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Sample records for determining corrosion rates

  1. NDT method in determining the rate of corrosion applicable to risk based inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Hairul Hasmoni; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in oil and gas industries, refineries and chemical process plants as the equipment is often exposed to corrosive environments or elevated temperature. Important equipment need to operate safely and reliably to avoid injuries to personnel and the public, and to prevent loss time and cost incurred due to loss of production and shutdown. The paper assess the approach in evaluating the technique of non-destructive testing (NDT) using Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in determining the rate of corrosion and remaining life of equipment applicable to Risk Based Inspection (RBI). Methods in determining the corrosion rate are presented using analytical method. Examples and data from MINT chiller water pipeline are presented to illustrate the application of these methods. (Author)

  2. An experimental comparison of three wire beam electrode based methods for determining corrosion rates and patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Y.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to examine the advantages and limitations of three wire beam electrode (WBE) based techniques, including the noise resistance R n -WBE method, the overpotential-galvanic current method, and the galvanic current method, in determining corrosion rates and patterns. These techniques have been applied simultaneously to several selected corrosion systems of different characteristics. It has been found that the R n -WBE method has advantages over other WBE based methods when applying to WBE surfaces under uniform corrosion. However, the R n -WBE method has been found to be unsuitable for low noise level corrosion systems. It has also been found that both R n -WBE and overpotential-galvanic current methods are similarly applicable to WBE surfaces under nonuniform corrosion. However, the galvanic current method has been found to be suitable only for WBE surfaces under highly localised corrosion. Some related issues regarding R n calculation such as trend removal and its effects on corrosion mapping have also been discussed

  3. Determination of the corrosion rate of zinc by measuring the polarization resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeschenbleck, B.; Koenig, W.

    1982-01-01

    Zinc is an important common metal. It should be noticeably attacked just by water as a result of its basic character. However, this is not the case, firstly because it tends to form protective layers and furthermore pure zinc has a high hydrogen overpressure. Zinc is often used as cathodic protection of iron. In order to assess the protective effect, the corrosion rate depending on the pH-value is important. A report is given here on the problems involved in determining these values. (orig./RW) [de

  4. Reliability of Electrochemical Techniques for Determining Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2007-01-01

    if the biofilm in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemicel impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from H2S solutions, biological sulfide media, and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected, and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutins was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data, resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured using electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased...

  5. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtas, H.

    2004-01-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate

  6. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  7. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  8. Comparison between the corrosion forecast based on the potential measurement and the determination of the corrosion rate of the reinforcement bar by means of electrochemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaneda, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The ASTA4 876-91 standard establishes a corrosion forecast of concrete reinforced bar by measuring the electrochemical potential. This forecast is based on thermodynamic considerations without taking into account the kinetic of the corrosion process. A comparison was made between the results obtained based on this standard and others using electrochemical techniques (Tafel, Rp, EIS, Electrochemical Noise. These techniques allows to obtain the corrosion rate in samples having 0.4, 0.5 and 0.66 water/cement ratios submitted to salt spray outdoors and by immersion in 3% saline solution during a test time of 20 months. Differences were detected between the results obtained using the ASTM standard and the electrochemical techniques used. The main difference is that samples submitted to immersion shows a higher probability of corrosion than samples submitted to salt spray; however, the electrochemical techniques showed the contrary concerning the corrosion kinetic process .A comparison respecting corrosion rate was also made between the results obtained by the different electrochemical techniques. It is very well known that all electrochemical techniques supposed always general corrosion except electrochemical noise. Using the technique the pitting index can be calculated. It shows that localized corrosion is the most predominant

    La norma ASTM 876-91 establece un pronóstico de corrosión de la barra de refuerzo del hormigón armado mediante la determinación de potenciales electroquímicos. Este pronóstico se basa en consideraciones termodinámicas, sin tener en cuenta la cinética del proceso de corrosión. Se comparan los resultados obtenidos aplicando esta norma con técnicas electroquímicas (Tafel, Rp, EIS, Ruido Electroquímico que permiten calcular la velocidad de corrosión en probetas con relaciones agua/cemento 0,4, 0,5 y 0,66 sometidas a niebla salina en condiciones naturales y en inmersión en solución salina al 3% durante un

  9. Determination of Erosion/Corrosion Rates in Hanford Tank Farms Radioactive Waste Transfer System Pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, D. J.; Girardot, C. L.; Wilson, E. R.; Page, J. A.; Engeman, J. K.; Gunter, J. R.; Johnson, J. M.; Baide, D. G.; Cooke, G. A.; Larson, J. D.; Castleberry, J. L.; Boomer, K. D.

    2015-01-01

    The twenty-eight double-shell underground radioactive waste storage tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, WA are interconnected by the Waste Transfer System network of buried steel encased pipelines and pipe jumpers in below-grade pits. The pipeline material is stainless steel or carbon steel in 51 mm to 152 mm (2 in. to 6 in.) sizes. The pipelines carry slurries ranging up to 20 volume percent solids and supernatants with less than one volume percent solids at velocities necessary to prevent settling. The pipelines, installed between 1976 and 2011, were originally intended to last until the 2028 completion of the double-shell tank storage mission. The mission has been subsequently extended. In 2010 the Tank Operating Contractor began a systematic evaluation of the Waste Transfer System pipeline conditions applying guidelines from API 579-1/ASME FFS-1 (2007), Fitness-For-Service. Between 2010 and 2014 Fitness-for-Service examinations of the Waste Transfer System pipeline materials, sizes, and components were completed. In parallel, waste throughput histories were prepared allowing side-by-side pipeline wall thinning rate comparisons between carbon and stainless steel, slurries and supernatants and throughput volumes. The work showed that for transfer volumes up to 6.1E+05 m"3 (161 million gallons), the highest throughput of any pipeline segment examined, there has been no detectable wall thinning in either stainless or carbon steel pipeline material regardless of waste fluid characteristics or throughput. The paper describes the field and laboratory evaluation methods used for the Fitness-for-Service examinations, the results of the examinations, and the data reduction methodologies used to support Hanford Waste Transfer System pipeline wall thinning conclusions.

  10. Determination of Erosion/Corrosion Rates in Hanford Tank Farms Radioactive Waste Transfer System Pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washenfelder, D. J.; Girardot, C. L.; Wilson, E. R.; Page, J. A.; Engeman, J. K.; Gunter, J. R.; Johnson, J. M.; Baide, D. G.; Cooke, G. A.; Larson, J. D.; Castleberry, J. L.; Boomer, K. D.

    2015-11-05

    The twenty-eight double-shell underground radioactive waste storage tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site near Richland, WA are interconnected by the Waste Transfer System network of buried steel encased pipelines and pipe jumpers in below-grade pits. The pipeline material is stainless steel or carbon steel in 51 mm to 152 mm (2 in. to 6 in.) sizes. The pipelines carry slurries ranging up to 20 volume percent solids and supernatants with less than one volume percent solids at velocities necessary to prevent settling. The pipelines, installed between 1976 and 2011, were originally intended to last until the 2028 completion of the double-shell tank storage mission. The mission has been subsequently extended. In 2010 the Tank Operating Contractor began a systematic evaluation of the Waste Transfer System pipeline conditions applying guidelines from API 579-1/ASME FFS-1 (2007), Fitness-For-Service. Between 2010 and 2014 Fitness-for-Service examinations of the Waste Transfer System pipeline materials, sizes, and components were completed. In parallel, waste throughput histories were prepared allowing side-by-side pipeline wall thinning rate comparisons between carbon and stainless steel, slurries and supernatants and throughput volumes. The work showed that for transfer volumes up to 6.1E+05 m3 (161 million gallons), the highest throughput of any pipeline segment examined, there has been no detectable wall thinning in either stainless or carbon steel pipeline material regardless of waste fluid characteristics or throughput. The paper describes the field and laboratory evaluation methods used for the Fitness-for-Service examinations, the results of the examinations, and the data reduction methodologies used to support Hanford Waste Transfer System pipeline wall thinning conclusions.

  11. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion......Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  12. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Samuel L., E-mail: szelinka@fs.fed.u [USDA Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sichel, Rebecca J. [College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stone, Donald S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. {yields} Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. {yields} Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 {mu}m year{sup -1}. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 {sup o}C at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  13. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  14. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  15. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  16. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  17. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports

  18. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  19. Corrosion rate transients observed by linear polarization techniques at Zr-1%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, J.; Cerny, K.

    1997-01-01

    Momentary corrosion rate of Zr-1%Nb alloy during nonisothermal autoclave experiments at temperature up to 328 deg. C in various solutions was determined by T/R p values (T - absolute temperature, R p - polarization resistance), multiplied by temperature independent conversion factor. This factor was found by comparison of conventional corrosion loss evaluation with electrochemical measurements. Corrosion rate transients in boric acid solutions and in lithium hydroxide differed significantly. Great differences were also found in stabilized corrosion rates at the end of experiments. Temperature irregularities caused considerable changes in corrosion rate. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  20. Corrosion rate transients observed by linear polarization techniques at Zr-1%Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beran, J; Cerny, K [ZJS SKODA plc., Pelzen (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Momentary corrosion rate of Zr-1%Nb alloy during nonisothermal autoclave experiments at temperature up to 328 deg. C in various solutions was determined by T/R{sub p} values (T - absolute temperature, R{sub p}- polarization resistance), multiplied by temperature independent conversion factor. This factor was found by comparison of conventional corrosion loss evaluation with electrochemical measurements. Corrosion rate transients in boric acid solutions and in lithium hydroxide differed significantly. Great differences were also found in stabilized corrosion rates at the end of experiments. Temperature irregularities caused considerable changes in corrosion rate. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab.

  1. The Leakage determination on corrosion fretting machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Hafid, Abdul; Febrianto; Prasetio, Joko; Abtokhi; Sumarno, Edy; Handoyo, Ismu; Hidayati, Nur Rahmah; Histori

    1998-01-01

    Fretting machine is an experimental loop to learn fretting corrosion phenomena wich is caused by loading and vibration. On the steam generator, one of the corrosion process that's occurred, it can be caused by vibration between tubes and bending material. Because of high flow rate inside the tube, the high frequency vibration will appeared so it can make the corrosion on bending material more faster. This process can be simulate by fretting machine. This machine has already damage because of leakage. So it will be repaired by dismantling, radiography testing and redrawing. from the result of radiography, the leakage is caused by cracking on bellows seals of the dynamic main support

  2. Corrosion rate of steel in concrete - Evaluation of confinement techniques for on-site corrosion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica; Elsener, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Earlier on-site investigations and laboratory studies have shown that varying corrosion rates are obtained when different commercially available instruments are used. The different confinement techniques, rather than the different electrochemical techniques used in the instruments, are considered...... to be the main reason for the discrepancies. This paper presents a method for the quantitative assessment of confinement techniques based on monitoring the operation of the corrosion rate instrument and the current distribution between the electrode assembly on the concrete surface and a segmented reinforcement...... bar embedded in the concrete. The applicability of the method was demonstrated on two commercially available corrosion rate instruments based on different confinement techniques. The method provided an explanation of the differences in performance of the two instruments. Correlated measurements...

  3. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: II. Swamp Sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henki Ashadi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A polluted environment will influence the building age. The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals within the sludge swamp area with the corrosion rate of steel concrete. Corrosion in steel concrete usually occur in acid area which contain of SO42-, Cl- and NO3-. The research treatment used by emerging ST 37 andST 60 within 60 days in 'polluted' sludge swamp area. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp sludge were made by increasing the concentration a corrosive unsure up to 1X, 5X and 10X. The corrosion rate measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that sulphate had a greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by chloride and nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 was 17.58 mpy and for ST 60 was 12.47 mpy.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Corrosion Rate Prediction Models Utilized for Reinforced Concrete Affected by Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamphukdee, Kanjana; Collins, Frank; Zou, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion is one of the major causes of premature deterioration in reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Given the high maintenance and replacement costs, accurate modeling of RC deterioration is indispensable for ensuring the optimal allocation of limited economic resources. Since corrosion rate is one of the major factors influencing the rate of deterioration, many predictive models exist. However, because the existing models use very different sets of input parameters, the choice of model for RC deterioration is made difficult. Although the factors affecting corrosion rate are frequently reported in the literature, there is no published quantitative study on the sensitivity of predicted corrosion rate to the various input parameters. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analysis of the input parameters for nine selected corrosion rate prediction models. Three different methods of analysis are used to determine and compare the sensitivity of corrosion rate to various input parameters: (i) univariate regression analysis, (ii) multivariate regression analysis, and (iii) sensitivity index. The results from the analysis have quantitatively verified that the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement bars in RC structures is highly sensitive to corrosion duration time, concrete resistivity, and concrete chloride content. These important findings establish that future empirical models for predicting corrosion rate of RC should carefully consider and incorporate these input parameters.

  5. Determination of Corrosion Rate of Artificial Bone Made of Metal at Different pH Conditions using X-Ray Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutikno; Handayani, L.; Edi, S. S.; Susilo; Elvira

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to observe the mechanism and the rate of corrosion of artificial bone made of metal by using x-ray radiography technique. Artificial bones can be made of metallic materials and composites which are biomaterials. The most commonly used metal for bone graft is stainless steel. The interaction between artificial bone and human tissue will have important medical impacts that need to be observed and examined. This interaction can be a mechanical or chemical interaction. X-ray radiography technique is selected because it uses non-destructive method. This method is done by x-ray radiation exposure on the observed body part. The bone density and bone fracture can be seen on the resulted radiographic film or image on the monitor screen.

  6. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  7. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  8. The Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Sodium Nitrite Using an On-line Corrosion Rate Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mal-Yong; Kang, Dae-Jin; Moon, Jeon-Soo

    2015-01-01

    An on-line corrosion rate measurement system was developed using a personal computer, a data acquisition board and program, and a 2-electrode corrosion probe. Reliability of the developed system was confirmed with through comparison test. With this system, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) as a corrosion inhibitor were studied on iron and aluminum brass that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Corrosion rate was measured based on the linear polarization resistance method. The corrosion rates of aluminum brass and iron in 1% NaCl solutions were measured to be 0.290 mm per year (mmpy) and 0.2134 mmpy, respectively. With the addition of 200 ppm of NO 2 - , the corrosion rates decreased to 0.0470 mmpy and 0.0254 mmpy. The addition of NO 2 - caused a decrease in corrosion rates of both aluminum brass and iron, yet the NO 2 - acted as a more effective corrosion inhibitor for iron. than aluminum brass

  9. Prediction of corrosion rates of water distribution pipelines according to aggressive corrosive water in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W S; Yu, M J; Lee, H D

    2004-01-01

    The drinking water network serving Korea has been used for almost 100 years. Therefore, pipelines have suffered various degrees of deterioration due to aggressive environments. The pipe breaks were caused by in-external corrosion, water hammer, surface loading, etc. In this paper, we focused on describing corrosion status in water distribution pipes in Korea and reviewing some methods to predict corrosion rates. Results indicate that corrosive water of lakes was more aggressive than river water and the winter was more aggressive compared to other seasons. The roughness growth rates of Dongbok lake showed 0.23 mm/year. The high variation of corrosion rates is controlled by the aging pipes and smaller diameter. Also the phenolphthalein test on a cementitious core of cement mortar lined ductile cast iron pipe indicated the pipes over 15 years old had lost 50-100% of their lime active cross sectional area.

  10. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: I. Swamp Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyoweni Widanarko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of infrastructures using steel concrete to reinforce the strength of concrete. Steel concrete is so vulnerable to chemical compounds that can cause corrosion. It can happen due to the presence of chemical compounds in acid environment in low pH level. These chemical compounds are SO42-, Cl-, NO3-. There are many swamp area in Indonesia. The acid contents and the concentration of ion sulphate, chlorides, and nitrate are higher in the swamp water than in the ground water .The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals in the swamp water to the steel concrete corrosion rate. There were two treatment used: (1 emerging ST 37 and ST 60 within 60 days in the 'polluted' swamp water, (2 moving the ST 37 up and down periodically in the ' polluted' swamp water. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp water were made by increasing the concentration of corrosive chemical up to 1X, 5X and 10X respectively. The corrosion rate was measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that chloride had the greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by sulphate and Nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 is 24.29 mpy and for ST 60 is 22.76 mpy. By moving the sample up and down, the corrosion rate of ST 37 increase up to 37.59 mpy, and chloride still having the greatest influence, followed by sulphate and nitrate.

  11. Risk Analysis using Corrosion Rate Parameter on Gas Transmission Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikirono, B.; Kim, S. J.; Haryadi, G. D.; Huda, A.

    2017-05-01

    In the oil and gas industry, the pipeline is a major component in the transmission and distribution process of oil and gas. Oil and gas distribution process sometimes performed past the pipeline across the various types of environmental conditions. Therefore, in the transmission and distribution process of oil and gas, a pipeline should operate safely so that it does not harm the surrounding environment. Corrosion is still a major cause of failure in some components of the equipment in a production facility. In pipeline systems, corrosion can cause failures in the wall and damage to the pipeline. Therefore it takes care and periodic inspections or checks on the pipeline system. Every production facility in an industry has a level of risk for damage which is a result of the opportunities and consequences of damage caused. The purpose of this research is to analyze the level of risk of 20-inch Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline using Risk-based inspection semi-quantitative based on API 581 associated with the likelihood of failure and the consequences of the failure of a component of the equipment. Then the result is used to determine the next inspection plans. Nine pipeline components were observed, such as a straight pipes inlet, connection tee, and straight pipes outlet. The risk assessment level of the nine pipeline’s components is presented in a risk matrix. The risk level of components is examined at medium risk levels. The failure mechanism that is used in this research is the mechanism of thinning. Based on the results of corrosion rate calculation, remaining pipeline components age can be obtained, so the remaining lifetime of pipeline components are known. The calculation of remaining lifetime obtained and the results vary for each component. Next step is planning the inspection of pipeline components by NDT external methods.

  12. Chemistry of the aqueous medium - Determining factor of corrosion in carbon steel components of secondary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, M.; Pirvan, I.; Dinu, A.; Velciu, L.

    2003-01-01

    The interplay of chemistry of aqueous medium and corrosion processes followed by deposition and/or release of corrosion products determines both formation and growth of superficial films as well as the kinetics of ion release from materials into the aqueous medium. Material corrosion in the secondary circuit of a NPP can be minimized by choosing the materials of the components and by a rigorous inspection of the chemistry of aqueous agent. The chemical inspection helps in minimizing: - the corrosion of the components immersed in feedwater and vapor and of Steam Generator components; - 'dirtying' of the systems particularly of the surfaces implied in heat transfer; - the amount of insoluble chemical species resulting in corrosion process and carried along the circuit; - the corrosion of secondary circuit components during revisions or outages. An important role among the chemical parameters of the fluids circulated in NPP tubing appears to be the pH. In CANDU reactors it must be kept within the range of 8.7 to 9.4 by treating the medium with volatile amines (morpholine and cyclohexylamine). A plot is presented giving the corrosion rate of carbon steels as a function of the pH of the medium. Besides, the oxygen concentration dissolved in the aqueous medium must be maintained under 5 μg per water kg. Other factors determining the corrosion rates are also discussed. The paper gives the results of the experiments done with various materials, solutions and analysis methods

  13. Chromium steel corrosion rates and mechanisms in aqueous nickel chloride at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, J.E.; Broomfield, J.P.; Mitra, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of PWR steam generator carbon steel support structures and consequential denting of steam generator tubes led to investigation of alternative support designs and materials. In recent designs of steam generators the carbon steel drilled hole tube support plate has been replaced by one of quatrefoil or trefoil shape to minimize the contact area. These plates are now made of more corrosion resistant chromium steel (approx. 12%Cr) to ensure that they are less vulnerable to attack in the event of adverse boiler water chemistry. This study was initiated to examine the corrosion behavior of a range of chromium steels in the acid chloride environments characteristic of tube/support plate crevices under adverse boiler water conditions. Objectives of the study were to: 1) determine the relative susceptibility of candidate tube support plate steels to acid chloride corrosion; 2) investigate the corrosion product morphology and its relationship to the corrosion mechanism; 3) determine the effect of environment aggressiveness on 12%Cr (A405) steel corrosion rates and mechanisms; and 4) investigate the effect of restraint stress/environment on denting potential of A405. Experimental method and results are discussed

  14. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.; Takiguchi, H.

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. It is considered that solubility is the most important factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on FAC. In the present study, effect of specific oxide on FAC rate was studied from the thermodynamic solubility of iron. The effects of temperature and pH on the iron solubility were evaluated by taking into consideration hydrolysis reactions of ferrous iron, dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and charge balance. The correlation between the iron solubility and FAC behavior was evaluated by using the normalized mass transfer coefficient. It is clarified that the product of iron solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and normalized mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate presence of magnetite on the surface of carbon steel. Diffusion of iron from the saturated layer determines the FAC rate from water chemistry aspect. (author)

  15. Influence of LMFBR fuel pin temperature profiles on corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Schrock, S.L.; Orbon, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the sodium corrosion behavior of 20 percent cold worked Type 316 stainless steel fuel pin cladding under a simulated reactor thermal environment. A temperature gradient, typical of a fuel pin, was generated in a 0.9 m long heater section by direct resistance heating. Specimens were located in an isothermal test section immediately downstream of the heater. A comparison of the measured corrosion rates with available data showed an enhancement factor of between 1.5 and 2 which was attributed to the severe axial temperature gradient through the heater. Differences in structure and surface chemistry were also noted

  16. The THIRST chemistry module as a tool to determine optimal steam generator corrosion control strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heppner, K.; Laroche, S.; Pietralik, J.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a coordinated program, AECL is developing a set of tools to aid with the prediction and management of steam generator performance. Although stress corrosion cracking (of Alloy 800) has not been detected in any operating steam generator, for life management it is necessary to develop mechanistic models to predict the conditions under which stress corrosion cracking is plausible. Therefore, constant extension rate tests were carried out for Alloy 800 under various steam generator crevice chemistry conditions at applied potentials. These tests were designed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy 800 under CANDU( steam generator operating conditions. Based on the experimental results, the recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zone for Alloy 800 determined by electrochemical polarization measurements was verified with the respect of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The effects of lead contamination on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy 800 tubing were also evaluated. The experimental results from constant extension rate tests obtained under applied potentials suggest that Alloy 800 has good performance inside much of a previously recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zone determined by electrochemical analysis. Alloy 800 is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under normal CANDU steam generator operating conditions. However, Alloy 800 may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under near-neutral crevice chemistry conditions in the presence of oxidants. In addition, stress corrosion cracking susceptibility is increased by lead contamination. This observation suggests that the previously defined electrochemical corrosion potential limit under near-neutral crevice conditions could be modified to minimize stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 800. The test results from this work also suggest that the pH dependency of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy 800

  17. Corrosion rate of nuclear glass in saturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillet, S.; Vernaz, E.; Nogues, J.L.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1986-01-01

    Leaching experiments under a static mode have shown that, after a given time, the concentration of the solubilized elements reaches an apparent steady state which can be detected by a plateau in the curve of cumulated leach rates vs time. Since the real slope of this plateau is a key datum to modernize the source term, works related to the evaluation of this slope and based on a statistical approach have been necessary. Twelve static leaching experiments carried out for one year at 90 0 C were scrutinized. Various glasses, both active and nonactive, akin to the LWR French reference glass were involved. Previously, an abnormally high corrosion rate had been found after 12 months of testing. This feature could have been interpreted as a further leaching step occuring after the plateau period. The corrosion rates at 90 0 C with deionized water are compared to those gained from integral tests at 90 0 C

  18. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.

    2011-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of the carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in the coolant systems of the power plants. FAC is influenced by the composition of the material, the flow condition, temperature, and the water chemistry conditions. It is considered that the solubility of iron (Fe) is the most important factor in the water chemistry parameters affecting FAC. In the present study, the effects of temperature and pH on the Fe solubility were evaluated in consideration of the hydrolysis reactions of the ferrous iron, the dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and the charge balance. The correlation between the Fe solubility and the FAC behavior was discussed. It has been suggested that the product of the Fe solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and the mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate the presence of the magnetite on the surface of the carbon steel. Diffusion of the Fe from the saturated layer to the bulk solution determines the FAC rate from the water chemistry aspect.

  19. Prediction of pipeline corrosion rate based on grey Markov models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Peng Guichu; Wang Yuemin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model that combined by grey model and Markov model, the prediction of corrosion rate of nuclear power pipeline was studied. Works were done to improve the grey model, and the optimization unbiased grey model was obtained. This new model was used to predict the tendency of corrosion rate, and the Markov model was used to predict the residual errors. In order to improve the prediction precision, rolling operation method was used in these prediction processes. The results indicate that the improvement to the grey model is effective and the prediction precision of the new model combined by the optimization unbiased grey model and Markov model is better, and the use of rolling operation method may improve the prediction precision further. (authors)

  20. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible

  1. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoulil, J., E-mail: jan.stoulil@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Parschová, H. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Novák, P. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  2. An Electrochemical Method to Predict Corrosion Rates in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafter, M. R. [Hunter Water Australia Pty Ltd, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Linear polarization resistance (LPR) testing of soils has been used extensively by a number of water utilities across Australia for many years now to determine the condition of buried ferrous water mains. The LPR test itself is a relatively simple, inexpensive test that serves as a substitute for actual exhumation and physical inspection of buried water mains to determine corrosion losses. LPR testing results (and the corresponding pit depth estimates) in combination with proprietary pipe failure algorithms can provide a useful predictive tool in determining the current and future conditions of an asset{sup 1)}. A number of LPR tests have been developed on soil by various researchers over the years{sup 1)}, but few have gained widespread commercial use, partly due to the difficulty in replicating the results. This author developed an electrochemical cell that was suitable for LPR soil testing and utilized this cell to test a series of soil samples obtained through an extensive program of field exhumations. The objective of this testing was to examine the relationship between short-term electrochemical testing and long-term in-situ corrosion of buried water mains, utilizing an LPR test that could be robustly replicated. Forty-one soil samples and related corrosion data were obtained from ad hoc condition assessments of buried water mains located throughout the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia. Each sample was subjected to the electrochemical test developed by the author, and the resulting polarization data were compared with long-term pitting data obtained from each water main. The results of this testing program enabled the author to undertake a comprehensive review of the LPR technique as it is applied to soils and to examine whether correlations can be made between LPR testing results and long-term field corrosion.

  3. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  4. Estimation of flow rates through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flow rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  5. Standard guide for determining corrosivity of crude oils

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide presents some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for determining the corrosivity of crude oil. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather a range of approaches that have found application in evaluating the corrosivity of crude oil. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in crude oil corrosivity evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide does not address the change in oil/water ratio caused by accumulation of water at low points in a pipeline system. 1.5 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for determining the corrosivity of crude oil under conditions in which water is present in the liquid state (typically up to 100°C). These conditions normally occur during oil and gas production, storage, and transportation in the pipelines. 1.6 This guide does not cover the evaluation of corrosivity of crude oil at higher temperatures (typically above 300°C) that oc...

  6. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  7. Determination of the corrosion mechanisms of high level waste containing glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradt, R.; Roggendorf, H.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the reported work was to determine the corrosion behaviour of the inactive HLW glass SM 58 LW 11 in Q-solution at temperatures up to 200 0 C and elevated pressures up to 13 MPa. In particular, a parametric study on the effects of time, temperature, pressure, crystallization, metallic impurities a.o. was performed. Further tests helped to identify the rate determining steps in the entire process and the most likely long-term corrosion law. (orig./RB)

  8. A finite element modeling method for predicting long term corrosion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.W.; Chan, S.

    1984-01-01

    For the analyses of galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, which have been identified as possible corrosion processes for nuclear waste isolation, a finite element method has been developed for the prediction of corrosion rates. The method uses a finite element mesh to model the corrosive environment and the polarization curves of metals are assigned as the boundary conditions to calculate the corrosion cell current distribution. A subroutine is used to calculate the chemical change with time in the crevice or the pit environments. In this paper, the finite element method is described along with experimental confirmation

  9. Development and evaluation of an instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, F.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M. W.; Roe, D. K.

    1985-06-01

    A research program was carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) was developed and evaluated, and equipment was constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first task, the ACRM was developed and tested in flow chambers in which relative humidity and gaseous and particulate pollutant levels can be controlled. Diurnal cycles and periods of rain were simulated. The effects of aerosols were studied. A computerized system was used for collection, storage, and analysis of the electrochemical data. In the second task, a relatively inexpensive electronics system for control of the ACRM and measurement of atmospheric corrosion rates was designed and built. In the third task, calibration of deterioration rates of various metallic and nonmetallic materials with the response of the ACRMs attached to these materials was carried out under controlled environmental conditions using the system developed in the second task. A Quality Assurance project plan was prepared with inputs from the Rockwell International Environmental Monitoring and Service Center and Quality Assurance System audits were performed.

  10. A new corrosion sensor to determine the start and development of embedded rebar corrosion process at coastal concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-09-30

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  11. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Jin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  12. The use of different techniques for determination of pitting corrosion potential of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskelinen, P.; Forsen, O.; Onnela, J.; Ylaesaari, S.; Haenninen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Three different techniques for pitting corrosion potential measurement on austenitic stainless steel (Fe18Cr10Ni) were compared: conventional polarization method, a new Avesta electrochemical corrosion measurement cell and a scratch technique. Special attention was paid to the effects of crevice corrosion during pitting corrosion potential measurement and to their elimination. Development of a rapid test technique for reliable pitting corrosion potential determination was aimed at and resulted from comparison of the different techniques

  13. Stress corrosion crack growth rate in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M. P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A. M.; Perosanz, F. J.; Navas, M.

    2000-01-01

    Dissimilar welds, used to join different sections in light water reactors, are potentially susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous mediums characteristic of nuclear plants. However, the study of these The ma has been limited to evaluating the weld material susceptibility in these mediums. Little scarce data are available on crack growth rates due, fundamentally, to inadequate testing techniques. In order to address this lack of information the crack growth rate at the interface of ferritic SA 533 B-1 alloy and alloy I-82, in a dissimilar weld (SA533B-1/I-82/316L), was studied. Experiments were conducted in water at 288 degree centigrade, 8 ppm of O 2 and 1 μS/cm conductivity. (Author) 33 refs

  14. The Secant Rate of Corrosion: Correlating Observations of the USS Arizona Submerged in Pearl Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald L.; DeAngelis, Robert J.; Medlin, Dana J.; Johnson, Jon E.; Carr, James D.; Conlin, David L.

    2018-03-01

    Contrary to previous linear projections of steel corrosion in seawater, analysis of an inert marker embedded in USS Arizona concretion since the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor reveals evidence that the effective corrosion rate decreases with time. The secant rate of corrosion, or SRC correlation, derived from this discovery could have a significant impact on failure analysis investigations for concreted shipwrecks or underwater structures. The correlation yields a lower rate of metal thinning than predicted. Development of the correlation is described.

  15. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics. Relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    Systematic approaches to evaluate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. First, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with two coupled models: 1.static electrochemical analysis and 2.dynamic oxide layer growth analysis. The anodic current density and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram. The ferrous ion release rate, determined by the anodic current density, was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic oxide layer growth model and then its value was used as input in the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results (corrosion rate and ECP) based on the coupled models were in good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP.

  16. Effect of steam corrosion on core post strength loss: I. Low, chronic steam ingress rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of chronic, low levels of steam ingress into the primary system of the HTGR on the corrosion, and consequent strength loss of the core support posts. The assessment proceeded through the following three steps: (1) The impurity composition in the primary system was estimated as a function of a range of steady ingress rates of from 0.001 to 1.0 g/sec, both by means of an analysis of the Dragon steam ingress experiment and a computer code, TIMOX, which treats the primary system as a well-mixed pot. (2) The core post burnoffs which result from 40-year exposures to these determined impurity atmospheres were then estimated using a corrosion rate expression derived from published ATJ-graphite corrosion rate data. Burnoffs were determined for both the core posts at the nominal and the maximum sustained temperature, estimated to be 90 0 C above nominal. (3) The final step involved assessment of the degree of strength loss resulting from the estimated burnoffs. An empirical equation was developed for this purpose which compares reasonably well with strength loss data for a number of different graphites and specimen geometries

  17. Effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Hoffman, N.J.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a large water leak into the sodium side of a steam generator in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) at Canoga Park, California, is performing a series of tests in a Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR). This test series involves heating a large steam generator that possibly contains localized pockets of aqueous caustic retained from a previous sodium-water reaction. Such pockets of caustic solution could be in contact with welds and other components that contain residual stresses up to the yield point. The LMEC and General Electric (GE) ran a series of tests to evaluate the effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for alloys either used or considered for the LLTR. A summary of the temperatures and caustic concentration ranges that can result in caustic SCC for carbon steel and Type-304 stainless steel is given

  18. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment,

  19. Effect of caffeine inhibitor in corrosion rate and microstructure of KS01 carbon steel and AISI 1045 at media sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulistioso Giat S; Setyo Purwanto; Deswita; Ari Handayani; Berta Vidyananda

    2013-01-01

    Many synthetic materials are good inhibitors for the prevention of corrosion . Many inhibitors are toxic, because of the influence of these toxic properties, recently use organic materials as corrosion inhibitors, that are not hazardous and environmentally friendly. In this study caffeine compounds used as corrosion inhibitors. This compound could be used as corrosion inhibitor because of the existence of their chemical groups that containing free electron pair, that is nitrogen. Corrosion rate testing conducted in sea water medium taken from the Northern region of Indramayu with variations of the concentration of caffeine 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 ppm to determine the optimum concentration of caffeine in corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045 and KS01 that a widely used on the cooling system in the industry. Corrosion rate of KS-01 steel before used in inhibitor media is 25,07 mpy that less than corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045, is 45,82 mpy . The results of this study indicate that caffeine is able to inhibit the corrosion rate of both of samples with optimum efficiency KS01 for 64.38%, and AISI 1045 of 66.63%. The optimum concentration of caffeine to inhibited AISI 1045 is 150 ppm and for KS01 is 100 ppm,. Beside that analysis of microstructure for both samples have done, for media before and after inhibitor addition. (author)

  20. Determination of sulfur isotopic composition for the study of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, in anoxic corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grousset, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The first goal of this project was to develop a methodology based on the study of the sulfur isotopic composition enabling the determination of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, within the corrosion products layers (CPL). Then, the aim was to apply this methodology to real corrosion systems in order to determine the mechanisms of iron sulfides formation. Sulfur isotopic analyses methodologies, adapted to micrometric iron sulfides layers observed in real corrosion systems, were developed in nanoSIMS and ToF-SIMS. The study of iron sulfides formed in anoxic carbonated medium with or without sulphate-reducing bacteria validated the use of these methods for the determination of iron sulfides origin. The application of these methods coupled with the precise characterization of irons sulfides formed in the real corrosion systems show two kind of corrosion pattern. In pattern 1, the iron sulfides are localized in the external part of the CPL. They result from the Fe 2+ migration from the metal surface to areas rich in biotic S 2- . In this pattern, corrosion rates are lower than 20 μm/year for laboratory systems, and lower than 5 μm/year for archaeological objects. In pattern 2, the large presence of conductive phases in the CPL results in the delocalization of electrons, and so a disequilibrium of the charges at the metal's surface. That leads to the migration of biotic S 2- in the CPL till the metal where they precipitate in iron sulphides. This pattern shows high corrosion rates (∼100 μm/an) that might be resulting from the accumulation of bio-corrosion and chloride corrosion mechanisms. (author) [fr

  1. Corrosion potential detection method, potential characteristic simulation method for reaction rate and plant monitoring system using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Onaka, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    In a calculation controlling device for a plant monitoring system, concentrations of materials concerning reaction materials in a certain state of a reaction process, and an actually measured value for the potential of a material in this state are substituted into a reaction rate equation obtained in accordance with a reaction process model. With such procedures, a relation between the reaction rate (current value) and the potential of the material can be obtained. A potential at which the reaction rates of an anode reaction and a cathode reaction contained in a corrosion reaction are made equal is determined by a numerical value calculation, based on an electrochemical hybrid potential logic by using the reaction rate equation, the reaction rate information relative to the corrosion reaction of the material and the concentration of the material concerning the corrosion reaction is obtained by a numerical value calculation. Then, simulation for the corrosion potential is enabled based on the handling corresponding to the actual reaction. Further, even for a portion which can not be measured actually, the corrosion potential can be recognized by simulation. (N.H.)

  2. High temperature corrosion in straw-fired power plants: Influence of steam/metal temperature on corrosion rates for TP347H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Biede, O; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion in straw-fired boilers has been investigated at various straw-fired power plants in Denmark. Water/air-cooled probes, a test superheater and test sections removed from the actual superheater have been utilised to characterise corrosion and corrosion rates. This paper describes...... the corrosion rates measured for the TP347H type steel. The corrosion morphology at high temperature consists of grain boundary attack and selective attack of chromium. The corrosion rate increases with calculated metal temperature (based on steam temperature), however there is great variation within....... The difference in the results could be traced back to a lower flue gas temperature on one side of the boiler. Although metal temperature is the most important parameter with respect to corrosion rate, flue gas temperature also plays an important role. Efforts to quantify the effect of flue gas temperature...

  3. EFFECT OF RATIO OF SURFACE AREA ON THE CORROSION RATE

    OpenAIRE

    Dody Prayitno; M. Irsyad

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and steel are used to be a construction for a building outdoor panel. Aluminum and steel are connected by bolt and nut. An atmosphere due to a corrosion of the aluminum. The corrosion possibly to cause the hole diameter of bolt and nut to become larger. Thus the bolt and nut can not enough strong to hold the panel. The panel may collapse. The aim of the research is first to answer a question where does the corrosion starts. The second is to know the effect of ratio surface area of st...

  4. Evaluation of intergranular corrosion rate and microstructure of forged 316L round bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    2009-01-01

    When austenitic stainless steels are heat treated in the range of 500∼850 .deg. C, the alloys are sensitized due to the formation of chromium carbide at grain boundaries and then intergranular corrosion occurs. This paper aims to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate and microstructural change of forged 316L stainless steel. To analyze the microstructure by forging conditions, ferrite phase, sigma phase, intergranular precipitation were observed. In order to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate. Huey test was performed by ASTM A262. On the base of microstructural observation, ferrite and sigma phases were not detected, and also intergranular precipitation was not revealed in optical microscopic observation. By ASTM A262 Practice A, step structure was shown in all forging conditions. Intergranular corrosion rate gradually increased by Huey test periods but average corrosion rate was under 0.03 mm/month

  5. Evaluation of intergranular corrosion rate and microstructure of forged 316L round bar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H. K.; Kim, Y. S. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    When austenitic stainless steels are heat treated in the range of 500{approx}850 .deg. C, the alloys are sensitized due to the formation of chromium carbide at grain boundaries and then intergranular corrosion occurs. This paper aims to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate and microstructural change of forged 316L stainless steel. To analyze the microstructure by forging conditions, ferrite phase, sigma phase, intergranular precipitation were observed. In order to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate. Huey test was performed by ASTM A262. On the base of microstructural observation, ferrite and sigma phases were not detected, and also intergranular precipitation was not revealed in optical microscopic observation. By ASTM A262 Practice A, step structure was shown in all forging conditions. Intergranular corrosion rate gradually increased by Huey test periods but average corrosion rate was under 0.03 mm/month.

  6. Standard practice for calculation of corrosion rates and related information from electrochemical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the providing of guidance in converting the results of electrochemical measurements to rates of uniform corrosion. Calculation methods for converting corrosion current density values to either mass loss rates or average penetration rates are given for most engineering alloys. In addition, some guidelines for converting polarization resistance values to corrosion rates are provided. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  7. Determination of the Optimum Conditions in Evaluation of Kiwi Juice as Green Corrosion Inhibitor of Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hamid Rasheed

    2018-08-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion protection of low carbon steel in 2.5 M HCl solution by kiwi juice was studied at different temperatures and immersion times by weight loss technique. To study the determination of the optimum conditions from statistical design in evaluation of a corrosion inhibitor, three variables, were considered as the most dominant variables. These variables are: temperature, inhibitor concentration (extracted kiwi juice and immersion time at static conditions. These three variables are manipulated through the experimental work using central composite rotatable Box – Wilson Experimental Design (BWED where second order polynomial model was proposed to correlate the studied variables with the corrosion rate of low carbon steel alloy to estimate the coefficients by nonlinear regression analysis method based on Rosenbrock and Quasi-Newton estimation method in as few experiments as possible to determinate of the optimum conditions of the proposed polynomial adopted via STATISTICA software. The parametric study on corrosion inhibition process using response surface methodology (RSM is presented in this paper. The study shows that the immersion time and temperature of corroding medium had shown negative dependence of great significance in increase the corrosion rate while the other studied variable (i.e. inhibitor concentration had shown large positive dependence in reduce the corrosion rate of low carbon steel alloy. Optimum conditions for achieving the minimum corrosion rate are obtained from optimizing the above correlation and are found as follow: 42.86 °C temperature of corroding medium, 29.29 cm3/L inhibitor concentration and 2.65 h immersion time. In these circumstances, the value of inhibition efficiency obtained was 96.09 %. It could be concluded that Box-Wilson experimental design was adequately applicable in the optimization of process variables and that kiwi juice sufficiently inhibited the corrosion for low carbon steel at the

  8. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (3), relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Systematic approaches for evaluating flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. Firstly, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis. Anodic current density and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic double oxide layer model and then was applied as input for the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results based on the coupled models resulted good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the flow-accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. 2. Measurement of corrosion rate and evaluation on the effects of the flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yukinori; Utanohara, Yoichi; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in order to evaluate the effects of flow field on corrosion rate due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), a corrosion rate downstream of an orifice was measured using the electric resistance method. The diameter of the pipe is 50 mm and that of the orifice is 24.3 mm, and flow velocity of the experimental loop was set at 5m/s, and the temperature of water was controlled within ±1 at 150deg-C. There were no significant circumferential difference in measured corrosion rate, and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 1D or 2D downstream from the orifice. The ratios of the measured corrosion rate and the calculated wall shear stress at the 1D downstream from the orifice to the value at upstream under well developed flow agreed well. (author)

  10. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  11. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo; Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz

    2012-12-01

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 μm were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  12. Corrosion and deposit determination in large diameter pipes by radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, W.

    2006-08-01

    Two steel reference pipes with outer diameters of 8 and 12 inches were machined to make artificial defects on each of them, such as inside and outside steps of different wall thicknesses, inside and outside flat bottomed holes (FBH) of different diameters and depths on steps, flat area (FA), and ground patch (GP). The artificial defect were made to simulate natural corrosion attack as regular corrosion and pitting. The two reference pipes were tested according to tangential radiography technique and double wall single image technique. Tangential radiography technique had been applied using Co-60 radio-isotope to determine the steps thicknesses, the FBH, the remaining wall thickness under the FA, the remaining wall thickness above the GP, and the minimum detectable thickness of the artificial cement deposit on the two reference pipes, with and without insulation. Double wall single image technique had also been applied on the two reference pipes with and without insulation using Ir-192 radio-isotope to measure the flat bottomed holes depths, GP depth, and FA depth by density measurement. The measurement results obtained from the radiographs confirm that, tangential radiography technique can be applied to detect and evaluate the inside and outside regular corrosion attack in the large diameter pipes. It can also be applied to detect and evaluate the outside FBH with depth equal or greater than 10%. Inside 10% FBH and inside 20% FBH can not be detected if their diameters are not larger than certain value related to diameter and wall thickness of the pipe under test. Increasing the film density up to 5 outside the pipe did not provide any detection improvement of 10% and 20% inside FBH. Tangential radiography technique can also be applied to detect and measure the deposit inside the pipes. Double wall technique can be applied as an alternative method of the tangential radiography technique to detect and to evaluate the shallow and small diameter, 10% and 20% inside FBH

  13. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G.

    2013-01-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  14. Corrosion product identification and relative rates of corrosion of candidate metals in an irradiated air-steam environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Swayambunathan, V.; Tani, B.S.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Previously reported work by others indicates that dicopper trihydroxide nitrate, Cu 2 NO 3 (OH) 3 , forms on copper and copper alloys subjected to irradiated moist air near room temperature. We have performed experiments over a range of temperature and humidity, and have found that this species is formed at temperatures up to at least 150 degree C if low to intermediate relative humidities are present. At 150 degree C and 100% relative humidity, only Cu 2 O and CuO were observed. The relative general corrosion rates of the copper materials tested in 1-month experiments at dose rates of 0.7 and 2.0 kGy/h were Cu > 70/30 Cu--Ni > Al-bronze. High-nickel alloy 825 showed no observable corrosion. 29 refs., 4 tabs

  15. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2005-01-01

    in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system accelerates......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutions was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured by electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if biofilm...

  16. The effect of texture, heat treatment and elongation rate on stress corrosion cracking in irradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Stany, W.; Hellstrand, E.

    1979-03-01

    Irradiated zircaloy samples with different textures and heat treatments have been tested concerning stress corrosion. Irradiated samples of Zr-1Nb, pure Zr and beta quenched zircaloy have also been investigated. Stress-relieve annealled zircaloy is even after irradiation more sensitive to stress corrosion than recrystallized zircaloy. Zr-1Nb and beta quenched zircaloy are much more sinsitive to stress corrosion than the samples with different textures. As a rule irradiated zircaloy is sensitive to stress corrosion at stresses far below the yield point. The breaking stress decreases with the elongation rate. The extension of cracks is much faster in irradiated zircaloy than in unirradiated zircaloy. There is no simple failure criterium for irradiated zircaloy. However for a certain stress and a certain elongation rate the probability for a failure before this stress is reached with a constant elongation rate can be given. (E.R.)

  17. Recorded corrosion rates on copper electrodes in the Prototype Repository at the Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Real-time corrosion monitoring by means of electrochemical methods has been applied in an effort to measure corrosion rates of pure copper in the Prototype Repository at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory. Copper electrodes were installed in bentonite blocks on top of the electrically heated copper canisters in two deposition holes (dh). Three nominally identical cylindrical copper electrodes were installed in dh 1 and another three in dh 5 a few days before the heat was turned on to the canisters in September 2001 and in May 2003 respectively. The temperature of the copper electrodes has been around 30 deg C in dh 1 and somewhat below 35 deg C in dh 5. Real-time corrosion monitoring for both electrode setups was first applied in January 2004, and then periodically in 2005, 2006, 2008, and most recently in the end of 2010 just before work to open the outer section of the Prototype Repository was started. The recorded corrosion rates fall below 1.3 {mu}m/year (using a default value of n=2 in the software to convert the corrosion current density to a penetration rate by means of Faraday's law, and with no correction applied for the used measuring frequency of 0.01 Hz; also disregarding highly scattered data obtained for the copper electrodes in dh 1 during 2010). While the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 5 first increased from about 0.2 {mu}m/year in 2004 up to a maximum of 1.3 {mu}m/year a year later (the drainage of the inner and outer sections was temporary closed in the end of 2004), and then gradually decreased to 0.7 {mu}m/year in the end of 2010, the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 1 show a quite different picture. The recorded rates fall in the range 0.4-0.7 {mu}m/year and do not reflect any obvious decrease. However, it is anticipated that a similar time dependence as observed for the electrodes in dh 5 could have been present early on in the exposure; the electrodes were installed in 2001 but the first measurements were performed in 2004. Also

  18. Recorded corrosion rates on copper electrodes in the Prototype Repository at the Aespoe HRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Real-time corrosion monitoring by means of electrochemical methods has been applied in an effort to measure corrosion rates of pure copper in the Prototype Repository at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory. Copper electrodes were installed in bentonite blocks on top of the electrically heated copper canisters in two deposition holes (dh). Three nominally identical cylindrical copper electrodes were installed in dh 1 and another three in dh 5 a few days before the heat was turned on to the canisters in September 2001 and in May 2003 respectively. The temperature of the copper electrodes has been around 30 deg C in dh 1 and somewhat below 35 deg C in dh 5. Real-time corrosion monitoring for both electrode setups was first applied in January 2004, and then periodically in 2005, 2006, 2008, and most recently in the end of 2010 just before work to open the outer section of the Prototype Repository was started. The recorded corrosion rates fall below 1.3 μm/year (using a default value of n=2 in the software to convert the corrosion current density to a penetration rate by means of Faraday's law, and with no correction applied for the used measuring frequency of 0.01 Hz; also disregarding highly scattered data obtained for the copper electrodes in dh 1 during 2010). While the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 5 first increased from about 0.2 μm/year in 2004 up to a maximum of 1.3 μm/year a year later (the drainage of the inner and outer sections was temporary closed in the end of 2004), and then gradually decreased to 0.7 μm/year in the end of 2010, the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 1 show a quite different picture. The recorded rates fall in the range 0.4-0.7 μm/year and do not reflect any obvious decrease. However, it is anticipated that a similar time dependence as observed for the electrodes in dh 5 could have been present early on in the exposure; the electrodes were installed in 2001 but the first measurements were performed in 2004. Also, saturation of

  19. Simulation of corrosion product activity in ion- exchanger of PWR under acceleration of corrosion and flow rate perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Rafique, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper computer code developed earlier by the authors (CPAIR-P) has been employed to compute corrosion product activity in PWRs for flow rate perturbations. The values of radioactivity in ion exchanger of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) under normal and flow rate perturbation conditions have been calculated. For linearly accelerating corrosion rates, activity saturates for removal rate of 600 cm/sup 3// s in primary coolant of PWR. A higher removal rate of 750 cm/sup 3// s was selected for which the saturation value is sufficiently low (0. 28 micro Ci/cm/sup 3/). Simulation results shows that the Fe/sup 59/ Na/sup 24/, Mo/sup 99/, Mn/sup 56/ reaches saturation values with in about 700 hours of reactor operation. However, Co/sup 58/ and Co/sup 60/ keep on accumulating and do not saturate with in 2000 hours of these simulation time. When flow rate is decreased by 10% of rated flow rate after 500 hours of reactor operation, a dip in activity is seen, which reaches to the value of 0.00138 micro Ci cm/sup -3/ then again it begins to rise and reaches saturation value of 0.00147 cm/sup 3//s. (author)

  20. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (2), flow dynamics calculations for determining mixing factors and mass transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Yasushi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    In order to predict and mitigate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel piping in PWR and BWR secondary systems, computer program packages for evaluating FAC have been developed by coupling one through three dimensional (1-3D) computational flow dynamics (CFD) models and corrosion models. To evaluate corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path, flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume were obtained with 1D computational flow dynamics (CFD) codes. Precise flow turbulence and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface were calculated with 3D CFD codes to determine wall thinning rates. One of the engineering options is application of k-ε calculation as a 3D CFD code, which has limitation of detail evaluation of flow distribution at very surface of large scale piping. A combination of k-ε calculation and wall function was proposed to evaluate precise distribution of mass transfer coefficients with reasonable CPU volume and computing time and, at the same time, reasonable accuracy. (author)

  1. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, Frederic; Tamalis, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 99 Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t 1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β - = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99 Tc ( 99 Tc → 99 Ru + β - ). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the nature of Tc in metallic spent fuel. Computational modeling

  2. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poineau, Frederic [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Tamalis, Dimitri [Florida Memorial Univ., Miami Gardens, FL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The isotope 99Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β⁻ = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99Tc (99Tc → 99Ru + β⁻). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the

  3. Repassivation potentials determination of crevice corrosion of alloy in Chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon Ortiz, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) belongs to the Ni-Cr-Mo family and it is highly resistant to general and localized corrosion, but it may suffer crevice corrosion in aggressive environmental conditions, such as high chloride concentration, high applied potential and high temperature. Alloy 22 is one of the candidates to be considered for the outer corrosion-resistant shell of high-level nuclear waste containers. It is assumed that localized corrosion will only occur when the corrosion potential (E CORR ) is equal or higher than the crevice corrosion repassivation potential (E R,CREV ). This parameter is obtained by different electrochemical techniques using artificially creviced specimens. These techniques include cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) curves, Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu electrochemical (THE) method or other non-standardized methods. Recently, as a variation of THE method, the PD-GS-PD technique was introduced. The aim of the present work was to determine reliable critical potentials for crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in pure chloride solutions at 90 C degrees. Conservative methodologies (which include extended potentiostatic steps) were applied for determining protection potentials below which crevice corrosion cannot initiate and propagate. Results from PD-GS-PD technique were compared with those from these methodologies in order to assess their reliability. Results from the CPP and the THE methods were also considered for comparison. The repassivation potentials from the PD-GS-PD technique were conservative and reproducible, and they did not depend on the amount of previous crevice corrosion propagation in the studied conditions. (author)

  4. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1), major features of coupled analysis and application for evaluation of wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Six calculation steps have been prepared for predicting flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) occurrence and evaluating wall thinning rate. (1) Flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume along the flow path are obtained with a 1D plant system code, (2) Corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path are calculated with a hydrazine-oxygen reaction code, (3) Precise flow patterns and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface are calculated with a 3D CFD code, (4) Danger zones are evaluated by combining major FAC parameters, (5) Wall thinning rates are calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified danger zone, and then, (6) Residual life and effects of countermeasures can be evaluated. Anodic and cathodic current densities and ECPs were calculated with the static electrochemistry model, and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was used as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Thickness of the oxide film and its characteristics determined by the dynamic double oxide layer model were used for the electrochemistry model to determine the resistances of cathodic current from the bulk to the surface and anodic current from the surface to the bulk. The calculated results of the coupled models had been compared with the data measured at operating Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants and it was demonstrated that the calculated results had good agreements with the measured ones. 6 step-evaluation procedures for liquid droplet impingement (LDI) were also proposed. (author)

  5. Determination of corrosion potential of coated hollow spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorkova, Andrea; Orinakova, Renata; Orinak, Andrej; Dudrova, Eva; Kupkova, Miriam; Kalavsky, Frantisek

    2008-01-01

    Copper hollow spheres were created on porous iron particles by electro-less deposition. The consequent Ni plating was applied to improve the mechanical properties of copper hollow micro-particles. Corrosion properties of coated hollow spheres were investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation method in 1 mol dm -3 NaCl solution. Surface morphology and composition were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy (LM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Original iron particles, uncoated copper spheres and iron particles coated with nickel were studied as the reference materials. The effect of particle composition, particularly Ni content on the corrosion potential value was investigated. The results indicated that an increase in the amount of Ni coating layer deteriorated corrosion resistivity of coated copper spheres. Amount of Ni coating layer depended on conditions of Ni electrolysis, mainly on electrolysis time and current intensity. Corrosion behaviour of sintered particles was also explored by potentiodynamic polarisation experiments for the sake of comparison. Formation of iron rich micro-volumes on the particle surface during sintering caused the corrosion potential shift towards more negative values. A detailed study of the morphological changes between non-sintered and sintered micro-particles provided explanation of differences in corrosion potential (E corr )

  6. The importance of the strain rate and creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a nuclear, power, petrochemical, and other industries equipment and components (like pressure vessels, nozzles, tubes, accessories) life degradation mode, involving fragile fracture. The stress corrosion cracking failures can produce serious accidents, and incidents which can put on risk the safety, reliability, and efficiency of many plants. These failures are of very complex prediction. The stress corrosion cracking mechanisms are based on three kinds of factors: microstructural, mechanical and environmental. Concerning the mechanical factors, various authors prefer to consider the crack tip strain rate rather than stress, as a decisive factor which contributes to the process: this parameter is directly influenced by the creep strain rate of the material. Based on two KAPL-Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory experimental studies in SSRT (slow strain rate test) and CL (constant load) test, for prediction of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel based alloys, it has done a data compilation of the film rupture mechanism parameters, for modeling PWSCC of Alloy 600 and discussed the importance of the strain rate and the creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models. As derived from this study, a simple theoretical model is proposed, and it is showed that the crack growth rate estimated with Brazilian tests results with Alloy 600 in SSRT, are according with the KAPL ones and other published literature. (author)

  7. Corrosion rate of construction materials in hot phosphoric acid with the contribution of anodic polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Christensen, E. [Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Eriksen, S.; Gillesberg, B. [Tantaline A/S, Nordborgvej 81, 6430 Nordborg (Denmark)

    2012-04-15

    The paper is focused on selection of a proper material for construction elements of water electrolysers, which make use of a 85% phosphoric acid as an electrolyte at temperature of 150 C and which might be loaded with anodic polarization up to 2.5 V versus a saturated Ag/AgCl electrode (SSCE). Several grades of stainless steels were tested as well as tantalum, niobium, titanium, nickel alloys and silicon carbide. The corrosion rate was evaluated by means of mass loss at free corrosion potential as well as under various levels of polarization. The only corrosion resistant material in 85% phosphoric acid at 150 C and at polarization of 2.5 V/SSCE is tantalum. In that case, even a gentle cathodic polarization is harmful in such an acidic environment. Hydrogen reduction leads to tantalum hydride formation, to loss of mechanical properties and to complete disintegration of the metal. Contrary to tantalum, titanium is free of any corrosion resistance in hot phosphoric acid. Its corrosion rate ranges from tens of millimetres to metres per year depending on temperature of the acid. Alloy bonded tantalum coating was recognized as an effective corrosion protection for both titanium and stainless steel. Its serviceability might be limited by slow dissolution of tantalum that is in order of units of mm/year. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  9. On the Determination of Magnesium Degradation Rates under Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidadavolu, Eshwara Phani Shubhakar; Feyerabend, Frank; Ebel, Thomas; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Dahms, Michael

    2016-07-28

    The current physiological in vitro tests of Mg degradation follow the procedure stated according to the ASTM standard. This standard, although useful in predicting the initial degradation behavior of an alloy, has its limitations in interpreting the same for longer periods of immersion in cell culture media. This is an important consequence as the alloy's degradation is time dependent. Even if two different alloys show similar corrosion rates in a short term experiment, their degradation characteristics might differ with increased immersion times. Furthermore, studies concerning Mg corrosion extrapolate the corrosion rate from a single time point measurement to the order of a year (mm/y), which might not be appropriate because of time dependent degradation behavior. In this work, the above issues are addressed and a new methodology of performing long-term immersion tests in determining the degradation rates of Mg alloys was put forth. For this purpose, cast and extruded Mg-2Ag and powder pressed and sintered Mg-0.3Ca alloy systems were chosen. DMEM Glutamax +10% FBS (Fetal Bovine Serum) +1% Penicillin streptomycin was used as cell culture medium. The advantages of such a method in predicting the degradation rates in vivo deduced from in vitro experiments are discussed.

  10. Preliminary Simulation of the Corrosion Rate of Archaeological Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-06

    In this study, we make use of a micro-continuum modeling approach (the Kinetic-Microscopic-Continuum Model or K{micro}C model) to capture the spatial distribution and identity of reaction products developing over time as a result of the archaeological glass corrosion, while also matching the time scales of alteration where possible. Since the glass blocks sat on the Mediterranean seafloor for 1800 years, the physical and chemical boundary conditions are largely constant. We focus on a fracture within the glass block identified by Verney-Carron et al. (2008) and simulate it as a 1D system, with a fixed concentration (Dirichlet) boundary corresponding to the interior of the fracture.

  11. Detrimental role of hydrogen on the corrosion rate of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.; Noel, D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that hydride precipitation at the metal/oxide interface could play a detrimental role on the waterside corrosion rate. Nevertheless, the mechanism of that detrimental role is not completely understood, and two hypotheses were investigated to understand the mechanism that controls the role of the hydrides. The first hypothesis is based on a mechanical effect: the hydrides precipitate at the metal/oxide interface and destroy the physical integrity of the barrier oxide layer. The second hypothesis is a modification of the transport properties of the oxide grown on the hydrided metal. The detrimental role of hydrides on the corrosion rate was studied by charging unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding material with hydrogen to a level higher than the limit of solubility at 400 C. Both gaseous and cathodic charging techniques were used. Static corrosion tests were carried out in autoclave with steam at 400 C on an as-received and hydrided sample. The detrimental role of hydrides is confirmed from the post-transition corrosion rate, and that effect is more significant for high cathodic charging. The results of the metallurgical examinations are discussed to provide an understanding of the mechanism. No relationship between hydrides, physical defects in the oxide, and local corrosion rate enhancement was found. Therefore, the results do not support the hypothesis of a mechanical effect at the scale of the performed examinations, but more detailed work is required to confirm this

  12. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  13. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with ‘Chinese Drywall’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacIntosh, David L.; Saltzman, Lori E.; Baker, Brian J.; Matheson, Joanna M.; Recht, Joel R.; Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A.; Myatt, Theodore A.; Spengler, John D.; Stewart, James H.; McCarthy, John F.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. 3 , p 2 S: 476 vs. 2 S: 1472 vs. 389 Å/30 d, p < 0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006–2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with ‘Chinese Drywall’ in 2006–2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air. - Highlights: ► Environmental measurements in homes with and without “Chinese Drywall” ► Homes with “Chinese Drywall” had higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations ► Homes with “Chinese Drywall” had elevated corrosion rates ► Study provides empirical evidence of reported associations

  14. Prediction on corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system based on optimized grey theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Jiang Wei

    2007-01-01

    For the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, the pre- diction error from the grey theory is greater, so a new method, optimized grey theory was presented in the paper. A comparison among predicted results from present and other methods was carried out, and it is seem that optimized grey theory is correct and effective for the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, and it provides a fundamental basis for the maintenance of pipe in nuclear power system. (authors)

  15. Savannah River Site Tank Cleaning: Corrosion Rate For One Versus Eight Percent Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  16. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with 'Chinese Drywall'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacIntosh, David L. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); Saltzman, Lori E. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baker, Brian J. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Matheson, Joanna M.; Recht, Joel R. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A.; Myatt, Theodore A. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Spengler, John D.; Stewart, James H. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, John F., E-mail: jmcccarthy@eheinc.com [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. < LOD {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.05), and significantly greater rates of copper sulfide and silver sulfide corrosion compared to non-complaint homes (Cu{sub 2}S: 476 vs. < 32 A/30 d, p < 0.01; Ag{sub 2}S: 1472 vs. 389 A/30 d, p < 0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006-2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with 'Chinese Drywall' in 2006-2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental measurements in homes with and without 'Chinese Drywall' Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had elevated corrosion rates Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study provides empirical evidence of reported associations.

  17. Influence of cooling rate on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of Al–Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorin, T.; Stanford, N.; Birbilis, N.; Gupta, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cooling rate from 0.1 to 500 °C/s, mass loss rate decreased by 6 times. • Increase in corrosion resistance was attributed to the refined Fe-intermetallics. • Increased cooling rate resulted in increased Fe content in solid solution. • Direct strip casting can produce alloys with higher acceptable content of impurities. • Direct Strip Casting is a potential candidate to improve recyclability of Al alloys - Abstract: The effect of Fe in Al is technologically important for commercial Al-alloys, and in recycled Al. This work explores the use of the novel rapid solidification technology, known as direct strip casting, to improve the recyclability of Al-alloys. We provide a comparison between the corrosion and microstructure of Al–Fe alloys prepared with wide-ranging cooling rates (0.1 °C/s to 500 °C/s). Rapid cooling was achieved via direct strip casting, while slow cooling was achieved using sand casting. Corrosion was studied via polarisation and immersion tests, followed by surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of Al–Fe alloys is improved with increased cooling rates, attributed to the reduced size and number of Fe-containing intermetallics.

  18. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking under multiaxial deformation conditions: technique and application to admiralty brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, W.K.; Heldt, L.A.; Koss, D.

    1984-01-01

    A set of straightforward experimental techniques are described for the examination of slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sheet deforming under nearly all multiaxial deformation conditions which result in sheet thinning. Based on local fracture strain as a failure criterion, the results contrast stress corrosion susceptibility in uniaxial tension with those in both plane strain and balanced biaxial tension. These results indicate that the loss of ductility of the brass increases as the stress state changes from uniaxial toward balanced biaxial tension

  19. System for corrosion monitoring in pipeline applying fuzzy logic mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, O. N.; Kolosova, A. L.; Andreeva, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    A list of factors influencing corrosion rate on the external side of underground pipeline is determined. Principles of constructing a corrosion monitoring system are described; the system performance algorithm and program are elaborated. A comparative analysis of methods for calculating corrosion rate is undertaken. Fuzzy logic mathematics is applied to reduce calculations while considering a wider range of corrosion factors.

  20. Mg and Mg alloys: how comparable are in vitro and in vivo corrosion rates? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Bérengère J C; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine

    2015-02-01

    Due to their biodegradability, magnesium and magnesium-based alloys could represent the third generation of biomaterials. However, their mechanical properties and time of degradation have to match the needs of applications. Several approaches, such as choice of alloying elements or tailored microstructure, are employed to tailor corrosion behaviour. Due to the high electrochemical activity of Mg, numerous environmental factors (e.g. temperature and surrounding ion composition) influence its corrosion behaviour, making it unpredictable. Nevertheless, the need of reliable in vitro model(s) to predict in vivo implant degradation is increasing. In an attempt to find a correlation between in vitro and vivo corrosion rates, this review presents a systematic literature survey, as well as an attempt to correlate the different results. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An expert system for corrosion rate monitoring and diagnosis in the heating circuits of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducelli, C.; Conte, E.; Federico, A.G.; Tripi, A.; Ronchetti, C.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation field of out of core components of a water reactor primary plant depends on corrosion product equilibria. The computer programs that try to simulate the behaviour of the corrosion products and the radiation build up didn't provide good results, especially in describing several different plants with the same program. In order to obtain better results the authors decided to use a different approach, building an expert system, which performs on-line corrosion rate monitoring by means of a number of probes connected to an automatic corrosimeter, evaluates expected corrosion rate values and behaviours, and, if there are discrepancies, performs a diagnosis, providing suggestions to overcome the difficulty. (author)

  2. Volatile amines treatment: Corrosion rates and Atucha I nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Alberto M.; Jimenez Rebagliati, Raul; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Manzi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Steam generators water treatment with volatile amines in place of ammonia is usual today. This option seems an acceptable alternative to the generalize use of ammonia-sodium phosphate and has advantages when copper alloys are present. There are several amines that can work as corrosion inhibitor but the most useful for plant applications are: morpholine, ethanolamine and cyclohexylamine. In this work, are present the obtained results of corrosion rates measurements by electrochemical methods. The hydrothermal conditions of our experiences were similar to that of the Atucha I nuclear power plant (CNA I). pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen measures were correlated with corrosion rates of the CNA I materials as carbon steel and admiralty brass. The faradaic impedance spectroscopy techniques allows a more detailed interpretation of corrosion rates process. Morpholine and ammonia behavior can be evaluated under power plant operations conditions with the accumulated experience of CNA I. Results are present throughout material release and his effects over heat transfer parameters. (author)

  3. The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure by using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Febrianto; Hidayati, N R; Arifal; Sumarno, Ady; Handoyo, Ismu; Prasetjo, Joko

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, and temperature can be simulated. For reducing the pressure on Autoclave so its can be measure by Corrosion Measurement System 100(CMS100), the electrodes placement had designed and fabrication on the cover of Autoclave. The electrodes of CMS100 are reference electrode, working electrodes and counter electrodes. The electrodes placement are made and and designed on two packages, these are Salt bridge and Counter-specimen placement. From the result of testing these both of placement are able to 90 bar (pressure) and 280 C (temperature) operation rate measurement was done on temperature variation from 150 0C, 190 0C, 200 0C, 210 0C, 220 0C and 230 0C, and the solution is 0.1 ppm chloride. The pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurred in Autoclave. From the Tafel analysis, even through very little The corrosion current increased from 150 C to 230 C it is 2,54x10-10 a/cm2 to 1,62x10-9 A/cm2, but the the corrosion rate is still zero

  4. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  5. In-situ corrosion measurements of WWII shipwrecks in Chuuk Lagoon, quantification of decay mechanisms and rates of deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Donald Macleod

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a series of measurements taken on WWII historic shipwrecks that resulted from the effects of Operation Hailstone in February 1944 on the Japanese merchant fleet which was assembled in Chuuk lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia. More than 65 shipwrecks and 250 aircraft were sunk during two main bombing raids. The vessels lost covered a wide range of underwater orientation and water depths and so provided a perfect suite of corrosion experiments. Since the fuel on board the aircraft was either readily burnt at the time or was lost through volatilisation, the wrecked planes present no pollution problems today. However the bunker fuel kept inside on-board storage tanks does present a real conservation management crisis. In-situ measurements on many vessels have determined how water depth, the localised wreck topography, dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and salinity affects the corrosion rate of cast iron and mild steel. Thus corrosion rates can be calculated with confidence.

  6. Effect of diamond-like carbon coating on corrosion rate of machinery steel HQ 805

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slat, Winda Sanni; Malau, Viktor; Iswanto, Priyo Tri; Sujitno, Tjipto; Suprapto

    2018-04-01

    HQ 805 is known as a super strength alloys steel and widely applied in military equipment and, aircraft components, drilling device and so on. It is due to its excellent behavior in wear, fatigue, high temperature and high speed operating conditions. The weakness of this material is the vulnerablality to corrosion when employed in sour environments where hydrogen sulfide and chlorides are present. To overcome the problems, an effort should be made to improve or enhance the surface properties for a longer service life. There are varieties of coatings developed and used to improve surface material properties. There are several kinds of coating methods; chemical vapour deposition (CVD), physical vapour deposition (PVD), thermochemical treatment, oxidation, or plasma spraying. This paper presents the research result of the influence of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coating deposited using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) on corrosion rate (by potentiodynamic polarization method) of HQ 805 machinery steel. As a carbon sources, a mixture of argon (Ar) and methane (CH4) with ratio 76% : 24% was used in this experiment. The conditions of experiment were 400 °C of temperature, 1.2 mbar, 1.4 mbar, 1.6 mbar and 1.8 mbar of pressure of process. Investigated surface properties were hardness (microhardness tester), roughness (roughness test), chemical composition (Spectrometer), microstructure (SEM) and corrosion rate (potentiodynamic polarization). It has been found that the optimum condition with the lowest corrosion rate is at a pressure of 1.4 mbar with a deposition duration of 4 hours at a constant temperature of 400 °C. In this condition, the corrosion rate decreases from 12.326 mpy to 4.487 mpy.

  7. Determination of the environmental effect for the sea salt aerosols corrosion (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayasu, Fumio; Umehara, Toshihiro; Kato, Akitoshi; Taniguchi, Akihide

    2008-01-01

    Present all nuclear power plants in Fukui prefecture are located at the bay side of Japan Sea coast. New facilities may be planed to be at ocean side. The sea salt corrosion at the ocean side should be larger than it at the bay side. We have the salt damage experimental yard at Awara sea coast and at Fukui city (about 15km from coast) for the corrosion comparison study between Japan Sea coast and inland. We confirm the amounts of sea salt aerosol vary among the season and year. The weight loss of specimen inside of shelter without filter is higher than both of sheltered with filter and inland specimen. The weight loss of specimen inside of shelter with filter is almost same as it of inland specimen. We confirmed the filter which we used is sufficient capability to prevent corrosion. We confirmed the corrosion rate of both opened specimen and sheltered specimen without filter increased after some periods. (author)

  8. On researching erosion-corrosion wear in pipelines: the rate and residual lifetime estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranenko, V.I.; Yanchenko, Yu.A.; Gulina, O.M.; Dokukin, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    To base the normative document on calculation of pipelines erosive-corrosive wear (ECW) rate and residual lifetime this research of ECW regularities for pearlitic steel NPP pipelines was performed. The estimates of control data treatment statistical procedures efficiency were presented. The influence of the scheme of piping control on the ECW rate and residual lifetime estimation results was demonstrated. The simplified scheme is valid only in case of complete information. It's usage under data uncertainties leads to essential residual lifetime overstating [ru

  9. Simulation of corrosion product activity in pressurized water reactors under flow rate transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Anwar M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mir, Imran

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of coolant activation due to corrosion products and impurities in a typical pressurized water reactor has been done under flow rate transients. Employing time dependent production and losses of corrosion products in the primary coolant path an approach has been developed to calculate the coolant specific activity. Results for 24 Na, 56 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co and 99Mo show that the specific activity in primary loop approaches equilibrium value under normal operating conditions fairly rapidly. Predominant corrosion product activity is due to Mn-56. Parametric studies at full power for various ramp decreases in flow rate show initial decline in the activity and then a gradual rise to relatively higher saturation values. The minimum value and the time taken to reach the minima are strong functions of the slope of linear decrease in flow rate. In the second part flow rate coastdown was allowed to occur at different flow half-times. The reactor scram was initiated at 90% of the normal flow rate. The results show that the specific activity decreases and the rate of decrease depends on pump half time and the reactor scram conditions

  10. The effect of borate and phosphate inhibitors on corrosion rate material SS321 and incoloy 800 in chloride containing solution by using potentiodynamic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febriyanto; Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari

    1998-01-01

    Determination of corrosion rate of steam generator materials (SS 321 and incoloy 800) in chloride containing solution using potentiodynamic method from CMS 100. NaCl 1%, 3% and 5% solution using is used as tested solution. A tested material is grounded by grinding paper on grade 400 600, 800 and 1000, then polished by METADI 1/4 microns paste to get homogeneity. Furthermore, the tested materials is mounted by epoxide resin, so only the surface which contacts to tested solution is open. From the result obtained that borate and phosphate inhibitor can reduce corrosion rate and aggressiveness of chloride ion

  11. What Determines Star Formation Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Neal John

    2017-06-01

    The relations between star formation and gas have received renewed attention. We combine studies on scales ranging from local (within 0.5 kpc) to distant galaxies to assess what factors contribute to star formation. These include studies of star forming regions in the Milky Way, the LMC, nearby galaxies with spatially resolved star formation, and integrated galaxy studies. We test whether total molecular gas or dense gas provides the best predictor of star formation rate. The star formation ``efficiency," defined as star formation rate divided by mass, spreads over a large range when the mass refers to molecular gas; the standard deviation of the log of the efficiency decreases by a factor of three when the mass of relatively dense molecular gas is used rather than the mass of all the molecular gas. We suggest ways to further develop the concept of "dense gas" to incorporate other factors, such as turbulence.

  12. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  13. Electrochemical techniques implementation for corrosion rate measurement in function of humidity level in grounding systems (copper and stainless steel) in soil samples from Tunja (Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Mejía-Camacho, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, DC electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion rate of copper and stainless-steel electrodes used in grounding, varying the level of humidity, in sandy loam and clay loam soils. The maximum corrosion potentials were: for copper -211 and -236mV and for stainless steel of -252 and -281mV, in sandy loam and clay loam respectively, showing that in sandy loam the values are higher, about 30mV. The mechanism by which steel controls corrosion is by diffusion, whereas in copper it is carried out by transfer of mass and charge, which affects the rate of corrosion, which in copper reached a maximum value of 5mm/yr and in Steel 0.8mm/yr, determined by Tafel approximations. The behaviour of the corrosion rate was mathematically adjusted to an asymptotic model that faithfully explains the C.R. as a function of humidity, however, it is necessary to define the relation between the factor □ established in the model and the precise characteristics of the soil, such as the permeability or quantity of ions present.

  14. Controlling corrosion rate of Magnesium alloy using powder mixed electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, M. A.; Rani, A. M. A.; Saad, N. M.; Littlefair, G.; Aliyu, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Biomedical implant can be divided into permanent and temporary employment. The duration of a temporary implant applied to children and adult is different due to different bone healing rate among the children and adult. Magnesium and its alloys are compatible for the biodegradable implanting application. Nevertheless, it is difficult to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy to suit the application on both the children and adult. Powder mixed electrical discharge machining (PM-EDM) method, a modified EDM process, has high capability to improve the EDM process efficiency and machined surface quality. The objective of this paper is to establish a formula to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy using the PM-EDM method. The different corrosion rate of machined surface is hypothesized to be obtained by having different combinations of PM-EDM operation inputs. PM-EDM experiments are conducted using an opened-loop PM-EDM system and the in-vitro corrosion tests are carried out on the machined surface of each specimen. There are four operation inputs investigated in this study which are zinc powder concentration, peak current, pulse on-time and pulse off-time. The results indicate that zinc powder concentration is significantly affecting the response with 2 g/l of zinc powder concentration obtaining the lowest corrosion rate. The high localized temperature at the cutting zone in spark erosion process causes some of the zinc particles get deposited on the machined surface, hence improving the surface characteristics. The suspended zinc particles in the dielectric fluid have also improve the sparking efficiency and the uniformity of sparks distribution. From the statistical analysis, a formula was developed to control the corrosion rate of magnesium alloy within the range from 0.000183 mm/year to 0.001528 mm/year.

  15. Corrosion and runoff rates of Cu and three Cu-alloys in marine environments with increasing chloride deposition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Zhang, Xian; Goidanich, Sara; Le Bozec, Nathalie; Herting, Gunilla; Leygraf, Christofer

    2014-02-15

    Bare copper sheet and three commercial Cu-based alloys, Cu15Zn, Cu4Sn and Cu5Al5Zn, have been exposed to four test sites in Brest, France, with strongly varying chloride deposition rates. The corrosion rates of all four materials decrease continuously with distance from the coast, i.e. with decreasing chloride load, and in the following order: Cu4Sn>Cu sheet>Cu15Zn>Cu5Al5Zn. The patina on all materials was composed of two main layers, Cu2O as the inner layer and Cu2(OH)3Cl as the outer layer, and with a discontinuous presence of CuCl in between. Additional minor patina constituents are SnO2 (Cu4Sn), Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2 (Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn) and Zn6Al2(OH)16CO3·4H2O/Zn2Al(OH)6Cl·2H2O/Zn5Cl2(OH)8·H2O and Al2O3 (Cu5Al5Zn). The observed Zn- and Zn/Al-containing corrosion products might be important factors for the lower sensitivity of Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn against chloride-induced atmospheric corrosion compared with Cu sheet and Cu4Sn. Decreasing corrosion rates with exposure time were observed for all materials and chloride loads and attributed to an improved adherence with time of the outer patina to the underlying inner oxide. Flaking of the outer patina layer was mainly observed on Cu4Sn and Cu sheet and associated with the gradual transformation of CuCl to Cu2(OH)3Cl of larger volume. After three years only Cu5Al5Zn remains lustrous because of a patina compared with the other materials that appeared brownish-reddish. Significantly lower release rates of metals compared with corresponding corrosion rates were observed for all materials. Very similar release rates of copper from all four materials were observed during the fifth year of marine exposure due to an outer surface patina that with time revealed similar constituents and solubility properties. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Atmospheric Cr Pollution as a Factor to Accelerated Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereje Homa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Cr(VI pollution on the corrosion rate of corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry areas was investigated through simulated laboratory exposure and spectrophotometric detection of Cr(III deposit as a product of the reaction. The total level of Cr detected in the samples ranged from 113.892 ± 0.17 ppm to 53.05 ± 0.243 ppm and showed increasing trend as sampling sites get closer to the tannery and in the direction of tannery effluent stream. The laboratory exposure of a newly manufactured material to a simulated condition showed a relatively faster corrosion rate in the presence of Cr(VI with concomitant deposition of Cr(III under pH control. A significant (P = 0.05 increase in the corrosion rate was also recorded when exposing scratched or stress cracked samples. A coupled redox process where Cr(VI is reduced to a stable, immobile, and insoluble Cr(III accompanying corrosion of the iron is proposed as a possible mechanism leading to the elevated deposition of the latter on the materials. In conclusion, the increased deposits of Cr detected in the corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry zones suggested possible atmospheric Cr pollution as a factor to the accelerated corrosion of the materials.

  17. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Atmospheric Cr Pollution as a Factor to Accelerated Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Dereje; Haile, Ermias; Washe, Alemayehu P

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Cr(VI) pollution on the corrosion rate of corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry areas was investigated through simulated laboratory exposure and spectrophotometric detection of Cr(III) deposit as a product of the reaction. The total level of Cr detected in the samples ranged from 113.892 ± 0.17 ppm to 53.05 ± 0.243 ppm and showed increasing trend as sampling sites get closer to the tannery and in the direction of tannery effluent stream. The laboratory exposure of a newly manufactured material to a simulated condition showed a relatively faster corrosion rate in the presence of Cr(VI) with concomitant deposition of Cr(III) under pH control. A significant ( P = 0.05) increase in the corrosion rate was also recorded when exposing scratched or stress cracked samples. A coupled redox process where Cr(VI) is reduced to a stable, immobile, and insoluble Cr(III) accompanying corrosion of the iron is proposed as a possible mechanism leading to the elevated deposition of the latter on the materials. In conclusion, the increased deposits of Cr detected in the corrugated iron roof samples collected from tanning industry zones suggested possible atmospheric Cr pollution as a factor to the accelerated corrosion of the materials.

  18. Slow strain rate corrosion and fracture characteristics of X-52 and X-70 pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, A.; Albiter, A.; Salazar, M.; Perez, R.

    2005-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a NACE solution saturated with H 2 S, of the X-52 and X-70 steels was studied using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and electrochemical evaluations. SCC tests were performed in samples which include the longitudinal weld bead of the pipeline steels and were carried out in the NACE solution at both room temperature and 50 deg. C. After failure, the fracture surfaces were observed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the chemical analysis were obtained using X-rays energy dispersive (EDXs) techniques. The specimens tested in air, exhibited a ductile type of failure, and whereas, those tested in the corrosive solution showed a brittle fracture. Specimens tested in the NACE solution saturated with H 2 S presented high susceptibility to SCC. Corrosion was found to be an important factor in the initiation of some cracks. In addition, the effect of the temperature on the corrosion attack was explored. The susceptibility to SCC was manifested as a decrease in the mechanical properties. Potentiodynamic polarization curves and hydrogen permeation measurements were made. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen was related to this fracture forms. The hydrogen permeation flux increased with the increasing of temperature

  19. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete u...

  20. The determination of partial current densities for the corrosion of valve metals and alloys with the aid of combined radioanalytical and electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, G.; Bestanpouri, A.; Droste, R.; Erben, W.; Schoenemann, W.; Wegen, D.

    1986-01-01

    Valve metals and stainless steel were investigated under practical conditions in order to evaluate their applicability from a corrosion viewpoint in nuclear technology. A new technique based upon the combined application of neutron activation analysis and normal electrochemical procedures, was developed which allowed the amount of material directly dissolved as a result of corrosion to be distinguished from that fraction forming the oxide passivation layer. Not only isotopic but also non-isotopic radionuclides were successfully employed in these studies. It was shown by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic measurements that any metal removal due to corrosion could be neglected for Hf, Ti and Ta under anodic Purex conditions. A plutonium content of up to 2.2 g l -1 even stabilized the oxide layer towards corrosion by forming mixed oxides of Hf and Pu. The influence of F - ions on the stability of the oxide layer was systematically investigated and techniques were evolved for masking these corroding anions. A particular advantage of the new radioisotopic method is its applicability for the determination of the selective corrosion of stainless steel whereby the corrosion of the various metal components may be followed with the aid of specific radionuclides. Experiments have shown that corrosion rates calculated from these radiochemical measurements were in accordance with those evaluated from various Huey-tests. (orig.) [de

  1. Influence of irradiation and radiolysis on the corrosion rates and mechanisms of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO 2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO 2 pellets + cladding). To optimize core management and to extend the lifetime of the fuel rods in reactor, new alloys based on zirconium-niobium (M5) have been developed. However, the corrosion mechanisms of these are not completely understood because of the complexity of these materials, corrosion environment and the presence of radiation from the nuclear fuel. Therefore, this thesis specifically addresses the effects of radiolysis and defects induced by irradiation with ions in the matrix metal and the oxide layer on the corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 and M5. The goal is to separate the influence of radiation damage to the metal, that relating to defects created in the oxide and that linked to radiolysis of the primary medium on the oxidation rate of zirconium alloys in reactor. 1) Regarding effect of irradiation of the metal on the oxidation rate: type dislocation loops appear and increase the oxidation rate of the two alloys. For M5, in addition to the first effect, a precipitation of fines needles of niobium reduced the solid solution of niobium concentration in the metal and ultimately in the oxide, which strongly reduces the oxidation rate of the alloy. 2) Regarding the effect of irradiation of the oxide layer on the oxidation rate: defects generated by the nuclear cascades in the oxide increase the oxidation rate of the two materials. For M5, germination of niobium enriched zones in irradiated oxide also causes a decrease of the niobium concentration in solid solution

  2. Probability distribution of pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Valor, A.; Hallen, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The probability distributions of external-corrosion pit depth and pit growth rate were investigated in underground pipelines using Monte Carlo simulations. The study combines a predictive pit growth model developed by the authors with the observed distributions of the model variables in a range of soils. Depending on the pipeline age, any of the three maximal extreme value distributions, i.e. Weibull, Frechet or Gumbel, can arise as the best fit to the pitting depth and rate data. The Frechet distribution best fits the corrosion data for long exposure periods. This can be explained by considering the long-term stabilization of the diffusion-controlled pit growth. The findings of the study provide reliability analysts with accurate information regarding the stochastic characteristics of the pitting damage in underground pipelines.

  3. Probability distribution of pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Velazquez, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado, 10400, La Habana (Cuba); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The probability distributions of external-corrosion pit depth and pit growth rate were investigated in underground pipelines using Monte Carlo simulations. The study combines a predictive pit growth model developed by the authors with the observed distributions of the model variables in a range of soils. Depending on the pipeline age, any of the three maximal extreme value distributions, i.e. Weibull, Frechet or Gumbel, can arise as the best fit to the pitting depth and rate data. The Frechet distribution best fits the corrosion data for long exposure periods. This can be explained by considering the long-term stabilization of the diffusion-controlled pit growth. The findings of the study provide reliability analysts with accurate information regarding the stochastic characteristics of the pitting damage in underground pipelines.

  4. The optimization of CNT-PVA nanocomposite for mild steel coating: Effect of CNTs concentration on the corrosion rate of mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryam, M.; Ibrahim, N. M. A. A.; Eswar, K. A.; Guliling, M.; Suhaimi, M. H. F.; Khusaimi, Z.; Abdullah, S.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are molecular-scale tubes of graphitic carbon which have outstanding mechanical and magnetic properties with extraordinary strength. It can be said that CNTs can be used in coating application to prevent corrosion and lower the rate of corrosion on steel. However, CNT alone cannot be used for coating purposes. Therefore, by combining it with polymer to produce a nanocomposite thin film, it can be used for nanocoating on mild steel substrate. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was chosen due to its high strength and high modulus polymer fibers and has the possibilities of improving the physicochemical properties of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes and polyvinyl alcohol (CNT-PVA) nanocomposite were prepared by using sol-gel method and coated as thin film on mild steel substrate by using spin coating. Sol-gel is a convenient technique used for the production of nanocomposite aqueous solution. Five samples were prepared at the different concentration of CNTs-PVA to verify the corrosion rate application. The samples were then characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) obtaining the structural properties, surface morphology and topography of samples. Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the microraman spectra of CNTs which showed the quality and purity of samples. Finally, corrosion test was done to measure the corrosion rate of samples at the different concentration of CNTs/PVA nanocomposite.

  5. A study on the corrosion rate for metal nuclear fuel by the soxhlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S. J.; Lee, Y. R.; Lee, D. B.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Park, H. D.; Kim, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    In order to compare in-pile performance of nuclear fuel candidates for HANARO, corrosion test with the Soxhlet apparatus for rare-earth-oxide added U-Mo alloy fuels has been carried out by measuring a leaching rate. It appeared from the result that the leaching rate of the U-Mo fuel specimen became decreased as a rare-earth-oxide added, and there was a little difference in the leaching rate depending on the kind of the rare-earth-oxide

  6. The effect of quench rate on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of U-6 Wt Pct Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckelmeyer, K.H.; Romiy, A.D.; Weirick, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on microstructure, mechanical behavior, corrosion resistance, and subsequent age hardenability is discussed. Cooling rates in excess of 20 Ks -1 cause the parent γ-phase to transform martensitically to a niobium supersaturated variant of the α-phase. This phase exhibits low hardness and strength, high ductility, good corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. As cooling rate decreases from 10 Ks -1 to 0.2 Ks -1 , microstructural changes (consistent with spinodal decomposition) occur to an increasing extent. These changes produce increases in hardness and strength and decreases in ductility, corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. At cooling rates less than 0.2 Ks -1 the parent phase undergoes cellular decomposition to a coarse two-phase lamellar microstructure which exhibits intermediate strength and ductility, reduced corrosion resistance, and no age hardenability. An analysis of the cooling rates indicates that fully martensitic microstructures can be obtained in plates as thick as 50 mm

  7. The use of skewness, kurtosis and neural networks for determining corrosion mechanism from electrochemical noise data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, S.; Bell, G.E.C.; Edgemon, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the work undertaken to de-skill the complex procedure of determining corrosion mechanisms derived from electrochemical noise data. The use of neural networks is discussed and applied to the real time generated electrochemical noise data files with the purpose of determining characteristics particular to individual types of corrosion mechanisms. The electrochemical noise signals can have a wide dynamic range and various methods of raw data pre-processing prior to neural network analysis were investigated. Normalized data were ultimately used as input to the final network analysis. Various network schemes were designed, trained and tested. Factors such as the network learning schedule and network design were considered before a final network was implemented to achieve a solution. Neural networks trained using general and localized corrosion data from various material environment systems were used to analyze data from simulated nuclear waste tank environments with favorable results

  8. Effect of water chemistry on flow accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel measured by on-line corrosion-monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.

    2010-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. Iron and chromium solubility should be the most effective factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on the FAC. It is very important to evaluate the correlation between the solubility and the FAC rate of the carbon steel. In the present study, the effects of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate of carbon steel were evaluated by using high temperature loop equipment with on-line corrosion-monitoring system. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration at pH 7 was also evaluated. The experimental FAC rates were compared with the calculation result, which was obtained from a FAC model developed previously by the authors' group. The tube specimens made of STPT 480 carbon steel were used for the FAC tests. The Cr concentration of STPT 480 was specially adjusted to 0.001 and 0.08 %. The inner diameters of the tubes were 1.6, 2.4, and 3.2 mm. The solutions were fed to the specimens with the flow rate of 1.5 l/min. The temperature of the solution at the specimen was controlled at 140 o C. Test solutions were demineralized water or NH 3 solutions of pH 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The increase in pH more than 9 decreased the FAC rates of both 0.001 and 0.08 % Cr specimens at 140 o C. Increase of the Cr concentration of the material decreased the FAC rate in the solution of pH 7.0, 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The FAC model reproduced well dependence of the experimental FAC behavior on water chemistry. It was confirmed that effect of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate were closely related to the solubility and diffusion of iron and chromium. (author)

  9. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  10. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  11. Ultrasonic Measurement of Erosion/corrosion Rates in Industrial Piping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A. N.; Safavi, V.; Honarvar, F.

    2011-06-01

    Industrial piping systems that carry aggressive corrosion or erosion agents may suffer from a gradual wall thickness reduction that eventually threatens pipe integrity. Thinning rates could be estimated from the very small change in wall thickness values measured by conventional ultrasound over a time span of at least a few months. However, measurements performed over shorter time spans would yield no useful information—minor signal distortions originating from grain noise and ultrasonic equipment imperfections prevent a meaningful estimate of the minuscule reduction in echo travel time. Using a Model-Based Estimation (MBE) technique, a signal processing scheme has been developed that enables the echo signals from the pipe wall to be separated from the noise. This was implemented in a laboratory experimental program, featuring accelerated erosion/corrosion on the inner wall of a test pipe. The result was a reduction in the uncertainty in the wall thinning rate by a factor of four. This improvement enables a more rapid response by system operators to a change in plant conditions that could pose a pipe integrity problem. It also enables a rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of new corrosion inhibiting agents under plant operating conditions.

  12. Monitoring of corrosion rates of Fe-Cu alloys under wet/dry condition in weakly alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Je Kyoung; Nishikata, Atsushi; Tsuru, Tooru

    2002-01-01

    When the steel, containing scrap elements like copper, is used as reinforcing steel bars for concrete, the steel is exposed to alkaline environments. in this study, AC impedance technique has been applied to the monitoring of corrosion rates of iron and several Fe-Cu (0.4, 10wt%) alloys in a wet-dry cycle condition. The wet-dry cycle was conducted by exposure to alternate conditions of 1 hour-immersion in a simulated pH10 concrete solution (Ca(OH) 2 ) containing 0.01M NaCl and 3 hour-drying at 298K and 50%RH. The corrosion rate of the iron is greatly accelerated by the wet-dry cycles. Because the active FeOOH species, which are produced by the oxidation of Fe(II, III)oxide in air during drying, act as very strong oxidants to the corrosion in the wet condition. As the drying progresses, iron shows a large increase in the corrosion rate and a small shift of the corrosion potential to the positive values. This can be explained by acceleration of oxygen transport through the thin electrolyte layer In contrast to iron, the Fe-Cu alloys show low corrosion rates and the high corrosion potentials in whole cycles

  13. The Corrosion Rate Measurement of Inconel 690 on High Temperature andPressure by Using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Febrianto

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature andpressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, pressure and temperature canbe simulated. The environment of this experiment is 0.1 ppm of chloridesolution, which permit to dissolved in secondary cooling of steam generator.The corrosion rate measurement was done on temperature between 150 o C and230 o C with step 10 o C. Pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurredin Autoclave. Corrosion rate is measured by CMS100. From the Tafel analysis,corrosion rate of Inconel 690 linearity increased from 6.548 x 10 -5 mpy to4.331 x 10 -4 mpy. It concludes that Inconel 690 is resist on corrosionenvironment, so it's most using on the fabrication of steam generator tubeson the advanced power plant. (author)

  14. Trace water vapor determination in nitrogen and corrosive gases using infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, L.H.; Niemczyk, T.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stallard, B.R.; Garcia, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The generation of particles in gas handling systems as a result of corrosion is a major concern in the microelectronics industry. The corrosion can be caused by the presence of trace quantities of water in corrosive gases such as HCl or HBr. FTIR spectroscopy has been shown to be a method that can be made compatible with corrosive gases and is capable of detecting low ppb levels of water vapor. In this report, the application of FTIR spectroscopy combined with classical least squares multivariate calibration to detect trace H{sub 2}O in N{sub 2}, HCl and HBr is discussed. Chapter 2 discusses the gas handling system and instrumentation required to handle corrosive gases. A method of generating a background spectrum useful to the measurements discussed in this report, as well as in other application areas such as gas phase environmental monitoring, is discussed in Chapter 3. Experimental results obtained with the first system are presented in Chapter 4. Those results made it possible to optimize the design options for the construction of a dedicate system for low ppb water vapor determination. These designs options are discussed in Chapter 5. An FTIR prototype accessory was built. In addition, a commercially available evacuable FTIR system was obtained for evaluation. Test results obtained with both systems are discussed in Chapter 6. Experiments dealing with the interaction between H{sub 2}O-HCl and potential improvements to the detection system are discussed in Chapter 7.

  15. Effects of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium by cooling rate-controlled solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichi; Liu, Debao; You, Chen; Chen, Minfang

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium developed for biomedical applications. High-purity magnesium samples with different grain size were prepared by the cooling rate-controlled solidification. Electrochemical and immersion tests were employed to measure the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium with different grain size. The electrochemical polarization curves indicated that the corrosion susceptibility increased as the grain size decrease. However, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and immersion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium is improved as the grain size decreases. The improvement in the corrosion resistance is attributed to refine grain can produce more uniform and density film on the surface of sample.

  16. The effects of time, temperature and rotation of water on the corrosion rate of different types of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Daud; Jamaliah Shariff.

    1984-01-01

    By using hot plate/magnetic stirrer and immersion technique, the steel corroded uniformly and their corrosion rates vary due to type of steel, time of immersion, temperature and rotation of water. Therefore the rate of general corrosion, or sealing, of steel alloys is influenced by a number of factors, those best established being the composition of the metal, time, temperature, velocity, cleanliness or roughness of the metal surface and direct contact with solutions of the other materials. (author)

  17. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  18. Determination of pollution for the effect of sea salt aerosols corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayasu, Fumio; Umehara, Toshihiro; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Matsukawa, Kiyokazu

    2007-01-01

    All of 15 nuclear power plants in Fukui Prefecture are located in the Japan Sea Coast. Corrosion is strongly influenced by material and environmental factors. We installed the salt damage experimental yard at Awara sea coast in March, 2006. We are doing the open air test, sheltered test without filter and with filter. The corrosivity of carbon steel of winter was higher than it of summer at Awara facility. The measurement of chloride deposition rate was done by the dry gauze method. The correlation between chloride deposition rate and the average velocity of the wind was found. The correlation between chloride deposition rate and the average rainfall was a little complicate. It means the chloride deposition rate has maximum value at a certain rainfall amount. No other clear relation was found. (author)

  19. Corrosion rates of fasteners in treated wood exposed to 100% relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    In the past, gravimetric corrosion data for fasteners exposed to treated wood has been reported as a percent weight loss. Although percent weight loss is a valid measure of corrosion for comparing identical fasteners, it can distort the corrosion performance of fasteners with different geometries and densities. This report reevaluates a key report on the corrosiveness...

  20. Optimization of the method for determining the corrosion-crevice repassivation potential of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuichi; Akashi, Masatsune; Sasaki, Hidetsugu; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the resistance of a candidate overpack material for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste to the crevice corrosion, the optimized test method for determining the corrosion-crevice repassivation potential, E R,CREV , of a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (Alloy 22) was developed based on that of stainless steels (JIS G0592). It was found that two restrictions shall be satisfied for determining the valid value of E R,CREV for Alloy 22. Restriction (a) was to avoid transpassive dissolution, and (b) was to obtain a penetration depth of 65 μm or more in creviced areas. The recommended procedure in JIS G 0592 at the corrosion-crevice initiation stage, which involved the potentiodynamic anodic polarization at a scan rate of 30 mV min -1 , could not satisfy the restriction (a). Consequently, we adopted the potentiostatic holding at the potential below the critical potential for transpassive dissolution. The recommended procedure in JIS G 0592 at the corrosion-crevice propagation stage, which involved the galvanostatic holding at an applied current of 200 μA for 2 hours, could not always satisfy the restriction (b), and the applied current of 1600 μA or more could not satisfy the restriction (a). Therefore, we adopted the galvanostatic holding at a current of 800 μA for 2 hours. The limits of safety usage of Alloy 22 were evaluated by values of E R,CREV which were measured with the optimized procedure in 0.1 to 4 mol dm -3 sodium chloride solutions at 90degC. (author)

  1. Chloride-induced corrosion mechanism and rate of enamel- and epoxy-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Fujian; Chen, Genda; Brow, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    The chloride-induced corrosion mechanisms of uncoated, pure enamel (PE)-coated, mixed enamel (ME)-coated, double enamel (DE)-coated, and fusion bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar cylinders are investigated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution and compared through electrochemical tests and visual inspection. Corrosion initiated after 29 or 61 days of tests in all uncoated and enamel-coated steel bars, and after 244 days of tests in some FBE-coated steel bars. In active stage, DE- and FBE-coated steel bars are subjected to the highest and lowest corrosion rates, respectively. The uncoated and ME-coated steel bars revealed relatively uniform corrosion while the PE-, DE-, and FBE-coated steel bars experienced pitting corrosion around damaged coating areas. Due to the combined effect of ion diffusion and capillary suction, wet–dry cyclic immersion caused more severe corrosion than continuous immersion. Both exposure conditions affected the corrosion rate more significantly than the water–cement ratio in mortar design.

  2. Determination of the speed of corrosion of aluminum brass in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarce, M.B; Vasquez, M; Sanchez, S.R de

    2004-01-01

    Copper alloys are widely used for water conduits. This work defines the speed of corrosion of aluminum brass (Cu76Zn22Al2) in potable water by comparing the results from electrochemical tests and from weight loss tests. The chosen medium is synthetic drinking water (pH 7.6) whose composition is the average for the drinking water in Mar del Plata city. Coupons were prepared for the weight loss test, which were kept in artificial potable water for 90 days. The flow of corrosion was determined based on the resulting weight loss. After the period of immersion, the coupons showed pitting. The resistance to polarization (Rp) was also determined at different immersion times with potential jumps, potentiodynamic sweeps and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The Rp values obtained with the different electrochemical methods are in agreement, and they increase over time. This increase can be attributed to the growth of a layer of oxide over the metallic surface. Based on the record of polarization curves the Tafel slopes were obtained and the corrosion current was estimated after 2 hrs and 192 hrs of immersion. The corrosion current values obtained for the different electrochemical methods match the results obtained from the weight loss test (CW)

  3. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2003-11-01

    . This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 μm/year. (author)

  4. Corrosion rate of API 5L Gr. X60 multipurpose steel pipeline under combined effect of water and crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jian; Wang, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Multipurpose pipeline is often seriously corroded during its service life, and the phenomenon is more prominent once the transportation medium is changed. Electrochemical polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy of the API 5L Gr. X60 steel pipeline's corrosion process in sedimentary water with different ion types and their concentrations have been studied in this work. The results showed that the corrosion rates were found to be 0.00418 and 0.00232 mm/a for pure water and crude oil, respectively. However, for the mixtures of water and crude oil (with water content increased from 0.2 vol% to 10 vol%), the corrosion rate increased consistently and reached a maximum value of 0.15557 mm/a for 10 vol% water in crude oil. The effect of the concentration of various ions, namely, chloride, bicarbonate and sulfate in (oil/water) mixtures on the corrosion rate was characterized by weight-loss method. The results showed that with increasing the ions' concentrations, the corresponding exchange current density increased significantly. The results were further supported by the observations of corrosion morphology using scanning electron microscopy and are helpful in devising guidelines which would help in reducing corrosion in multipurpose transport pipelines involving a change of transported medium during their service life.

  5. Effectiveness of Ti-micro alloying in relation to cooling rate on corrosion of AZ91 Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candan, S.; Celik, M.; Candan, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, micro Ti-alloyed AZ91 Mg alloys (AZ91 + 0.5wt.%Ti) have been investigated in order to clarify effectiveness of micro alloying and/or cooling rate on their corrosion properties. Molten alloys were solidified under various cooling rates by using four stage step mold. The microstructural investigations were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behaviors of the alloys were evaluated by means of immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Mg 17 Al 12 (β) intermetallic phase in the microstructure of AZ91 Mg alloy formed as a net-like structure. The Ti addition has reduced the distribution and continuity of β intermetallic phase and its morphology has emerged as fully divorced eutectic. Compared to AZ91 alloy, the effect of the cooling rate in Ti-added alloy on the grain size was less pronounced. When AZ91 and its Ti-added alloys were compared under the same cooling conditions, the Ti addition showed notably high corrosion resistance. Electrochemical test results showed that while I corr values of AZ91 decrease with the increase in the cooling rate, the effect of the cooling rate on I corr values was much lower in the Ti-added alloy. The corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy was sensitive towards the cooling rates while Ti-added alloy was not affected much from the cooling conditions. - Highlights: • Effect the cooling rate on grain size was less pronounced in the Ti-added alloy. • The morphology of the β phase transformed into fully divorced eutectics. • Ti addition exhibited significantly higher corrosion resistance. • Ti micro alloying is more effective than faster cooling of the alloy on corrosion.

  6. Markov chain model helps predict pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Hallen, J. M. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Esquivel-Amezcua, A. [PEMEX PEP Region Sur, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Valor, A. [Universidad de la Habana, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)

    2010-07-01

    Recent reports place pipeline corrosion costs in North America at seven billion dollars per year. Pitting corrosion causes the higher percentage of failures among other corrosion mechanisms. This has motivated multiple modelling studies to be focused on corrosion pitting of underground pipelines. In this study, a continuous-time, non-homogenous pure birth Markov chain serves to model external pitting corrosion in buried pipelines. The analytical solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process gives the transition probability function in a discrete space of pit depths. The transition probability function can be completely identified by making a correlation between the stochastic pit depth mean and the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. The model proposed in this study can be applied to pitting corrosion data from repeated in-line pipeline inspections. Case studies presented in this work show how pipeline inspection and maintenance planning can be improved by using the proposed Markovian model for pitting corrosion.

  7. Measuring the corrosion rate of steel in concrete – effect of measurement technique, polarisation time and current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    , are in some studies considered the main reasons for the variations. This paper presents an experimental study on the quantitative effect of polarisation time and current on the measured polarisation resistance – and thus the corrosion current density – of passively and actively corroding steel. Two...... electrochemical techniques often used in instruments for on-site corrosion rate measurements are investigated. On passively corroding reinforcement the measured polarisation resistance was for both techniques found to be highly affected by the polarisation time and current and no plateaus at either short or long...... rate for actively corroding steel. For both techniques guidelines for polarisation times and currents are given for (on-site) non-destructive corrosion rate measurements on reinforcement steel in concrete....

  8. The determinants of credit rating: brazilian evidence

    OpenAIRE

    MurciaI,Flávia Cruz de Souza; Dal-Ri Murcia,Fernando; Rover,Suliani; Borba,José Alonso

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the determinant factors of credit rating in Brazil. The relevance of this proposal is based on the importance of the subject as well as the uniqueness of the Brazilian market. As for originality, the great majority of previous studies regarding credit rating have been developed in the US, UK and Australia; therefore the effect on other markets is still unclear, especially in emerging markets, like Brazil. We’ve used a Generalized Estimating Equa...

  9. Dose-rate determination by radiochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangini, A.; Pernicka, E.; Wagner, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    At the previous TL Specialist Seminr we had suggested that α-counting is an unsuitable technique for dose-rate determination due to overcounting effects. This is confirmed by combining α-counting, neutron activation analysis, fission track counting, α-spectrometry on various pottery samples. One result of this study is that disequilibrium in the uranium decay chain alone cannot account for the observed discrepancies between α-counting and chemical analysis. Therefore we propose for routine dose-rate determination in TL dating to apply chemical analysis of the radioactive elements supplemented by an α-spectrometric equilibrium check. (author)

  10. The determinants of exchange rate in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel BENAZIC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The dilemma for every country with an independent monetary policy is which kind of exchange rate arrangement should be applied. Through the exchange rate policy, countries can influence their economies, i.e. price stability and export competiveness. Croatia is a new EU member state, it has its own monetary policy and currency but it is on the way to euro introduction. Regarding the experiences from the beginning of the 1990s when Croatia was faced with serious monetary instabilities and hyperinflation, the goal of Croatian National Bank (CNB is to ensure price stability and one way to do so is through exchange rate policy. Croatia, as a small and open economy, has applied a managed floating exchange rate regime. The exchange rate is determined primarily by the foreign exchange supply and demand on the foreign exchange market, with occasional market interventions by the CNB. Therefore, in order to maintain exchange rate stability, policymakers must be able to recognize how changes in these factors affect changes in the exchange rate. This research aims to find a relationship among the main sources of foreign currency inflow and outflow and the level of exchange rate in Croatia. The analysis is carried out by using the bounds testing (ARDL approach for co-integration. The results indicate the existence of a stable co-integration relationship between the observed variables, whereby an increase in the majority of variables leads to an exchange rate appreciation.

  11. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  12. Corrosion studies on PREPP waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    Deformation or Failure Test and Accelerated Corrosion Test procedures were conducted to investigate the effect of formulation variables on the corrosion of oversize waste in Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) concrete waste forms. The Deformation or Failure Test did not indicate substantial waste form swelling from corrosion. The presence or absence of corrosion inhibitor was the most significant factor relative to measured half-cell potentials identified in the Accelerated Corrosion Test. However, corrosion inhibitor was determined to be only marginally beneficial. While this study produced no evidence that corrosion is of sufficient magnitude to produce serious degradation of PREPP waste forms, the need for corrosion rate testing is suggested. 11 references, 4 figures, 8 tables

  13. DETERMINATION OF THE SPECIFIC GROWTH RATE ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sewage generation is one of the dense problems Nigerians encounter on daily bases, mostly at the urbanized area where factories and industries are located. This paper is aimed at determining the specific growth rate “K” of biological activities on cassava wastewater during degradation using Michaelis-Menten Equation.

  14. Available Prediction Methods for Corrosion under Insulation (CUI): A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Burhani Nurul Rawaida Ain; Muhammad Masdi; Ismail Mokhtar Che

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is an increasingly important issue for the piping in industries especially petrochemical and chemical plants due to its unexpected catastrophic disaster. Therefore, attention towards the maintenance and prediction of CUI occurrence, particularly in the corrosion rates, has grown in recent years. In this study, a literature review in determining the corrosion rates by using various prediction models and method of the corrosion occurrence between the external su...

  15. Corrosion measurement using flux gate magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashdi Shah Ahmad; Chong Cheong Wei

    2001-01-01

    The ability of fluxgate magnetometer to detect and measure quantitatively the magnetic field generated by electrochemical corrosion is presented. In this study, each sample (iron plate) was exposed to a range of increasingly corrosive environment. During the exposure, we measured the magnetic field above the sample for specific duration of time. The result shows that there is a clear relationship between corrosivity of the environment and the change in magnitude of magnetic field that was generated by the corrosion reaction. Therefore, the measurement of magnetic field might be used to determine the corrosion rates. (Author)

  16. Corrosion mechanism applicable to biodegradable magnesium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrens, Andrej, E-mail: Andrejs.Atrens@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Liu Ming; Zainal Abidin, Nor Ishida [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Much of our understanding of the Mg corrosion mechanism is based on research using aggressive chloride based solutions like 3% NaCl, which are appropriate for understand the corrosion for applications such as auto construction. The chloride ions tend to cause break down of the partly protective surface film on the Mg alloy surface. The corrosion rate increases with exposure time until steady state is reached, which may take several weeks. An overview is provided of the aspects which determine the corrosion of Mg alloys: (i) measurement details; (ii) impurity elements Fe, Ni, Cu and Co; (iii) second phases; (iv) surface films and surface condition and (v) stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This understanding is used to help understand Mg corrosion for Mg as a biodegradable implant for medical applications. Solutions that elucidate these applications tend to form surface films and the corrosion rate tends to decrease with immersion time.

  17. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Qin

    Full Text Available FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10−7–5.748 × 10−7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa m. The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface. Keywords: FV520B, Wedge opening loading specimen, Stress corrosion cracking, Hydrogen sulfide

  18. Dose rate determining factors of PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terachi, Takumi; Kuge, Toshiharu; Nakano, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between dose rate trends and water chemistry has been studied to clarify the determining factors on the dose rates. Therefore dose rate trends and water chemistry of 11 PWR plants of KEPCO (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.) were summarized. It is indicated that the chemical composition of the oxide film, behaviour of corrosion products and Co-58/Co-60 ratio in the primary system have effected dose rate trends based on plant operation experiences for over 40 years. According to plant operation experiences, the amount of Co-58 has been decreasing with the increasing duration of SG (Steam Generator) usage. It is indicated that the stable oxide film formation on the inner surface of SG tubing, is a major beneficial factor for radiation sources reduction. On the other hand, the reduction of the amount of Co-60 for the long term has been not clearly observed especially in particular high dose plants. The primary water parameters imply that considering release and purification balance on Co-59 is important to prevent accumulation of source term in primary water. In addition, the effect of zinc injection, which relates to the chemical composition of oxide film, was also assessed. As the results, the amount of radioactive Co has been clearly decreased. The decreasing trend seems to correlate to the half-life of Co-60, because it is considered that the injected zinc prevents the uptake of radioactive Co into the oxide film on the inner surface of the components and piping. In this paper, the influence of water chemistry and the replacement experiences of materials on the dose rates were discussed. (author)

  19. The Determinants of Credit Rating: Brazilian Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Cruz de Souza Murcia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to identify the determinant factors of credit rating in Brazil. The relevance of this proposal is based on the importance of the subject as well as the uniqueness of the Brazilian market. As for originality, the great majority of previous studies regarding credit rating have been developed in the US, UK and Australia; therefore the effect on other markets is still unclear, especially in emerging markets, like Brazil. We’ve used a Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE model considering a panel structure with a categorical dependent variable (credit rating and ten independent variables: leverage, profitability, size, financial coverage, growth, liquidity, corporate governance, control, financial market performance and internationalization. The sample consisted of 153 rating observations during the period of 1997-2011 for a total of 49 public firms operating in the Brazilian Market. Results showed that leverage and internationalization are significant at the 1% level in explaining credit rating. Performance in the financial market was significant at a 5% level; profitability and growth were also statistically significant, but at a 10% significance level.

  20. Importance of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on rates of hydrogen production from galvanized steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the known sources of hydrogen gas within a nuclear plant containment building during a LOCA is the high temperature corrosion of galvanized steel yielding hydrogen gas. The importance of this source of hydrogen will vary depending on the severity of the accident. In an accident which resulted in core degradation, for example, the major source of hydrogen would probably be the metal-water reaction of the zircaloy cladding, and the corrosion of galvanized steel would then become a relatively minor source of hydrogen. However, in an accident in which core degradation is avoided or limited to minor damage, the corrosion of galvanized steel, and presumably of other materials as well, would then become a major contributor to the buildup of hydrogen within containment. The purpose of this paper is to present the overall effects of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on the rate of hydrogen generation over a broad range of each parameter

  1. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...

  2. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  3. The corrosion rate and the hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reducing condition-III. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Taniguchi, N.; Kawakami, S.

    2005-03-01

    Titanium is one of the candidate materials for overpacks as a high corrosion resistance metal. At the initial stage of repository, oxidizing condition will be given around the overpack because oxygen will be brought from the ground. The oxygen will be consumed by the reaction with impurities in buffer material or corrosion of overpack, and reducing condition will be achieved around the overpack. With the changing of redox condition, the water reduction becomes to dominate the cathodic reaction accompanying hydrogen generation. Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are main causes of the damage of long term integrity of titanium overpack. However, it is not known about the corrosion resistance and hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reduction condition. In this study, the completely sealed ampoule test and the immersion test of titanium in aqueous solution and bentonite was carried out. In order to obtain reliable data about the hydrogen generation rate and the ratio of hydrogen absorption in titanium. From the result of 3 years immersion tests, corrosion rate of titanium were estimated to be in the order of 10 -2 ∼10 -1 μm/y in the aqueous solution, and 10 -3 ∼10 -2 μm/y in bentonite. This value is almost the same as the last report. Almost all the hydrogen generated by corrosion was absorbed in titanium in the immersion tests in completely sealed ampoule. In the examination that changed each parameter, it was suggested that the amount of the hydrogen absorption become 2∼3 times in 1M HCO 3- and pH13. (author)

  4. Determination of the characteristics of a Schottky barrier formed by latent finger mark corrosion of brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J W

    2009-01-01

    The ideality factor (η) and barrier height (φ B ) for a metal-copper(I) oxide rectifying contact formed by the latent finger mark corrosion of α phase brass have been determined from forward bias I/V characteristics in the range 0.4 V ≤ V ≤ 0.55 V. Rectifying contacts formed from the finger mark deposits of different people gave η = 1.5-1.6 ± 0.1 and φ B = 0.49-0.52 ± 0.04 V. A Mott-Schottky plot of capacitance-voltage measurements in reverse bias gave the built in potential ψ bi = 0.4 ± 0.1 V, the gradient of the plot confirming the conductivity of the finger mark corrosion as p type. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of the corrosion showed that Cu(I), Cu(II) and Zn(II) can co-exist on the surface, the Cu(I) : Cu(II) and Zn : Cu ratios determining whether a rectifying contact is formed. Initial findings suggest that when the concentration of Cu(I) dominates the Cu(I) : Cu(II) ratio (approximately 6 : 1), or when Cu(II) is absent, a rectifying contact can be formed subject to the Zn : Cu ratio being approximately 1 : 3. As the surface concentration of zinc increases, the rectifying contact is degraded until the concentration of zinc approaches that of copper when no evidence of a Schottky barrier is observed and the contact appears ohmic.

  5. Experimental Protocol to Determine the Chloride Threshold Value for Corrosion in Samples Taken from Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Ueli M; Boschmann, Carolina; Wagner, Matthias; Elsener, Bernhard

    2017-08-31

    The aging of reinforced concrete infrastructure in developed countries imposes an urgent need for methods to reliably assess the condition of these structures. Corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel is the most frequent cause for degradation. While it is well known that the ability of a structure to withstand corrosion depends strongly on factors such as the materials used or the age, it is common practice to rely on threshold values stipulated in standards or textbooks. These threshold values for corrosion initiation (Ccrit) are independent of the actual properties of a certain structure, which clearly limits the accuracy of condition assessments and service life predictions. The practice of using tabulated values can be traced to the lack of reliable methods to determine Ccrit on-site and in the laboratory. Here, an experimental protocol to determine Ccrit for individual engineering structures or structural members is presented. A number of reinforced concrete samples are taken from structures and laboratory corrosion testing is performed. The main advantage of this method is that it ensures real conditions concerning parameters that are well known to greatly influence Ccrit, such as the steel-concrete interface, which cannot be representatively mimicked in laboratory-produced samples. At the same time, the accelerated corrosion test in the laboratory permits the reliable determination of Ccrit prior to corrosion initiation on the tested structure; this is a major advantage over all common condition assessment methods that only permit estimating the conditions for corrosion after initiation, i.e., when the structure is already damaged. The protocol yields the statistical distribution of Ccrit for the tested structure. This serves as a basis for probabilistic prediction models for the remaining time to corrosion, which is needed for maintenance planning. This method can potentially be used in material testing of civil infrastructures, similar to established

  6. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birbilis, N., E-mail: nick.birbilis@monash.ed [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Cavanaugh, M.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University (United States); Sudholz, A.D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A. [CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Gibson, M.A. [CSIRO Division of Process Science and Engineering (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to {approx}6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  7. Application of electromagnetic fields to improve the removal rate of radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Tae Young; Lee, Kun Jai; Song, Min Chul

    2004-01-01

    To comply with increasingly strict regulations for protection against radiation exposure, many nuclear power plants have been working ceaselessly to reduce and control both the radiation sources within power plants and the radiation exposure experienced by operational and maintenance personnel. Many research studies have shown that deposits of irradiated corrosion products on the surfaces of coolant systems are the main cause of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. These corrosion product deposits on the fuel-clad surface are also known to be main factors in the onset of Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA). Hence, there is a great deal of ongoing research on water chemistry and corrosion processes. In this study, a magnetic filter with permanent magnets was devised to remove the corrosion products in the coolant stream by taking advantage of the magnetic properties of the corrosion particles. Experiments using permanent magnets to filter the corrosion products demonstrated a removal efficiency of over 90% for particles above 5 μm. This finding led to the construction of an electromagnetic device that causes the metallic particulates to flocculate into larger aggregates of about 5 μm in diameter by using a novel application of electromagnetic flocculation on radioactive corrosion products

  8. Outdoor corrosion of zinc coated carbon steel, determined by thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, M.L.; Laguzzi, G.; De Cristofaro, N.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Thin Layer Activation was applied in the frame of a European programme addressed to the evaluation of the corrosion the behaviour of different steels. This included outdoor exposure of zinc coated carbon steel in a rural-marine climatic environment, for a period of several months. The zinc layer of specimens was 10 micrometers thick. For the TLA studies 65Zn radio nuclides were produced along the full depth of the coating, by a cyclotron accelerated deuteron beam. For quantification of the material release, activity versus depth was determined using different thickness of Zn coatings on top the carbon steel. After exposure corrosion product were removed from the surface using a pickling solution and the residual activity was determined by gamma spectrometry. The high sensitivity of the method allowed the evaluation of relatively small thickness losses (i.e. 1.2 micrometer). Thickness loss results, obtained by the TLA method, were compared with those arising from the Atomic Absorption analysis of zinc detected in the pickling solutions. A good agreement was observed between the different methods

  9. Detection and depth determination of corrosion defects in embedded bolts using ultrasonic testing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Shan; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki; Yuya, Hideki; Ito, Keisuke

    2011-01-01

    A great number of anchor bolts are used to fix various components to concrete foundation in thermal and nuclear power plants. As aging power plants degrade, it is feared that defects resulted from corrosion may occur underground. In this paper, a measurement method utilizing the phased array technique is developed to detect such defects. Measurement results show that this method can detect local and circumferential corrosion defects introduced artificially, but defect echo position appears to be farther away from the bolt head than is actually the case. A finite element simulation of wave propagation shows that longitudinal waves excited by a phased array probe are mode converted and reflected at the defect and at bolt wall, which results in the position of the defect echo appearing to be farther away than the defect actually is. Moreover, an approach for determining the depth of defects using measurement results is also proposed based on numerical results. The depths determined by the proposed approach agree with the actual depths with a maximum error of 1.8 mm and a RMSE of 1.06 mm. (author)

  10. Stress field determination in an alloy 600 stress corrosion crack specimen; Determination du champ de contraintes dans une eprouvette de corrosion sous contrainte de l`alliage 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassineux, B.; Labbe, T.

    1995-05-01

    In the context of EDF studies on stress corrosion cracking rates in the Alloy 600 steam generators tubes, we studied the influence of strain hardened surface layers on the different stages of cracking for a tensile smooth specimen (TLT). The stress field was notably assessed to try and explain the slow/rapid-propagation change observed beyond the strain hardened layers. The main difficulty is to simulate in a finite element model the inner and outer surfaces of these strain hardened layers, produced by the final manufacturing stages of SG tubes which have not been heat treated. In the model, the strain hardening is introduced by simulating a multi-layer material. Residual stresses are simulated by an equivalent fictitious thermomechanical calculation, realigned with respect to X-ray measurements. The strain hardening introduction method was validated by an analytical calculation giving identical results. Stress field evolution induced by specimen tensile loading were studied using an elastoplastic 2D finite element calculations performed with the Aster Code. The stress profile obtained after load at 660 MPa shows no stress discontinuity at the boundary between the strain hardened layer and the rest of the tube. So we propose that a complementary calculation be performed, taking into account the multi-cracked state of the strain hardened zones by means of a damage variable. In fact, this state could induce stress redistribution in the un-cracked area, which would perhaps provide an explanation of the crack-ground rate change beyond the strain hardened zone. The calculations also evidence the harmful effects of plastic strains on a strain hardened layer due to the initial state of the tube (not heat-treated), to grit blasting or to shot peening. The initial compressive stress condition of this surface layer becomes, after plastic strain, a tensile stress condition. These results are confirmed by laboratory test. (author). 10 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs., 2 appends.

  11. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of 125 I and 103 Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089–6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated 125 I and 103 Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 125 I and 6 103 Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 × 2.7 × 0.05 cm 3 voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the 125 I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for 103 Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were ⩽0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in 125 I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The 103 Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when calculated with the TG-43U1 rather than the NNDC(2000) initial spectrum. The measured values from three different

  12. Strain rate and temperature effects on the stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 steam generator tubing in the primary water conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, U.C.; van Rooyen, D.

    1985-01-01

    A single heat of Inconel Alloy 600 was examined in this work, using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in simulated primary water at temperatures of 325 0 -345 0 -365 0 C. The best measure of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was percent SCC present on the fracture surface. Strain rate did not seem to affect crack growth rate significantly, but there is some question about the accuracy of calculating these values in the absence of a direct indication of when a crack initiates. Demarcation was determined between domains of temperature/strain rate where SCC either did, or did not, occur. Slower extension rates were needed to produce SCC as the temperature was lowered. 10 figs

  13. Analysis of Gamma Dose Rate Caused by Corrosion Products inside the Containment Building of Yonngwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 During Shutdown Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Occupational radiation exposure(ORE) of nuclear power plant(NPP) workers mainly occurs during the shutdown period. Major radioactive sources are the corrosion products released from the reactor coolant system(RCS). The corrosion products consist of circulating crud and deposited crud. Major radioactive corrosion products, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co, are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. In this study, the corrosion products regarding cobalt were evaluated during the shutdown period, and gamma dose rates caused by them were calculated at the main working area inside the containment building of the Yonggwang NPP Unit 3.

  14. Determining leach rates of monolithic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Dole, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provides a conservative means of predicting long-term release from monolithic waste forms, offering a simple and relatively quick means of determining effective solid diffusion coefficients. As presented here, these coefficients can be used in a simple model to predict maximum release rates or be used in more complex site-specific models to predict actual site performance. For waste forms that pass the structural integrity test, this model also allows the prediction of EP-Tox leachate concentrations from these coefficients. Thus, the results of the ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provide a powerful tool that can be used to predict the waste concentration limits in order to comply with the EP-Toxicity criteria for characteristically nonhazardous waste. 12 refs., 3 figs

  15. Determination of Ga-67 disintegration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Katia A.; Koskinas, Maria F.; Dias, Mauro S.

    1996-01-01

    One of the consequences of the production by IPEN of new radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine, as the case of Ga-67, is the need of new standard sources of the radionuclide obtained in a fast and simple way. The Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radionuclideos at IPEN has a well-type ionization chamber system, the most suitable for this purpose. In order to calibrate this system it was necessary to standardize Ga-67 solutions by an absolute system. The present work gives details on the Ga-67 disintegration rate determination by an 4 π β-γ coincidence system, gamma spectrometry using an HPGe detector and measurements using a 1383A - type ionization chamber, in order to check the consistency in the adopted methodology. (author)

  16. The Effect of superficial cracks of the concrete on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in Persian Golf (Booshehr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar, A.; Rajabi, A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of superficial cracks in concrete increases the diffusion of destructive agents into concrete and the corrosion of rebars will take place. In the present work, the effects of cracks width on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete containing cements type I and II at Persian Gulf water have been studied. The results show that the corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete with cracks width less than 0.4 mm is negligible, but with increasing the cracks width to 0.7 mm, the corrosion rate increase rapidly. Also, the corrosion gate of gebars in the concrete containing cement type I is more than that of cement type II. The visual inspection of the surface area of gebars shows that the corroded area is 6-7 times of the crack width and length

  17. An electrochemical study of the corrosion behavior of primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion behavior for 2219-T87 aluminum coated with various primers, including those used for the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the Space Shuttle Transportation System, were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Corrosion potential time, polarization resistance time, electrical resistance time, and corrosion rate time measurements were all investigated. It was found that electrical resistance time and corrosion rate time measurement were most useful for studying the corrosion behavior of painted aluminum. Electrical resistance time determination give useful information concerning the porosity of paint films, while corrosion rate time curves give important information concerning overall corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. In general, the corrosion rate time curves all exhibited at least one peak during the 30 day test period, which was attributed, according to the proposed mechanisms, to the onset of the hydrogen evolution reaction and the beginning of destruction of the protective properties of the paint film.

  18. Methods and apparatus for managing corrosion in buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chey, S Jay; Hamann, Hendrik F; Klein, Levente Ioan; Schappert, Michael Alan; Stepanchuk, Andriy

    2015-02-03

    Principles of the invention provide methods and apparatus for providing corrosion management in buildings. In one aspect, an exemplary method includes the step of receiving first data relating corrosion rate to a plurality of environmental conditions. This first data is subsequently utilized to determine a quantitative relationship between corrosion rate and the plurality of environmental conditions. In another step, second data indicative of one or more environmental conditions within a building is received. A corrosion rate in the building is then determined at least in part by applying the determined quantitative relationship to this second data.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Sulfuric Acid Condensation and Corrosion Rate in Motored Bukh DV24 Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjemtrup, Lars; Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Meyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The work conducted in this paper presents a novel experimental setup to study sulfuric acid cold corrosion of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines. The process is simulated in a motored light duty BUKH DV24 diesel engine where the charge air contain known amounts of H2SO4 and H......2O vapor. Liner corrosion is measured as iron accumulation in the lubeoil. Similarly sulfuric acid condensation is assessed by measuring the accumulation of sulfur in the lube oil. To clarify the corrosive effect of sulfuric acid the lube oil utilized for experiments is a sulfur free neutral oil...... without alkaline additives (Chevron Neutral Oil 600R). Iron and sulfur accumulation in the lube oil is analyzed withan Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) apparatus. Three test cases with different H2SO4 concentrations are run. Results reveal good agreement between sulfuric acid injection flow...

  20. Points of Interest: What Determines Interest Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Tim

    Interest rates can significantly influence people's behavior. When rates decline, homeowners rush to buy new homes and refinance old mortgages; automobile buyers scramble to buy new cars; the stock market soars, and people tend to feel more optimistic about the future. But even though individuals respond to changes in rates, they may not fully…

  1. Determination of susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of stainless steels type X5CrNi18-10 in field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the DL EPR method (electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop was modified and used to study the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of a stainless steel type X5CrNi18-10. The tests were performed in a special electrochemical cell, with the electrolyte in the gel form. Modified DL EPR method is characterized by simple and high accuracy measurements as well as repeatability of the test results. The indicator of susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (Qr/QpGBA obtained by modified DL EPR method is in a very good agreement with the same indicator obtained by standard DL EPR method. The modified DL EPR method is quantitative and highly selective method. Small differences in the susceptibility of the stainless steel type CrNi18-10 to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking can be determined. Test results can be obtained in a short time. The cost of tests performed by modified DL EPR method is much lower than the cost of tests by conventional chemical methods. Modified DL EPR method can be applied in the field on the stainless steels constructions.

  2. Method and device for the determination of material loss due to corrosion and/or erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugstad, A.; Videm, K.

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and an apparatus for gauging material loss due to corrosion and/or erosion during a certain period of time from a given piece of material which previously has been made radioactive. The material loss is determined by measuring the intensity of the radiactive radiation from the material by means of a radiation intensity meter disposed at a measuring site a fixed distance from said piece of material for the measurement of the radioactive radiation from the piece both at the beginning and at the end of said period of time. Each of the measurements is calibrated by means of an additional radiation source disposed for controllably adopting either a most radiation screened position or alternatively a least screened position with respect to a radiation screen, and thereby providing a known radiation intensity at the measuring site in both positions. The least radiation screened position provides full unscreened radiation intensity at the measuring site, whereas the most screened position provides negligible radiation intensity at said site. The measurement results in the two positions are subsequently compared in order to deduce the contribution of said piece of material to the combined radiation intensity in proporsion to the known contribution of the radiation source. The additional radiation source is preferable made from a calibration body composed of the same material as the piece of material exposed to corrosion and/or erosion, the calibration body body being activated at the same time and by the same activation process as said piece. The calibration body is preferably dimensioned to provide at all time the same radiation intensity at the measuring site as a predetermined material loss from the piece of material, e.g. a prefixed thickness reduction of the same. 4 figs

  3. The Determinants of Country Risk Ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Claude Cosset; Jean Roy

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to replicate Euromoney's and Institutional Investor's country risk ratings on the basis of economic and political variables. The evidence reveals that country risk ratings respond to some of the variables suggested by the theory. In particular, both the level of per capita income and propensity to invest affect positively the rating of a country. In addition, high-ranking countries are less indebted than low-ranking countries. It also appears that the ability of t...

  4. Corrosion Inhibition on SAE 1010 Steel by Nanoscale Exopolysaccharides Coatings Determined by Electrochemical and Surface Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plating, painting and the application of enamel are the most common anti-corrosion treatments. They are effective by providing a barrier of corrosion resistant material between the damaging environment and the structural material. Coatings start failing rapidly if scratched or damaged because a co...

  5. Measurement of Localized Corrosion Rates at Inclusion Particles in AA7075 by In Situ Three Dimensional (3D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Williams, Jason J.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; De Carlo, Francesco; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to measure the localized corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles present in 7075 aluminum alloys in deionized ultra-filtered (DIUF) water. The evolution of hydrogen bubbles was captured as a function of time and the measured volume was used to calculate the local corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles. It was shown that in the absence of chloride ions, stress was needed to create fresh particle surfaces, either by fracture or debonding, to initiate corrosion at the particles.

  6. Prediction equations for corrosion rates of a A-537 and A-516 steels in Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; Mackey, D.B.; Bates, D.J.; Pool, K.H.

    1985-06-01

    Even though the interest in the corrosion of radwaste tanks goes back to the mid-1940's when waste storage was begun, and a fair amount of corrosion work has been done since then, the changes in processes and waste types have outpaced the development of new data pertinent to the new double shell tanks. As a consequence, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began a development of corrosion data on a broad base of waste compositions in 1980. The objective of the program was to provide operations personnel with corrosion rate data as a function of waste temperature and composition. The work performed in this program examined A-537 tank steel in Double Shell Slurry and Future PUREX Wastes, at temperatures between 40 and 180 0 C as well as in Hanford Facilities Waste at 25 and 50 0 C. In general, the corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.001 in./y) and usually less than 0.5 mpy. Excessive corrosion rates (>1 mpy) were only found in dilute waste compositions or in concentrated caustic compositions at temperatures above 140 0 C. Stress corrosion cracking was only observed under similar conditions. The results are presented as polynomial prediction equations with examples of the output of existing computer codes. The codes are not provided in the text but are available from the authors. 12 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs

  7. Predicting concrete corrosion of sewers using artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is often a major failure mechanism for concrete sewers and under such circumstances the sewer service life is largely determined by the progression of microbially induced concrete corrosion. The modelling of sewer processes has become possible due to the improved understanding of in-sewer transformation. Recent systematic studies about the correlation between the corrosion processes and sewer environment factors should be utilized to improve the prediction capability of service life by sewer models. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN)-based approach for modelling the concrete corrosion processes in sewers. The approach included predicting the time for the corrosion to initiate and then predicting the corrosion rate after the initiation period. The ANN model was trained and validated with long-term (4.5 years) corrosion data obtained in laboratory corrosion chambers, and further verified with field measurements in real sewers across Australia. The trained model estimated the corrosion initiation time and corrosion rates very close to those measured in Australian sewers. The ANN model performed better than a multiple regression model also developed on the same dataset. Additionally, the ANN model can serve as a prediction framework for sewer service life, which can be progressively improved and expanded by including corrosion rates measured in different sewer conditions. Furthermore, the proposed methodology holds promise to facilitate the construction of analytical models associated with corrosion processes of concrete sewers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  9. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbilis, N.; Cavanaugh, M.K.; Sudholz, A.D.; Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A.; Gibson, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. → The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). → The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. → The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. → The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to ∼6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  10. TO THE QUESTION ABOUT THE INFLUENCE OF THE STRESSES IN THE ELEMENTS OF THE REINFORCEMENT SHAFTS AT THE RATE OF CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kovalenko

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of laboratory explorations the features of conducting the corrosive process in the shaft reinforcement parts under the load from lifting buckets and rock mass were determined.

  11. Temperature influence on corrosion rate of armco iron in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perboni, G.; Rocchini, G.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the behaviour of Armco iron and several steels in acid solutions (HCl, H 2 SO 4 , H 3 PO 4 ) has been undertaken to determine the temperature effect on dissolution rate. The test temperatures were 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg C. The activation heat was determined by application of the Arrhenius law from colorimetric and electrochemical data. Investigation results obtained by both methods were represented diagrammatically and showed a good agreement, though the discrepancy in the data increased with test temperature

  12. MONETARY MODELS AND EXCHANGE RATE DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Power Party [PPP] based on the law of one price asserts that the change in the exchange rate between .... exchange in international economic transactions has made it vitally evident that the management of ... One lesson from this episode is to ...

  13. Enzymatic spectrophotometric reaction rate determination of aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifković Kata T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame is an artificial sweetener of low caloric value (approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. Aspartame is currently permitted for use in food and beverage production in more than 90 countries. The application of aspartame in food products requires development of rapid, inexpensive and accurate method for its determination. The new assay for determination of aspartame was based on set of reactions that are catalyzed by three different enzymes: α-chymotrypsin, alcohol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Optimization of the proposed method was carried out for: (i α-chymotrypsin activity; (ii time allowed for α-chymotrypsin action, (iii temperature. Evaluation of the developed method was done by determining aspartame content in “diet” drinks, as well as in artificial sweetener pills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46010

  14. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate

  15. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate.

  16. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This is the final report of a 2 year programme aimed at (1) determining the rate of anaerobic corrosion of steel in concrete, (2) investigating the nature of the corrosion products formed on carbon steel embedded in cementitious material under anaerobic conditions and (3) evaluating the effect of hydrogen over-pressures on the rate of anaerobic corrosion. All experiments have been carried out at temperatures in the range 20-30 0 C, ie ambient conditions. 4 refs.; 19 figs.; 6 tabs

  17. Approach to mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking and dose rate reduction rate by water chemistry control in Tokai-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamune, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) had been working on material replacement and measures to mitigate stress in order to maintain the integrity of the structural material of Tokai-Daini nuclear power plant (Tokai-2, BWR, 1,100 MWe; commercial operation started on November 28, 1978). In addition, as Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) environmental mitigation measures, we have been reducing the sulfate ion concentration in the reactor water by improving the regeneration method of the ion exchange resin at condensate purification system. Furthermore, in conducting the SCC environmental mitigation measures by applying hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC during start-up (HDS), we have been reducing the oxidizing agent concentration in the reactor water. On the other hand, as a plant that has not installed condensate filters, we have been working on feed water iron concentration reduction measures in Tokai-2 as part of the dose reduction measures. Therefore, we have improved condensate demineralizer's ion exchange resin and the ion exchange resin cleaning method using the ARCS (Advanced Resin Cleaning System) in order to improve the iron removal performance of condensate demineralizer. This document reports the improvement effect of the SCC environmental mitigation measures and the dose reduction measures by water chemistry management at Tokai-2. In addition, the dose reduction effect of the recently applied zinc injection, and the Electrochemical Corrosion Potential (ECP) monitoring plan under the On-Line Noble Chemical Addition (OLNC™) to be implemented later shall be introduced. (author)

  18. 7 CFR 1714.5 - Determination of interest rates on municipal rate loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of interest rates on municipal rate... General § 1714.5 Determination of interest rates on municipal rate loans. (a) RUS will post on the RUS website, Electric Program HomePage, a schedule of interest rates for municipal rate loans at the beginning...

  19. Influence of tannin content in Terminalia catappa leaves extracts resulted from maceration extraction on decreasing corrosion rate for mild steel in 1M H2SO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramudita, M.; Sukirno; Nasikin, M.

    2018-04-01

    The ability of natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors is necessary to obtain safe corrosion inhibitors for the environment. The tannin compounds derived from plant extract has the ability to decrease the corrosion rate. The purpose of this research is to find the ability of tannin compounds in Terminalia catappa leaves extracts to decrease corrosion rate on mild steel. Terminalia catappa leaves that have been mashed in ethanol solvent extraction using maceration with the variable time 2.4 and 6 days. Mild steel that has been on the sandpaper and cleaned then soak into the 1 M H2SO4. Terminalia catappa leaves extract concentration used is 0, 250, 500, 500, 750, 1000 ppm, the immersion time is 3.6 and 9 hours. Calculating of corrosion rate is used the weight loss method, the analysis of the tannin concentration using GC-MS. The results indicate that highest tannin content equal to 7.23% in 6 days maceration time. The result showed that the corrosion rate was reduced in the presence of tannin content in Terminalia catappa leaves extract.

  20. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  1. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  2. Array-type sensor to determine corrosive conditions in high temperature water under gamma rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.; Tsukada, T.; Uchida, S.; Katoh, C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the problems to determine electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) in high temperature water under irradiation is to apply long-lived and reliable reference electrodes. In order to avoid troubles due to the reference electrode, a new concept to determine ECP without the reference electrode has been proposed. Several metal plates are applied as working electrodes and at the same time as the reference electrodes. Potential of the metal plates with stable oxide films on their surfaces show stable values in high temperature water. As a result of the combination of their potential values, ECP of each metal can be determined without any specific reference electrode. Array-type sensors consisting of several metal plates, e.g., Fe, Ni, Cr, Zr, Pt, Pd, Re, Ir, with well developed oxide films on their surface were prepared for ECP measurement in high temperature water under neutron/gamma ray irradiations. In order to confirm the feasibility of this concept, responses of the redox potentials of the pure metals to changes in the simulated BWR reactor water conditions were measured and the ECP was determined by the differences in potentials between a couple of metal plates. Major conclusions of the study are as follows: 1) The redox potentials of the Fe, Pt, Zr, Ir, Pd, and Re electrodes showed the different dependences on the changes in O 2 and H 2 O 2 concentrations. The redox potentials of the electrodes increased as the oxidant concentrations increased except for Zr electrode. The potential of the Zr electrode was kept the very low potential at the wide range of O 2 and H 2 O 2 concentrations differed form the other electrodes. 2) It was estimated that the redox potential of highly soluble metal may be increased, while that of low soluble metal may be decreased by an oxide film. The stable oxide film would cause the stable potential response of the electrode with oxide film. 3) The relationship between the oxidant concentrations and the redox potentials of the

  3. Stress field determination in an alloy 600 stress corrosion crack specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassineux, B.; Labbe, T.

    1995-05-01

    In the context of EDF studies on stress corrosion cracking rates in the Alloy 600 steam generators tubes, we studied the influence of strain hardened surface layers on the different stages of cracking for a tensile smooth specimen (TLT). The stress field was notably assessed to try and explain the slow/rapid-propagation change observed beyond the strain hardened layers. The main difficulty is to simulate in a finite element model the inner and outer surfaces of these strain hardened layers, produced by the final manufacturing stages of SG tubes which have not been heat treated. In the model, the strain hardening is introduced by simulating a multi-layer material. Residual stresses are simulated by an equivalent fictitious thermomechanical calculation, realigned with respect to X-ray measurements. The strain hardening introduction method was validated by an analytical calculation giving identical results. Stress field evolution induced by specimen tensile loading were studied using an elastoplastic 2D finite element calculations performed with the Aster Code. The stress profile obtained after load at 660 MPa shows no stress discontinuity at the boundary between the strain hardened layer and the rest of the tube. So we propose that a complementary calculation be performed, taking into account the multi-cracked state of the strain hardened zones by means of a damage variable. In fact, this state could induce stress redistribution in the un-cracked area, which would perhaps provide an explanation of the crack-ground rate change beyond the strain hardened zone. The calculations also evidence the harmful effects of plastic strains on a strain hardened layer due to the initial state of the tube (not heat-treated), to grit blasting or to shot peening. The initial compressive stress condition of this surface layer becomes, after plastic strain, a tensile stress condition. These results are confirmed by laboratory test. (author). 10 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs., 2 appends

  4. 5 CFR 304.104 - Determining rate of pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determining rate of pay. 304.104 Section... CONSULTANT APPOINTMENTS § 304.104 Determining rate of pay. (a) The rate of basic pay for experts and... appropriate rate of basic pay on an hourly or daily basis, subject to the limitations described in section 304...

  5. Laboratory investigations on the corrosion rate of A42 carbon steel in various secondary circuit chemistries representative of hydraulic tests conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brussieux, C.; Clinard, M.H.; Guillodo, M.; Alos-Ramos, O.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrazine are currently used in the chemical conditioning of steam generators hydraulic test medium to minimize the corrosion rate of carbon steels. However, hydrazine is classified carcinogenic by the European Commission. Significant effort is therefore ongoing to limit its use or even replace it. The results presented in this paper were obtained in the frame of an EDF and AREVA research program on the subject. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in alkaline media with hydrazine was thoroughly studied. However, most studies concern polished coupons and very few data are available for carbon steel covered with oxides layer(s) representative of the layer(s) which can be found in a SG after operation. In this context, the corrosion rate at 25°C of carbon steel pre-oxidized by an autoclave treatment was studied. The tests coupons were submitted to a secondary circuit chemical conditioning treatment in an autoclave at 280°C during 30 days prior to the corrosion rate measurement. The corrosion rates were measured during two months by an electrochemical method (polarization resistance) in test media composed with deionized water, ammonia and hydrazine under an air blanket at 25°C. Similitudes with steam generators' volume/surface ratios were respected during these tests. The coupons submitted to an autoclave treatment were covered by a duplex magnetite layer. After exposure to hydrazine and ageing, the structure of the magnetite layer contains bigger crystallites than after ageing without exposure to hydrazine. The corrosion rate of passive A42 steel exposed to hydrazine was stable and low even after the complete consumption of hydrazine during at least 50 days. The corrosion rate of passive A42 steel not exposed to hydrazine grew steadily to reach the same corrosion rates as polished carbon steels within 50 days. The hydrazine consumption rate observed in the presence of magnetite covered A42 carbon steel was found higher than 1mg/kg/hour. To explain

  6. DETERMINING STAR FORMATION RATES FOR INFRARED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Weiner, B. J.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Donley, J. L.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Blaylock, M.; Marcillac, D.

    2009-01-01

    We show that measures of star formation rates (SFRs) for infrared galaxies using either single-band 24 μm or extinction-corrected Paα luminosities are consistent in the total infrared luminosity = L(TIR) ∼ 10 10 L sun range. MIPS 24 μm photometry can yield SFRs accurately from this luminosity upward: SFR(M sun yr -1 ) = 7.8 x 10 -10 L(24 μm, L sun ) from L(TIR) = 5x 10 9 L sun to 10 11 L sun and SFR = 7.8 x 10 -10 L(24 μm, L sun )(7.76 x 10 -11 L(24)) 0.048 for higher L(TIR). For galaxies with L(TIR) ≥ 10 10 L sun , these new expressions should provide SFRs to within 0.2 dex. For L(TIR) ≥ 10 11 L sun , we find that the SFR of infrared galaxies is significantly underestimated using extinction-corrected Paα (and presumably using any other optical or near-infrared recombination lines). As a part of this work, we constructed spectral energy distribution templates for eleven luminous and ultraluminous purely star forming infrared galaxies and over the spectral range 0.4 μm to 30 cm. We use these templates and the SINGS data to construct average templates from 5 μm to 30 cm for infrared galaxies with L(TIR) = 5x 10 9 to 10 13 L sun . All of these templates are made available online.

  7. Non-destructive elecrochemical monitoring of reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn

    been widely accepted as a non-destructive ”state of the art” technique for detection of corrosion in concrete structures. And, over the last decade, the trend in corrosion monitoring has moved towards quantitative non-destructive monitoring of the corrosion rate of the steel reinforcement. A few...... corrosion rate measurement instruments have been developed and are commercially available. The main features of these instruments are the combined use of an electrochemical technique for determining the corrosion rate and a so-called ”confinement technique”, which in principle controls the polarised surface...... area of the reinforcement, i.e. the measurement area. Both on-site investigations and laboratory studies have shown that varying corrosion rates are obtained when the various commercially available instruments are used. And in the published studies, conflicting explanations are given illustrating...

  8. Determination of the environmental effect for the sea salt aerosols corrosion (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayasu, Fumio; Umehara, Toshihiro; Kato, Akitoshi; Taniguchi, Akihide

    2009-01-01

    Fukui Prefecture presently hosts 15 reactor units, including PWRs, BWR, FBR (Monjyu) and Japanese ATR (Fugen), all of which are located along the Japan Sea. Under such a circumstange, corrosion due to sea salt aerosols is one of the major factors causing ageing degradation of nuclear power plants facilities. Many scientists have been engaged in research on the corrosion of structures due to sea salt aerosols. In pursuing sea salt aerosol-induced corrosion research, it was necessary to perform corrosion tests under a certain set of environmental conditions since corrosion of structures is highly sensitive to environmental factors. In this respect, we installed the outdoor exposure test facilities along the sea coast in Awara-city and inland in Fukui-city, Fukui Prefecture of Japan. The amounts of sea salt aerosol tend to be lower in the summer season and higher in the winter season. The difference between seasons is expected to relate to the wind speed, the sunshine time, the rain amount and others. We tried to use the multivariate analysis for finding some relations between sea salt aerosol amounts and environment factor. We found the clear relations. (author)

  9. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  10. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  11. Corrosion probe. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    Over 253 million liters of high-level waste (HLW) generated from plutonium production is stored in mild steel tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Corrosion monitoring of double-shell storage tanks (DSTs) is currently performed at Hanford using a combination of process knowledge and tank waste sampling and analysis. Available technologies for corrosion monitoring have progressed to a point where it is feasible to monitor and control corrosion by on-line monitoring of the corrosion process and direct addition of corrosion inhibitors. The electrochemical noise (EN) technique deploys EN-based corrosion monitoring probes into storage tanks. This system is specifically designed to measure corrosion rates and detect changes in waste chemistry that trigger the onset of pitting and cracking. These on-line probes can determine whether additional corrosion inhibitor is required and, if so, provide information on an effective end point to the corrosion inhibitor addition procedure. This report describes the technology, its performance, its application, costs, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  12. Corrosion in seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  13. Investigation of surface oxide morphology in SG feedwater pipes and study of its influence on flow accelerated corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, G.; Alos-Ramos, O.; Monchecourt, D.; Mansour, C.; Delaunay, S.; Trevin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) affects carbon steel components in the secondary circuits of PWR plants. The mandatory use of the prediction tool BRT-CICERO in all its PWR plants enables EDF to perform efficient inspections programs and minimize the number of leaks in the secondary circuits. Due to the operating conditions, SG feedwater flow regulation (ARE) circuits can be affected by FAC phenomenon. Thickness loss has been reported by several plants during the last 10 years, although significant damage by FAC remains very rare. This paper describes the surface features observed on an ARE straight tube that has orange peel pattern with thickness loss on the one half of its inner surface and a thick fouling layer without much thickness loss on the other. An analysis of the oxide porosity and structure by SEM investigation has been carried out. The origin of fouling layer and its behavior in the ARE circuits environment (oxide solubility, flow stability/turbulence) have been discussed. Finally by comparing with the classic FAC models, an attempt of correlation between the presence of the fouling layer and the lower corrosion rate is proposed. (authors)

  14. Determining the Effect of Environmental Conditions on Iron Corrosion by Atomic Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malel, Esteban; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Iron corrosion is a complex process that occurs when iron is exposed to oxygen and humidity and is exacerbated by the presence of chloride ions. The deterioration of iron structures or other components can be costly to society and is usually evaluated by following the properties of the corroding material. Here, the iron ions released into solution…

  15. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  16. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-01-01

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H 2 formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO 2 and UH 3

  18. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-03-20

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H{sub 2} formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}.

  19. Monetary models and exchange rate determination: The Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monetary models and exchange rate determination: The Nigerian evidence. ... income levels and real interest rate differentials provide better forecasts of the ... partner can expect to suffer depreciation in the external value of her currency.

  20. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  1. Aqueous corrosion study on U-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Titas; Venkatesan, V.; Kumar, Pradeep; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun

    2009-01-01

    In low power or research reactor, U-Zr alloy is a potential candidate for dispersion fuel. Moreover, Zirconium has a low thermal-neutron cross section and uranium alloyed with Zr has excellent corrosion resistance and dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In the present study aqueous corrosion behavior of U-Zr alloy samples was studied in autoclave at 200 deg C temperature. Corrosion rate was determined from weight loss with time. (author)

  2. Influence of heating rate on corrosion behavior of Ni-base heat resistant alloys in simulated VHTR helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1985-04-01

    The influence of heating rate on corrosion and carbon transfer was studied for Ni-base heat resistant alloys exposed to simulated VHTR(very high temperature reactor) coolant environment. Special attention was focused to relationship between oxidation and carburization at early stage of exposure. Tests were conducted on two heats of Hastelloy XR with different boron(B) content and the developmental alloys, 113MA and KSN. Two kinds of heating rates, i.e. 80 0 C/min and 2 0 C/min, were employed. Corrosion tests were carried out at 900 0 C up to 500 h in JAERI Type B helium, one of the simulated VHTR primary coolant specifications. Under higher heating rate, oxidation resistance of both heats of Hastelloy XR(2.8 ppmB and 40 ppmB) were equivalent and among the best, then KSN and 113MA followed in the order. Under lower heating rate only alloy, i.e. Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB, showed some deteriorated oxidation resistance while all others being unaffected by the heating rate. On the other hand the carbon transfer behavior showed strong dependence on the heating rate. In case of higher heating rate, significant carburization occured at early stage of exposure and thereafter the progress of carburization was slow in all the alloys. On the other hand only slow carburization was the case throughout the exposure in case of lower heating rate. The carburization in VHTR helium environment was interpreted as to be affected by oxide film formation in the early stage of exposure. The carbon pick-up was largest in Hastelloy XR with 40 ppmB and it was followed by Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB. 113MA and KSN were carburized only slightly. The observed difference of carbon pick-up among the alloys tested was interpreted to be attributed mainly to the difference of the carbon activity, the carbide precipitation characteristics among the alloys tested. (author)

  3. Determining Sorption Rate by a Continuous Gravimetric Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Monicia R; Procell, Lawrence R; Bartram, Philip W; Shuely, Wendel J

    2003-01-01

    ... were automatically recorded in an Excel file while CARC coupons were submerged in solvent. Initial sorption rates were determined for butyl acetate, butyl ether, cyclohexane and propylene carbonate...

  4. Fatigue life determination by damage measuring in SAE 8620 specimens steel subjected to multiaxial experiments in neutral and corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luiz L. da; Filho, Nelson do N.A.; Gomes, Paulo de T.V.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is the fail phenomenon of a material subjected to cyclic loads. This phenomenon affects any component under loads (forces, temperatures, etc.) that changes in time. When there is a combined load, originating multiaxial fatigue, which is the most of the real loads, worst is the situation. Before the component fail, the fatigue phenomenon produces damages to its material and this is a cumulative process that could not be reduced. In the continuum mechanic context, material damage is defined as a parameter that reduces the component resistance and this could cause its fail. The process of damage measuring by changes in electrical resistance is used in this work, and from experimental results of SAE 8620 steel specimens subjected to multiaxial fatigue in corrosive and neutral environment, the remaining specimen time life could be determined. Each specimen has its initial electrical resistance measured and after a certain number of fatigue cycles stopping points, its electrical resistance was measured again. In order to study multiaxial fatigue in specimens, a machine that induces simultaneously bending and torsional loads in the specimen was developed. Air at the temperature range of 18 deg C and 20 deg C was considered neutral environment. The corrosive environment was a NaCl solution with a concentration of 3,5% in weigh. The experimental results showed that the measuring fatigue damage using the changes in electrical resistance is efficient and that is possible to estimate the effect of a corrosive environment in the fatigue damage. (author)

  5. Standard test method for determining susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of 2XXX and 7XXX Aluminum alloy products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for characterizing the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength aluminum alloy wrought products for the guidance of those who perform stress-corrosion tests, for those who prepare stress-corrosion specifications, and for materials engineers. 1.2 This test method covers method of sampling, type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure for determining the susceptibility to SCC of 2XXX (with 1.8 to 7.0 % copper) and 7XXX (with 0.4 to 2.8 % copper) aluminum alloy products, particularly when stressed in the short-transverse direction relative to the grain structure. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The inch-pound units in parentheses are provided for information. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and de...

  6. Use of high temperature thermogravimetry for the determination of oxidation, reduction, corrosion-type reactions kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, Luc; Bancel, Fabrice; Setaram

    2002-01-01

    Full text.Thermogravimetry is a very powerful technique for the investigation of gas-solid interactions, by measuring the amount of gas adsorbed on the sample or desorbed from the sample. According to the type of interaction, this amount of gas can be very small, that means that the detection of the mass variation can be very difficult to achieve. This is especially the case for certain types of oxidation, reduction and corrosion reactions in the field of metallic and ceramic materials. The good configuration for such kinetic studies is a hanged up sample, to get every face of the sample in contact with the atmosphere. In order to improve the thermogravimetric measurement, two ways can be used: increase the sample mass and especially its area, second use a symmetrical balance. As the gas-solid interaction is adsorption or desorption-type, the area of the sample is one very important parameter. For such a determination, it is important to increase as much as possible this area, that means increasing the sample size and mass. By increasing the contact area for the gas interaction, the accuracy of such a thermogravimetric measurement is largely improved. This design is very convenient for any metallic or ceramic sample that can be directly hung to the balance, without using any container. The second way of improving the test is to use a symmetrical thermogravimetric design. If the variation of mass is too weak to be measured (some micrograms for example), a symmetrical design has to be used. In such a system, a sample and a reference are hung at each beam of the balance, in two identical furnaces. Such a symmetrical technique allows to compensate the buoyancy effect that is identical on both sides. The limit of detection of the thermogravimetric measure is largely improved, allowing accurate measurements on very small variations of mass for long term basis experiments. An example of oxidation of a plate of steel at 500 celsius degree, with a slow mass gain of 1.5

  7. Study of optimal operation management by a monitoring system for corrosion and heat-transfer rate of condensate pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Katsmi; Kominami, Hirohiko; Atsumi, Tetsuro; Nagata, Koji (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Sumitomo Light Metal Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-09-26

    In order to optimize the anticorrosion and antifouling management of aluminum brass condensate pipes, the monitoring system was developed, which could control a corrosion resistance and heat transfer rate during operation. Since a polarization resistance could be used as an index for anticorrosion control, while a heat transmission coefficient or cleanliness factor for heat transfer control, a polarization resistance meter and fouling meter were made as prototype detectors. Fundamental test of a model condenser (simulated by-pass pipe) was performed using a processing system combined with the meters, and monitored data and analytical data of the test were arranged. System performance was ascertained to be preferable by the verification test on a real condenser, however, more compact system was required for practical use because of restriction in by-pass pipe installation. In addition to the monitoring function, a control function for sponge ball cleaning and iron ion injection was also added to keep the specified index value. 13 figs,. 1 tab.

  8. Water side corrosion prevention in boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeid, A.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion may be defined as a naturally occurring physical and chemical deterioration of a material due to reaction with the environment or surrounding atmosphere. In boilers the material is subjected on both sides to two different media which may cause severe corrosion. At the water side the content of O 2 considered one of the principal factors which determine the extent of corrosion in the boiler tubes. This paper deals with certain conditions that result in the increase of O 2 in the boiler water and hence increase the corrosion rate, to minimize the effect of these conditions a chemical treatment was carried out the results obtained indicated the success of the treatment procedure in corrosion prevention and boiler material protection. The treatment is traditional. But the study indicates how a simple mean could be applied to solve a serious problem. 4 tab

  9. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Correlation of the corrosion rates of steels in a straw fired boiler with the thermodynamically predicted trend of KOH(g) in the flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of KOH(g) in flue gases without sulfur and chlorine compounds was studied. Relatively good correlation of the thermodynamically predicted trend of KOH(g) in the flue gases and the literature data of the corrosion rates of different steels in a straw fired boiler was found. A discussion on a possible, physically reasonable mechanism is also presented. However, the causality of the found correlation requires further studies. Highlights: ► Corrosion rates in a straw boiler correlate with the predicted trend of KOH(g). ► KOH(g) impinging the surface may be an important factor in corrosion in straw fired boilers. ► The proposed mechanism may be relevant also to other biomass fuels that release potassium hydroxide during combustion.

  11. Corrosion behavior of low-alloy steel in the presence of Desulfotomaculum sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetin, Demet; Aksu, Mehmet Levent

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum sp. bacteria isolated from a crude oil field on the corrosion of low-alloy steel. The corrosion rate and mechanism were determined with the use of Tafel slopes, mass loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The formation of the biofilm and the corrosion products on the steel surface was determined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs and energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) analysis. It was observed from the Tafel plots that the corrosion potential exhibited a cathodic shift that verifies an increase in the corrosion rates. The semicircles tended to open at lower frequencies in the Nyquist plots which indicates the rupture of the protective film. The corrosion current density reached its maximum value at the 14th hour after the inoculation and decreased afterwards. This was attributed to the accumulation of corrosion products on the surface.

  12. Spent nuclear fuel project recommended reaction rate constants for corrosion of N-Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.; Pajunen, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the Hanford Site's K Basins. The SNF Project has been tasked by the DOE with moving the spent N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to contained dry storage in order to reduce operating costs and environmental hazards. The chemical reactivity of the fuel must be understood at each process step and during long-term dry storage. Normally, the first step would be to measure the N-fuel reactivity before attempting thermal-hydraulic transfer calculations; however, because of the accelerated project schedule, the initial modeling was performed using literature values for uranium reactivity. These literature values were typically found for unirradiated, uncorroded metal. It was fully recognized from the beginning that irradiation and corrosion effects could cause N-fuel to exhibit quite different reactivities than those commonly found in the literature. Even for unirradiated, uncorroded uranium metal, many independent variables affect uranium metal reactivity resulting in a wide scatter of data. Despite this wide reactivity range, it is necessary to choose a defensible model and estimate the reactivity range of the N-fuel until actual reactivity can be established by characterization activities. McGillivray, Ritchie, and Condon developed data and/or models that apply for certain samples over limited temperature ranges and/or reaction conditions (McGillivray 1994, Ritchie 1981 and 1986, and Condon 1983). These models are based upon small data sets and have relatively large correlation coefficients

  13. Determinants of Commercial banks' interest rate spreads in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated the determinants of commercial banks' interest rate ... Index (HHI), a proxy measure of the degree of competition in a market ... the difference between prime lending rate and the savings account rate. ... as profit maximizing firms whose primary business is to offer deposits and loan ..... and Accounting.

  14. Dose Rate Determination from Airborne Gamma-ray Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The standard method for determination of ground level dose rates from airborne gamma-ray is the integral count rate which for a constant flying altitude is assumed proportional to the dose rate. The method gives reasonably results for natural radioactivity which almost always has the same energy...

  15. Determining the Exchange Rate: Purchasing Power Parity – PPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangun WIDOYOKO

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effect of inflation on the issue of exchange rate determination of the forward exchange rate on the exchange rate of RMB (Renminbi to Rupiah. Inflation has been chosen as an independent variable because of its close relation to PPP (purchasing power parity theory. Analyses in this research have used logistic analysis with time series data. The data that has been used include exchange rate data with the period 2007-2017 with a sample size of 132 data. The results of this study have shown that inflation is effective in determining the exchange rate.

  16. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A. [Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, Michael I., E-mail: m.ojovan@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface. - Highlights: • The radionuclides yield is determined by the transport from the glass through the surface corrosion layer. • Formation of the surface layer is due to the dissolution of the glass network and the formation of insoluble compounds. • The model proposed accounts for glass dissolution, formation of corrosion layer, specie diffusion and chemical reactions. • Analytical solutions are found for corrosion layer growth rate and glass components component leaching rates.

  17. Improvements in zirconium alloy corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilp, G.R.; Thornburg, D.R.; Comstock, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion rates of a series of Zircaloy 4 and Zr-Nb alloys were evaluated in long-term (exceeding 500 days in some cases) autoclave tests. The testing was done at various conditions including 633 K (680 F) water, 633 K (650 F) water, 633 k (680 F) lithiated water (70 PPM/0.01 molal lithium), and 673 K (750 F) steam. Materials evaluated are from the following three groups: (1) standard Zircaloy 4; (2) Zircaloy 4 with tightened controls on chemistry limits and heat-treatment history; and (3) Zr-Nb alloys. To optimize the corrosion resistance of the Zircaloy 4 material, the effects of specific chemistry controls (tighter limits on nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, carbon and tin) were evaluated. Also the effects of the thermal history, as measured by integrated annealing of ''A'' time were determined. The ''A'' times ranged from 0.1x10 -18 (h) to 46x10 -18 (h). A material referred to as ''Improved Zircaloy 4'', having optimized chemistry and ''A'' time levels for reduced corrosion, has been developed and tested. This material has a reduced and more uniform corrosion rate compared to the prior Zircaloy 4 material. Alternative alloys were also evaluated for potential improvement in cladding corrosion resistance. ZIRLO TM material was chosen for development and has been included in the long-term corrosion testing. Demonstration fuel assemblies using ZIRLO cladding are now operating in a commercial reactor. The results for the various test conditions and compositions are reported and the relative corrosion characteristics summarized. Based on the BR-3 data, there is a ranking correspondence between in-reactor corrosion and autoclave testing in lithiated water. In particular, the ZIRLO material has significantly improved relative corrosion resistance in the lithiated water tests. Reduced Zircaloy-4 corrosion rates are also obtained from the tighter controls on the chemistry (specifically lower tin, nitrogen, and carbon; higher silicon; and reduced oxygen variability) and ''A

  18. Corrosion rate of steel embedded in blended Portland and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payá, J.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the corrosion levels in steel bars embedded in mortars made with a blend of Portland cement and (0-20% spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R, with a variable (0.3-0.7 water/binder (w/b ratio. The specimens were stored in the following conditions: relative humidity of 40, 80 or 100% and CO2 concentrations of 5 and 100%. The steel corrosion rate was measured with polarization resistance techniques. In the absence of aggressive agents, the steel was found to remain duly passivated in mortars with an FC3R content of up to 15% under all the conditions of relative humidity tested. The reinforcement corrosion level in mortars with a w/b ratio of 0.3 and 15% FC3R subjected to accelerated carbonation was similar to the level observed in the unblended Portland cement control mortar.En este trabajo se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosión de barras de acero embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland con relación agua/material cementante (a/mc variable (0,3-0,7, en los que parte del cemento (0-20% se sustituyó por catalizador de craqueo usado (FC3R. Las condiciones de conservación de las probetas elaboradas fueron las siguientes: distintas humedades relativas (40, 80 y 100% y dos concentraciones de CO2 (5 y 100%. La velocidad de corrosión de los aceros se midió mediante la técnica de resistencia de polarización. Se ha podido determinar que, bajo las distintas condiciones de humedad relativa y ausencia de agresivo, los aceros se mantuvieron correctamente pasivados en los morteros con contenidos de FC3R de hasta el 15%. El nivel de corrosión que presenta el refuerzo embebidos en morteros con sustitución de un 15% de cemento por FC3R y relación a/mc 0,3, al ser sometidos a un proceso de carbonatación acelerada, era muy similar al mostrado por el mortero patrón, sin FC3R.

  19. Construction of an external electrode for determination of electrochemical corrosion potential in normal operational conditions of an BWR type reactor for hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar T, J.A.; Rivera M, H.; Hernandez C, R.

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of the corrosion processes at high temperature requires of external devices that being capable to resist a temperature of 288 Centigrade and a pressure of 80 Kg/cm 2 , to give stable and reproducible results of some variable and resisting physically and chemically the radiation. The external electrode of Ag/AgCl fulfils all the requirements in the determination of the electrochemical corrosion potential under normal operational conditions of a BWR type reactor in hot cells. (Author)

  20. Corrosion and wear resistant metallic layers produced by electrochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion and wear-corrosion properties of novel nickel alloy coatings with promising production characteristics have been compared with conventional bulk materials and hard platings. Corrosion properties in neutral and acidic environments have been investigated with electrochemical methods....... Determination of polarisation resistance during 100 hours followed by stepwise anodic polarisation seems to be a promising technique to obtain steady state data on slowly corroding coatings with transient kinetics. A slurry test enables determination of simultaneous corrosion and abrasive wear. Comparison...... of AISI 316, hard chromium and hardened Ni-P shows that there is no universal correlation between surface hardness and wear-corrosion loss. The possible relation between questionable passivity of Ni-P coatings and their high wear-corrosion loss rate compared to hard chromium is discussed....

  1. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions

  2. Influence of Portland Cement Class on the Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement in Cement Mortar Caused by Penetrating Chloride and Sulfate from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić, F.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of portland cement class on the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar caused by penetrating chloride or sulfate from the environment in already hardened cement mortar is investigated in this paper. Three classes of portland cement have been used for the tests, PC 35, PC 45 and PC 55. Cylindrical samples of cement mortar with steel reinfor- cement in the middle were treated 6 months at room temperature in the following solutions: w(SO42- = 2.1 % and w(Cl- = 5 %. Two techniques have been used for testing corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar: Tafel extrapolation technique and potentiodynamic polarization technique. Investigations were conducted by potentiostat/galvanostat Princeton Applied Research 263A-2 with the software PowerCORR®. The results of both techniques indi-cate the most active corrosion of steel reinforcement in the samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both treated solutions, while the lowest corrosion of the steel reinforcement was observed in cement samples prepared from cement PC 55. This conclusion was drawn by analyzing the results shown in Figs. 1–4. Comparing corrosion current density of samples, working electrodes, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2, the results show the most stable corrosion of steel reinforcement in samples prepared from cement PC 55, and the most active corrosion in samples prepared from ce- ment PC 35. The most active corrosion in samples prepared from cement PC 35 is evident from the positions of the open circuit potentials whose values are less for samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both the treated solution, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2. Comparison of the anodic polarization curves of the working electrodes in both the treated solutions, Figs. 3 and 4, also shows that the intensity of corrosion is the largest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 35 and the smallest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 55. Investigation results should be

  3. Establishing empirical relationships to predict porosity level and corrosion rate of atmospheric plasma-sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. In this work, empirical relationships were developed to predict the porosity and corrosion rate of alumina coatings by incorporating independently controllable atmospheric plasma spray operational parameters (input power, stand-off distance and powder feed rate using response surface methodology (RSM. A central composite rotatable design with three factors and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Within the scope of the design space, the input power and the stand-off distance appeared to be the most significant two parameters affecting the responses among the three investigated process parameters. A linear regression relationship was also established between porosity and corrosion rate of the alumina coatings. Further, sensitivity analysis was carried out and compared with the relative impact of three process parameters on porosity level and corrosion rate to verify the measurement errors on the values of the uncertainty in estimated parameters.

  4. Integrating Mobile Phones into Science Teaching to Help Students Develop a Procedure to Evaluate the Corrosion Rate of Iron in Simulated Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Edgar P.; Confessor, Mario R.; Gasparotto, Luiz H. S.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes an indirect method to evaluate the corrosion rate of iron nail in simulated seawater. The official procedure is based on the direct measurement of the specimen's weight loss over time; however, a highly precise scale is required and such equipment may not be easily available. On the other hand, mobile phones equipped with…

  5. Corrosion of porous silicon in tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Chuan; Li, Xue-Ming; Zou, Li-Ke; Chen, Qiang; Xie, Bin; Li, Yu-Lian; Li, Xiao-Lin; Tao, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The corrosion of porous silicon in (CH 3 ) 4 NOH solution was studied. • The residue of corrosion products was a mixture of [(CH 3 ) 4 N] 2 SiO 3 and SiO 2 . • The effect factors for porous silicon corrosion were elaborately investigated. • The additive of ethanol in (CH 3 ) 4 NOH solution could reduce the corrosion rate. • The 1.0 M (CH 3 ) 4 NOH could act as an applicable and novel corrosion solution. - Abstract: Corrosion of porous silicon in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution was studied using weight loss measurements and scanning electron microscope. The effects of temperature, concentration of TMAH and volume ratio of ethanol in 1.0 M TMAH on corrosion rate and corrosion time were elaborately investigated. The residue of corrosion products were characterized as a mixture of [(CH 3 ) 4 N] 2 SiO 3 and SiO 2 . A comparative test among TMAH, KOH and NaOH illustrated that the 1.0 M TMAH could act as an applicable and novel corrosion solution to remove porous silicon layer for determining the porosity of porous silicon

  6. Investigations on the determination of corrosion kinetics and the structure of corrosion products on high-temperature alloys under low oxygen partial pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poestges, A.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1979-04-01

    On three nickel-base-alloys (NIMONIC 80A, INCONNEL 617 and ALLOY 713LC), which are planned as materials for components of the primary cooling circuit of high-temperature reactors, studies for the determination of the oxidation behaviour under reactor relevant conditions were performed. The test conditions were fixed at an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -16 bars with a total pressure of 0,2 bars and a temperature of 1080 0 C. The use of the X-ray diffraction analysis on the oxidised samples of type NIMONIC 80A showed the corrosion products Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating as well as Al 2 O 3 in the inner oxide zone. The samples of the alloy type INCOEL 617 showed the oxides Cr 2 O 3 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating. Samples of the alloy ALLOY 713LC showed Cr 2 O 3 and CrNbO 4 in the outer oxide coating and Al 2 O 3 in the zone of inner oxidation. Sufficient detection certainty was only ascertained by investigating samples with plane surface. For both alloys first mentioned, it was possible to prove the validity of the paralinear relationship W = k x t -1 / 2 - a x t for the increase in weight for the explanation of the time law of the oxidation. For the non-destructive determination of the oxide coating thickness on the alloys samples, the X-ray fluorescence analysis gave reproducible results of good precision. (orig.) [de

  7. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  8. Efficiency and corrosion rate analysis of organic inhibitor utilization from bawang dayak leaves (EleutherineamericanaMerr.) on API 5L steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Shaimah Rinda; Sari, Eli Novita; Rizky, Yoel; Sulistijono, Triana, Yunita

    2018-05-01

    This research studied the inhibition of corrosion by bawang dayak leaves extract (EleutherineamericanaMerr.) on API 5L steel in brine water environment (3.5% NaCl). The inhibitor was extracted using maceration process from bawang dayak leaves that was cultivated in Paser District, East Kalimantan. The test of antioxidant activity showed that bawang dayak leaves extract is a very powerful antioxidant with IC50 value of 27.30204. The results from FTIR test show the presence of electronegative atoms and double bonds of the alkenes groups that provide the potential of the extract as a corrosion inhibitor. Efficiency of inhibition reached up to 93.158% for the addition of inhibitor with 300 ppm concentration and 20 days of immersion time. This inhibitory behavior is also supported by polarization measurements where the lowest corrosion rate of 0.00128 mm/year is obtained at the same concentration and immersion time.

  9. Corrosion of carbon steel in contact with bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Vokal, A.; Bruha, P.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Carbon steel canisters were chosen in a number of disposal concepts as reference material for disposal canisters. The corrosion rates of carbon steels in water solution both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions are well known, but only scarce data are available for corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in contact with bentonite. A special apparatus, which enables to measure corrosion rate of carbon steels under conditions simulating conditions in a repository, namely in contact with bentonite under high pressure and elevated temperatures was therefore prepared to study: - Corrosion rate of carbon steels in direct contact with bentonite in comparison with corrosion rate of carbon steels in synthetic bentonite pore water. - Influence of corrosion products on bentonite. The apparatus is composed of corrosion chamber containing a carbon steel disc in direct contact with compacted bentonite. Synthetic granitic water is above compacted bentonite under high pressure (50 - 100 bar) to simulate hydrostatic pressure in a repository. The experiments can be carried out under various temperatures. Bentonites used for experiments were Na-type of bentonite Volclay KWK 80 - 20 and Ca-Mg Czech bentonite from deposit Rokle. Before adding water into corrosion system the corrosion chamber was purged by nitrogen gas. The saturation of bentonite and corrosion rate were monitored by measuring consumption of water, pressure increase caused by swelling pressure of bentonite and by generation of hydrogen. Corrosion rate was also determined after corrosion experiments from weight loss of samples. The results of experiments show that the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in contact with bentonite is very different from corrosion of carbon steels in water simulating bentonite pore water solution. The corrosion rates of carbon steel in contact with bentonite reached after 30 days of corrosion the values approaching 40 mm/yr contrary to values

  10. Corrosion of well casings in compressed air energy storage environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, R.P.; Stottlemyre, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine corrosive effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) environments on several well casing materials to aid in material selections. A literature search on corrosion behavior of well casing material in similar environments revealed that corrosion rates of 0.20 to 0.25 mm/y might be expected. This information was employed in designing the laboratory study. Unstressed electrically isolate samples of various carbon steels were autoclaved at varying humidities, temperatures, and exposure durations to simulate anticipated environments in the well bore during CAES operation. All compressed air tests were run at 12.1 MPa. Temperatures varied from 323/sup 0/K to 573/sup 0/K, and humidity varied from 100% to completely dry air. The effects of salts in the humidified air were also studied. Results indicated that typical well casings of carbon steel as used in oil, gas, and water production wells adequately withstand the anticipated CAES reservoir environment. An acceptable corrosion rate arrived at by these laboratory simulations was between 0.0015 and 0.15 mm/y. Corrosion was caused by metal oxidation that formed a protective scale of iron oxide. Higher temperatures, humidity rates, or salinity content of the humid air increased corrosion. Corrosion also increased on a metal coupon in contact with a sandstone sample, possibly due to crevice corrosion. For each of these factors either singularly or collectively, the increased corrosion rates were still acceptable with the maximum measured at 0.15 mm/y. When coupons were reused in an identical test, the corrosion rates increased beyond the anticipated values that had been determined by extrapolation from one-time runs. Fine cracking of the protective scale probably occurred due to thermal variations, resulting in increased corrosion rates and a greater potential for particulates, which could plug the reservoir.

  11. Measurement of very low release rates of corrosion products in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.-P.; Falk, I.

    1984-01-01

    A radiotracer technique has been developed for the measurement of release rates from nuclear reactor materials and it has been tested in a number of experiments. THis article, which forms the first part in a series, describes the experimental loop, the experimental technique and the preliminary results. Experiments were carried out on 18Cr8Ni stainless steel and on Inconel X750 in BWR primary system and feed water environments. The result show that a steady state in the release rate is achieved after operation for approximately 600 h. The release rate depends on the elemental concentration in the material and on the chemical and physical environments. Typical release rates for an 18Cr8Ni stainless steel and Inconel X750 in a BWR primary system environment were found to be 5 mdm and 8 mdm respectively. (Authors)

  12. Marine corrosion of mild steel at Lumut, Perak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Ong Shiou; Potty, Narayanan Sambu; Liew, Mohd. Shahir

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion rate of structural steels in the adverse marine and offshore environments affects the economic interest of offshore structures since the loss of steel may have significant impact on structural safety and performance. With more emphasis to maintain existing structures in service for longer time and hence to defer replacement costs, there is increasing interest in predicting corrosion rate at a given location for a given period of exposure once the protection coating or cathodic protection is lost. The immersion depth, salinity, steel composition and water pollution will be taken into account. Various corrosion allowances are prescribed for structural members by different standards. There are no studies to determine the appropriate corrosion allowance for steel structures in marine environment in Malaysia. The objectives of the research are to determine the nature and rate of corrosion in mm/year for steel structures in marine environment. It also tries to identify whether the corrosion rate is affected by differences in the chemical composition of the steels, and microalgae. Two sets of corrosion coupons of Type 3 Steel consisting of mild steel were fabricated and immersed in seawater using steel frames. The corrosion rate of the coupon in mm/ per year is estimated based on the material weight loss with time in service. The results are compared with recommendations of the code.

  13. Electrochemical noise based corrosion monitoring: FY 2001 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGAR, C.

    2001-01-01

    Underground storage tanks made of mild steel are used to contain radioactive waste generated by plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Corrosion of the walls of these tanks is a major issue. Corrosion monitoring and control are currently provided at the Hanford Site through a waste chemistry sampling and analysis program. In this process, tank waste is sampled, analyzed and compared to a selection of laboratory exposures of coupons in simulated waste. Tank wall corrosion is inferred by matching measured tank chemistries to the results of the laboratory simulant testing. This method is expensive, time consuming, and does not yield real-time data. Corrosion can be monitored through coupon exposure studies and a variety of electrochemical techniques. A small number of these techniques have been tried at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex to determine the corrosivity of nuclear waste stored in underground tanks [1]. Coupon exposure programs, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and electrical resistance techniques have all been tried with limited degrees of success. These techniques are most effective for monitoring uniform corrosion, but are not well suited for early detection of localized forms of corrosion such as pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Pitting and SCC have been identified as the most likely modes of corrosion failure for Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST'S) [2-3]. Over the last 20 years, a new corrosion monitoring system has shown promise in detecting localized corrosion and measuring uniform corrosion rates in process industries [4-20]. The system measures electrochemical noise (EN) generated by corrosion. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems monitor and record fluctuations in current and voltage over time from electrodes immersed in an environment of interest. Laboratory studies and field

  14. Determination of Biological Oxygen Demand Rate Constant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of Biological Oxygen Demand Rate Constant and Ultimate Biological Oxygen Demand for Liquid Waste Generated from Student Cafeteria at Jimma University: A Tool for Development of Scientific Criteria to Protect Aquatic Health in the Region.

  15. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  16. Determination of in vivo RNA kinetics using RATE-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, Benjamin; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Gresham, David

    2014-10-01

    The abundance of a transcript is determined by its rate of synthesis and its rate of degradation; however, global methods for quantifying RNA abundance cannot distinguish variation in these two processes. Here, we introduce RNA approach to equilibrium sequencing (RATE-seq), which uses in vivo metabolic labeling of RNA and approach to equilibrium kinetics, to determine absolute RNA degradation and synthesis rates. RATE-seq does not disturb cellular physiology, uses straightforward normalization with exogenous spike-ins, and can be readily adapted for studies in most organisms. We demonstrate the use of RATE-seq to estimate genome-wide kinetic parameters for coding and noncoding transcripts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. © 2014 Neymotin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. The jet impingement cell: A valuable device for investigating CO{sub 2} corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, Brian; John, Douglas; Bailey, Stuart; De Marco, Roland [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, School of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA, 6845 (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    The jet impingement cell (JIC) is a valuable technique for the investigation of carbon dioxide corrosion of steel and its inhibition under high flow conditions or high wall shear stress. Despite the use of the JIC in corrosion testing laboratories not a great deal has been published on the design and calibration of these cells. In the evaluation of corrosion inhibitors, the type of corrosion and relative performance of the inhibitors depends on the metallurgy of the steel used to manufacture electrodes and measure the corrosion rate. This paper covers aspects of cell design and the determination of mass transfer and wall shear stress at electrodes used in the cell. The performance of different generic type corrosion inhibitors and their affect on the type of corrosion (i.e, uniform, pitting and crevice corrosion) is shown and discussed. (authors)

  18. Study on the Synthesis and Corrosion Inhibition Performance of Mannich-Modified Imidazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjun Kong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel Mannich-modified imidazoline (MMI as cationic emulsifier was synthesised for corrosion harm reduction, through three steps — acylation, cyclization, and Mannich reaction. The surface activity was characterized by determination of surface tensions and critical micelle concentration (CMC. The corrosion inhibition performance of five types of steels in the simulated corrosion solution in the presence of the MMI was investigated by static weight loss tests. The results showed that the MMI had good surface activities, with CMC of 19.8 μg g−1 and surface tension of 36.4 mN m−1. The corrosion test results indicated that the corrosion rates of different materials were decreased significantly, and degrees of corrosion inhibition were always higher than 80.0 %. The main inhibition mechanism was most likely due to the adsorption of the corrosion inhibitor on the steel surface, leading to the prevention of corrosion medium from the metal surface.

  19. Determination of human muscle protein fractional synthesis rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; Hulston, Carl J; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, different MS methods for the determination of human muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) using [ring-(13)C6 ]phenylalanine as a tracer were evaluated. Because the turnover rate of human skeletal muscle is slow, only minute quantities of the stable isotopically...

  20. Determinants of Graduation Rate of Public Alternative Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Masashi; Shen, Jianping; Xia, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated determinants of the graduation rate of public alternative schools by analyzing the most recent, nationally representative data from Schools and Staffing Survey 2007-2008. Based on the literature, we built a series of three regression models via successive block entry, predicting the graduate rate first by (a) student…

  1. Raman Spectral Determination of Chemical Reaction Rate Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakhnina, I. A.; Brandt, N. N.; Mankova, A. A.; Chikishev, A. Yu.; Shpachenko, I. G.

    2017-09-01

    The feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to determine chemical reaction rates and activation energies has been demonstrated for the saponification of ethyl acetate. The temperature dependence of the reaction rate was found in the range from 15 to 45°C.

  2. Proposed test method for determining discharge rates from water closets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, V.; Fjord Jensen, T.

    At present the rates at which discharge takes place from sanitary appliances are mostly known only in the form of estimated average values. SBI has developed a measuring method enabling determination of the exact rate of discharge from a sanitary appliance as function of time. The methods depends...

  3. Can we use human judgments to determine the discount rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J

    2000-12-01

    It has been suggested that the long-term discount rate for environmental goods should decrease at longer delays. One justification for this suggestion is that human judgments support it. This article presents an experiment showing that judgments concerning discount rates are internally inconsistent. These results point to potential problems with the use of judgments referenda for determining discount rates in cost-benefit analyses.

  4. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip

  5. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  6. Contribution of the characterization of radioactive surfaces after sodium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Holl, M.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1972 INTERATOM is performing sodium mass and activity transfer investigations in an SNR-corrosion mockup loop which allows to study the transport of activated corrosion products in the primary heat transfer system of a sodium cooled reactor. The loop simulates the temperature and flow conditions and the materials combination of the SNR 300. The mass transfer examinations were aimed at the determination of the following: the linear corrosion and deposition rates; the selective corrosion of the alloying elements; the transfer of activated corrosion products. The results of a number of corrosion runs will be used in the following contribution to characterize the contaminated and corroded surface layers of reactor components. The loop reached a total operation time of 12300 h while the cold trap temperature was changed between 105 deg. C and 165 deg. C in successive runs

  7. Corrosion of aluminum alloys in simulated dry storage environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 150 degrees C) corrosion of aluminum alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels in a closed or sealed system. A dependency on alloy type, temperature and initial humidity was determined for 1100, 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys. Results after 4500 hours of environmental testing show that for a closed system, corrosion tends to follow a power law with the rate decreasing with increasing exposure. As corrosion takes place, two phenomena occur: (1) a hydrated layer builds up to resist corrosion, and (2) moisture is depleted from the system and the humidity slowly decreases with time. At a critical level of relative humidity, corrosion reactions stop, and no additional corrosion occurs if the system remains closed. The results form the basis for the development of an acceptance criteria for the dry storage of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuels

  8. Synthesis of published and unpublished corrosion data from long term tests of fasteners embedded in wood : calculation of corrosion rates and the effect of corrosion on lateral joint strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2011-01-01

    In the past 5 years, several accelerated test methods have been developed to measure the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. It is desirable to contrast these accelerated results against those of long term exposure tests. While there have been several published long-term exposure tests performed on metals in treated wood, the data from these studies could not be...

  9. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnoş, Bihter; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Çotuk, Ayşın; Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Cansever, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor was investigated over a 10-month period in a hotel. Planktonic and sessile numbers of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic bacteria were monitored. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method. The corrosion products were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A mineralized, heterogeneous biofilm was observed on the coupons. Although a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor were regularly added to the cooling water, the results showed that microorganisms, such as SRB in the mixed species biofilm, caused corrosion of galvanized steel. It was observed that Zn layers on the test coupons were completely depleted after 3 months. The Fe concentrations in the biofilm showed significant correlations with the weight loss and carbohydrate concentration (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01).

  10. Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten alkaline-earth metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalik, O.Yu.; Tkhaj, V.D.

    2000-01-01

    Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten calcium, strontium and barium chlorides are measured and their temperature dependences are determined. It is stated that the corrosion potential of hafnium becomes more electropositive with an increase of the environment temperature. If the temperature is the same the potential shifts to the interval of more electronegative values in the row of CaCl 2 , SrCl 2 , BaCl 2 which corresponds to a lesser corrosion rate in environments positioned from left to right. the comparison of hafnium corrosion potentials with previously measured values for titanium and zirconium shows that a metal activity decrease results in a more electronegative corrosion potential [ru

  11. Correlation between electrochemical impedance measurements and corrosion rate of magnesium investigated by real-time hydrogen measurement and optical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Curioni, M.; Scenini, F.; Monetta, T.; Bellucci, F.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of magnesium in chloride-containing aqueous environment was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed simultaneously with real-time hydrogen evolution measurements and optical imaging of the corroding surface. The potentiodynamic investigation revealed substantial deviations from linearity in close proximity of the corrosion potential. In particular, differences in the slope of the current/potential curves w...

  12. Determination of the Optimal Exchange Rate Via Control of the Domestic Interest Rate in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virtue U. Ekhosuehi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic scenario has been considered where the government seeks to achieve a favourable balance-of-payments over a fixed planning horizon through exchange rate policy and control of the domestic interest rate. The dynamics of such an economy was considered in terms of a bounded optimal control problem where the exchange rate is the state variable and the domestic interest rate is the control variable. The idea of balance-of-payments was used as a theoretical underpinning to specify the objective function. By assuming that, changes in exchange rates were induced by two effects: the impact of the domestic interest rate on the exchange rate and the exchange rate system adopted by the government. Instances for both fixed and flexible optimal exchange rate regimes have been determined. The use of the approach has been illustrated employing data obtained from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN statistical bulletin. (original abstract

  13. Effect of water flow rate and water chemistry on corrosion environment in reactor pressure vessel bottom of BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Hemmi, Yukio; Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the corrosion environment at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel in a BWR and the effect of hydrogen water chemistry on the corrosion of materials in the region, measurements of the corrosion potential of Type-304 stainless steel and nickel base alloy were made in a laboratory test loop. The effect of water chemistry on the corrosion potential of nickel base alloy is found to be similar to the effect on Type-304 stainless steel. Flow analysis and precise evaluations of the corrosion potential of materials in the bottom region were implemented. Corrosion potentials throughout the region were evaluated from the flow analysis results. At the jet pump outlet and shroud support leg, a rather large amount of hydrogen had to be added to reduce the potential. Conversely, a small amount of hydrogen was enough in the case of the stub tube of the control rod drive guide tubing and the ICM housings located in the center of the bottom region. (author)

  14. Effect of water flow rate and water chemistry on corrosion environment in reactor pressure vessel bottom of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Hemmi, Yukio; Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the corrosion environment at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel in a BWR and the effect of hydrogen water chemistry on the corrosion of materials in the region, measurements of the corrosion potential of Type-304 stainless steel and nickel base alloy were made in a laboratory test loop. The effect of water chemistry on the corrosion potential of nickel base alloy is found to be similar to the effect on Type-304 stainless steel. Flow analysis and precise evaluations of the corrosion potential of materials in the bottom region were implemented. Corrosion potentials throughout the region were evaluated from the flow analysis results. At the jet pump outlet and shroud support leg, a rather large amount of hydrogen had to be added to reduce the potential. Conversely, a small amount of hydrogen was enough in the case of the stub tube of the control rod drive guide tubing and the ICM housings located in the center of the bottom region. (author)

  15. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-06-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed

  16. Evaluation of corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of the naphthenic corrosion of AISI-316 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Cala, J. A.; Montañez, N. D.; Laverde Cataño, D.; Y Peña Ballesteros, D.; Mejía, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Naphthenic acids present in oil from most regions worldwide currently stand as the main responsible for the naphthenic corrosion problems, affecting the oil-refining industry. The phenomenon of sulfidation, accompanying corrosion processes brought about by naphthenic acids in high-temperature refining plant applications, takes place when the combination of sulfidic acid (H2S) with Fe forms layers of iron sulphide (FeS) on the material surface, layers with the potential to protect the material from attack by other corrosive species like naphthenic acids. This work assessed corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of naphthenic corrosion rate in AISI-316 steel exposed to processing conditions of simulated crude oil in a dynamic autoclave. Calculation of the sulfidation and naphthenic corrosion rates were determined by gravimetry. The surfaces of the AISI-316 gravimetric coupons exposed to acid systems; were characterized morphologically by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). One of the results obtained was the determination of an inhibiting effect of corrosion products at 250 and 300°C, where lower corrosion rate levels were detected. For the temperature of 350°C, naphthenic corrosion rates increased due to deposition of naphthenic acids on the areas where corrosion products formed by sulfidation have lower homogeneity and stability on the surface, thus accelerating the destruction of AISI-316 steel. The above provides an initial contribution to oil industry in search of new alternatives to corrosion control by the attack of naphthenic acids, from the formation of FeS layers on exposed materials in the processing of heavy crude oils with high sulphur content.

  17. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  18. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haiya, E-mail: flying850612@126.com; Tian, Yimei, E-mail: ymtian_2000@126.com; Wan, Jianmei, E-mail: 563926510@qq.com; Zhao, Peng, E-mail: zhpeng@tju.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Compared to sterile water, biofilm in reclaimed water promoted corrosion process significantly. • Corrosion rate was accelerated by the biofilm in the first 7 days but was inhibited afterwards. • There was an inverse correlation between the biofilm thickness and general corrosion rate. • Corrosion process was influenced by bacteria, EPS and corrosion products comprehensively. • The corrosion process can be divided into three different stages in our study. - Abstract: Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  19. Corrosion of copper under Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of copper was studied under Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions. The groundwater in a Canadian waste vault is expected to be saline, with chloride concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0 mol/l. The container would be packed in a sand/clay buffer, and the maximum temperature on the copper surface would be 100C; tests were performed up to 150C. Radiation fields will initially be around 500 rad/h, and conditions will be oxidizing. Sulfides may be present. The minimum design lifetime for the container is 500 years. Most work has been done on uniform corrosion, although pitting has been considered. It was found that the rate of uniform corrosion in aerated NaCl at room temperature is limited by the rate of the anodic reaction, which is controlled mainly by the rate of transport of dissolved metal species away from the copper surface. The rate of corrosion should become controlled by the transport of oxygen to the copper surface only at very low oxygen concentrations. In the presence of gamma radiation the corrosion rate may never become cathodically transport limited. In compacted buffer material, the corrosion rate appears to be limited by the rate of transport of copper species away from the corroding surface. The authors recommend that long-term predictions of container lifetime should be based on the known rate-determining step for the overall corrosion process. 8 refs

  20. Determinants of Sub-Sovereign Government Ratings In Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas JANNONE-BELLOT

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify the determinantsof the rating assigned to sub-sovereignentities in Germany, Austria, Belgium, France,Italy and Spain, using a total of 92 territorial entitiesfor the 1989-2012 period. Multinomial orderedprobit estimation models were estimatedfor each specifi cation and agency.We conclude that the country’s rating is oneof the most important determinants of regionalgovernment’s ratings with a positive infl uence(as expected, and that the country debt/GDPratio is a stronger determinant for regions thantheir own indebtedness with a negative sign.Other relevant variables are population growthrate, unemployment rate, elderly people weight,regional public expenditure weight and size. Additionally,economic variables, such as country’srating and population growth are more importantto Fitch; whereas budget variables and size variablesare more relevant to Moody’s. Debt variablesand elderly people ratio are more importantto S&P.

  1. Corrosion behaviour of AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to massive laser shock peening impacts with different pulse energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.Z.; Qi, H.; Luo, K.Y.; Luo, M.; Cheng, X.N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Laser shock peening caused an obvious increase of corrosion resistance of 304 steel. •Corrosion resistance of stainless steel increased with increasing pulse energy. •Mechanism of laser shock peening on corrosion behaviour was also entirely determined. -- Abstract: Effects of massive laser shock peening (LSP) impacts with different pulse energies on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, fracture appearance and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by slow strain rate test, potentiodynamic polarisation test and scanning electron microscope observation. The influence mechanism of massive LSP impacts with different pulse energies on corrosion behaviour was also determined. Results showed that massive LSP impacts effectively caused a significant improvement on UTS, SCC resistance, and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel. Increased pulse energy can also gradually improve its corrosion resistance

  2. Standard test method for determining effects of chemical admixtures on corrosion of embedded steel reinforcement in concrete exposed to chloride environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effects of chemical admixtures on the corrosion of metals in concrete. This test method can be used to evaluate materials intended to inhibit chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete. It can also be used to evaluate the corrosivity of admixtures in a chloride environment. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Application of electrochemical frequency modulation for monitoring corrosion and corrosion inhibition of iron by some indole derivatives in molar hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, K.F.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of four indole derivatives, namely indole (IND), benzotriazole (BTA), benzothiazole (BSA) and benzoimidazole (BIA), have been used as possible corrosion inhibitors for pure iron in 1 M HCl. In this study, electrochemical frequency modulation, EFM was used as an effective method for corrosion rate determination in corrosion inhibition studies. By using EFM measurements, corrosion current density was determined without prior knowledge of Tafel slopes. Corrosion rates obtained using EFM, were compared to that obtained from other chemical and electrochemical techniques. The results obtained from EFM, EIS, Tafel and weight loss measurements were in good agreement. Tafel polarization measurements show that indole derivatives are cathodic-type inhibitors. Molecular simulation studies were applied to optimize the adsorption structures of indole derivatives. The inhibitor/iron/solvent interfaces were simulated and the adsorption energies of these inhibitors were calculated. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed and several quantum chemical indices were calculated and correlated with the corresponding inhibition efficiencies

  4. Standard test method for determining whether gas-leak-detector fluid solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking of brass alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers an accelerated test method for evaluating the tendency of gas leak detection fluids (LDFs) to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass components in compressed gas service. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. The effect of sulphide and moisture content on steel corrosion during transport of fine wet coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Vorster, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation the influence of compaction pressure (stress) on the corrosivity of wet coal was investigated. Two coal samples, one high in sulphur content (3 %) and the other low in sulphur content (0.6 %) were used to determine the influence of compaction stress on the corrosion rates of steel samples in contact with compacted coal. It was found that the pressure exerted on finely divided wet coal is an important factor in determining its water content and corrosivity towards mild steel. Corrosion of the steel was typically in the form of pitting and the sulphur content of the coal was an important factor in determining the corrosivity of the coal. The corrosion rate of the high sulphur content coal was higher than that of the low sulphur coal. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that a FeS species developed on the steel surface.

  6. Determinants of self-rated health of Warsaw inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supranowicz, Piotr; Wysocki, Mirosław J; Car, Justyna; Debska, Anna; Gebska-Kuczerowska, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Self-rated health is a one-point measure commonly used for recognising subjectively perceived health and covering a wide range of individual's health aspects. The aim of our study was to examine the extent to which self-rated health reflects the differences due to demographic characteristics, physical, psychical and social well-being, health disorders, occurrence of chronic disease and negative life events in Polish social and cultural conditions. Data were collected by non-addressed questionnaire methods from 402 Warsaw inhabitants. The questionnaire contained the questions concerning self-rated health, physical, psychical and social well-being, the use of health care services, occurrence of chronic disease and contact with negative life events. The analysis showed that worse self-rated health increased exponentially with age and less sharply with lower level of education. Pensioners were more likely to assess their own health worse then employed or students. Such difference was not found for unemployed. Compared to married, the self-rated health of divorced or widowed respondents was lower. Gender does not differentiate self-rated health. In regard to well-being, self-rated health linearly decreased for physical well-being, for social and, especially, for psychical well-being the differences were significant, but more complicated. Hospitalisation, especially repeated, strongly determined worse self-rated health. In contrast, relationship between self-rated health and sickness absence or frequency of contact with physician were lower. Chronic diseases substantially increased the risk of poorer self-rated health, and their co-morbidity increased the risk exponentially. The patients with cancer were the group, in which the risk several times exceeded that reported for the patients of other diseases. Regarding negative life events, only experience with violence and financial difficulties were resulted in worse self-rated health. Our findings confirmed the usefulness

  7. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  8. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 5. Evaluation of wall thinning rate with the coupled model of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Wall thinning rates due to FAC were calculated with the coupled model of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified danger zone. Anodic and cathodic current densities and ECPs were calculated with the static electrochemistry model and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was used as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Thickness of oxide film and its characteristics determined by the dynamic double oxide layer model were used for the electrochemistry model to determine the resistances of cathodic current from the bulk to the surface and anodic current from the surface to the bulk. Two models were coupled to determine local corrosion rate and ECP for various corrosive conditions. The calculated results of the coupled models had good agreement with the measured ones. (author)

  9. Determinants of Commercial Banks' Interest Rate Spread in Namibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reduces net interest margin whilst the liquidity levels of a commercial bank increases ... and the capital ratio are not important determinants of the net interest margin. .... profitable and resilient to shocks including the recent financial crisis .... affects its business operations including its decision of what interest rate to charge.

  10. Determinants of Commercial banks' interest rate spreads in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated the determinants of commercial banks' interest rate spreads in Botswana using time series cross-sectional analysis for the period of 2004Q1 to 2014Q4. Factors empirically tested are bank-specific, industry-specific and macroeconomic data. Results indicate that bank intermediation, GDP, inflation ...

  11. Determining the nucleation rate from the dimer growth probability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, J.H.; Kashchiev, D.

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for the determination of the stationary one-component nucleation rate J with the help of data for the growth probability P2 of a dimer which is the smallest cluster of the nucleating phase. The method is based on an exact formula relating J and P2, and is readily applicable

  12. Codon usage determines translation rate in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Askvad; Kurland, C G; Pedersen, Steen

    1989-01-01

    We wish to determine whether differences in translation rate are correlated with differences in codon usage or with differences in mRNA secondary structure. We therefore inserted a small DNA fragment in the lacZ gene either directly or flanked by a few frame-shifting bases, leaving the reading fr...

  13. Influence of Heat Treatments on the Corrosion Resistance of Medium -Carbon Steel using Sulfuric Spring Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas Basheer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion is one of the important problems that may be occur to the parts of machinery and equipment after manufactured and when used as a result of exposure to corrosive media. Plain-carbon steel is considered as one of the most common minerals used in industrial applications. Some of heat treatments can have direct effect on the corrosion rate of steel by building up galvanic corrosion cells between its microscopic phases. Therefore, to adopt one of kinds of the plain-carbon steel and the most commonly used in industry to be study subject, that is medium carbon steel and took samples of this steel has been treated thermally in three methods which the normalising, annealing, and hardening .The corrosive media used in the research is Sulfuric Spring, it contains many chemical compounds to show its influence on the corrosion of steel. The weight loss method is used to determine corrosion rate and to compare between the results obtained, show that the greatest corrosion resistance of the annealed steel and the corrosion resistance of the hardened steel is the lowest while the corrosion  resistance of the normalised steel is in-between them.         Calcium carbonate was formed on the metal surface which acts as an isolating layer which decrease corrosion rate with time

  14. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  15. Determination of varying consumption rates from radiotracer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained on the uptake and elimination of phosphorus-32 by foraging grasshoppers were utilized to estimate consumption rates of blue grama grass (Bouteloua gracilis). Grasshoppers were caged in field enclosures containing blue grama grass labeled with 32 P. Periodic measurements were made to determine the body burdens of the grasshoppers and concentration of 32 P in the grass. This information, along with a two-component exponential function which was observed to best mathematically describe the retention of acutely ingested phosphorus, provided the basis for a convolution integral of the consumption rate. The consumption rate was estimated by dividing the observed body burden of the grasshopper by the convolution integral of the input (grass concentration) and impulse (retention curve) function over each observation period. Successive calculations of the consumption rates were made at various points in time as the body burden changed from continued feeding on labeled forage

  16. Stochastic theory of fatigue corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyun

    1999-10-01

    A stochastic theory of corrosion has been constructed. The stochastic equations are described giving the transportation corrosion rate and fluctuation corrosion coefficient. In addition the pit diameter distribution function, the average pit diameter and the most probable pit diameter including other related empirical formula have been derived. In order to clarify the effect of stress range on the initiation and growth behaviour of pitting corrosion, round smooth specimen were tested under cyclic loading in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  17. Corrosion and hydrogen permeation of A216 Grade WCA steel in hydrothermal magnesium-containing brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, J.H.; Frydrych, D.J.; Westerman, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    Corrosion rates determined at 1 month in 150/degree/C brine increased with magnesium concentration. The structure of the corrosion product, as determined by x-ray diffraction, depended upon the magnesium concentration. In brines with less than 10,000 ppM magnesium, the primary corrosion product had a spinel structure characteristic of magnetite or magnesioferrite. In brines containing magnesium concentrations greater than 20,000 ppM, the primary corrosion product had the amakinite structure characteristic of a complex iron-magnesium hydroxide. The high corrosion rates observed in brines containing high magnesium concentrations suggest that the corrosion products having the amakinite structure is less protective than corrosion products having the spinel structure. Corrosion rates in high-magnesium (inclusion) brine determined over a 6-month test duration were essentially constant. Hydrogen permeation rates observed in exposing mild steel to high-Mg/sup 2/plus// brine at 150/degree/C could be potentially damaging to a mild steel waste package container. The rate of hydrogen permeation was proportional to the brine flow rate in the autoclave. Thiourea additions to the brine increased the hydrogen permeation rate; sulfate and bromide ion additions did not. The maximum gaseous hydrogen pressure attainable is not known (based on 3Fe /plus/ 4H 2 O /plus/ Fe(sub 3)O /plus/ 4H 2 , would be /approximately/900 atmospheres), and the dependence of permeation rate on temperature is not known. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Determinants of Interest Rates on Corporate Bonds of Mining Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranosz, Robert

    2017-09-01

    This article is devoted to the determinants of interest rates on corporate bonds of mining enterprises. The study includes a comparison between the cost of foreign capital as resulting from the issue of debt instruments in different sectors of the economy in relation to the mining industry. The article also depicts the correlation between the rating scores published by the three largest rating agencies: S&P, Moody's, and Fitch. The test was based on simple statistical methods. The analysis performed indicated that there is a dependency between the factors listed and the amount of interest rates on corporate bonds of global mining enterprises. Most significant factors include the rating level and the period for which the given series of bonds was issued. Additionally, it is not without significance whether the given bond has additional options. Pursuant to the obtained results, is should be recognized that in order to reduce the interest rate on bonds, mining enterprises should pay particular attention to the rating and attempt to include additional options in issued bonds. Such additional options may comprise, for example, an ability to exchange bonds to shares or raw materials.

  19. Metallic copper corrosion rates, moisture content, and growth medium influence survival of copper ion-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elguindi, J; Moffitt, S; Hasman, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of both copper ion-resistant E. coli and E. faecium strains when samples in rich medium were spread in a thin, moist layer on copper alloys with 85% or greater copper content. E. coli strains were rapidly killed under dry conditions, while E. faecium strains were less affected. Electroplated copper...... on electroplated copper surfaces with benzotriazole coating and thermal oxide coating compared to surfaces without anti-corrosion treatment. Control of surface corrosion affected the level of copper ion influx into bacterial cells, which contributed directly to bacterial killing....

  20. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil; Apport des analogues archeologiques a l'estimation des vitesses moyennes et a l'etude des mecanismes de corrosion a tres long terme des aciers non allies dans les sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, D

    2003-11-15

    identified. This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 {mu}m/year. (author)

  1. Heart rate variability as determinism with jump stochastic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiongxuan; Skufca, Joseph D; Bollt, Erik M

    2013-08-01

    We use measured heart rate information (RR intervals) to develop a one-dimensional nonlinear map that describes short term deterministic behavior in the data. Our study suggests that there is a stochastic parameter with persistence which causes the heart rate and rhythm system to wander about a bifurcation point. We propose a modified circle map with a jump process noise term as a model which can qualitatively capture such this behavior of low dimensional transient determinism with occasional (stochastically defined) jumps from one deterministic system to another within a one parameter family of deterministic systems.

  2. ANALYSIS OF MACROECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF EXCHANGE RATE VOLATILITY IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mirchandani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Foreign Exchange Market in India has undergone substantial changes over last decade. It is imperative by the excessive volatility of Indian Rupee causing its depreciation against major dominating currencies in international market. This research has been carried out in order to investigate various macroeconomic variables leading to acute variations in the exchange rate of a currency. An attempt has been made to review the probable reasons for the depreciation of the Rupee and analyse different macroeconomic determinants that have impact on the volatility of exchange rate and their extent of correlation with the same.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  4. Corrosion of steel tanks in liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand how solution chemistry would impact on the corrosion of waste storage steel tanks at the Hanford Site. Future tank waste operations are expected to process wastes that are more dilute with respect to some current corrosion inhibiting waste constituents. Assessment of corrosion damage and of the influence of exposure time and electrolyte composition, using simulated (non-radioactive) wastes, of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloys is being conducted in a statistically designed long-term immersion experiment. Corrosion rates at different times of immersion were determined using both weight-loss determinations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Localized corrosion susceptibility was assessed using short-term cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The results presented in this paper correspond to electrochemical and weight-loss measurements of the immersed coupons during the first year of immersion from a two year immersion plan. A good correlation was obtained between electrochemical measurements, weight-loss determinations and visual observations. Very low general corrosion rates ( -1 ) were estimated using EIS measurements, indicating that general corrosion rate of the steel in contact with liquid wastes would no be a cause of tank failure even for these out-of-chemistry limit wastes. (author) [es

  5. Modelling of zirconium alloys corrosion in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritskij, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Kritskij, A.V.; Stjagkin, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical parameters, that exerted effect on Zr+1%Nb alloy corrosion and deserved consideration during reactor operation, were defined and a model was developed to describe the influence of physical and chemical parameters on zirconium alloys corrosion in nuclear power plants. The model is based on the correlation between the zirconium oxide solubility in high-temperature water under the influence of the chemical parameters and the measured values of fuel cladding corrosion under LWR conditions. The intensity of fuel cladding corrosion in the primary circuits depends on the coolant water quality, growth of iron oxide deposits and vaporization portion. Mathematically, the oxidation rate can be expressed as a sum of heat and radiation components. The temperature dependence on the oxidation rate can be described by the Arrenius equation. The radiation component of Zr uniform corrosion equation is a function of several factors such as neutron fluency, the temperature the metallurgical composition and et. We assume that the main factor is the changing of water chemistry and the H 2 O 2 concentration play the determinative role. Probably, the influence of H 2 O 2 is based on the formation of unstable compound ZrO 3 ·nH 2 O and Zr(OH) 4 with high solubility. The validity of the used formulae was confirmed by corrosion measurements on WWER and RBMK fuel cladding. The model can be applied for calculating the reliability of nuclear fuel operation. (author)

  6. Alloying effects on dissolution rate of crevice corrosion for austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl solution at 80 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.; Shinohara, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1996-01-01

    Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been a problem for austenitic stainless steel in aqueous environments containing chlorides. Studies have found that SCC initiates only from a dissolving surface and under the condition that the crack growth rate is higher than the dissolution rate of the dissolving surface. Research conducted to improve the resistance to SCC for Type 304 steels (UNS S30400) have revealed that while molybdenum and phosphorus are unfavored, the combined alloying of 3% aluminum with 2% copper can almost nullify their detrimental effect. Based on the mentioned criteria, this study was dedicated to clarify the mechanism behind these alloying effects by examining the relationship between the measured enhancements on SCC resistance and the dissolution rate observed via the moire technique. It was found that the addition of both molybdenum and phosphorus reduces the dissolution rate and therefore impaired SCC resistance; the addition of copper increases the dissolution rate of steady growth stage where crevice corrosion proceeds at a constant rate. Moreover this dissolution rate could further be increased when combined with the alloying of aluminum. These observed results correspond well to that of the measured behavior of the SCC critical temperature, T c , suggesting that the SCC susceptibility is influenced by anodic dissolution

  7. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  8. Procedure for determining the optimum rate of increasing shaft depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durov, E.M.

    1983-03-01

    Presented is an economic analysis of increasing shaft depth during mine modernization. Investigations carried out by the Yuzhgiproshakht Institute are analyzed. The investigations are aimed at determining the optimum shaft sinking rate (the rate which reduces investment to the minimum). The following factors are considered: coal output of a mine (0.9, 1.2, 1.5 and 1.8 Mt/year), depth at which the new mining level is situated (600, 800, 1200, 1400 and 1600 m), four schemes of increasing depth of 2 central shafts (rock hoisting to ground surface, rock hoisting to the existing level, rock haulage to the developed level, rock haulage to the level being developed using a large diameter borehole drilled from the new level to the shaft bottom and enlarged from shaft bottom to the new level), shaft sinking rate (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 m/month), range of increasing shaft depth (the difference between depth of the shaft before and after increasing its depth by 100, 200, 300 and 400 m). Comparative evaluations show that the optimum shaft sinking rate depends on the scheme for rock hoisting (one of 4 analyzed), range of increasing shaft depth and gas content in coal seams. The optimum shaft sinking rate ranges from 20 to 40 m/month in coal mines with low methane content and from 20 to 30 m/month in gassy coal mines. The planned coal output of a mine does not influence the optimum shaft sinking rate.

  9. Study on Corrosion of Materials by Fluoric Acid and Silicofluoric Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kun You; Kwon, Yeong Soo; Kuk, Myung Ho; Kim, Myun Sup

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion properties of 304 Stainless steel, Cupro-nickel, NiCrMo alloy in hydrofluoric acid and silicofluoric acid has been studied. The corrosion resistance of NiCrMo alloy and Cupro-nickel in hydrofluoric acid or mixed acid of hydrofluoric and sulfuric acid is excellent. Because of lower corrosion resistance of 304 Stainless steel, it would not be used for these corrosion resistant materials. The corrosion activation energy of 304 Stainless steel, Cupro-nickel and NiCrMo alloy in 40% HF solution are 42.7, 58.9 and 89.7 kJ/mol, respectively. By these values, it is assumed that the corrosion rate determining step is the chemical reaction on surface of metals. In the plastics, Teflon and polychloro tetrafluoroethylene are most excellent for corrosion resistance in hydrofluoric acid

  10. Determinants of Inter-Country Internet Diffusion Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wunnava, Phanindra V.; Leiter, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper employs cross-sectional data from 100 countries to analyze the main determinants of inter-country Internet diffusion rates. We set up an empirical model based on strong theoretical foundations, in which we regress Internet usage on variables that capture social, economic and political differences between these countries. Our results support past findings that economic strength, infrastructure and knowledge of the English language positively affect Internet connectivity. In addition...

  11. Plastic strains during stent deployment have a critical influence on the rate of corrosion in absorbable magnesium stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Emmet; Cummins, Christy; Yoshihara, Shoichiro; Mac Donald, Bryan J; Lally, Caitríona

    2017-08-01

    Magnesium stents are a promising candidate in the emerging field of absorbable metallic stents (AMSs). In this study, the mechanical and corrosion performance of dog-bone specimens and a specific stent design of a magnesium alloy, WE43, are assessed experimentally in terms of their corrosion behaviour and mechanical integrity. It is shown that plastic strains that are induced in the struts of the stent during stent deployment have a critical influence in directing subsequent corrosion behaviour within the material. In addition, the deployment and scaffolding characteristics of the magnesium stent are elucidated and contrasted with those of a commercial stainless steel stent. The magnesium stent is found to support higher levels of cyclic strain amplitude than the stainless steel stent, even prior to degradation, and this may play a role in reducing in-stent restenosis. This study provides new insights into the experimental performance of a current AMS design and material whilst demonstrating the critical influence of plastic strain on the corrosion performance and scaffolding ability of an AMS.

  12. Metabolic rate determines haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, P S R K

    2004-01-01

    The number of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) per animal is conserved across species. This means the HSCs need to maintain hematopoiesis over a longer period in larger animals. This would result in the requirement of stem cell self-renewal. At present the three existing models are the stochastic model, instructive model and the third more recently proposed is the chiaro-scuro model. It is a well known allometric law that metabolic rate scales to the three quarter power. Larger animals have a lower metabolic rate, compared to smaller animals. Here it is being hypothesized that metabolic rate determines haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. At lower metabolic rate the stem cells commit for self-renewal, where as at higher metabolic rate they become committed to different lineages. The present hypothesis can explain the salient features of the different models. Recent findings regarding stem cell self-renewal suggest an important role for Wnt proteins and their receptors known as frizzleds, which are an important component of cell signaling pathway. The role of cGMP in the Wnts action provides further justification for the present hypothesis as cGMP is intricately linked to metabolic rate. One can also explain the telomere homeostasis by the present hypothesis. One prediction of the present hypothesis is with reference to the limit of cell divisions known as Hayflick limit, here it is being suggested that this is the result of metabolic rate in laboratory conditions and there can be higher number of cell divisions in vivo if the metabolic rate is lower. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Stress corrosion crack growth in unirradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.

    1978-10-01

    Experimental techniques suitable for the determination of stress corrosion crack growth rates in irradiated Zircaloy tube have been developed. The techniques have been tested on unirradiated. Zircaloy and it was found that the results were in good agreement with the results of other investigations. Some of the results were obtained at very low stress intensities and the crack growth rates observed, gave no indication of the existance of a K sub(ISCC) for iodine induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy. This is of importance both for fuel rod behavior after a power ramp and for long term storage of spent Zircaloy-clad fuel. (author)

  14. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S.; Abosdell, Alajale M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations

  15. Determining Surface Infiltration Rate of Permeable Pavements with Digital Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Valeo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell phone images of pervious pavement surfaces were used to explore relationships between surface infiltration rates (SIR measured using the ASTM C1701 standard test and using a simple falling head test. A fiber-reinforced porous asphalt surface and a highly permeable material comprised of stone, rubber and a polymer binder (Porous Pave were tested. Images taken with a high-resolution cellphone camera were acquired as JPEG files and converted to gray scale images in Matlab® for analysis. The distribution of gray levels was compared to the surface infiltration rates obtained for both pavements with attention given to the mean of the distribution. Investigation into the relationships between mean SIR and parameters determined from the gray level distribution produced in the image analysis revealed that mean SIR measured in both pavements were proportional to the inverse of the mean of the distribution. The relationships produced a coefficient of determination over 85% using both the ASTM and the falling head test in the porous asphalt surface. SIR measurements determined with the ASTM method were highly correlated with the inverse mean of the distribution of gray levels in the Porous Pave material as well, producing coefficients of determination of over 90% and Kendall’s tau-b of roughly 70% for nonparametric data.

  16. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  17. Determination of cost effective waste management system receipt rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Huber, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive logistics and cost analysis has been carried out to determine if there are potential benefits to the high-level waste management system for receipt rates other than the current 3000 MTU/yr design-basis. The analysis includes both a Repository-Only System and a Storage-Only System. Repository startup dates of 2010 and 2015 and MRS startup dates of 1988 and three years prior to the repository have been evaluated. Receipt rates ranging from 1,500 to 6, 000 MTU/yr have been considered. Higher receipt rates appear to be economically justified, for either system, minimum costs are found at a repository receipt rate of 6000 MTU/yr. However, the MRS receipt rate for minimum system costs depends on the MRS startup date. With a 1988 MRS and a 2010 repository, the added cost of providing the MRS is offset by at-reactor storage cost reductions and the total system cost of $10.0 billion is virtually the same as for the repository- only system. 9 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  18. The effect of prior deformation on stress corrosion cracking growth rates of Alloy 600 materials in a simulated pressurized water reactor primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiya; Lu Zhanpeng; Ito, Yuzuru; Takeda, Yoichi; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    The effect of prior deformation on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth rates of Alloy 600 materials in a simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment is studied. The prior deformation was introduced by welding procedure or by cold working. Values of Vickers hardness in the Alloy 600 weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) and in the cold worked (CW) Alloy 600 materials are higher than that in the base metal. The significantly hardened area in the HAZ is within a distance of about 2-3 mm away from the fusion line. Electron backscatter diffraction (EPSD) results show significant amounts of plastic strain in the Alloy 600 HAZ and in the cold worked Alloy 600 materials. Stress corrosion cracking growth rate tests were performed in a simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was found in the Alloy 600 HAZ, 8% and 20% CW Alloy 600 specimens. The crack growth rate in the Alloy 600 HAZ is close to that in the 8% CW base metal, which is significantly lower than that in the 20% CW base metal, but much higher than that in the as-received base metal. Mixed intergranular and transgranular SCC was found in the 40% CW Alloy 600 specimen. The crack growth rate in the 40% CW Alloy 600 was lower than that in the 20% CW Alloy 600. The effect of hardening on crack growth rate can be related to the crack tip mechanics, the sub-microstructure (or subdivision of grain) after cross-rolling, and their interactions with the oxidation kinetics

  19. Determination of cost effective waste management system receipt rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Huber, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive logistics and cost analysis has been carried out to determine if there are potential benefits to the high-level waste management system for receipt rates other than the current 3,000 MTU/yr design-basis receipt rate. The scope of the analysis includes both a Repository-Only System and a Storage-Only or Basic MRS System. To allow for current uncertainties in facility startup scheduling, cases considering repository startup dates of 2010 and 2015 and MRS startup dates of 1998 and three years prior to the repository have been evaluated. Receipt rates ranging from 1,500 to 6,000 MTU/yr have been considered for both the MRS and the repository. Higher receipt rates appear to be economically justified for both the repository and an MRS. For a repository-only system, minimum costs are found at a repository receipt rate of 6,000 MTU/yr. When a storage-only MRS is included in the system, minimum system costs are also achieved at a repository receipt rate of 6,000 MTU/yr. However, the MRS receipt rate for minimum system costs depends on the MRS startup date and ranges from 3,500 to 6,000 MTU/yr. With a 1998 MRS and a 2010 repository, the added cost of providing the MRS is offset by at-reactor storage cost reductions and the total system cost of $10.0 billion is virtually the same as for the repository-only system

  20. Corrosion studies on HGW-canister materials for marine disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.J.; Bland, I.D.; Smith, S.; Marsh, G.P.

    1986-03-01

    Results are presented from theoretical and experimental work undertaken to investigate and assess the general corrosion behaviour of carbon steel canister/overpacks for heat generating nuclear waste under marine disposal conditions. The mean general corrosion rates of carbon steels, determined experimentally by polarisation resistance measurements on specimens in on-going immersion tests, are between 65-124 μm yr -1 at 90 0 C and 5-25 μm yr -1 at 25 0 C and are tending to increase with time. Anomalously high corrosion rates are being indicated by similar tests at 50 0 C. It is not clear what reliance should be placed on the polarisation resistance results, however, and therefore no conclusion will be drawn until the tests are dismantled and inspected in the 1985/86 programme. Tests with γ-radiation on forged carbon steel specimens immersed in deaerated seawater at 90 0 C show that this causes an acceleration of corrosion rate at the three dose rates down to at least 300 R h -1 . Deep ocean sediment from GME also accelerates the corrosion rate of carbon steel in deaerated seawater both with and without γ-radiation. The effect diminishes with continued exposure and is thought to be due to the presence of either an additional so far unidentified oxidising agent or some component which reduces the corrosion protection afforded by the build up of a corrosion product layer. Acquisition of improved electrochemical kinetic data for the mathematical model is now complete, and the model has been run for temperatures of 25 and 90 0 C, where it predicts steady corrosion rates of 19.3 and 180 μm/yr. The model has shown that the rate of attack is not influenced greatly by the depth of sediment, and that the component of corrosion caused by radiation is of the order of 7 mm over 1000 years. (author)

  1. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  2. On-line electrochemical monitoring of microbially influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, N.J.E.; Stansbury, E.E.; White, D.C.; Borenstein, S.W.; Danko, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Newly emerging electrochemical measurement techniques can provide on-line, non-destructive monitoring of the average corrosion rate and indications of localized pitting corrosion together with insight into fundamental electrochemical mechanisms responsible for the corrosion process. This information is relevant to evaluating, monitoring, understanding and controlling microbially influenced corrosion (MIC). MIC of coupons exposed in sidestream devices on site or in laboratory-based experiments, where the corrosion response is accelerated by exposure to active consortia of microbes recovered from specific sites, can be utilized to evaluate mitigation strategies. The average corrosion rates can be determined by small amplitude cyclic voltametry (SACV), and AC impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS can also give insight into the mechanisms of the MIC and indications of localized corrosion. Pitting corrosion can be detected non-destructively with open circuit potential monitoring (OCP). OCP also responds to bacterial biofilm activities such as oxygen depletion and other electrochemical activities. Utilizing these methods, accelerated tests can be designed to direct the selection of materials, surface treatments of materials, and welding filler materials, as well as the optimization of chemical and mechanical countermeasures with the microbial consortia recovered and characterized from the specific sites of interest

  3. Metallic corrosion in the polluted urban atmosphere of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Da-Wei; Guo, Hai; Ling, Zhen-Hao; Cheung, Kalam

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between air pollutants, particularly acidic particles, and metallic material corrosion. An atmospheric corrosion test was carried out in spring-summer 2012 at a polluted urban site, i.e., Tung Chung in western Hong Kong. Nine types of metallic materials, namely iron, Q235 steel, 20# steel, 16Mn steel, copper, bronze, brass, aluminum, and aluminum alloy, were selected as specimens for corrosion tests. Ten sets of the nine materials were all exposed to ambient air, and then each set was collected individually after exposure to ambient air for consecutive 6, 13, 20, 27, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days, respectively. After the removal of the corrosion products on the surface of the exposed specimens, the corrosion rate of each material was determined. The surface structure of materials was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the corrosion tests. Environmental factors including temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of gaseous pollutants, i.e., sulfur dioxide (SO₂), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O₃), and particulate-phase pollutants, i.e., PM₂.₅ (FSP) and PM₁₀ (RSP), were monitored. Correlation analysis between environmental factors and corrosion rate of materials indicated that iron and carbon steel were damaged by both gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and NO₂) and particles. Copper and copper alloys were mainly corroded by gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and O₃), while corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloy was mainly attributed to NO₂ and particles.

  4. 31 CFR 359.14 - How are composite rates determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... composite interest rates.): Composite rate = {(Fixed rate ÷ 2) + Semiannual inflation rate + [Semiannual inflation rate × (Fixed rate ÷ 2)]} × 2. 2 2 Example for I bonds issued May 2002-October 2002: Fixed rate = 2.00% Inflation rate = 0.28% Composite rate = [0.0200 ÷ 2 + 0.0028 + (0.0028 × 0.0200 ÷ 2)] ×2...

  5. Stress corrosion crack initiation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment during creep, relaxation, and constant strain rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezequel, T.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Bono, M.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Chabretou, V.; Mozzani, N.; Rautenberg, M.

    2018-02-01

    During accidental power transient conditions with Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), the synergistic effect of the stress and strain imposed on the cladding by thermal expansion of the fuel, and corrosion by iodine released as a fission product, may lead to cladding failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this study, internal pressure tests were conducted on unirradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment. The goal was to investigate the influence of loading type (constant pressure tests, constant circumferential strain rate tests, or constant circumferential strain tests) and test temperature (320, 350, or 380 °C) on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC). The experimental results obtained with different loading types were consistent with each other. The apparent threshold hoop stress for I-SCC was found to be independent of the test temperature. SEM micrographs of the tested samples showed many pits distributed over the inner surface, which tended to coalesce into large pits in which a microcrack could initiate. A model for the time-to-failure of a cladding tube was developed using finite element simulations of the viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material and a modified Kachanov's damage growth model. The times-to-failure predicted by this model are consistent with the experimental data.

  6. Determination of heart rate variability with an electronic stethoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Haroon; Naggar, Isaac; Oniyuke, Francisca; Palomeque, Mercy; Chokshi, Priya; Salciccioli, Louis; Stewart, Mark; Lazar, Jason M

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is widely used to characterize cardiac autonomic function by measuring beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate. Decreased HRV has been found predictive of worse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. HRV is determined from time intervals between QRS complexes recorded by electrocardiography (ECG) for several minutes to 24 h. Although cardiac auscultation with a stethoscope is performed routinely on patients, the human ear cannot detect heart sound time intervals. The electronic stethoscope digitally processes heart sounds, from which cardiac time intervals can be obtained. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of obtaining HRV from electronically recorded heart sounds. We prospectively studied 50 subjects with and without CV risk factors/disease and simultaneously recorded single lead ECG and heart sounds for 2 min. Time and frequency measures of HRV were calculated from R-R and S1-S1 intervals and were compared using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The majority of the indices were strongly correlated (ICC 0.73-1.0), while the remaining indices were moderately correlated (ICC 0.56-0.63). In conclusion, we found HRV measures determined from S1-S1 are in agreement with those determined by single lead ECG, and we demonstrate and discuss differences in the measures in detail. In addition to characterizing cardiac murmurs and time intervals, the electronic stethoscope holds promise as a convenient low-cost tool to determine HRV in the hospital and outpatient settings as a practical extension of the physical examination.

  7. Determining long-term regional erosion rates using impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergarten, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    More than 300,000 impact craters have been found on Mars, while the surface of Moon's highlands is even saturated with craters. In contrast, only 184 impact craters have been confirmed on Earth so far with only 125 of them exposed at the surface. The spatial distribution of these impact craters is highly inhomogeneous. Beside the large variation in the age of the crust, consumption of craters by erosion and burial by sediments are the main actors being responsible for the quite small and inhomogeneous crater record. In this study we present a novel approach to infer long-term average erosion rates at regional scales from the terrestrial crater inventory. The basic idea behind this approach is a dynamic equilibrium between the production of new craters and their consumption by erosion. It is assumed that each crater remains detectable until the total erosion after the impact exceeds a characteristic depth depending on the crater's diameter. Combining this model with the terrestrial crater production rate, i.e., the number of craters per unit area and time as a function of their diameter, allows for a prediction of the expected number of craters in a given region as a function of the erosion rate. Using the real crater inventory, this relationship can be inverted to determine the regional long-term erosion rate and its statistical uncertainty. A limitation by the finite age of the crust can also be taken into account. Applying the method to the Colorado Plateau and the Deccan Traps, both being regions with a distinct geological history, yields erosion rates in excellent agreement with those obtained by other, more laborious methods. However, these rates are formally exposed to large statistical uncertainties due to the small number of impact craters. As higher crater densities are related to lower erosion rates, smaller statistical errors can be expected when large regions in old parts of the crust are considered. Very low long-term erosion rates of less than 4

  8. Standard practice for preparing, cleaning, and evaluating corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers suggested procedures for preparing bare, solid metal specimens for tests, for removing corrosion products after the test has been completed, and for evaluating the corrosion damage that has occurred. Emphasis is placed on procedures related to the evaluation of corrosion by mass loss and pitting measurements. (Warning—In many cases the corrosion product on the reactive metals titanium and zirconium is a hard and tightly bonded oxide that defies removal by chemical or ordinary mechanical means. In many such cases, corrosion rates are established by mass gain rather than mass loss.) 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see 1 and 7.2.

  9. Variation in human recombination rates and its genetic determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Fledel-Alon

    Full Text Available Despite the fundamental role of crossing-over in the pairing and segregation of chromosomes during human meiosis, the rates and placements of events vary markedly among individuals. Characterizing this variation and identifying its determinants are essential steps in our understanding of the human recombination process and its evolution.Using three large sets of European-American pedigrees, we examined variation in five recombination phenotypes that capture distinct aspects of crossing-over patterns. We found that the mean recombination rate in males and females and the historical hotspot usage are significantly heritable and are uncorrelated with one another. We then conducted a genome-wide association study in order to identify loci that influence them. We replicated associations of RNF212 with the mean rate in males and in females as well as the association of Inversion 17q21.31 with the female mean rate. We also replicated the association of PRDM9 with historical hotspot usage, finding that it explains most of the genetic variance in this phenotype. In addition, we identified a set of new candidate regions for further validation.These findings suggest that variation at broad and fine scales is largely separable and that, beyond three known loci, there is no evidence for common variation with large effects on recombination phenotypes.

  10. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  11. Apparatus and method for determining solids circulation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, J Christopher [Morgantown, WV; Spenik, James L [Morgantown, WV

    2012-02-14

    The invention relates to a method of determining bed velocity and solids circulation rate in a standpipe experiencing a moving packed bed flow, such as the in the standpipe section of a circulating bed fluidized reactor The method utilizes in-situ measurement of differential pressure over known axial lengths of the standpipe in conjunction with in-situ gas velocity measurement for a novel application of Ergun equations allowing determination of standpipe void fraction and moving packed bed velocity. The method takes advantage of the moving packed bed property of constant void fraction in order to integrate measured parameters into simultaneous solution of Ergun-based equations and conservation of mass equations across multiple sections of the standpipe.

  12. Generating pipeline networks for corrosion assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J. [Cimarron Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Production characteristics and gas-fluid compositions of fluids must be known in order to assess pipelines for internal corrosion risk. In this study, a gathering system pipeline network was built in order to determine corrosion risk for gathering system pipelines. Connections were established between feeder and collector lines in order measure upstream production and the weighted average of the upstream composition of each pipeline in the system. A Norsok M-506 carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) corrosion rate model was used to calculate corrosion rates. A spreadsheet was then used to tabulate the obtained data. The analysis used straight lines drawn between the 'from' and 'to' legal sub-division (LSD) endpoints in order to represent pipelines on an Alberta township system (ATS) and identify connections between pipelines. Well connections were established based on matching surface hole location and 'from' LSDs. Well production, composition, pressure, and temperature data were sourced and recorded as well attributes. XSL hierarchical computations were used to determine the production and composition properties of the commingled inflows. It was concluded that the corrosion assessment process can identify locations within the pipeline network where potential deadlegs branched off from flowing pipelines. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  13. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  14. Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry was studied as a function of the microstructure developed by austempering at 380 and 300°C for different exposure time in the slurry. The corrosion rates of the ADI balls immersed in the iron ore slurry was determined using weight loss method.

  15. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  16. Lifetime forecasting of a WWER NPP steam generator tube bundle from stress corrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereda, E.V.; Gorbatykh, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    An approach is outlined to the description of corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in hot chloride solutions to predict the failure of WWER NPP steam generator heat exchange tubes. The dependence of the corrosion cracking development rate on the chloride concentration and characteristic electrochemical potentials is suggsted. The approach permits also to determine the quantity of damaged tubes versus the operation parameters

  17. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  18. Electrochemical study of corrosion inhibition of stainless steel in phosphoric medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnini, K.; Chtaini, A. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Bio Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Khouili, M.; Elbouadili, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Analytique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion of metals represents a terrible waste of both natural resources and money, the failure of some stainless steel resulting from pitting corrosion is some times considered a technological problem, consequently, much effort has been expended in attempting to understand and overcome the corrosion therefore, many stainless steel/ environment combinations have been studied. The use of heterocyclic compounds as inhibitors is one of the most practical methods for protection against corrosion in acidic media. In continuation of our work on development of macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors we report in our study the corrosion inhibiting behaviour of organic compound Methoxy-2-Allyl-4 Phenol (MAP) containing coordinating and conjugation groups, at three forms (natural, polymerized and chemically treated) on the corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid. This study focused on the comparison for corrosion inhibition proprieties of these different applications using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and SEM. The specimen was evaluated to determine change in his corrosion potential and resistance polarization; These MAP products have exhibited corrosion inhibition by maintaining a high resistance polarization (low corrosion rate) in each application. These results reveal that this compound is efficient inhibitor in all forms; the most inhibition efficiency is obtained with polymerized form. To further evaluate the test data, the steel surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, SEM observations of surface treated concrete confirmed presence of inhibitor on the steel surfaces. (authors)

  19. Corrosion of breached UF6 storage cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, E.J.; Taylor, M.S.; DeVan, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the corrosion processes that occurred following the mechanical failure of two steel 14-ton storage cylinders containing depleted UF 6 . The failures both were traced to small mechanical tears that occurred during stacking of the cylinders. Although subsequent corrosion processes greatly extended the openings in the wall. the reaction products formed were quite protective and prevented any significant environmental insult or loss of uranium. The relative sizes of the two holes correlated with the relative exposure times that had elapsed from the time of stacking. From the sizes and geometries of the two holes, together with analyses of the reaction products, it was possible to determine the chemical reactions that controlled the corrosion process and to develop a scenario for predicting the rate of hydrolysis of UF 6 , the loss rate of HF, and chemical attack of a breached UF 6 storage cylinder

  20. [Determination of the 120-day post prostatic biopsy mortality rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canat, G A; Duclos, A; Couray-Targe, S; Schott, A-M; Polazzi, S; Scoazec, J-Y; Berger, F; Perrin, P

    2014-06-01

    Concerning death-rates were reported following prostate biopsy but the lack of contexts in which event occurred makes it difficult to take any position. Therefore, we aimed to determine the 120-day post-biopsy mortality rate. Between 2000 and 2011, 8804 men underwent prostate biopsy in the hospice civils de Lyon. We studied retrospectively, the mortality rate after each of the 11,816 procedures. Biopsies imputability was assessed by examining all medical records. Dates of death were extracted from our local patient management database, which is updated trimestrially with death notifications from the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies. In our study 42 deaths occurred within 120days after 11,816 prostate biopsies (0.36%). Of the 42 records: 9 were lost to follow-up, 3 had no identifiable cause of death, 28 had an intercurrent event ruling out prostate biopsy as a cause of death. Only 2 deaths could be linked to biopsy. We reported at most 2 deaths possibly related to prostate biopsy over 11,816 procedures (0.02%). We confirmed the fact that prostate biopsies can be lethal but this rare outcome should not be considered as an argument against prostate screening given the circumstances in which it occurs. 5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of area reduction rate by continuous ball indentation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Bin; Guan, Kai Shu; Wu, Sheng Bao

    2016-01-01

    Rate of area reduction is an important mechanical property to appraise the plasticity of metals, which is always obtained from the uniaxial tensile test. A methodology is proposed to determine the area reduction rate by continuous ball indentation test technique. The continuum damage accumulation theory has been adopted in this work to identify the failure point in the indentation. The corresponding indentation depth of this point can be obtained and used to estimate the area reduction rate. The local strain limit criterion proposed in the ASME VIII-2 2007 alternative rules is also adopted in this research to convert the multiaxial strain of indentation test to uniaxial strain of tensile test. The pile-up and sink-in phenomenon which can affect the result significantly is also discussed in this paper. This method can be useful in engineering practice to evaluate the material degradation under severe working condition due to the non-destructive nature of ball indentation test. In order to validate the method, continuous ball indentation test is performed on ferritic steel 16MnR and ASTM (A193B16), then the results are compared with that got from the traditional uniaxial tensile test.

  2. Corrosion of stainless and carbon steels in molten mixtures of industrial nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Prairie, M.R.; Chavez, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of two stainless steels and carbon steel in mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} was evaluated to determine if impurities found in commodity grades of alkali nitrates aggravate corrosivity as applicable to an advanced solar thermal energy system. Corrosion tests were conducted for 7000 hours with Types 304 and 316 stainless steels at 570C and A36 carbon steel at 316C in seven mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} containing variations in impurity concentrations. Corrosion tests were also conducted in a ternary mixture of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses while oxidation products were examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The nitrate mixtures were periodically analyzed for changes in impurity concentrations and for soluble corrosion products.

  3. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  4. Corrosion of Cast Iron Mill Plates in Wet Grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony ANDREWS

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion studies were carried out on two different maize grinding plates. Maize was soaked in water for three days and the water decanted and used as electrolyte. Mass loss and pH measurements were carried out every 3 days for 15-day period. Results show that, for each plate, mass loss and pH increased with exposure time. Corrosion rates determined from mass loss data was found to be strongly dependent on pH. The observed behaviour may be explained in terms of the chemical composition and/or microstructures of the plates. Results are briefly discussed in terms of the contribution of corrosion to wear.

  5. Analysis of the structural steels corrosion resistance in sour water from petroleum refineries; Analise da resistencia a corrosao de acos estruturais em aguas acidas de refinarias de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proenca, Marcos B.; Freire, Celia M. de A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Santos, Margatita B. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada

    1994-07-01

    The presence of H{sub 2} S in refineries FCC sour water provokes the formation of a passive Fe S scale. The cyanides present on sour water remove this scale, raising the corrosion rate in pipping and vessels. In this work it was measured the corrosion rate of structural steels in this water by electrochemical methods. Anodic polarization curves were plotted and the corrosion rates of the steels were determined. (author)

  6. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate Characteristics for Weldable Ship and Offshore Steels with Regard to the Influence of Loading Frequency and Saltwater Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Marek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available After Vosikovsky (1975, the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (CFCGR characteristics have been divided into three regions. The region-III rates are very close to mechanical fatigue crack growth rates. CFCGR formulae, including the long-crack length effect (in region I only, the loading frequency effect (in region II only, and the saltwater temperature effect, have been proposed. It has been assumed that CFCGR is proportional to f-k, where f is the loading frequency and k is a constant. The averaged k-value for all steels of yield stress (YS below 500 MPa, usually with ferrite-pearlite microstructures, is higher than that for YS > 500 MPa, usually with quenched and tempered microstructures. The temperature effect does not appear in region I below room temperature. In the remaining cases, that is, in region I for elevated temperatures and in region II for both low and elevated temperatures, the CFCGR increases with increasing temperature. Under a potential of -0.8 V, a long-crack-length effect, qualitatively similar to analogous effect for free corrosion conditions, appears.

  7. Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests on A508-III and A533B steel in de-ionized and PWR water at 563K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, P.; Appleton, D.A.; Banks, P.; Raffel, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental programme is being undertaken to assess the extent to which PWR pressure vessel steels, including weldments, may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under relevant water chemistry and flow rate conditions. Initial results from slow strain rate tests on parent A533B and A508-III steels together with a weldment are described. No susceptibility to stress corrosion was observed for either steel, when tested in the rolling (L) direction, at a potential characteristic of normal quality PWR water. For cracking to occur on such specimens the potential must be displaced by 400 to 500 mV in the positive direction, requiring (in the case of high flow de-ionized water) the presence of ca 200 ppb oxygen. Some cracking was observed on transverse (S) direction specimens in water containing 2 , indicating that there may be micro-structural features which can cause cracking even in low oxygen water. This orientation is not directly relevant to pressure vessels and the cracking may only arise as a consequence of the deformation encountered in the slow strain rate test. (author)

  8. The effect of sulfide on the aerobic corrosion of carbon steel in near-neutral pH saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion rate is low when steel is exposed to anaerobic conditions (pH = 8.9). ► An anaerobic to aerobic corrosion with sulfide switch increases the corrosion rate. ► Aerobic exposure induces the formation of goethite-covered tubercles. ► Continual sulfide exposure leads to the slow conversion of goethite to mackinawite. - Abstract: Severe corrosion damage may occur when gas transmission pipelines are exposed, at disbonded coating locations, to trapped waters containing sulfide followed by secondary exposure to air. Aerobic corrosion with sulfide was investigated in a long-term corrosion experiment in which corrosion was monitored by measurement of the corrosion potential and polarization resistance obtained from linear polarization resistance measurements. The properties and composition of the corrosion product deposits formed were determined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. A switch from aerobic to aerobic-with-sulfide corrosion doubles the relative corrosion rate.

  9. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  10. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion ... cables, steel rigs, pipelines and other marine facilities, is ..... make high strength steel material to crack with stress ... of SBS has yet been very limited, and selection of.

  11. Relationship between corrosion and the biological sulfur cycle: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, B.J.; Ray, R.I.; Pope, R.K.

    2000-04-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds can produce pitting, crevice corrosion, dealloying, stress corrosion cracking, and stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking of susceptible metals and alloys. Even though the metabolic by-products of the biological sulfur cycle are extremely corrosive, there are no correlations between numbers and types of sulfur-related organisms and the probability or rate of corrosion, Determination of specific mechanisms for corrosion caused by microbiologically mediated oxidation and reduction of sulfur and sulfur compounds is complicated by the variety of potential metabolic-energy sources and by-products; the coexistence of reduced and oxidized sulfur species; competing reactions with inorganic and organic compounds; and the versatility and adaptability of microorganisms in biofilms. The microbial ecology of sulfur-rich environments is poorly understood because of the association of aerobes and anaerobes and the mutualism or succession of heterotrophs to autotrophs. The physical scale over which the sulfur cycle influences corrosion varies with the environment. The complete sulfur cycle of oxidation and reduction reactions can take place in macroenvironments, including sewers and polluted harbors, or within the microenvironment of biofilms. In this review, reactions of sulfur and sulfur compounds resulting in corrosion were discussed in the context of environmental processes important to corrosion.

  12. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee Ling Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates had insufficient knowledge of corrosion engineering and superficial understanding of corrosion in real-life design contexts. The effectiveness of corrosion education is determined by both competence in corrosion knowledge/skills and availability of resources (faculty and research. Though most departments would not hire new corrosion-specialist faculty, department research efforts and industry partnerships in corrosion research were present. The paper concluded with recommendations for improving knowledge and skills of future engineers in corrosion and enhancing corrosion instruction to better meet industry needs.

  13. Study for determination of industrial water corrosivity in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing Mills during 2005-2006 Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, D; Miranzadeh, M B; Motlagh, A Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    This research was carried out in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing mills (KFSGM) for evaluation of water corrosivity during 2005-2006. A total of 18 samples were taken from various points of the water supply system for testing the specific parameters and calculation Langelier Index (LI), Ryznar Index (RI) and Pukorious Index (PI). This research showed that in raw water (sand filter effluent) LI were positive as well as RI and PI were lower than 7 which means that mentioned water is not corrosive. Also LI in treated water by reverse osmosis process was negative and RI and PI were higher than 7, so, this water has corrosive properties. Finally, calculated indexes indicate that according to LI, conditioned water is not corrosive but based on RI and P. this water tend to corrosivity which this findings is compatible with literature review statement. So it is recommended that, for water conditioning addition of preservative chemicals to be continued but at the same time another alternatives such as pH adjustment, air stripping and deoxygenating, control of carbonate concentration and split flow treatment should be studied.

  14. Corrosivity of solutions from evaporation of radioactive liquid wastes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payer, H.; Kolic, E.S.; Boyd, W.K.

    1977-01-01

    New double-shell storage tanks are constructed with ASTM A-516 Grade 65 steel. This study had two main objectives: To characterize the corrosivity of synthetic nonradioactive terminal waste solutions to ASTM A-516 Grade 65 steel and to determine the severity of stress-corrosion cracking of carbon steel in terminal waste solutions. The information developed provides guidance in the characterization of the aggressiveness of actual terminal liquors and in the design and operation of fail-safe tanks. Corrosion behavior was measured over a range of oxidizing conditions by the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Oxidizing conditions in a solution likely to promote general corrosion, pitting or stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) were identified. Absolute stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility was determined by constant strain rate procedure for ASTM A-516 Grade 65 steel for conditions identified by polarization experiments as likely to promote SCC. Based on the results of this study, terminal waste storage tanks are safe from stress-corrosion cracking under freely corroding conditions. Corrosion potential of steel in solutions within anticipated compositions is at the positive end of the critical range for stress-corrosion cracking, and no conditions were observed which would lower the potential to more negative values within the cracking range under freely corroding conditions. Measurement of corrosion potential and hydroxide concentration provides a means to extend these results to compositions outside of the composition range studied

  15. Update of the water chemistry effect on the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel: influence of hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavageau, E.-M.; De Bouvier, O.; Trevin, S.; Bretelle, J.-L.; Dejoux, L.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the water chemistry on Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) affecting carbon steel components has been studied for many years and is relatively well known and taken into account by the models. Nonetheless, experimental studies were conducted in the last few years at EDF on the CIROCO loop in order to check the influence of the water chemistry parameters (hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine) on the FAC rate of carbon steel in one phase flow conditions. The hydrazine impact on the FAC rate was shown to be minor in EDF's chemistry recommendation range, compared to other parameters' effects such as the pH effect. The presence of boric acid in the nominal secondary circuit conditions was negligible. Finally, as expected, the nature of the chemical conditioning (ammonia, morpholine or ethanolamine) did not modify the FAC rate, the influencing chemical variable being the at-temperature pH in one-phase flow conditions. (author)

  16. 42 CFR 418.306 - Determination of payment rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) of the Act. (b) Payment rates. The payment rates for routine home care and other services included in... October 21, 1990, through December 31, 1990, the payment rates for routine home care and other services... December 31, 1990: Routine home care $75.80 Continuous home care: Full rate for 24 hours 442.40 Hourly rate...

  17. In-situ monitoring of undercoating corrosion damage by Direct Optical Interrogation (DOI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garrity, Meng

    An approach referred to as "Direct Optical Interrogation" (DOI) has been developed as an extension of the thin film pitting approach developed and used by Frankel and others. Samples were prepared by depositing Al and Al-Cu alloy metallizations about 800 nm thick on glass substrates. These metallizations were then coated with various coatings and coating systems. Samples were introduced to aggressive environments and the progression of corrosion of the metallization under the coating was monitored in situ using low power videography. Because metallizations were thin, corrosion quickly penetrated through the metal layer to the glass substrate and then spread laterally. Measurement of the lateral spread of corrosion enabled non-electrochemical assessment of the corrosion kinetics. In Al-Cu thin films, both aged and as-deposited, corrosion sites are irregularly shaped because there is not enough cathodic current to propagate the entire corrosion site margin at equal rates. In a number of cases, corrosion propagates with a filamentary morphology resembling filiform corrosion. Cu played a strong role in determining under coating corrosion morphology and growth kinetics in experiments with Al-Cu thin films substrates. As-deposited Al-Cu metallizations were more corrosion resistant than aged metallization and both were more corrosion resistant than pure Al. Cu-rich dendrites were formed on the corrosion front. Corrosion rate (current density) was calculated using Faraday's law by collecting corrosion site perimeter and bottom area. Systematic exploration of the effects of a chromate and chromate-free conversion coatings, chromate and chromate-free primer coatings and the presence or absence of a polyurethane topcoat confirmed the extraordinary corrosion protection by chromates. A commercial praseodymium-pigmented primer coating was not particularly effective in retarding undercoating corrosion site growth unless paired with a chromate conversion coating. The presence of a

  18. Determinants of patient-rated and clinician-rated illness severity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fervaha, Gagan; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Agid, Ofer; Lee, Jimmy; Foussias, George; Remington, Gary

    2015-07-01

    The contribution of specific symptoms on ratings of global illness severity in patients with schizophrenia is not well understood. The present study examined the clinical determinants of clinician and patient ratings of overall illness severity. This study included 1,010 patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia who participated in the baseline visit of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study conducted between January 2001 and December 2004 and who had available symptom severity, side effect burden, cognition, and community functioning data. Both clinicians and patients completed the 7-point Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S), the primary measure of interest in the present study. Symptoms were rated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, and functional status with the Quality of Life Scale. Neurocognition, insight, and medication-related side effects were also evaluated. Clinicians rated illness severity significantly higher than patients (P negative, disorganized, and depressive symptoms, as well as functional outcome (all P values enhance patient engagement in care and improve outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00014001. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  19. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy's treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation

  20. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program includ...

  1. Corrosion behaviour of the AlSi6Cu4 alloy and cast AlSi6Cu4-graphite particles composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Holecek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of the AlSi6Cu4 alloy as a composite matrix and of composites with 8% vol. of graphite particles was investigated. The corrosion experiments were performed over a range of elevated temperatures and were carried out in sea water (3.5%NaCl solution. We have focused our attention to the determination of the mode of corrosion attack and to the determination of the rate ofcorrosion and other corrosion characteristics. Both as-cast and annealed matrix and composite specimens were tested, as well as the99.9% as-cast aluminium for comparison. Corrosion behaviour of the materials was assessed by the corrosion potential (Ec and bypotentiodynamic (polarization curves. As expected, composite is less corrosion resistant than the matrix alloy. In addition to pitting,a severe galvanic corrosion occurs as a result of galvanic couple aluminium/graphite formation. Corrosion potentials imply that examinedmaterials would be sufficiently resistant in non or slightly oxidizing solutions without dissolved oxygen. All studied materials corrode very slowly at potentials negative to corrosion potential, while at potentials positive to corrosion potential the corrosion rate goes up by 1 or 2 orders.

  2. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  3. Determination of in vitro oxygen consumption rates for tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas-Navia, L.I.; Moeller, B.J.; Kirkpatrick, J.P.; Laursen, T.A.; Dewhirst, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    To determine pO 2 at the surface of a monolayer of confluent HCT 116 cells, and to then determine consumption rate in vitro by examining the pO 2 profile in media above the cells. Materials and Methods: A recessed-tip polarographic oxygen microelectrode (diameter ∼10μm) was used to measure pO 2 profiles of media above a confluent monolayer of HCT 116 human colon adenocarcinoma cells in a T25 flask exposed to a 95% air, 5% CO 2 mixture. A two-dimensional finite element analysis of the diffusion equation was used to fit the data, thereby extracting a steady-state O 2 consumption rate. The diffusion equation was solved for zeroth and first-order expressions. No-flux boundary conditions were imposed on its bottom and side boundaries and experimental data was used for boundary conditions at the gas-media boundary. All flasks show an O 2 gradient in the media, with a mean (SE) media layer of 1677 (147) μm and a mean pO 2 at the cell layer/media interface of 44 (8) mm Hg (n=9). pO 2 gradient over the entire media layer is 630 (90) mm Hg/cm, equivalent to a consumption rate of 6.3 x 10 -4 (9.0 x 10 -5 ) mm Hg/s. The mean values for the zeroth and first order rate constants are 8.1 x 10 -9 (1.3 x 10 -9 ) g mol O 2 /cm 3 s and 1.0 x 10 3 (0.46 x 10 3 ) /s, respectively. Control experiments in flasks containing no cells show slight gradients in pO 2 of 38 (12) mm Hg/cm, resulting from some O 2 diffusion through the flask into the surrounding water bath. An addition of 10 -3 M NaCN to the media results in a dramatic increase in pO 2 at the cell layer, consistent with a shut-down in respiration. Under normal cell culture conditions there is an O 2 gradient present in the media of cull culture systems, resulting in physiologic O 2 concentrations at the cell layer, despite the non-physiologic O 2 concentration of the gas mixture to which the cell culture system is exposed. This significant (p -6 ) O 2 gradient in the media of cell culture systems is a result of cell O 2

  4. EFFECT OF THE HEAT AND SURFACE LASER TREATMENT ON THE CORROSION DEGRADATION OF THE Mg-Al ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek A. Dobrzański

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper there is presented the corrosion behavior of the cast magnesium alloys as cast state, after heat and laser treatment. Pitting corrosion resistance of the analyzed alloys was carried out using the potentiodynamic electrochemical method (direct current, based on a anodic polarization curve. On the basis of the achieved anodic polarization curves, using the Tefel extrapolation method near to the corrosion potential, the quantitative data were determined, which describe the electrochemical corrosion process of the investigated alloys: value of the corrosion potential Ecorr (mV, polarization resistance RP (kohm.cm2, corrosion current density icorr (10-6A/cm2, corrosion rate Vcorr (mm/year as well the mass loss Vc (g/m2<.

  5. Germination rate is the significant characteristic determining coconut palm diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Hugh C

    2012-01-01

    This review comes at a time when in vitro embryo culture techniques are being adopted for the safe exchange and cryo-conservation of coconut germplasm. In due course, laboratory procedures may replace the options that exist among standard commercial nursery germination techniques. These, in their turn, have supplanted traditional methods that are now forgotten or misunderstood. Knowledge of all germination options should help to ensure the safe regeneration of conserved material. This review outlines the many options for commercial propagation, recognizes the full significance of one particular traditional method and suggests that the diversity of modern cultivated coconut varieties has arisen because natural selection and domestic selection were associated with different rates of germination and other morphologically recognizable phenotypic characteristics. The review takes into account both the recalcitrant and the viviparous nature of the coconut. The ripe fruits that fall but do not germinate immediately and lose viability if dried for storage are contrasted with the bunches of fruit retained in the crown of the palm that may, in certain circumstances, germinate to produce seedlings high above ground level. Slow-germinating and quick-germinating coconuts have different patterns of distribution. The former predominate on tropical islands and coastlines that could be reached by floating when natural dispersal originally spread coconuts widely-but only where tides and currents were favourable-and then only to sea-level locations. Human settlers disseminated the domestic types even more widely-to otherwise inaccessible coastal sites not reached by floating-and particularly to inland and upland locations on large islands and continental land masses. This review suggests four regions where diversity has been determined by germination rates. Although recent DNA studies support these distinctions, further analyses of genetic markers related to fruit abscission and

  6. Germination rate is the significant characteristic determining coconut palm diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Hugh C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale This review comes at a time when in vitro embryo culture techniques are being adopted for the safe exchange and cryo-conservation of coconut germplasm. In due course, laboratory procedures may replace the options that exist among standard commercial nursery germination techniques. These, in their turn, have supplanted traditional methods that are now forgotten or misunderstood. Knowledge of all germination options should help to ensure the safe regeneration of conserved material. Scope This review outlines the many options for commercial propagation, recognizes the full significance of one particular traditional method and suggests that the diversity of modern cultivated coconut varieties has arisen because natural selection and domestic selection were associated with different rates of germination and other morphologically recognizable phenotypic characteristics. The review takes into account both the recalcitrant and the viviparous nature of the coconut. The ripe fruits that fall but do not germinate immediately and lose viability if dried for storage are contrasted with the bunches of fruit retained in the crown of the palm that may, in certain circumstances, germinate to produce seedlings high above ground level. Significance Slow-germinating and quick-germinating coconuts have different patterns of distribution. The former predominate on tropical islands and coastlines that could be reached by floating when natural dispersal originally spread coconuts widely—but only where tides and currents were favourable—and then only to sea-level locations. Human settlers disseminated the domestic types even more widely—to otherwise inaccessible coastal sites not reached by floating—and particularly to inland and upland locations on large islands and continental land masses. This review suggests four regions where diversity has been determined by germination rates. Although recent DNA studies support these distinctions, further analyses of genetic markers

  7. What determines the exchange rate: economic factors or market sentiment?

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory P. Hopper

    1997-01-01

    Do economic factors influence exchange rates? Or does market sentiment play a bigger role? Are short-run exchange rates predictable? Greg Hopper reviews exchange-rate economics, focusing on what is predictable and what isn't. He also examines the practical implications of exchange-rate theories for currency option pricing, risk management, and portfolio selection.

  8. Validation of a chromatographic method and its use in the determination of sulphates in the products of atmospheric corrosion of zinc exposed to SO2 and NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Paula; Castano, Juan G

    2005-01-01

    The role of SO 2 and NO 2 in the atmospheric corrosion of zinc was studied by determining sulphates as the main products of corrosion when this metal is exposed to atmospheres containing SO 2 and NO 2 , scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) and Ion Exchange Chromatography (IC) were used as instrumental techniques, the former was used to establish the morphology and the elementary qualitative determination of corrosion products, and the latter to quantify sulphates, before conducting the chromatographic analyses a series of parameters such as selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of quantification, and detection limit, were evaluated to validate the method and to have the statistical certainty of its utility in the sulphate quantification, the results showed that when the metal is exposed to an atmosphere containing SO 2 and NO 2 , the sulphate formation increases with exposure time, a synergetic effect of both polluting agents on sulphate formation was found with respect to the sulphate formation in atmospheres containing only SO 2

  9. Detailed investigation of Cl-corrosion initiated by deposits formed in biomass-fired boilers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, Flemming J.; Lith, S. van

    2009-10-15

    The aim was to investigate deposit-induced Cl-corrosion under well-controlled laboratory conditions, simulating the conditions in biomass-fired boilers. This has been done by exposing pieces of superheater tubes, covered by synthetic salts, at temperatures and gas mixtures simulating biomass-fired conditions. The corroded specimens have been studied in detail using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), in order to determine the corrosion rate, and to investigate the chemistry and morphology of the corrosive attack. The project has been divided into four activities: A1: Relationship between the Cl-concentration in the deposit, and the corrosion rate. A2: Influence of cation type (K+ and Na+) on the mobility of Cl in the deposit. A3: Influence of metal temperature on the corrosion rate. A4: Critical evaluation of the existing experience for minimizing corrosion in full-scale boilers firing totally or partly with biomass. (LN)

  10. Determinants of intra-specific variation in basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarzewski, Marek; Książek, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) provides a widely accepted benchmark of metabolic expenditure for endotherms under laboratory and natural conditions. While most studies examining BMR have concentrated on inter-specific variation, relatively less attention has been paid to the determinants of within-species variation. Even fewer studies have analysed the determinants of within-species BMR variation corrected for the strong influence of body mass by appropriate means (e.g. ANCOVA). Here, we review recent advancements in studies on the quantitative genetics of BMR and organ mass variation, along with their molecular genetics. Next, we decompose BMR variation at the organ, tissue and molecular level. We conclude that within-species variation in BMR and its components have a clear genetic signature, and are functionally linked to key metabolic process at all levels of biological organization. We highlight the need to integrate molecular genetics with conventional metabolic field studies to reveal the adaptive significance of metabolic variation. Since comparing gene expressions inter-specifically is problematic, within-species studies are more likely to inform us about the genetic underpinnings of BMR. We also urge for better integration of animal and medical research on BMR; the latter is quickly advancing thanks to the application of imaging technologies and 'omics' studies. We also suggest that much insight on the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of BMR variation can be gained from integrating studies on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which appears to be the major regulatory pathway influencing the key molecular components of BMR.

  11. Kinetic mechanism of steel corrosion in clay soils by impedance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpaia, M.; Pernice, P.; Costantini, A.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of steel in clay soil at m.c. 15% has been studied for a long exposure time by electrochemical methods. A.c. impedance measurements results show that at a short exposure time the corrosion process is controlled by the diffusion of H + coupled with a rate determining homogeneous reaction, whereas at a long exposure time the process is controlled by pure diffusion. We have hypothesized that the rate determining homogeneous reaction might be the clay particles cations exchange. (orig.)

  12. Study on metal material corrosion behavior of packaging of cement solidified form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhouguo; Lin Meiqiong; Fan Xianhua

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of A3 carbon steel is studied by the specimens that are exposed to atmosphere, embedded in cement solidified form or immersed in corrosion liquid. The corrosion rate is determined by mass change of the specimens. In order to compare the corrosion resistant performance of various coatings, the specimens painted with various material such as epoxide resin, propionic acid resin, propane ether resin and Ti-white paint are tested. The results of the tests show that corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel is less than 10 -3 mm·a -1 in the atmosphere and the cement solidified from, less than 0.1 mm·a -1 in the corrosion liquids, and pH value in the corrosion liquids also affect the corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel. The corrosion resistant performance of Ti-white paint is better than that of other paints. So, A3 carbon steel as packaging material can meet the requirements during storage

  13. Study of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of type 304 austenitic stainless steel in aqueous solution of MgCl2 at 1250C using the slow - strain - rate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been made of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of type 304 austenitic stainless steel mainly in aqueous solution of MgCl 2 at 125 0 C using the slow strain-rate technique. A system is built up of a tensile test machine and the peripheric equipment. The efficacy of this system has been tested by running experiments for determination of critical potentials in MgCl 2 with or without aditions of NaNO 3 . Critical potentials are found to be between -145 and -160 mV sub(H) for pure MgCl 2 and between -90 and -100 mV sub(H) for MgCl 2 plus 2,5% NaNO 3 . Comparing these results with others of constant load tests, good agreement is found. (Author) [pt

  14. Effects of annealing on the corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. K.; Choi, B. S.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, D. J.; Jang, M. H.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2002-01-01

    In order to determine the annealing condition after cold rolling, the effects of annealing on the corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-V alloy were evaluated. The results of tensile tests at room temperature showed that the strengths and the ductility were almost independent of the annealing temperature. The results of hardness test also revealed that the hardness was independent of the annealing, However, the results of corrosion test in an ammoniated water of pH 9.98 at 360 .deg. C showed that the corrosion resistance depended on the annealing temperature, and the corrosion rate was accelerated with increasing annealing temperature. Hydrogen contents absorbed during the corrosion test of 120 days also increased with the annealing temperature. It may be attributed to the growth of α' precipitates by annealing. It is thus suggested that the lower annealing temperatures provide the better corrosion properties without degrading the tensile properties

  15. Use of empirically based corrosion model to aid steam generator life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angell, P.; Balakrishnan, P.V.; Turner, C.W

    2000-07-01

    Alloy 800 (N08800) tubes used in CANDU 6 steam generators have shown a low incidence of corrosion damage because of the good corrosion resistance of N08800 and successful water chemistry control strategies. However, N08800 is not immune to corrosion, especially pitting, under plausible SG conditions. Electrochemical potentials are critical in determining both susceptibility and rates of corrosion and are known to be a function of water-chemistry. Using laboratory data an empirical model for pitting and crevice corrosion has been developed for N08800. Combination of such a model with chemistry monitoring and diagnostic software makes it possible to arm the impact of plant operating conditions on SG tube corrosion for plant life management (PLIM). Possible transient chemistry regimes that could significantly shorten expected tube lifetimes have been identified and predictions continue to support the position dud under normal, low dissolved oxygen conditions, pitting of N08800 will not initiate. (author)

  16. Use of empirically based corrosion model to aid steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, P.; Balakrishnan, P.V.; Turner, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    Alloy 800 (N08800) tubes used in CANDU 6 steam generators have shown a low incidence of corrosion damage because of the good corrosion resistance of N08800 and successful water chemistry control strategies. However, N08800 is not immune to corrosion, especially pitting, under plausible SG conditions. Electrochemical potentials are critical in determining both susceptibility and rates of corrosion and are known to be a function of water-chemistry. Using laboratory data an empirical model for pitting and crevice corrosion has been developed for N08800. Combination of such a model with chemistry monitoring and diagnostic software makes it possible to arm the impact of plant operating conditions on SG tube corrosion for plant life management (PLIM). Possible transient chemistry regimes that could significantly shorten expected tube lifetimes have been identified and predictions continue to support the position dud under normal, low dissolved oxygen conditions, pitting of N08800 will not initiate. (author)

  17. Determination of rate constants for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, A.; Walter, T.; Stimming, U. [Munich Technical Univ., Garching (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells is a complex and fundamental electrochemical reaction. However, greater insight is needed into this multi-electron reaction in order to develop efficient and innovative catalysts. The rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) is a useful tool for studying reaction intermediates of the ORR and to better understand the reaction pathway. Carbon materials such as carbon nanofilaments-platelets (CNF-PL) have high electrical conductivity and may be considered for fuel cells. In particular Pt and RuSe{sub x}, deposited on CNF-PL materials could act as efficient catalysts in fuel cells. This study used the RRDE to evaluate the oxygen reduction kinetics of these catalysts in oxygen-saturated, diluted sulphuric acid at room temperature. Kinetic data and hydrogen peroxide formation were determined by depositing a thin-film of the catalyst on the Au disc. The values for the constants k1, k2 and k3 were obtained using diagnostic criteria and expressions to calculate the rate constants of the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction for RuSe on new carbon supports. A potential dependency of the constants k1 and k2 for RuSe{sub x}/CNF-PL was observed. The transition of the Tafel slopes for this catalyst was obtained. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Determining cardiac vagal threshold from short term heart rate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Rami Abou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating individual aerobic exercise capacity is fundamental in sports and exercise medicine but associated with organizational and instrumental effort. Here, we extract an index related to common performance markers, the aerobic and anaerobic thresholds enabling the estimation of exercise capacity from a conventional sports watch supporting beatwise heart rate tracking. Therefore, cardiac vagal threshold (CVT was determined in 19 male subjects performing an incremental maximum exercise test. CVT varied around the anaerobic threshold AnT with mean deviation of 7.9 ± 17.7 W. A high correspondence of the two thresholds was indicated by Bland-Altman plots with limits of agreement −27.5 W and 43.4 W. Additionally, CVT was strongly correlated AnT (rp = 0.86, p < 0.001 and reproduced this marker well (rc = 0.81. We conclude, that cardiac vagal threshold derived from compression entropy time course can be useful to assess physical fitness in an uncomplicated way.

  19. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illus, E [ed.

    1998-08-01

    The Second NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research)/EKO-1 Seminar was held at the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) on April 2-3, 1997. The work of the NKS is based on 4-year programmes; the current programme having been planned for the years 1994-1997. The programme comprises 3 major fields, one of them being environmental effects (EKO). Under this umbrella there are 4 main projects. The EKO-1 project deals with marine radioecology, in particular bottom sediments and sediment processes. The programme of the second seminar consisted of 8 invited lecturers and 6 other scientific presentations. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate are important in all types of sedimentological study and model calculations of fluxes of substances in the aquatic environment. In many cases these tasks have been closely related to radioecological studies undertaken in marine and fresh water environments, because they are often based on measured depth profiles of certain natural or artificial radionuclides present in the sediments. During recent decades Pb-210 has proved to be very useful in dating of sediments, but some other radionuclides have also been successfully used, e.g. Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cs-137. The difficulties existing and problems involved in dating of sediments, as well as solutions for resolving these problems are discussed in the presentations

  20. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illus, E.

    1998-01-01

    The Second NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research)/EKO-1 Seminar was held at the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) on April 2-3, 1997. The work of the NKS is based on 4-year programmes; the current programme having been planned for the years 1994-1997. The programme comprises 3 major fields, one of them being environmental effects (EKO). Under this umbrella there are 4 main projects. The EKO-1 project deals with marine radioecology, in particular bottom sediments and sediment processes. The programme of the second seminar consisted of 8 invited lecturers and 6 other scientific presentations. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate are important in all types of sedimentological study and model calculations of fluxes of substances in the aquatic environment. In many cases these tasks have been closely related to radioecological studies undertaken in marine and fresh water environments, because they are often based on measured depth profiles of certain natural or artificial radionuclides present in the sediments. During recent decades Pb-210 has proved to be very useful in dating of sediments, but some other radionuclides have also been successfully used, e.g. Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cs-137. The difficulties existing and problems involved in dating of sediments, as well as solutions for resolving these problems are discussed in the presentations

  1. Rate-base determination through real-time efficiency assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhardt, J.H.; Bishop, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    One of the main problems with nuclear power is the extremely high construction costs and long schedules for plant construction and start-up. It is unlikely that utility executives will risk their companies' financial health by committing the necessary capital resources given the prevailing uncertainties. For new nuclear plants to play a major role in preventing future electric supply shortages, the financial uncertainties associated with high construction costs must be minimized. To contain costs and maintain reasonable schedules for future plants, the utilities, vendors, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the state regulatory commissions can make specific changes. One of the key factors to reduce uncertainty and improve cost and schedule performance is for the state regulatory commissions to change the method of determining reasonable plant costs and placing those costs in the rate base. Currently, most state regulatory commissions assess the reasonableness of costs only after completion of construction, resulting in years of financial uncertainty and untimely conclusions as to what should have been done better

  2. Corrosion strength monitoring of NPP component residual lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.G.; Belous, V.N.; Arzhaev, A.I.; Shuvalov, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Importance of corrosion and fatigue monitoring; types of corrosion determine the NPP equipment life; why automated on-line corrosion and fatigue monitoring is preferable; major stages of lifetime monitoring system development; major groups of sensors for corrosion and strength monitoring system; high temperature on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion; the RBMK-1000 NPP unit automatic water chemistry and corrosion monitoring scheme; examples of pitting, crevice and general corrosion forecast calculations on the basis of corrosion monitoring data; scheme of an experimental facility for water chemistry and corrosion monitoring sensor testing. 2 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  4. INTERNATIONAL RATINGS IN DETERMINING THE FINANCIAL STABILITY OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Plieshakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem of the global financial stability and position of Ukraine in international ratings are considered in the paper. Impact of ratings assessment on the financial stability of the country in general is analysed.

  5. The Determinants of Real Exchange Rate Volatility in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rahel

    magnitude of exchange rate volatility while the federal government exercises control of ... objectives in the area of price stability and economic growth. Volatile real ..... Exchange rate shocks and instability is a common feature of emerging.

  6. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.S., E-mail: yinwenfeng2010@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Yin, W.F. [College of Mechatronic Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Sang, D.H. [Sheng Li Construction Group International Engineering Department, Shandong, Dongying, 257000 (China); Jiang, Z.Y. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of a carbon-manganese steel and a stainless steel in sulfur and/or naphthenic acid media was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion rate of the carbon-manganese steel increased with the increase of the acid value and sulfur content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical values of the concentration of sulfur and acid for corrosion rate of the stainless steel were ascertained respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stainless steel is superior to the carbon-manganese steel in corrosion resistance because of the presence of stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases. - Abstract: The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 Degree-Sign C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  7. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  8. Determination of sedimentation rates and absorption coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2+ has a higher sedimentation rate of 5.10x10-2 s-1 while Ni2+ has the lowest sedimentation rates of 1.10 x10-3. The rate of sedimentation of the metal carbonates decreased in the order: Zn2+ > Cd2+ > Cu2+ > Co2+ > Ni2+. The order ...

  9. The determinants of real exchange rate volatility in Nigeria | Ajao ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study recommends that the central monetary authority should institute policies that will minimize the magnitude of exchange rate volatility while the federal government exercises control of viable macroeconomic variables which have direct influence on exchange rate fluctuation. Keywords: Exchange Rate, Volatility, ...

  10. Exchange Rate Determinants in Russia; 1992-1993

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Koen; Eric Meyermans

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of the exchange rate of the ruble vis-à-vis the U.S. dollar from exchange rate unification, in July 1992, to the end of 1993. The expected and actual paths of the exchange rate are related to the exchange and trade regime and to the stance of financial and exchange rate policies. An econometric analysis based on weekly data is offered, which suggests that monetary factors have a significant impact on the short run behavior of the exchange rate.

  11. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  12. Assessing microbiologically induced corrosion of waste package materials in the Yucca Mountain repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J. M., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of bacterial activities to corrosion of nuclear waste package materials must be determined to predict the adequacy of containment for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. The program to evaluate potential microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of candidate waste container materials includes characterization of bacteria in the post-construction YM environment, determination of their required growth conditions and growth rates, quantitative assessment of the biochemical contribution to metal corrosion, and evaluation of overall MIC rates on candidate waste package materials.

  13. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  14. Treatment Tank Corrosion Studies For The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  15. Development of analytical procedures for the determination of hexavalent chromium in corrosion prevention coatings used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Castetbon, A; Ortega, R; Guimon, C; Niveau, F; Barrois-Oudin, N; Garraud, H; Donard, O F X

    2008-05-01

    The European directive 2000/53/EC limits the use of Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. Although a maximum of 2 g of Cr(VI) was authorised per vehicle for corrosion prevention coatings of key components, since July 2007 its use has been prohibited except for some particular applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to develop direct analytical procedures for Cr(VI) determination in the different steel coatings used for screws. Instead of working directly with screws, the optimisation of the procedures was carried out with metallic plates homogeneously coated to improve the data comparability. Extraction of Cr(VI) from the metallic parts was performed by sonication. Two extraction solutions were tested: a direct water extraction solution used in standard protocols and an ammonium/ammonia buffer solution at pH 8.9. The extracts were further analysed for Cr speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry or HPLC ICP mass spectrometry depending on the concentration level. When possible, the coatings were also directly analysed by solid speciation techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure, XANES) for validation of the results. Very good results between the different analytical approaches were obtained for the sample of coating made up of a heated paint containing Zn, Al and Cr when using the extracting buffer solution at pH 8.9. After a repeated four-step extraction procedure on the same portion test, taking into account the depth of the surface layer reached, good agreement with XPS and XANES results was obtained. In contrast, for the coatings composed of an alkaline Zn layer where Cr(VI) and Cr(III) are deposited, only the extraction procedure using water allowed the detection of Cr(VI). To elucidate the Cr(VI) reduction during extraction at pH 8.9, the reactivity of Cr(VI) towards different species of Zn generally present in the

  16. Corrosion of candidate iron-base waste package structural barrier materials in moist salt environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.

    1984-11-01

    Mild steels are considered to be strong candidates for waste package structural barrier (e.g., overpack) applications in salt repositories. Corrosion rates of these materials determined in autoclave tests utilizing a simulated intrusion brine based on Permian Basin core samples are low, generally <25 μm (1 mil) per year. When the steels are exposed to moist salts containing simulated inclusion brines, the corrosion rates are found to increase significantly. The magnesium in the inclusion brine component of the environment is believed to be responsible for the increased corrosion rates. 1 reference, 4 figures, 2 tables

  17. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  18. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  19. 47 CFR 54.607 - Determining the rural rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (a) The rural rate shall be the average of the rates actually being charged to commercial customers... programs, charged for the same or similar services in that rural area over the same distance as the... into account anticipated and actual demand for telecommunications services by all customers who will...

  20. Estimated Interest Rate Rules: Do they Determine Determinacy Properties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    I demonstrate that econometric estimations of nominal interest rate rules may tell little, if anything, about an economy's determinacy properties. In particular, correct inference about the interest-rate response to inflation provides no information about determinacy. Instead, it could reveal...

  1. Factors which determine the swelling rate of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to variables that control the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature, displacement rate and composition is also discussed

  2. Super-Hydrophobic Green Corrosion Inhibitor On Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-06-01

    There are many examples of organic coatings used for corrosion protection. In particular, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic coatings are shown to give good protection because of their enhanced ability to slow down transport of water and ions through the coating. The purpose of this research is to develop water repellent coating to avoid direct contact between metal and environment corrosive and mitigate corrosion attack at pipeline system. This water repellent characteristic on super-hydrophobic coating was coated by electrodeposition method. Wettability of carbon steel with super-hydrophobic coating (cerium chloride and myristic acid) and oxidized surface was investigated through contact angle and inhibitor performance test. The inhibitor performance was studied in 25% tannin acid corrosion test at 30°C and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl). The water contact angle test was determined by placing a 4-μL water droplet of distilled water. It shows that the wettability of contact angle super-hydrophobic with an angle of 151.60° at zero minute can be classified as super-hydrophobic characteristic. By added tannin acid as inhibitor the corrosion protection on carbon steel becomes more consistent. This reveals that the ability of the coating to withstand with the corrosion attack in the seawater at different period of immersions. The results elucidate that the weight loss increased as the time of exposure increased. However, the corrosion rates for uncoated carbon steel is high compared to coated carbon steel. As a conclusion, from both samples it can be seen that the coated carbon steel has less corrosion rated compared to uncoated carbon steel and addition of inhibitor to the seawater provides more protection to resist corrosion attack on carbon steel.

  3. Corrosion Effects on the Fatigue Crack Propagation of Giga-Grade Steel and its Heat Affected Zone in pH Buffer Solutions for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. S.

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation test was conducted of giga-grade steel and its heat affected zone in pH buffer solutions, and the results were compared with model predictions. Pure corrosion effect on fatigue crack propagation, particularly, in corrosive environment was evaluated by means of the modified Forman equation. As shown in results, the average corrosion rate determined from the ratio of pure corrosion induced crack length to entire crack length under a cycle load were 0.11 and 0.37 for base metal and heat affected zone, respectively, with load ratio of 0.5, frequency of 0.5 and pH 10.0 environment. These results demonstrate new interpretation methodology for corrosion fatigue crack propagation enabling the pure corrosion effects on the behavior to be determined.

  4. Mechanisms of Zr surface corrosion determined via molecular dynamics simulations with charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordhoek, Mark J.; Liang, Tao; Chiang, Tsu-Wu; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An interatomic potential for zirconium–zirconium oxide–zirconium hydride is presented. • Diffusion of oxygen and hydrogen into Zr (0 0 0 1). • Deposition of O 2 and H 2 O on low-index Zr surfaces. • Surface structure affects resulting corrosion behavior. - Abstract: A charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential is proposed for the zirconium–zirconium oxide–zirconium hydride system. This potential is developed to describe the energetics of the interactions of oxygen and hydrogen with zirconium metal. We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations showing the initial corrosion behavior of three low-index zirconium surfaces via the deposition of O 2 and H 2 O molecules. The basal (0 0 0 1) surface shows greater resistance to oxygen diffusion than the prism (101 ¯ 0) and (112 ¯ 0) surfaces. We suggest ways in which the surface structure has a unique role in the experimentally observed enhanced corrosion of the prism surfaces

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed to determine if chemical compounds other than pepper extracts could inhibit the growth of corrosion-associated microbes and to determine if pepper extracts and other compounds can inhibit corrosion when mature biofilms are present. Several chemical compounds were shown to be capable of inhibiting the growth of corrosion-associated microorganisms, and all of these compounds limited the amount of corrosion caused by mature biofilms to a similar extent. It is difficult to control corrosion caused by mature biofilms, but any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion.

  6. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 ceramics

  7. Grain boundary corrosion of copper canister weld material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubner, Rolf; Andersson, Urban; Linder, Mats; Nazarov, Andrej; Taxen, Claes

    2006-01-01

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in granite bedrock and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container fitted inside a corrosion-resistant copper canister. During fabrication of the outer copper canisters there will be some unavoidable grain growth in the welded areas. As grains grow, they will tend to concentrate impurities within the copper at the new grain boundaries. The work described in this report was undertaken to determine whether there is any possibility of enhanced corrosion at grain boundaries within the copper canister, based on the recommendations of the report SKB-TR--01-09 (INIS ref. 32025363). Grain boundary corrosion of copper is not expected to be a problem for the copper canisters in a repository. However, as one step in the experimental verification it is necessary to study grain boundary corrosion of copper in an environment where it may occur. A literature study aimed to find one or several solutions that are aggressive with respect to grain boundary corrosion of copper. Copper specimens cut from welds of real copper canisters where exposed to aerated ammonium hydroxide solution for a period of 14 days at 80 degrees C and 10 bar pressure. The samples were investigated prior to exposure using the scanning Kelvin probe technique to characterize anodic and cathodic areas on the samples. The degree of corrosion was determined by optical microscopy. No grain boundary corrosion could be observed in the autoclave experiments, however, a higher rate of corrosion was observed for the weld material compared to the base material. The work suggests that grain boundary corrosion of copper weld material is most unlikely to adversely affect SKB's copper canisters under the conditions in the repository

  8. Grain boundary corrosion of copper canister weld material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubner, Rolf; Andersson, Urban; Linder, Mats; Nazarov, Andrej; Taxen, Claes [Corrosion and Metals Research Inst. (KIMAB), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-01-15

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in granite bedrock and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container fitted inside a corrosion-resistant copper canister. During fabrication of the outer copper canisters there will be some unavoidable grain growth in the welded areas. As grains grow, they will tend to concentrate impurities within the copper at the new grain boundaries. The work described in this report was undertaken to determine whether there is any possibility of enhanced corrosion at grain boundaries within the copper canister, based on the recommendations of the report SKB-TR--01-09 (INIS ref. 32025363). Grain boundary corrosion of copper is not expected to be a problem for the copper canisters in a repository. However, as one step in the experimental verification it is necessary to study grain boundary corrosion of copper in an environment where it may occur. A literature study aimed to find one or several solutions that are aggressive with respect to grain boundary corrosion of copper. Copper specimens cut from welds of real copper canisters where exposed to aerated ammonium hydroxide solution for a period of 14 days at 80 degrees C and 10 bar pressure. The samples were investigated prior to exposure using the scanning Kelvin probe technique to characterize anodic and cathodic areas on the samples. The degree of corrosion was determined by optical microscopy. No grain boundary corrosion could be observed in the autoclave experiments, however, a higher rate of corrosion was observed for the weld material compared to the base material. The work suggests that grain boundary corrosion of copper weld material is most unlikely to adversely affect SKB's copper canisters under the conditions in the repository.

  9. Evolutionary Computation Techniques for Predicting Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Marref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion occurs in many engineering structures such as bridges, pipelines, and refineries and leads to the destruction of materials in a gradual manner and thus shortening their lifespan. It is therefore crucial to assess the structural integrity of engineering structures which are approaching or exceeding their designed lifespan in order to ensure their correct functioning, for example, carrying ability and safety. An understanding of corrosion and an ability to predict corrosion rate of a material in a particular environment plays a vital role in evaluating the residual life of the material. In this paper we investigate the use of genetic programming and genetic algorithms in the derivation of corrosion-rate expressions for steel and zinc. Genetic programming is used to automatically evolve corrosion-rate expressions while a genetic algorithm is used to evolve the parameters of an already engineered corrosion-rate expression. We show that both evolutionary techniques yield corrosion-rate expressions that have good accuracy.

  10. Noninvasive Biosensor Algorithms for Continuous Metabolic Rate Determination

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our collaborators in the JSC Cardiovascular lab implemented a technique to determine stroke volume during exercise using ultrasound imaging. Data collection using...

  11. Corrosion of alloy C-22 in organic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.; Giordano, Celia M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C degrees. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric acids. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and Picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and Acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids. (author) [es

  12. Electrochemical and weight-loss study of carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.J.; Olive, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) will undergo an 18 month refurbishment project beginning in April, 2008. During this time, most of the carbon steel piping in the primary loop will be drained of water and dried. However, some water will remain during the shutdown due to the lack of drains in some lower points in the piping system. As a result, it is necessary to examine the effect of corrosion during the refurbishment. This study examined the effect of several variables on the corrosion rate of clean carbon steel. Specifically, the effect of oxygen in the system and the presence of chloride ions were evaluated. Corrosion rates were determined using both a weight-loss technique and electrochemical methods. The experiment was conducted at room temperature. The corrosion products from the experiment were analyzed using a Raman microscope. The results of the weight-loss measurements show that the corrosion rate of polished carbon steel is independent of both the presence of oxygen and chloride ions. The electrochemical method failed to yield meaningful results due to the lack of clearly interpretable data and the inherent subjectivity in the analysis. Lepidocricite was found to be the main corrosion product using the Raman microscope. (author)

  13. Exchange rate determination and the flaws of mainstream monetary theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEINER FLASSBECK

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Developing countries in general need flexibility and a sufficient number of instruments to prevent excessive volatility. Evidence does not support the orthodox belief that, with free floating, international financial markets will perform that role by smoothly adjusting exchange rates to their “equilibrium” level. In reality, exchange rates under a floating regime have proved to be highly unstable, leading to long spells of misalignment. The experience with hard pegs has not been satisfactory either: the exchange rate could not be corrected in cases of external shocks or misalignment. Given this experience, “intermediate” regimes are preferable when there is instability in international financial markets.

  14. Determination of surface dose rate for cloisonne using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengyuan, Zhao; Yulian, Zhang

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, the measuring method and results of surface dose rate of cloisonne using CaSO/sub 4/ Dy-Teflon foil dosimeter are described. The surface dose rate of all products are below 0.015 mrad/h. These products contain 42 sorts of jewelery and 20 sets of wares (such as vases, plates, ash-trays, etc.). Most of the data fall within the range of natural background. For comparison, some jewelery from Taiwan and 3 vases from Japan are measured. The highest surface dose rate of 0.78 mrad/h is due to the necklace jewelery from Taiwan.

  15. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor

  16. Corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, C.M.

    1982-10-01

    A comparative study has been made of those properties of Massiv and Standard cements which are considered to determine their ability to protect steel reinforcement from corroding. Saturated Massiv cement has a higher evaporabel water content, but a significantly finer pore structure than has saturated Standard cement. This fine structure resulted in an electrical resistivity ten times higher and chloride diffusivity ten times lower than those of Standard cement. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the passive current density of steel in Massiv mortar is higher than that of steel in Standard mortar, but the higher current should lead to a more rapid decrease in potential to a level at which neither chloride attack of hydrogen evolution will occur. Whereas steel in Standard mortar was found to be highly susceptible to crevice corrosion, no such attack has been observed in Massiv mortar. Moreover, the initiation of chloride induced corrosion and the subsequent rates of corrosion were both lower in Massiv mortar than in Standard mortar. Thus, it may be predicted that Massiv cement would provide greater protection for steel reinforcement in underground structures exposed to chloride containing ground water than would Standard cement. (author)

  17. Boric acid corrosion of low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.; White, G.; Collin, J.; Marks, C. [Dominion Engineering, Inc., Reston, Virginia (United States); Reid, R.; Crooker, P. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade, the industry has been aware of a potential loss of coolant accident (LOCA) per the following scenario: primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of a primary system component or weld leads to a coolant leak, the coolant corrodes a low alloy steel structural component (e.g., the reactor vessel (RV) or the reactor vessel head (RVH)), and corrosion degrades the pressure boundary leading to a loss of coolant accident. The industry has taken several steps to address this concern, including replacement of the most susceptible components (RVH replacement), enhanced inspection (both NDE of components and visual inspections for boric acid deposits), and safety analyses to determine appropriate inspection intervals. Although these measures are generally thought to have adequately addressed this issue, there have been some uncertainties in the safety analyses which the industry has sought to address in order to quantify the extent of conservatism in the safety analyses. Specifically, there has been some uncertainty regarding the rate of boric acid corrosion under various conditions which might arise due to a PWSCC leak and the extent to which boric acid deposits are retained near the leak under various geometries. This paper reviews the results of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) boric acid corrosion (BAC) test programs conducted over the last 8 years, focusing on the most recent results of full-scale mockup testing of CRDM nozzle and bottom mounted nozzle (BMN) configurations. The main purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of the risk of boric acid corrosion as it is informed by the results of the testing conducted over the last eight years. The rate of boric acid corrosion has been found to be a function of many factors, including initial chemistry, the extent of concentration due to boiling, the temperature at which concentration takes place, the velocity

  18. Solutions of corrosion Problems in advanced Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, Asger

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic and ferritic steels were exposed in the superheater area of a straw-fired CHP plant. The specimens were exposed for 1400 hours at 450-600°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed based on unattacked metal remaining. The corrosion products and course of corrosion for the various steel types...

  19. Corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajimura, H.; Morikawa, H.; Nagano, H.

    1987-01-01

    Slow strain rate tests are effected on zirconium in boiling nitric acid to study the influence of nitric acid concentration, of oxidizing ions (Cr and Ce) and of electric potential. Corrosion resistance is excellent and stress corrosion cracking occurs only for severe conditions: 350 mV over electric potential for corrosion with nitric acid concentration of 40 % [fr

  20. Genetic determination of mortality rate in Danish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Rafael Pimentel; Ask, Birgitte; Madsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    : a sire random component with pedigree representing the sire genetic effects and a herd-year-season component. Moreover, the level of heterozygosity and the sire breed proportions were included in the models as covariates in order to account for potential non-additive genetic effects due to the massive...... introduction of genetic material from other populations. The correlations between the sire components for death rate and slaughter rate were negative and small for the 3 populations, suggesting the existence of specific genetic mechanisms for each culling reason and common concurrent genetic mechanisms...

  1. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-04-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 a). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  2. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 xa). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  3. The corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. Since gas production is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible on the corrosion rate of steel in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities lie in the range 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 .a). Corrosion rates of this order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, with the result that there is very little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. Given the current situation, it would appear somewhat risky to accept the lower value for hydrogen production as proven. Proposals are made for experiments which would reduce this element of uncertainty. (author) 10 figs., 35 refs

  4. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of sa106 gr.b carbon steel in raw water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Stancu, M.; Popa, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of microbiological corrosion susceptibility of carbon steel SA106gr.B in raw water. The experiment consisted of a series of electrochemical accelerated tests which evaluated the pitting corrosion susceptibility and determined corrosion rates before and after the immersion. The microbiological analysis of the water determined the types of bacteria and bacterial concentration present in water and in biofilms. Microbiological analysis of the water sample emphasized the existence, in small numbers (10-101 ml-1), of heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, sulphate-reducing bacteria and iron-oxidizing microorganisms. Along with sulphate-reducing bacteria, the heterotrophic aerobic bacteria and the iron-oxidizing microorganisms are categorized as having an important role in the corrosion of metals, including steel. The surfaces of the tested samples were analysed using the optical and electronic microscope, and emphasized the role of bacteria in the development of biofilms under which appeared characteristics of corrosion attack. (authors)

  5. Mechanisms of Corrosion of Copper-Nickel Alloys in Sulfide-Polluted Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    anaerobic bacteria, which convert the natural sulfate content of the seawater into sulfides. Also, the putrefaction of organic compounds containing...corrosion rate bozause the Cu2 0 growth3 292 probably follows a parabolic rate law. The corrosion behavior at high oxygen concentrations (> 7.0 g/m ) is...determined using the rotating ring disk electrode method or SRI’s recently developed rotating cylinder- collector electrode.3 In these methods, the

  6. Determination of the void nucleation rate from void size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailsford, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    A method of estimating the void nucleation rate from one void size distribution and from observation of the maximum void radius at prior times is proposed. Implicit in the method are the assumptions that both variations in the critical radius with dose and vacancy thermal emission processes during post-nucleation quasi-steady-state growth may be neglected. (Auth.)

  7. The Determination of Rate-Limiting Steps during Soot Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-08

    and a CH3N precursor of acetonitrile such as 2H-aziridine although other intermediates of lower energy such as ketenimine have been identified on the...precursor of acetonitrile such as 2H-aziridine or ketenimine . Experimentally it was found that the overall rate of disappearance of pyrrole is first order

  8. Determination of sedimentation rates and absorption coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    particles have pores that can absorb radiation. Gamma rays have been used to study the absorption coefficients of cobalt(II) insoluble compounds (Essien and Ekpe, 1998), densities of marine sediments. (Gerland and Villinger, 1995) and soil particle-size distribution (Vaz et al., 1992). In this study, sedimentation rates of ...

  9. determination of design inflow rate in furrow irrigation using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    taken as the minimum inflow rate which gave rise to a minimum water application efficiency of. 60% and a minimum distribution uniformity of 75%. It is recommended that the procedure described in this work is useful for the modification of existing furrow irrigation systems and the establishment of new ones. Also, the design ...

  10. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    In comparative corrosion tests, the corrosion resistance of an Australian tungsten alloy (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe) was found to be superior to three other tungsten alloys and, under certain conditions, even more corrosion-resistant than pure tungsten. Corrosion resistance was evaluated after immersion in both distilled water and 5% sodium chloride solutions, and in cyclic humidity and salt mist environments. For all but the Australian alloy, the rate of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilated water. In all cases, alloys containing copper had the greatest corrosion rates. Corrosion mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope, analysis of corrosion products and galvanic corrosion studies. For the alloys, corrosion was attributed primarily to a galvanic reaction. Whether the tungsten or binder phase of the alloy became anodic, and thus was attacked preferentially, depended upon alloy composition and corrosion environment. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  11. Biocide-mediated corrosion of coiled tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohita; An, Dongshan; Liu, Tao; Pinnock, Tijan; Cheng, Frank; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    Coiled tubing corrosion was investigated for 16 field water samples (S5 to S20) from a Canadian shale gas field. Weight loss corrosion rates of carbon steel beads incubated with these field water samples averaged 0.2 mm/yr, but injection water sample S19 had 1.25±0.07 mm/yr. S19 had a most probable number of zero acid-producing bacteria and incubation of S19 with carbon steel beads or coupons did not lead to big changes in microbial community composition. In contrast other field water samples had most probable numbers of APB of 102/mL to 107/mL and incubation of these field water samples with carbon steel beads or coupons often gave large changes in microbial community composition. HPLC analysis indicated that all field water samples had elevated concentrations of bromide (average 1.6 mM), which may be derived from bronopol, which was used as a biocide. S19 had the highest bromide concentration (4.2 mM) and was the only water sample with a high concentration of active bronopol (13.8 mM, 2760 ppm). Corrosion rates increased linearly with bronopol concentration, as determined by weight loss of carbon steel beads, for experiments with S19, with filtered S19 and with bronopol dissolved in defined medium. This indicated that the high corrosion rate found for S19 was due to its high bronopol concentration. The corrosion rate of coiled tubing coupons also increased linearly with bronopol concentration as determined by electrochemical methods. Profilometry measurements also showed formation of multiple pits on the surface of coiled tubing coupon with an average pit depth of 60 μm after 1 week of incubation with 1 mM bronopol. At the recommended dosage of 100 ppm the corrosiveness of bronopol towards carbon steel beads was modest (0.011 mm/yr). Higher concentrations, resulting if biocide is added repeatedly as commonly done in shale gas operations, are more corrosive and should be avoided. Overdosing may be avoided by assaying the presence of residual biocide by HPLC

  12. Determination of LEDs degradation with entropy generation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadras, Angel; Yao, Jiaqiang; Quilez, Marcos

    2017-10-01

    We propose a method to assess the degradation and aging of light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on irreversible entropy generation rate. We degraded several LEDs and monitored their entropy generation rate ( S ˙ ) in accelerated tests. We compared the thermoelectrical results with the optical light emission evolution during degradation. We find a good relationship between aging and S ˙ (t), because S ˙ is both related to device parameters and optical performance. We propose a threshold of S ˙ (t) as a reliable damage indicator of LED end-of-life that can avoid the need to perform optical measurements to assess optical aging. The method lays beyond the typical statistical laws for lifetime prediction provided by manufacturers. We tested different LED colors and electrical stresses to validate the electrical LED model and we analyzed the degradation mechanisms of the devices.

  13. Rates and determinants of peripartum and puerperal anemia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A prospective longitudinal study involving women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies who were recruited at term at two tertiary maternity centers and were followed up with the determination of hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations till 6 weeks after delivery. Data were analyzed with descriptive and ...

  14. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Guzzi, G.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M.C.; Ripamonti, D.

    2006-01-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to 4 K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials

  15. Application Of Fractal Dimension On Atmospheric Corrosion Of Galvanized Iron Roofing Material

    OpenAIRE

    Issa A.K; Abba. M. Aji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Corrosion rates of galvanized iron roofing sheet In yola north eastern part of Nigeria were assessed and determined by weight loss method and scanner fractal analysis method. Scanning electronic machine SEM was used to transform corrosion coupons to electronic form for image j processing and analysing software The result of corrosion rates for these two methods after six months of the samples exposure in industrial. Coastal market and urban areas in the region are 1.51 1.079 1.051 0....

  16. Mechanical behavior of precipitation hardenable steels exposed to highly corrosive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1994-01-01

    Unexpected occurrences of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15 - 5 PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution. The material selected for the study was 15 - 5 PH steel in the H 900 condition. The Slow Strain Rate technique was used to test the metallic specimens.

  17. Experimental Determination of the Cosmogenic Ar Production Rate From Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, S.; Schäfer, J. M.; Wieler, R.; Naumann, R.

    2005-12-01

    Cosmogenic 38Ar is produced in terrestrial surface rocks by spallation of target nuclides, in particular K and Ca. Though the presence of cosmogenic Ar in Ca-rich minerals has been demonstrated earlier [1], is has proven difficult to establish its production rate. To circumvent problems connected to 36Ar production by 35Cl neutron capture and different production rates from K and Ca, we have analyzed the noble gases in seven pyroxene separates (px) from the Antarctic Dry Valleys which are essentially free of Cl and K. The px were obtained from dolerite rocks, for which 3He and 21Ne exposure ages from 1.5 to 6.5 Ma have been reported [2]. The noble gases were extracted in two or three heating steps at GFZ Potsdam, yielding 38Ar/36Ar ratios up to 0.2283 ± 0.0008 (air: 0.1880). Ca (3.7-11.2 wt. %) is expected to be the only relevant target element for Ar production in the five pure px (ratio of 1.5 ± 0.2, we obtain cosmogenic 38Ar concentrations between 130 and 530x106 atoms/g. The 38Ar production rate was calculated based on 21Ne exposure ages [2], corrected for elevated nuclide production in Antarctica due to prevailing low air pressure and for the revised 21Ne production rate from Si. We obtain values between 188 ± 17 and 243 +110/-24 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1 at sea level and high (northern) latitudes for four out of the five pure px, while one yields a very high value of 348 ± 70 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1. Values above 250 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1 are also obtained from two less pure px containing 0.3 and 0.9% K and from one feldspar/quartz accumulate, indicating that the production rate from K may be higher than that from Ca. The weighted mean (excluding the outlier) of ~200 atoms (g Ca)-1 a-1 is in excellent agreement with Lal's [3] theoretical estimate. [1] Renne et al., EPSL 188 (2001) 435. [2] Schäfer et al., EPSL 167 (1999) 215. [3] Lal, EPSL 104 (1991) 424.

  18. Corrosion of the CANDU steam generator tubesheet due to aqueous environment pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucan, D.; Fulger, M.; Velciu, L.

    2009-01-01

    There is a side environment that is known to be affected significantly by several factors dependent on the balance of plant conditions (condenser leaks, condensate polishing, and coolant system materials) as well on the operational conditions, particularly through their thermal-hydraulic effects. The presence of tube-tubesheet crevices and restricted flow areas within sludge or surface deposits provides for local concentration sites for various impurities, including the acidic ones. The generalized corrosion can occur and can affect the steam generator performances. It is very important to understand the generalized corrosion mechanism with the purpose of evaluating the amount of corrosion products which exist in the steam generator after a determined period of operation. The purpose of this work consists in the assessment of corrosion behavior of the tubesheet material (carbon steel SA508 cl.2) at normal secondary circuit parameters (temperature, 260 deg. C, pressure, 5.1 MPa). The testing environment was the demineralized water without impurities, at different pH values regulated with morpholine and cyclohexylamine (all volatile treatment - AVT). The results are presented like micrographs, potentiodynamic curves and graphics representing loss of metal by corrosion, corrosion rate, the total corrosion products, the adherent corrosion products, the released corrosion products and the release of the metal. (authors)

  19. Corrosion control for open cooling water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karweer, S.B.; Ramchandran, R.

    2000-01-01

    Frequent stoppage of water circulation due to shut down of the Detritiation Plant in Heavy Water Division, Trombay resulted in considerable algae growth. As polyphosphate is a nutrient to algae growth, studies were directed in the evaluation of a nonpolyphosphate formulation for controlling corrosion and scale formation of carbon-steel, copper and aluminium. A blend of HEDP, polyacrylate, zinc, and benzotriazole was used and the optimum condition was determined. In presence of 25 ppm kw-1002 [proprietary formulation, containing HEDP and polyacrylate], 10 ppm kw-201 [active ingredient benzotriazole] and 2 ppm zinc (as zinc sulphate), the corrosion rate of carbon-steel in Mumbai Municipal Corporation (MMC) water at pH 7.5 ± 0.1 for a period of 31 days was 10.4 x 10 -3 μm/h. When MMC water concentrated to half its original volume was used, the corrosion rate was still 9.74 x 10 -3 μm/h close to the original value without concentration. Hence, this formulation was used for controlling scale and corrosion. The results were satisfactory. (author)

  20. Weld region corrosion during chemical cleaning of PWR [pressurized-water reactor] steam generators: Volume 2, Tests and analyses: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, J.L.; Bozeka, S.A.; Jevec, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The potential for preferential corrosion of steam generator weld regions during chemical cleaning using the generic SGOG solvents was investigated. The investigations included development and use of a corrosion assessment test facility which measured corrosion currents in a realistic model of the steam generator geometry in the vicinity of a specific weld during a simulated chemical dissolution of sludge consisting of essentially pure magnetite. A corrosion monitoring technique was developed and qualified. In this technique free corrosion rates measured by linear polarization techniques are added to corrosion rates calculated from galvanic current measured using a zero resistance ammeter to give an estimate of total corrosion rate for a galvanically corroding material. An analytic modeling technique was developed and proved useful in determining the size requirements for the weld region mockup used in the corrosion assessment test facility. The technique predicted galvanic corrosion rates consistent with that observed in a corrosion assessement test when polarization data used as model input were obtained on-line during the test. The test results obtained during this investigation indicated that chemical cleaning using the SGOG magnetite dissolution solvent can be performed with a small amount of corrosion of secondary side internals and pressure boundary welds. The maximum weld region corrosion measured during a typical chemical cleaning cycle to remove essentially pure magnetite sludge was about 8 mils. However, additional site specific weld region corrosion assessment testing and qualification will be required prior to chemical cleaning steam generators at a specific plant. Recommendations for site specific qualification of chemical cleaning processes and for use of process monitors and on-line corrosion instrumentation are included in this report

  1. Determination of the stoichiometric rate in UO2 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Sergio C.; Lima, Nelson B. de; Sassine, Andre; Bustillos, Jose Oscar Vega

    2000-01-01

    The gravimetric and voltammetric methods for determination of non-stoichiometric O/U ratio in uranium dioxide used as nuclear fuel are discussed in this work. The oxidation of uranium oxide is very complex due to many phase changes. Gravimetric and voltammetric methods do not detect phase changes. The results of this work shown that, to evaluate both methods is requiring to be done Rietveld methods by X-ray diffraction data to identify the uranium oxide phase changes. (author)

  2. Determinants of inter-specific variation in basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Craig R; Kearney, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the rate of metabolism of a resting, postabsorptive, non-reproductive, adult bird or mammal, measured during the inactive circadian phase at a thermoneutral temperature. BMR is one of the most widely measured physiological traits, and data are available for over 1,200 species. With data available for such a wide range of species, BMR is a benchmark measurement in ecological and evolutionary physiology, and is often used as a reference against which other levels of metabolism are compared. Implicit in such comparisons is the assumption that BMR is invariant for a given species and that it therefore represents a stable point of comparison. However, BMR shows substantial variation between individuals, populations and species. Investigation of the ultimate (evolutionary) explanations for these differences remains an active area of inquiry, and explanation of size-related trends remains a contentious area. Whereas explanations for the scaling of BMR are generally mechanistic and claim ties to the first principles of chemistry and physics, investigations of mass-independent variation typically take an evolutionary perspective and have demonstrated that BMR is ultimately linked with a range of extrinsic variables including diet, habitat temperature, and net primary productivity. Here we review explanations for size-related and mass-independent variation in the BMR of animals, and suggest ways that the various explanations can be evaluated and integrated.

  3. Corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent - application to the continuous determination of hydrofluoric acid in the atmosphere; Corrosion en presence de complexant. - Application a la determination en continu de l'acide fluorhydrique dans l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapron, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1966-10-01

    After a presentation of the thermodynamics and kinetics involved during corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent, the first part of this report deals with the electrochemical properties of an aluminium electrode in the presence of fluoride solutions. Various physical and chemical parameters have been studied together with their influence on the aforementioned properties. From this first part are deduced the medium and the various parameters which lead to the maximum efficiency for the detection of fluorides by amperometry. The second part is an application of the results of the above work, which has made it possible to develop a cell having an original design. Its performances are described. They show that the cell has a greater sensitivity and a shorter response time than existing equipment. (author) [French] Apres un rappel sur la thermodynamique et la cinetique de la corrosion en presence de complexant, la premiere partie du memoire est consacree a l'etude des proprietes electrochimiques de l'electrode d'aluminium, en presence de solutions de fluorure. Differents parametres physiques et chimiques ont ete etudies ainsi que leurs influences sur les dites proprietes. De cette premiere partie on en a deduit le milieu et les divers parametres a fixer de facon a obtenir un rendement optimum au vue de la detection des fluorures par amperometrie. La deuxieme partie, qui est l'application des renseignements tires du travail deja cite, a permis de mettre au point une cellule de conception nouvelle. Ses performances sont decrites. Elles indiquent une sensibilite plus grande, un temps de reponse plus court que les appareils existants. (auteur)

  4. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  5. The growing rate and the type of corrosion products of aluminium alloy AA 5052 in deionized water at temperature up to 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    The process of corrosion concerning the aluminum alloy AA5052 in deionized water at temperatures of 40 0 C, 80 0 C, 90 0 C, 140 0 C, 200 0 C and 280 0 C is studied. The following methods are used: periodic weighting of the test samples; analysis by neutronic activation of the corrosion products dissolved in water; thermogravimetric and thermodiferential analysis; analysis through X-ray diffraction and from metalografic observations of the crystals produced in the corrosion process; an optical microscope using polarized and normal light and a scanning electronic microscope. The activation energies are calculated for the corrosion film formation, and for the dissolution of the corrosion products in the deionized water. (ARHC) [pt

  6. Corrosion behavior of electrodeposited Co-Fe alloys in aerated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chansena, A. [Research Unit on Corrosion, College of Data Storage Innovation, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Sutthiruangwong, S., E-mail: sutha.su@kmitl.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Research Unit on Corrosion, College of Data Storage Innovation, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand)

    2017-05-01

    Co-Fe alloy is an important component for reader-writer in hard disk drive. The surface of the alloy is exposed to the environment both in gas phase and in liquid phase during manufacturing process. The study of corrosion behavior of Co-Fe alloys can provide useful fundamental data for reader-writer production planning especially when corrosion becomes a major problem. The corrosion study of electrodeposited Co-Fe alloys from cyclic galvanodynamic polarization was performed using potentiodynamic polarization technique. The composition of electrodeposited Co-Fe alloys was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The patterns from X-ray diffractometer showed that the crystal structure of electrodeposited Co-Fe alloys was body-centered cubic. A vibrating sample magnetometer was used for magnetic measurements. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) was increased and the intrinsic coercivity (H{sub ci}) was decreased with increasing Fe content. The corrosion rate study was performed in aerated deionized water and aerated acidic solutions at pH 3, 4 and 5. The corrosion rate diagram for Co-Fe alloys was constructed. It was found that the corrosion rate of Co-Fe alloys was increased with increasing Fe content in both aerated deionized water and aerated acidic solutions. In aerated pH 3 solution, the Co-Fe alloy containing 78.8% Fe showed the highest corrosion rate of 7.7 mm yr{sup −1} with the highest M{sub s} of 32.0 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1}. The corrosion rate of the alloy with 23.8% Fe was at 1.1 mm yr{sup −1} with M{sub s} of 1.2 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1}. In aerated deionized water, the alloy with the highest Fe content of 78.5% still showed the highest corrosion rate of 0.0059 mm yr{sup −1} while the alloy with the lowest Fe content of 20.4% gave the lowest corrosion rate of 0.0045 mm yr{sup −1}. - Highlights: • The aeration during corrosion measurement simulates reader-writer head production environment. • The corrosion rate diagram for Co-Fe alloys

  7. Corrosion Behavior of Surface-Treated Implant Ti-6Al-4V by Electrochemical Polarization and Impedance Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subir; Yadav, Kasturi

    2011-04-01

    Implant materials for orthopedic and heart surgical services demand a better corrosion resistance material than the presently used titanium alloys, where protective oxide layer breaks down on a prolonged stay in aqueous physiological human body, giving rise to localized corrosion of pitting, crevice, and fretting corrosion. A few surface treatments on Ti alloy, in the form of anodization, passivation, and thermal oxidation, followed by soaking in Hank solution have been found to be very effective in bringing down the corrosion rate as well as producing high corrosion resistance surface film as reflected from electrochemical polarization, cyclic polarization, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The XRD study revealed the presence of various types of oxides along with anatase and rutile on the surface, giving rise to high corrosion resistance film. While surface treatment of passivation and thermal oxidation could reduce the corrosion rate by 1/5th, anodization in 0.3 M phosphoric acid at 16 V versus stainless steel cathode drastically brought down the corrosion rate by less than ten times. The mechanism of corrosion behavior and formation of different surface films is better understood from the determination of EIS parameters derived from the best-fit equivalent circuit.

  8. 7 CFR 1610.10 - Determination of interest rate on Bank loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of interest rate on Bank loans. 1610.10..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN POLICIES § 1610.10 Determination of interest rate on Bank loans. (a) All loan..., shall bear interest at the rate determined as established below, but not less than 5 percent per annum...

  9. 75 FR 11227 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Tip Rate Determination Agreement (TRDA) for Use in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Rate Determination Agreement (TRDA) for Use in Industries Other Than the Food and Beverage Industry and... Tip Rate Determination Agreement (TRDA) for industries other than the food and beverage industry and...: Tip Rate Determination Agreement (TRDA) for industries other than the food and beverage industry and...

  10. Electrochemical Study of Welded AISI 304 and 904L Stainless Steel in Seawater in View of Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richárd Székely

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of welds in AISI 304 and AISI 904L stainless steels carried out in seawater model solution in the temperature range 5-35°C and the standard of corrosion testing of welds was followed. The corrosion rate and corrosion attack characteristics were determined for welds of the examined steels with several type of treatment. The aim of this work was to compare the steels based on their resistance against the corrosion in terms of pitting potential (Epit and repassivation potential (Erepass. Seawater is an electrochemically aggressive medium, which can initiate localised corrosion in welded stainless steels. Different electrochemical and testing methods were used, including cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, pH measuring and penetration tests.

  11. Long-term corrosion inhibition mechanism of microarc oxidation coated AZ31 Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yanhong; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Chen, Cheng-fu; Ning, Chengyun; Guo, Yuanjun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion behavior is significantly affected by the long-term immersion. ► The degradation is inhibited due to the corrosion product layer. ► The corrosion resistance is enhanced by optimized MAO electrolyte concentrations. ► The corrosion inhibition mechanism is presented by a Flash animation. - Abstract: This paper addresses the long-term corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation coated Mg alloys immersed in simulated body fluid for 28 days. The coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys were produced in the electrolyte of sodium phosphate (Na 3 PO 4 ) at the concentration of 20 g/L, 30 g/L and 40 g/L, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical micrograph were used to observe the microstructure of the samples before and after corrosion. The composition of the MAO coating and corrosion products were determined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Corrosion product identification showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) was formed on the surface of the corroded samples. The ratio of Ca/P in HA determined by the X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) technique showed that HA is an acceptable biocompatible implant material. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to characterize the corrosion rate and the electrochemical impedance. The corrosion resistance of the coated Mg alloys can be enhanced by optimizing the electrolyte concentrations for fabricating samples, and is enhanced after immersing the coated samples in simulated body fluid for more than 14 days. The enhanced corrosion resistance after long-term immersion is attributed to a corrosion product layer formed on the sample surface. The inhibition mechanism of the corrosion process is discussed and presented with an animation

  12. Corrosion of candidate materials in Lake Rotokawa geothermal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion rates were determined for CDA 613, CDA 715, A-36 carbon steel, 1020 carbon steel, and Alloy 825 flat coupons which were exposed to geothermal spring water at Paraiki site number 9 near Lake Rotokawa, New Zealand. Qualitative observations of the corrosion performance of Type 304L stainless steel and CDA 102 exposed to the same environment were noted. CDA 715, Alloy 825, 1020 carbon steel, and other alloys are being considered for the materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste containers for the United States civilian radioactive waste disposal program. Alloys CDA 613 and CDA 102 were tested to provide copper-based materials for corrosion performance comparison purposes. A36 was tested to provide a carbon steel baseline material for comparison purposes, and alloy 304L stainless steel was tested to provide an austenitic stainless steel baseline material for comparison purposes. In an effort to gather corrosion data from an environment that is rooted in natural sources of water and rock, samples of some of the proposed container materials were exposed to a geothermal spring environment. At the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, currently under consideration for high-level nuclear waste disposal, transient groundwater may come in contact with waste containers over the course of a 10,000-year disposal period. The geothermal springs environment, while extremely more aggressive than the anticipated general environment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, could have similarities to the environment that arises at selected local sites on a container as a result of crevice corrosion, pitting corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), or the concentration of the ionic species due to repetitive evaporation or boiling of the groundwater near the containers. The corrosion rates were based on weight loss data obtained after six weeks exposure in a 90{degrees}C, low-pH spring with relatively high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}.

  13. On the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel, nickel-chromium and zirconium-alloys in pore water of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.; Graefen, H.

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of an extensive review of literature and available experience, an evaluation was made of the corrosion of a metallic matrix for radioactive nuclides embedded in porous, water containing Portland cement. As a metallic matrix, austenitic high-alloy steel, nickel-base alloys and zirconium alloys are discussed. Pore waters in Portland cement have low aggressivity. However, through contact with formation water, chloride and sulphate enrichment can occur. Although corrosion is principally possible on the basis of purely thermodynamic considerations, it can be assumed that local corrosion (pitting, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion) is highly improbable under the given boundary conditions. This is valid for all three groups of alloys and means that only low release rates of corrosion products are to be expected. As a result of the discussion on radiolysis-induced corrosion, additional corrosion activity can be excluded. Final conclusions concerning the stimulation of corrosion processes by microbial action cannot be drawn and, therefore, additional experiments are proposed. The release rates of radioactive products are controlled by a very low dissolution rate of the materials in the passive state. All three groups of alloys show this type of general dissolution. From a survey of literature data it can be concluded that release rates greater than 250 mg/m 2 per day are not exceeded. Since these data were mainly obtained by electrochemical methods, it is proposed that quantitative analytical investigations of the corrosion products in pore water be made. On the whole the release rates determined are far below corrosion rates which are generally technically relevant. (author) 13 figs., 9 tabs., 61 refs

  14. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  15. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  16. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  17. Standard test method for determining the crevice repassivation potential of corrosion-resistant alloys using a potentiodynamic-galvanostatic-potentiostatic technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for conducting anodic polarization studies to determine the crevice repassivation potential for corrosion–resistant alloys. The concept of the repassivation potential is similar to that of the protection potential given in Reference Test Method G 5. 1.2 The test method consists in applying successively potentiodynamic, galvanostatic, and potentiostatic treatments for the initial formation and afterward repassivation of crevice corrosion. 1.3 This test method is a complement to Test Method G 61. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent - application to the continuous determination of hydrofluoric acid in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapron, J.

    1966-10-01

    After a presentation of the thermodynamics and kinetics involved during corrosion in the presence of a complexing agent, the first part of this report deals with the electrochemical properties of an aluminium electrode in the presence of fluoride solutions. Various physical and chemical parameters have been studied together with their influence on the aforementioned properties. From this first part are deduced the medium and the various parameters which lead to the maximum efficiency for the detection of fluorides by amperometry. The second part is an application of the results of the above work, which has made it possible to develop a cell having an original design. Its performances are described. They show that the cell has a greater sensitivity and a shorter response time than existing equipment. (author) [fr

  19. Nondestructive metallographic control for the determination of the degree of sensitivity to intragranular corrosion of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz S, A.; Juarez G, F.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between: microstructure-heat treatment, microstructure-mechanical properties, microstructure-corrosion resistance make that the study of the microstructure of metals and alloys be a powerful tool either in technical-scientific research as in the control of materials. The destructive nature of metallographic analysis create a serious limitation in the case of control methods for failures in the service. The 'Tampon' Method make possible the polishing 'In situ' of the majority of metals and alloys of industrial use, and the method of nitrocellulose replica allows the obtention of an accurate copy of the metallographic structure which can be observed by transparency or reflection. The purpose of this work is to show in a general way, the fundamental principles of the technique for the obtention of replicas, as well as the countless benefits of its utilization in the national industry. (Author)

  20. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  1. 77 FR 31756 - Energy Conservation Program: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternative Rating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ...-AC46 Energy Conservation Program: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternative Rating... regulations authorizing the use of alternative methods of determining energy efficiency or energy consumption... alternative methods of determining energy efficiency or energy consumption of various consumer products and...

  2. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Kusmierek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  3. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust.

  4. A clustering based method to evaluate soil corrosivity for pipeline external integrity management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Ayako; Wang, Hui; Liang, Robert Y.; Castaneda, Homero

    2015-01-01

    One important category of transportation infrastructure is underground pipelines. Corrosion of these buried pipeline systems may cause pipeline failures with the attendant hazards of property loss and fatalities. Therefore, developing the capability to estimate the soil corrosivity is important for designing and preserving materials and for risk assessment. The deterioration rate of metal is highly influenced by the physicochemical characteristics of a material and the environment of its surroundings. In this study, the field data obtained from the southeast region of Mexico was examined using various data mining techniques to determine the usefulness of these techniques for clustering soil corrosivity level. Specifically, the soil was classified into different corrosivity level clusters by k-means and Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In terms of physical space, GMM shows better separability; therefore, the distributions of the material loss of the buried petroleum pipeline walls were estimated via the empirical density within GMM clusters. The soil corrosivity levels of the clusters were determined based on the medians of metal loss. The proposed clustering method was demonstrated to be capable of classifying the soil into different levels of corrosivity severity. - Highlights: • The clustering approach is applied to the data extracted from a real-life pipeline system. • Soil properties in the right-of-way are analyzed via clustering techniques to assess corrosivity. • GMM is selected as the preferred method for detecting the hidden pattern of in-situ data. • K–W test is performed for significant difference of corrosivity level between clusters

  5. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of carbon steel in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Mihalache, M.; Laurentiu, P.

    2016-01-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are the most important organisms in microbiologically induced corrosion. In this context, the paper presents an assessment (by experimental tests) of the behaviour of carbon steel samples (SA106gr.B) in SRB media. Some of samples were immersed in microbial environment in order microbiological analysis of their surface and another part was used to perform accelerated electrochemical tests to determine electrochemical parameters for the system carbon steel / microbial medium (corrosion rate, the polarization resistance of the surface, susceptibility to pitting corrosion). The surfaces of the tested samples were analyzed using the optical and electronic microscope, and emphasized the role of bacteria in the development of biofilms under which appeared characteristics of corrosion attack. The correlation of all results confirmed that SRB accelerated the localized corrosion of the surfaces of SA 106gr.B carbon steel. (authors)

  6. System and method for determining an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Perry, Kevin L; Kim, Chang H

    2014-12-30

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a rate determination module, a storage level determination module, and an air/fuel ratio control module. The rate determination module determines an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst based on a reaction efficiency and a reactant level. The storage level determination module determines an ammonia storage level in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst based on the ammonia generation rate. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the ammonia storage level.

  7. Does growth rate determine the rate of metabolism in shorebird chicks living in the arctic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Joseph B.; Tieleman, B. Irene; Visser, G. Henk; Ricklefs, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    We measured resting and peak metabolic rates (RMR and PMR, respectively) during development of chicks of seven species of shorebirds: least sandpiper (Calidris minutilla; adult mass 20 22 g), dunlin (Calidris alpina; 56-62 g), lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes; 88-92 g), short-billed dowitcher

  8. Investigation of the Effects of Solution Temperature on the Corrosion Behavior of Austenitic Low-Nickel Stainless Steels in Citric Acid using Impedance and Polarization Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulimbayan Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steels may be classified according to alloy microstructure – ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. Among these, austenitic grade has the largest contribution to market due to the alloy’s numerous industrial and domestic applications. In this study, the corrosion behavior of low-Nickel stainless steel in citric acid was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization techniques and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS. The corrosion current density which is directly related to corrosion rate was extracted from the generated anodic polarization curve. Increasing the temperature of the citric acid resulted to increased corrosion current densities indicating higher corrosion rates at initial corrosion condition. EIS was performed to generate Nyquist plots whose shape and size depicts the corrosion mechanism and corrosion resistance of the alloy in citric acid, respectively. All the generated Nyquist plots have depressed semi-circle shapes implying that corrosion process takes place with charge-transfer as the rate-determining step. Based from the extracted values of polarization resistance (Rp, the temperature of the solution has negative correlation with the corrosion resistance of the studied alloy.

  9. Application for Determination of the Forward Exchange Rate in Access 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana MOCEAN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The exchange rate set the present rate for a foreign currency transaction with payment or delivery at some future date. Forward rates are calculated by using the current exchange rate for the currency pair and the interest rates for the two currencies and allow you to lock in rate now for a future. This paper describes the formulas which determinate the forward exchange rate and how can we implement them in a short, but efficient informatics application.

  10. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear-waste-package structural-barrier materials. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250 0 C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a 60 Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10 6 rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300 0 C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90 0 C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking

  11. Corrosion Monitoring of PEO-Pretreated Magnesium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnedenkov, A. S.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Mashtalyar, D. V.; Gnedenkov, S. V.; Sergienko, V. I. [Institute of Chemistry, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    The MA8 alloy (formula Mg-Mn-Ce) has been shown to have greater corrosion stability than the VMD10 magnesium alloy (formula Mg-Zn-Zr-Y) in chloride-containing solutions by Scanning Vibrating Electrode Technique (SVET) and by optical microscopy, gravimetry, and volumetry. It has been established that the crucial factor for the corrosion activity of these samples is the occurrence of microgalvanic coupling at the sample surface. The peculiarities of the kinetics and mechanism of the corrosion in the local heterogeneous regions of the magnesium alloy surface were investigated by localized electrochemical techniques. The stages of the corrosion process in artificial defects in the coating obtained by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) at the surface of the MA8 magnesium alloy were also studied. The analysis of the experimental data enabled us to determine that the corrosion process in the defect zone develops predominantly at the magnesium/coating interface. Based on the measurements of the corrosion rate of the samples with PEO and composite polymer-containing coatings, the best anticorrosion properties were displayed by the composite polymer-containing coatings.

  12. Exchange Rate Volatility, Its Determinants and Effects on the Manufacturing Sector in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Chimaobi V. Okolo; Onyinye S. Ugwuanyi; Kenneth A. Okpala

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of exchange rate volatility on the manufacturing sector of Nigeria. The flow and stock market theories of exchange rate determination was adopted considering macroeconomic determinants such as balance of trade, trade openness, and net international investment. Furthermore, the influence of changes in parallel exchange rate, official exchange rate and real effective exchange rate was modeled on the manufacturing sector output. Vector autoregression techniques an...

  13. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  14. Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of grades-2 and -12 titanium under Canadian nuclear waste vault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Bailey, M.G.; Clarke, C.F.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Results on the corrosion of titanium grades 2 and 12 under the saline conditions anticipated in Canadian nuclear waste vaults are presented. The experimental approach included short-term electrochemical experiments to determine corrosion mechanisms, the susceptibility of titanium to crevice corrosion under a variety of conditions, and the extent of hydrogen uptake under controlled conditions; medium-term corrosion tests lasting a few weeks to a few months; and long-term immersion tests to provide rates for uniform corrosion, crevice corrosion, and hydrogen pickup. Results indicated that propagation, not initiation, is important in establishing susceptibility to crevice corrosion. Increasing the iron content of Ti-2 to 0.13 weight percent prevents crevice corrosion by causing repassivation. Crevice corrosion initiates on Ti-12, but repassivation is rapid. The supply of oxidant is essential to maintain crevice propagation. Hydrogen embrittlement is unlikely unless oxide film breakdown occurs. Film breakdown occurs under crevice conditions, and hydrogen pickup is to be expected. Film breakdown could occur if the strain or creep rate is fast enough to compete with repassivation reactions, a highly unlikely situation

  15. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  16. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDY VIA LINEAR POLARIZATION IN PEAS CAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Costa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the corrosion of tinplate can for peas. Firstly, the characterization of canning solution was made. The values of pH, conductivity, Brix, viscosity, density and content of Fe were, respectively, 5.88; 32.6 mS/cm; 6.6%; 3,42cP; 1.026 g/ml; 12.05 mg/kg. The corrosion rate in the cans was determined by linear polarization technique. The electrodes with and without varnish were analyzed in the first and fifth day of the experiment for the 3 parts of the can. The corrosion rate increased significantly when the coating was removed and the body showed a higher corrosion rate, reaching 1.7 mm/year in the absence of varnish. The microstructure of the samples was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. The increase of iron on the surface, evidenced by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS may have contributed to the corrosion in the samples without varnish.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system.

  19. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230 0 to 270 0 C and static lithium at temperatures from 200 0 to 500 0 C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system

  20. 42 CFR 23.25 - How will interest rates for loans be determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will interest rates for loans be determined? 23... will interest rates for loans be determined? Interest will be charged at the Treasury Current Value of Funds (CVF) rate in effect on April 1 immediately preceding the date on which the loan is approved and...

  1. Effects of secondary phase and grain size on the corrosion of biodegradable Mg-Zn-Ca alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Bradshaw, A R; Chiu, Y L; Jones, I P

    2015-03-01

    The bio-corrosion behaviour of Mg-3Zn-0.3Ca (wt.%) alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37°C has been investigated using immersion testing and electrochemical measurements. Heat treatment has been used to alter the grain size and secondary phase volume fraction; the effects of these on the bio-corrosion behaviour of the alloy were then determined. The as-cast sample has the highest bio-corrosion rate due to micro-galvanic corrosion between the eutectic product (Mg+Ca2Mg6Zn3) and the surrounding magnesium matrix. The bio-corrosion resistance of the alloy can be improved by heat treatment. The volume fraction of secondary phases and grain size are both key factors controlling the bio-corrosion rate of the alloy. The bio-corrosion rate increases with volume fraction of secondary phase. When this is lower than 0.8%, the dependence of bio-corrosion rate becomes noticeable: large grains corrode more quickly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determining the capacity and rate of advance of tunneling scoops during the sinking of shafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durov, E.M.

    1979-03-01

    Methods for calculating parameters and selecting tunneling rigs for deepening mine shafts and for determining their rate of advance are outlined. The output according to type of rig, scoop capacity and range of rate of advance in the shaft are determined firstly and then a graph of output in relation to the change of maximum rates of advance is constructed. The desired productivity is determined on the basis of output per working shift in loose soil. Having determined scoop capacity and rate of advance, the remaining parameters of the excavation may be determined.

  3. Radiolysis effects on fuel corrosion within a failed nuclear waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; Shoeshmith, D.W.; Christensen, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of geological disposal of used nuclear fuel in corrosion resistant containers is being investigated in several countries. In the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP), it is assumed that the used fuel will be disposed of in copper containers. Since the predicted lifetimes of these containers are very long (>106 years), only those containers emplaced with an undetected defect will fail within the period for which radionuclide release from the fuel must be considered. Early failure could lead to the entry of water into the container and subsequent release of radionuclides. The release rate of radionuclides from the used fuel will depend upon its dissolution rate. The primary mechanism for release will be the corrosion of the fuel driven by radiolytically-produced oxidants. The studies carried out to determine the effects of water radiolysis on fuel corrosion are reviewed, and some of the procedures used to predict corrosion rates of used fuel in failed nuclear waste containers described. (author)

  4. Corrosion of radioactive waste containers, case of a container made of low allow steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataillon, C.; Musy, C.; Roy, M.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: radioactive waste concept ANDRA, low alloy steel (XC38) container corrosion under representative storage conditions, corrosion rate and passivation effects, micrographic investigations

  5. Standard test method for determining the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of 5XXX series Aluminum alloys by mass loss after exposure to nitric acid (NAMLT Test)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for constant immersion intergranular corrosion testing of 5XXX series aluminum alloys. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to wrought products. 1.3 This test method covers type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Evaluation of electrochemical techniques for measurement of fireside corrosion in thermal power plants; Utvaerdering av elektrokemiska tekniker foer maetning av roekgassidig hoegtemperaturkorrosion i pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjorrnhede, Anders

    2007-12-15

    probes in order to determine the exact corrosion rate. However, a correlation between the temperature and the corrosion rate exists. The practical use of the on-line corrosion probes is in use together with conventional corrosion probes. Either should the quality of the measured corrosion rates given from the corrosion probes increase or the post treatment of the data must be standardised in order to avoid different kind of influences on the results

  7. Standard test method for determining atmospheric chloride deposition rate by wet candle method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a wet candle device and its use in measuring atmospheric chloride deposition (amount of chloride salts deposited from the atmosphere on a given area per unit time). 1.2 Data on atmospheric chloride deposition can be useful in classifying the corrosivity of a specific area, such as an atmospheric test site. Caution must be exercised, however, to take into consideration the season because airborne chlorides vary widely between seasons. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for conducting corrosion tests in plant equipment or systems under operating conditions to evaluate the corrosion resistance of engineering materials. It does not cover electrochemical methods for determining corrosion rates. 1.1.1 While intended primarily for immersion tests, general guidelines provided can be applicable for exposure of test specimens in plant atmospheres, provided that placement and orientation of the test specimens is non-restrictive to air circulation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See also 10.4.2.

  9. Salt Spray Test to Determine Galvanic Corrosion Levels of Electroless Nickel Connectors Mounted on an Aluminum Bracket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, T. D.; Hodge, R. E.; Torres, P. D.; Jones, D. D.; Laird, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    During preliminary vehicle design reviews, requests were made to change flight termination systems from an electroless nickel (EN) connector coating to a zinc-nickel (ZN) plating. The reason for these changes was due to a new NASA-STD-6012 corrosion requirement where connectors must meet the performance requirement of 168 hr of exposure to salt spray. The specification for class F connectors, MIL-DTL-38999, certifies the EN coating will meet a 48-hr salt spray test, whereas the ZN is certified to meet a 168-hr salt spray test. The ZN finish is a concern because Marshall Space Flight Center has no flight experience with ZN-finished connectors, and MSFC-STD-3012 indicates that zinc and zinc alloys should not be used. The purpose of this test was to run a 168-hr salt spray test to verify the electrical and mechanical integrity of the EN connectors and officially document the results. The salt spray test was conducted per ASTM B117 on several MIL-DTL-38999 flight-like connectors mounted to an aluminum 6061-T6 bracket that was alodined. The configuration, mounting techniques, electrical checks, and materials used were typical of flight and ground support equipment.

  10. Corrosion Assessment by Using Risk-Based Inspection Method for Petrochemical Plant - Practical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Song Chun; Song, Ki Hun

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion assessment has a number of uses but the use considered here is as a precursor to Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) planning. Systematic methods consisting of technical modules of RBI program were used to assess the effect of specific corrosion mechanism on the probability of failure in equipment of petrochemical plants. Especially in part of the damage and corrosion assessment, screening step involved evaluating the combinations of process conditions and construction materials for each equipment item in order to determine which damage mechanisms are potentially active. For general internal corrosion, either API 510 or API 570 was applied as the damage rate in the calculation to determine the remaining life and inspection frequency. In some cases, a measured rate of corrosion may not be available. The technical modules of RBI program employ default values for corrosion, typically derived from published data or from experience with similar processes, for use until inspection results are available. This paper describes the case study of corrosion and damage assessment by using RBI methodology in petrochemical plant. Specifically, this paper reports the methodology and the results of its application to the petrochemical units using the KGS-RBI TM program, developed by the Korea Gas Safety Corporation to suit Korean situation in conformity with API 581 Codes

  11. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  12. Corrosion of carbon steel in clay environments relevant to radioactive waste geological disposals, Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Necib, S. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs ANDRA, Meuse Haute-Marne, Center RD 960, Bure (France); Diomidis, N. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Keech, P. [Nuclear Waste Management Organisation NWMO, Toronto (Canada); Nakayama, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency JAEA, Horonobe-Cho (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Carbon steel is widely considered as a candidate material for the construction of spent fuel and high-level waste disposal canisters. In order to investigate corrosion processes representative of the long term evolution of deep geological repositories, two in situ experiments are being conducted in the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The iron corrosion (IC) experiment, aims to measure the evolution of the instantaneous corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with Opalinus Clay as a function of time, by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The Iron Corrosion in Bentonite (IC-A) experiment intends to determine the evolution of the average corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with bentonite of different densities, by using gravimetric and surface analysis measurements, post exposure. Both experiments investigate the effect of microbial activity on corrosion. In the IC experiment, carbon steel showed a gradual decrease of the corrosion rate over a period of 7 years, which is consistent with the ongoing formation of protective corrosion products. Corrosion product layers composed of magnetite, mackinawite, hydroxychloride and siderite with some traces of oxidising species such as goethite were identified on the steel surface. Microbial investigations revealed thermophilic bacteria (sulphate and thiosulphate reducing bacteria) at the metal surface in low concentrations. In the IC-A experiment, carbon steel samples in direct contact with bentonite exhibited corrosion rates in the range of 2 µm/year after 20 months of exposure, in agreement with measurements in absence of microbes. Microstructural and chemical characterisation of the samples identified a complex corrosion product consisting mainly of magnetite. Microbial investigations confirmed the limited viability of microbes in highly compacted bentonite. (authors)

  13. Corrosion behavior of austenitic steels and their components in niobium-containing chloride melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. V.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.; Volkovich, V. A.; Lisienko, D. G.

    2014-02-01

    The mechanism of corrosion of austenitic steels 12Kh18N10T, 10Kh17N13M2T, and 03Kh17N14M3 and metals Cr, Fe, Ni, and Mo in a NaCl-KCl-NbCl n ( n = 3.5, Nb content is 5 ± 0.1 wt %) melt at 750°C is studied. The metal and steel corrosion rates under these conditions are determined. The character of material fracture and the mechanisms of material corrosion are found.

  14. Corrosion of copper-based materials in irradiated moist air systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of oxygen-free copper (CDA-102), 70/30 copper-nickel (CDA-715), and 7% aluminum bronze (CDA-613) in an irradiated moist air environment was investigated. Experiments were performed in both dry and 40% RH (at sign 90 degree C) air at temperatures of 90 and 150 degree C. Initial corrosion rates were determined based on a combination of weight gain and weight loss measurements. Corrosion products observed were identified. These experiments support efforts by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to evaluate possible metallic barrier materials for nuclear waste containers. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. A brief review on the atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shafiei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the atmospheric corrosion of steel, at three sites, in Iran. Corrosion rate values, time of wetness, and the level of pollutants, namely of SO2 and chlorides were determined for the first year of exposure in order to establish the aggressiveness of the atmospheres. The results obeyed well with the empirical kinetics equation of the form C = Ktn.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking growth rate of TT alloy 690 and its weld joint in simulated PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, some researchers reported that the SCC growth rate (SCCGR) of cold worked thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 was significantly different in heat by heat. But, author has hypothesized that these high SCCGRs in cold worked TT Alloy 690 could be due to the metallurgical characteristics of these heats. In order to confirm this hypothesis, this study has been started in the author's laboratory, and the following 4 new evidences were obtained. First, microcracks of carbides and voids were observed in eutectic M 23 C 6 GB carbides (primary carbides) for cold rolled laboratory heat after as cast or lightly forged condition or for chemical composition simulated Bettis'TT Alloy 690 heat, after cold rolling, before SCC test. However, microcracks in primary carbides along grain boundaries and voids were rarely detected in the cold rolled commercial heat of TT Alloy 690 used for CRDM penetrations. Secondly, the SCCGR observed in TT Alloy 690 was different in each hot working process and each heat. Comparing the SCCGRs for all heats of cold worked TT Alloy 690, the SCCGR decreased with increasing of Vickers hardness. However, in same heats of cold worked TT Alloy 690, the SCCGR increased with increasing of Vickers hardness. Thirdly, the SCCGR in cold rolled TT Alloy 690 should be integrated by the effect of hardness or cold working ratio and by the effect of existing ratio of primary M23C6 carbides with cracks and Voids due to chemical composition and the fabrication process of TT Alloy 690. Fourthly, it is argued that the high SCCGRs in highly cold rolled TT Alloy 690 are not representative of the practical situation with TT Alloy 690 in service for CRDM adapter nozzles etc. The high SCCGR of highly cold rolled TT Alloy 690 is not thought to be an accurate tool in predicting the possibility of cracking of TT Alloy 690 for CRDM adapter nozzles. (author)

  17. Effect of microstructure on corrosion behavior of Ag-30Cu-27Sn alloy in vitro media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehisaki, Mehdi; Aryana, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High cooling rates decrease the number of Ag intermetallic particles in Cu-rich phase. • Increasing cooling rate improves corrosion behavior of Ag-30Cu-27Sn dental alloy. • Cathode/anode ratio in Cu-rich phases determines the corrosion behavior of alloy. - Abstract: In the present work, three simple heat treatment cycles were used to study the effects of microstructure on electrochemical corrosion behavior of Ag-30Cu-27Sn dental alloy. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out to investigate the corrosion behavior of as-cast and heat treated samples in synthetic saliva solution. The presence of intermetallic compounds were studied by X-ray diffraction method (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDAX). The microstructural observations and electrochemical corrosion results revealed that, increasing the cooling rate improves the corrosion behavior of under investigation samples. Improvement of the corrosion behavior is attributed to reducing the area of fine distributed Ag 3 Sn islands in the Cu-rich matrix which decrease the cathode/anode ratio of microgalvanic cells

  18. Corrosion control of carbon steel using inhibitor of banana peel extract in acid diluted solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komalasari; Utami, S. P.; Fermi, M. I.; Aziz, Y.; Irianti, R. S.

    2018-04-01

    Issues of corrosion happened in pipes, it was used as fluid transportation in the chemical industry. Corrosion cannot be preventing, however it could be controlled or blocked. Inhibitor addition is one of the method to control the corrosion inside the pipe. Corrosion inhibitors consisted of inorganic and organic compound inhibitors. Organic inhibitor is composed from synthetic and natural material. This study focused to evaluate the inhibition’s efficiency from banana peel to carbon steel in different concentration of inhibitor and immersing time in acid solution variation. The research employed inhibitor concentration of 0 gram/liter, 2 gram/liter, 4 gram/liter and 6 gram/liter, immersed time of carbon steel for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours. It was immersed in chloride acid solution of 0.5 M and 1.5 M. Carbon Steel AISI 4041 was used as specimen steel. Results were analyzed using corrosion rate evaluation for each specimens and inhibitor efficiencies determination. It was found that the specimen without inhibitor yielded fast corrosion rate in long immersing time and high concentration of HCl. However, the specimens with inhibitor gave lowest corrosion rate which was 78.59% for 6 gram/litre and 10 hours in 0.5 M HCl.

  19. 12 CFR 617.7125 - How should a qualified lender determine the effective interest rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... effective interest rate? 617.7125 Section 617.7125 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM BORROWER RIGHTS Disclosure of Effective Interest Rates § 617.7125 How should a qualified lender determine the effective interest rate? (a) A qualified lender must calculate the effective interest rate on...

  20. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n