW) and a salt transport (Random Walk Particle) model. The (dynamical) behavior of the transport process (nonlinear deterministic or stochastic) is identified using standard statistical techniques (e.g. autocorrelation function, power spectrum) as well as specific nonlinear deterministic dynamical techniques (e.g. phase-space diagram, correlation dimension method). The sensitivity of the salt transport dynamical behavior to the hydrostratigraphic parameters (i.e. number, volume proportions, mean lengths, and juxtapositional tendencies of facies) used in the transition probability/Markov chain model is also studied. The results indicate that the salt transport process may exhibit very simple (i.e. deterministic) to very complex (i.e. stochastic) dynamical behavior, depending upon the above parameters (i.e. characteristics of the aquifer medium). Efforts towards verification and strengthening of the present results and prediction of salt

  11. Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Mekena; Chern, Gia-Wei; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The geometry of optical lattices can be engineered, allowing the study of atomic transport along paths arranged in patterns that are otherwise difficult to probe in the solid state. A question feasible to atomic systems is related to the speed of matter-wave propagation as a function of the lattice geometry. To address this issue, we investigated, theoretically, the quantum transport of noninteracting and weakly-interacting ultracold fermionic atoms in several 2D optical lattice geometries. We find that the triangular lattice has a higher propagation velocity compared to the square lattice, and the cross-linked square lattice has an even faster propagation velocity. The increase results from the mixing of the momentum states which leads to different group velocities in quantum systems. Standard band theory provides an explanation and allows for a systematic way to search and design systems with controllable matter-wave propagation. Moreover, the presence of a flat band such as in a two-leg ladder geometry leads to a dynamical density discontinuity due to its localized atoms. Possible realizations of those dynamical phenomena are discussed.

  12. Effects of MHD slow shocks propagating along magnetic flux tubes in a dipole magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Erkaev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations of the plasma pressure in a magnetic flux tube can produce MHD waves evolving into shocks. In the case of a low plasma beta, plasma pressure pulses in the magnetic flux tube generate MHD slow shocks propagating along the tube. For converging magnetic field lines, such as in a dipole magnetic field, the cross section of the magnetic flux tube decreases enormously with increasing magnetic field strength. In such a case, the propagation of MHD waves along magnetic flux tubes is rather different from that in the case of uniform magnetic fields. In this paper, the propagation of MHD slow shocks is studied numerically using the ideal MHD equations in an approximation suitable for a thin magnetic flux tube with a low plasma beta. The results obtained in the numerical study show that the jumps in the plasma parameters at the MHD slow shock increase greatly while the shock is propagating in the narrowing magnetic flux tube. The results are applied to the case of the interaction between Jupiter and its satellite Io, the latter being considered as a source of plasma pressure pulses.

  13. Effects of Variability Associated with the Antarctic Circumpolar Current on Sound Propagation in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    showing shot locations (circles) and IMS hydrophone station locations ( triangles ), superimposed on a map of group velocities derived using average fall...E. McDonald (1991). Perth- Bermuda sound propagation (1960): Adiabatic mode interpretation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90: 2586–2594. Jensen, F. B., W. A

  14. Non-perturbative production rate of photons with a lattice quark propagator: effect of vertex correction

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Taekwang; Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the production rate of photons from the thermal medium above the deconfinement temperature with a quark propagator obtained from a lattice QCD numerical simulation. The photon-quark vertex is determined gauge-invariantly, so as to satisfy the Ward-Takahashi identity. The obtained photon production rate shows a suppression compared to perturbative results.

  15. Space weather effects on radio propagation: study of the CEDAR, GEM and ISTP storm events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Blagoveshchensky

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of 14 geomagnetic storms from a list of CEDAR, GEM and ISTP storms, that occurred during 1997–1999, on radio propagation conditions has been investigated. The propagation conditions were estimated through variations of the MOF and LOF (the maximum and lowest operation frequencies on three high-latitude HF radio paths in north-west Russia. Geophysical data of Dst, Bz, AE as well as some riometer data from Sodankyla observatory, Finland, were used for the analysis. It was shown that the storm impact on the ionosphere and radio propagation for each storm has an individual character. Nevertheless, there are common patterns in variation of the propagation parameters for all storms. Thus, the frequency range Δ=MOF−LOF increases several hours before a storm, then it narrows sharply during the storm, and expands again several hours after the end of the storm. This regular behaviour should be useful for the HF radio propagation predictions and frequency management at high latitudes. On the trans-auroral radio path, the time interval when the signal is lost through a storm (tdes depends on the local time. For the day-time storms an average value tdes is 6 h, but for night storms tdes is only 2 h. The ionization increase in the F2 layer before storm onset is 3.5 h during the day-time and 2.4 h at night. Mechanisms to explain the observed variations are discussed including some novel possibilities involving energy input through the cusp.

  16. Numerical Study of Shock Waves Propagating in a Rectangular Elbow : Effects of Area Reduction and Rounded Corner

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the shock wave propagating in a rectangular elbow and the transient flow induced by the shock were investigated numerically in order to clarify how the transmitted shock wave past the elbow is stabilized to uniformity by the effects of area reduction and the rounded corner. Computations were carried out by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations by using the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme. Calculations were performed for three kinds of area re...

  17. Covert communications using random noise signals: effects of atmospheric propagation nulls and rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Karen M.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-06-01

    transmissions since these signals are rejected during the correlation process at the receiver. Dispersive effects caused by the atmosphere and other factors are significantly reduced since both polarization channels operate over identical frequency bands. This paper analyzes in detail various atmospheric propagation effects such as nulls, rain, and forests.

  18. Technical Evaluation Report on the Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Panel Symposium on Propagation Effects on Military Systems in the High Latitude Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    considered to be of the most importance to the mission of NATO as defined by AGARD. Welcoming address by Professor Juan Roederer. Professor Roederer...the Mesosphere (85-50 km) at 69 N (Andenes, Norway) H. W. Widdell, Max Planck Institut, Lindau . FRG 1200 Lunch Session VIII - Low Frequency Propagation

  19. A mathematical theory for deterministic quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooft, Gerard ' t [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University (Netherlands); Spinoza Institute, Postbox 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    Classical, i.e. deterministic theories underlying quantum mechanics are considered, and it is shown how an apparent quantum mechanical Hamiltonian can be defined in such theories, being the operator that generates evolution in time. It includes various types of interactions. An explanation must be found for the fact that, in the real world, this Hamiltonian is bounded from below. The mechanism that can produce exactly such a constraint is identified in this paper. It is the fact that not all classical data are registered in the quantum description. Large sets of values of these data are assumed to be indistinguishable, forming equivalence classes. It is argued that this should be attributed to information loss, such as what one might suspect to happen during the formation and annihilation of virtual black holes. The nature of the equivalence classes follows from the positivity of the Hamiltonian. Our world is assumed to consist of a very large number of subsystems that may be regarded as approximately independent, or weakly interacting with one another. As long as two (or more) sectors of our world are treated as being independent, they all must be demanded to be restricted to positive energy states only. What follows from these considerations is a unique definition of energy in the quantum system in terms of the periodicity of the limit cycles of the deterministic model.

  20. Design of deterministic OS for SPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Choul Woong; Kim, Dong Hoon; Son, Gwang Seop [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Existing safety PLCs for using in nuclear power plants operates based on priority based scheduling, in which the highest priority task runs first. This type of scheduling scheme determines processing priorities when multiple requests for processing or when there is a lack of resources available for processing, guaranteeing execution of higher priority tasks. This type of scheduling is prone to exhaustion of resources and continuous preemptions by devices with high priorities, and therefore there is uncertainty every period in terms of smooth running of the overall system. Hence, it is difficult to apply this type of scheme to where deterministic operation is required, such as in nuclear power plant. Also, existing PLCs either have no output logic with regard to devices' redundant selection or it was set in a fixed way, and as a result it was extremely inefficient to use them for redundant systems such as that of a nuclear power plant and their use was limited. Therefore, functional modules that can manage and control all devices need to be developed by improving on the way priorities are assigned among the devices, making it more flexible. A management module should be able to schedule all devices of the system, manage resources, analyze states of the devices, and give warnings in case of abnormal situations, such as device fail or resource scarcity and decide on how to handle it. Also, the management module should have output logic for device redundancy, as well as deterministic processing capabilities, such as with regard to device interrupt events.

  1. Streamflow disaggregation: a nonlinear deterministic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sivakumar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces a nonlinear deterministic approach for streamflow disaggregation. According to this approach, the streamflow transformation process from one scale to another is treated as a nonlinear deterministic process, rather than a stochastic process as generally assumed. The approach follows two important steps: (1 reconstruction of the scalar (streamflow series in a multi-dimensional phase-space for representing the transformation dynamics; and (2 use of a local approximation (nearest neighbor method for disaggregation. The approach is employed for streamflow disaggregation in the Mississippi River basin, USA. Data of successively doubled resolutions between daily and 16 days (i.e. daily, 2-day, 4-day, 8-day, and 16-day are studied, and disaggregations are attempted only between successive resolutions (i.e. 2-day to daily, 4-day to 2-day, 8-day to 4-day, and 16-day to 8-day. Comparisons between the disaggregated values and the actual values reveal excellent agreements for all the cases studied, indicating the suitability of the approach for streamflow disaggregation. A further insight into the results reveals that the best results are, in general, achieved for low embedding dimensions (2 or 3 and small number of neighbors (less than 50, suggesting possible presence of nonlinear determinism in the underlying transformation process. A decrease in accuracy with increasing disaggregation scale is also observed, a possible implication of the existence of a scaling regime in streamflow.

  2. Deterministic Polynomial Factoring and Association Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Manuel; Karpinski, Marek; Saxena, Nitin

    2012-01-01

    The problem of finding a nontrivial factor of a polynomial f(x) over a finite field F_q has many known efficient, but randomized, algorithms. The deterministic complexity of this problem is a famous open question even assuming the generalized Riemann hypothesis (GRH). In this work we improve the state of the art by focusing on prime degree polynomials; let n be the degree. If (n-1) has a `large' r-smooth divisor s, then we find a nontrivial factor of f(x) in deterministic poly(n^r,log q) time; assuming GRH and that s > sqrt{n/(2^r)}. Thus, for r = O(1) our algorithm is polynomial time. Further, for r > loglog n there are infinitely many prime degrees n for which our algorithm is applicable and better than the best known; assuming GRH. Our methods build on the algebraic-combinatorial framework of m-schemes initiated by Ivanyos, Karpinski and Saxena (ISSAC 2009). We show that the m-scheme on n points, implicitly appearing in our factoring algorithm, has an exceptional structure; leading us to the improved time ...

  3. Deterministic prediction of surface wind speed variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisya, G. V.; Kiplangat, D. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of wind speed is an important aspect of various tasks related to wind energy management such as wind turbine predictive control and wind power scheduling. The most typical characteristic of wind speed data is its persistent temporal variations. Most of the techniques reported in the literature for prediction of wind speed and power are based on statistical methods or probabilistic distribution of wind speed data. In this paper we demonstrate that deterministic forecasting methods can make accurate short-term predictions of wind speed using past data, at locations where the wind dynamics exhibit chaotic behaviour. The predictions are remarkably accurate up to 1 h with a normalised RMSE (root mean square error) of less than 0.02 and reasonably accurate up to 3 h with an error of less than 0.06. Repeated application of these methods at 234 different geographical locations for predicting wind speeds at 30-day intervals for 3 years reveals that the accuracy of prediction is more or less the same across all locations and time periods. Comparison of the results with f-ARIMA model predictions shows that the deterministic models with suitable parameters are capable of returning improved prediction accuracy and capturing the dynamical variations of the actual time series more faithfully. These methods are simple and computationally efficient and require only records of past data for making short-term wind speed forecasts within practically tolerable margin of errors.

  4. Light Drag Effect of Vacuum Tube Versus Light Propagation in Stationary Vacuum Tube with Moving Source and Receiver

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ruyong; He, Le; Zhang, Wenyan; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We presented a new way to examine the principle of relativity of Special Relativity. According to the principle of relativity, the light dragging by moving media and the light propagation in stationary media with moving source and receiver should be two totally equivalent phenomena. We select a vacuum tube with two glass rods at two ends as the optical media. The length of the middle vacuum cell is L and the thicknesses of the glass rods with refractive index n are D1 and D2. The light drag effect of the moving vacuum tube with speed v is a first-order effect, delta t = 2(n-1)(D1+D2)v/c^2, which is independent of L because vacuum does not perform a drag effect. Predicted by the principle of relativity, the change of the light propagation time interval with stationary vacuum tube and moving source and receiver must be the same, i.e., delta tao = delta t = 2(n-1)(D1+D2)v/c^2. However all analyses have shown that the change of the propagation time interval delta tao is caused by the motion of the receiver during...

  5. Atmospheric propagation effects through natural and man-made obscurants for visible to MM-wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Modern, precision-guided weapons require that guidance and target acquisition/recognition systems take into account the effects of the propagation environment. Successful performance must be obtained under adverse weather conditions such as haze, clouds, fog, rain, and snow and under adverse battlefield conditions such as dust, smoke, and man-made obscurants. Sensors operate at wavelengths ranging across the millimeter, IR, and the visible regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Propagation effects vary drastically over this wavelength span and systems may employ a combination of sensors to mitigate adverse environmental conditions. The effectiveness of countermeasures such as multispectral obscurants and multispectral camouflage also depends on atmospheric properties. System performance is measured in terms of probability of detection, probability of recognition, and, ultimately, in terms of probability of a kill. A partial listing of the processes that affect theses probabilities and, in turn, are affected by the propagation environment includes extinction, angles and amplitude scintillation, target to background contrast, contrast transmission, and clutter characteristics. The symposium addresses the following topics: natural obscurants, multispectral camouflage, man-made obscurants and battlefield-induced phenomena, and target and background signatures.

  6. Suppressive Effects of the Site 1 Protease (S1P) Inhibitor, PF-429242, on Dengue Virus Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Leo; Urata, Shuzo; Ulanday, Gianne Eduard L; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-02-10

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes one of the most widespread mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Despite the great need, effective vaccines and practical antiviral therapies are still under development. Intracellular lipid levels are regulated by sterol regulatory elements-binding proteins (SREBPs), which are activated by serine protease, site 1 protease (S1P). Small compound PF-429242 is known as a S1P inhibitor and the antivirus effects have been reported in some viruses. In this study, we examined the anti-DENV effects of PF-429242 using all four serotypes of DENV by several primate-derived cell lines. Moreover, emergence of drug-resistant DENV mutants was assessed by sequential passages with the drug. DENV dependency on intracellular lipids during their infection was also evaluated by adding extracellular lipids. The addition of PF-429242 showed suppression of viral propagation in all DENV serotypes. We showed that drug-resistant DENV mutants are unlikely to emerge after five times sequential passages through treatment with PF-429242. Although the levels of intracellular cholesterol and lipid droplets were reduced by PF-429242, viral propagations were not recovered by addition of exogenous cholesterol or fatty acids, indicating that the reduction of LD and cholesterol caused by PF-429242 treatment is not related to its mechanism of action against DENV propagation. Our results suggest that PF-429242 is a promising candidate for an anti-DENV agent.

  7. Deterministic approach to microscopic three-phase traffic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, B S; Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.

    2005-01-01

    A deterministic approach to three-phase traffic theory is presented. Two different deterministic microscopic traffic flow models are introduced. In an acceleration time delay model (ATD-model), different time delays in driver acceleration associated with driver behavior in various local driving situations are explicitly incorporated into the model. Vehicle acceleration depends on local traffic situation, i.e., whether a driver is within the free flow, or synchronized flow, or else wide moving jam traffic phase. In a speed adaptation model (SA-model), driver time delays are simulated as a model effect: Rather than driver acceleration, vehicle speed adaptation occurs with different time delays depending on one of the three traffic phases in which the vehicle is in. It is found that the ATD- and SA-models show spatiotemporal congested traffic patterns that are adequate with empirical results. It is shown that in accordance with empirical results in the ATD- and SA-models the onset of congestion in free flow at a...

  8. Electrocardiogram (ECG) pattern modeling and recognition via deterministic learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xunde DONG; Cong WANG; Junmin HU; Shanxing OU

    2014-01-01

    A method for electrocardiogram (ECG) pattern modeling and recognition via deterministic learning theory is presented in this paper. Instead of recognizing ECG signals beat-to-beat, each ECG signal which contains a number of heartbeats is recognized. The method is based entirely on the temporal features (i.e., the dynamics) of ECG patterns, which contains complete information of ECG patterns. A dynamical model is employed to demonstrate the method, which is capable of generating synthetic ECG signals. Based on the dynamical model, the method is shown in the following two phases:the identification (training) phase and the recognition (test) phase. In the identification phase, the dynamics of ECG patterns is accurately modeled and expressed as constant RBF neural weights through the deterministic learning. In the recognition phase, the modeling results are used for ECG pattern recognition. The main feature of the proposed method is that the dynamics of ECG patterns is accurately modeled and is used for ECG pattern recognition. Experimental studies using the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) database are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  9. Nonlinear propagation analysis of few-optical-cycle pulses for subfemtosecond compression and carrier envelope phase effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Yo; Nagasawa, Minoru; Ohtani, Morimasa; Yamashita, Mikio

    2005-12-01

    A numerical approach called Fourier direct method (FDM) is applied to nonlinear propagation of optical pulses with the central wavelength 800 nm, the width 2.67-12.00 fs, and the peak power 25-6870 kW in a fused-silica fiber. Bidirectional propagation, delayed Raman response, nonlinear dispersion (self-steepening, core dispersion), as well as correct linear dispersion are incorporated into “bidirectional propagation equations” which are derived directly from Maxwell’s equations. These equations are solved for forward and backward waves, instead of the electric-field envelope as in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). They are integrated as multidimensional simultaneous evolution equations evolved in space. We investigate, both theoretically and numerically, the validity and the limitation of assumptions and approximations used for deriving the NLSE. Also, the accuracy and the efficiency of the FDM are compared quantitatively with those of the finite-difference time-domain numerical approach. The time-domain size 500 fs and the number of grid points in time 2048 are chosen to investigate numerically intensity spectra, spectral phases, and temporal electric-field profiles up to the propagation distance 1.0 mm. On the intensity spectrum of a few-optical-cycle pulses, the self-steepening, core dispersion, and the delayed Raman response appear as dominant, middle, and slight effects, respectively. The delayed Raman response and the core dispersion reduce the effective nonlinearity. Correct linear dispersion is important since it affects the intensity spectrum sensitively. For the compression of femtosecond optical pulses by the complete phase compensation, the shortness and the pulse quality of compressed pulses are remarkably improved by the intense initial peak power rather than by the short initial pulse width or by the propagation distance longer than 0.1 mm. They will be compressed as short as 0.3 fs below the damage threshold of fused-silica fiber 6

  10. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  11. Uncertainty propagation in nerve impulses through the action potential mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Valderrama, A.; Witteveen, J.A.S.; Navarro Jimenez, M.I.; Blom, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of probabilistic uncertainty through the action potential mechanism in nerve cells. Using the Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) model and Stochastic Collocation on Sparse Grids, we obtain an accurate probabilistic interpretation of the deterministic dynamics of the transmembrane po

  12. Uncertainty quantification of inflow boundary condition and proximal arterial stiffness coupled effect on pulse wave propagation in a vascular network

    CERN Document Server

    Brault, A; Lucor, D

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This work aims at quantifying the effect of inherent uncertainties from cardiac output on the sensitivity of a human compliant arterial network response based on stochastic simulations of a reduced-order pulse wave propagation model. A simple pulsatile output form is utilized to reproduce the most relevant cardiac features with a minimum number of parameters associated with left ventricle dynamics. Another source of critical uncertainty is the spatial heterogeneity of the aortic compliance which plays a key role in the propagation and damping of pulse waves generated at each cardiac cycle. A continuous representation of the aortic stiffness in the form of a generic random field of prescribed spatial correlation is then considered. Resorting to a stochastic sparse pseudospectral method, we investigate the spatial sensitivity of the pulse pressure and waves reflection magnitude with respect to the different model uncertainties. Results indicate that uncertainties related to the shape and magnitude of th...

  13. Numerical modeling of hydrogen diffusion in structural steels under cathodic overprotection and its effects on fatigue crack propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Diniz, D.; Almeida Silva, A. [Federal University of Campina Grande, Campina Grande-PB (Brazil); Andrade Barbosa, J.M. [Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife-PE (Brazil); Palma Carrasco, J.

    2012-05-15

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of the effect of hydrogen atomic diffusion on fatigue crack propagation on structural steels. The simulation was performed with a specimen type CT of API 5CT P110 steel, loaded in the tensile opening mode, in plane strain state and under the effects of a cyclic mechanical load and the hydrogen concentration at the crack tip. As hydrogen source, a cathodic protection system was considered, commonly used in subsea pipelines. The equations of evolution of variables at the crack tip form a non-linear system of ordinary differential equations that was solved by means of the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The solid-solid diffusion through the lattice ahead of the crack tip was simulated using the finite difference method. The simulations results show that under these conditions, the fatigue crack evolution process is enhanced by the hydrogen presence in the material, and that the start time of the crack propagation decreases as its concentration increases. These results show good correlation and consistency with macroscopic observations, providing a better understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in fatigue crack propagation processes in structural steels. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Compression Stress Effect on Dislocations Movement and Crack propagation in Cubic Crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Suprijadi,; Yusfi, Meiqorry

    2012-01-01

    Fracture material is seriously problem in daily life, and it has connection with mechanical properties itself. The mechanical properties is belief depend on dislocation movement and crack propagation in the crystal. Information about this is very important to characterize the material. In FCC crystal structure the competition between crack propagation and dislocation wake is very interesting, in a ductile material like copper (Cu) dislocation can be seen in room temperature, but in a brittle material like Si only cracks can be seen observed. Different techniques were applied to material to study the mechanical properties, in this study we did compression test in one direction. Combination of simulation and experimental on cubic material are reported in this paper. We found that the deflection of crack direction in Si caused by vacancy of lattice,while compression stress on Cu cause the atoms displacement in one direction. Some evidence of dislocation wake in Si crystal under compression stress at high tempera...

  15. Effect of oceanic turbulence on the propagation of cosine-Gaussian-correlated Schell-model beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chaoliang; Liao, Lamei; Wang, Haixia; Zhang, Yongtao; Pan, Liuzhan

    2015-03-01

    On the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the analytic expression for the cross-spectral density function of the cosine-Gaussian-correlated Schell-model (CGSM) beams propagating in oceanic turbulence is derived and used to investigate the spectral density and spectral degree of coherence of CGSM beams. The dependence of the spectral density and spectral degree of coherence of CGSM beams on the oceanic turbulence parameters including temperature-salinity balance parameter ω, mean square temperature dissipation rate χT and energy dissipation rate per unit mass ɛ is stressed and illustrated numerically. It is shown that oceanic turbulence plays an important role in the evolution of spectral density and spectral degree of coherence of CGSM beams upon propagation.

  16. Effects of uncertainties in simulations of extragalactic UHECR propagation, using CRPropa and SimProp

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, Rafael Alves; di Matteo, Armando; van Vliet, Arjen; Walz, David

    2015-01-01

    The results of simulations of the extragalactic propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have intrinsic uncertainties due to poorly known physical quantities and approximations used in the codes. We quantify the uncertainties in the simulated UHECR spectrum and composition due to different models for the extragalactic background light (EBL), different photodisintegration setups, approximations concerning photopion production and the use of different simulation codes. We discuss the results for several representative source scenarios with proton, nitrogen or iron at injection. For this purpose we used SimProp and CRPropa, two publicly available codes for Monte Carlo simulations of UHECR propagation. CRPropa is a detailed and extensive simulation code, while SimProp aims to achieve acceptable results using a simpler code. We show that especially the choices for the EBL model and the photodisintegration setup can have a considerable impact on the simulated UHECR spectrum and composition.

  17. EFFECT OF GENOTYPE AND NUTRIENT MEDIUM HORMONAL COMPOSITION ON INTENSITY OF PROPAGATION OF RASPBERRY IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova-Khanina L. V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The key stage of clonal micropropagation, the micropropagation sensu stricto, affords to increase the propagation index for plants, especially perennials. In this study, we consider ways to optimize clonal micropropagation of remontant raspberry cultivars. It is found that microsprout regeneration rate is 78,5–96,0 % on the multiplication s. str. stage. The most multipurpose nutrient medium is selected with containing 0,5 mg/l both of BAP and GK. When one uses this medium, regeneration rate runs 79,0–94,0% depending on genotype with sprout high running 24,8–32,7 mm and sprout number – 1,2–2,2 per node. The optimal duration of growing cycle is 30 days with the propagation index within 6,6–7,8, depending of genotype

  18. Effects of ion-atom collisions on the propagation and damping of ion-acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; D'Angelo, N.; Jensen, Vagn Orla;

    1968-01-01

    Experiments are described on ion-acoustic wave propagation and damping in alkali plasmas of various degrees of ionization. An increase of the ratio Te/Ti from 1 to approximately 3-4, caused by ion-atom collisions, results in a decrease of the (Landau) damping of the waves. At high gas pressure and....../or low wave frequency a "fluid" picture adequately describes the experimental results....

  19. The Effect of Steady Fluid Motion on One-Dimensional Wave Propagation (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    wave propagation in ducts where fluid motion was appreciable, Morse and Ingard (1968), Eversman (1970, 1971b), Ingard and Singhai (1973, 1974), Gogate...modified with the continuity equation to give an alternate momentum equation. This methodology was applied by Morse and Ingard (1968) to achieve a second...termed the convective wave equation, Morse and Ingard (1968) and Dowling (2003) 3. SIMPLIFICATION OF PDEs TO ODE’s WITH SECOND ORDER ACCURATE FINITE

  20. The human ECG nonlinear deterministic versus stochastic aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Kantz, H; Kantz, Holger; Schreiber, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    We discuss aspects of randomness and of determinism in electrocardiographic signals. In particular, we take a critical look at attempts to apply methods of nonlinear time series analysis derived from the theory of deterministic dynamical systems. We will argue that deterministic chaos is not a likely explanation for the short time variablity of the inter-beat interval times, except for certain pathologies. Conversely, densely sampled full ECG recordings possess properties typical of deterministic signals. In the latter case, methods of deterministic nonlinear time series analysis can yield new insights.

  1. Effects of the horizontal propagation and refraction of gravity waves on elevated stratopause after sudden stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Sun; Choi, Hwajin; Lee, Changsup; Kim, Jeong-Han; Jee, Geonhwa; Choi, Hyesun; Kim, Baekmin; Choi, Hyun-Joo

    2017-04-01

    Mesospheric temperature has been measured through the observation of airglow emissions from OH Meinel bands near 87 km altitude using the Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTSs) operated at both Esrange (67°53'N, 21°04'E), Kiruna, Sweden and Korea Dasan station (78°55'N, 11°56'E), Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard since November 2002. The FTS observations have provided simultaneous records of time evolutions of air temperature at the two different latitudes in association with elevated stratopause (ES) after major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. ES-like phenomena and relevant warming have been simulated using global circulation models such as the whole-atmosphere community climate model (WACCM), but the modeled warming is found to be much weaker compared with the FTS observations (and satellite observations) especially in the higher latitudes (e.g., Dasan station). Considering that gravity waves (GWs) may have substantial impacts in the generation and evolution of the ES, the discrepancy between observation and model may be attributed to common issues in GW parameterizations in the model simulation: Uncertainty in GW spectra and unrealism in GW propagation (i.e., columnar propagation). In this study, we investigate the effects of the horizontal propagation and refraction of GWs on the warming associated with the ES after major SSW events using a ray-tracing model with specified GW spectra. Preliminary results for steady background flows show that the horizontal propagation and refraction increase westward GW momentum forcing near z = 100 km in the NH high latitudes that can induce downward motions and adiabatic warming in the NH polar regions below z = 100 km. Results are extended for time-varying background flows and different GW spectra to consider tidal effects and improve robustness of results, respectively.

  2. Effective enhancement of classification of respiratory states using feed forward back propagation neural networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Bhavani Sankar; J Arputha Vijaya Selvi; D Kumar; K Seetha Lakshmi

    2013-06-01

    In biomedical signal analysis, Artificial Neural Networks are frequently used for classification, owing to their capability to resolve nonlinearly separable problems and the flexibility to implement them on-chip processor, competently. Artificial Neural Network for a classification task attempts to hand design a network topology and to find a set of network parameters using a back propagation training algorithm. This work presents an intelligent diagnosis system using artificial neural network. Features were extracted from respiratory effort signal based on the threshold-based scheme and the respiratory states were classified into normal, sleep apnea and motion artifacts. The introduced neural classifier was then trained with different back propagation training algorithms and the classified output was compared with the hand designed results. Five different back propagation training algorithms were used for training, such as Levenberg–Marquardt, scaled conjugate gradient, BFGS algorithm, one step secant and Powell–Beale restarts. Our results revealed that the system could correctly classify at an average of 98.7%, when the LM training method was used. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and confusion matrix showed that the LM method conferred a more balanced and an apt classification of sleep apnea and normal states.

  3. Investigation of near-axial interference effects in long-range acoustic propagation in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, Natalie S.; Fridman, Gregory M.

    2002-05-01

    The observed time-of-arrival patterns from a number of long-range ocean acoustic propagation experiments show early geometrical-like arrivals followed by a crescendo of energy that propagates along the sound-channel axis and is not resolved into individual arrivals. The two-dimensional reference point source problem for the parabolic index of refraction squared is investigated to describe in a simple model case the interference of near-axial waves which resulted in forming the so-called axial wave and propose a formula for the axial wave in more general cases. Using the method proposed by Buldyrev [V. Buldyrev, Tr. Mat. Inst. Steklov 115, 78-102 (1971)], the integral representation for the exact solution is transformed in such a way to extract ray summands corresponding to rays radiated from the source at angles less than a certain angle, the axial wave, and a term corresponding to the sum of all the rays having launch angles greater than the indicated angle. Numerical results for the axial wave and the last term are obtained for parameters corresponding to long-range ocean acoustic propagation experiments. The generalization of the obtained formula for the axial wave to the case of an arbitrary range-independent sound speed is given and discussed. [Work supported by VSP Grant No. N00014-01-4003.

  4. Effect of Microstructural Parameters on Fatigue Crack Propagation in an API X65 Pipeline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Eskandari, M.; Ghaednia, H.; Das, S.

    2016-11-01

    In the current research, we investigate fatigue crack growth in an API X65 pipeline steel by using an Instron fatigue testing machine. To this, first the microstructure of steel was accurately investigated using scanning electron microscope. Since nonmetallic inclusions play a key role during crack propagation, the type and distribution of such inclusions were studied through the thickness of as-received X65 steel using energy-dispersive spectroscopy technique. It was found that the accumulation of such defects at the center of thickness of the pipe body was higher than in other regions. Our results showed that there were very fine oxide inclusions (1-2 µm in length) appeared throughout the cross section of X65 steel. Such inclusions were observed not at the fatigue crack path nor on both sides of the fatigue crack. However, we found that large manganese sulfide inclusions (around 20 µm in length) were associated with fatigue crack propagation. Fatigue experiments on CT specimens showed that the crack nucleated when the number of fatigue cycles was higher than 340 × 103. On fracture surfaces, crack propagation also occurred by joining the microcracks at tip of the main crack.

  5. Deterministic, Nanoscale Fabrication of Mesoscale Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr., R M; Gilmer, J; Rubenchik, A; Shirk, M

    2004-12-08

    Neither LLNL nor any other organization has the capability to perform deterministic fabrication of mm-sized objects with arbitrary, {micro}m-sized, 3-D features and with 100-nm-scale accuracy and smoothness. This is particularly true for materials such as high explosives and low-density aerogels, as well as materials such as diamond and vanadium. The motivation for this project was to investigate the physics and chemistry that control the interactions of solid surfaces with laser beams and ion beams, with a view towards their applicability to the desired deterministic fabrication processes. As part of this LDRD project, one of our goals was to advance the state of the art for experimental work, but, in order to create ultimately a deterministic capability for such precision micromachining, another goal was to form a new modeling/simulation capability that could also extend the state of the art in this field. We have achieved both goals. In this project, we have, for the first time, combined a 1-D hydrocode (''HYADES'') with a 3-D molecular dynamics simulator (''MDCASK'') in our modeling studies. In FY02 and FY03, we investigated the ablation/surface-modification processes that occur on copper, gold, and nickel substrates with the use of sub-ps laser pulses. In FY04, we investigated laser ablation of carbon, including laser-enhanced chemical reaction on the carbon surface for both vitreous carbon and carbon aerogels. Both experimental and modeling results will be presented in the report that follows. The immediate impact of our investigation was a much better understanding of the chemical and physical processes that ensure when solid materials are exposed to femtosecond laser pulses. More broadly, we have better positioned LLNL to design a cluster tool for fabricating mesoscale objects utilizing laser pulses and ion-beams as well as more traditional machining/manufacturing techniques for applications such as components in NIF

  6. Molten salt reactor: Deterministic safety evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Lucotte, Elsa; Heuer, Daniel; Mathieu, Ludovic; Le Brun, Christian [Laboratory for Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC), 53, Avenue des Marthyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2006-07-01

    Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) are one of the systems retained by Generation IV as a candidate for the next generation of nuclear reactors. This type of reactor is particularly well adapted to the thorium fuel cycle (Th- {sup 233}U) which has the advantage of producing less minor actinides than the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle ({sup 238}U- {sup 239}Pu). In the frame of a major re-evaluation of the MSR concept and concentrating on some major constraints such as feasibility, breeding capability and, above all, safety, we have considered a particular reactor configuration that we call the 'unique channel' configuration in which there is no moderator in the core, leading to a quasi fast neutron spectrum. This reactor is presented in the first section. MSRs benefit from several specific advantages which are listed in a second part of this work. Beyond these advantages of the MSR, the level of the deterministic safety in such a reactor has to be assessed precisely. In a third section, we first draw up a list of the reactivity margins in our reactor configuration. We then define and quantify the parameters characterizing the deterministic safety of any reactor: the fraction of delayed neutrons, and the system's feedback coefficients that are here negative. Finally, using a simple point-kinetic evaluation, we analyze how these safety parameters impact the system when the total reactivity margins are introduced in the MSR. The results of this last study are discussed, emphasizing the satisfactory behavior of the MSR and the excellent level of deterministic safety which can be achieved. This work is based on the coupling of a neutron transport code called MCNP with a materials evolution code. The former calculates the neutron flux and the reaction rates in all the cells while the latter solves the Bateman equations for the evolution of the materials composition within the cells. These calculations take into account the input parameters (power released

  7. Proposition of a full deterministic medium access method for wireless network in a robotic application

    CERN Document Server

    Bossche, Adrien Van Den; Campo, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Today, many network applications require shorter react time. Robotic field is an excellent example of these needs: robot react time has a direct effect on its task's complexity. Here, we propose a full deterministic medium access method for a wireless robotic application. This contribution is based on some low-power wireless personal area networks, like ZigBee standard. Indeed, ZigBee has identified limits with Quality of Service due to non-determinist medium access and probable collisions during medium reservation requests. In this paper, two major improvements are proposed: an efficient polling of the star nodes and a temporal deterministic distribution of peer-to-peer messages. This new MAC protocol with no collision offers some QoS faculties.

  8. Deterministic and stochastic trends in the Lee-Carter mortality model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callot, Laurent; Haldrup, Niels; Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene

    2015-01-01

    mortality data. We find empirical evidence that this feature of the Lee–Carter model overly restricts the system dynamics and we suggest to separate the deterministic and stochastic time series components at the benefit of improved fit and forecasting performance. In fact, we find that the classical Lee......) factor model where one factor is deterministic and the other factors are stochastic. This feature generalizes to the range of models that extend the Lee–Carter model in various directions.......The Lee and Carter (1992) model assumes that the deterministic and stochastic time series dynamics load with identical weights when describing the development of age-specific mortality rates. Effectively this means that the main characteristics of the model simplify to a random walk model with age...

  9. Deterministic and stochastic trends in the Lee-Carter mortality model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callot, Laurent; Haldrup, Niels; Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene

    that characterizes mortality data. We find empirical evidence that this feature of the Lee-Carter model overly restricts the system dynamics and we suggest to separate the deterministic and stochastic time series components at the benefit of improved fit and forecasting performance. In fact, we find...... as a two (or several)-factor model where one factor is deterministic and the other factors are stochastic. This feature generalizes to the range of models that extend the Lee-Carter model in various directions.......The Lee and Carter (1992) model assumes that the deterministic and stochastic time series dynamics loads with identical weights when describing the development of age specific mortality rates. Effectively this means that the main characteristics of the model simplifies to a random walk model...

  10. Deterministic remote preparation via the Brown state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Song-Ya; Gao, Cong; Zhang, Pei; Qu, Zhi-Guo

    2017-04-01

    We propose two deterministic remote state preparation (DRSP) schemes by using the Brown state as the entangled channel. Firstly, the remote preparation of an arbitrary two-qubit state is considered. It is worth mentioning that the construction of measurement bases plays a key role in our scheme. Then, the remote preparation of an arbitrary three-qubit state is investigated. The proposed schemes can be extended to controlled remote state preparation (CRSP) with unit success probabilities. At variance with the existing CRSP schemes via the Brown state, the derived schemes have no restriction on the coefficients, while the success probabilities can reach 100%. It means the success probabilities are greatly improved. Moreover, we pay attention to the DRSP in noisy environments under two important decoherence models, the amplitude-damping noise and phase-damping noise.

  11. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-11-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg-Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.

  12. Primality deterministic and primality probabilistic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Rizzi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the A. comments the importance of prime numbers in mathematics and in cryptography. He remembers the very important researches of Eulero, Fermat, Legen-re, Rieman and others scholarships. There are many expressions that give prime numbers. Between them Mersenne’s primes have interesting properties. There are also many conjectures that still have to be demonstrated or rejected. The primality deterministic tests are the algorithms that permit to establish if a number is prime or not. There are not applicable in many practical situations, for instance in public key cryptography, because the computer time would be very long. The primality probabilistic tests consent to verify the null hypothesis: the number is prime. In the paper there are comments about the most important statistical tests.

  13. Anisotropic permeability in deterministic lateral displacement arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Vernekar, Rohan; Loutherback, Kevin; Morton, Keith; Inglis, David

    2016-01-01

    We investigate anisotropic permeability of microfluidic deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) arrays. A DLD array can achieve high-resolution bimodal size-based separation of micro-particles, including bioparticles such as cells. Correct operation requires that the fluid flow remains at a fixed angle with respect to the periodic obstacle array. We show via experiments and lattice-Boltzmann simulations that subtle array design features cause anisotropic permeability. The anisotropy, which indicates the array's intrinsic tendency to induce an undesired lateral pressure gradient, can lead to off-axis flows and therefore local changes in the critical separation size. Thus, particle trajectories can become unpredictable and the device useless for the desired separation duty. We show that for circular posts the rotated-square layout, unlike the parallelogram layout, does not suffer from anisotropy and is the preferred geometry. Furthermore, anisotropy becomes severe for arrays with unequal axial and lateral gaps...

  14. Deterministic aspects of nonlinear modulation instability

    CERN Document Server

    van Groesen, E; Karjanto, N

    2011-01-01

    Different from statistical considerations on stochastic wave fields, this paper aims to contribute to the understanding of (some of) the underlying physical phenomena that may give rise to the occurrence of extreme, rogue, waves. To that end a specific deterministic wavefield is investigated that develops extreme waves from a uniform background. For this explicitly described nonlinear extension of the Benjamin-Feir instability, the soliton on finite background of the NLS equation, the global down-stream evolving distortions, the time signal of the extreme waves, and the local evolution near the extreme position are investigated. As part of the search for conditions to obtain extreme waves, we show that the extreme wave has a specific optimization property for the physical energy, and comment on the possible validity for more realistic situations.

  15. Mechanics From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, Florian

    2010-01-01

    This book covers all topics in mechanics from elementary Newtonian mechanics, the principles of canonical mechanics and rigid body mechanics to relativistic mechanics and nonlinear dynamics. It was among the first textbooks to include dynamical systems and deterministic chaos in due detail. As compared to the previous editions the present fifth edition is updated and revised with more explanations, additional examples and sections on Noether's theorem. Symmetries and invariance principles, the basic geometric aspects of mechanics as well as elements of continuum mechanics also play an important role. The book will enable the reader to develop general principles from which equations of motion follow, to understand the importance of canonical mechanics and of symmetries as a basis for quantum mechanics, and to get practice in using general theoretical concepts and tools that are essential for all branches of physics. The book contains more than 120 problems with complete solutions, as well as some practical exa...

  16. Dynamics of vector dark solitons propagation and tunneling effect in the variable coefficient coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musammil, N M; Porsezian, K; Subha, P A; Nithyanandan, K

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of vector dark solitons propagation using variable coefficient coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (Vc-CNLS) equation. The dark soliton propagation and evolution dynamics in the inhomogeneous system are studied analytically by employing the Hirota bilinear method. It is apparent from our asymptotic analysis that the collision between the dark solitons is elastic in nature. The various inhomogeneous effects on the evolution and interaction between dark solitons are explored, with a particular emphasis on nonlinear tunneling. It is found that the tunneling of the soliton depends on a condition related to the height of the barrier and the amplitude of the soliton. The intensity of the tunneling soliton either forms a peak or a valley, thus retaining its shape after tunneling. For the case of exponential background, the soliton tends to compress after tunneling through the barrier/well. Thus, a comprehensive study of dark soliton pulse evolution and propagation dynamics in Vc-CNLS equation is presented in the paper.

  17. Effect of interstitial content on high- temperature fatigue crack propagation and low- cycle fatigue of alloy 720

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, S.; Thomas, M. C.

    1993-08-01

    Alloy 720 is a high-strength cast and wrought turbine disc alloy currently in use for temperatures up to about 650 °C in Allison’s T800, T406, GMA 2100, and GMA 3007 engines. In the original composition in-tended for use as turbine blades, large carbide and boride stringers formed and acted as preferred crack initiators. Stringering was attributed to relatively higher boron and carbon levels. These interstitials are known to affect creep and ductility of superalloys, but the effects on low-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation have not been studied. Recent emphasis on the total life approach in the design of turbine discs necessitates better understanding of the interactive fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue behavior at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to improve the damage tolerance of Alloy 720 by systematically modifying boron and carbon levels in the master melt, without altering the low-cy-cle fatigue and strength characteristics of the original composition. Improvement in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue life was achieved by fragmenting the continuous stringers via composition modifica-tion. The fatigue crack propagation rate was reduced by a concurrent reduction of both carbon and bo-ron levels to optimally low levels at which the frequency of brittle second phases was minimal. The changes in composition have been incorporated for production disc forgings.

  18. Deterministic seismic hazard macrozonation of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolathayar, Sreevalsa; Sitharam, T. G.; Vipin, K. S.

    2012-10-01

    Earthquakes are known to have occurred in Indian subcontinent from ancient times. This paper presents the results of seismic hazard analysis of India (6°-38°N and 68°-98°E) based on the deterministic approach using latest seismicity data (up to 2010). The hazard analysis was done using two different source models (linear sources and point sources) and 12 well recognized attenuation relations considering varied tectonic provinces in the region. The earthquake data obtained from different sources were homogenized and declustered and a total of 27,146 earthquakes of moment magnitude 4 and above were listed in the study area. The sesismotectonic map of the study area was prepared by considering the faults, lineaments and the shear zones which are associated with earthquakes of magnitude 4 and above. A new program was developed in MATLAB for smoothing of the point sources. For assessing the seismic hazard, the study area was divided into small grids of size 0.1° × 0.1° (approximately 10 × 10 km), and the hazard parameters were calculated at the center of each of these grid cells by considering all the seismic sources within a radius of 300 to 400 km. Rock level peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) and spectral accelerations for periods 0.1 and 1 s have been calculated for all the grid points with a deterministic approach using a code written in MATLAB. Epistemic uncertainty in hazard definition has been tackled within a logic-tree framework considering two types of sources and three attenuation models for each grid point. The hazard evaluation without logic tree approach also has been done for comparison of the results. The contour maps showing the spatial variation of hazard values are presented in the paper.

  19. Deterministic seismic hazard macrozonation of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sreevalsa Kolathayar; T G Sitharam; K S Vipin

    2012-10-01

    Earthquakes are known to have occurred in Indian subcontinent from ancient times. This paper presents the results of seismic hazard analysis of India (6°–38°N and 68°–98°E) based on the deterministic approach using latest seismicity data (up to 2010). The hazard analysis was done using two different source models (linear sources and point sources) and 12 well recognized attenuation relations considering varied tectonic provinces in the region. The earthquake data obtained from different sources were homogenized and declustered and a total of 27,146 earthquakes of moment magnitude 4 and above were listed in the study area. The sesismotectonic map of the study area was prepared by considering the faults, lineaments and the shear zones which are associated with earthquakes of magnitude 4 and above. A new program was developed in MATLAB for smoothing of the point sources. For assessing the seismic hazard, the study area was divided into small grids of size 0.1° × 0.1° (approximately 10 × 10 km), and the hazard parameters were calculated at the center of each of these grid cells by considering all the seismic sources within a radius of 300 to 400 km. Rock level peak horizontal acceleration (PHA) and spectral accelerations for periods 0.1 and 1 s have been calculated for all the grid points with a deterministic approach using a code written in MATLAB. Epistemic uncertainty in hazard definition has been tackled within a logic-tree framework considering two types of sources and three attenuation models for each grid point. The hazard evaluation without logic tree approach also has been done for comparison of the results. The contour maps showing the spatial variation of hazard values are presented in the paper.

  20. Vertical cultural transmission effects on demic front propagation: Theory and application to the Neolithic transition in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Joaquim

    2011-05-01

    It is shown that Lotka-Volterra interaction terms are not appropriate to describe vertical cultural transmission. Appropriate interaction terms are derived and used to compute the effect of vertical cultural transmission on demic front propagation. They are also applied to a specific example, the Neolithic transition in Europe. In this example, it is found that the effect of vertical cultural transmission can be important (about 30%). On the other hand, simple models based on differential equations can lead to large errors (above 50%). Further physical, biophysical, and cross-disciplinary applications are outlined.

  1. Effects of trapped electrons on the oblique propagation of ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. G.; Roy, N. C.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-08-01

    The characteristics of the nonlinear oblique propagation of ion acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized plasmas consisting of Boltzmann positrons, trapped electrons and ions are investigated. The modified Kadomtsev-Petviashivili ( m K P ) equation is derived employing the reductive perturbation technique. The parametric effects on phase velocity, Sagdeev potential, amplitude and width of solitons, and electrostatic ion acoustic solitary structures are graphically presented with the relevant physical explanations. This study may be useful for the better understanding of physical phenomena concerned in plasmas in which the effects of trapped electrons control the dynamics of wave.

  2. A physics exhibit to show the effect of the aerosol in the atmosphere on electromagnetic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Marchetti, Dedalo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper it is explained the construction and utility of a didactic exhibit about the effect of aerosol in atmosphere on electromagnetic wave propagation. The exhibit is composed by a lamp simulating the Sun, a Plexiglas case (the atmosphere), white or black panels (surface albedo), a combustion chamber to supply aerosol inside the case and other equipments. There are temperature and relative humidity of air sensors and 5 light sensors to measure direct and scattered light. It is possible to measure the cooling effect of aerosol inside the case and the increasing in scattered light.

  3. Effects of lead contamination on the clonal propagative ability of Phragmites australis (common reed) grown in wet and dry environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N; Zhang, J W; Yang, Y H; Li, X Y; Lin, J X; Li, Z L; Cheng, L Y; Wang, J F; Mu, C S; Wang, A X

    2015-07-01

    Clonal propagation is important for the survival and maintenance of the common reed Phragmites australis. Pot culture experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of lead (Pb) concentration (0, 500, 1500, 3000, 4500 mg·kg(-1) ) and water stress on the clonal reproductive ability of this species. The Pb concentration found in plant organs, in decreasing order, was roots >shoots >rhizomes. There was a negative relationship between the growth of clonal propagative modules (excluding axillary shoot buds) and Pb concentrations, which caused a decrease in biomass, rhizome growth and number of axillary and apical rhizome buds. Daughter axillary shoots exhibited a tolerance strategy, with no significant change in their number; the axillary and apical rhizome buds, daughter apical rhizome shoots and rhizomes exhibited compensatory growth during the late stage of Pb (excluding 4500 mg·kg(-1) ) treatment in a wet environment. Pb applications above 500 mg·kg(-1) reduced these parameters significantly in the drought treatment, except for the number of axillary shoot buds, which did not change. Our results indicate that clonal propagative resistance to Pb contamination can occur via tolerance strategies, compensatory growth and a Pb allocation strategy, enabling these reeds to maintain population stability in wet environments. However, clonal modular growth and reproductive ability were inhibited significantly by the interaction between drought and Pb, which would cause a decline in P. australis populations in a dry environment. Lead concentrations of 4500 and 500 mg·kg(-1) in soils might meet or exceed the Pb tolerance threshold of clonally propagated reeds in wet and dry environments, respectively.

  4. VISCO-ELASTIC SYSTEMS UNDER BOTH DETERMINISTIC AND BOUND RANDOM PARAMETRIC EXCITATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟; 戎海武; 方同

    2003-01-01

    The principal resonance of a visco-elastic systems under both deterministic and random parametric excitation was investigated. The method of multiple scales was used to determine the equations of modulation of amplitude and phase. The behavior, stability and bifurcation of steady state response were studied by means of qualitative analysis. The contributions from the visco-elastic force to both damping and stiffness can be taken into account. The effects of damping, detuning, bandwidth, and magnitudes of deterministic and random excitations were analyzed. The theoretical analysis is verified by numerical results.

  5. Scattering of electromagnetic light waves from a deterministic anisotropic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Chang, Liping; Wu, Pinghui

    2015-11-01

    Based on the weak scattering theory of electromagnetic waves, analytical expressions are derived for the spectral densities and degrees of polarization of an electromagnetic plane wave scattered from a deterministic anisotropic medium. It is shown that the normalized spectral densities of scattered field is highly dependent of changes of the scattering angle and degrees of polarization of incident plane waves. The degrees of polarization of scattered field are also subjective to variations of these parameters. In addition, the anisotropic effective radii of the dielectric susceptibility can lead essential influences on both spectral densities and degrees of polarization of scattered field. They are highly dependent of the effective radii of the medium. The obtained results may be applicable to determine anisotropic parameters of medium by quantitatively measuring statistics of a far-zone scattered field.

  6. Deterministic and risk-informed approaches for safety analysis of advanced reactors: Part I, deterministic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Kyu [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Inn Seock, E-mail: innseockkim@gmail.co [ISSA Technology, 21318 Seneca Crossing Drive, Germantown, MD 20876 (United States); Oh, Kyu Myung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this paper and a companion paper in this issue (part II, risk-informed approaches) is to derive technical insights from a critical review of deterministic and risk-informed safety analysis approaches that have been applied to develop licensing requirements for water-cooled reactors, or proposed for safety verification of the advanced reactor design. To this end, a review was made of a number of safety analysis approaches including those specified in regulatory guides and industry standards, as well as novel methodologies proposed for licensing of advanced reactors. This paper and the companion paper present the review insights on the deterministic and risk-informed safety analysis approaches, respectively. These insights could be used in making a safety case or developing a new licensing review infrastructure for advanced reactors including Generation IV reactors.

  7. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Louise R; Baker, Andrew T; Elias, Damian O; Dammann, John F; Zielinski, Mark C; Polashock, Vicky S; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2012-01-01

    Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  8. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise R Manfredi

    Full Text Available Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  9. Validity of Parametrized Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJi-Zhen; ZHOULi-Juan; MAWei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensively study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the “rainbow”approximation, a parametrized fully dressed quark propagator is proposed in this paper. The parametrized propagator describes a confining quark propagator in hadron since it is analytic everywhere in complex p2-plane and has no Lemmann representation. The validity of the new propagator is discussed by comparing its predictions on selfenergy functions A/(p2), Bl(p2) and effective mass M$(p2) of quark with flavor f to their corresponding theoretical results produced by Dyson-Schwinger equations. Our comparison shows that the parametrized quark propagator is a good approximation to the fully dressed quark propagator given by the solutions of Dyson-Schwinger equations in the rainbow approximation and is convenient to use in any theoretical calculations.

  10. Validity of Parametrized Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ji-Zhen; ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensively study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the "rainbow" approximation, a parametrized fully dressed quark propagator is proposed in this paper. The parametrized propagator describes a confining quark propagator in hadron since it is analytic everywhere in complex p2-plane and has no Lemmann representation. The validity of the new propagator is discussed by comparing its predictions on selfenergy functions Af(p2), Bf(p2) and effective mass Mf(p2) of quark with flavor f to their corresponding theoretical results produced by Dyson-Schwinger equations. Our comparison shows that the parametrized quark propagator is a good approximation to the fully dressed quark propagator given by the solutions of Dyson-Schwinger equations in the rainbow approximation and is convenient to use in any theoretical calculations.

  11. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  12. Determination of the Ionosphere Parameters by Analyzing the Propagation After-Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-27

    is a very “lively” medium; its characteristics depend on many factors , such as time of the day, time of the year, geographic location, level of Solar...whereas the long waves are subject to stronger dispersion. Indeed, the phase and group velocity of the propagation are given by: vph = c ( 1 + ω2pe/c...c) |x − y |2 . (2.19) The filter is essentially a complex conjugate of ψ1 given by (2.19); for simplicity, the constant factor −ω20/16π2, as well the

  13. Light propagation in tissues: effect of finite size of tissue sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rusina, Tatyana V.

    1995-12-01

    Laser beam propagation inside tissues with different lateral dimensions has been considered. Scattering and anisotropic properties of tissue critically determine spatial fluence distribution and predict sizes of tissue specimens when deviations of this distribution can be neglected. Along the axis of incident beam the fluence rate weakly depends on sample size whereas its relative increase (more than 20%) towards the lateral boundaries. The finite sizes were considered to be substantial only for samples with sizes comparable with the diameter of the laser beam. Interstitial irradiance patterns simulated by Monte Carlo method were compared with direct measurements in human brain specimens.

  14. Propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés. Effets d'interface Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Saturated Porous Media. Interface Effects (Part Two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail constitue le prolongement logique d'un précédent article (O. Coussy, T. Bourbié, 1984 relatif à la propagation, dans le cadre de la théorie de Biot, des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés infinis. Partant des mêmes hypothèses concernant les milieux de propagation, nous étudions l'influence de la présence de discontinuités géométriques planes (milieux semi-infinis libres ou contact entre deux milieux semi-infinis ou à symétrie cylindrique (puits. Après un rappel des lois de comportement hydromécanique du milieu poreux et des équations fondamentales de la poroélasticité dynamique, nous discutons les conditions aux limites à imposer aux interfaces. Nous étudions ensuite les lois générales de la réflexion et de la réfraction en poroélasticité (lois de Snell-Descartes généralisées. L'application de celles-ci à quelques cas particuliers intéressants, met surtout en évidence les phénomènes suivants : -Une onde lente compressive est toujours engendrée à l'interface entre 2 milieux poreux saturés. - Les ondes réfléchies et transmises sont en général inhomogènes. Dans une étape suivante, nous étudions la propagation des ondes acoustiques à la surface libre d'un milieu poreux saturé semi-infini (ondes de Rayleigh et à l'interface plane entre un liquide et un milieu poreux saturé (ondes de Stoneley. Par rapport aux propriétés qu'on leur connaît en élastodynamique classique, en poroélasticité, ces ondes sont légèrement dispersives mais sont notablement atténuées du fait du caractère biphasique du milieu de propagation. Puis enfin nous étudions l'influence d'une source immergée émettant près d'une interface perméable. Nous soulignons le rôle fondamental de la perméabilité et des conditions de flux aux interfaces sur l'atténuation des ondes S et des ondes de surface. Comparativement, l'influence de ces paramètres sur les premières arrivées (ondes P est n

  15. Propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés. Effets d'interface Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Saturated Porous Media. Interface Effects (Part Three

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail constitue le prolongement logique d'un précédent article (O. Coussy, T. Bourbié, 1984 relatif à la propagation, dans le cadre de la théorie de Biot, des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés infinis. Partant des mêmes hypothèses concernant les milieux de propagation, nous étudions l'influence de la présence de discontinuités géométriques planes (milieux semi-infinis libres ou contact entre deux milieux semi-infinis ou à symétrie cylindrique (puits. Après un rappel des lois de comportement hydromécanique du milieu poreux et des équations fondamentales de la poroélasticité dynamique, nous discutons les conditions aux limites à imposer aux interfaces. Nous étudions ensuite les lois générales de la réflexion et de la réfraction en poroélasticité (lois de Snell-Descartes généralisées. L'application de celles-ci à quelques cas particuliers intéressants, met surtout en évidence les phénomènes suivants : -Une onde lente compressive est toujours engendrée à l'interface entre 2 milieux poreux saturés. - Les ondes réfléchies et transmises sont en général inhomogènes. Dans une étape suivante, nous étudions la propagation des ondes acoustiques à la surface libre d'un milieu poreux saturé semi-infini (ondes de Rayleigh et à l'interface plane entre un liquide et un milieu poreux saturé (ondes de Stoneley. Par rapport aux propriétés qu'on leur connaît en élastodynamique classique, en poroélasticité, ces ondes sont légèrement dispersives mais sont notablement atténuées du fait du caractère biphasique du milieu de propagation. Puis enfin nous étudions l'influence d'une source immergée émettant près d'une interface perméable. Nous soulignons le rôle fondamental de la perméabilité et des conditions de flux aux interfaces sur l'atténuation des ondes S et des ondes de surface. Comparativement, l'influence de ces paramètres sur les premières arrivées (ondes P est n

  16. Propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés. Effets d'interface Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Saturated Porous Media. Interface Effects (Part One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail constitue le prolongement logique d'un précédent article (O. Coussy, T. Bourbié, 1984 relatif à la propagation, dans le cadre de la théorie de Biot, des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés infinis. Partant des mêmes hypothèses concernant les milieux de propagation, nous étudions l'influence de la présence de discontinuités géométriques planes (milieux semi-infinis libres ou contact entre deux milieux semi-infinis ou à symétrie cylindrique (puits. Après un rappel des lois de comportement hydromécanique du milieu poreux et des équations fondamentales de la poroélasticité dynamique, nous discutons les conditions aux limites à imposer aux interfaces. Nous étudions ensuite les lois générales de la réflexion et de la réfraction en poroélasticité (lois de Snell-Descartes généralisées. L'application de celles-ci à quelques cas particuliers intéressants, met surtout en évidence les phénomènes suivants : -Une onde lente compressive est toujours engendrée à l'interface entre 2 milieux poreux saturés. - Les ondes réfléchies et transmises sont en général inhomogènes. Dans une étape suivante, nous étudions la propagation des ondes acoustiques à la surface libre d'un milieu poreux saturé semi-infini (ondes de Rayleigh et à l'interface plane entre un liquide et un milieu poreux saturé (ondes de Stoneley. Par rapport aux propriétés qu'on leur connaît en élastodynamique classique, en poroélasticité, ces ondes sont légèrement dispersives mais sont notablement atténuées du fait du caractère biphasique du milieu de propagation. Puis enfin nous étudions l'influence d'une source immergée émettant près d'une interface perméable. Nous soulignons le rôle fondamental de la perméabilité et des conditions de flux aux interfaces sur l'atténuation des ondes S et des ondes de surface. Comparativement, l'influence de ces paramètres sur les premières arrivées (ondes P est n

  17. Development of a model for unsteady deterministic stresses adapted to the multi-stages turbomachines simulation; Developpement d'un modele de tensions deterministes instationnaires adapte a la simulation de turbomachines multi-etagees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charbonnier, D.

    2004-12-15

    The physical phenomena observed in turbomachines are generally three-dimensional and unsteady. A recent study revealed that a three-dimensional steady simulation can reproduce the time-averaged unsteady phenomena, since the steady flow field equations integrate deterministic stresses. The objective of this work is thus to develop an unsteady deterministic stresses model. The analogy with turbulence makes it possible to write transport equations for these stresses. The equations are implemented in steady flow solver and e model for the energy deterministic fluxes is also developed and implemented. Finally, this work shows that a three-dimensional steady simulation, by taking into account unsteady effects with transport equations of deterministic stresses, increases the computing time by only approximately 30 %, which remains very interesting compared to an unsteady simulation. (author)

  18. The degree of irreversibility in deterministic finite automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock; Holzer, Markus; Kutrib, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Holzer et al. gave a method to decide whether the language accepted by a given deterministic finite automaton (DFA) can also be accepted by some reversible deterministic finite automaton (REV-DFA), and eventually proved NL-completeness. Here, we show that the corresponding problem for n...

  19. Recognition of deterministic ETOL languages in logarithmic space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Neil D.; Skyum, Sven

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that if G is a deterministic ETOL system, there is a nondeterministic log space algorithm to determine membership in L(G). Consequently, every deterministic ETOL language is recognizable in polynomial time. As a corollary, all context-free languages of finite index, and all Indian par...

  20. Safety Verification of Piecewise-Deterministic Markov Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer; Bujorianu, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    We consider the safety problem of piecewise-deterministic Markov processes (PDMP). These are systems that have deterministic dynamics and stochastic jumps, where both the time and the destination of the jumps are stochastic. Specifically, we solve a p-safety problem, where we identify the set...

  1. Use of deterministic models in sports and exercise biomechanics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, John W; Knudson, Duane V

    2011-09-01

    A deterministic model is a modeling paradigm that determines the relationships between a movement outcome measure and the biomechanical factors that produce such a measure. This review provides an overview of the use of deterministic models in biomechanics research, a historical summary of this research, and an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of using deterministic models. The deterministic model approach has been utilized in technique analysis over the last three decades, especially in swimming, athletics field events, and gymnastics. In addition to their applications in sports and exercise biomechanics, deterministic models have been applied successfully in research on selected motor skills. The advantage of the deterministic model approach is that it helps to avoid selecting performance or injury variables arbitrarily and to provide the necessary theoretical basis for examining the relative importance of various factors that influence the outcome of a movement task. Several disadvantages of deterministic models, such as the use of subjective measures for the performance outcome, were discussed. It is recommended that exercise and sports biomechanics scholars should consider using deterministic models to help identify meaningful dependent variables in their studies.

  2. The cointegrated vector autoregressive model with general deterministic terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    In the cointegrated vector autoregression (CVAR) literature, deterministic terms have until now been analyzed on a case-by-case, or as-needed basis. We give a comprehensive unified treatment of deterministic terms in the additive model X(t)= Z(t) + Y(t), where Z(t) belongs to a large class...

  3. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-18

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  4. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  5. Kadomtsev-Petviashvili solitons propagation in a plasma system with superthermal and weakly relativistic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez-Ur-Rehman; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Shah, Asif; Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-12-15

    Two dimensional (2D) solitons are studied in a plasma system comprising of relativistically streaming ions, kappa distributed electrons, and positrons. Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation is derived through the reductive perturbation technique. Analytical solution of the KP equation has been studied numerically and graphically. It is noticed that kappa parameters of electrons and positrons as well as the ions relativistic streaming factor have an emphatic influence on the structural as well as propagation characteristics of two dimensional solitons in the considered plasma system. Our results may be helpful in the understanding of soliton propagation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, specifically the interaction of pulsar relativistic wind with supernova ejecta and the transfer of energy to plasma by intense electric field of laser beams producing highly energetic superthermal and relativistic particles [L. Arons, Astrophys. Space Sci. Lib. 357, 373 (2009); P. Blasi and E. Amato, Astrophys. Space Sci. Proc. 2011, 623; and A. Shah and R. Saeed, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 095006 (2011)].

  6. On the effect of elastic nonlinearity on aquatic propulsion caused by propagating flexural waves

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, Victor V

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, the initial theoretical results on wave-like aquatic propulsion of marine craft by propagating flexural waves are reported. Recent experimental investigations of small model boats propelled by propagating flexural waves carried out by the present author and his co-workers demonstrated viability of this type of propulsion as an alternative to a well-known screw propeller. In the attempts of theoretical explanation of the obtained experimental results using the theory of Lighthill for fish locomotion, it was found that this theory predicts zero thrust for such model boats, which is in contradiction with the results of the experiments. One should note in this connection that the theory developed by Lighthill assumes that the amplitudes of propulsive waves created by fish body motion grow from zero on the front (at fish heads) to their maximum values at the tails. This is consistent with fish body motion in nature, but is not compatible with the behaviour of localised flexural waves used for...

  7. Deterministic single-file dynamics in collisional representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesoni, F; Taloni, A

    2007-12-01

    We re-examine numerically the diffusion of a deterministic, or ballistic single file with preassigned velocity distribution (Jepsen's gas) from a collisional viewpoint. For a two-modal velocity distribution, where half the particles have velocity +/-c, the collisional statistics is analytically proven to reproduce the continuous time representation. For a three-modal velocity distribution with equal fractions, where less than 12 of the particles have velocity +/-c, with the remaining particles at rest, the collisional process is shown to be inhomogeneous; its stationary properties are discussed here by combining exact and phenomenological arguments. Collisional memory effects are then related to the negative power-law tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions, predicted earlier in the continuous time formalism. Numerical and analytical results for Gaussian and four-modal Jepsen's gases are also reported for the sake of a comparison.

  8. Sensitivity analysis in a Lassa fever deterministic mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Doko, Umar Chado; Mamuda, Mamman

    2015-05-01

    Lassa virus that causes the Lassa fever is on the list of potential bio-weapons agents. It was recently imported into Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States as a consequence of the rapid growth of international traffic. A model with five mutually exclusive compartments related to Lassa fever is presented and the basic reproduction number analyzed. A sensitivity analysis of the deterministic model is performed. This is done in order to determine the relative importance of the model parameters to the disease transmission. The result of the sensitivity analysis shows that the most sensitive parameter is the human immigration, followed by human recovery rate, then person to person contact. This suggests that control strategies should target human immigration, effective drugs for treatment and education to reduced person to person contact.

  9. Connection between stochastic and deterministic modelling of microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutalik, Zoltán; Razaz, Moe; Baranyi, József

    2005-01-21

    We present in this paper various links between individual and population cell growth. Deterministic models of the lag and subsequent growth of a bacterial population and their connection with stochastic models for the lag and subsequent generation times of individual cells are analysed. We derived the individual lag time distribution inherent in population growth models, which shows that the Baranyi model allows a wide range of shapes for individual lag time distribution. We demonstrate that individual cell lag time distributions cannot be retrieved from population growth data. We also present the results of our investigation on the effect of the mean and variance of the individual lag time and the initial cell number on the mean and variance of the population lag time. These relationships are analysed theoretically, and their consequence for predictive microbiology research is discussed.

  10. Effect of inner oxidant on self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of MnZn-ferrite powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ke; GUO Zhimeng; AKHTAR Farid; ZHANG Bin; TU Yifan

    2006-01-01

    Using KClO3 as an inner oxidant, MnZn-ferrite powder was synthesized by a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process in normal air atmosphere. The effects of the inner oxidant on combustion temperature, combustion velocity, microstructure and the phase of the product were investigated by XRD and SEM,respectively. The results show that a highly ferritized powder can be obtained as well as the highest combustion temperature and the highest combustion velocity when the inner oxidant content m equals 5/4( k -1/6).

  11. Relativistic degeneracy effect on propagation of arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic solitons in Thomas-Fermi plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, Abdolrasoul; Saberian, Ehsan; 10.1585/pfr.5.045

    2011-01-01

    Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) are studied using Sagdeev-Potential approach in electron-positron-ion plasma with ultra-relativistic or non-relativistic degenerate electrons and positrons and the matching criteria of existence of such solitary waves are numerically investigated. It has been shown that the relativistic degeneracy of electrons and positrons has significant effects on the amplitude and the Mach-number range of IASWs. Also it is remarked that only compressive IASWs can propagate in both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate plasmas.

  12. Effect of Cu addition and heat treatment self-propagating high temperature synthesis reaction in Al-Ti-C system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y.X.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Cu addition and heat treatment on the self-propagating high temperature synthesis reaction have been investigated. The results show that Cu reacts with Al to form Al2Cu phase. With the addition of Cu, the combustion temperature of the system decreases and the porosity of the products is reduced, the size of TiC particulate decreases in the SHS reaction products. Specially, when heat treatment is carried out for the sintering products at 800 ◦C, the rigid framework (sintering neck between TiC particles was formed.

  13. Effects of Short-Day and Gibberellic Acid Treatments on Summer Vegetative Propagation of Napier Grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach)

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuyuki Ishii; Asuka Yamano; Sachiko Idota

    2016-01-01

    The effects of short-day (SD) and gibberellic acid (GA3) treatments on promoting vegetative propagation during the summer were examined in Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach). A dwarf variety of late heading type (DL) Napier grass was exposed to three SD treatments (5, 10, and 20 short days plus a spray of 400 ppm GA3 solution following each SD treatment, GASD) or no treatment (control). Additionally, then, a dwarf variety of early heading (DE) and the normal variety of Merkeron (ME)...

  14. Effects of axial load and structural damping on wave propagation in periodic Timoshenko beams on elastic foundations under moving loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lan; Zhu, Hong-Ping; Wu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The propagation and attenuation properties of waves in ordered and disordered periodic composite Timoshenko beams, which consider the effects of axial static load and structural damping, resting on elastic foundations are studied when the system is subjected to moving loads of constant amplitude with a constant velocity. The transfer matrix methodology is adopted to formulate the model in a reference coordinate system moving with the load. The localization factor is calculated to determine the wave velocity pass bands and stop bands. The interactions between the static axial load and moving load, structural damping and disorder on the bands are analyzed.

  15. A Deterministic Projector Configuration Interaction Approach for the Ground State of Quantum Many-Body Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyuan; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2016-09-13

    In this work we propose a novel approach to solve the Schrödinger equation which combines projection onto the ground state with a path-filtering truncation scheme. The resulting projector configuration interaction (PCI) approach realizes a deterministic version of the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method [Booth, G. H.; Thom, A. J. W.; Alavi, A. J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 131, 054106]. To improve upon the linearized imaginary-time propagator, we develop an optimal projector scheme based on an exponential Chebyshev expansion in the limit of an infinite imaginary time step. After writing the exact projector as a path integral in determinant space, we introduce a path filtering procedure that truncates the size of the determinantal basis and approximates the Hamiltonian. The path filtering procedure is controlled by one real threshold that determines the accuracy of the PCI energy and is not biased toward any determinant. Therefore, the PCI approach can equally well describe static and dynamic electron correlation effects. This point is illustrated in benchmark computations on N2 at both equilibrium and stretched geometries. In both cases, the PCI achieves chemical accuracy with wave functions that contain less than 0.5% determinants of full CI space. We also report computations on the ground state of C2 with up to quaduple-ζ basis sets and wave functions as large as 200 million determinants, which allow a direct comparison of the PCI, FCIQMC, and density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) methods. The size of the PCI wave function grows modestly with the number of unoccupied orbitals, and its accuracy may be tuned to match that of FCIQMC and DMRG.

  16. Analysis and test of efficient methods for building recursive deterministic perceptron neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, David A; Birkenhead, Ralph; Góngora, Mario; Taillard, Eric; Luyima, Patrick

    2007-12-01

    The Recursive Deterministic Perceptron (RDP) feed-forward multilayer neural network is a generalisation of the single layer perceptron topology. This model is capable of solving any two-class classification problem as opposed to the single layer perceptron which can only solve classification problems dealing with linearly separable sets. For all classification problems, the construction of an RDP is done automatically and convergence is always guaranteed. Three methods for constructing RDP neural networks exist: Batch, Incremental, and Modular. The Batch method has been extensively tested and it has been shown to produce results comparable with those obtained with other neural network methods such as Back Propagation, Cascade Correlation, Rulex, and Ruleneg. However, no testing has been done before on the Incremental and Modular methods. Contrary to the Batch method, the complexity of these two methods is not NP-Complete. For the first time, a study on the three methods is presented. This study will allow the highlighting of the main advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods by comparing the results obtained while building RDP neural networks with the three methods in terms of the convergence time, the level of generalisation, and the topology size. The networks were trained and tested using the following standard benchmark classification datasets: IRIS, SOYBEAN, and Wisconsin Breast Cancer. The results obtained show the effectiveness of the Incremental and the Modular methods which are as good as that of the NP-Complete Batch method but with a much lower complexity level. The results obtained with the RDP are comparable to those obtained with the backpropagation and the Cascade Correlation algorithms.

  17. Effects of imperfection of ionic channels and exposure to electromagnetic fields on the generation and propagation of front waves in nervous fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboussi Nkomidio, A.; Woafo, P.

    2010-09-01

    This work deals with the effects of perturbations such as imperfection of ionic channels and exposure to electromagnetic field on the generation and propagation of wave fronts in a nervous fibre. The initial excitation inserted in the fibre is a pulse of amplitude a and width 1/k. The domain of initial values of a and k leading to front waves generation are delineated for each type of perturbation. Links of the results to biological facts are given. It is found that imperfections of ionic channels strongly modify the velocity of propagation and can even lead to propagation failure.

  18. An effective theory for jet propagation in dense QCD matter: jet broadening and medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Ovanesyan, Grigory

    2011-01-01

    Two effects, jet broadening and gluon bremsstrahlung induced by the propagation of a highly energetic quark in dense QCD matter, are reconsidered from effective theory point of view. We modify the standard Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) Lagrangian to include Glauber modes, which are needed to implement the interactions between the medium and the collinear fields. We derive the Feynman rules for this Lagrangian and show that it is invariant under soft and collinear gauge transformations. We find that the newly constructed theory SCET$_{\\rm G}$ recovers exactly the general result for the transverse momentum broadening of jets. In the limit where the radiated gluons are significantly less energetic than the parent quark, we obtain a jet energy-loss kernel identical to the one discussed in the reaction operator approach to parton propagation in matter. In the framework of SCET$_{\\rm G}$ we present results for the fully-differential bremsstrahlung spectrum for both the incoherent and the Landau-Pomeranchun...

  19. Modeling Optical Spectra of Large Organic Systems Using Real-Time Propagation of Semiempirical Effective Hamiltonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Andersen, Amity; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2017-09-12

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent semiempirical method (INDO/S) in NWChem using real-time (RT) propagation to address, in principle, the entire spectrum of valence electronic excitations. Adopting this model, we study the UV/vis spectra of medium-sized systems such as P3B2 and f-coronene, and in addition much larger systems such as ubiquitin in the gas phase and the betanin chromophore in the presence of two explicit solvents (water and methanol). RT-INDO/S provides qualitatively and often quantitatively accurate results when compared with RT- TDDFT or experimental spectra. Even though we only consider the INDO/S Hamiltonian in this work, our implementation provides a framework for performing electron dynamics in large systems using semiempirical Hartree-Fock Hamiltonians in general.

  20. Small-Scale Effect on Longitudinal Wave Propagation in Laser-Excited Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kh. Mirzade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal wave propagation in an elastic isotopic laser-excited solid plate with atomic defect (vacancies, interstitials generation is studied by the nonlocal continuum model. The nonlocal differential constitutive equations of Eringen are used in the formulations. The coupled governing equations for the dynamic of elastic displacement and atomic defect concentration fields are obtained. The frequency equations for the symmetrical and antisymmetrical motions of the plate are found and discussed. Explicit expressions for different characteristics of waves like phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients are derived. It is shown that coupling between the displacement and defect concentration fields affects the wave dispersion characteristics in the nonlocal elasticity. The dispersion curves of the elastic-diffusion instability are investigated for different pump parameters and larger wave numbers.

  1. Modeling Optical Spectra of Large Organic Systems using Real-Time Propagation of Semiempirical Effective Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Andersen, Amity; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J.; Govind, Niranjan

    2017-09-01

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent semiempirical method (INDO/S) in NWChem using real-time (RT) propagation to address, in principle, the entire spectrum of valence electronic excitations. Adopting this model, we study the UV-visible spectra of medium-sized systems like P3B2, f-coronene, and in addition much larger systems like ubiquitin in the gas phase and the betanin chromophore in the presence of two explicit solvents (water and methanol). RT-INDO/S provides qualitatively and indeed often quantitatively accurate results when compared with RT- TDDFT or experimental spectra. While demonstrated here for INDO/S in particular, our implementation provides a framework for performing electron dynamics in large systems using semiempirical Hartree-Fock (HF) Hamiltonians in general.

  2. Simulation of propagation in a bundle of skeletal muscle fibers: Modulation effects of passive fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Kaj-åge; F.A., Roberge

    1997-01-01

    source current (I-ma) enters the passive tissue as a radial load current (I-ep) while the rest flows longitudinally in the cleft between the active and adjacent passive fibers. The conduction velocity of 1.32 m/s was about 30% lower than on an isolated fiber in a Ringer bath, in close agreement...... rate of rise of the action potential upstroke (V-max) from 512 to 503 V/s. Increasing the phase angle of the passive fiber membrane impedence (Z(m)) increases the phase delay between I-ma and I-ep, thereby increasing phi(epp) which in turn slows down propagation and increases V-max....

  3. Effect of small floating disks on the propagation of gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Santi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    A dispersion relation for gravity waves in water covered by disk-like impurities floating in a viscous matrix is derived. The macroscopic equations are obtained ensemble-averaging the fluid equations at the disk scale in the asymptotic limit of long waves and low disk surface fraction. Various regimes have been identified depending on the disk radii and the thickness and viscosity of the top layer. Semi-quantitative analysis in the close-packing regime suggests dramatic modification of the dynamics, with order of magnitude increase in wave damping and wave dispersion. Possible relevance of the results to wave propagation in ice-covered ocean is discussed, and comparison with field data is provided.

  4. Effects of radiative transfer modelling on the dynamics of a propagating electrical discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahhali, Nicolas; Riviere, Philippe; Perrin, Marie-Yvonne; Soufiani, Anouar [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Gonnet, Jean-Paul, E-mail: Anouar.Soufiani@em2c.ecp.f [Schneider Electric, Power Business, LV Arc Breaking-Modeling and Expertise Site 38 EQI Eybens, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-10-27

    A radiative transfer methodology is developed for the modelling of coupled radiation, hydrodynamic and electromagnetic phenomena in unsteady air plasma flows. Absorption spectra are discretized according to the distribution functions of the absorption coefficients resulting from different types of radiative transitions, and this spectral model is combined with the differential P{sub 1} approximation which is shown to predict quite accurately radiative source terms. The study of a propagating electrical arc in a 2D channel shows that radiative transfer modelling significantly affects the shape of the plasma and its dynamics. In particular, when compared with the results from the net emission coefficient method, the arc velocity is found to increase due to radiation absorption in the arc boundaries.

  5. The effect of negative feedback on noise propagation in transcriptional gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshangi, Sara; Weiss, Ron

    2006-06-01

    This paper analyzes how the delay and repression strength of negative feedback in single-gene and multigene transcriptional networks influences intrinsic noise propagation and oscillatory behavior. We simulate a variety of transcriptional networks using a stochastic model and report two main findings. First, intrinsic noise is not attenuated by the addition of negative or positive feedback to transcriptional cascades. Second, for multigene negative feedback networks, synchrony in oscillations among a cell population can be improved by increasing network depth and tightening the regulation at one of the repression stages. Our long term goal is to understand how the noise characteristics of complex networks can be derived from the properties of modules that are used to compose these networks.

  6. Simple illustrations of range-dependence and 3-D effects by normal-mode sound propagation modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivansson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, the sound-speed profile has significant effects on underwater acoustic sound propagation. These effects can be quantified by normal-mode models, for example. The basic case is a laterally homogeneous medium, for which the sound speed and the density depend on depth only and not on horizontal position. Effects of horizontal medium-parameter variation can be quantified by coupled-mode models, with coupling between mode expansions for laterally homogeneous parts of the medium. In the present paper, these effects are illustrated for media with a particularly simple horizontal parameter variation such that mode shapes do not vary with horizontal position. The modal wavenumbers depend on horizontal position, however. At a vertical interface between regions with laterally homogeneous medium parameters, each mode is reflected as well as transmitted. For the media considered, reflection and transmission coefficients can be computed separately for each mode without mode coupling, and this is done recu...

  7. The Light Velocity Casimir Effect Does the Velocity of Light Increase when Propagating Between the Casimir Plates?

    CERN Document Server

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01

    We propose experiments that might be set up to detect the increase in the velocity of light in a vacuum in the laboratory frame for photons travelling between (and perpendicular to) the Casimir plates in a vacuum. The Casimir plates are two closely spaced, conductive plates, where an attractive force is observed to exist between the plates called the 'Casimir Force'. We propose that the velocity of light in a vacuum increases when propagating between two transparent Casimir Plates. We call this effect the 'Light Velocity Casimir Effect' or LVC effect. The LVC effect happens because the vacuum energy density in between the plates is lower than that outside the Casimir plates. The conductive plates disallow certain frequencies of electrically charged virtual particles to exist inside the plates, thus lowering the inside vacuum particle density, compared to the density outside the plates. The reduced (electrically charged) virtual particle density results in fewer photon scattering events inside the plates, whic...

  8. A Deterministic Approach to Earthquake Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Sgrigna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at giving suggestions for a deterministic approach to investigate possible earthquake prediction and warning. A fundamental contribution can come by observations and physical modeling of earthquake precursors aiming at seeing in perspective the phenomenon earthquake within the framework of a unified theory able to explain the causes of its genesis, and the dynamics, rheology, and microphysics of its preparation, occurrence, postseismic relaxation, and interseismic phases. Studies based on combined ground and space observations of earthquake precursors are essential to address the issue. Unfortunately, up to now, what is lacking is the demonstration of a causal relationship (with explained physical processes and looking for a correlation between data gathered simultaneously and continuously by space observations and ground-based measurements. In doing this, modern and/or new methods and technologies have to be adopted to try to solve the problem. Coordinated space- and ground-based observations imply available test sites on the Earth surface to correlate ground data, collected by appropriate networks of instruments, with space ones detected on board of Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO satellites. Moreover, a new strong theoretical scientific effort is necessary to try to understand the physics of the earthquake.

  9. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-08-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick-slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy-loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small-scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global statistics of flare energy release, this latter behavior may be relevant to recurrent flaring in individual coronal loops. This class of models could provide a basis for the prediction of large solar flares.

  10. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, Antoine; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-01-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick--slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global st...

  11. Deterministic Secure Positioning in Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Delaët, Sylvie; Rokicki, Mariusz; Tixeuil, Sébastien

    2007-01-01

    Properly locating sensor nodes is an important building block for a large subset of wireless sensor networks (WSN) applications. As a result, the performance of the WSN degrades significantly when misbehaving nodes report false location and distance information in order to fake their actual location. In this paper we propose a general distributed deterministic protocol for accurate identification of faking sensors in a WSN. Our scheme does \\emph{not} rely on a subset of \\emph{trusted} nodes that are not allowed to misbehave and are known to every node in the network. Thus, any subset of nodes is allowed to try faking its position. As in previous approaches, our protocol is based on distance evaluation techniques developed for WSN. On the positive side, we show that when the received signal strength (RSS) technique is used, our protocol handles at most $\\lfloor \\frac{n}{2} \\rfloor-2$ faking sensors. Also, when the time of flight (ToF) technique is used, our protocol manages at most $\\lfloor \\frac{n}{2} \\rfloor...

  12. Deterministic Random Walks on Regular Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Joshua; Friedrich, Tobias; Spencer, Joel; 10.1002/rsa.20314

    2010-01-01

    Jim Propp's rotor router model is a deterministic analogue of a random walk on a graph. Instead of distributing chips randomly, each vertex serves its neighbors in a fixed order. Cooper and Spencer (Comb. Probab. Comput. (2006)) show a remarkable similarity of both models. If an (almost) arbitrary population of chips is placed on the vertices of a grid $\\Z^d$ and does a simultaneous walk in the Propp model, then at all times and on each vertex, the number of chips on this vertex deviates from the expected number the random walk would have gotten there by at most a constant. This constant is independent of the starting configuration and the order in which each vertex serves its neighbors. This result raises the question if all graphs do have this property. With quite some effort, we are now able to answer this question negatively. For the graph being an infinite $k$-ary tree ($k \\ge 3$), we show that for any deviation $D$ there is an initial configuration of chips such that after running the Propp model for a ...

  13. Analysis of pinching in deterministic particle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risbud, Sumedh; Luo, Mingxiang; Frechette, Joelle; Drazer, German

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the problem of spherical particles vertically settling parallel to Y-axis (under gravity), through a pinching gap created by an obstacle (spherical or cylindrical, center at the origin) and a wall (normal to X axis), to uncover the physics governing microfluidic separation techniques such as deterministic lateral displacement and pinched flow fractionation: (1) theoretically, by linearly superimposing the resistances offered by the wall and the obstacle separately, (2) computationally, using the lattice Boltzmann method for particulate systems and (3) experimentally, by conducting macroscopic experiments. Both, theory and simulations, show that for a given initial separation between the particle centre and the Y-axis, presence of a wall pushes the particles closer to the obstacle, than its absence. Experimentally, this is expected to result in an early onset of the short-range repulsive forces caused by solid-solid contact. We indeed observe such an early onset, which we quantify by measuring the asymmetry in the trajectories of the spherical particles around the obstacle. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. CBET- 0731032, CMMI-0748094, and CBET-0954840.

  14. Effect of Lorentz local field correction on propagation of ultrashort laser pulse in one-dimensional para-nitroaniline (PNA)molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yong; Miao Quan; Wang Chuan-Kui

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of Lorentz local field correction(LFC)on the propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in a para-nitroaniline molecular medium under resonant and nonresonant conditions by solving numerically the full-wave Maxwell-Bloch equations beyond slowly-varying envelope approximation and rotating-wave approximation.The effect of the LFC is considerably obvious when pulses with large areas propagate in the dense molecular medium.In the case of resonance, the group velocity of the sub-pulses split from the incident pulse along propagation is severely decreased by the LFC, especially for the latest sub-pulse. However, in the case of nonresonance, the influence of the LFC on the temporal evolution of the pulse is less obvious and lacks homogeneity with an increase in incident pulse area, propagation distance and molecular density.

  15. Effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes based on Timoshenko laminated beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, H.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Timoshenko laminated beam models, this paper investigates the influence of initial stress on the vibration and transverse wave propagation in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under ultrahigh frequency (above 1 THz), in which the initial stress in the MWNTs can occur due to thermal or lattice mismatch between different materials. Considering van der Waals force interaction between two adjacent tubes and effects of rotary inertia and shear deformation, results show that the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes not only affects the number of transverse wave speeds and the magnitude of transverse wave speeds, but also terahertz critical frequencies at which the number of wave speeds changes. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the compressive stress, transverse wave speeds decrease and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes increases. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the tensile stress, transverse wave speeds increase and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes decreases. The investigation of the effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes may be used as a useful reference for the application and the design of nanoelectronic and nanodrive devices, nano-oscillators, and nanosensors, in which carbon nanotubes act as basic elements.

  16. Effect of High-Frequency Electric Field on Propagation of Electrostatic Wave in a Non-Uniform Relativistic Plasma Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kh. H. EL-SHORBAGY

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a high frequency (HF) electric field on the propagation of electrostatic wave in a 2D non-uniform relativistic plasma waveguide is investigated. A variable separation method is applied to the two-fluid plasma model. An analytical study of the reflection of electro-static wave propagation along a magnetized non-uniform relativistic plasma slab subjected to an intense HF electric field is presented and compared with the case of a non relativistic plasma. It is found that, when the frequency of the incident wave is close to the relativistic electron plasma frequency, the plasma is less reflective due to the presence of both an HF field and the effect of rel-ativistic electrons. On the other hand, for a low-frequency incident wave the reflection coefficient is directly proportional to the amplitude of the HF field. Also, it is shown that the relativistic electron plasma leads to a decrease in the value of reflection coefficient in comparison with the case of the non relativistic plasma.

  17. Effects of Higher-Order Relativistic Nonlinearity and Wakefield During a Moderately Intense Laser Pulse Propagation in a Plasma Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-Ping; LIU Bing-Bing; LIU San-Qiu; ZHANG Fu-Yang; LIU Jie

    2013-01-01

    Using a variational approach,the propagation of a moderately intense laser pulse in a parabolic preformed plasma channel is investigated.The effects of higher-order relativistic nonlinearity (HRN) and wakefield are included.The effect of HRN serves as an additional defocusing mechanism and has the same order of magnitude in the spot size as that of the transverse wakefield (TWF).The effect of longitudinal wakefield is much larger than those of HRN and TWF for an intense laser pulse with the pulse length equaling the plasma wavelength.The catastrophic focusing of the laser spot size would be prevented in the present of HRN and then it varies with periodic focusing oscillations.

  18. Improved digital backward propagation for the compensation of inter-channel nonlinear effects in polarization-multiplexed WDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Eduardo F; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Guifang

    2011-01-17

    An improved split-step method (SSM) for digital backward propagation (DBP) applicable to wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) transmission with polarization-division multiplexing (PDM) is presented. A coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations, derived from the Manakov equations, is used for DBP. The above system enables the implementation of DBP on a channel-by-channel basis, where only the effect of phase-mismatched four-wave mixing (FWM) is neglected. A novel formulation of the SSM for PDM-WDM systems is presented where new terms are included in the nonlinear step to account for inter-polarization mixing effects. In addition, the effect of inter-channel walk-off is included. This substantially reduces the computational load compared to the conventional SSM.

  19. Effects of Pre-Stress State and Propagation Velocity on Dynamic Fault Branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kame, N.; Rice, J. R.; Dmowska, R.

    2001-12-01

    Major earthquakes seldom rupture along single planar faults. Instead there exist geometric complexities, including fault bends, branches and stepovers, which affect the rupture process, including nucleation and arrest. Here we consider a mode II rupture which propagates along a planar fault and encounters an intersection with a branching fault that makes an angle with the main fault. Analyses based on elastic stress fields near propagating ruptures suggest that whether a branch path will be followed or not, and whether branching to the extensional or compressional side is favored, depend on both the rupture propagation velocity as the branch is approached and on the pre-stress state before rupture arrives. See Kame and Yamashita (GJI, 139, 345-358, 1999) and Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice (JGR subm. 2001, http://esag.harvard.edu/dmowska/PDR.pdf). The latter predicted that branching to the extensional side would be favored in all pre-stress states except for those in which the direction of maximum pre-compression Smax makes a shallow angle ψ with the fault plane. Angles ψ 45 ° result when the ratio is less than unity. Thus it is anticipated that the most favored side for rupture branching should switch from the extensional to the compressive side as we consider progressively larger σ oxx/σ oyy (which means progressively smaller ψ ). In order to test that and other predictions, we have adapted the elastodynamic boundary integral equation methodology of Kame and Yamashita to 2-dimensional Mode II ruptures along branched fault systems, to allow simulations of rupture in which the failure path is dynamically self-chosen. Failure in the modeling is described by a slip-weakening law for which the peak and residual strength, and strength at any particular amount of slip, is proportional to normal stress (-σ nn). Our current results are preliminary. Nevertheless, by comparing results for σ oxx/σ oyy = 0.8 with those for 1.4, we have established, e.g., that a 15

  20. Optical Realization of Deterministic Entanglement Concentration of Polarized Photons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yong-Jian; XIAN Liang; LI Wen-Dong; MA Li-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    @@ We propose a scheme for optical realization of deterministic entanglement concentration of polarized photons.To overcome the difficulty due to the lack of sufficiently strong interactions between photons, teleportation is employed to transfer the polarization states of two photons onto the path and polarization states of a third photon, which is made possible by the recent experimental realization of the deterministic and complete Bell state measurement. Then the required positive operator-valued measurement and further operations can be implemented deterministically by using a linear optical setup. All these are within the reach of current technology.

  1. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  2. A model experiment to assess the effects of inclusions on wave propagation in soil media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Thomas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ray, Richard P [UNIV OS SOUTH CAROLINA

    2009-01-01

    A data acquisition system has been assembled using Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology which provides a flexible data gathering capability to support recording accelerations at various locations within a sand filled 5 meter square test pit that has a depth extending into underlying gravelly soils. Dual-axis accelerometers weighing less than 1 gram each, made possible by advances in MEMS technology, are connected to up to 5 data acquisition (PXI modules) boards, each capable of controlling and recording data from 16 separate dual axis accelerometers. This data acquisition system is used to measure and record acceleration data from wave propagations that are generated by the impact of a hammer on a striker plate and are modified by an inclusion or occlusion buried in the soil media. Thirty-four two-axis accelerometers were placed at surface and embedded locations on either side of various inclusions buried in the test pit. This large number of accelerometers permits experimentally obtaining high quality spatial and temporal data that can describe the character of the generated wave-forms and the modification of those wave-forms caused by the inclusion. A number of differing materials and geometric forms are used to create inclusions in order to provide sufficient data to permit ascertaining the ability of the measurements to describe the character of the inclusion. Continuous Wavelet Transforms are used to remove background noise and to aid interpretation of the character of the generated wave-form.

  3. Modelling turbulence effects in wildland fire propagation by the randomized level-set method

    CERN Document Server

    Pagnini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence is of paramount importance in wildland fire propagation since it randomly transports the hot air mass that can pre-heat and then ignite the area ahead the fire. This contributes to give a random character to the firefront position together with other phenomena as for example fire spotting, vegetation distribution (patchiness), gaseous combustion fluctuation, small-scale terrain elevation changes. Here only turbulence is considered. The level-set method is used to numerically describe the evolution of the fireline contour that is assumed to have a random motion because of turbulence. The progression of the combustion process is then described by a level-set contour distributed according to a weight function given by the probability density function of the air particles in turbulent motion. From the comparison between the ordinary and the randomized level-set methods, it emerges that the proposed modelling approach turns out to be suitable to simulate a moving firefront fed by the ground fuel and dri...

  4. Effect of auxins and associated biochemical changes during clonal propagation of the biofuel plant - Jatropha curcas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochhar, Sunita; Singh, S.P.; Kochhar, V.K. [National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2008-12-15

    Rooting and sprouting behaviour of stem cuttings of biofuel plant Jatropha curcas and their performance under field conditions have been studied in relation to auxin application. Pretreatment with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) increased both the rooting and sprouting. Sprouting of buds on the cuttings preceded rooting. The rooting and sprouting in J. curcas was more with IBA than NAA. The endogenous auxin contents were found to increase almost 15 days prior to rooting, indicating that mobilization of auxin rather than the absolute contents of auxin may be involved in root initiation. Indole acetic acid oxidase (IAA-oxidase) seems to be involved for triggering and initiating the roots/root primordia, whereas peroxidase is involved in both root initiation and the elongation processes as supported by the peroxidase and IAA-oxidase isoenzyme analysis in the cuttings. The clonally propagated plants (cutting-raised plants) performed better in the field as compared to those raised from the seeds. The plants produced from auxin-treated cuttings produced fruits and seeds in the same year as compared to the plants raised from seeds or from untreated or control cuttings that did not produce any seeds in 1 year of this study. Jatropha plants in general produce seeds after 2-3 years. (author)

  5. Computer animation as a tool to visualize effects of seismic wave propagation inside heterogeneous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lanucara

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A technique to make computer animations representing the propagation of antiplane shear waves in heterogeneous dissipative media is presented. The aim is to develop a useful tool to better investigate the physics of site effectsin the 2D approximation. We apply this technique to real case studies that were the subject of previous papers. For each case study a movie has been made to illustrate the wavefield time evolution and its interaction with the geological structure. All the movies can be seen and downloaded at the web site http://sigfrido.ingrm.it/movies.html. The paper shows the most representative frames of movies, providing an overview of the role played by the topographic irregularities and the geometry of internal discontinuities in trapping and focusing energy. The details of the dynamics are well visualized through movies. Particular attention is devoted to the representation of simulated ground motion in sediment-filled basins under resonance conditions. Problems related to color scales and frame normalization are analysed and discussed.

  6. AGE OF STOCK PLANTS, SEASONS AND IBA EFFECT ON VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION OF ILEX PARAGUARIENSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos André Stuepp

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The low germination of Ilex paraguariensis seeds and their long reproductive cycle make cuttings propagation a good alternative for its reproduction all year round, enabling to obtain genetically superior clones. Thus, we evaluated the influence of stock plants age, plant growth regulator indole-3-butyric acid (IBA application and plant material collection in different seasons related to rooting of cuttings. From 12 and over 80-years-old trees shoots cuttings were made in four seasons, treated with IBA hydroalcoholic solution at concentrations of 0, 1500, 3000, 4500 and 6000 mg L-1. The rooting was performed in plastic boxes filled with vermiculite and carbonized rice husk at a ratio of 1:1 (v/v and, after 90 days in controlled greenhouse conditions were evaluated the rooting percentage, callus formation, survival, mortality, number of roots/cutting and length of three larger roots/cutting. Cuttings from 12-years-old stock plants have higher ability to form adventitious roots and the use of IBA did not increase rooting potential. Autumn proved to be the most favorable season for rooting, followed by spring and winter.

  7. Effects of a Solar Eclipse on the Propagation of VLF-LF Signals: Observations and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barin Kumar De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results from the measurements of some of the fundamental parameters (amplitude of sferics and transmitted signal, conductivity of lower ionosphere of the ionospheric responses to the 22 July 2009 solar eclipse (partial: 91.7% are shown. This study summarizes our results from sferics signals at 81 kHz and subionospheric transmitted signals at 19.8 and 40 kHz recorded at Agartala, Tripura (latitude: 23¢XN, longitude: 91.4¢XE. We observed significant absorption in amplitude of these signals during the eclipse period compared to their ambient values for the same period during the adjacent 7 days. The signal strength along their propagation paths was controlled by the eclipse associated decrease in ionization in the D-region of the ionosphere. Waveguide mode theory calculations show that the elevation of the height of lower ionosphere boundary of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to a value where the conductivity parameter was 106 unit. The absorption in 81 kHz sferics amplitude is high compared to the absorption in the amplitude of 40 kHz signal transmitted from Japan. The simultaneous changes in the amplitudes of sferics and in the amplitude of transmitted signals assert some sort of coupling between the upper atmosphere and the Earth¡¦s near-surface atmosphere prevailing clouds during solar eclipse.

  8. Effect of cutting diameter and hormonal application on the propagation of Ficus roxburghii Wall. through branch cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakeshwar Singh Rana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fruit gathering from Ficus roxburghii Wall., a multipurpose tree,hinders its regeneration through seed. The present study was undertaken to propagate this species using branch cuttings treated with different hormones in two different seasons: rainy-July and spring-March. In both seasons (rainy and spring, large sized (1.25-2.5 cm diameter cuttings resulted in statistically higher growth of all the studied parameters than that of small sized (< 1.25 cm diameter cuttings, except the number of shoots in both the seasonsand number of lateral roots in rainy season. The effect of hormonal treatments(Indole-acetic acid, Indole-butyric acid and Naphthyl-acetic acidwas also significant on all the studied parameters in both the study seasons except in the case of number of shoots in rainy season where the influence was not-significant. The interaction large size x IBA 100 ppm resulted in significantly better growth of the studied parameters in both seasons except for the number of lateral roots, number of shoots, shoot length and number of leaves in rainy season. This study implies that species is amenable to cloning with different hormonal treatments. In general, it was observed that growth and development of cuttings was better in spring than the rainy season.Therefore, for the successful propagation of Ficus roxburghii, largesized cuttings are to be treated with IBA 100 ppm and be planted in spring.

  9. Multi-fluid Modeling of Magnetosonic Wave Propagation in the Solar Chromosphere: Effects of Impact Ionization and Radiative Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Alvarez Laguna, Alejandro; Lani, Andrea; Poedts, Stefaan

    2017-02-01

    In order to study chromospheric magnetosonic wave propagation including, for the first time, the effects of ion–neutral interactions in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, we have developed a new multi-fluid computational model accounting for ionization and recombination reactions in gravitationally stratified magnetized collisional media. The two-fluid model used in our 2D numerical simulations treats neutrals as a separate fluid and considers charged species (electrons and ions) within the resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskiis transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations and the solenoidality of the magnetic field is enforced with a hyperbolic divergence-cleaning scheme. The initial density and temperature profiles are similar to VAL III chromospheric model in which dynamical, thermal, and chemical equilibrium are considered to ensure comparison to existing MHD models and avoid artificial numerical heating. In this initial setup we include simple homogeneous flux tube magnetic field configuration and an external photospheric velocity driver to simulate the propagation of MHD waves in the partially ionized reactive chromosphere. In particular, we investigate the loss of chemical equilibrium and the plasma heating related to the steepening of fast magnetosonic wave fronts in the gravitationally stratified medium.

  10. Computational Study of the Effect of Cortical Porosity on Ultrasound Wave Propagation in Healthy and Osteoporotic Long Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki T. Potsika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational studies on the evaluation of bone status in cases of pathologies have gained significant interest in recent years. This work presents a parametric and systematic numerical study on ultrasound propagation in cortical bone models to investigate the effect of changes in cortical porosity and the occurrence of large basic multicellular units, simply called non-refilled resorption lacunae (RL, on the velocity of the first arriving signal (FAS. Two-dimensional geometries of cortical bone are established for various microstructural models mimicking normal and pathological tissue states. Emphasis is given on the detection of RL formation which may provoke the thinning of the cortical cortex and the increase of porosity at a later stage of the disease. The central excitation frequencies 0.5 and 1 MHz are examined. The proposed configuration consists of one point source and multiple successive receivers in order to calculate the FAS velocity in small propagation paths (local velocity and derive a variation profile along the cortical surface. It was shown that: (a the local FAS velocity can capture porosity changes including the occurrence of RL with different number, size and depth of formation; and (b the excitation frequency 0.5 MHz is more sensitive for the assessment of cortical microstructure.

  11. MR imaging of heterogeneity in partially frozen brine and their effect on ultrasonic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, O.; Matsushima, J.; Suzuki, M.

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrate bearing sediment possesses unique seismic wave propagation properties. Both high seismic wave velocity and high wave attenuation are observed in methane hydrate bearing sediment. We used brine with salinity 2% in analogous to methane hydrate for conducting laboratory waveform measurement and characterization by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. When brine undergoes freezing, only pure water freezes into ice and salt remains in solution with successively increasing salinity and decreasing freezing point of the solution. Unfrozen brine is enclosed inside micro pores in ice, with exhibiting solid-liquid coexisting system. We used conventional pulse transmission technique to measure compressional wave velocity in partially frozen brine when brine is subjected cooling down to -12oC. Waveform measurement shows sudden increase in compressional wave velocity at temperature -3oC. Below -3oC, velocity increases slightly. Largest wave attenuation is observed at around -3oC. We conducted MRI experiment by using instrument Varian Unity Inova 4.7T. T1 weighted and diffusion weighted (DW) MR images were prepared by applying magnetic field gradient of 0.3 gauss/cm. We observe the spatial distribution of pores, microstructures and heterogeneity in partially frozen brine sample slices. Two dimensional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps are prepared from DW images with b-values 0 and 81 s/mm2 respectively. We estimate porosity quantitatively from each MR slices at temperature -3, -5, -7 and -12oC by using image analysis technique. Gassmann equation is applied to calculate compressional wave velocity from the porosity data and compared with the measured velocity obtained by waveform analysis technique. The NMR results show the existence of high and low mobility unfrozen brine in the pore space. MR imaging shows the heterogeneously distributed porosity values within a single slice with low porosity and high

  12. Non deterministic finite automata for power systems fault diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LINDEN, R.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an application based on finite non-deterministic automata for power systems diagnosis. Automata for the simpler faults are presented and the proposed system is compared with an established expert system.

  13. A Method to Separate Stochastic and Deterministic Information from Electrocardiograms

    CERN Document Server

    Gutíerrez, R M

    2004-01-01

    In this work we present a new idea to develop a method to separate stochastic and deterministic information contained in an electrocardiogram, ECG, which may provide new sources of information with diagnostic purposes. We assume that the ECG has information corresponding to many different processes related with the cardiac activity as well as contamination from different sources related with the measurement procedure and the nature of the observed system itself. The method starts with the application of an improuved archetypal analysis to separate the mentioned stochastic and deterministic information. From the stochastic point of view we analyze Renyi entropies, and with respect to the deterministic perspective we calculate the autocorrelation function and the corresponding correlation time. We show that healthy and pathologic information may be stochastic and/or deterministic, can be identified by different measures and located in different parts of the ECG.

  14. A proof system for asynchronously communicating deterministic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, F.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072666641; van Hulst, M.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce in this paper new communication and synchronization constructs which allow deterministic processes, communicating asynchronously via unbounded FIFO buffers, to cope with an indeterminate environment. We develop for the resulting parallel programming language, which subsumes deterministi

  15. A proof system for asynchronously communicating deterministic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, F.S.; van Hulst, M.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce in this paper new communication and synchronization constructs which allow deterministic processes, communicating asynchronously via unbounded FIFO buffers, to cope with an indeterminate environment. We develop for the resulting parallel programming language, which subsumes deterministi

  16. Sound propagation in narrow tubes including effects of viscothermal and turbulent damping with application to charge air coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Magnus; Åbom, Mats

    2009-02-01

    Charge air coolers (CACs) are used on turbocharged internal combustion engines to enhance the overall gas-exchange performance. The cooling of the charged air results in higher density and thus volumetric efficiency. It is also important for petrol engines that the knock margin increases with reduced charge air temperature. A property that is still not very well investigated is the sound transmission through a CAC. The losses, due to viscous and thermal boundary layers as well as turbulence, in the narrow cooling tubes result in frequency dependent attenuation of the transmitted sound that is significant and dependent on the flow conditions. Normally, the cross-sections of the cooling tubes are neither circular nor rectangular, which is why no analytical solution accounting for a superimposed mean flow exists. The cross-dimensions of the connecting tanks, located on each side of the cooling tubes, are large compared to the diameters of the inlet and outlet ducts. Three-dimensional effects will therefore be important at frequencies significantly lower than the cut-on frequencies of the inlet/outlet ducts. In this study the two-dimensional finite element solution scheme for sound propagation in narrow tubes, including the effect of viscous and thermal boundary layers, originally derived by Astley and Cummings [Wave propagation in catalytic converters: Formulation of the problem and finite element scheme, Journal of Sound and Vibration 188 (5) (1995) 635-657] is used to extract two-ports to represent the cooling tubes. The approximate solutions for sound propagation, accounting for viscothermal and turbulent boundary layers derived by Dokumaci [Sound transmission in narrow pipes with superimposed uniform mean flow and acoustic modelling of automobile catalytic converters, Journal of Sound and Vibration 182 (5) (1995) 799-808] and Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent shear layers, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 98 (3) (1995) 1723-1730], are

  17. Deterministic operations research models and methods in linear optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Rader, David J

    2013-01-01

    Uniquely blends mathematical theory and algorithm design for understanding and modeling real-world problems Optimization modeling and algorithms are key components to problem-solving across various fields of research, from operations research and mathematics to computer science and engineering. Addressing the importance of the algorithm design process. Deterministic Operations Research focuses on the design of solution methods for both continuous and discrete linear optimization problems. The result is a clear-cut resource for understanding three cornerstones of deterministic operations resear

  18. A Review of Deterministic Optimization Methods in Engineering and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hua Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing reliance on modeling optimization problems in practical applications, a number of theoretical and algorithmic contributions of optimization have been proposed. The approaches developed for treating optimization problems can be classified into deterministic and heuristic. This paper aims to introduce recent advances in deterministic methods for solving signomial programming problems and mixed-integer nonlinear programming problems. A number of important applications in engineering and management are also reviewed to reveal the usefulness of the optimization methods.

  19. Deterministic Consistency: A Programming Model for Shared Memory Parallelism

    OpenAIRE

    Aviram, Amittai; Ford, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    The difficulty of developing reliable parallel software is generating interest in deterministic environments, where a given program and input can yield only one possible result. Languages or type systems can enforce determinism in new code, and runtime systems can impose synthetic schedules on legacy parallel code. To parallelize existing serial code, however, we would like a programming model that is naturally deterministic without language restrictions or artificial scheduling. We propose "...

  20. A STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF RADIAL INERTIA ON THE ELASTO-PLASTIC COMBINED STRESS WAVE PROPAGATION IN THIN-WALLED TUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yongchi; Huang Chengyi; Yuan Fuping; Jin Yongmei

    2001-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of propagation characteristics of elasto-plastic combined stress waves in circular thin-walled tubes has been made. In obtaining the simple-wave solution, however,most researches have ignored the influence of the circumferential stressrelated to the radial inertial effect in the tubes. In this paper the incremental elasto-plastic constitutive relations which are convenient for dynamic numerical analysis are adopted, and the finite-difference method is used to study the evolution and propagation of elasto-plastic combined stress waves in a thin-walled tube with the radial inertial effect of the tube considered. The calculation results are compared with those obtained when the radial inertial effect is not considered. The calculation results show that the radial inertial effect of a tube has a fairly great influence on the propagation of elasto-plastic combined stress waves.