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Sample records for determining absolute atomic

  1. Atom-chip-based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Sven; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity with a quantum gravimeter based on an atom chip. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal [1]. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates [2], as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties that will allow to overcome the current limitations in the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technology offers the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We present a lab-based prototype that uses the atom chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serves as inertial reference inside the vacuum [3]. With this setup, it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal. All steps are pursued on a baseline of 1 cm right below the atom chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will target for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz [4]. The device will be characterized in cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor and finally employed in a campaign to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the

  2. Theoretical Calculation of Absolute Radii of Atoms and Ions. Part 1. The Atomic Radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raka Biswas

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A set of theoretical atomic radii corresponding to the principal maximum in the radial distribution function, 4πr2R2 for the outermost orbital has been calculated for the ground state of 103 elements of the periodic table using Slater orbitals. The set of theoretical radii are found to reproduce the periodic law and the Lother Meyer’s atomic volume curve and reproduce the expected vertical and horizontal trend of variation in atomic size in the periodic table. The d-block and f-block contractions are distinct in the calculated sizes. The computed sizes qualitatively correlate with the absolute size dependent properties like ionization potentials and electronegativity of elements. The radii are used to calculate a number of size dependent periodic physical properties of isolated atoms viz., the diamagnetic part of the atomic susceptibility, atomic polarizability and the chemical hardness. The calculated global hardness and atomic polarizability of a number of atoms are found to be close to the available experimental values and the profiles of the physical properties computed in terms of the theoretical atomic radii exhibit their inherent periodicity. A simple method of computing the absolute size of atoms has been explored and a large body of known material has been brought together to reveal how many different properties correlate with atomic size.

  3. Accurate absolute measurement of trapped Cs atoms in a MOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talavera O, M.; Lopez R, M.; Carlos L, E. de; Jimenez S, S.

    2007-01-01

    A Cs-133 Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) has been developed at the Time and Frequency Division of the Centro Nacional de Metrologia, CENAM, in Mexico. This MOT is part of a primary frequency standard based on ultra-cold Cs atoms, called CsF-1 clock, under development at CENAM. In this Cs MOT, we use the standard configuration (σ + - σ - ) 4-horizontal 2-vertical laser beams 1.9 cm in diameter, with 5 mW each. We use a 852 nm, 5 mW, DBR laser as a master laser which is stabilized by saturation spectroscopy. Emission linewidth of the master laser is l MHz. In order to amplify the light of the master laser, a 50 mW, 852 nm AlGaAs laser is used as slave laser. This slave laser is stabilized by light injection technique. A 12 MHz red shift of the light is performed by two double passes through two Acusto-Optic Modulators (AOMs). The optical part of the CENAMs MOT is very robust against mechanical vibration, acoustic noise and temperature changes in our laboratory, because none of our diode lasers use an extended cavity to reduce the linewidth. In this paper, we report results of our MOT characterization as a function of several operation parameters such as the intensity of laser beams, the laser beam diameter, the red shift of light, and the gradient of the magnetic field. We also report accurate absolute measurement of the number of Cs atoms trapped in our Cs MOT. We found up to 6 x 10 7 Cs atoms trapped in our MOT measured with an uncertainty no greater than 6.4%. (Author)

  4. Absolute measurement of alkaline atoms in low density jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, J.; Guernigou, J.

    1974-01-01

    In order to determine the neutral fraction of cesium vapor which is not ionized in the beam issuing from an ion thruster, a particular sensor was developed at ONERA. This probe, the sensibility of which is 6 10 7 atoms sec -1 was used in order to measure the variation of cesium atom flux ejected from a spherical isothermal cavity. Experiments were performed in three flow conditions caracterized by the ratio of the mean free path to the dimension of the orifice or to the diameter of the cavity. Results demonstrate that it is possible in this configuration to obtain an efflux of 5 10 13 atoms sec -1 in accordance to cosine law when the mean free path is about the diameter of the spherical cavity [fr

  5. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1 degree C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273 degrees C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and…

  6. Absolute activity determination of I-125 in the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelled, O.; German, U.; Kol, R.; Levinson, S.; Laichter, Y.

    1997-01-01

    I-125 has been widely used in nuclear medicine and as a tracer in different experiments. The dose equivalent to the thyroid Tom internal contamination of 1-125, can be estimated by in-vivo monitoring of the thyroid or through bioassay of urine . The in-vivo monitoring of the thyroid can be carried out by counting the photon emission from the decay of the 1-125 , by a Nal(Tl) detector calibrated with a thyroid phantom. This direct method is sensitive , but due to the low photon energy (27keV to 35keV), the counting efficiency depends strongly on the variations of the thyroid mass , thyroid depth below the surface , thyroid shape and detector position . It is estimated that the uncertainty of the activity determination can reach several hundred percents . A mewed for absolute determination of the activity of a '251 source based on the counting rate values of file 27 keV photons and the 54 keV coincidence photo peak, which diminishes the geometry dependence of the counting efficiency , was applied to determine the uptake of 125-I in human thyroid In this work we checked also the application of the absolute determination method wife high sensitivity phoswich detectors. We compare the results of calculations of interval exposure to 125-I for a real case, evaluated by the absolute determination method and by the direct method. (authors)

  7. Study on the performances of an absolute atomic gravimeter: limit sensitivity and preliminary accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gouet, J.

    2008-02-01

    Atom interferometry is applied to absolute measurement of gravity acceleration g, to provide an accurate value for the realization of the LNE watt balance. The atomic source is obtained from a cloud of cold 87 Rubidium atoms. Two vertical counter-propagating are used to generate stimulated Raman transitions, that separate the wave-packets and make them interfere. During the transitions, the phase difference between the beams is printed on the phase of the free-falling atoms. Then the atomic phase shift between the two vertical paths becomes sensitive to the atom acceleration and allows obtaining an accurate value of g. A part of this manuscript is dedicated to the study of noise sources which deteriorate the measurement sensitivity. In particular, we detail the vibrations contribution, which we are able to reduce by a factor of 3 to 10, depending on the configurations, thanks to the measurement of a seismometer and to its analog processing. The best reported sensitivity, in optimal environment, is 1.4*10 -8 g/Hz 1/2 . The study of the measurement accuracy also represents an important part of this work. Although the vacuum chamber was only temporary, we started to list the systematic shifts. According to two comparisons with well-known absolute gravimeters based on optical interferometry, our measurement shows a residual bias of 16*10 -9 g. (author)

  8. The Determination of Absolute Sea level Rise in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, J.; Denys, P. H.; Beavan, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Long term sea level trends at five New Zealand tide gauges with records > 60 yr in length have been determined through to the end of 2008. These gauges, with a wide spatial distribution, reveal an average relative sea level rise across of 1.7 ± 0.1 mm/yr. When a Glacial Isostatic adjustment (GIA) is applied using Peltier’s ICE 5G (v1.2) model, this estimated trend rises to 2.0 mm/yr. However, the absolute trends, when calculated using approximately 10 years of cGPS data at the four gauges with the longest records (Auckland, Wellington, Lyttelton and Dunedin), show a sea level rise of only 1.2 ± 0.4 mm/yr. If the Wellington gauge (located in the transitional plate boundary zone) is removed, this absolute trend rises to 1.4 mm/yr. This paper outlines how the above results were obtained and discusses proposed future research directions. It also includes previously unpublished data on relative sea level trends as determined at a further four New Zealand tide gauge sites.

  9. Realization of a frequency standard at 778 nm: absolute frequency measurement of the 2S-8S/D transitions in hydrogen and deuterium and determination of the Rydberg constant; Realisation d'un etalon de frequence a 778 nm: mesure absolue des frequences 2S-8S/D des atomes d'hydrogene et de deuterium et determination de la constante de rydberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvoir, B. de

    1996-12-15

    The purpose of this work is to design a 778 nm standard laser for performing an absolute measurement of 2S-8S/D frequencies of hydrogen and deuterium atoms. This frequency calibration is based on a 5S-5D two-photon transition of the rubidium atom. Metrological performance of this laser is 10 times as good as that of He-Ne laser calibrated on iodine. It has been shown that the passage of a laser radiation through an optic fiber does not deteriorate its metrological properties. 2S-8S/8D transitions have been excited in an atomic jet by a titanium-sapphire laser. Spurious effects can shift and broaden lines. In order to prevent these effects, a theoretical line has been shaped and adjusted on experimental signals. The frequency comparison between the excitation laser and the standard laser has led to the measurement of the absolute frequency of the line concerned. The value of the Rydberg constant has been deduced: R{sub {infinity}} = 109737.3156859 (10) cm{sup -1}. The comparison of experimental data between deuterium and hydrogen has allowed us to determine the value of the Lamb shift of the 2S state of deuterium: L(2S-2P) = 1059,230 (9) MHz.

  10. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  11. Mylar sources for the absolute determination of activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenillas, Pablo A.

    1999-01-01

    Strong Mylar foils 2.5 μm thick are proposed as an alternative to the very fragile Vyns foils for the preparation of the radioactive sources for absolute counting. Several experiments have been carried out with β and X-ray emitters to demonstrate the suitability of this material. The results show that Mylar can replace Vyns foils even for low energy β emitters. (author)

  12. Absolute nondestructive quantitative determination of uranium in special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragnev, T.; Damyanov, B.; Grozev, G.; Karamanova, J.

    1985-01-01

    An absolute nondestructive method for quantitative measurement of uranium concentration and enrichment in special nuclear materials is proposed. The method uses intrinsic calibration and portable instrumentation and the particularly suitable for IAEA safequards applications. The intrinsic calibration accumulates the positive experience of the previous measurements and the results will be continuously improving. It is possible to measure standards in laboratories and use the results for analysis at different time and places. The tests show a good agreement with known classical methods and better results in some cases

  13. An energy-dependent photoemission study on line-shape analysis in determining the absolute coverage of metallic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C-M; Tsuei, K-D; Luh, D-A

    2008-01-01

    Energy-dependent photoemission was measured to investigate the validity of the analysis of line shape in determining the absolute coverage of atomically flat, metallic thin films. The surface states of two Ag/Au(1 1 1) thin films with carefully controlled coverage of Ag were measured and analysed. Our results confirm that line-shape analysis is a valid procedure; the absolute error associated with this technique is within 0.1 ML, which makes the technique advantageous over other techniques to determine the film coverage. The experimental procedure in our work provides a routine to determine an appropriate photon energy for use in line-shape analysis. Our results indicate that the widely accessible He Iα line is a suitable excitation source to utilize line-shape analysis for confined states in a Ag film

  14. Determination of absolute oscillator strengths for doubly-ionized vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goly, A.

    1978-01-01

    Oscillator strengths of thirty V III lines in the wavelength region from 2300A to 2600A were determined by the emission method using a modified wallstabilized cascade are operating at atmospheric pressure in helium with traces of VOCl 3 -vapour. The plasma radiation was analyzed by using a high dispersion grating spectrograph (0.7 A/mm) and Kodak IIaO-plates. Conventional techniques of intensity measurement were employed. Under the physical conditions created the helium plasma was found more or less distant from LTE, but for singly- and doubly-ionized vanadium according to Drawin's criteria, a Boltzmann distribution of level population can be assumed (and has been proved for VII). Measuring a set of intensities of V II lines (with different energies of upper levels) and using gf-values, obtained previously in an argon-vanadium plasma in LTE, excitation temperatures were determined from slopes of Boltzmann plots. (orig.) 891 WL [de

  15. Determination of the Absolute Stereochemistry of Secondary Alcohols: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaranayake, Wickramasinghe M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes experiments which can be completed in five four-hour laboratory sessions, including two synthesis (alpha-phenylbutyric and alpha-phenylbutyric acid anhydride) and determining the absolute stereochemistry of secondary alcohols using the synthetic products. (JN)

  16. Determination of the absolute configuration of (+) - surinamensin's via diastereomeric O-methylmandelic esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L. da S.; Barata, L.E.S.

    1990-01-01

    The absolute configurarion of (+) surinamensin, a 8.0.4' neolignan, has been determined based on its O-methymandalates esters. Nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared and mass spectroscopy analysis are presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  17. Quantification of silane molecules on oxidized silicon: are there options for a traceable and absolute determination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, P M; Streeck, C; Glamsch, S; Ehlert, C; Lippitz, A; Nutsch, A; Kulak, N; Beckhoff, B; Unger, W E S

    2015-10-06

    Organosilanes are used routinely to functionalize various support materials for further modifications. Nevertheless, reliable quantitative information about surface functional group densities after layer formation is rarely available. Here, we present the analysis of thin organic nanolayers made from nitrogen containing silane molecules on naturally oxidized silicon wafers with reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An areic density of 2-4 silane molecules per nm(2) was calculated from the layer's nitrogen mass deposition per area unit obtained by reference-free TXRF. Complementary energy and angle-resolved XPS (ER/AR-XPS) in the Si 2p core-level region was used to analyze the outermost surface region of the organic (silane layer)-inorganic (silicon wafer) interface. Different coexisting silicon species as silicon, native silicon oxide, and silane were identified and quantified. As a result of the presented proof-of-concept, absolute and traceable values for the areic density of silanes containing nitrogen as intrinsic marker are obtained by calibration of the XPS methods with reference-free TXRF. Furthermore, ER/AR-XPS is shown to facilitate the determination of areic densities in (mono)layers made from silanes having no heteroatomic marker other than silicon. After calibration with reference-free TXRF, these areic densities of silane molecules can be determined when using the XPS component intensity of the silane's silicon atom.

  18. On determining absolute entropy without quantum theory or the third law of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    We employ classical thermodynamics to gain information about absolute entropy, without recourse to statistical methods, quantum mechanics or the third law of thermodynamics. The Gibbs-Duhem equation yields various simple methods to determine the absolute entropy of a fluid. We also study the entropy of an ideal gas and the ionization of a plasma in thermal equilibrium. A single measurement of the degree of ionization can be used to determine an unknown constant in the entropy equation, and thus determine the absolute entropy of a gas. It follows from all these examples that the value of entropy at absolute zero temperature does not need to be assigned by postulate, but can be deduced empirically.

  19. Improvement Of The Absolute Activity Determination Technique Of '125I In The Thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelled, O.; German, U.; Alfassi, Z.

    1999-01-01

    A method for absolute determination of the activity of a 125 I source based on the counting rate values of the 27 keV photons and the 54 keV coincidence photo-peak is given in the literature. We had shown in previous works, that this method, within certain limitations, diminishes the geometry dependence of the activity determination for 125 I sources and for measuring the uptake of 125 I in human thyroid. In the present work we present a farther improvement of the accuracy of the absolute determination method

  20. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with dimethyl sulfide and episulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Timmons, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    It is pointed out that the investigated reaction of oxygen with dimethyl sulfide may play an important role in photochemical smog formation and in the chemical evolution of dense interstellar clouds. Kinetic data were obtained with the aid of the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence method. The photodecomposition of molecular oxygen provided the oxygen atoms for the experiments. The decay of atomic oxygen was studied on the basis of resonance fluorescence observations. Both reactions investigated were found to be fast processes. A negative temperature dependence of the rate constants for reactions with dimethyl sulfide was observed.

  1. Determination of the absolute configuration of monosaccharides in complex carbohydrates by capillary G.L.C.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Gerwig, G.J.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The absolute configuration of neutral monosaccharides, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy sugars, and uronic acids can be determined by capillary g.l.c. on SE-30 after glycosidation with (-)-2-butanol and protection of the remaining polar groups. The method is illustrated by application to mixtures of the

  2. Fast, Computer Supported Experimental Determination of Absolute Zero Temperature at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast experimental method of determining absolute zero temperature is presented. Air gas thermometer coupled with pressure sensor and data acquisition system COACH is applied in a wide range of temperature. By constructing a pressure vs temperature plot for air under constant volume it is possible to obtain--by extrapolation to zero…

  3. Absolute ground-state nitrogen atom density in a N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} late afterglow: TALIF experiments and modelling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es-sebbar, Et; C-Gazeau, M; Benilan, Y; Jolly, A [LISA, Universites Paris-Est Creteil Val de Marne (UPEC) and Paris Denis Diderot, CNRS-UMR 7583, 61, avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil Cedex (France); Pintassilgo, C D, E-mail: essebbar@lisa.univ-paris12.f [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-08-25

    Following a first study on a late afterglow in flowing pure nitrogen post discharge, we report new two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of the absolute ground-state atomic nitrogen density N({sup 4}S) and investigate the influence of methane introduced downstream from the discharge by varying the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio from 0% up to 50%. The N ({sup 4}S) maximum density is about 2.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} in pure N{sub 2} for a residence time of 22 ms and does not change significantly for methane mixing ratio up to {approx}15%, while above, a drastic decrease is observed. The influence of the residence time has been studied. A kinetic model has been developed to determine the elementary processes responsible for the evolution of the N ({sup 4}S) density in N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} late afterglow. This model shows the same decrease as the experimental results even though absolute density values are always larger by about a factor of 3. In the late afterglow three-body recombination dominates the loss of N ({sup 4}S) atoms whatever the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio. For high CH{sub 4} mixing ratio, the destruction process through collisions with CH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}CN and NH becomes important and is responsible for the observed decrease of the N ({sup 4}S) density.

  4. "Marking" the nitrogen atoms of phenyl-(2-pyridyl)-(3-pyridyl)-(4-pyridyl)-methane. Synthesis and absolute configuration of the corresponding tris(pyridine N-oxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kouzou; Miki, Kaori; Inagaki, Takuya; Nehira, Tatsuo; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Hirao, Yasukazu; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Kawase, Takeshi; Kubo, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    To "mark" the nitrogen atoms in phenyl-(2-pyridyl)-(3-pyridyl)-(4-pyridyl)methane (1), we have synthesized the corresponding tris(pyridine N-oxide) 2 by oxidation of 1 with m-chloroperbenzoic acid. The nitrogen atoms of 2 are unequivocally determined by the X-ray crystal analysis of a single crystal of rac-2 whereas the nitrogen atoms cannot be assigned at all in the case of rac-1. N-Oxide 2 can be resolved by chiral high-performance liquid chromatography under similar conditions to those used for the resolution of 1. The calculated circular dichroism (CD) curve for (R)-2 on the basis of time-dependent density functional theory reproduces the experimental spectra very well to suggest that the second-eluted fraction ([CD(+)283]-2) is the R isomer, namely (R)-[CD(+)283]-2. The independent absolute configuration determinations for 1 and 2 are in keeping with the chemical correlation between the two compounds by oxidation of (R)-1 into (R)-2. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Determination of hafnium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Isao; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Keihei.

    1977-01-01

    Optimum conditions for atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of hafnium were investigated by use of a Jarrel-Ash AA-1 instrument which was equipped with a premixed gas burner slotted 50 mm in length and 0.4 mm in width. Absorption of hafnium, which was atomized in an nitrous oxide-acetylene flame, was measured on a resonance line at 307.29 nm. The absorption due to hafnium was enhanced in the presence of ammonium fluoride and iron(III) ion, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, depending on their concentration. The highest absorption was attained by the addition of (0.15 -- 0.3)M ammonium fluoride, 0.07 M of iron(III) ion and 0.05 M of hydrochloric acid. An excess of the additives decreased the absorption. The presence of zirconium, which caused a significant interference in the ordinary analytical methods, did not affect the absorption due to hafnium, if the zirconium concentration is less than 0.2 M. A standard procedure was proposed; A sample containing a few mg of hafnium was dissolved in a 25-ml volumetric flask, and ammonium fluoride, ferric nitrate and hydrochloric acid were added so that the final concentrations were 0.3, 0.07 and 0.05 M, respectively. Atomic absorption was measured on the aqueous solution in a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame and the hafnium content was calculated from the absorbance. Sensitivity was as high as 12.5 μg of Hf/ml/l% absorption. The present method is especially recommendable to the direct determination of hafnium in samples containing zirconium. (auth.)

  6. Direct Determination of Nonmetals in Solution with Atomic Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, David A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Addresses solution nonmetal determinations on a fundamental level. Characterizes research in this area of chemical instrumentation. Discusses the fundamental limitations of nonmetal atomic spectrometry, the status of nonmetals and atomic spectroscopic techniques, and current directions in solution nonmetal determinations. (CW)

  7. Determination of the Absolute Disintegration Rate of Cs-137 sources by the Tracer Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, S.; Brune, D.

    1963-07-01

    137 Cs - sources were absolutely measured by the 'tracer method', with 82 Br as a tracer nuclide and with application of the 4π β-γ coincidence technique. A self-absorption of 6 % was found in sources obtained from a solution with a carrier-content of 400 μg/ml. The precision of the method for the determination of the β-emission rate was estimated to ± 1 %. The results were compared with those of other works

  8. Absolute determination of radiation bursts and of proportional counters space charge effect through the influence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, I.J.; Mayer, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    When proportional counters are employed in charge integration mode to determine the magnitude of a radiation pulse, so intense that individual detection events take place in a time too short to produce individual output pulses, mostly in pulsed neutron sources, the strong build-up of positive space charge reduces the electric multiplication factor of the proportional detector. Under such conditions the ensuing measurement underestimates the amount of radiation that interacted with the detector. If the geometric characteristics, the filling gas pressure and the voltage applied to that detector are known, it becomes possible to apply an analytical correction method to the measurement. In this article we present a method that allows to determine the absolute value of the detected radiation burst without the need to know the characteristics of the employed detectors. It is necessary to employ more than one detector, taking advantage of the Influence Method. The “Influence Method” is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1,2]). Its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016 [3]) and the extension for multiple detectors in (Rios and Mayer 2016 [4]). - Highlights: • Absolute determination of radiation burst. • Proportional counters space charge effect. • Radiation measurements on pulsed devices.

  9. Determination of Absolute Configuration of Secondary Alcohols Using Thin-Layer Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alexander J.; Rychnovsky, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    A new implementation of the Competing Enantioselective Conversion (CEC) method was developed to qualitatively determine the absolute configuration of enantioenriched secondary alcohols using thin-layer chromatography. The entire process for the method requires approximately 60 min and utilizes micromole quantities of the secondary alcohol being tested. A number of synthetically relevant secondary alcohols are presented. Additionally, 1H NMR spectroscopy was conducted on all samples to provide evidence of reaction conversion that supports the qualitative method presented herein. PMID:23593963

  10. Determination of local absolute detection efficiency of a ceratron with 55Fe Auger electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, C.; Sugiyama, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1983-01-01

    The local absolute detection efficiency of a Ceratron (channel electron multiplier made of ceramics) was determined with collimated Mn K Auger electrons ( 5 keV) emitted from 55 Fe as a function of electron incident position and applied voltage. The local efficiency at the channel inlet did not depend so much on the applied voltage. The efficiency at the funnel increased with the applied voltage, while it was always lower than that at the channel inlet. (orig.)

  11. Absolute rate constant, kinetic isotope effect, and mechanism of the reaction of ethylene oxide with oxygen(3P) atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, D.J.; Hand, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of ethylene oxide with O( 3 P) atoms has been investigated in detail using a discharge flow system with mass spectrometric and photometric detection. Absolute measurements of the rate constant, kinetic isotope effect, and stoichiometry have been made. The overall stoichiometry is 3 +- 1 oxygen atoms consumed per ethylene oxide molecule. Arrhenius parameters for the reaction of C 2 H 4 O with O are A = 10/sup (9.28+-0.08)/ L mol -1 s -1 and E = 5250 +- 150 cal mol -1 over the temperature range 298 to 691 0 K, and Arrhenius parameters for the kinetic isotope effect are A/sub H//A/sub D/ = 0.9 +- 0.20 and E/sub D/--E/sub H/ = 1460 +- 230 cal mol -1 , over the temperature range 482 to 691 0 K. The magnitude of the preexponential factor and the temperature dependence of the isotope effect establish that hydrogen abstraction, rather than insertion to form a dioxetane intermediate, is the sole reactive channel for ethylene oxide plus O( 3 P). The Arrhenius parameters are discussed and compared to other hydrogen abstraction reactions of O( 3 P). Comparison is also made to the reactions of O( 3 P) with other strained three-membered ring compounds. The final products H 2 , H 2 O, HCHO, CO, and CO 2 were identified, and a mechanism is proposed to account for their formation from the radical products of the initial step

  12. Accurate measurement of the optical activity of alanine crystals and the determination of their absolute chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Terasawa, Yukana; Tanaka, Masahito; Asahi, Toru

    2017-05-01

    Wavelength dependence measurements of the chiroptical properties in alanine crystals have so far been unsuccessful using conventional spectroscopic techniques. We describe our attempts to measure the wavelength dependence of the optical activity in L- and D-alanine crystals along each crystallographic axis, and to determine the absolute chirality of alanine crystals by correlating the absolute structure to the optical activity using an x-ray diffractometer and a generalized high accuracy universal polarimeter. We have succeeded in accurately measuring the optical rotatory dispersion in the direction, which shows that the optical rotation of the D-alanine crystal is dextrorotatory and that of the L-alanine crystal is laevorotatory, thereby determining the absolute chirality. Furthermore, comparison with the optical activity in solution shows that the optical activity in alanine crystals is different not only in value, but also in the sign. These results have led us to conclude that the optical rotatory power in the crystalline state should not be simply the summation of molecular optical rotatory power values. We propose the necessity of a theory, which contains the contribution of molecular interactions within the crystal, in order to calculate the optical rotatory power of the crystalline state.

  13. Absolute determination of the temperature-dependent penetration depth in superconducting V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, D.K.; Sekula, S.T.; Kerchner, H.R.; Chang, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature-dependent penetration depth lambda(T) is the fundamental length that describes the spatial variation of a static magnetic field within a superconductor, including the field decay from the core of an isolated flux line (FL) in a type-II superconductor in the mixed state. The penetration depth has been the subject of extensive investigation in a number of superconducting pure materials and alloys. Few experimental techniques enable an absolute determination of lambda; usually one may obtain only relative changes with temperature. The authors have shown that for an extreme (high-kappa) type-II superconductor, such as V 3 Si, it is possible to measure lambda(T) absolutely from the low-field flux-line lattice (FLL) form factor F/sub hk/, which is extracted from the intensity of neutrons diffracted at small angles from the FLL. Since this technique provides an absolute determination, it enables a direct comparison to the predictions of microscopic theory. Here the authors compare the observed lambda to the BCS theory and its modifications due to many-body effects

  14. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained.

  15. Method for determining the absolute number concentration of nanoparticles from electrospray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingdong; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zangmeister, Rebecca; Tarlov, Michael J; Zachariah, Michael R

    2011-12-20

    We have developed a simple, fast, and accurate method to measure the absolute number concentration of nanoparticles in solution. The method combines electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) with a statistical analysis of droplet-induced oligomer formation. A key feature of the method is that it allows determination of the absolute number concentration of particles by knowing only the droplet size generated from a particular ES source, thereby eliminating the need for sample-specific calibration standards or detailed analysis of transport losses. The approach was validated by comparing the total number concentration of monodispersed Au nanoparticles determined by ES-DMA with UV/vis measurements. We also show that this approach is valid for protein molecules by quantifying the absolute number concentration of Rituxan monoclonal antibody in solution. The methodology is applicable for quantification of any electrospray process coupled to an analytical tool that can distinguish monomers from higher order oligomers. The only requirement is that the droplet size distribution be evaluated. For users only interested in implementation of the theory, we provide a section that summarizes the relevant formulas. This method eliminates the need for sample-specific calibration standards or detailed analysis of transport losses. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Ultraviolet photochemistry of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-dienes: laser spectroscopic absolute hydrogen atom quantum yield and translational energy distribution measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, A; Volpp, H-R; Sharma, P; Mittal, J P; Vatsa, R K

    2010-07-14

    Using pulsed H-atom Lyman-alpha laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy along with a photolytic calibration approach, absolute H-atom product quantum yields of phi(H-b13d) = (0.32+/-0.04) and phi(H-b12d) = (0.36+/-0.04) were measured under collision-free conditions for the 193 nm gas-phase laser flash photolysis of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene at room temperature, which demonstrate that nascent H-atom formation is of comparable importance for both parent molecules. Comparison of the available energy fraction, f(T-b13d) = (0.22+/-0.03) and f(T-b12d) = (0.13+/-0.01), released as H+C(4)H(5) product translational energy with results of impulsive and statistical energy partitioning modeling calculations indicates that for both, buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene, H-atom formation is preceded by internal conversion to the respective electronic ground state (S(0)) potential energy surfaces. In addition, values of sigma(b-1,3-d-L alpha) = (3.5+/-0.2)x10(-17) cm(2) and sigma(b-1,2-d-L alpha) = (4.4+/-0.2)x10(-17) cm(2) for the previously unknown Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm) radiation photoabsorption cross sections of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene in the gas-phase were determined.

  17. Absolute determination of zero-energy phase shifts for multiparticle single-channel scattering: Generalized Levinson theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1996-01-01

    Levinson close-quote s theorem relates the zero-energy phase shift δ for potential scattering in a given partial wave l, by a spherically symmetric potential that falls off sufficiently rapidly, to the number of bound states of that l supported by the potential. An extension of this theorem is presented that applies to single-channel scattering by a compound system initially in its ground state. As suggested by Swan [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 228, 10 (1955)], the extended theorem differs from that derived for potential scattering; even in the absence of composite bound states δ may differ from zero as a consequence of the Pauli principle. The derivation given here is based on the introduction of a continuous auxiliary open-quote open-quote length phase close-quote close-quote η, defined modulo π for l=0 by expressing the scattering length as A=acotη, where a is a characteristic length of the target. Application of the minimum principle for the scattering length determines the branch of the cotangent curve on which η lies and, by relating η to δ, an absolute determination of δ is made. The theorem is applicable, in principle, to single-channel scattering in any partial wave for e ± -atom and nucleon-nucleus systems. In addition to a knowledge of the number of composite bound states, information (which can be rather incomplete) concerning the structure of the target ground-state wave function is required for an explicit, absolute, determination of the phase shift δ. As for Levinson close-quote s original theorem for potential scattering, no additional information concerning the scattering wave function or scattering dynamics is required. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. a Chiral Tagging Strategy for Determining Absolute Configuration and Enantiomeric Excess by Molecular Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther; Patterson, David; Thomas, Javix; Xu, Yunjie; West, Channing; Pate, Brooks

    2017-06-01

    The introduction of three wave mixing rotational spectroscopy by Patterson, Schnell, and Doyle [1,2] has expanded applications of molecular rotational spectroscopy into the field of chiral analysis. Chiral analysis of a molecule is the quantitative measurement of the relative abundances of all stereoisomers of the molecule and these include both diastereomers (with distinct molecular rotational spectra) and enantiomers (with equivalent molecular rotational spectra). This work adapts a common strategy in chiral analysis of enantiomers to molecular rotational spectroscopy. A "chiral tag" is attached to the molecule of interest by making a weakly bound complex in a pulsed jet expansion. When this tag molecule is enantiopure, it will create diastereomeric complexes with the two enantiomers of the molecule being analyzed and these can be differentiated by molecule rotational spectroscopy. Identifying the structure of this complex, with knowledge of the absolute configuration of the tag, establishes the absolute configuration of the molecule of interest. Furthermore, the diastereomer complex spectra can be used to determine the enantiomeric excess of the sample. The ability to perform chiral analysis will be illustrated by a study of solketal using propylene oxide as the tag. The possibility of using current methods of quantum chemistry to assign a specific structure to the chiral tag complex will be discussed. Finally, chiral tag rotational spectroscopy offers a "gold standard" method for determining the absolute configuration of the molecule through determination of the substitution structure of the complex. When this measurement is possible, rotational spectroscopy can deliver a quantitative three dimensional structure of the molecule with correct stereochemistry as the analysis output. [1] David Patterson, Melanie Schnell, John M. Doyle, Nature 497, 475 (2013). [2] David Patterson, John M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 023008 (2013).

  19. Research on determine the absolute neutron output of distributed pulse generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bojun; Tang Zhangkui; Wang Dong; Yang Gaozhao; Peng Taiping

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine the absolute neutron output of distributed pulse generators, we deduced equivalent length to deal with experimental data, according to the different layout and weighting of multiple pulse generators. The deposited energy in scintillation crystal and the integral flux which drilling through crystal interface was simulated by MCNP code. The result shows the simulated proportion of different distributed pulse generators is approximately agreed with experimental data. The validity of the equivalent length model was proved by the consistent results between calculation and experimental data. (authors)

  20. Determination of the absolute activity by the coincidences 4πβ-γ method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urcelay Silva, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The 4π beta-gamma coincidence method for absolute determination of activities is extremely important in the production of high-precision radioactive sources. By means of this method it is possible to obtain absolute measurements of decay to within 0.1%. Thanks to the high efficiency of the 4π counter, most of the corrections required - background, random coincidences, dead time, decay scheme and detector efficiency - are small. The paper describes the experimental set-up showing the pulses in the two branches of the system, together with the conditions under which the 4πbeta flux detector functions. To determine whether the system was functioning satisfactorily, the activity of four cobalt-60 standards (supplied by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures based at Sevres in France) was determined and the differences obtained were less than 0.5% with respect to the certificates accompanying the sources. Alterations to the flux detector are suggested so that higher accuracy may be obtained. (author)

  1. Experimental determination of the absolute infrared absorption intensities of formyl radical HCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Tyurin, Daniil A; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2017-12-05

    Formyl radical HCO is an important reactive intermediate in combustion, atmospheric and extraterrestrial chemistry. Like in the case of other transients, the lack of knowledge of the absolute IR intensities limits the quantitative spectroscopic studies on this species. We report the first experimental determination of the absorption intensities for the fundamental vibrational bands of HCO. The measurements have been performed using matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy. Determination of the values was based on the repeated photodissociation and thermal recovery of the HCO radical using the known value of the absorption coefficient of CO. The experimentally determined values (93.2±6.0, 67.2±4.5, and 109.2±6.6kmmol -1 for the ν 1 , ν 2 , and ν 3 modes, respectively) have been compared to the calculated IR intensities obtained by DFT and UCCSD(T) computations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultratrace determination of lead in whole blood using electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, E P; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1996-09-15

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence has been used to detect lead that was electrothermally atomized from whole blood in a graphite furnace. A 9 kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser pumped dye laser was used to excite the lead at 283.3 nm, and the resulting atomic fluorescence was detected at 405.8 nm. No matrix modification was used other than a 1:21 dilution of the whole blood with high-purity water. Using the atomic fluorescence peak area as the analytical measure and a background correction technique based upon a simultaneous measurement of the transmitted laser intensity, excellent agreement for NIST and CDC certified whole blood reference samples was obtained with aqueous standards. A limit of detection in blood of 10 fg/mL (100 ag absolute) was achieved.

  3. Determination of Atomic Data Pertinent to the Fusion Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reader, J.

    2013-06-11

    We summarize progress that has been made on the determination of atomic data pertinent to the fusion energy program. Work is reported on the identification of spectral lines of impurity ions, spectroscopic data assessment and compilations, expansion and upgrade of the NIST atomic databases, collision and spectroscopy experiments with highly charged ions on EBIT, and atomic structure calculations and modeling of plasma spectra.

  4. A novel setup for the determination of absolute cross sections for low-energy electron induced strand breaks in oligonucleotides - The effect of the radiosensitizer 5-fluorouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rackwitz, J.; Rankovic, M.L.; Milosavljevic, A.R.; Bald, I.

    2017-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in DNA radiation damage. Here we present a method to quantify LEE induced strand breakage in well-defined oligonucleotide single strands in terms of absolute cross sections. An LEE irradiation setup covering electron energies <500 eV is constructed and optimized to irradiate DNA origami triangles carrying well-defined oligonucleotide target strands. Measurements are presented for 10.0 and 5.5 eV for different oligonucleotide targets. The determination of absolute strand break cross sections is performed by atomic force microscopy analysis. An accurate fluence determination ensures small margins of error of the determined absolute single strand break cross sections σ_S_S_B. In this way, the influence of sequence modification with the radiosensitive 5-Fluorouracil ("5"FU) is studied using an absolute and relative data analysis. We demonstrate an increase in the strand break yields of "5"FU containing oligonucleotides by a factor of 1.5 to 1.6 compared with non-modified oligonucleotide sequences when irradiated with 10 eV electrons. (authors)

  5. Counting the Photons: Determining the Absolute Storage Capacity of Persistent Phosphors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Van der Heggen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a persistent phosphor is often determined by comparing luminance decay curves, expressed in cd/m 2 . However, these photometric units do not enable a straightforward, objective comparison between different phosphors in terms of the total number of emitted photons, as these units are dependent on the emission spectrum of the phosphor. This may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding the storage capacity of the phosphor. An alternative and convenient technique of characterizing the performance of a phosphor was developed on the basis of the absolute storage capacity of phosphors. In this technique, the phosphor is incorporated in a transparent polymer and the measured afterglow is converted into an absolute number of emitted photons, effectively quantifying the amount of energy that can be stored in the material. This method was applied to the benchmark phosphor SrAl 2 O 4 :Eu,Dy and to the nano-sized phosphor CaS:Eu. The results indicated that only a fraction of the Eu ions (around 1.6% in the case of SrAl 2 O 4 :Eu,Dy participated in the energy storage process, which is in line with earlier reports based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These findings imply that there is still a significant margin for improving the storage capacity of persistent phosphors.

  6. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N 2 /O 2 (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 ± 0.7)×10 20 m −3 was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 ± 0.4)×10 19 m −3 at 0.1 vol. %

  7. Determination of Absolute Plate Spacing for the Fabry-Perot Subassembly of the Thermosphere Imager for Global Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We will rad test a commercial Capacitive to Digital Converter for potential use in geostationary orbit, develop an algorithm to determine absolute spacing using a...

  8. Determination of boron in natural waters using atomic-absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usenko, S.I.; Prorok, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    A method of direct determination of boron in natural waters using atomic-absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was developed. Concomitant elements Si, K, Mg, Na, present in natural waters in the concentration of 0.05-100 mg/cv 3 , do not produce effect on the value of boron atomic absorption. Boron determination limit constituted 0.02 mg/cm 3 for 25 ml of solution introduced

  9. A 170Tm gamma scattering technique for the determination of absolute bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkonen, H; Karjalainen, P

    1975-07-01

    A new technique for the determination of absolute bone density is described. The procedure is based on the measurement of both transmitted and scattered photons emitted from a 650 mCi radioisotope source of 170Tm in a narrow beam geometry. The method takes into consideration the change in the effective Z/A as a function of bone density which is due to the changing of the elementary composition of bone when bone material is resorbed. The experimental results show that the density of homogeneous materials can be measured with a reproducibility of 2 per cent. The bone density values for the 24 bone specimens measured by the new method show a good correlation (r=0 with 94) with results obtained by application of Archimedes' principle.

  10. Determination of atomic cluster structure with cluster fusion algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters.......We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters....

  11. Determination of the absolute second-order rate constant for the reaction Na + O3 → NaO + O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, David; Marshall, Paul; Plane, J.M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute second-order rate constant for the reaction Na + O 3 -> NaO + O 2 (k 1 ) has been determined by time-resolved atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy at lambda = 589 nm [Na(3 2 Psub(j)) 2 Ssub(1/2))] following pulsed irradiation, coupled with monitoring of O 3 by light absorption in the ultra-violet; this yields k 1 (500 K) = 4(+4,-2) x 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , resolving large differences for various estimates of this important quantity used in modelling the sodium layer in the mesosphere. (author)

  12. Absolute Lymphocyte Count Is Not a Suitable Alternative to CD4 Count for Determining Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Fiji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashika A. Balak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An absolute lymphocyte count is commonly used as an alternative to a CD4 count to determine initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected individuals in Fiji when a CD4 count is unavailable. Methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of laboratory results of HIV-infected individuals registered at all HIV clinics in Fiji. Results. Paired absolute lymphocyte and CD4 counts were available for 101 HIV-infected individuals, and 96% had a CD4 count of ≤500 cells/mm3. Correlation between the counts in individuals was poor (Spearman rank correlation r=0.5. No absolute lymphocyte count could be determined in this population as a suitable surrogate for a CD4 count of either 350 cells/mm3 or 500 cells/mm3. The currently used absolute lymphocyte count of ≤2300 cells/μL had a positive predictive value of 87% but a negative predictive value of only 17% for a CD4 of ≤350 cells/mm3 and if used as a surrogate for a CD4 of ≤500 cells/mm3 it would result in all HIV-infected individuals receiving ART including those not yet eligible. Weight, CD4 count, and absolute lymphocyte count increased significantly at 3 months following ART initiation. Conclusions. Our findings do not support the use of absolute lymphocyte count to determine antiretroviral therapy initiation in Fiji.

  13. Atomic Homogeneity: A semantic strategy for the determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existence of a particular semantic agreement strategy, what I will here call Atomic Homogeneity, has been argued to determine plurality in complex noun phrases. If the denotational properties of a complex noun phrase can be distributed to its smallest, atomic subset then plural agreement is the result. This paper ...

  14. Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Choi, Sangkook; Jin, Chenhao; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Kim, Jihoon; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2014-05-27

    Optical absorption is the most fundamental optical property characterizing light-matter interactions in materials and can be most readily compared with theoretical predictions. However, determination of optical absorption cross-section of individual nanostructures is experimentally challenging due to the small extinction signal using conventional transmission measurements. Recently, dramatic increase of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-based homodyne microscope, where the scattered light wave from the nanostructure interferes with the optimized reference signal (the reflected/transmitted light). Here we demonstrate high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization-based homodyne technique with broadband supercontinuum excitation in transmission configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that high-throughput and quantitative determination of nanotube absorption cross-section over broad spectral range at the single-tube level was performed for more than 50 individual chirality-defined single-walled nanotubes. Our data reveal chirality-dependent behaviors of exciton resonances in carbon nanotubes, where the exciton oscillator strength exhibits a universal scaling law with the nanotube diameter and the transition order. The exciton linewidth (characterizing the exciton lifetime) varies strongly in different nanotubes, and on average it increases linearly with the transition energy. In addition, we establish an empirical formula by extrapolating our data to predict the absorption cross-section spectrum for any given nanotube. The quantitative information of absorption cross-section in a broad spectral range and all nanotube species not only provides new insight into the unique photophysics in one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, but also enables absolute determination of optical quantum efficiencies in important

  15. Determination of absolute expression profiles using multiplexed miRNA analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunke Song

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of miRNA expression is critical to understanding their role in gene expression as well as their application as disease biomarkers. Correct identification of changes in miRNA expression rests on reliable normalization to account for biological and technological variance between samples. Ligo-miR is a multiplex assay designed to rapidly measure absolute miRNA copy numbers, thus reducing dependence on biological controls. It uses a simple 2-step ligation process to generate length coded products that can be quantified using a variety of DNA sizing methods. We demonstrate Ligo-miR's ability to quantify miRNA expression down to 20 copies per cell sensitivity, accurately discriminate between closely related miRNA, and reliably measure differential changes as small as 1.2-fold. Then, benchmarking studies were performed to show the high correlation between Ligo-miR, microarray, and TaqMan qRT-PCR. Finally, Ligo-miR was used to determine copy number profiles in a number of breast, esophageal, and pancreatic cell lines and to demonstrate the utility of copy number analysis for providing layered insight into expression profile changes.

  16. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span of the K2 light curve. We achieve a precision of around 22% for the radii of the star and the transiting planets, between 40% and 60% for their masses, and between 1.5% and 38% for their densities. All values agree with previously reported measurements. When theoretical stellar models are included, the system parameters are determined with a precision that exceeds that achieved by previous studies, thanks to the self-consistent modelling of light curve and radial velocity data.

  17. Determination of mercury in microwave-digested soil by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, S T; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1994-12-01

    A sample digestion procedure was developed which employs microwave heating of soil and sediment in concentrated nitric acid in a high-pressure closed vessel. Complete dissolution of mercury into the sample solution occurs within 5 min at 59 W/vessel without loss of analyte through overpressurization. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (LEAFS-ETA) was used as the detection method. The scheme uses a two-step excitation, with lambda(1) = 253.7 nm and lambda(2) = 435.8 nm. Direct line fluorescence was measured at 546.2 nm. The absolute instrumental limit of detection was 14 fg; 1.4 pg/ml with a 10 mul sample injection. The recoveries of mercury in two spiked samples were 94 and 98%. The SRM 8406 (Mercury in River Sediment) was digested and analyzed for mercury, and the results (58.4 +/- 1.8 ng/g) agreed well with the reference value of 60 ng/g. The results obtained by LEAFS-ETA with microwave sample digestion are in good agreement with those found by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with EPA Series Method 245.5 sample digestion, which is one of the most commonly used methods for the determination of mercury in soil.

  18. Non-invasive determination of absolute lung resistivity in adults using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jie; Patterson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Lung resistivity is a physiological parameter that describes the electrical characteristics of the lungs. Lung composition changes due to changes in the lung tissues, fluid and air volume. Various diseases that can cause a change in lung composition may be monitored by measuring lung resistivity. Currently, there is no accepted non-invasive method to measure lung resistivity. In this study, we presented a method and framework to non-invasively determine lung resistivity using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). By comparing actual measurements from subjects with data from a 3D human thorax model, an EIT image can be reconstructed to show a resistivity difference between the model and the subject. By adjusting the lung resistivity in the model, the resistivity difference in the lung regions can be reduced to near zero. This resistivity value then is the estimation of the lung resistivity of the subject. Using the proposed method, the lung resistivities of four normal adult males (43 ± 13 years, 78 ± 10 kg) in the supine position at air volumes starting at functional residual capacity (FRC—end expiration) and increasing in 0.5 l steps to 1.5 l were studied. The averaged lung resistivity changes 12.59%, from 1406 Ω cm to 1583 Ω cm, following the inspiration of 1.5 l air from FRC. The coefficients of variation (CV) of precision for the four subjects are less than 10%. The experiment was repeated five times at each air volume on a subject to test the reproducibility. The CVs are less than 3%. The results show that it is feasible to determine absolute lung resistivity using an EIT-based method

  19. Methodology for the Absolute Configuration Determination of Epoxythymols Using the Constituents of Ageratina glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreaga-González, Héctor M; Pardo-Novoa, Julio C; Del Río, Rosa E; Rodríguez-García, Gabriela; Torres-Valencia, J Martín; Manríquez-Torres, J Jesús; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; Gómez-Hurtado, Mario A

    2018-01-26

    A methodology to determine the enantiomeric excess and the absolute configuration (AC) of natural epoxythymols was developed and tested using five constituents of Ageratina glabrata. The methodology is based on enantiomeric purity determination employing 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL) as a chiral solvating agent combined with vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) measurements and calculations. The conformational searching included an extensive Monte Carlo protocol that considered the rotational barriers to cover the whole conformational spaces. (+)-(8S)-10-Benzoyloxy-6-hydroxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (1), (+)-(8S)-10-acetoxy-6-methoxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (4), and (+)-(8S)-10-benzoyloxy-6-methoxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (5) were isolated as enantiomerically pure constituents, while 10-isobutyryloxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (2) was obtained as a 75:25 (8S)/(8R) scalemic mixture. In the case of 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (3), the BINOL methodology revealed a 56:44 scalemic mixture and the VCD measurement was beyond the limit of sensitivity since the enantiomeric excess is only 12%. The racemization process of epoxythymol derivatives was studied using compound 1 and allowed the clarification of some stereochemical aspects of epoxythymol derivatives since their ACs have been scarcely analyzed and a particular behavior in their specific rotations was detected. In more than 30 oxygenated thymol derivatives, including some epoxythymols, the reported specific rotation values fluctuate from -1.6 to +1.4 passing through zero, suggesting the presence of scalemic and close to racemic mixtures, since enantiomerically pure natural constituents showed positive or negative specific rotations greater than 10 units.

  20. Experimental and theoretical determinations of the absolute ionization cross section of alkali metals by electron impact in the energy range from 100 to 2000 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalin, Rene

    1972-01-01

    The absolute electron impact ionization cross sections for the alkali metals in the energy range between 100 eV and 2000 eV were measured by the non-modulated crossed beam technique. The neutral beam of alkali atoms is produced by a Knudsen cell and crossed at right angles with the electron beam. The ions formed are collected on a plate and their intensity determined with a D.C. amplifier. The neutral beam is condensed on a cold trap cooled with liquid nitrogen, this temperature being much lower than that required to obtain total condensation. The amount of metal deposited is measured by the isotopic dilution technique and by atomic absorption, and the density of the atoms in the neutral beam is calculated. The total absolute ionization cross sections can then be determined. All possible errors have been carefully analyzed and their magnitudes estimated. The absolute ionization cross section for Li at an energy of 500 eV is: Q Li = 0,358 x 10 -16 cm 2 . This value is half of that obtained by Mac Farland and Kinney. The partial ionization cross sections for the singly and multiply charged ions is determined with a mass spectrometer attached to this apparatus. For the singly charged ions, the variation of the cross section with the energy of the ionizing electrons is in agreement with the optically allowed transition law: Q = A log BE/E. From the variation of Q with E, the squared matrix elements of the transition moment (|M i |) 2 are determined for all the elements studied. New calculations of the ionization cross section of Li and Na were performed in the framework of the Born-Bethe approximation as modified by Gaudin and Botter to take into account collisions with large momentum variation of the incident electron. Hartree-Fock type wave functions for the ground state atom (tabulated by Clementi) were used. The calculated values are in good agreement with our experimental results and with the former theoretical results calculated by various methods. This work also

  1. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method for the determination of trace amount of cadmium ion after preconcentration by extracting its dithizone complex into molten naphthalene was developed. Several experimental conditions such as pH of the solution, stirring time, the amounts of naphthalene, standing time and volume of the solution were optimized.

  2. Traceable Determination of the Absolute Neutron Emission Yields of UO2F2 Working Reference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFleur, A.M.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Mayo, D.R.; Sapp, B.A.; Croft, S.; Mayer, R.L.

    2013-06-01

    The nuclear material contained in the process equipment of a uranium enrichment plant (referred to as holdup) is an important component of the overall nuclear material inventory for the plant. Accurate quantification and verification of holdup is needed to improve international safeguards and nuclear material accountancy. This is also needed for criticality safety and waste disposition. Passive neutron and gamma-ray nondestructive assay (NDA) methods are used to measure the holdup in process equipment. A key advantage of neutron measurements is that neutrons are highly penetrating and can be measured through thick walled equipment. The dominant source of neutrons in the UO 2 F 2 holdup is from the 19 F(α, n) 22 Na reaction resulting from 234 U alpha decay when uranium is enriched. There is a considerable spread between different historic determinations of the 19 F(α, n) yield from uranium which limits the accuracy of modeling and the calibration of NDA instruments. Furthermore, the compound form and presence of water also significantly affects the neutron emission rate from the holdup. This paper describes a series of experimental measurements performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the absolute neutron emission yield from 10 different UO 2 F 2 working reference materials (WRMs) fabricated at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The Mini Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (Mini ENMC) and a NIST certified 252 Cf neutron source were used for these measurements. The high efficiency and short die-away time of the Mini ENMC provides the high measurement precision needed to certify the neutron emission yield. The experiment was designed to achieve sub 1% accuracy in the net counting rate on each item and to provide assurance that important factors such as instrument stability, item placement and background were well understood. The traceable neutron yields measured from the WRMs were used to determine a more accurate neutron yield

  3. DETERMINATION OF THE ABSOLUTE EXCITED-STATE DENSITY OF A SODIUM TARGET BY MEANS OF BEAM DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSEMA, WP; SCHLATMANN, AR; MORGENSTERN, R

    1994-01-01

    The average deflection of a laser excited, divergent sodium beam with a broad velocity distribution is measured by means of a Langmuir-Taylor detector and exploited for determining the absolute density of the excited state in the interaction area. Simulations of the excitation and deflection process

  4. Determination of the absolute binding free energies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-05-01

    The absolute binding free energy of an inhibitor to HIV-1 Protease (PR) was determined throughout evaluation of the non-bonded interaction energy difference between the two bound and unbound states of the inhibitor and surrounding molecules by the fast pulling of ligand (FPL) process using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The calculated free energy difference terms help clarifying the nature of the binding. Theoretical binding affinities are in good correlation with experimental data, with R = 0.89. The paradigm used is able to rank two inhibitors having the maximum difference of ∼1.5 kcal/mol in absolute binding free energies.

  5. Absolute determination of 75Se for international comparison of activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglicki, F.A.; Arenillas, P.A.; Furnari, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    An international intercomparison of absolute activity measurements of a solution of Se-75, organized by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, France, in 1992, has been carried out. The methodology and results are presented. Source preparation, experimental techniques and measurement system are described. (author). 2 refs

  6. Absolute activity determinations on large volume geological samples independent of self-absorption effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a method for measuring the absolute activity of large volume samples by γ-spectroscopy independent of self-absorption effects using Ge detectors. The method yields accurate matrix independent results at the expense of replicative counting of the unknown sample. (orig./HP)

  7. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Gerbaud, T.; Alper, B.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; de la Luna, E.; Sirinelli, A.; Zerbini, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron

  8. Absolute band structure determination on naturally occurring rutile with complex chemistry: Implications for mineral photocatalysis on both Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Yanzhang; Ding, Cong; Wu, Jing; Lu, Anhuai; Ding, Hongrui; Qin, Shan; Wang, Changqiu

    2018-05-01

    Rutile is the most common and stable form of TiO2 that ubiquitously existing on Earth and other terrestrial planets like Mars. Semiconducting mineral such as rutile-based photoredox reactions have been considered to play important roles in geological times. However, due to the inherent complexity in chemistry, the precision determination on band structure of natural rutile and the theoretical explanation on its solar-driven photochemistry have been hardly seen yet. Considering the multiple minor and trace elements in natural rutile, we firstly obtained the single-crystal crystallography, mineralogical composition and defects characteristic of the rutile sample by using both powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the band gap was accurately determined by synchrotron-based O K-edge X-ray absorption and emission spectra, which was firstly applied to natural rutile due to its robustness on compositions and defects. The absolute band edges of the rutile sample was calculated by considering the electronegativity of the atoms, band gap and point of zero charge. Besides, after detecting the defect energy levels by photoluminescence spectra, we drew the schematic band structure of natural rutile. The band gap (2.7 eV) of natural rutile was narrower than that of synthetic rutile (3.0 eV), and the conduction and valence band edges of natural rutile at pH = pHPZC were determined to be -0.04 V and 2.66 V (vs. NHE), respectively. The defect energy levels located at nearly the middle position of the forbidden band. Further, we used theoretical calculations to verify the isomorphous substitution of Fe and V for Ti gave rise to the distortion of TiO6 octahedron and created vacancy defects in natural rutile. Based on density functional theory, the narrowed band gap was interpreted to the contribution of Fe-3d and V-3d orbits, and the defect energy state was formed by hybridization of O-2p and Fe/V/Ti-3d

  9. Determination of microquantities of cesium in leaching tests by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crubellati, R.O.; Di Santo, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    An original method for cesium determinations by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization is described. The effect of foreign ions (alkali and earth alkaline metals) present in leaching test of glasses with incorporated radioactive wastes was studied. The effect of different mineral acids was also investigated. A comparison between the flame excitation method and the electrothermal atomization one was made. Under optimum conditions, cesium in quantities down to 700 ng in 1000 ml of sample could be determined. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.7 - 15 ng/mL. The fact that the proposed determinations can be performed in a short time and that a small sample volume is required are fundamental advantages of this method, compared with the flame excitation procedure. Besides, it is adaptable to be applied in hot cells and glove boxes. (Author) [es

  10. Direct atomic absorption determination of silicon in metallic niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinova, Eh.S.; Guzeev, I.D.; Nedler, V.V.; Khokhrin, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration is being given to realization of the basic advantage of non-flame atomizer-analysis of directly solid samples-for silicon determination in niobium for the content of the first one of less than 1x10 -3 mass %. Analysis technique is described. Diagrams of the dependences of atomic silicon absorption in graphite cells of usual type as well as lined by tungsten carbide and atomic silicon absorption on the value of niobium weighed amount are presented. It is shown that Si determination in metallic niobium according to aqueous reference solutions results in understatement of results 2.4 times. The optimal conditions for Si determination in niobium are the following: 2400 deg C temperature, absence of carbon and oxygen. Different niobium specimens with the known silicon content were used as reference samples

  11. Determination of collagen fibril size via absolute measurements of second-harmonic generation signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Aimé, Carole; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    The quantification of collagen fibril size is a major issue for the investigation of pathological disorders associated with structural defects of the extracellular matrix. Second-harmonic generation microscopy is a powerful technique to characterize the macromolecular organization of collagen in unstained biological tissues. Nevertheless, due to the complex coherent building of this nonlinear optical signal, it has never been used to measure fibril diameter so far. Here we report absolute measurements of second-harmonic signals from isolated fibrils down to 30 nm diameter, via implementation of correlative second-harmonic-electron microscopy. Moreover, using analytical and numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the high sensitivity of this technique originates from the parallel alignment of collagen triple helices within fibrils and the subsequent constructive interferences of second-harmonic radiations. Finally, we use these absolute measurements as a calibration for ex vivo quantification of fibril diameter in the Descemet’s membrane of a diabetic rat cornea.

  12. Using star tracks to determine the absolute pointing of the Fluorescence Detector telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Donato, Cinzia; Sanchez, Federico; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan; Santander, Marcos; Natl.Tech.U., San Rafael; Camin, Daniel; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan; Garcia, Beatriz; /Natl.; Grassi, Valerio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-05-01

    To accurately reconstruct a shower axis from the Fluorescence Detector data it is essential to establish with high precision the absolute pointing of the telescopes. To d that they calculate the absolute pointing of a telescope using sky background data acquired during regular data taking periods. The method is based on the knowledge of bright star's coordinates that provide a reliable and stable coordinate system. it can be used to check the absolute telescope's pointing and its long-term stability during the whole life of the project, estimated in 20 years. They have analyzed background data taken from January to October 2004 to determine the absolute pointing of the 12 telescopes installed both in Los Leones and Coihueco. The method is based on the determination of the mean-time of the variance signal left by a star traversing a PMT's photocathode which is compared with the mean-time obtained by simulating the track of that star on the same pixel.

  13. Determining the Absolute Configuration of Two Marine Compounds Using Vibrational Chiroptical Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hopmann, K. H.; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Novotná, J.; Stensen, W.; Urbanová, M.; Svenson, J.; Svendsen, J. S.; Bouř, Petr; Ruud, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 2 (2012), s. 858-869 ISSN 0022-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : vibrational circular dichroism * Raman optical activity * absolute configuration * bioprospecting Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.564, year: 2012

  14. Direct Determination of Absolute Configuration of Methyl-Substituted Phenyloxiranes: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Peter; Lassen, Peter Rygaard; Johannessen, Christian

    2006-01-01

    obtained from quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory with the B3LYP hybrid exchange correlation functional with 6-31++G**, aug-cc-pVDZ, or aug-cc-pVTZ basis set) and related to the physical structure of the compounds. The absolute configuration could be established directly in each case...... by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra. In addition, we have been able to document the changes that occur both in structures and in the VA and VCD spectra due to substituent effects on the oxirane ring....

  15. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    OpenAIRE

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span o...

  16. Sorghum cobalt analysis on not determined wave length with atomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-24

    Aug 24, 2011 ... right wave length for cobalt analysis with the atomic absorption spectrophotometer method. And this problem on wave length might exist also on the inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) method. The wave length generally employed for cobalt determination is. 240.7 nm (Shapiro and Martin, 1988) ...

  17. determination of vanadium in foods by atomic absorption spectrometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an assessment of the level of vanadium in foods (Plantain, Musa spp; Yam, Discorea rotundata; and Maize, Zea mays) from ten popular market places in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. Total acid leaching digestion method was employed and determination was by Flame Atomic Absorption ...

  18. The determination of zirconium by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, E.R.; Cunha, M.T.C. da

    1975-01-01

    The interference of iron in the determination of zirconium by atomic absorption spectrophotometry was studied. Attempts were made to emininate this interference by complexing the iron with EDTA, ascorbic acid and hydrazine; also by the addition of ammonium fluoride to the solution. Some experiments were carried out in order to explain the results obtained [pt

  19. Sorghum cobalt analysis on not determined wave length with atomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was to know the better wave length on measuring cobalt content in forage sorghum hybrid (Sorghum bicolor) with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The analysis was on background correction mode with three wave lengths; 240.8, 240.7 (determined wave length or recommended wave length) and 240.6 ...

  20. Effects of N2O and O2 addition to nitrogen Townsend dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure on the absolute ground-state atomic nitrogen density

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2012-11-27

    Absolute ground-state density of nitrogen atoms N (2p3 4S3/2) in non-equilibrium Townsend dielectric barrier discharges (TDBDs) at atmospheric pressure sustained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 gas mixtures has been measured using Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy. The quantitative measurements have been obtained by TALIF calibration using krypton as a reference gas. We previously reported that the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) atom density is around 3 × 1014 cm-3 in pure nitrogen TDBD, and that this maximum depends strongly on the mean energy dissipated in the gas. In the two gas mixtures studied here, results show that the absolute N (2p3 4S3/2) density is strongly affected by the N2O and O2 addition. Indeed, the density still increases exponentially with the energy dissipated in the gas but an increase in N2O and O2 amounts (a few hundreds of ppm) leads to a decrease in nitrogen atom density. No discrepancy in the order of magnitude of N (2p3 4S3/2) density is observed when comparing results obtained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 mixtures. Compared with pure nitrogen, for an energy of ∼90 mJ cm-3, the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) density drops by a factor of 3 when 100 ppm of N2O and O2 are added and it reduces by a factor of 5 for 200 ppm, to reach values close to our TALIF detection sensitivity for 400 ppm (1 × 1013 cm -3 at atmospheric pressure). © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Absolute configuration determination and convenient asymmetric synthesis of cis-3-(9-Anthryl)cyclohexanol with proline as a catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Jędrzej; Kwit, Marcin; Gawronski, Jacek

    2012-10-01

    cis-(3R)-(9-anthryl) derivative of cyclohexanol was conveniently obtained in enantiomerically pure form from 2-cyclohexenone using asymmetric Michael addition of anthrone catalyzed by l-proline in a key step. The absolute configuration of the addition product was unequivocally determined by means of electronic circular dichroism measurements combined with calculation of the circular dichroism spectrum by using a density functional theory method. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Determination of the Rb atomic number density in dense rubidium vapors by absorption measurements of Rb2 triplet bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Veza, Damir; Niemax, Kay; Vadla, Cedomil

    2008-01-01

    A simple and accurate way of determining atom number densities in dense rubidium vapors is presented. The method relies on the experimental finding that the reduced absorption coefficients of the Rb triplet satellite bands between 740 nm and 750 nm and the triplet diffuse band between 600 nm and 610 nm are not temperature dependent in the range between 600 K and 800 K. Therefore, the absolute values of the reduced absorption coefficients of these molecular bands can provide accurate information about atomic number density of the vapor. The rubidium absorption spectrum was measured by spatially resolved white-light absorption in overheated rubidium vapor generated in a heat pipe oven. The absolute values for the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet bands were determined at lower vapor densities, by using an accurate expression for the reduced absorption coefficient in the quasistatic wing of the Rb D1 line, and measured triplet satellite bands to the resonance wing optical depth ratio. These triplet satellite band data were used to calibrate in absolute scale the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet diffuse band at higher temperatures. The obtained values for the reduced absorption coefficient of these Rb molecular features can be used for accurate determination of rubidium atomic number densities in the range from about 5 x 10 16 cm -3 to 1 x 10 18 cm -3

  3. Absolute determination of deuterium content of heavy water standards by distillation and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurston, W.M.; James, M.W.D.

    1984-01-01

    An absolute method for heavy water standardization is described which is based on linear extrapolation to 100% D 2 O. The method uses a reflux column attached to a boiler containing the sample to be standardized. With the column operating at equilibrium under total reflux, samples from both the top and bottom of the column are converted to hydrogen and mass analyzed by use of an arbitrary D 2 O scale. To minimize mass spectrometer errors, the difference between top and bottom HD/total ion current is measured at the sample concentration and at several other slightly higher HD concentrations. The difference values vary linearly with the HDO concentration in the boiler. The linear relationship is extrapolated to zero HD difference as would be observed if 100% D 2 O were used. The extrapolated value on the arbitrary D 2 O scale is compared with 100% and any discrepancy represents an adjustment required to establish an absolute scale. The method has been tested at both the D 2 O and H 2 O ends of the range and has shown that the accuracy of the method is within the precision of 0.0006 mass % D 2 O. 8 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  4. Optical parameters Determination for absolute luminosity and total cross section measurements in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalier, Sophie

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) aims at measuring the absolute luminosity for the ATLAS experiment with an incertitude down to 2-3 \\% and the total elastic cross section. The luminosity is related to the number of events, the highest the luminosity, the highest the number of events. This is, then, an important quantity for colliders like LHC (Large Hadron Collider). LHC is made of two beams circulating in two different beam pipes and colliding at four interaction points where the four physics experiments are located (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE, LHCb). ALFA detectors inserted into Roman Pots (RPs), have been placed around ATLAS at 240 m distance from the collision point (IP1) after six quadrupoles magnets and two dipoles defining the ALFA beam line which is part of the LHC ring.The detectors are made of scintillating optics fibers to catch elastic protons generated at IP1. These protons are tracked through the LHC magnets beam line which needs to be optimized in terms of optics parameters. We call high β optics, ...

  5. Determination of the absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol by neutron and x-ray diffraction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, H S; Stevens, R C; Bau, R; Mosher, H S; Koetzle, T F

    1994-12-20

    The absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol, prepared by the reduction of 2,2-dimethylpropanal-1-d by actively fermenting yeast, has been determined to be S by neutron diffraction. The neutron study was carried out on the phthalate half ester of neopentyl-1-d alcohol, crystallized as its strychnine salt. The absolute configuration of the (-)-strychninium cation was first determined by an x-ray anomalous dispersion study of its iodide salt. The chiral skeleton of strychnine then served as a reference from which the absolute configuration of the -O-CHD-C(CH3)3 group of neopentyl phthalate was determined. Difference Fourier maps calculated from the neutron data showed unambiguously that the -O-CHD-C(CH3)3 groups of both independent molecules in the unit cell had the S configuration. This work proves conclusively that the yeast system reduces aldehydes by delivering hydrogen to the re face of the carbonyl group. Crystallographic details: (-)-strychninium (+)-neopentyl-1-d phthalate, space group P2(1) (monoclinic), a = 18.564(6) A, b = 7.713(2) A, c = 23.361(8) A, beta = 94.18(4) degrees, V = 3336.0(5) A3, Z = 2 (T = 100 K). Final agreement factors are R(F) = 0.073 for 2768 reflections collected at room temperature (x-ray analysis) and R(F) = 0.144 for 960 reflections collected at 100 K (neutron analysis).

  6. Absolute polarization determinations of 33 pulsars using the Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Megan M.; Demorest, Paul; Rankin, Joanna M.

    2015-11-01

    Absolute polarimetry observations of 33 pulsars were carried out with the Green Bank Telescope in the 1100-1900 MHz band using the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument. This group was selected to help complete a larger sample for which accurate proper-motion measurements were available. A combination of profile analysis using the core/double cone model and polarization-angle fitting methods were applied to estimate the `fiducial' longitude of the magnetic axis for each star and refer the linear polarization angle at that point to infinite frequency. As had been found previously, a number of the pulsars are found to have fiducial polarization directions that fall either along or at right angles to their proper-motion directions, whereas upwards of a third of the stars studied show alignments that are neither parallel nor orthogonal.

  7. Uranium determination using atomic spectrometric techniques: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Juracir S.; Teixeira, Leonardo S.G.; Santos, Walter N.L. dos; Lemos, Valfredo A.; Godoy, Jose M.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the determination of uranium using spectroanalytical techniques that are aimed at total determination such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES); and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) that also enables the determination of uranium isotopes. The advantages and shortcomings related to interferences, precision, accuracy, sample type and equipment employed in the analysis are taken into account, as well as the complexity and costs (i.e., acquisition, operation and maintenance) associated with each of the techniques. Strategies to improve their performance that employ separation and/or preconcentration steps are considered, with an emphasis given to solid-phase extraction because of its advantages compared to other preconcentration procedures.

  8. Determination of atomic number and composition of human enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, M.S.; Rodas Duran, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The teeth are organs of complicated structure that consist, partly, of hard tissue containing in its interior the dental pulp, rich in vases and nerves. The main mass of the tooth is constituted by the dentine, which is covered with hard tissues and of epithelial origin called enamel. The dentine of the human teeth used in this work were completely removed and the teeth were cut with a device with a diamond disc. In this work the chemical composition of the human enamel was determined, which showed a high percentage of Ca and P, in agreement with the results found in the literature. The effective atomic number of the material and the half-value layer in the energy range of diagnostic X-ray beams were determined. Teeth could be used to evaluated the public's individual doses as well as for retrospective dosimetry what confirms the importance of their effective atomic number and composition determination. (author)

  9. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of (±-Mandelic Acid-d5, Optical Resolution, and Absolute Configuration Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient microwave-assisted synthesis of (±-mandelic acid-d5 was developed. The racemic mixture was resolved by diastereomeric salt formation using 1-phenylethylamine enantiomers as resolving agents. At each step, the resolution process was checked by determining mandelic acid-d5 enantiomer ee values directly on fractional crystallized diastereomeric salts by chiral capillary electrophoresis analysis. Highly enriched (−- and (+-mandelic acid-d5 (95% and 90% ee, resp. were obtained and their absolute configurations—R and S, respectively—were determined by correlation of the (−-mandelic acid-d5 circular dichroism spectrum to the (R-mandelic acid one.

  10. Determination of cadmium in aluminium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, D.A.; Erlijman, L.H.

    1978-12-01

    A direct method for the determination of cadmium in elemental aluminium is described. Metal samples are dissolved in diluted hydrochloric acid and cadmium is determined by atomic absorption spectrometry in an air-acetylene flame. Interference by non-specific absorption observed at the analytical wavelength incorrected for by means of a non-absorbing line emitted by the hollow-cathode lamp. Relatively large amounts of arsenic do not interfere. The minimun determinable concentration of cadmium for this procedure is 2-3 ppm, expressed on aluminium basis. (author) [es

  11. Aluminium determination in U Alx using atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, E.S.K.; Pires, M.A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. A method for aluminium determination in uranium-aluminium dispersions (U al x ) using atomic absorption spectrometry is presented. The sample is dissolved in nitric acid, heated, dried, and market up the volume with 0.1 N H NO 3 . The uranium is precipitated with 30% NaOH and the aluminium is determined in the solution after filtration. The determination limit achieved was 5 μg Al/mL. The method is reproducible. (author). 7 refs, 2 tabs

  12. Luminosity measurement method for the LHC: Event selection and absolute luminosity determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny, M. W.; Chwastowski, J.; Cyz, A.; Słowikowski, K.

    2013-11-01

    In our earlier papers Krasny et al. [1,2] have proposed a new luminosity measurement method which uses lepton pairs produced in peripheral collisions of the LHC beam particles, and identified the requirements for a new, specialized luminosity detector which is indispensable for their efficient on-line selection. In this paper we use the base-line detector model, with no precise timing capabilities, to evaluate the statistical and systematic accuracy of the method. We propose the complete event selection procedure and demonstrate that it allows to collect a sufficiently large sample of e+e- pairs to achieve a better than 1% statistical accuracy of the luminosity measurement over less than one-month-long running time intervals. We argue that the absolute luminosity measurement systematic errors can be kept below 1%. The proposed method can be directly applied to the LHC running periods for which the machine instantaneous luminosity does not exceed the L=1033 s-1 cm-2 value. Two ways extending the method to the large pile-up periods corresponding to higher instantaneous luminosities are proposed.

  13. Methodological issues in cardiovascular epidemiology: the risk of determining absolute risk through statistical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demosthenes B Panagiotakos

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Demosthenes B Panagiotakos, Vassilis StavrinosOffice of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Department of Dietetics, Nutrition, Harokopio University, Athens, GreeceAbstract: During the past years there has been increasing interest in the development of cardiovascular disease functions that predict future events at individual level. However, this effort has not been so far very successful, since several investigators have reported large differences in the estimation of the absolute risk among different populations. For example, it seems that predictive models that have been derived from US or north European populations  overestimate the incidence of cardiovascular events in south European and Japanese populations. A potential explanation could be attributed to several factors such as geographical, cultural, social, behavioral, as well as genetic variations between the investigated populations in addition to various methodological, statistical, issues relating to the estimation of these predictive models. Based on current literature it can be concluded that, while risk prediction of future cardiovascular events is a useful tool and might be valuable in controlling the burden of the disease in a population, further work is required to improve the accuracy of the present predictive models.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, risk, models

  14. Direct experimental determination of the atomic structure at internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, N.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Pennycook, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A crucial first step in understanding the effect that internal interfaces have on the properties of materials is the ability to determine the atomic structure at the interface. As interfaces can contain atomic disorder, dislocations, segregated impurities and interphases, sensitivity to all of these features is essential for complete experimental characterization. By combining Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), the ability to probe the structure, bonding and composition at interfaces with the necessary atomic resolution has been obtained. Experimental conditions can be controlled to provide, simultaneously, both incoherent imaging and spectroscopy. This enables interface structures observed in the image to be interpreted intuitively and the bonding in a specified atomic column to be probed directly by EELS. The bonding and structure information can then be correlated using bond-valence sum analysis to produce structural models. This technique is demonstrated for 25{degrees}, 36{degrees} and 67{degrees} symmetric and 45{degrees} and 25{degrees} asymmetric [001] tilt grain boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3} The structures of both types of boundary were found to contain partially occupied columns in the boundary plane. From these experimental results, a series of structural units were identified which could be combined, using continuity of gain boundary structure principles, to construct all [001] tilt boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3}. Using these models, the ability of this technique to address the issues of vacancies and dopant segregation at grain boundaries in electroceramics is discussed.

  15. Problems determining relative and absolute ages using the small crater population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Strom, Robert G.

    2012-07-01

    The small crater populations (diameter smaller than 1 km) are widely used to date planetary surfaces. The reliability of small crater counts is tested by counting small craters at several young and old lunar surfaces, including Mare Nubium and craters Alphonsus, Tycho and Giordano Bruno. Based on high-resolution images from both the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera and Kaguya Terrain Camera, small craters in two different diameter ranges are counted for each counting area. Large discrepancies exist in both the cumulative (absolute model ages) and relative plots for the two different size ranges of the same counting areas. The results indicate that dating planetary surfaces using small crater populations is highly unreliable because the contamination of secondaries may invalidate the results of small crater counts. A comparison of the size-frequency distributions of the small crater populations and impact ejected boulders around fresh lunar craters shows the same upturn as typical martian secondaries, which supports the argument that secondaries dominate the small crater populations on the Moon and Mars. Also, the size-frequency distributions of small rayed lunar and martian craters of probable primary origin are similar to that of the Population 2 craters on the inner Solar System bodies post-dating Late Heavy Bombardment. Dating planetary surfaces using the small crater populations requires the separation of primaries from secondaries which is extremely difficult. The results also show that other factors, such as different target properties and the subjective identification of impact craters by different crater counters, may also affect crater counting results. We suggest that dating planetary surfaces using small crater populations should be with highly cautious.

  16. A proposed atom interferometry determination of G at 10‑5 using a cold atomic fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, G.

    2018-02-01

    In precision metrology, the determination of the Newtonian gravity constant G represents a real problem, since its history is plagued by huge unknown discrepancies between a large number of independent experiments. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental setup for measuring G with a relative accuracy of 10-5 , using a standard cold atomic fountain and matter wave interferometry. We discuss in detail the major sources of systematic errors, and provide the expected statistical uncertainty. The feasibility of determining G at the 10-6 level is also discussed.

  17. Determination of the absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol by neutron and x-ray diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, H.S.H.; Stevens, R.C.; Bau, R. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Mosher, H.S. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Koetzle, T.F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1994-12-20

    The absolute configuration of (+)-neopentyl-1-d alcohol, prepared by the reduction of 2,2-dimethylpropanol-1-d by actively fermenting yeast, has been determined to be S by neutron diffraction. The neutron study was carried out on the phthalate half ester of neopentyl-1-d alcohol, crystallized as its strychnine salt. The absolute configuration of the (-)-strychninium cation was first determined by an x-ray anomalous dispersion study of its iodide salt. The chiral skeleton of strychnine then served as a reference from which the absolute configuration of the -O-CHD-C(CH[sub 3])[sub 3] group of neopentyl phthalate was determined. Difference Fourier maps calculated from the neutron data showed unambiguously that the -O-CHD-C(CH[sub 3])[sub 3] groups of both independent molecules in the unit cell had the S configuration. This work proves conclusively that the yeast system reduces aldehydes by delivering hydrogen to the re face of the carbonyl group. Crystallographic details: (-)-strychninium (+)-neopentyl-1-d phthalate, space group P2[sub 1] (monoclinic), a = 18.564(6) [angstrom], b = 7.713(2) [angstrom], c = 23.361(8) [angstrom], [beta] = 94.18(4)[degrees], V = 3336.0(5) [angstrom][sup 3], Z = 2 (T = 100 K). Final agreement factors are R(F) = 0.073 for 2768 reflections collected at room temperature (x-ray analysis) and R(F) = 0.144 for 960 reflections collected at 100 K (neutron analysis). 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Lithium determination in whole blood by flame atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Khalid, N.; Nasimullah; Iqbal, M.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of lithium in whole blood using Flame atomic emission spectrometry is described. No sample preparation was required apart from dilution with 0.02 N HNO/sub 3/. The reliability of the method was determined by analyzing Standard Reference Material (SRM) under identical experimental conditions and comparing the determined lithium concentration with the reported value. These were in good agreement with each other. The determined range of lithium in the whole blood of fifty-six healthy adult volunteers (28 males and 28 females) were 13.1 - 47.8 mg L-1. The determined average concentration of lithium in whole blood was compared with the reported values of other countries. The data was statistically analyzed with respect to sex and different age groups. (author)

  19. Lipase-catalyzed Remote Kinetic Resolution of Quaternary Carbon-containing Alcohols and Determination of Their Absolute Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Dai Sig [Computer-aided Molecular Design and Bioscience Research Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Chan Seong; Lee, So Ha [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    The quaternary carbon-containing alcohols (1-6) were resolved enantioselectively by various lipases such as PFL (Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase), LAK (Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase), CRL (Candida rugosa lipase) and PCL (Pseudomonas cepacia lipase). The enzymatic resolution of racemic alcohol (±)-2 gave the excellent enantioselectivity in favor of (S)-2d in 99% ee, while those of the racemic alcohols (1, 3, 4, 5 and 6) gave the resolved alcohols with moderate to good enantioselectivity. Also, their absolute configurations were determined by chemical transformation to the known compounds.

  20. Are sap flow measurements useful for determining water use of fruit orchards, when absolute values are important?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taylor

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Horticultureae (Proceedings of the 9th International workshop on sap flow), Gent, Belgium, 4-7 June 2013 Are Sap Flow Measurements Useful for Determining Water Use of Fruit Orchards, when Absolute Values Are Important? N.J. Taylor1, N.A. Ibraimo1, J....G. Annandale1, C.S. Everson1, J.T. Vahrmeijer1 and M.B. Gush2 1 Department of Plant Production and Soil Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa 2 CSIR – Natural Resources and the Environment, Hydroscience Research Group, South Africa Abstract...

  1. Enantioselective semi-preparative HPLC separation of PCB metabolites and their absolute structures determined by electronic and vibrational circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, H.P.; Larsson, C.; Huehnerfuss, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Hoffmann, F.; Froeba, M. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Bergmann, Aa. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    The present paper represents a first result of an ongoing systematic study of atropisomeric methylsulfonyl, methylthionyl, hydroxy, and methoxy metabolites of environmentally most relevant PCBs. This involves semi-preparative enantioselective HPLC separation to obtain pure atropisomers from synthesized PCB metabolite standards, their configuration estimation using the electronic circular dichroism (UV-CD) method and the determination / confirmation of these absolute configurations applying the combined vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) / ab initio approach. The following substances have been investigated: 4-HO-, 4-MeO-, 4-MeS-, 4-MeSO2-, 3-MeS- and 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149.

  2. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwob, C.

    2006-12-01

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm -1 ). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10 -9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α -1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10 -9 . The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  3. Optical oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules determined by the dipole ( γ,γ) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long-Quan; Liu, Ya-Wei; Xu, Xin; Ni, Dong-Dong; Yang, Ke; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2017-07-01

    The dipole (γ,γ) method, which is the inelastic X-ray scattering operated at a negligibly small momentum transfer, has been developed to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules. This new method is free from the line saturation effect, and its Bethe-Born conversion factor varies much more slowly with the excitation energy than that of the dipole (e, e) method. Thus the dipole (γ,γ) method provides a reliable approach to obtain the benchmark optical oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations for gaseous atoms and molecules. In this paper, we give a review of the dipole (γ,γ) method and some recent measurements of absolute optical oscillator strengths of gaseous atoms and molecules. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  4. A simple method for the absolute determination of uranium enrichment by high-resolution {gamma} spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korob, R.O. [Unidad de Actividad Radioquimica y Quimica de las Radiaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15 Partido de Ezeiza, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: korob@cae.cnea.gov.ar; Blasiyh Nuno, G.A. [Unidad de Actividad Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon No. 15 Partido de Ezeiza, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-05-15

    A simple method for the determination of uranium enrichment using high-resolution {gamma} spectrometry is presented in this paper. The method relies solely on the {gamma}-ray emission probabilities of {sup 235}U and {sup 234m}Pa, and an iterative procedure for the least squares fit of a polynomial to a set of experimentally determined data. To ensure the reliability of the {sup 234m}Pa {gamma}-ray emission probabilities employed, a new determination of these probabilities was carried out using a combination of {gamma} spectrometry and Cerenkov counting of a purified {sup 234}Th solution. Using these new data, a maximum difference of {approx}5% has been found between the experimental and declared uranium enrichment in a set of solid and liquid samples containing uranium compounds.

  5. Determination of metals in atmospheric particulates using atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C.

    1979-01-01

    Nineteen trace metals in atmospheric samples have been determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, using a graphite furnace for most elements. Paper filters have been used to collect air samples. The sample preparation procedure involves the removal of organic matter and the conversion of the metals to soluble salts by ashing the filters in an oxygen plasma at 125 deg C for 6 h. and by subsequent dissolution in HN0 3 HCl solution. The sensitivities achieved are in the range of 2,5.10 -5 and 6,3.10 -3 μg/m 3 , for an air volume of 2000 m 3 . (author)

  6. Absolute determination of optical constants of three transition metals using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Yang, L. H.; Tóth, J.; Tőkési, K.; Da, B.; Ding, Z. J.

    2018-01-01

    The optical constants, n and k, of three transition metals (Cr, Co, and Pd) were determined from the measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra, covering the spectral energy range from visible to vacuum ultraviolet. To do this, a spectral data analysis technique [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. B 95, 195417 (2017)], which combines a sophisticated Monte Carlo simulation for modelling the experimental REELS spectrum and the simulated annealing algorithm for the determination of the true energy loss function (ELF) was adopted. The validity of the obtained ELFs was discussed by comparing with the previous data derived by optical methods and by applying the oscillator strength and the perfect screening-sum rules. Besides, the consistency of the calculated data was evaluated for three in situ measurements for each sample at three primary energies. The complex dielectric function, the refractive index n and the extinction coefficient k were then derived from the obtained ELF via the analytical Kramers-Kronig relation.

  7. ABSOLUTE NEUTRINO MASSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schechter, J.; Shahid, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos.......We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos....

  8. Absolute np and pp cross section determinations aimed at improving the standard for cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laptev, Alexander B.; Haight, Robert C.; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arndt, Richard A.; Briscoe, William J.; Paris, Mark W.; Strakovsky, Igor I.; Workman, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PW As) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-V11.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  9. Determination of absolute configuration of the phosphonic acid moiety of fosfazinomycins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessl, Katharina; Roller, Alexander; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich

    2013-11-14

    Fosfazinomycins A and B produced by Streptomyces lavendofoliae share the same phosphonate moiety with one chiral centre of unknown configuration which was determined by synthesising both enantiomers of 2-hydroxy-2-phosphonoacetic acid methyl ester. A chiral cyclic phosphite was reacted with methyl glyoxylate in a Pudovik reaction to give a pair of diastereomeric α-hydroxyphosphonates, which were separated by HPLC. The configurations at C-2 were assigned on the basis of single crystal X-ray structure analysis. Deprotection of these diastereomers furnished the enantiomeric α-hydroxyphosphonic acids, of which the (S)-configured had the same sign of optical rotation as the phosphonic acid moiety of the two fosfazinomycins.

  10. Determining the importance of model calibration for forecasting absolute/relative changes in streamflow from LULC and climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, Rewati; Meixner, Thomas; Norman, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) and climate changes are important drivers of change in streamflow. Assessing the impact of LULC and climate changes on streamflow is typically done with a calibrated and validated watershed model. However, there is a debate on the degree of calibration required. The objective of this study was to quantify the variation in estimated relative and absolute changes in streamflow associated with LULC and climate changes with different calibration approaches. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied in an uncalibrated (UC), single outlet calibrated (OC), and spatially-calibrated (SC) mode to compare the relative and absolute changes in streamflow at 14 gaging stations within the Santa Cruz River Watershed in southern Arizona, USA. For this purpose, the effect of 3 LULC, 3 precipitation (P), and 3 temperature (T) scenarios were tested individually. For the validation period, Percent Bias (PBIAS) values were >100% with the UC model for all gages, the values were between 0% and 100% with the OC model and within 20% with the SC model. Changes in streamflow predicted with the UC and OC models were compared with those of the SC model. This approach implicitly assumes that the SC model is “ideal”. Results indicated that the magnitude of both absolute and relative changes in streamflow due to LULC predicted with the UC and OC results were different than those of the SC model. The magnitude of absolute changes predicted with the UC and SC models due to climate change (both P and T) were also significantly different, but were not different for OC and SC models. Results clearly indicated that relative changes due to climate change predicted with the UC and OC were not significantly different than that predicted with the SC models. This result suggests that it is important to calibrate the model spatially to analyze the effect of LULC change but not as important for analyzing the relative change in streamflow due to climate change. This

  11. Atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mineral elements in mammalian bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoh, Anthony P.

    2000-01-01

    The phosphorus content of the major bones of male and female selected mammals was determined using the yellow vanadomolybdate colorimetric method. For each animal, the bone with the highest phosphorus content was used as pilot sample. Varying concentrations of strontium were added to solutions of the ashed pilot samples to minimize phosphorus interference in the determination of calcium and magnesium using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry operated on the air-acetylene mode. At least 6,000 ppm (0.6%) of strontium was required to give optimum results for calcium. The amount of magnesium obtained from the analysis was not affected by the addition of strontium. With the incorporation of strontium in the sample solution, all elements of interest can be determined in the same sample solution. Based on this, a procedure is proposed for the determination of calcium and other elements in bones. Average recoveries of spiked calcium and magnesium were 97.85% and 98.16%, respectively at the 95% confidence level. The coefficients of variation obtained for replicate determinations using one of the samples were 0.00% for calcium, lead and sodium, 2.93% for magnesium, 3.27% for iron and 3.92% for zinc at the concentration levels found in that sample. Results from the proposed procedure compared well with those from classical chemical methods at the 95% confidence level. It is evident that calcium phosphorus, magnesium and sodium which are the most abundant elements in the bones are distributed in varying amounts both in the different types of bones and different animal species, although the general trend is Ca > P > Na > Mg for each bone considered. The calcium - phosphorus ratio is generally 3:1. The work set out to propose an atomic absorption spectrometric method for the multi-element analysis of mammalian bones with a single sample preparation and to study the distribution pattern of these elements in the bones. (Author)

  12. Population effects on the red giant clump absolute magnitude, and distance determinations to nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Léo; Salaris, Maurizio

    2001-05-01

    The red giant clump has been recently argued to be a reliable distance indicator for the galaxies in the Local Group. The accuracy of distance determinations based on this method, however, depends on the possible presence of systematic magnitude differences (ΔMIRC) between the local clump revealed by the Hipparcos colour-magnitude diagram (CMD), and the clump stars observed in distant galaxies. In this paper, we re-address the problem of these systematic `population' effects. First, we present tables with the theoretically predicted I-band clump magnitude as a function of age and metallicity. Simple equations, taken from basic population synthesis theory, are provided for the easy computation of the mean clump magnitude for any given galaxy model. We use our models to explain in some detail what determines the distribution of masses, ages and metallicities of clump stars in a galaxy. Such an approach has so far been neglected in the analysis of clump data related with distance determinations. We point out that, in galaxies with recent/ongoing star formation (e.g. the discs of spirals), the age distribution of clump stars is strongly biased towards younger (~1-3Gyr) ages, and hence towards higher metallicities. Obviously, this does not happen in galaxies with predominantly old stellar populations (e.g. ellipticals and bulges). We construct detailed models for the clump population in the local (Hipparcos) sample, the bulge, Magellanic Clouds and Carina dSph galaxy. In all cases, star formation rates and chemical enrichment histories are taken from the literature. The Hipparcos model is shown to produce distributions of metallicities, colours, and magnitudes, that are similar to those derived from spectroscopic and Hipparcos data. The bulge, Magellanic Clouds, and Carina dSph models are used to analyse the values of ΔMIRC for these different stellar systems. We show how the clump-RR Lyrae data from Udalski are well reproduced by the models. However, despite the

  13. Determination of the absolute jet energy scale in the DOe calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G.A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E.W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M.M.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J.F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S.B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bhat, P.C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N.I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Butler, J.M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christenson, J.H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.R.; Cobau, W.G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W.E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O.I.; Davis, K.; De, K.; Signore, K. Del; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Loreto, G. Di; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L.V.; Dugad, S.R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H.E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G.E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K.C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A.N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T.L.; II, R.J. Genik; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P.I.; GonzalezSolis, J.L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L.T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Green, D.R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Gruenendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J.A.; Guida, J.M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N.J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K.S.; Hall, R.E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A.P.; Heintz, U.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J.D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J.S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A.S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S.A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J.Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Joestlein, H.; Jun, S.Y.; Jung, C.K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J.S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.L.; Kim, C.L.; Kim, S.K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kohli, J.M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q.Z.; Lima, J.G.R.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S.L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S.C.; Loekoes, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.L.; Maciel, A.K.A.; Madaras, R.J.; Madden, R.; Magan#=tilde#a-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H.S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M.I.; Mauritz, K.M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A.A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H.L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K.W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C.S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N.K.; Montgomery, H.E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V.S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H.A.; Negret, J.P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y.M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P.Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H.C.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J.B.; Siroten ko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R.P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G.R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A.L.; Steinbrueck, G.; Stephens, R.W.; Stevenson, M.L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D.A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T.L.T.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T.G.; Tuts, P.M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A.A.; Vorobiev, A.P.; Wahl, H.D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J.T.; Wightman, J.A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S.J.; Wirjawan, J.V.D.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D.R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z.H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E.G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1999-01-01

    The DOe detector is used to study pp-bar collisions at the 1800 and 630 GeV center-of-mass energies available at the Fermilab Tevatron. To measure jets, the detector uses a sampling calorimeter composed of uranium and liquid argon as the passive and active media, respectively. Understanding the jet energy calibration is not only crucial for precision tests of QCD, but also for the measurement of particle masses and the determination of physics backgrounds associated with new phenomena. This paper describes the energy calibration of jets observed with the DOe detector at the two pp-bar center-of-mass energies in the transverse energy and pseudorapidity range E T >8 GeV and vertical bar η vertical bar <3

  14. Systematic determination of the JET absolute neutron yield using the MPR spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronborg-Pettersson, N

    2003-04-01

    This thesis describes the first high-statistics systematic analysis of JET neutron yield and rate measurements obtained by using data acquired with the Magnetic Proton Recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer. The neutron yield and rate were determined by using the count-rate from the MPR neutron spectrometer together with neutron profile information from other neutron diagnostic systems. This has previously been done manually for a few pulses. To be able to do this in a more systematic way a part of the neutron spectrum evaluation code was extracted and put into a separate custom-made program and modifications were done to extract sets of MPR data automatically. The codes have been used for analysis of a large set of pulses from the deuterium-tritium campaign at JET in 1997. Several results were obtained, the most significant of which was the clear improvement seen when neutron profile corrections were applied. Neutron yield-rates derived from MPR count-rate are shown to be in excellent agreement with other JET neutron diagnostic data.

  15. Determination of lead in mother's milk by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandarchian, F.; Assadian, F

    2002-01-01

    With due attention to increasing air pollution specially the lead amount that is generated from gasoline burning in automobiles, it seems that it is necessary to control the amount of it continuously. Because Pb has an easy absorbability to body and also damages the nervous system. For this reason determination of it in mother's milk has a special importance. In this research, the milks of 15 mothers twice a day were examined and the concentration of Pb were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In accordance the international organization, the permissible amount in body is 0.05 ppm. Fortunately, the obtained data was less than of it and it showed the absorbance of lead by babies is insignificant

  16. Absolute measurement of {beta} activities and application to the determination of neutronic densities; Mesure absolue d'activites {beta} et application a la determination des densites neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1951-01-15

    M. Berthelot, to my entrance to the ''Commissariat a l 'Energie Atomique'', proposed me to study the absolute measurement of neutron densities. Very quickly the problem of the absolute activity of {beta} sources became the central object of this work. In a first part, we will develop the methods of absolute determination for {beta} activities. The use of a 4{pi} counter permits to get the absolute activity of all beta radioactive source, susceptible to be put as thin leaf and of period superior than some minutes. The method is independent of the spectra of the measured radioelement. we will describe in the second part some applications which use neutron densities measurement, neutron sources intensities and ratio of cross sections of capture of thermal neutrons. (M.B.) [French] M. Berthelot, a mon entree au ''Commissariat a l 'Energie Atomique'', m'a propose d'etudier la mesure absolue des densites neutroniques. Tres rapidement le probleme de l'activite absolue des sources beta est devenu l'objet central de ce travail. Dans une premiere partie, on abordera les methodes de determination absolue des activites beta. L'utilisation d'un compteur 4{pi} permet d 'obtenir l'activite absolue de toute source radioactive beta, susceptible d'etre mise sous forme de feuille mince et de periode superieure a quelques minutes. La methode est independante du spectre du radioelement mesure. On decrira dans la seconde partie quelques applications a des mesures de densites neutroniques, d'intensites de sources de neutrons et de rapport de sections efficaces de capture de neutrons thermiques. (M.B.)

  17. Determination of multi-GNSS pseudo-absolute code biases and verification of receiver tracking technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Arturo; Schaer, Stefan; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    It is common to handle code biases in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data analysis as conventional differential code biases (DCBs): P1-C1, P1-P2, and P2-C2. Due to the increasing number of signals and systems in conjunction with various tracking modes for the different signals (as defined in RINEX3 format), the number of DCBs would increase drastically and the bookkeeping becomes almost unbearable. The Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) has thus changed its processing scheme to observable-specific signal biases (OSB). This means that for each observation involved all related satellite and receiver biases are considered. The OSB contributions from various ionosphere analyses (geometry-free linear combination) using different observables and frequencies and from clock analyses (ionosphere-free linear combination) are then combined on normal equation level. By this, one consistent set of OSB values per satellite and receiver can be obtained that contains all information needed for GNSS-related processing. This advanced procedure of code bias handling is now also applied to the IGS (International GNSS Service) MGEX (Multi-GNSS Experiment) procedure at CODE. Results for the biases from the legacy IGS solution as well as the CODE MGEX processing (considering GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, and QZSS) are presented. The consistency with the traditional method is confirmed and the new results are discussed regarding the long-term stability. When processing code data, it is essential to know the true observable types in order to correct for the associated biases. CODE has been verifying the receiver tracking technologies for GPS based on estimated DCB multipliers (for the RINEX 2 case). With the change to OSB, the original verification approach was extended to search for the best fitting observable types based on known OSB values. In essence, a multiplier parameter is estimated for each involved GNSS observable type. This implies that we could

  18. Procoagulant and platelet-derived microvesicle absolute counts determined by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Ayers

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flow cytometry is the most commonly used technology to measure microvesicles (MVs. Despite reported limitations of this technique, MV levels obtained using conventional flow cytometry have yielded many clinically relevant findings, such as associations with disease severity and ability to predict clinical outcomes. This study aims to determine if MV enumeration by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity, as this may explain how flow cytometry generates clinically relevant results. Methods: One hundred samples from healthy individuals and patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were analysed by conventional flow cytometry (FACSCalibur and by three functional MV assays: Zymuphen MP-activity in which data were given as phosphatidylserine equivalent, STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay expressed as clotting time and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP reflecting in vitro thrombin generation. Correlations were determined by Spearman correlation. Results: Absolute counts of lactadherin+ procoagulant MVs generated by flow cytometry weakly correlated with the results obtained from the Zymuphen MP-activity (r=0.5370, p<0.0001; correlated with ETP (r=0.7444, p<0.0001; negatively correlated with STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay clotting time (−0.7872, p<0.0001, reflecting a positive correlation between clotting activity and flow cytometry. Levels of Annexin V+ procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs were also associated with functional assays. Absolute counts of MVs derived from other cell types were not correlated with the functional results. Conclusions: Quantitative results of procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs from conventional flow cytometry are associated with the functional capability of the MVs, as defined by three functional MV assays. Flow cytometry is a valuable technique for the quantification of MVs from different cellular origins; however, a combination of several analytical techniques may give the

  19. Determination of antimony by using a quartz atom trap and electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menemenlioglu, Ipek; Korkmaz, Deniz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2007-01-15

    The analytical performance of a miniature quartz trap coupled with electrochemical hydride generator for antimony determination is described. A portion of the inlet arm of the conventional quartz tube atomizer was used as an integrated trap medium for on-line preconcentration of electrochemically generated hydrides. This configuration minimizes transfer lines and connections. A thin-layer of electrochemical flow through cell was constructed. Lead and platinum foils were employed as cathode and anode materials, respectively. Experimental operation conditions for hydride generation as well as the collection and revolatilization conditions for the generated hydrides in the inlet arm of the quartz tube atomizer were optimized. Interferences of copper, nickel, iron, cobalt, arsenic, selenium, lead and tin were examined both with and without the trap. 3{sigma} limit of detection was estimated as 0.053 {mu}g l{sup -1} for a sample size of 6.0 ml collected in 120 s. The trap has provided 18 fold sensitivity improvement as compared to electrochemical hydride generation alone. The accuracy of the proposed technique was evaluated with two standard reference materials; Trace Metals in Drinking Water, Cat CRM-TMDW and Metals on Soil/Sediment 4, IRM-008.

  20. Determination of antimony by using a quartz atom trap and electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menemenlioglu, Ipek; Korkmaz, Deniz; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2007-01-01

    The analytical performance of a miniature quartz trap coupled with electrochemical hydride generator for antimony determination is described. A portion of the inlet arm of the conventional quartz tube atomizer was used as an integrated trap medium for on-line preconcentration of electrochemically generated hydrides. This configuration minimizes transfer lines and connections. A thin-layer of electrochemical flow through cell was constructed. Lead and platinum foils were employed as cathode and anode materials, respectively. Experimental operation conditions for hydride generation as well as the collection and revolatilization conditions for the generated hydrides in the inlet arm of the quartz tube atomizer were optimized. Interferences of copper, nickel, iron, cobalt, arsenic, selenium, lead and tin were examined both with and without the trap. 3σ limit of detection was estimated as 0.053 μg l -1 for a sample size of 6.0 ml collected in 120 s. The trap has provided 18 fold sensitivity improvement as compared to electrochemical hydride generation alone. The accuracy of the proposed technique was evaluated with two standard reference materials; Trace Metals in Drinking Water, Cat CRM-TMDW and Metals on Soil/Sediment 4, IRM-008

  1. Determination of molybdenum in flotation concentrates by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Kazuo

    1978-01-01

    Molybdenum was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 0.05 N ammoniacal solution after the decomposition of the concentrate with aqua regia. Negros ore from Philippines was used as a flotation feed, which contained chalcopyrites and calcium-magnesium minerals. Among the metals tested copper, iron and the alkaline earths interfered. Less than 50 ppm of copper yielded lower results for molybdenum. Higher results came out with more than 50 ppm of copper. In the presence of iron and citric acid (0.4 g/100 ml) which is a suppressor for hydroxide formation, a lower estimation resulted for molybdenum. Calcium interfered, lower results by 2 and >10% being obtained with respective 2.5 and 20 ppm of calcium. More than 20 ppm of magnesium behaved similarly. Sodium sulfate (0.5 g/100 ml) served as the suppressor for copper, iron and citric acid; 100 ppm each of copper and iron did not interfere in this way. Interferences due to calcium and magnesium (less than 60 ppm) was able to be masked by the addition of sodium silicate (200 ppm as silica). The analysis of flotation products and synthetic samples consisting of molybdenite, chalcopyrite, calcium chloride and magnesium sulfate revealed that the atomic absorption method can be applied to the analysis of the concentrates for molybdenum with an error of about 2%. (auth.)

  2. Determination of metallic impurities in uranium compounds of nuclear purity by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry, with electrothermal atomization, has been used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni in uranium oxide standards. The analysis were performed without sample dissolution and without uranium chemical separation. This technique is adequate for the qualification of uranium of nuclear purity according to the standard specifications. (Author) [pt

  3. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  4. Determination of Lead in Blood by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Stig; Cramér, Kim

    1968-01-01

    Lead in blood was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, using a wet ashing procedure and a procedure in which the proteins were precipitated with trichloroacetic acid. In both methods the lead was extracted into isobutylmethylketone before measurement, using ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate as chelator. The simpler precipitation procedure was shown to give results identical with those obtained with the ashing technique. In addition, blood specimens were examined by the precipitation method and by spectral analysis, which method includes wet ashing of the samples, with good agreement. All analyses were done on blood samples from `normal' persons or from lead-exposed workers, and no additions of inorganic lead were made. The relatively simple protein precipitation technique gave accurate results and is suitable for the large-scale control of lead-exposed workers. PMID:5663425

  5. Determination of Lead in Urine by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Stig; Cramé, Kim

    1968-01-01

    A method for the determination of lead in urine by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) is described. A combination of wet ashing and extraction with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate into isobutylmethylketone was used. The sensitivity was about 0·02 μg./ml. for 1% absorption, and the detection limit was about 0·02 μg./ml. with an instrumental setting convenient for routine analyses of urines. Using the scale expansion technique, the detection limit was below 0·01 μg./ml., but it was found easier to determine urinary lead concentrations below 0·05 μg./ml. by concentrating the lead in the organic solvent by increasing the volume of urine or decreasing that of the solvent. The method was applied to fresh urines, stored urines, and to urines, obtained during treatment with chelating agents, of patients with lead poisoning. Urines with added inorganic lead were not used. The results agreed well with those obtained with a colorimetric dithizone extraction method (r = 0·989). The AAS method is somewhat more simple and allows the determination of smaller lead concentrations. PMID:5647975

  6. Quantitative composition determination at the atomic level using model-based high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; De Backer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-02-01

    High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images provide sample information which is sensitive to the chemical composition. The image intensities indeed scale with the mean atomic number Z. To some extent, chemically different atomic column types can therefore be visually distinguished. However, in order to quantify the atomic column composition with high accuracy and precision, model-based methods are necessary. Therefore, an empirical incoherent parametric imaging model can be used of which the unknown parameters are determined using statistical parameter estimation theory (Van Aert et al., 2009, [1]). In this paper, it will be shown how this method can be combined with frozen lattice multislice simulations in order to evolve from a relative toward an absolute quantification of the composition of single atomic columns with mixed atom types. Furthermore, the validity of the model assumptions are explored and discussed. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Absolute concentration determination of phosphorus metabolites in the Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gard, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of mobile high energy phosphorus metabolites and intracellular pH of Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart have been determined under control and reduced flow conditions. Absolute concentration determination was accomplished by Lorentzian lineshape analysis after development of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene as an external intensity standard. Hearts were demonstrated to be biochemically and physiologically competent during control perfusion periods and compromised during reduced flow conditions by independent hemodynamic and metabolic measurements coincident with the NMR experiment. Reduction in perfusate flow from 20 mL/min to 5.0 mL/min (25% flow) or 2.5 mL/min (12.5% flow) demonstrated a fall in phosphocreatine and adenosine triphosphate concentrations, a rise in cytosolic inorganic phosphate concentrations, and drops in pH. Subsequent recovery upon reflow was observed. The derived values for the free concentration of ADP were very close to the reported values of the Michaelis constant for respiratory stimulation, implicating a regulatory role for this molecule in cellular respiration. Strong evidence that the creating kinase reaction was in equilibrium in the 25% flow study was seen. The NMR observable correlated closely with myocardial performance and biochemical indices of metabolic function, and supported the use of phosphocreatine as an indicator of current metabolic integrity

  8. A non-invasive diffuse reflectance calibration-free method for absolute determination of exogenous biochemicals concentration in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Alexander V.; Kulikovskiy, Artem N.; Busarov, Oleg G.

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents a new method for distant non-destructive determination of concentration of light absorbing admixtures in turbid media. In particular, it is intended for non-invasive in vivo control of accumulation in patient tissues of various biochemicals introduced to the patients for chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy or diagnostics. It is require that the admixture absorption spectrum should have a clearly marked peak in the wavelength region where the pure medium one varies regularly. Fluorescence of admixtures is not required. The method uses the local diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with optical fiber probe including one emitting and two reading There are several features in the method: the value to be determined is absolute concentration of admixtures; the method needs no calibration measurements on phantoms; it needs no reference measurements on sample with zero admixture concentration; it uses a two parametric kinetic light propagation model and original algorithms to resolve direct and inverse tasks of radiation transport theory. Experimental testing passed with tissue equivalent phantoms and different admixtures, including a chlorine photosensitizer, showed accuracy under 10% in all cases.

  9. Electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbab-Zavar, M.H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: arbab@um.ac.ir; Chamsaz, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Youssefi, A. [Pare-Taavous Research Institute, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aliakbari, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-08-01

    An electrolytic hydride generation system for determination of another hydride forming element, cadmium, by catholyte variation electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) atomic absorption spectrometry is described. A laboratory-made electrolytic cell with lead-tin alloy as cathode material is designed as electrolytic generator of molecular hydride. The influences of several parameters on the analytical signal have been evaluated using a Plackett-Burman experimental design. The significant parameters such as cathode surface area, electrolytic current, carrier gas flow rate and catholyte concentration have been optimized using univariate method. The analytical figures of merit of procedure developed were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 20 ng ml{sup -1}of cadmium. The concentration detection limit (3{sigma}, n = 8) of 0.2 ng ml{sup -1} and repeatability (relative standard deviation, n = 7) of 3.1% were achieved at 10.0 ng ml{sup -1}. It was shown that interferences from major constituents at high concentrations were significant. The accuracy of method was verified using a real sample (spiked tap water) by standard addition calibration technique. Recovery of 104% was achieved for Cd in the spiked tap water sample.

  10. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  11. A Precision Determination of the Effect of Metallicity on Cepheid Absolute Magnitudes in VIJHK Bands from Magellanic Cloud Cepheids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielgórski, Piotr; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Zgirski, Bartłomiej; Graczyk, Dariusz [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Gieren, Wolfgang; Górski, Marek [Universidad de Concepción, Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Storm, Jesper [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Matsunaga, Noriyuki [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Soszyński, Igor, E-mail: pwielgor@camk.edu.pl [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, PL-00-478 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-06-20

    Using high-quality observed period–luminosity ( P – L ) relations in both Magellanic Clouds in the VIJHK s bands and optical and near-infrared Wesenheit indices, we determine the effect of metallicity on Cepheid P – L relations by comparing the relative distance between the LMC and SMC as determined from the Cepheids to the difference in distance between the Clouds that has been derived with very high accuracy from late-type eclipsing binary systems. Within an uncertainty of 3%, which is dominated by the uncertainty on the mean difference in metallicity between the Cepheid populations in the LMC and SMC, we find metallicity effects smaller than 2% in all bands and in the Wesenheit indices, consistent with a zero metallicity effect. This result is valid for the metallicity range from −0.35 dex to −0.75 dex corresponding to the mean [Fe/H] values for classical Cepheids in the LMC and SMC, respectively. Yet most Cepheids in galaxies beyond the Local Group and located in the less crowded outer regions of these galaxies do fall into this metallicity regime, making our result important for applications to determine the distances to spiral galaxies well beyond the Local Group. Our result supports previous findings that indicated a very small metallicity effect on the near-infrared absolute magnitudes of classical Cepheids, and resolves the dispute about the size and sign of the metallicity effect in the optical spectral range. It also resolves one of the most pressing problems in the quest toward a measurement of the Hubble constant with an accuracy of 1% from the Cepheid–supernova Ia method.

  12. MAGIA - using atom interferometry to determine the Newtonian gravitational constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhler, J; Fattori, M; Petelski, T; Tino, G M

    2003-01-01

    We describe our experiment MAGIA (misura accurata di G mediante interferometria atomica), in which we will use atom interferometry to perform a high precision measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant G. Free-falling laser-cooled atoms in a vertical atomic fountain will be accelerated due to the gravitational potential of nearby source masses (SMs). Detecting this acceleration with techniques of Raman atom interferometry will enable us to assign a value to G. To suppress systematic effects we will implement a double-differential measurement. This includes launching two atom clouds in a gradiometer configuration and moving the SMs to different vertical positions. We briefly summarize the general idea of the MAGIA experiment and put it in the context of other high precision G-measurements. We present the current status of the experiment and report on analyses of the expected measurement accuracy

  13. Determination of strontium in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamari, Yuzo; Tsuji, Haruo; Kusaka, Yuzuru

    1984-01-01

    Strontium in silicate rocks was determined by the following procedure. A rock powder sample prepared to pass through a 100-mesh size sieve (0.1--0.5g) was taken in a Teflon beaker, and 6ml of 46% hydrofluoric acid and 1 ml of 70% perchloric acid were added. After being allowed to stand for over one day, the mixture in the beaker was concentrated by heating on a hot plate until white fumes of the perchloric acid appeared. The content in the beaker was transferred to a glass beaker with 2ml of 61% nitric acid and 0.5ml of the perchloric acid, and concentrated until white fumes appeared. Further, 2ml of 20% hydrochloric acid was added and warmed. After cooling, the rock solution was made up to 100ml with water. To a 50-ml stoppered centrifugal tube, a 10-ml portion of the rock solution was transferred, and 1ml of 2% 8-quinolinol solution was added. Then the solution was adjusted to pH 5 with both saturated sodium acetate solution and hydrochloric acid, and made up to 15ml. The decomposed rock sample solution with 20ml of chloroform was shaken for 5min. The decomposed rock sample solution was shaken with 20ml of chloroform for 5min, and then centrifuged at 2500rpm for 5min to separate an aqueous phase from an organic one. After adding 1ml of 2% lanthanum solution into a 10ml portion of the aqueous phase, strontium was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry at 460.7nm. This method was applied to the rock reference materials, JB-1 and JG-1, issued from the Geological Survey of Japan. Analytical values of strontium in the rocks were almost consistent with their certified and recommended values. (author)

  14. Simultaneous Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Cadmium and Lead Determination in Wastewater: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead by multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with electrochemical atomization is proposed by employing a problem-based approach. The reports indicate that the students assimilated the principles of the simultaneous atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS), the role of the chemical modifier, the…

  15. Molecule-specific determination of atomic polarizabilities with the polarizable atomic multipole model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo Kim, Hyun; Rhee, Young Min

    2012-07-30

    Recently, many polarizable force fields have been devised to describe induction effects between molecules. In popular polarizable models based on induced dipole moments, atomic polarizabilities are the essential parameters and should be derived carefully. Here, we present a parameterization scheme for atomic polarizabilities using a minimization target function containing both molecular and atomic information. The main idea is to adopt reference data only from quantum chemical calculations, to perform atomic polarizability parameterizations even when relevant experimental data are scarce as in the case of electronically excited molecules. Specifically, our scheme assigns the atomic polarizabilities of any given molecule in such a way that its molecular polarizability tensor is well reproduced. We show that our scheme successfully works for various molecules in mimicking dipole responses not only in ground states but also in valence excited states. The electrostatic potential around a molecule with an externally perturbing nearby charge also exhibits a near-quantitative agreement with the reference data from quantum chemical calculations. The limitation of the model with isotropic atoms is also discussed to examine the scope of its applicability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Determining the absolute abundance of dinoflagellate cysts in recent marine sediments: The Lycopodium marker-grain method put to the test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertens, K; Verhoeven; Verleye

    2009-01-01

    Absolute abundances (concentrations) of dinoflagellate cysts are often determined through the addition of Lycopodium clavatum marker-grains as a spike to a sample before palynological processing. An inter-laboratory calibration exercise was set up in order to test the comparability of results...

  17. Absolute Summ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  18. Sorghum cobalt analysis on not determined wave length with atomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-24

    Aug 24, 2011 ... 60. 70. 0. 5. 10. 15. 20. 25. Sludge treatment and its replications. A bsorbance / B ackground. Absorbance. Background. Figure 1. Absorbance and background values during Cobalt analyses of forage sorghum with atomic absorption spectrophotometer depending on measuring order (1/10,000) on 240.6 ...

  19. nuclear and atomic methods applied in the determination of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elements from soil samples of different industrial locations of Kano state, Nigeria. The techniques used were Neutron Activation Analysis. (NAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). The order of average contents of metals in soil samples was. Mn>Fe>Zn>Cu>Pb>Cd>Cr>Ni and their concentration values ranged.

  20. Automatic twin vessel recrystallizer. Effective purification of acetaminophen by successive automatic recrystallization and absolute determination of purity by DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Osamu

    2011-01-24

    I describe an interchangeable twin vessel (J, N) automatic glass recrystallizer that eliminates the time-consuming recovery and recycling of crystals for repeated recrystallization. The sample goes in the dissolution vessel J containing a magnetic stir-bar K; J is clamped to the upper joint H of recrystallizer body D. Empty crystallization vessel N is clamped to the lower joint M. Pure solvent is delivered to the dissolution vessel and the crystallization vessel via the head of the condenser A. Crystallization vessel is heated (P). The dissolution reservoir is stirred and heated by the solvent vapor (F). Continuous outflow of filtrate E out of J keeps N at a stable boiling temperature. This results in efficient dissolution, evaporation and separation of pure crystals Q. Pure solvent in the dissolution reservoir is recovered by suction. Empty dissolution and crystallization vessels are detached. Stirrer magnet is transferred to the crystallization vessel and the role of the vessels are then reversed. Evacuating mother liquor out of the upper twin vessel, the apparatus unit is ready for the next automatic recrystallization by refilling twin vessels with pure solvent. We show successive automatic recrystallization of acetaminophen from diethyl ether obtaining acetaminophen of higher melting temperatures than USP and JP reference standards by 8× automatic recrystallization, 96% yield at each stage. Also, I demonstrate a novel approach to the determination of absolute purity by combining the successive automatic recrystallization with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement requiring no reference standards. This involves the measurement of the criterial melting temperature T(0) corresponding to the 100% pure material and quantitative ΔT in DSC based on the van't Hoff law of melting point depression. The purity of six commercial acetaminophen samples and reference standards and an eight times recrystallized product evaluated were 98.8 mol%, 97.9 mol%, 99

  1. A novel method to determine the electron temperature and density from the absolute intensity of line and continuum emission: application to atmospheric microwave induced Ar plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordanova, E; Van der Mullen, J J A M; Palomares, J M; Gamero, A; Sola, A

    2009-01-01

    An absolute intensity measurement (AIM) technique is presented that combines the absolute measurements of the line and the continuum emitted by strongly ionizing argon plasmas. AIM is an iterative combination of the absolute line intensity-collisional radiative model (ALI-CRM) and the absolute continuum intensity (ACI) method. The basis of ALI-CRM is that the excitation temperature T 13 determined by the method of ALI is transformed into the electron temperature T e using a CRM. This gives T e as a weak function of electron density n e . The ACI method is based on the absolute value of the continuum radiation and determines the electron density in a way that depends on T e . The iterative combination gives n e and T e . As a case study the AIM method is applied to plasmas created by torche a injection axiale (TIA) at atmospheric pressure and fixed frequency at 2.45 GHz. The standard operating settings are a gas flow of 1 slm and a power of 800 W; the measurements have been performed at a position of 1 mm above the nozzle. With AIM we found an electron temperature of 1.2 eV and electron density values around 10 21 m -3 . There is not much dependence of these values on the plasma control parameters (power and gas flow). From the error analysis we can conclude that the determination of T e is within 7% and thus rather accurate but comparison with other studies shows strong deviations. The n e determination comes with an error of 40% but is in reasonable agreement with other experimental results.

  2. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  3. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  4. Nuclear and Atomic Methods Applied in the Determination of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The techniques used were Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). The order of average contents of metals in soil samples was Mn>Fe>Zn>Cu>Pb>Cd>Cr>Ni and their concentration values ranged from (31.8 to 18.1), (21.1 to 10.3), (8.8 to 2.01), (7.17 to 1.72), (4.02 to 1.71), (2.18 to ...

  5. A new compound from liquid fermentation broth of Armillaria mellea and the determination of its absolute configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Chao; Zhang, Yu-Wei; Zheng, Li-Hua; Bao, Yong-Li; Wu, Yin; Yu, Chun-Lei; Sun, Lu-Guo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yan-Xin; Sun, Ying; Li, Yu-Xin

    2013-01-01

    A new 2,5-diketopiperazine, (R)-2-(2-(furan-2-yl)-oxoethyl)-octahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dione, and seven known compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of liquid fermentation broth of Armillaria mellea. The structures of the isolated compounds were established from NMR and HR-MS data. The absolute configuration of the new compound was established by comparing the experimental electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectrum with the calculated ECD data.

  6. Determination of iron in seawater by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and atomic fluorescence spectrometry: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabon, J Y; Giamarchi, P; Le Bihan, A

    2010-04-07

    Two methods available for direct determination of total Fe in seawater at low concentration level have been examined: electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and electrothermal atomization laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). In a first part, we have optimized experimental conditions of ETAAS (electrothermal program, matrix chemical modification) for the determination of Fe in seawater by minimizing the chemical interference effects and the magnitude of the simultaneous background absorption signal. By using the best experimental conditions, a detection limit of 80 ng L(-1) (20 microL, 3sigma) for total Fe concentration was obtained by ETAAS. Using similar experimental conditions (electrothermal program, chemical modification), we have optimized experimental conditions for the determination of Fe by LEAFS. The selected experimental conditions for ETA-LEAFS: excitation wavelength (296.69 nm), noise attenuation and adequate background correction led to a detection limit (3sigma) of 3 ng L(-1) (i.e. 54 pM) for total Fe concentration with the use a 20 microL seawater sample. For the two methods, concentration values obtained for the analysis of Fe in a NASS-5 (0.2 microg L(-1)) seawater sample were in good agreement with the certified values. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of iron in seawater by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and atomic fluorescence spectrometry: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabon, J.Y.; Giamarchi, P.; Le Bihan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Two methods available for direct determination of total Fe in seawater at low concentration level have been examined: electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and electrothermal atomization laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). In a first part, we have optimized experimental conditions of ETAAS (electrothermal program, matrix chemical modification) for the determination of Fe in seawater by minimizing the chemical interference effects and the magnitude of the simultaneous background absorption signal. By using the best experimental conditions, a detection limit of 80 ng L -1 (20 μL, 3σ) for total Fe concentration was obtained by ETAAS. Using similar experimental conditions (electrothermal program, chemical modification), we have optimized experimental conditions for the determination of Fe by LEAFS. The selected experimental conditions for ETA-LEAFS: excitation wavelength (296.69 nm), noise attenuation and adequate background correction led to a detection limit (3σ) of 3 ng L -1 (i.e. 54 pM) for total Fe concentration with the use a 20 μL seawater sample. For the two methods, concentration values obtained for the analysis of Fe in a NASS-5 (0.2 μg L -1 ) seawater sample were in good agreement with the certified values.

  8. Comparison of NO titration and fiber optics catalytic probes for determination of neutral oxygen atom concentration in plasmas and postglows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozetic, Miran; Ricard, Andre; Babic, Dusan; Poberaj, Igor; Levaton, Jacque; Monna, Virginie; Cvelbar, Uros

    2003-01-01

    A comparative study of two different absolute methods NO titration and fiber optics catalytic probe (FOCP) for determination of neutral oxygen atom density is presented. Both methods were simultaneously applied for measurements of O density in a postglow of an Ar/O 2 plasma created by a surfatron microwave generator with the frequency of 2.45 GHz an adjustable output power between 30 and 160 W. It was found that the two methods gave similar results. The advantages of FOCP were found to be as follows: it is a nondestructive method, it enables real time measuring of the O density, it does not require any toxic gas, and it is much faster than NO titration. The advantage of NO titration was found to be the ability to measure O density in a large range of dissociation of oxygen molecules

  9. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Absolute determination of the dominant amplitudes of the electroproduction of neutral pions at the momentum transfer of 0,630 GeV2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bantes, B.

    2003-10-01

    A complete Monte Carlo simulation for the neutral pion electroproduction experiment in the kinematics of the Δ(1232) that was carried out at the accelerator facility ELSA has been developed to correct the data concerning effects like detector resolution efficiencies, acceptances and radiation corrections. Results for the leading amplitudes are extracted at the four momentum transfer of 0.630 GeV 2 . Absolute cross sections are extracted using the well known elastic ep scattering to determine the luminosity. (orig.)

  11. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.; Forester, J.P.; Liao, K.H.; Pegg, D.J.; Peterson, R.S.; Thoe, R.S.; Hayden, H.C.; Griffin, P.M.

    1976-01-01

    The atomic structure and collision phenomena of highly stripped ions in the range Z = 6 to 35 were studied. Charge-transfer and multiple-electron-loss cross sections were determined. Absolute x-ray-production cross sections for incident heavy ions were measured. 10 figures, 1 table

  12. Quantitative determination of impurities in nuclear grade aluminum by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, J.R.; Nayak, A.K.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Ravindra, H.R.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with quantitative determination of impurity elements in nuclear grade aluminum, used as fin tubes in research reactors, by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS). The results have been compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) method. Experimental conditions used in both the methods are given in the paper. (author)

  13. A laboratory manual for the determination of metals in water and wastewater by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    1983-01-01

    This guide presents, in addition to a brief discussion of the basic principles and practical aspects of atomic absorption spectrophotometry, a scheme of analysis for the determination of 19 metals in water and wastewater, 16 by flame atomic absorption and 3 by vapour generation techniques. Simplicity, speed and accuracy were the main criteria considered in the selection of the various methods

  14. Selenium determination in biological material by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in graphite furnace and using vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Vidal, M. de F. de.

    1984-01-01

    The applicability of the atomic absorption spectrophotometry to the determination of selenium in biological material using vapor generation and electrothermal atomization in the graphite furnace was investigated. Instrumental parameters and the analytical conditions of the methods were studied. Decomposition methods for the samples were tested, and the combustion in the Wickbold apparatus was chosen. (author) [pt

  15. The Determination of Trace Metals in Saline Waters and Biological Tissues Using the Heated Graphite Atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segar, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    A selective, volatalization technique utilizing the heated graphite atomizer atomic absorption technique has been developed for the analysis of iron in sea water. A similar technique may be used to determine vanadium, copper, nickel and cobalt in saline waters when their concentrations are higher than those normally encountered'in unpolluted sea waters. A preliminary solvent extraction using ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate and methyl iso-butyl ketone permits the determination of a number of elements including iron, copper, zinc, nickel, cobalt and lead in sea water. The heated graphite atomized technique has also been applied to the determination of a range of trace transition elements in marine plant and animal tissues.

  16. Human chorionic gonadotropin cutoff value determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis is useful but not absolute for determining pregnancy outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa M. Khadra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the clinical value of a single early human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG assay (day 14 post embryo transfer in assisted reproductive technology (ART pregnancies. Design: Retrospective study. Settings: The Assisted Reproductive Unit at Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan. Patients: During 2009–2011, a total of 248 embryo transfer cycles resulting in pregnancy, defined as serum HCG concentration of ⩾10 IU/l, were included. Interventions: None. Materials and methods: Pregnancies were classified as viable (live fetus at 24 weeks gestation or non-viable (biochemical pregnancy, miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to evaluate the cutoff value of HCG with maximal sensitivity and specificity to differentiate between viable and non-viable pregnancies. Results: The median HCG concentration was 264 IU/l in viable pregnancies and 120 IU/l in non-viable pregnancies (p < 0.001. The median HCG concentration was 222 IU/l in singleton pregnancies, 389 IU/l in twin pregnancies and 809 IU/l in triplet pregnancies (p < 0.001. An HCG value of 145 IU/l emerged as the most suitable cutoff point to predict viable pregnancy. Conclusion: HCG cutoff values determined by a ROC curve analysis are useful but not absolute for discriminating between viable and non-viable pregnancy outcomes on day 14 after embryo transfer. So it is important to continue routine monitoring of ART pregnancy outcomes.

  17. Determination of lead in flour samples directly by solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinas, Hande; Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2018-02-01

    In this study, lead concentrations in various flour samples were determined by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with solid sampling. Since samples were analyzed directly, the risks and disadvantages of sample digestion were eliminated. Solid flour samples were dried, weighed on the platforms, Pd was added as a modifier and introduced directly into a graphite tube using a manual solid sampler. Platforms and tubes were coated with Zr. The optimized pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. The sensitivities of lead in various flour certified reference materials (CRMs) and aqueous standards were not significantly different. Therefore, aqueous standards were safely used for calibration. The absolute limit of detection and characteristic mass were 7.2 pg and 9.0 pg of lead, respectively. The lead concentrations in different types of flour samples were found in the range of 25-52 μg kg- 1. Finally, homogeneity factors representing the heterogeneity of analyte distribution for lead in flour samples were determined.

  18. Absolute configuration determination of the anti-head-to-head photocyclodimer of anthracene-2-carboxylic acid through cocrystallization with L-prolinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanami, Yuko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Mizoguchi, Jun-ichi; Kanehisa, Nobuko; Fukuhara, Gaku; Nishijima, Masaki; Mori, Tadashi; Inoue, Yoshihisa

    2013-11-01

    The absolute configuration has been established of the enantiopure anti-head-to-head cyclodimer of anthracene-2-carboxylic acid (AC) cocrystallized with L-propinol and dichloromethane [systematic name: (S)-2-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidin-1-ium (5R,6S,11R,12S)-8-carboxy-5,6,11,12-tetrahydro-5,12:6,11-bis([1,2]benzeno)dibenzo[a,e][8]annulene-2-carboxylate dichloromethane monosolvate], C5H12NO(+)·C30H19O4(-)·CH2Cl2. In the crystal structure, the AC dimer interacts with L-prolinol through a nine-membered hydrogen-bonded ring [R2(2)(9)], while the dichloromethane molecule is incorporated to fill the void space. The absolute configuration determined in this study verifies a recent assignment made by comparing theoretical versus experimental circular dichroism spectra.

  19. Chemical method for determination of atomic fluorine flows at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezmel'nitsyn, V.N.; Spirin, S.N.; Chajvanov, B.B.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for determination of atomic fluorine flows from the Krsub(sol)+2F → KrF 2 reaction at 77 K has been developed. The kinetics of krypton difluoride formation in this reaction is studied. The atomic fluorine flows from the surface of a heated catalyst and the energetic efficiency of the process of catalytic molecular fluorine dissociation are determined in the 786-873 K temperature range and 5-40 torr pressure range

  20. Evaluation of a method for the determination of chromium in urine by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.; Sardinas, O.; Castaneda, I.; Sanchez, R.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of chromium in urine by atomic absorption spectrometry, using electrothermic atomization with pyrolytic graphite tubes, is proposed. The determinations are performed by standard addition. The method is applicable to biologic monitoring of populations with different degrees of exposition. It is also used in the analysis of chromium in sediments. Results of chromium in urine of a population group non-exposed to the metal are presented. 11 refs

  1. Biotransformations of 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid and the determination of the absolute configuration of all isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Paulina

    2015-08-01

    2-Hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid, a new type of organophosphorus compound possessing two stereogenic centers, was investigated. Racemic 2-butyryloxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid was synthesized and hydrolyzed using four bacterial species as biocatalysts. In all cases the reaction was more or less stereoselective and isomers bearing a phosphorus atom with an (SP)-configuration were hydrolyzed preferentially. The observed (1)H and (31)P NMR chemical shifts of Mosher esters of 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid were correlated with the configurations of both stereogenic centers of all four stereoisomers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of 4 analytical techniques based on atomic spectrometry for the determination of total tin in canned foodstuffs

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Different techniques for the determination of total tin in beverage and canned food by atomic spectrometry were compared. The performance characteristics of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES), Electrothermal Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETA-AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) were determined in term of linearity, ...

  3. Determination of boron in sea water by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horta, A.M.T.C.; Curtius, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    The chelation-extraction of boric acid with are acid solution of 2-ethyl-1,3 hexanediol in methy1-isobutye-ketone is studied. By this way a simple, quick and precise method for boron determination can be obtained [pt

  4. Determination of the Absolute Configurations Using Exciton Chirality Method for Vibrational Circular Dichroism: Right Answers for the Wrong Reasons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Cody L; Nicu, Valentin P; Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2015-10-22

    Quantum chemical (QC) predictions of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra for the keto form of 3-benzoylcamphor and conformationally flexible diacetates of spiroindicumide A and B are presented. The exciton chirality (EC) model has been briefly reviewed, and a procedure to evaluate the relevance of the EC model has been presented. The QC results are compared with literature experimental VCD spectra as well as with those obtained using the EC model for VCD. These comparisons reveal that the EC contributions to bisignate VCD couplets associated with the C═O stretching vibrations of benzoylcamphor, spiroindicumide A diacetate, and spiroindicumide B diacetate are only ∼30%, ∼3%, and ∼15%, respectively. With such meager EC contributions, the correct absolute configurations (ACs) suggested in the literature for spiroindicumide A diacetate and spiroindicumide B diacetate molecules using the EC concepts can be considered fortuitous. The possibilities for obtaining wrong AC predictions using the EC concepts for VCD are identified, and guidelines for the future use of this model are presented.

  5. Performance on absolute scattering intensity calibration and protein molecular weight determination at BL16B1, a dedicated SAXS beamline at SSRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianrong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie; Li, Xiuhong; Wang, Yuzhu; Tian, Feng; Zhou, Ping

    2017-03-01

    The optical system and end-station of bending-magnet beamline BL16B1, dedicated to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, is described. Constructed in 2009 and upgraded in 2013, this beamline has been open to users since May 2009 and supports methodologies including SAXS, wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), simultaneous SAXS/WAXS, grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). Considering that an increasing necessity for absolute calibration of SAXS intensity has been recognized in in-depth investigations, SAXS intensity is re-stated according to the extent of data processing, and the absolute intensity is suggested to be a unified presentation of SAXS data in this article. Theory with a practical procedure for absolute intensity calibration is established based on BL16B1, using glass carbon and water as primary and secondary standards, respectively. The calibration procedure can be completed in minutes and shows good reliability under different conditions. An empirical line of scale factor estimation is also established for any specific SAXS setup at the beamline. Beamline performance on molecular weight (MW) determination is provided as a straightforward application and verification of the absolute intensity calibration. Results show good accuracy with a deviation of less than 10% compared with the known value, which is also the best attainable accuracy in recent studies using SAXS to measure protein MW. Fast MW measurement following the demonstrated method also enables an instant check or pre-diagnosis of the SAXS performance to improve the data acquisition.

  6. The determination, by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using electrothermal atomization, of platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and iridium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, J.; Robert, R.V.D.

    1982-01-01

    A method that involves measurement by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using electrothermal atomization has been developed for the determination of trace quantities of platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and iridium in mineralogical samples. The elements are separated and concentrated by fusion, nickel sulphide being used as the collector, and the analyte elements are measured in the resulting acid solution. An organic extraction procedure was found to offer no advantages over the proposed method. Mutual interferences between the five platinum-group metals examined, as well as interferences from gold, silver, and nickel were determined. The accuracy of the measurement was established by the analysis of a platinum-ore reference material. The lower limits of determination of each of the analyte elements in a sample material are as follows: platinum 1,6μg/l, palladium 0,2μg/1, rhodium 0,5μg/l, ruthenium 3μg/l, and iridium 2,5μg/l. The relative standard deviations range from 0,05 for rhodium to 0.08 for iridium. The method, which is described in detail in the Appendix, is applicable to the determination of these elements in ores, tailings, and geological materials in which the total concentration of the noble metals is less than 1g/t

  7. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  8. A method for determining weights for excess relative risk and excess absolute risk when applied in the calculation of lifetime risk of cancer from radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Linda [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Oberschleissheim (Germany); University of Manchester, The Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Schneider, Uwe [University of Zurich, Vetsuisse Faculty, Zurich (Switzerland); Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    Radiation-related risks of cancer can be transported from one population to another population at risk, for the purpose of calculating lifetime risks from radiation exposure. Transfer via excess relative risks (ERR) or excess absolute risks (EAR) or a mixture of both (i.e., from the life span study (LSS) of Japanese atomic bomb survivors) has been done in the past based on qualitative weighting. Consequently, the values of the weights applied and the method of application of the weights (i.e., as additive or geometric weighted means) have varied both between reports produced at different times by the same regulatory body and also between reports produced at similar times by different regulatory bodies. Since the gender and age patterns are often markedly different between EAR and ERR models, it is useful to have an evidence-based method for determining the relative goodness of fit of such models to the data. This paper identifies a method, using Akaike model weights, which could aid expert judgment and be applied to help to achieve consistency of approach and quantitative evidence-based results in future health risk assessments. The results of applying this method to recent LSS cancer incidence models are that the relative EAR weighting by cancer solid cancer site, on a scale of 0-1, is zero for breast and colon, 0.02 for all solid, 0.03 for lung, 0.08 for liver, 0.15 for thyroid, 0.18 for bladder and 0.93 for stomach. The EAR weighting for female breast cancer increases from 0 to 0.3, if a generally observed change in the trend between female age-specific breast cancer incidence rates and attained age, associated with menopause, is accounted for in the EAR model. Application of this method to preferred models from a study of multi-model inference from many models fitted to the LSS leukemia mortality data, results in an EAR weighting of 0. From these results it can be seen that lifetime risk transfer is most highly weighted by EAR only for stomach cancer. However

  9. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  10. Determination of cadmium in coal by metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fudagawa, Noriko; Kawase, Akira

    1985-01-01

    Conditions for determination of cadmium in coal were investigated by atomic absorption spectrometry using a boat-shape tungsten furnace. For concentrating and separating cadmium from the coexisting components cadmium dithizonate-m-xylene solution and the 0.05 mol/l perchloric acid solution were examined. Ashing and atomizing temperatures, sheath gas composition, distribution of the cadmium atoms in the furnace were examined. Similar characteristics were obtained for the determination of cadmium in perchloric acid solution and the chelate m-xylene solution, except that a reduction of the peak time and FWHM (full width at half maximum) was observed for the latter solution. When the atomization temperature is near 2300 deg C, the change in the magnitude of absorbance is small in terms of the temperature. The influence of hydrogen contained in the sheath gas was complicated: Change in the thermal conductivity with increasing hydrogen content, resulted decrease of the atomization temperature but the integrated absorbance did not change so much. The concentration of cadmium atoms decreased linearily in the vertical direction of the furnace, while absorbance in the horizontal direction was almost constant. Cadmium in coal was determined by the methods (1) solvent extraction, (2) back-extraction with perchloric acid, (3) on-boat standard addition method. (author)

  11. Determination of heavy metals in polar snow and ice by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, M.A.; Boutron, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    The new laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry technique offers unrivalled sensitivity for the determination of trace metals in a wide variety of samples. This has allowed the direct determination of Pb, Cd and Bi in Antarctic and Greenland snow and ice down to the sub pg/g level. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  12. Determination of the Relative Atomic Masses of Metals by Liberation of Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorne, W. Earle; Rous, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Students determine the relative atomic masses of calcium, magnesium, and aluminum by reaction with hydrochloric acid and measurement of the volume of hydrogen gas liberated. The experiment demonstrates stoichiometry and illustrates clearly that mass of the reagent is not the determinant of the amounts in chemical reactions. The experiment is…

  13. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  14. Determination of the Absolute Enantiomeric Excess of the Carbon Nanotube Ensemble by Symmetry Breaking Using the Optical Titration Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jinsook; Kim, Somin; Jang, Myungsu; Park, Minsuk; Oh, Hyunkyu; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2017-10-17

    Symmetry breaking of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has profound effects on their optoelectronic properties that are essential for fundamental study and applications. Here, we show that isomeric SWNTs that exhibit identical photoluminescence (PL) undergo symmetry breaking by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and exhibit dual PLs and different binding affinities (K a ). Increasing the FMN concentration leads to systematic PL shifts of SWNTs according to structural modality and handedness due to symmetry breaking. Density gradient ultracentrifugation using a FMN-SWNT dispersion displays PL shifts and different densities according to SWNT handedness. Using the optical titration method to determine the PL-based K a of SWNTs against an achiral surfactant as a titrant, left- and right-handed SWNTs display two-step PL inflection corresponding to respective K a values with FMN, which leads to the determination of the enantiomeric excess (ee) of the SWNT ensemble that was confirmed by circular dichroism measurement. Decreasing the FMN concentration for the SWNT dispersion leads to enantiomeric selection of SWNTs. The titration-based ee determination of the widely used sodium cholate-based SWNT dispersion was also demonstrated by using FMN as a cosurfactant.

  15. An indirect method for determining phosphorus in aluminium alloys by atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, J L; Del Nozal, M A; Deban, L; Aller, A J

    1981-07-01

    An indirect method is described for the determination of phosphorus in aluminium alloys. Ammonium molybdate is added to a solution of the aluminium alloy and the molybdophosphoric acid formed is selectively extracted into n-butyl acetate. The twelve molybdenum atoms associated with each phosphate ion are determined by direct atomic-absorption spectrometry with the n-butyl acetate phase in a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame, with measurement at 313.2 nm. The most suitable conditions have been established and the effect of other ions has been studied.

  16. Direct determination of selenoproteins in polyvinylidene difluoride membranes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, U; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2000-01-01

    A method for the direct determination of selenoproteins in plastic membranes after protein separation by gel electrophoresis was developed. Quantification was based on the determination of the selenium content of the proteins by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) after manual...... were excised and chemical modifier was added on top of the excised membrane prior to atomic absorption measurement. Acceptable linearity was achieved in the range 2-10 ng Se, corresponding to selenium concentrations close to 1 mg/L, when aqueous solutions of selenomethionine standard as well...

  17. [Determination of chloride ion in additives of concrete by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Min; Shan, Yun

    2003-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry due to its high sensitivity and selectivity has been widely used for the determination of micro levels of metal elements in various materials. But this method can not be used for the determination of Cl- directly. In this paper the determination of Cl- in additives of concrete by flame atomic absorption spectrometry was studied. Adding superfluous standard solution of Ag+ to the sample solution, the results were obtained by determining the remanent content of Ag+ having reacted with Cl- quantitatively. The acidity of the sample solution and the precision were studied. The standard rate of recovery obtained was in the range of 96%-104%. By the determination of actual samples it was proved that the method features simple sample preparation, fast determination, and little interference, especially for those samples which contain micro levels of Cl-. The procedure is as follows: weight 0.05-2 g of sample, dissolve it in water and adjust the acidity with nitric acid, add proper standard solution of Ag+, and after 2 h, measure the remanent Ag+ content by atomic absorption spectrometry. A GBC902 atomic absorption spectrometry was employed.

  18. A whole rock absolute paleointensity determination of dacites from the Duffer Formation (ca. 3.467 Ga) of the Pilbara Craton, Australia: An impossible task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Krasa, David; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2016-09-01

    We have conducted a whole-rock type magnetic and absolute paleointensity determination of the red dacite of the Duffer Formation from the Pilbara Craton, Australia. The age of the dated rock unit is 3467 ± 5 Ma (95% confidence). Vector analyses results of the step-wise alternating field demagnetization (NRM up to 100 mT) and thermal demagnetization (from NRM up to 650 °C) yield three components of magnetization. Curie point determinations indicate three characteristic temperatures, one at 150-200 °C, a second one at ∼450 °C and a third one at ∼580 °C. Magnetic grain-size experiments were performed on small specimens with a variable field translation balance (VFTB). The coercivity of remanence (Hcr) suggests that the NRM is carried by low-coercivity grains that are associated with a magnetite fraction as is shown by the high-temperature component with blocking temperatures above 450 °C and up to at least 580 °C. The ratios of the hysteresis parameters plotted as a modified Day diagram show that most grain sizes are scattered within the Single Domain (SD) and the Superparamagnetic and Single Domain SP-SD domain ranges. In addition to the rock magnetic experiments we have performed absolute paleointensity experiments on the samples using the modified Thellier-Coe double heating method to determine the paleointensities. Partial-TRM (p-TRM) checks were performed systematically to document magnetomineralogical changes during heating. The temperature was incremented by steps of 50 °C between room temperature and 590 °C. The paleointensity determinations were obtained from the slope of Arai diagrams. Our paleointensity results indicate that the paleofield obtained was ∼6.4 ± 0.68 (N = 11) micro-Teslas with a Virtual Dipole Moment (VDM) of 1.51 ± 0.81 × 1022 Am2, from a medium-to high-temperature component ranging from 300 to 590 °C that has been interpreted to be the oldest magnetization yet recorded in paleomagnetic studies of the Duffer Formation. The

  19. Determination of the absolute configuration of (+)-xestoaminol C [(2S, 3R)-2-amino-3-tetradecanol], a metabolite of Fiji sponge, Xestospongia sp., by the synthesis of its N,O-diacetyl derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Miwako; Mori, Kenji

    2003-02-01

    The N,O-diacetyl derivative of (+)-xestoaminol C (2-amino-3-tetradecanol, 1), an inhibitor of reverse transcriptase isolated from Xestospongia sp., was synthesized from (S)-alanine, and its absolute configuration was determined as 2S, 3R.

  20. Direct Determination of Atomic Structure and Magnetic Coupling of Magnetite Twin Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Li, Hongping; Seki, Takehito; Yin, Deqiang; Sanchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2018-03-27

    Clarifying how the atomic structure of interfaces/boundaries in materials affects the magnetic coupling nature across them is of significant academic value and will facilitate the development of state-of-the-art magnetic devices. Here, by combining atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomistic spin-polarized first-principles calculations, and differential phase contrast imaging, we conduct a systematic investigation of the atomic and electronic structures of individual Fe 3 O 4 twin boundaries (TBs) and determine their concomitant magnetic couplings. We demonstrate that the magnetic coupling across the Fe 3 O 4 TBs can be either antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic, which directly depends on the TB atomic core structures and resultant electronic structures within a few atomic layers. Revealing the one-to-one correspondence between local atomic structures and magnetic properties of individual grain boundaries will shed light on in-depth understanding of many interesting magnetic behaviors of widely used polycrystalline magnetic materials, which will surely promote the development of advanced magnetic materials and devices.

  1. Experimental determination of the attachment coefficients of atoms and ions on monodisperse aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porstendoerfer, J.; Roebig, G.; Ahmed, A.

    1979-01-01

    The attachment coefficients of 212 Pb atoms and ions were measured for aerosols in the diameter range 0.1 to 5 μm. The attachment of the Tn-decay products to the aerosol was carried out in laminar flow through a cylindrical tube. Under the same experimental conditions (but without aerosols) the diffusion coefficient of the atoms was determined. The generation of the monodisperse di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DEHS) aerosol was carried out by controlled condensation of vapour upon nuclei. The aerosols had standard deviations of 3 to 5%. The aerosol size distributions and concentrations were determined by means of an aerosol size spectrometer, which measured the intensity of the scattered light from single-particles or droplets. The experimental results agree well with the values of the diffusion attachment theory based on the kinetic theory of gases with the assumption of a sticking probability of the Pb atoms, S = 1. (author)

  2. [Determination of trace cobalt in human urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometr].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L X; Ding, B M; Jiang, D; Liu, D Y; Yu, B; Zhu, B L; Ding, L

    2016-05-20

    To establish a method to determine cobalt in human urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine with 2% nitric acid diluted two-fold, to quantify the curve, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Co was linear within 2.5~40.0 ng/ml with r>0.999. Spike experiment showed that Co received good recovery rate, which was 90.8%~94.8%. Intra-assay precisions were 3.2%~5.1% for Co, inter-assay precisions were 4.4%~5.2% for Co. The method by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometr to determine urine Co was fast, accurate and with low matrix effect. It could meet the requirement in GBZ/T 210.5-2008.

  3. Using a Novel Absolute Ontogenetic Age Determination Technique to Calculate the Timing of Tooth Eruption in the Saber-Toothed Cat, Smilodon fatalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, M Aleksander; Feranec, Robert S; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Bjornsson, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the superb fossil record of the saber-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis, ontogenetic age determination for this and other ancient species remains a challenge. The present study utilizes a new technique, a combination of data from stable oxygen isotope analyses and micro-computed tomography, to establish the eruption rate for the permanent upper canines in Smilodon fatalis. The results imply an eruption rate of 6.0 millimeters per month, which is similar to a previously published average enamel growth rate of the S. fatalis upper canines (5.8 millimeters per month). Utilizing the upper canine growth rate, the upper canine eruption rate, and a previously published tooth replacement sequence, this study calculates absolute ontogenetic age ranges of tooth development and eruption in S. fatalis. The timing of tooth eruption is compared between S. fatalis and several extant conical-toothed felids, such as the African lion (Panthera leo). Results suggest that the permanent dentition of S. fatalis, except for the upper canines, was fully erupted by 14 to 22 months, and that the upper canines finished erupting at about 34 to 41 months. Based on these developmental age calculations, S. fatalis individuals less than 4 to 7 months of age were not typically preserved at Rancho La Brea. On the whole, S. fatalis appears to have had delayed dental development compared to dental development in similar-sized extant felids. This technique for absolute ontogenetic age determination can be replicated in other ancient species, including non-saber-toothed taxa, as long as the timing of growth initiation and growth rate can be determined for a specific feature, such as a tooth, and that growth period overlaps with the development of the other features under investigation.

  4. Determination of atomic positions from time resolved high resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaini, Zahra; Lin, Pin Ann; Natarajan, Bharath; Zhu, Wenhui; Sharma, Renu

    2018-03-01

    For many reaction processes, such as catalysis, phase transformations, nanomaterial synthesis etc., nanoscale observations at high spatial (sub-nanometer) and temporal (millisecond) resolution are required to characterize and comprehend the underlying factors that favor one reaction over another. The combination of such spatial and temporal resolution (up to 600 µs), while rich in information, produces a large number of snapshots, each of which must be analyzed to obtain the structural (and thereby chemical) information. Here we present a methodology for automated quantitative measurement of real-time atomic position fluctuations in a nanoparticle. We leverage a combination of several image processing algorithms to precisely identify the positions of the atomic columns in each image. A geometric model is then used to measure the time-evolution of distances and angles between neighboring atomic columns to identify different phases and quantify local structural fluctuations. We apply this technique to determine the atomic-level fluctuations in the relative fractions of metal and metal-carbide phases in a cobalt catalyst nanoparticle during single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) growth. These measurements provided a means to obtain the number of carbon atoms incorporated into and released from the catalyst particle, thereby helping resolve carbon reaction pathways during SWCNT growth. Further we demonstrate the use of this technique to measure the reaction kinetics of iron oxide reduction. Apart from reducing the data analysis time, the statistical approach allows us to measure atomic distances with sub-pixel resolution. We show that this method can be applied universally to measure atomic positions with a precision of 0.01 nm from any set of atomic-resolution video images. With the advent of high time-resolution direct detection cameras, we anticipate such methods will be essential in addressing the metrology problem of quantifying large datasets of time

  5. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pozebon, Dirce [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: dircepoz@iq.ufrgs.br; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, UFSM, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 {mu}g g{sup -1} of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

  6. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S.; Pozebon, Dirce; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M.M.

    2007-01-01

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO 3 ) 2 was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 μg g -1 of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

  7. Micro determination of plasma and erythrocyte copper by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, J; Macmahon, R A

    1969-03-01

    The free and total plasma copper and total erythrocyte copper levels have been determined by simple, yet sensitive and highly specific methods, using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. For total copper determination, the copper was split from its protein combination in plasma or red cells by the action of hydrochloric acid at room temperature. The liberated copper was chelated by ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extracted into n-butyl acetate by shaking and the organic extract was aspirated into the atomic absorption spectrophotometer flame. The entire procedure was carried out in polypropylene centrifuge tubes, capped during shaking. For the free plasma copper measurement the hydrochloric acid step was omitted. Removal of the plasma or erythrocyte proteins was found to be unnecessary, and, in addition, the presence of trichloracetic acid caused an appreciable lowering of absorption. Using a double-beam atomic absorption spectrophotometer and scale expansion x 10, micro methods have been derived for determining the total copper of plasma or erythrocytes with 0.1 ml of sample, and the free copper of plasma with 0.5 ml. The macro plasma copper method requires 2 ml of plasma and is suitable for use with single-beam atomic absorption spectrophotometers. With blood from 50 blood donors, normal ranges of plasma and erythrocyte copper have been determined.

  8. Direct microcomputer controlled determination of zinc in human serum by flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Nielsen, Bent; Jensen, Arne

    1986-01-01

    A procedure is described for the direct determination of zinc in human serum by fully automated, microcomputer controlled flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry (Fl-AAS). The Fl system is pumpless, using the negative pressure created by the nebuliser. It only consists of a three-way valve...

  9. Chemical modifiers in electrothermal atomic absorption determination of Platinum and Palladium containing preparations in blood serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аntonina Alemasova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological liquids matrixes influence on the characteristic masses and repeatability of Pt and Pd electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS determination was studied. The chemical modifiers dimethylglyoxime and ascorbic acid for matrix interferences elimination and ETAAS results repeatability improvement were proposed while bioliquids ETAAS analysis, and their action mechanism was discussed.

  10. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  11. Tungsten determination in heat resistant nickel-base-alloys by the method of atomic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorczyk, S.; Wycislik, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of atomic absorption was developed. It allows for the tungsten to be determined in heatresistant nickel-base-alloys within the range 0.01 to 7%. It consists in precipitating tungsten acid in the presence of alkaloids with its following decomposition by hydrofluoric acid in the teflon bomb. (author)

  12. Errors and limits in the determination of plasma electron density by measuring the absolute values of the emitted continuum radiation intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, L.; Bruzzone, H.; Grondona, D.

    1994-01-01

    The reliable determination of a plasma electron structure requires a good knowledge of the errors affecting the employed technique. A technique based on the measurements of the absolute light intensity emitted by travelling plasma structures in plasma focus devices has been used, but it can be easily modified to other geometries and even to stationary plasma structures with time-varying plasma densities. The purpose of this work is to discuss in some detail the errors and limits of this technique. Three separate errors are shown: the minimum size of the density structure that can be resolved, an overall error in the measurements themselves, and an uncertainty in the shape of the density profile. (author)

  13. Synthesis of (3S,3′S- and meso-Stereoisomers of Alloxanthin and Determination of Absolute Configuration of Alloxanthin Isolated from Aquatic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Yamano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the absolute configuration of naturally occurring alloxanthin, a HPLC analytical method for three stereoisomers 1a–c was established by using a chiral column. Two authentic samples, (3S,3′S- and meso-stereoisomers 1b and 1c, were chemically synthesized according to the method previously developed for (3R,3′R-alloxanthin (1a. Application of this method to various alloxanthin specimens of aquatic animals demonstrated that those isolated from shellfishes, tunicates, and crucian carp are identical with (3R,3′R-stereoisomer 1a, and unexpectedly those from lake shrimp, catfish, biwa goby, and biwa trout are mixtures of three stereoisomers of 1a–c.

  14. Determination of {pi}{pi} scattering lengths from measurement of {pi}{sup +{pi}-} atom lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeva, B. [Santiago de Compostela University (Spain); Afanasyev, L. [JINR Dubna (Russian Federation); Benayoun, M. [LPNHE des Universites Paris VI/VII, IN2P3-CNRS (France); Benelli, A. [Zurich University (Switzerland); Berka, Z. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Brekhovskikh, V. [IHEP Protvino (Russian Federation); Caragheorgheopol, G. [IFIN-HH, National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cechak, T. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Chiba, M. [Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan); Chliapnikov, P.V. [IHEP Protvino (Russian Federation); Ciocarlan, C.; Constantinescu, S. [IFIN-HH, National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Costantini, S. [Basel University (Switzerland); Curceanu, C. [IFIN-HH, National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Doskarova, P. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Dreossi, D. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and Trieste University, Trieste (Italy); Drijard, D., E-mail: Daniel.Drijard@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dudarev, A. [JINR Dubna (Russian Federation); Ferro-Luzzi, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Fungueirino Pazos, J.L. [Santiago de Compostela University (Spain)

    2011-10-05

    The DIRAC experiment at CERN has achieved a sizeable production of {pi}{sup +{pi}-} atoms and has significantly improved the precision on its lifetime determination. From a sample of 21 227 atomic pairs, a 4% measurement of the S-wave {pi}{pi} scattering length difference |a{sub 0}-a{sub 2}|=(0.2533{sub -0.0078}{sup +0.0080}|{sub stat}{sup +0.0078}{sub -0.0073}|{sub syst})M{sub {pi}}{sup +-1} has been attained, providing an important test of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  15. Exploiting flow Injection and sequential injection schemes for trace metal determinations by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    Determination of low or trace-level amounts of metals by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) often requires the use of suitable preconcentration and/or separation procedures in order to attain the necessary sensitivity and selectivity. Such schemes are advantageously executed...... by superior performance and versatility. In fact, two approaches are conceivable: The analyte-loaded ion-exchange beads might either be transported directly into the graphite tube where they are pyrolized and the measurand is atomized and quantified; or the loaded beads can be eluted and the eluate forwarded...

  16. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianming [San Diego, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Wu, Ning [Boston, MA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  17. Systematics of multielement determination with resonance ionization mass spectrometry and thermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, L.J.; Fassett, J.D.; Travis, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The systematics for multielement determination using resonance ionization mass spectrometry and thermal atomization is developed. The aspects of atomization, ionization, and detection are discussed and resonance ionization is demonstrated for 19 elements. The selective, sequential ionization of seven elements from a single sample is also demonstrated. A one-wavelength, two-photon ionization scheme generally is used in which the first photon excites a bound transition in the near-ultraviolet region and second photon promotes the electron into theionization continuum. The wavelength-dependence ion formation from the thermally produced atom reservoirs is demonstrated for these elements by scanning a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser across its tunable wavelength range. The observed wavelengths where ionization occurs have been correlated where possible with allowed transitions between known electronic energy levels. The elements accessible by using four common dyes are tabulated. More than 20 elements are accessible within the wavelength range of each dye

  18. Atomic structure of large angle grain boundaries determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Sass, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to determine the atomic structure of the Σ = 5 and 13 [001] twist boundaries in Au with a resolution of 0.09 Angstrom or better. The reciprocal lattices of these boundaries were mapped out using synchrotron radiation. The atomic structures were obtained by testing model structures against the intensity observations with a chi square analysis. The boundary structure were modeled using polyhedra, including octahedra, special configurations of tetrahedra and Archimedian anti-prisms, interwoven together by the boundary symmetry. The results of this work point to the possibility of obtaining general rules for grain boundary structure based on X-ray diffraction observations that give the atomic positions with high resolution

  19. Atomic absorption determination of iron and copper impurities in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelyukova, Yu.V.; Kravchenko, J.B.; Kucher, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    An extraction atomic absorption method for the determination of copper and iron impurities in rare earth compounds has been developed. The extraction separation of determined elements as hydroxy quinolinates with isobuthyl alcohol was used. It increased the sensitivity of these element determination and excluded the effect of the analysed sample. Cu, Te, Zn, Bi, Sn, In, Ga, Tl and the some other elements can be determined at pH 2.0-3.0 but rare earths are remained in an aqueous phase. The condition of the flame combustion does not change during the introduction of isobutyl extract but the sensitivity of the determination of the elements increased 2-3 times. The limit of Fe determination is 0.01 mg/ml and the limit of Cu determination is 0.014 mg/ml

  20. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  1. [Determination of mercury in Boletus impolitus by flow injection-atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Yuan-Zhong

    2008-04-01

    Various test conditions and effect factors for the determination of mercury by flow injection-atomic absorption spectrometry were discussed, and a method for the determination of mercury in Boletus impolitus has been developed. The linear range for mercury is 0-60 microg x L(-1). The relative standard deviation is less than 3.0%, and the recovery is 96%-107%. This method is simple, rapid and has been applied to the determination of mercury in Boletus impolitus samples with satisfactory results.

  2. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  3. Determination of trace amounts of cerium in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of Ce in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is described, and the detection limit of ICP-OES of 0.0004 ppM is compared with that of other methods. The effects of the major elemental components of paint, Si, Pb, Cr, and Na on the ICP-OES determination of Ce were studied. The interference of 400 ppM of the other ions on the determination of 10 ppM Ce was small (0 to 3% error). The method is applicable to the range of 0.2 to 700 ppM Ce

  4. NADH-fluorescence scattering correction for absolute concentration determination in a liquid tissue phantom using a novel multispectral magnetic-resonance-imaging-compatible needle probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Frank; Schalk, Robert; Heintz, Annabell; Feike, Patrick; Firmowski, Sebastian; Beuermann, Thomas; Methner, Frank-Jürgen; Kränzlin, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert; Rädle, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    In this report, a quantitative nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) fluorescence measurement algorithm in a liquid tissue phantom using a fiber-optic needle probe is presented. To determine the absolute concentrations of NADH in this phantom, the fluorescence emission spectra at 465 nm were corrected using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy between 600 nm and 940 nm. The patented autoclavable Nitinol needle probe enables the acquisition of multispectral backscattering measurements of ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and fluorescence spectra. As a phantom, a suspension of calcium carbonate (Calcilit) and water with physiological NADH concentrations between 0 mmol l-1 and 2.0 mmol l-1 were used to mimic human tissue. The light scattering characteristics were adjusted to match the backscattering attributes of human skin by modifying the concentration of Calcilit. To correct the scattering effects caused by the matrices of the samples, an algorithm based on the backscattered remission spectrum was employed to compensate the influence of multiscattering on the optical pathway through the dispersed phase. The monitored backscattered visible light was used to correct the fluorescence spectra and thereby to determine the true NADH concentrations at unknown Calcilit concentrations. Despite the simplicity of the presented algorithm, the root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.093 mmol l-1.

  5. Determinations of its Absolute Dimensions and Distance by the Analyses of Light and Radial-Velocity Curves of the Contact Binary -I. V417 Aquilae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woo Lee

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available New photometric and spectroscopic solutions of W-type overcontact binary V417 Aql were obtained by solving the UBV light curves of Samec et al. (1997 and radial-velocity ones of Lu & Rucinski (1999 with the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney binary code. In the light curve synthesis the light of a third-body, which Qian (2003 proposed, was considered and obtained about 2.7%, 2.2%, and 0.4% for U, B, and V bandpasses, respectively. The model with third-light is better fitted to eclipse parts than that with no third-light. Absolute dimensions of V417 Aql are determined from our solution as M1=0.53 M⊙, M2=1.45 M⊙, R1=0.84 R⊙ and R2=1.31 M⊙, and the distance to it is deduced as about 216pc. Our distance is well consistent with that (204pc derived from Rucinski & Duerbeck's (1997 relation, MV=MV(log P, B-V, but is more distant than that (131±40pc determined by the Hipparcos trigonometric parallax. The difference may result from the relatively large error of Hipparcos parallax for V417 Aql.

  6. Experimental determination of the real elements of the density matrix of H(n=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV collisions of H+ on Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, N.; Gibson, N.D.; Risley, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    In continuation of our previous work, charge transfer processes occurring in protons on rare-gas-atom collisions have been investigated. Diagonal and real off-diagonal coherence elements of the density matrix for H(n=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV electron-capture collisions with Kr atoms are experimentally determined by analyzing the Balmer-α light from the decay of H atoms from the (n=3) state to the (n=2) state. The intensity and polarization of the emitted light are measured as functions of an axially symmetric electric field in the collision region. These data are fitted to a numerical model of the H atom in an electric field in order to extract density-matrix elements. The results are compared to previous studies of H + on He and Ar. The collisionally produced dipole moment of the H(n=3) atom decreases for increasing atomic number of the rare-gas target atoms, which indicates that the final phase of the collision process is not essential for the formation of the dipole moment. This physical picture is further supported by our alignment data. Absolute cross sections for charge transfer to the 3s, 3p, and 3d levels are presented as well

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  8. Determination of vanadium in mussels by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra, Y.; Fernandez, P. [Centro de Control do Medio Marino, Peirao de Vilaxoan s/n, Vilagarcia de Arousa, 36611 Pontevedra (Spain); Gonzalez, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, 15706, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2004-05-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of total vanadium concentration in mussels via electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After the microwave digestion of the samples, a program using temperatures of 1600 C and 2600 C for ashing and atomization respectively, without any matrix modifiers, allowed us to obtain results that were satisfactory since they agreed closely with certified reference material values. The detection limit was 0.03 mg kg{sup -1} (dry weight), indicating that the method is suitable for the analysis of mussel samples. This determination was compared with matrix modifiers that have been reported previously. The method was applied to various cultivated and wild mussels from the Galician coast, yielding levels below 1 mg kg{sup -1} (wet weight). (orig.)

  9. Determination of effective atomic number of composite materials using backscattered gamma photons - A novel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, M. M.; Badiger, N. M.

    2018-03-01

    The effective atomic number (Zeff) of composite materials has been determined by measuring the backscattered gamma photons at 180°. A 661.6 keV gamma photons from 137Cs radioactive source are allowed to scatter at an angle of 180° from the sample. The backscattered photons at 180° from the sample are detected with "2 × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation gamma ray spectrometer coupled to 16 K Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA). It is observed experimentally that the intensity of backscattered photons increases initially with increasing the thickness of the target and then it becomes saturated above a certain thickness. By knowing the saturated thickness values for known atomic number of the elemental targets, the Zeff of composite materials has been determined. The experimentally measured Zeff values have been compared with theoretical values predicted by direct method, power law method and AutoZeff code.

  10. Indirect determination of uranium by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using an air-acetylene flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, J.F.; Das, B.C.

    1977-01-01

    An indirect method has been developed for the determination of uranium by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using an air-acetylene flame. Use is made of the reduction of copper(II) by uranium(IV) followed by complex formation of the copper(I) ions so produced with neocuproine (2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) and finally the determination of copper in this complex by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The results show that the method can be recommended, provided that care is taken to ensure the complete reduction of uranium(VI) to uranium(IV). The sensitivity of the method is 4.9 μg of uranium and the upper limit 500 μg without dilution. (author)

  11. Direct determination of selenoproteins in polyvinylidene difluoride membranes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, U; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2000-01-01

    A method for the direct determination of selenoproteins in plastic membranes after protein separation by gel electrophoresis was developed. Quantification was based on the determination of the selenium content of the proteins by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) after manual...... introduction of membrane pieces into the graphite furnace. The proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and subsequently transferred to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane by semi-dry electroblotting. After staining the membrane, the protein bands...... were excised and chemical modifier was added on top of the excised membrane prior to atomic absorption measurement. Acceptable linearity was achieved in the range 2-10 ng Se, corresponding to selenium concentrations close to 1 mg/L, when aqueous solutions of selenomethionine standard as well...

  12. Atomic absorption determination of vanadium in products of metallurgical production and mineral feed stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikarpova, N.V.; Panteleeva, E.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid and selective method of atomic absorption determination of vanadium in metallurgical process products and numerical feed stock is suggested. Buffering mixture of aluminium and phosphoric acid is used to suppress the effect of sample composition on the value of vanadium atomic absorption. The concentration of buffer components can vary from 400 up to 2000 μg/ml Al and from 2 up to 5% vol. H 3 PO 4 . The suggested mixture completely eli-- minates the strong chromium effect. The developed method was used for analyzing steels, alloys based on Mo, Ni, Ti, Cr, as well as titanium magnetite ores and concentrates. The method enables to determine from 0.05 up to 10% vanadium with 0.05-0.01 relative standard deviation, respectively

  13. The relation of double peaks, observed in quartz hydride atomizers, to the fate of free atoms in the determination of arsenic and selenium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    D'Ulivo, A.; Dědina, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 12 (2002), s. 2069-2079 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0453 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : hydride atomization * hydride generation * atomic absortion spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.695, year: 2002

  14. Determination of five trace elements in leaves in Nanfang sweet orange by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangqing

    2006-01-01

    The five trace elements of copper, zinc, manganese, iron and cobalt in leaves of Nanfang sweet orange are determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The technique is simple, precise and sensitive. The effect of the type of digesting solution (mixed acid), the ratio of mixed acid, the volume of digesting solution and the time of digesting are investigated in details. The results show that leaves of Nanfang sweet orange contain higher amount of iron and zinc. (authors)

  15. On-line Incorporation of Cloud Point Extraction in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determination of Silver

    OpenAIRE

    DALALI, Nasser; JAVADI, Nasrin; AGRAWAL, Yadvendra KUMAR

    2008-01-01

    A cloud point extraction method was incorporated into a flow injection system, coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, for determination of trace amounts of silver. The analyte in the aqueous solution was acidified with 0.2 mol L-1 sulfuric acid and complexed with dithizone. The cloud point extraction was performed using the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114. After obtaining the cloud point, the surfactant-rich phase containing the dithizonate complex was collected in a m...

  16. Determination of Selection Criteria for Spray Drift Reduction from Atomization Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    W. Clint Hoffmann,1 Bradley K. Fritz,1 William E. Bagley,2 Joe Gednalske,3 Curt E. Elsik,4 and Greg R. Kruger5 Determination of Selection Criteria...for Spray Drift Reduction from Atomization Data REFERENCE: Hoffmann, W. Clint, Fritz, Bradley K., Bagley, William E., Ged- nalske, Joe, Elsik, Curt E...351–357. [15] Downer, R. A., Wolf, T. M., Chapple, A. C., Hall, F. R., and Hazen , J. L., “Characterizing the Impact of Drift Management Adjuvants on

  17. Automated installation for atomic emission determination of gold, silver and platinum group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayakina, S.B.; Anoshin, G.N.; Gerasimov, P.A.; Smirnov, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    An automated installation for the direct atomic emission determination of silver, gold and platinum-group metals (Ru) in geological and geochemical materials with software for automated data acquisition and handling is designed and developed. The installation consists of a DFS-458 diffraction spectrograph, a MAES-10 multichannel analyzer of emission spectra, and a dual-jet plasmatron. A library of spectral lines of almost all elements excited in the dual-jet plasmatron is complied [ru

  18. Determination of diethyllead in the urine by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Turlakiewicz, Z; Jakubowski, M; Chmielnicka, J

    1985-01-01

    A method for the determination of diethyllead in urine by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry after chelation with glyoxal-bis (2-hydroxyanil) and extraction of the formed complex with methyl isobutyl ketone is described. The method is specific in relation to both triethyllead and inorganic lead. The limit of detection was 3.2 micrograms Pb/l and the relative standard deviation in the concentration range 20-100 micrograms Pb/l was 0.076.

  19. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming. PMID:26133270

  20. [Determination of trace bismuth in iron, steel and alloy by hydride generation-atomic fluorimetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q

    2000-02-01

    With the aid of hydride generation-atomic fluorimetry, an analysis method by adding thiosemicarbazide-ascorbic acid and phosphoric acid to eliminate the interference of matrix has been developed for the determination of trace bismuth in iron, steel and alloy. The detection limit is Bi = 0.02 microgram.g-1 (3 sigma, n = 11, sample amount 0.2000 g). The method has been applied to determine trace arsenic in middle and low alloy steel, ferro and nickel-based superalloy, nickel-based superalloy, cobalt-based superalloy, copper alloy with satisfactory results.

  1. Determination of platinum originated from antitumoral drugs in human urine by atomic absorption spectrometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Anilton Coelho; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; Luna, Aderval Severino; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto

    2010-10-15

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are the most common platinum-based drugs used in cancer treatment. Pharmacokinetic investigations, the evaluation of the body burden during the treatment, as well as baseline levels of platinum in humans have attracted great interest. Thus, accurate analytical methods for fast and easy Pt monitoring in clinical samples become necessary. In the present study atomic absorption spectrometric methods for the determination of platinum in the forms of cisplatin and carboplatin in human urine were investigated. Platinum, in these different forms, could be determined in urine, after simple sample dilution. Regarding electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, the optimum parameters were defined by a central composite design optimization. Multiplicative matrix effects were overcome by using a mixture of HCl and NaCl as modifier. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.004 mgL(-1) of platinum in the original sample. For the analysis of more concentrated samples, high resolution continuous source flame atomic absorption spectrometry was also investigated. Flame conditions were optimized by a multivariate D-optimal design, using as response the sum of the analyte addition calibration slopes and their standard deviations. Matrix matched external calibration with PtCl(2) calibration solutions, was possible, and the LOD was 0.06 mgL(-1) in the original sample. The results obtained by the proposed procedures were also in good agreement with those obtained by an independent comparative procedure. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Spaceflight Experiment to Determine the Effect of Chamfered Sample Holders on Atomic Oxygen Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Kshama; Banks, Bruce A.; De Groh, Kim K.

    2017-01-01

    The exteriors of low Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft are subjected to many environmental threats that can cause the surface materials to degrade. One of these threats is atomic oxygen (AO), which is formed by photo dissociation of molecular oxygen by energetic UV radiation. Atomic oxygen exposure can result in oxidative erosion of polymers leading to structural or thermal failure of spacecraft components. The amount of AO erosion expected during a mission can be calculated by knowing the AO erosion yield (Ey, volume loss per incident atom) of the material and the AO fluence expected for the mission. The Ey can be determined through dehydrated mass loss measurements of test samples if one knows the AO fluence, density, and exposure area. Such measurements have been made as part of flight experiments, including the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2) Polymers Experiment. The MISSE 2 Polymers Experiment sample holders had chamfered circular apertures that controlled the exposure area, but also allowed some additional AO to scatter from the chamfered edges onto the samples thus causing some samples to erode thru and peel at their perimeter due to this scattering effect. By modeling the scattered AO flux one can predict the actual total AO fluence, and hence more accurate sample Ey. Sample holders with different chamfered-perimeter to exposed-area ratios have been designed for future spaceflight experiments that allow a more accurate determination of the Ey for large area polymers, representative of their use on spacecraft surfaces.

  3. Atomic hydrogen determination in medium-pressure microwave discharge hydrogen plasmas via emission actinometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Zicai; Xu Yong; Yang Xuefeng; Wang Weiguo; Zhu Aimin

    2005-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in the chemical vapour deposition of functional materials, plasma etching and new approaches to the chemical synthesis of hydrogen-containing compounds. This work reports experimental determinations of atomic hydrogen in microwave discharge hydrogen plasmas formed from the TM 01 microwave mode in an ASTeX-type reactor, via optical emission spectroscopy using Ar as an actinometer. The relative intensities of the H atom Balmer lines and Ar-750.4 nm emissions as functions of input power and gas pressure have been investigated. At an input microwave power density of 13.5 W cm -3 , the approximate hydrogen dissociation fractions calculated from electron-impact excitation and quenching cross sections in the literature, decreased from ∼0.08 to ∼0.03 as the gas pressure was increased from 5 to 25 Torr. The influences of the above cross sections, and the electron and gas temperatures of the plasmas on the determination of the hydrogen dissociation fraction data have been discussed

  4. The determination of magnesium in simulated PWR coolant by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatford, C.; Torrance, K.

    1988-06-01

    The determination of magnesium in simulated PWR coolant has been investigated by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with atomization from a L'vov platform. The presence of boric acid in the coolant suppresses the magnesium absorption to such an extent that removal of the boron is necessary and three variations of a methyl borate volatilization technique for the in situ removal of boron from the sample platform were investigated. This work has shown that dilution of the sample with an equal volume of acidified methanol and volatilization of the methyl borate was adequate for the determination of magnesium in coolant samples containing up to 2000 mg 1 -1 of boron. In simulated coolant samples containing 25 and 4 μg 1 -1 of magnesium, positive biases of about 2 and 0.5 μg 1 -1 were measured and these errors were considered to be due to contamination. The limit of detection in the presence of 100 and 2000 mg 1 -1 boron were 0.14 and 0.93 μg 1 -1 respectively. These performance characteristics suggest the method is completely acceptable for monitoring the chemical purity of PWR coolant and associated waters containing boric acid. If, however, more precise analyses were to be required for research purposes then any significant improvement in the above figures would require increased purity of reagents, clean-room conditions to reduce contamination and a more versatile atomic absorption spectrophotometer. (author)

  5. Determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the pulsed laser atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the recently developed Pulsed Laser Atom Probe. A procedure based on the reduction of the lattice evaporation field with increasing emitter temperature is found to be the most convenient and reliable method between 60 and 500 K. Calibration curves (plots of the evaporation field versus temperature) are presented for dc and pulsed field evaporation of W, Mo, and Rh. These results show directly the important influence of the evaporation rate on the temperature dependence of the evaporation field. The possibility of a temperature calibration based on the ionic charge state distribution of field evaporated lattice atoms is also discussed. The shift in the charge state distributions which occurs when the emitter temperature is increased and the applied field strength is decreased at a constant rate of evaporation is shown to be due to the changing field and not the changing temperature. Nevertheless, the emitter temperature can be deduced from the charge state distribution for a specified evaporation rate. Charge state distributions as a function of field strength and temperature are presented for the same three materials. Finally, a preliminary experiment is reported which shows that the emitter temperature can be determined from field ion microscope observations of single atom surface diffusion over low index crystal planes. This last calibration procedure is shown to be very useful at higher temperatures (>600 K) where the other two methods become unreliable

  6. The determination, by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry, of impurities in manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaes, G.E.E.; Robert, R.V.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes various methods for the determination of impurities in electrolytic manganese dioxide by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The sample is dissolved in a mixture of acids, any residue being ignited and retreated with acid. Several AAS methods were applied so that the analysis required to meet the specifications could be attained. These involved conventional flame AAS, AAS with electrothermal atomization (ETA), hydride generation coupled with AAS, and cold-vapour AAS. Of the elements examined, copper, iron, zinc, and lead can be determined direct with confidence with or without corrections based on recoveries obtained from spiked solutions. Nickel can be determined direct by use of the method of standard additions, and copper, nickel, and lead by ETA with the method of standard additions. Arsenic and antimony are determined by hydride generation coupled with AAS, and mercury by cold-vapour AAS. The precision of analysis (relative standard deviation) is generally less than 0,050. Values were obtained for aluminium, molybdenum, magnesium, sodium, copper, chromium, and cadmium, but the accuracy of these determinations has not been fully established

  7. Rapid increase of near atomic resolution virus capsid structures determined by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phuong T; Reddy, Vijay S

    2018-01-01

    The recent technological advances in electron microscopes, detectors, as well as image processing and reconstruction software have brought single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) into prominence for determining structures of bio-molecules at near atomic resolution. This has been particularly true for virus capsids, ribosomes, and other large assemblies, which have been the ideal specimens for structural studies by cryo-EM approaches. An analysis of time series metadata of virus structures on the methods of structure determination, resolution of the structures, and size of the virus particles revealed a rapid increase in the virus structures determined by cryo-EM at near atomic resolution since 2010. In addition, the data highlight the median resolution (∼3.0 Å) and size (∼310.0 Å in diameter) of the virus particles determined by X-ray crystallography while no such limits exist for cryo-EM structures, which have a median diameter of 508 Å. Notably, cryo-EM virus structures in the last four years have a median resolution of 3.9 Å. Taken together with minimal sample requirements, not needing diffraction quality crystals, and being able to achieve similar resolutions of the crystal structures makes cryo-EM the method of choice for current and future virus capsid structure determinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of metallic impurities in raw materials for radioisotope production by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Alvarez, F.; Capdevila, C.

    1969-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry has been used for the determination of traces of calcium in scandium oxide, copper in zinc, iron in cobalt oxide, manganese In ferric oxide, nickel in copper and zinc in gallium oxide. The influences on the sensitivities arising from the hollow cathode currents, the gas pressures and the acid concentrations have been considered. A study of the interferences from the metallic matrices has also been performed, the interference due to the absorption of the manganese radiation by the atoms of iron being the most outstanding . In order to remove the interfering elements and increase sensitivity, pre-concentration methods have been tested. The addition methods has also been used. (Author) 14 refs

  9. Determination of Cd in urine by cloud point extraction-tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, George L; Pharr, Kathryn E; Calloway, Clifton P; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Jones, Bradley T

    2008-09-15

    Cadmium concentrations in human urine are typically at or below the 1 microgL(-1) level, so only a handful of techniques may be appropriate for this application. These include sophisticated methods such as graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. While tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry is a simpler and less expensive technique, its practical detection limits often prohibit the detection of Cd in normal urine samples. In addition, the nature of the urine matrix often necessitates accurate background correction techniques, which would add expense and complexity to the tungsten coil instrument. This manuscript describes a cloud point extraction method that reduces matrix interference while preconcentrating Cd by a factor of 15. Ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and Triton X-114 are used as complexing agent and surfactant, respectively, in the extraction procedure. Triton X-114 forms an extractant coacervate surfactant-rich phase that is denser than water, so the aqueous supernatant is easily removed leaving the metal-containing surfactant layer intact. A 25 microL aliquot of this preconcentrated sample is placed directly onto the tungsten coil for analysis. The cloud point extraction procedure allows for simple background correction based either on the measurement of absorption at a nearby wavelength, or measurement of absorption at a time in the atomization step immediately prior to the onset of the Cd signal. Seven human urine samples are analyzed by this technique and the results are compared to those found by the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of the same samples performed at a different institution. The limit of detection for Cd in urine is 5 ngL(-1) for cloud point extraction tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the method is determined with a standard reference material (toxic metals in freeze-dried urine) and the determined values agree with

  10. Hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of trace arsenic in draining waste water of uranium hydrometallurgical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Suqing; Sun Shiying; Xue Jingxia

    1986-01-01

    The arsenate is reduced to the arsenite by potassium iodide-sulfourea in dilute sulphuric acid. Then the arsenite is reduced to arsine by sodium borohydride. The arsine carried into silica tube atomizer by nitrogen is atomized at 920 deg C and determined by the homemade atomic absorption instrument. It is shown that the sensitivity of the mentioned method is 0.2 ng/ml (1% absorption). The recovery is 88-103% and the relative standard deviation is ≤ 10%

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Study and determination of the ratio atoms between hydrogen and manganese in the manganese sulphate bath: procedure and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Leonardo C. de; Pereira, Walsan W.; Fonseca, Evaldo S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: curvello@ird.gov.br; walsan@ird.gov.br; Leite, Sandro P. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2007-07-01

    The Brazilian Neutron Laboratory (LN) is part of the National Laboratory of Ionising Radiation of Metrology (LNMRI/IRD). It operates a system for absolute standardization for the measurement of the neutrons sources fluence. The Manganese Sulphate Bath (MSB) is part of this measurement system and was donated by the Bureau International de Poids et Measures (BIPM) in 1996. Since then at LN has become a fulfilled inquiry and measurements of fluence rate of a neutrons source Q. LN has carried through activities for the maintenance and dissemination of the reference values for this primary standard. Currently LN advances in two work lines: One of them is the study of the bath sensibility of the detection system (e), and the other is the study of f parameter, that measures the fraction of captured neutrons by {sup 55}Mn. In the present work, we dedicate special attention to the measurement of the neutron fraction that depends on the amount of ratio atoms between hydrogen and manganese. A revision of the procedures and the experience involved with the measurement system gave chance to evaluate points for a metrology refinement leading to lower uncertainties and greater reliability degree values. To obtain the cited refinement, the following stages had been fulfilled: Firstly, the development of a tool for confection of standardized crucibles. Secondly, the characterization of the muffle used in the work through the survey of heating slopes. And finally, the study of the volatility with the temperature of manganese sulphate (MnSO4 + H2O) through a thermo-gravimetric analysis in the own muffle conditions used in the work. It was observed that the steady temperature of operation in the quantification of the Manganese in the solution meets above of 350 deg C and this caused a significant improvement over the measurement proceeding. This work demonstrates that the improvements in the proceeding for the determination of the NH/NMn ratio leads to the one of the goals longed for

  14. Trace determination of antimony by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with analyte preconcentration/atomization in a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurynková, Pavla; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2018-06-20

    Atomization conditions for antimony hydride in the plasma atomizer based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with atomic absorption spectrometric detection were optimized. Argon was found as the best discharge gas under a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 while the DBD power was optimum at 30 W. Analytical figures of merit including interference study of As, Se and Bi have been subsequently investigated and the results compared to those found in an externally heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA). The limit of detection (LOD) reached in DBD (0.15 ng mL -1  Sb) is comparable to that observed in QTA (0.14 ng mL -1  Sb). Finally, possibility of Sb preconcentration by stibane in situ trapping in a DBD atomizer was studied. For trapping time of 300 s, the preconcentration efficiency and LOD, respectively, were 103 ± 2% and 0.02 ng mL -1 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effective atomic number and density determination of rocks by X-ray microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jussiani, Eduardo Inocente; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Microtomography, as a non-destructive technique, has become an important tool in studies of internal properties of materials. Recently, interest using this methodology in characterizing the samples with respect to their compositions, especially rocks, has grown. Two physical properties, density and effective atomic number, are important in determining the composition of rocks. In this work, six samples of materials with densities that varied from 2.42 to 6.84g/cm(3) and effective atomic numbers from 15.0 to 77.3 were studied. The measurements were made using a SkyScan-Bruker 1172 microtomography apparatus operating in voltages at 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100kV with a resolution of 13.1μm. Through micro-CT images, an average gray scale was calculated for the samples and correlation studies of this value with the density and the effective atomic number of samples were made. Linear fits were obtained for each energy value. The obtained functions were tested with samples of Amazonite, Gabbro, Sandstone and Sodalite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  17. Direct determination of Hg in polymers by solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resano, M.; Briceno, J.; Belarra, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores the potential of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GFAAS) for the fast and direct determination of Hg in polymers. Eight certified reference materials with different composition (polyethylene-PE-, polystyrene-PS-, poly vinyl chloride-PVC- and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-ABS-) were selected for the study, covering a wide Hg content range (from 20 to 1100 μg g - 1 ). The difficulties found in achieving a selective atomization of the analyte from these samples were partially mitigated by the maintenance of the Ar flow during the atomization step, leading to an improved signal-to-background ratio. Even then, when a line source (LS) GFAAS instrument was employed for analysis, it was only possible to develop truly accurate procedures relying on the use of aqueous standards for calibration for PE and PVC samples, and different atomization conditions (1200 deg. C and 1300 deg. C, respectively) were needed for the two types of samples. The use of high-resolution continuum source (HR-CS) GFAAS instrumentation permitted to improve this situation significantly thanks to its higher potential for the correction of high and fast changing background. With such an instrument, satisfactory results could be obtained for all the samples under study using the same atomization conditions (1200 deg. C) and aqueous standard solutions for calibration. Additionally, the HR-CS GFAAS technique presented a lower limit of detection (0.6 μg g - 1 for CS and 2.2 μg g - 1 for LS), a broader linear range (10 to 320 Hg ng for CS, and 20 to 200 ng for LS), and a somewhat improved sensitivity (approximately 0.0030 s ng - 1 for CS using the three central pixels for quantification, and approximately 0.0025 s ng - 1 for LS). Overall, the use of HR-CS GFAAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in plastics, such as straightforward calibration with aqueous standards, a high sample throughput (15 min

  18. Determination of mercury in sewage sludge by direct slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baralkiewicz, Danuta; Gramowska, Hanka; Kozka, MaIgorzata; Kanecka, Anetta

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) method was elaborated to the determination of Hg in sewage sludge samples with the use of KMnO 4 +Pd modifier. The minimum sample amount required for slurry preparation with respect to sample homogeneity was evaluated by weighting masses between 3 and 30 mg directly into the autosampler cups. Validation of the proposed method was performed with the use of Certified Reference Materials of sewage sludge, CRM 007-040 and CRM 144R. Two sewage sludge samples from Poznan (Poland) city were analysed using the present direct method and a method with sample digestion, resulting in no difference within statistical error

  19. Determination of lead in high-purity silver. Comparison between photon activation and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Neskovic, C.; Fedoroff, M.; Revel, G.

    1978-01-01

    A chemical separation based on the fixation of silver on nickel ferrocyanide was studied. It was applied to the determination of lead in silver by photon-activation or atomic absorption spectrometry. The first method gave a detection limit of 0.1 μg. The second one could not be applied for concentration less than 50 μg/g, owing to loss by adsorption. Analytical results showed that lead is one of the major metallic impurity in high purity silver. (author)

  20. Atomic absorption determination of metals in soils using ultrasonic sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmilenko, F.A.; Smityuk, N.M.; Baklanov, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that ultrasonic treatment accelerates sample preparation of soil extracts from chernozem into different solvents by a factor of 6 to 60. These extracts are used for the atomic absorption determination of soluble species of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The optimum ultrasound parameters (frequency, intensity, and treatment time) were found for preparing soil extracts containing analytes in concentrations required in agrochemical procedures. Different extractants used to extract soluble heavy metals from soils of an ordinary chernozem type in agrochemical procedures using ultrasonic treatment were classified in accordance with the element nature [ru

  1. Direct determination of sodium and potassium in blood serum by flow injection and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burguera, J.L.; Burguera, M.; Gallignani, M.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for the measurement of sodium and potassium in blood serum without any sample dilution by using flow injection and atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. A sample throughout of 100 measurements per hour is possible. The coefficient of variation for within-run determination was about 1,14 and 2,36% for sodium and potassium, respectively, in serum samples (n=10). The method is easily adaptable to pediatric research, because of the low required sample volume of 5ul. (Author) [pt

  2. Solvent extraction atomic absorption determination of indium in minerals and rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Samchuk, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    A method of the atomic-absorption determination of indium in minerals and rocks after extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone of an indium complex with N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylamine (CAPHA) has been developed. The characteristic indium concentration in the dispersion of the extract into the acetylene-air flame is 0.08 mcg/ml. The indium-CAPHA complex is extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone practically completely at pH 3.5-7.6, Ksub(ex)=10sup(-0.92). Consideration is given to the effect of organic solvents on the absorption of indium

  3. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of some fluoroquinolone antibacterials using ammonium reineckate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghannam, Sheikha M.

    2008-04-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GTF), moxifloxacin (MXF) and sparfloxacin (SPF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. Optimum concentration ranges for the determination of GTF, MXF and SPF were 5.0-150, 40-440 μg mL -1 and 0.10-1.5 mg mL -1 using atomic absorption (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods, respectively. Detection and quantification limits are ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 μg mL -1 using AAS method or 30-45 μg mL -1 using colorimetric method. The proposed procedures have been applied successfully to the analysis of these drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and the results are favourably comparable to the reference methods.

  4. [Determination of sulfur in plant using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jia-xi

    2009-05-01

    A method for the analysis of sulfur (S) in plant by molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide (CS) using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (CS AAS) with a fuel-rich air/acetylene flame has been devised. The strong CS absorption band was found around 258 nm. The half-widths of some absorption bands were of the order of picometers, the same as the common atomic absorption lines. The experimental procedure in this study provided optimized instrumental conditions (the ratio of acetylene to air, the burner height) and parameters, and researched the spectral interferences and chemical interferences. The influence of the organic solvents on the CS absorption signals and the different digestion procedures for the determination of sulfur were also investigated. The limit of detection achieved for sulfur was 14 mg x L(-1), using the CS wavelength of 257. 961 nm and a measurement time of 3 s. The accuracy and precision were verified by analysis of two plant standard reference materials. The major applications of this method have been used for the determination of sulfur in plant materials, such as leaves. Compared to the others, this method for the analysis of sulfur is rapid, easy and simple for sulfur determination in plant.

  5. Some metals determination in beers by atomic emission spectrometry of induced argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushige, I.

    1990-01-01

    It was made the identification and determination of metals in brazilian bottled and canned beer, using atomic emission spectrometry with d.c. are and argon coupled plasma excitation sources. The elements Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in beer samples, after treatment with HNO sub(3) conc. /H sub(2) O sub(2) (30%). In the determination of Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and alternative method using HNO sub(3) conc. /O sub(3) was proved be useful. The results obtained for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were below the limits established by brazilian legislation, showing the good quality of the beer concerning the metals. The results of this work were requested by the previous Ministerio do Meio Ambiente e Urbanismo in order to contribute to review the brazilian legislation in foods and beverages about metals contents. (author)

  6. [Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of thallium in blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q L; Gao, G

    2016-04-20

    Colloidal palladium was used as chemical modifier in the determination of blood thallium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Blood samples were precipitated with 5% (V/V)nitric acid, and then determined by GFAAS with colloidal palladium used as a chemical modifier. 0.2% (W/V)sodium chloride was added in the standard series to improve the matrix matching between standard solution and sample. The detection limit was 0.2 μg/L. The correlation coefficient was 0.9991. The recoveries were between 93.9% to 101.5%.The relative standard deviations were between 1.8% to 2.7%.The certified reference material of whole blood thallium was determined and the result was within the reference range Conclusion: The method is accurate, simple and sensitive, and it can meet the needs of detection thallium in blood entirely.

  7. [Determination of aluminum in sediments by atomic absorption spectrophotometer without FIA spectrophotometric analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen-yi; Han, Guang-xi; Song, Xi-ming; Luo, Zhi-xiong

    2008-06-01

    To search for a new method of determining, we developed a new flow injection analyzer, applied to the atomic absorption spectrophotometer, relying on it without flame in place of visible spectrophotometer, and studied the appropriate condition for the determination of aluminum in sediments, thus built up a kind of new analytical test technique. Three peak and two valley absorption values (A1, A2, A3, A4 and A5) can be continuously obtained simultaneously that all can be used for quantitative analysis, then we discussed its theory and experiment technique. Based on the additivity of absorbance (A = A1+A2+A3+A4+ A5), the sensitivity of FIA is enhanced, and its precision and linear relation are also good, raising the efficiency of AAS. The simple method has been applied to determining Al in sediments, and the results are satisfactory.

  8. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6–4.3%), repeatability (4–9%), reproducibility (9–11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as

  9. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia, E-mail: e.vasileva-veleva@iaea.org

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6–4.3%), repeatability (4–9%), reproducibility (9–11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as

  10. Trace determination of antimony by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with analyte preconcentration/atomization in a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zurynková, Pavla; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 1010, JUN (2018), s. 11-19 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * Stibane * atomization and preconcentration Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  11. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  12. Slurry analysis after lead collection on a sorbent and its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baysal, Asli; Tokman, Nilgun [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469 Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey); Akman, Suleyman [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469 Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: akmans@itu.edu.tr; Ozeroglu, Cemal [Istanbul University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, 34320 Avcilar-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-02-11

    In this study, in order to eliminate the drawbacks of elution step and to reach higher enrichment factors, a novel preconcentration/separation technique for the slurry analysis of sorbent loaded with lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was described. For this purpose, at first, lead was collected on ethylene glycol dimethacrylate methacrylic acid copolymer (EGDMA-MA) treated with ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) by conventional batch technique. After separation of liquid phase, slurry of the sorbent was prepared and directly pipetted into graphite furnace of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Optimum conditions for quantitative sorption and preparation of the slurry were investigated. A 100-fold enrichment factor could be easily reached. The analyte element in certified sea-water and Bovine-liver samples was determined in the range of 95% confidence level. The proposed technique was fast and simple and the risks of contamination and analyte loss were low. Detection limit (3{delta}) for Pb was 1.67 {mu}g l{sup -1}.

  13. Measurement of absolute light yield and determination of a lower limit for the light attenuation length for YAP:Ce crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Domenico, G.D.; Zavattini, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the peak position of the photoabsorption peak as a function of the interaction distance from the photomultiplier window in order to get some information about the light attenuation length, internal reflectivity and absolute light yield for a 2 x 2 x 30 mm 3 YAP:Ce scintillator

  14. Study of the roles of chemical modifiers in determining boron using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and optimization of the temperature profile during atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Shirasaki, Toshihiro; Yonetani, Akira; Imai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The measurement conditions for determining boron using graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) were investigated. Differences in the boron absorbance profiles were found using three different commercially available GF-AAS instruments when the graphite atomizers in them were not tuned. The boron absorbances found with and without adjusting the graphite atomizers suggested that achieving an adequate absorbance for the determination of boron requires a sharp temperature profile that overshoots the target temperature during the atomization process. Chemical modifiers that could improve the boron absorbance without the need for using coating agents were tested. Calcium carbonate improved the boron absorbance but did not suppress variability in the peak height. Improvement of boron absorbance was comparatively less using iron nitrate or copper nitrate than using calcium carbonate, but variability in the peak height was clearly suppressed using iron nitrate or copper nitrate. The limit of detection was 0.0026 mg L(-1) when iron nitrate was used. It appears that iron nitrate is a useful new chemical modifier for the quick and simple determination of boron using GF-AAS.

  15. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward

  16. Calculations of recombination rates for cold 4He atoms from atom-dimer phase shifts and determination of universal scaling functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Three-body recombination rates for cold 4 He are calculated with a method which exploits the simple relationship between the imaginary part of the atom-dimer elastic scattering phase shift and the S-matrix for recombination. The elastic phase shifts are computed above breakup threshold by solving a three-body Faddeev equation in momentum space with inputs based on a variety of modern atom-atom potentials. Recombination coefficients for the HFD-B3-FCII potential agree very well with the only previously published results. Since the elastic scattering and recombination processes for 4 He are governed by 'Efimov physics', they depend on universal functions of a scaling variable. The computed recombination coefficients for potentials other than HFD-B3-FCII make it possible to determine these universal functions

  17. On-line determination of manganese in solid seafood samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yebra, M.C.; Moreno-Cid, A.

    2003-01-01

    Manganese is extracted on-line from solid seafood samples by a simple continuous ultrasound-assisted extraction system (CUES). This system is connected to an on-line manifold, which permits the flow-injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese. Optimisation of the continuous leaching procedure is performed by an experimental design. The proposed method allows the determination of manganese with a relative standard deviation of 0.9% for a sample containing 23.4 μg g -1 manganese (dry mass). The detection limit is 0.4 μg g -1 (dry mass) for 30 mg of sample and the sample throughput is ca. 60 samples per hour. Accurate results are obtained by measuring TORT-1 certified reference material. The procedure is finally applied to mussel, tuna, sardine and clams samples

  18. Determination of trace amounts of tin in geological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, E.P.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption method is described for the determination of traces of tin in rocks, soils, and stream sediments. A dried mixture of the sample and ammonium iodide is heated to volatilize tin tetraiodide -which is then dissolved in 5 % hydrochloric acid, extracted into TOPO-MIBK, and aspirated into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The limit of determination is 2 p.p.m. tin and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2 to 14 %. Up to 20 % iron and 1000 p.p.m. Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Hg, Mo, V, or W in the sample do not interfere. As many as 50 samples can be easily analyzed per man-day. ?? 1976.

  19. Determination of cadmium in whole blood and urine by Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleban, P A; Pearson, K H

    1979-12-17

    Direct determination of cadmium in whole blood and urine can be achieved using Zeeman effect flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. Within-run precision studies for whole blood cadmium determinations gave relative standard deviations of 11.3% and 6.3% for 0.53 micrograms/l and 3.16 micrograms/l, respectively. Within-run precision studies for the urine analyses yielded relative standard deviations of 11.3% and 5.2% for 0.62 micrograms/l and 2.48 micrograms/l, respectively. The detection limit is 0.12 micrograms/l in the diluted specimens. Thus, this methodology may be used to quantitate normal and toxic cadmium levels in whole blood and urine.

  20. Determination of molybdenum in silicates through atomic absorption spectrometry using pre-concentration by active carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaventura, G.R.; Rocha Hirson, J. da; Santelli, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical procedure for molybdenum determination in geological materials through Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, after pre-concentration of the Mo-APDC complex in activated carbon, has been developed, which is needed in order to reduce the dilution effect in the sample decomposition. During the development of this method the influence of pH, the amount of APDC for complexation of Mo and the interference of Fe, Ca, Mn, Al, K, Na, Mg and Ti were tested. It was shown that none of these causes any significant effect on the Mo determination proposed. The results of the analysis at the international geochemical reference samples JB-1 (basalt) and GH (granite) were very accurate and showed that the detection limit in rocks (1,00g) is 0,6 ppm, when using sample dilution of 1 ml and microinjection techniques. (author) [pt

  1. Determination of mercury, lead and cadmium in water by the CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry with solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Y.B.; Won, M.S.; Kim, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The method of CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometer with solvent extraction for the determination of mercury, lead and cadmium in water was studied. The optimum extracting conditions for CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry were the following: the complexes of mercury, lead and cadmium with dithizone were separated from the aqueous solution and concentrated into the 10 ml chloroform solution. Back extraction was performed; the concentrated mercury, lead and cadmium was extracted from the chloroform solution into the 10 ml 6-normal aqueous hydrochloric acid solution. In this case, recovery ratios were the following: mercury was 94.7%, lead 97.7% and cadmium 103.6%. The optimum operating conditions for the determination of mercury, lead and cadmium by the CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry also were investigated to test the dry step, ash step and atomization step for each metal. The experimental results of standard addition method were the following: the determination limit of each metal within 6% relative deviation was that lead was 0.04 ppb, and cadmium 0.01 ppb. Especially, mercury has been known impossible to determine by CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry until now. But in this study, mercury can be determined with CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Its determination limit was 4 ppb within 8% relative deviation. (author)

  2. Determination of atomic-scale chemical composition at semiconductor heteroepitaxial interfaces by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C; Ma, Y J

    2018-03-01

    The determination of atomic structures and further quantitative information such as chemical compositions at atomic scale for semiconductor defects or heteroepitaxial interfaces can provide direct evidence to understand their formation, modification, and/or effects on the properties of semiconductor films. The commonly used method, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), suffers from difficulty in acquiring images that correctly show the crystal structure at atomic resolution, because of the limitation in microscope resolution or deviation from the Scherzer-defocus conditions. In this study, an image processing method, image deconvolution, was used to achieve atomic-resolution (∼1.0 Å) structure images of small lattice-mismatch (∼1.0%) AlN/6H-SiC (0001) and large lattice-mismatch (∼8.5%) AlSb/GaAs (001) heteroepitaxial interfaces using simulated HRTEM images of a conventional 300-kV field-emission-gun transmission electron microscope under non-Scherzer-defocus conditions. Then, atomic-scale chemical compositions at the interface were determined for the atomic intermixing and Lomer dislocation with an atomic step by analyzing the deconvoluted image contrast. Furthermore, the effect of dynamical scattering on contrast analysis was also evaluated for differently weighted atomic columns in the compositions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous flow hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination and speciation of arsenic in wine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadjova, Irina B. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria); Lampugnani, Leonardo [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: lampugnani@ipcf.cnr.it; Onor, Massimo [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); D' Ulivo, Alessandro [C.N.R. Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici, Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Tsalev, Dimiter L. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2005-07-15

    Methods for the atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) determination of total arsenic and arsenic species in wines based on continuous flow hydride generation (HG) with atomization in miniature diffusion flame (MDF) are described. For hydride-forming arsenic, L-cysteine is used as reagent for pre-reduction and complexation of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate. Concentrations of hydrochloric acid and tetrahydroborate are optimized in order to minimize interference by ethanol. Procedure permits determination of the sum of these four species in 5-10-fold diluted samples with limit of detection (LOD) 0.3 and 0.6 {mu}g l{sup -1} As in white and red wines, respectively, with precision between 2% and 8% RSD at As levels within 0.5-10 {mu}g l{sup -1}. Selective arsine generation from different reaction media is used for non-chromatographic determination of arsenic species in wines: citrate buffer at pH 5.1 for As(III); 0.2 mol l{sup -1} acetic acid for arsenite + dimethylarsinate (DMA); 8 mol l{sup -1} HCl for total inorganic arsenic [As(III) + As(V)]; and monomethylarsonate (MMA) calculated by difference. Calibration with aqueous and ethanol-matched standard solutions of As(III) is used for 10- and 5-fold diluted samples, respectively. The LODs are 0.4 {mu}g l{sup -1} for As(III) and 0.3 {mu}g l{sup -1} for the other three As species and precision is within 4-8% RSDs. Arsenic species in wine were also determined by coupling of ion chromatographic separation on an anion exchange column and HG-flame AFS detection. Methods were validated by means of recovery studies and comparative analyses by HG-AFS and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The LODs were 0.12, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.13 {mu}g l{sup -1} (as As) and RSDs were 2-6%, 5-9%, 3-7% and 2-5% for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA arsenic species, respectively. Bottled red and white wines from Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia and Italy were analyzed by non

  4. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels.

  5. Surface Plasmon Polaritons Probed with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Sierant, Aleksandra; Panas, Roman

    2017-01-01

    We report on an optical mirror for cold rubidium atoms based on a repulsive dipole potential created by means of a modified recordable digital versatile disc. Using the mirror, we have determined the absolute value of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) intensity, reaching 90 times the intensity...

  6. Study on the application of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of metallic Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd traces in sea water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Kim Dung; Doan Thanh Son; Tran Thi Ngoc Diep

    2004-01-01

    The trace amount of some heavy metallic elements (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd) in sea water samples were determined directly (without separation) and quantitatively by using Electro-Thermal Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETA-AAS). The effect of mainly major constituents such as Na, Mg, Ca, K, and the mutual effect of the trace elements, which were present in the matrix on the absorption intensity of each analyzed element was studied. The adding of a certain chemical modification for each trace element was also investigated in order to eliminate the overall effect of the background during the pyrolysis and atomization. The sea water sample after fitrating through a membrane with 0.45 μm-hole size was injected in to the graphite tube via an autosampler (MPE50). The absorption intensity of each element was then measured on the VARIO-6 under the optimum parameters for spectrometer such as: maximum wavelength, current of hollow cathode lamp, and that for graphite furnace such as dry temperature, pyrolysis temperature, atomization temperature, ect. The analytical procedures were set-up and applied for the determination of these above mentioned elements in the synthesized sea water sample and in the real sea water samples with high precision and accuracy. (author)

  7. Determination of lead in hair and its segmental analysis by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baysal, Asli, E-mail: baysalas@itu.edu.t [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Akman, Suleyman, E-mail: akmans@itu.edu.t [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    A rapid and practical solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method was described for the determination of lead in scalp hair. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 deg. C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, atomization temperature, the amount of sample as well as addition of a modifier (Pd/Mg) and/or auxiliary digesting agents (hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid) and/or a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the recovery of lead were investigated. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 deg. C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The limit of detection for lead (3sigma, N = 10) was 0.3 ng/g The addition of modifier, acids, oxidant and surfactant hardly improved the results. Due to the risk of contamination and relatively high blank values, the lead in hair were determined directly without adding any reagent(s). Finally, the method was applied for the segmental determination of lead concentrations in hair of different persons which is important to know when and how much a person was exposed to the analyte. For this purpose, 0.5 cm of pieces were cut along the one or a few close strands and analyzed by solid sampling.

  8. Determination of lead in hair and its segmental analysis by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baysal, Asli; Akman, Suleyman

    2010-01-01

    A rapid and practical solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method was described for the determination of lead in scalp hair. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 deg. C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, atomization temperature, the amount of sample as well as addition of a modifier (Pd/Mg) and/or auxiliary digesting agents (hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid) and/or a surfactant (Triton X-100) on the recovery of lead were investigated. Hair samples were washed once with acetone; thrice with distilled-deionized water and again once with acetone and dried at 75 deg. C. Typically 0.05 to 1.0 mg of dried samples were inserted on the platforms of solid sampling autosampler. The limit of detection for lead (3σ, N = 10) was 0.3 ng/g The addition of modifier, acids, oxidant and surfactant hardly improved the results. Due to the risk of contamination and relatively high blank values, the lead in hair were determined directly without adding any reagent(s). Finally, the method was applied for the segmental determination of lead concentrations in hair of different persons which is important to know when and how much a person was exposed to the analyte. For this purpose, 0.5 cm of pieces were cut along the one or a few close strands and analyzed by solid sampling.

  9. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  10. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques for size determination of polyurethane nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)], E-mail: betinagzramos@pq.cnpq.br; Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficie, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [Grupo de Estudos em Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borsali, Redouane [Centre de Recherche sur les Macromolecules Vegetales CERMAV/CNRS, 38041 - Grenoble (France); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles have applications in various industrial fields principally in drug delivery. Nowadays, there are several processes for manufacturing colloidal polymeric systems and methods of preparation as well as of characterization. In this work, Dynamic Light Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques were used to characterize polyurethane nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by miniemulsion technique. The lipophilic monomers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and natural triol, were emulsified in water containing surfactant. In some formulations the poly(ethylene glycol) was used as co-monomer to obtain the hydrophilic and pegylated nanoparticles. Polyurethane nanoparticles observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were spherical with diameter around 209 nm for nanoparticles prepared without PEG. From AFM imaging two populations of nanoparticles were observed in the formulation prepared with PEG (218 and 127 nm) while dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed a monodisperse size distribution around 250 nm of diameters for both formulations. The polydispersity index of the formulations and the experimental procedures could influence the particle size determination with these techniques.

  11. The Validation of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) Method for the Determination of Cr, Cu and Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purwanto, A.; Supriyanto, C.; Samin P

    2007-01-01

    The validation of analytical method of atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of Cr, Cu and Pb by using certified reference materials (CRM) have been carried out. The validation of analytical method was done by measurement of precision, accuracy, bias, % D and % RSD by analysis of chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), and Lead (Pb) elements in CRM samples. Soil-7 is weighted and dissolved 0.3337 gram to use the bomb digester with concentrated nitric acid, perchloric acid, fluoric acid, and than solution to vinal volume is 10 mL with aquabidest. The validity of instrument atomic absorption spectrometer still valid with obtained of accuracy is 95.85 % and precision is 2.86 for Cr.; 103.32 % and 0.45 for Cu., 114.14 % and 9.89 for Pb. The validation of analytical method showed that with obtained of the content of Cr, Cu and Pb elements is 57.51, 11.37 and 68.49 μg/g., this result is still in the range concentration of certificate. (author)

  12. Near-atomic structure of Japanese encephalitis virus reveals critical determinants of virulence and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangxi; Li, Shi-Hua; Zhu, Ling; Nian, Qing-Gong; Yuan, Shuai; Gao, Qiang; Hu, Zhongyu; Ye, Qing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Xie, Dong-Yang; Shaw, Neil; Wang, Junzhi; Walter, Thomas S; Huiskonen, Juha T; Fry, Elizabeth E; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Stuart, David I; Rao, Zihe

    2017-04-26

    Although several different flaviviruses may cause encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis virus is the most significant, being responsible for thousands of deaths each year in Asia. The structural and molecular basis of this encephalitis is not fully understood. Here, we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of mature Japanese encephalitis virus at near-atomic resolution, which reveals an unusual "hole" on the surface, surrounded by five encephalitic-specific motifs implicated in receptor binding. Glu138 of E, which is highly conserved in encephalitic flaviviruses, maps onto one of these motifs and is essential for binding to neuroblastoma cells, with the E138K mutation abrogating the neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness of Japanese encephalitis virus in mice. We also identify structural elements modulating viral stability, notably Gln264 of E, which, when replaced by His264 strengthens a hydrogen-bonding network, leading to a more stable virus. These studies unveil determinants of neurovirulence and stability in Japanese encephalitis virus, opening up new avenues for therapeutic interventions against neurotropic flaviviruses.Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a Flavivirus responsible for thousands of deaths every year for which there are no specific anti-virals. Here, Wang et al. report the cryo-EM structure of mature JEV at near-atomic resolution and identify structural elements that modulate stability and virulence.

  13. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  14. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Vojtková, B.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 3 (2007), s. 304-308 ISSN 0584-8547. [European Furnace Symposium on Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Electrothermal Vaporization and Atomization /7./ and Solid Sampling Colloquium with Atomic Spectrometry /12./. St. Petersburg, 02.07.2006-07.07.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : direct solid sampling * electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry * trace element analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.957, year: 2007

  15. Decoherence at absolute zero

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Supurna

    2005-01-01

    We present an analytical study of the loss of quantum coherence at absolute zero. Our model consists of a harmonic oscillator coupled to an environment of harmonic oscillators at absolute zero. We find that for an Ohmic bath, the offdiagonal elements of the density matrix in the position representation decay as a power law in time at late times. This slow loss of coherence in the quantum domain is qualitatively different from the exponential decay observed in studies of high temperature envir...

  16. Determination of iron in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLANDAS KAZLAUSKAS

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple methods for the determination of Fe in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS are suggested. The results of the investigation of selectivity of the proposed AAS method proved that this procedure is not affected by high concentrations of other metals. The calibration graph for iron was linear at levels near the detection limit up to at least 0.10 mg ml-1. For the determination of microamounts of iron in mineral waters, an extraction AAS technique was developed. Iron was retained as Fe-8-oxyquinoline complex and extracted into chloroform. The optimal conditions for the extraction of the iron complex were determined. The AAS method was applied to the determination of Fe in mineral waters and natural waters from different areas of Lithuania. The accuracy of the developed method was sufficient and evaluated in comparison with a photometric method. The obtained results demonstrated that the procedure could be successfully applied for the analysis of water samples with satisfactory accuracy.

  17. Buffer choice and effects of sample composition examined by experiment planning methods for determination of molybdenum by atomic absorption with a flame atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zav'yalkov, P.I.; Danishehvskii, A.L.; Rakita, R.A.; Yakshinskii, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors use orthogonal experiment planning to define the optimum form of buffer and to establish the effects of sample composition since there are high levels of cation and anion interference in the atomic-absorption determination of molybdenum. A spectroscopic buffer has been identified (HCLO 4 + NH 4 Cl mixture), which eliminates the interference from the elements tested and improves the analytical characteristics in determining molybdenum. A model has been formulated enabling one to estimate the buffer performance and the effects of the components on the determination of molybdenum. The model enables one to forecast the expected order of the effect without performing additional experiments

  18. Sites of Au atoms in Sn crystals as determined by channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.W.; Gemmell, D.S.; Holland, R.E.; Poizat, J.C.; Worthington, J.N.; Loess, R.E.

    1974-01-01

    The position of Au atoms diffused into Sn monocrystals has been studied by channeling and backscattering of 2.5-MeV Ne ions. For equilibrium conditions at 217 0 C, Au atoms are found almost entirely in substitutional positions, so that the unusually fast diffusion of Au in Sn most likely arises from a small fraction of Au atoms migrating interstitially

  19. Determination of pi pi scattering lengths from measurement of pi(+)pi(-) atom lifetime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adeva, B.; Afanasyev, L.; Benayoun, M.; Hons, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 704, 1-2 (2011), s. 24-29 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : DIRAC experiment * Elementary atom * Pionium atom Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.955, year: 2011

  20. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  1. Investigation of interference mechanism of cobalt chloride on the determination of bismuth by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokman, Nilgun [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Akman, Suleyman [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey)]. E-mail: akmans@itu.edu.tr

    2005-03-31

    The interferences of cobalt chloride on the determination of bismuth by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) were examined using a dual cavity platform (DCP), which allows the gas-phase and condensed phase interferences to be distinguished. Effects of pyrolysis temperature, pyrolysis time, atomization temperature, heating rate in the atomization step, gas-flow rate in the pyrolysis and atomization steps, interferent mass and atomization from wall on sensitivity as well as atomization signals were studied to explain the interference mechanisms. The mechanism proposed for each experiment was verified with other subsequent sets of experiments. Finally, modifiers pipetted on the thermally treated sample+interferent mixture and pyrolyzed at different temperatures provided very useful information for the existence of volatilization losses of analyte before the atomization step. All experiments confirmed that when low pyrolysis temperatures are applied, the main interference mechanisms are the gas-phase reaction between bismuth and decomposition products of cobalt chloride in the atomization step. On the other hand, at elevated temperatures, the removal of a volatile compound formed between analyte and matrix constituents is responsible for some temperature-dependent interferences, although gas-phase interferences still continue. The experiments performed with colloidal palladium and nickel nitrate showed that the modifier behaves as both a matrix modifier and analyte modifier, possibly delaying the vaporization of either analyte or modifier or both of them.

  2. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90{sup o} (x=0.99 A{sup -1}). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Z{sub eff} of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  3. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceição, A. L. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90° ( x=0.99 Å -1). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number ( Zeff) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Zeff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon ( Z=6) and oxygen ( Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  4. Determination of ionization potential of atomic gadolinium and its isotope effect. Analysis of unperturbed Rydberg series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Ohba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    Autoionizing Rydberg series converging to six states (0, 261.841, 633.273, 3082.011, 3427.274, 3444.235 cm{sup -1}) of Gd ion have been observed by using three-color three-step photoionization via ten different 2nd-step levels of J=0 or 1. While the perturbations with interlopers become significant in the region of n=30-35 for most of the observed series, long and well-defined series structures appeared in higher energy region. From an analysis of such unperturbed structures, the first ionization potential of Gd atom was estimated to be 49601.45 (30) cm{sup -1}. This is in good agreement with the previous value, but the accuracy is improved by about one order of magnitude. In addition, isotope effect on the ionization potential was also determined by isotope shifts of some Rydberg series. (author)

  5. Alternative set of conditions for molybdenum determination by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    In comparing a newly developed procedure with that recommended by Perkin--Elmer, et al., (Analytical Methods for Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry, Perkin--Elmer Corp., Norwalk, Conn. 1973) two areas were found in which the new procedure appeared more suitable for Mo determination. If Cr is present in concentrations greater than 100 ppM, the recommended procedure results in an enhancement effect on Mo absorption. This erroneously high result is eliminated when the new procedure is followed. In the recommended procedure, when the sample has to be dissolved in hydrofluoric acid and Al is added to help eliminate interferences, the acid combines with the Al to form insoluble aluminum fluoride. The part that Al plays in eliminating interferences is lessened, because it is no longer in solution

  6. Determination of lanthanides in yttrium and praseodymium oxides by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modenesi, C.R.; Abrao, A.

    1984-01-01

    The operational conditions for the graphite furnace, the instrumental parameters and the sensitivity for the determination of Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Y, Gd, Dy, Er, Ho, Tm, and Yb in Y 2 O 3 and Pr 2 O 3 by atomic absorption spectrophotometry are presented. The analyses were carried out into a highly pure argon atmosphere and using pyrolytic graphite tube and graphite supporting electrodes. The accuracy and precision of the method were checked through analyses of synthetic lanthanides mixtures. The concentration range of the lanthanides varied from 0,003 to 3,5% in Y 2 O 3 and from 0,001 to 3,5% in Pr 2 O 3 . (Author) [pt

  7. Determination of cadmium in bovine tissue by spectrophotometry of atomic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Zeledon, Mauricio

    2004-01-01

    The present work utilized the suggested method by Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) for the analysis of cadmium in animal tissue, it was adapted by the Toxicology's Laboratory of MAG, where the project was organized. This method consist of a burning of sample and the instrumental analysis by means of the atomic absorption's technique. In the study there were determined parameters of carrying out of the analytical methodology, it was getting the following values: linearity : 0,020 -1,0 mg/L; homogeneity of the model: homoscedastic; limit of detection (LD) : 0,0049 mg/kg (4,9 μg/Kg); limit of quantification (LC): 0,016 μg/L (16 mg/kg); sensibility of calibration: 0,243 A * L/gm; analytical sensibility: 105 L/mg; instrumental repetitively: [es

  8. Determination of Aluminum in Dialysis Concentrates by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after Coprecipitation with Lanthanum Phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, Emine Kılıçkaya; Şahin, Uğur; Şahan, Serkan

    2017-01-01

    This method was developed for the determination of trace amounts of aluminum(III) in dialysis concentrates using atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with lanthanum phosphate. The analytical parameters that influenced the quantitative coprecipitation of analyte including amount of lanthanum, amount of phosfate, pH and duration time were optimized. The % recoveries of the analyte ion were in the range of 95-105 % with limit of detection (3s) of 0.5 µg l -1 . Preconcentration factor was found as 1000 and Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) % value obtained from model solutions was 2.5% for 0.02 mg L -1 . The accuracy of the method was evaluated with standard reference material (CWW-TMD Waste Water). The method was also applied to most concentrated acidic and basic dialysis concentrates with satisfactory results.

  9. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C.; Poletti, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90 o (x=0.99 A -1 ). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z eff ) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Z eff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  10. Determination of tin in biological reference materials by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, M.; Iyengar, V.; Gills, T.

    1991-01-01

    Because of a lack of reliable analytical techniques for the determination of tin in biological materials, there have been no reference materials certified for this element. However, the authors' experience has shown that it is feasible to use both atomic absorption and nuclear activation techniques at least for selected matrices. Therefore, an investigation was undertaken to determine tin in several biological materials such as non-fat milk powder (NBS-SRM-1549), citrus leaves (NBS-SRM-1572), total diet (NIST-SRM-1548), mixed diet (NBS-RM-8431), and USDIET-I by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). AAS-ashed samples were extracted with MIBK and assayed using a Perkin Elmer model 5000 apparatus. NAA was carried out by irradiating the samples at the NIST reactor in the RT-4 facility and counting with the help of a Ge(Li) detector connected to a multichannel analyzer. The concentration of tin measured by both AAS and NAA agree well for USDIET-I, total diet, citrus leaves and non-fat milk powder (the concentration ranges for tin in these matrices were from 0.0025 to 3.8 micro g/g). However, in the case of mixed diet (RM-8431), the mean values found were 47 ± 5.6 (n = 19) by AAS and 55.5 ± 2.5 (n = 6) by INAA. Since RM-8431 is not certified it is difficult to draw conclusions. For apple and peach leaves, a distillation step was required. The results were apple leaves 0.085 ± 0.015 (n = 10) by AAS and < 0.2 (n = 3) by RNAA; for peach leaves 0.077 ± 0.02 (n = 9) by AAS and < 0.1 (n = 3) by RNAA. All concentrations are expressed in micro g/g dry weight

  11. Determination of the Kinematics of the Qweak Experiment and Investigation of an Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Valerie M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The Qweak experiment has tested the Standard Model through making a precise measurement of the weak charge of the proton (QpW). This was done through measuring the parity-violating asymmetry for polarized electrons scattering off of unpolarized protons. The parity-violating asymmetry measured is directly proportional to the four-momentum transfer (Q^2) from the electron to the proton. The extraction of QpW from the measured asymmetry requires a precise Q^2 determination. The Qweak experiment had a Q^2 = 24.8 ± 0.1 m(GeV^2) which achieved the goal of an uncertainty of <= 0.5%. From the measured asymmetry and Q^2, QpW was determined to be 0.0719 ± 0.0045, which is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction. This puts a 7.5 TeV lower limit on possible "new physics". This dissertation describes the analysis of Q^2 for the Qweak experiment. Future parity-violating electron scattering experiments similar to the Qweak experiment will measure asymmetries to high precision in order to test the Standard Model. These measurements will require the beam polarization to be measured to sub-0.5% precision. Presently the electron beam polarization is measured through Moller scattering off of a ferromagnetic foil or through using Compton scattering, both of which can have issues reaching this precision. A novel Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter has been proposed as a non-invasive way to measure the polarization of an electron beam via Moller scattering off of polarized monatomic hydrogen gas. This dissertation describes the development and initial analysis of a Monte Carlo simulation of an Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter.

  12. Determination of mercury and selenium in herbal medicines and hair by using a nanometer TiO2-coated quartz tube atomizer and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Cai, Shu-Jie; Cai, Tian-Shou

    2011-01-01

    The nanometer TiO 2 particle was coated onto the inner wall of a T-shaped quartz tube atomizer (QTA) and then was used as a new atomizer (NT-QTA) for the determination of Hg and Se by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). After coating 67.4 mg TiO 2 on a quartz tube, the analytical performance of NT-QTA-HGAAS was compared to conventional QTA-HGAAS and it was improved as follows: (a) the linear range of the calibration curves was expanded from 10.0-80.0 ng mL -1 to 5.0-150.0 ng mL -1 for Hg, and from 10.0-70.0 ng mL -1 to 5.0-100.0 ng mL -1 for Se; (b) the characteristic concentration of was decreased from 2.8 ng mL -1 /1% to 1.1 ng mL -1 /1% for Hg and from 1.2 ng mL -1 /1% to 0.8 ng mL -1 /1% for Se; and (c) the interference from the coexistence of As on the determination of Hg and Se could be eliminated. The achieved technique was applied for the determination of Hg and Se in herbal medicines and hair.

  13. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) in urine by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grases, F.; Perello, J.; Isern, B.; Prieto, R.M

    2004-05-10

    Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) is a substance present in urine with an important role in preventing calcium renal calculi development. In spite of this, the use of urinary phytate levels on stone-formers' evaluation and treatment is still notably restricted as a consequence of the enormous difficulty to analyze this substance in urine. In this paper, a simple procedure for routinary urinary phytate determination based on phosphorus determination through inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is described. The method only requires a previous separation of phytate from other components by column anion exchange chromatography. The working linear range used was 0-2 mg l{sup -1} phosphorus (0-7 mg l{sup -1} phytate). The limit of detection was 64 {mu}g l{sup -1} of phytate and the limit of quantification was 213 {mu}g l{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 1.35 mg l{sup -1} phytate was 2.4%. Different urine samples were analyzed using an alternative analytical methodology based on gas chromatography (GC)/mass detection used for inositol determination (phytate was previously hydrolyzed), resulting both methods comparable using as criterion to assess statistical significance P<0.05.

  15. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  16. Absolute bioavailability of evacetrapib in healthy subjects determined by simultaneous administration of oral evacetrapib and intravenous [(13) C8 ]-evacetrapib as a tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannady, Ellen A; Aburub, Aktham; Ward, Chris; Hinds, Chris; Czeskis, Boris; Ruterbories, Kenneth; Suico, Jeffrey G; Royalty, Jane; Ortega, Demetrio; Pack, Brian W; Begum, Syeda L; Annes, William F; Lin, Qun; Small, David S

    2016-05-30

    This open-label, single-period study in healthy subjects estimated evacetrapib absolute bioavailability following simultaneous administration of a 130-mg evacetrapib oral dose and 4-h intravenous (IV) infusion of 175 µg [(13) C8 ]-evacetrapib as a tracer. Plasma samples collected through 168 h were analyzed for evacetrapib and [(13) C8 ]-evacetrapib using high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameter estimates following oral and IV doses, including area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) from zero to infinity (AUC[0-∞]) and to the last measureable concentration (AUC[0-tlast ]), were calculated. Bioavailability was calculated as the ratio of least-squares geometric mean of dose-normalized AUC (oral : IV) and corresponding 90% confidence interval (CI). Bioavailability of evacetrapib was 44.8% (90% CI: 42.2-47.6%) for AUC(0-∞) and 44.3% (90% CI: 41.8-46.9%) for AUC(0-tlast ). Evacetrapib was well tolerated with no reports of clinically significant safety assessment findings. This is among the first studies to estimate absolute bioavailability using simultaneous administration of an unlabeled oral dose with a (13) C-labeled IV microdose tracer at about 1/1000(th) the oral dose, with measurement in the pg/mL range. This approach is beneficial for poorly soluble drugs, does not require additional toxicology studies, does not change oral dose pharmacokinetics, and ultimately gives researchers another tool to evaluate absolute bioavailability. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. X-ray determination of static displacements of atoms in alloyed Ni3Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morinaga, M.; Sone, K.; Kamimura, T.; Ohtaka, K.; Yukawa, N.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystals of Ni 3 (Al, M) were grown by the Bridgman method, where M is Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Nb, Mo and Ta. The composition was controlled to be about Ni 75 Al 20 M 5 so that the alloying element, M, substitutes mainly for Al. With these crystals conventional X-ray structural analysis was performed. The measured static displacements of atoms from the average lattice points depended largely on the alloying elements and varied in the range 0.00-0.13 A for Ni atoms and 0.09-0.18 A for Al atoms. It was found that these atomic displacements correlated well with the atomic radius of the alloying element, M. For example, when the atomic radius of M is larger than that of Al, the static displacements are large for the atoms in the Al sublattice but small for the atoms in the Ni sublattice. By contrast, when the atomic radius of M is smaller than that of Al, the displacements are more enhanced in the Ni sublattice than in the Al sublattice. Thus, there is an interesting correlation between the atomic displacements in both the Al and Ni sublattices in the presence of alloying elements. This seems to be one of the characteristics of alloyed compounds with several sublattices. (orig.)

  18. Ab initio determination of polarizabilities and van der Waals coefficients of Li atoms using the relativistic coupled-cluster method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansbeek, L. W.; Sahoo, B. K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    We report on a technique to determine the van der Waals coefficients of lithium (Li) atoms based on relativistic coupled-cluster theory. These quantities are determined using the imaginary parts of the scalar dipole and quadrupole polarizabilities, which are evaluated using an approach that we have

  19. Quantitative structure determination of nanostructured materials using the atomic pair distribution function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Ahmad Salah

    The employed experimental method in this Ph.D. dissertation research is the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) technique specializing in high real space resolution local structure determination. The PDF is obtained via Fourier transform from powder total scattering data including the important local structural information in the diffuse scattering intensities underneath, and in-between, the Bragg peaks. Having long been used to study liquids and amorphous materials, the PDF technique has been recently successfully applied to highly crystalline materials owing to the advances in modern X-ray and neutron sources and computing power. The conventional XRD experiments probe for the presence of periodic structure which are reflected in the Bragg peaks. Local structural deviations or disorder mainly affect the diffuse scattering background. In order to have information about both long-range order and local structure disorder, a technique that takes both Bragg and diffuse scattering need to be used, such as the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) technique. This Ph.D. work introduces a PDF based methodology to quantitatively study nanostructure materials in general. The introduced methodology have been applied to a size-dependent structural study on CdSe nanoparticles (NPs). Quantitative structural information about structure, crystallinity level, core size, NP size, and inhomogeneous internal strain in the studied NPs have been obtained. This method is generally applicable to the characterization of the nano-scale solid, many of which may exhibit complex disorder and strain. The introduced methodology have been also applied on technologically important system, ultra-small CdSe NPs.

  20. Simultaneous determination of selenium and tellurium in native sulfur by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikawa, Yoshiko; Hirai, Shoji; Ozawa, Takejiro.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the determination of selenium and tellurium in native sulfur has been investigated by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Native sulfur collected from around fumarole or volcanic crater is ground down into powder, a portion of which weighing 1 g is subjected to analysis. A 2.6% (w/v) sodium hydroxide solution is added by 10 ml to the sample in a teflon beaker, and the mixture is then heated on a hot plate. Sulfur is decomposed and dissolved in the form of disulfide and thiosulfate. A 30% hydrogenperoxide solution is added by 10 ml to oxidize them to sulfate. At the same time selenium and tellurium contained in the sulfur sample are also thought to be oxidized to Se(VI) and Te(VI) states. The solution is neutralized with hydrochloric acid and diluted with distilled water to 100 ml. The sample solution thus prepared is sprayed into the air-acetylene flame of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The absorbance is measured at 195.9 nm for selenium and 214.2 nm for tellurium. Calibration curve is prepared by measuring the absorbances of the solutions prepared as follows. One gram portions of pure sulfur (99.9999%) are decomposed as for the samples. After neutralization, standard solutions containing each same amount of selenium and tellurium (0 -- 1000 μg) are added to the sulfur solution and then diluted with water to 100 ml. The standard deviations were estimated to be 50.4 ppm for selenium at 756 ppm and 16.6 ppm for tellurium at 587 ppm. For the check of the reliability of the method, results were compared with those obtained by neutron activation analysis. Results obtained by both methods showed good agreement. (author)

  1. Determination of mercury in hair: Comparison between gold amalgamation-atomic absorption spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanico, Francesco; Forte, Giovanni; Majorani, Costanza; Senofonte, Oreste; Petrucci, Francesco; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    Mercury is a heavy metal that causes serious health problems in exposed subjects. The most toxic form, i.e., methylmercury (MeHg), is mostly excreted through human hair. Numerous analytical methods are available for total Hg analysis in human hair, including cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal decomposition amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry (TDA-AAS). The aim of the study was to compare the TDA-AAS with the ICP-MS in the Hg quantification in human hair. After the washing procedure to minimize the external contamination, from each hair sample two aliquots were taken; the first was used for direct analysis of Hg by TDA-AAS and the second was digested for Hg determination by the ICP-MS. Results indicated that the two data sets were fully comparable (median; TDA-AAS, 475ngg -1 ; ICP-MS, 437ngg -1 ) and were not statistically different (Mann-Whitney test; p=0.44). The two techniques presented results with a good coefficient of correlation (r=0.94) despite different operative ranges and method limits. Both techniques satisfied internal performance requirements and the parameters for method validation resulting sensitive, precise and reliable. Finally, the use of the TDA-AAS can be considered instead of the ICP-MS in hair analysis in order to reduce sample manipulation with minor risk of contamination, less time consuming due to the absence of the digestion step and cheaper analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine infrared CH intensities of hydrocarbons: a quantum theory of atoms in molecules model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arnaldo F; Richter, Wagner E; Meneses, Helen G C; Bruns, Roy E

    2014-11-14

    Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine most of the infrared fundamental CH intensities of simple hydrocarbons, methane, ethylene, ethane, propyne, cyclopropane and allene. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux model predicted the values of 30 CH intensities ranging from 0 to 123 km mol(-1) with a root mean square (rms) error of only 4.2 km mol(-1) without including a specific equilibrium atomic charge term. Sums of the contributions from terms involving charge flux and/or dipole flux averaged 20.3 km mol(-1), about ten times larger than the average charge contribution of 2.0 km mol(-1). The only notable exceptions are the CH stretching and bending intensities of acetylene and two of the propyne vibrations for hydrogens bound to sp hybridized carbon atoms. Calculations were carried out at four quantum levels, MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p), MP2/cc-pVTZ, QCISD/6-311++G(3d,3p) and QCISD/cc-pVTZ. The results calculated at the QCISD level are the most accurate among the four with root mean square errors of 4.7 and 5.0 km mol(-1) for the 6-311++G(3d,3p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. These values are close to the estimated aggregate experimental error of the hydrocarbon intensities, 4.0 km mol(-1). The atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effect is much larger than the charge effect for the results of all four quantum levels. Charge transfer-counter polarization effects are expected to also be important in vibrations of more polar molecules for which equilibrium charge contributions can be large.

  3. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of metallic impurities in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.J.S.F. da.

    1983-06-01

    The Brazilian Energetic Alternative Program expects the reduction of our dependence on foreign energy sources, through replacing fuel oil by mineral coal. Its gasification by means of nuclear energy must be also considered. However, the intensive burning of coal leads to serious environmental problems. During its combustion the release, to atmosphere, of toxic elements such as As, Hg, Pb, Sb, Se, Cd, Zn and others is of great concern. Increase in atmospheric pollution will take place by burning increased amounts of coal. In addition, some of those elements are concentrated in fly ashes. The determination of impurities in coal is also important for the Figueiras Project in the Nuclebras Mineral Prospection Program. Hence, it is important to have reliable analytical methods which can monitor inorganic constituents at various stages of coal production and utilization. The atomic absorption spectrophotometry is a suitable analytical technique to determine pollutants in coal because it is sensitive, simple, economic and cover a large range of concentrations. The need of a previous treatment of the sample is overcome by using an acid attack (HNO 3 + HClO 4 + HF) which has proved to be rapid and efficient. (Author) [pt

  4. An indirect atomic absorption spectrometric determination of ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium in pharmaceutical formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMOUD MOHAMED ISSA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive indirect atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS method has been developed for the determination of very low concentrations of ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium. The method is based on the oxidation of these drugs with iron(III. The excess of iron(III was extracted into diethyl ether and then the iron(II in the aqueous layer was aspirated into an air–acetylene flame and determined by AAS. The linear concentration ranges were 25–400, 50–500 and 60–600 ng ml-1 for ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium, respectively. The results were statistically compared with the official method using t- and f-test at p < 0.05. There were insignificant interferences from most of the excipients present. The intra- and inter-day assay coefficients of variation were less than 6.1 % and the recoveries ranged from 95 to 103 %. The method was applied for the analysis of these drug substances in their commercial pharmaceutical formulations.

  5. Determination of trace elements in refined gold samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steharnik Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for determination the trace contents of silver, copper, iron, palladium, zinc and platinum in refined gold samples. Simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer with radial torch position and cross flow nebulizer was used for determination. In order to compare the different calibration strategies, two sets of calibration standards were prepared. The first set was based on matrix matched calibration standards and the second was prepared without the addition of matrix material. Detection limits for matrix matching calibrations were higher for some elements than those without matrix matching. In addition, the internal standardization method was applied and experiments indicated that indium was the best option as internal standard. The obtained results for gold sample by matrix matching and matrix free calibrations were compared with the obtained results by standard addition method. The accuracy of the methods was tested performing recovery test. Recoveries for spiked sample were in the range of 90-115 %. The accuracy of the methods was also tested by analysis of certified reference material of high pure goldAuGHP1. The best results were achieved by matrix free calibration and standard addition method using indium as internal standard at wavelength of 230 nm. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34024: Development of Technologies for Recycling of Precious, Rare and Associated Metals from Solid Waste in Serbia to High Purity Products

  6. Optimization of digital image processing to determine quantum dots' height and density from atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J E; Paciornik, S; Pinto, L D; Ptak, F; Pires, M P; Souza, P L

    2018-01-01

    An optimized method of digital image processing to interpret quantum dots' height measurements obtained by atomic force microscopy is presented. The method was developed by combining well-known digital image processing techniques and particle recognition algorithms. The properties of quantum dot structures strongly depend on dots' height, among other features. Determination of their height is sensitive to small variations in their digital image processing parameters, which can generate misleading results. Comparing the results obtained with two image processing techniques - a conventional method and the new method proposed herein - with the data obtained by determining the height of quantum dots one by one within a fixed area, showed that the optimized method leads to more accurate results. Moreover, the log-normal distribution, which is often used to represent natural processes, shows a better fit to the quantum dots' height histogram obtained with the proposed method. Finally, the quantum dots' height obtained were used to calculate the predicted photoluminescence peak energies which were compared with the experimental data. Again, a better match was observed when using the proposed method to evaluate the quantum dots' height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Determination of soil exchangeable base cations by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and extraction with ammonium acetate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-ge; Xiao, Min; Dong, Yi-hua; Jiang, Yong

    2012-08-01

    A method to determine soil exchangeable calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and extraction with ammonium acetate was developed. Results showed that the accuracy of exchangeable base cation data with AAS method fits well with the national standard referential soil data. The relative errors for parallel samples of exchangeable Ca and Mg with 66 pair samples ranged from 0.02%-3.14% and 0.06%-4.06%, and averaged to be 1.22% and 1.25%, respectively. The relative errors for exchangeable K and Na with AAS and flame photometer (FP) ranged from 0.06%-8.39% and 0.06-1.54, and averaged to be 3.72% and 0.56%, respectively. A case study showed that the determination method for exchangeable base cations by using AAS was proven to be reliable and trustable, which could reflect the real situation of soil cation exchange properties in farmlands.

  8. Column preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of rhodium in some food and standard samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Pourmohammad, Fatemeh; Fazelirad, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium after adsorption of its 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol/tetraphenylborate ion associated complex at the surface of alumina. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the pH, type of eluent, sample and eluent flow rates, sorption capacity of alumina and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The relative standard deviation for eight measurements of 0.1 ng/mL of rhodium was ±6.3%. In this method, the detection limit was 0.003 ng/mL in the original solution. The sorption capacity of alumina and the linear range for Rh(III) were evaluated as 0.8 mg/g and 0.015-0.45 ng/mL in the original solution, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of rhodium content in some food and standard samples with high recovery values. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Determination of lithium in sodium by vacuum distillation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Chun; Sun Shiping; Jia Yunteng; Wen Ximeng

    1996-12-01

    When sodium is used as a coolant in China Experimental Fast Reactor, the lithium content in sodium has an effect on the nuclear property of reactor. A method has been developed to determine the trace lithium in sodium metal at the level of less than ten parts per million. About 0.4 g sodium is placed into a high-purity tantalum crucible, then it is placed in a stainless-steel still to distill at 360 degree C under vacuum (0.01 Pa). After the sodium has been removed, the residue is dissolved by nitric acid (1:2) and analyzed with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy at 671.0 nm wavelength. The distillation conditions, working conditions of the instrument and interferences from matrix sodium, acid and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with lithium chloride and lithium nitrate. The percentage recoveries are 96.8% and 97.4% respectively. The relative standard deviation is less than +- 5%. The method has been used to determine lithium content in high pure sodium and industrial grade sodium. (11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.)

  10. Use of intensity quotients and differences in absolute structure refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, Simon; Flack, Howard D.; Wagner, Trixie

    2013-01-01

    Differences and quotients can be defined using Friedel pairs of reflections and applied in refinement to enable absolute structure to be determined precisely even for light atom crystal structures. Several methods for absolute structure refinement were tested using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected using Cu Kα radiation for 23 crystals with no element heavier than oxygen: conventional refinement using an inversion twin model, estimation using intensity quotients in SHELXL2012, estimation using Bayesian methods in PLATON, estimation using restraints consisting of numerical intensity differences in CRYSTALS and estimation using differences and quotients in TOPAS-Academic where both quantities were coded in terms of other structural parameters and implemented as restraints. The conventional refinement approach yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with standard uncertainties ranging from 0.15 to 0.77. The other methods also yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with much higher precision. Absolute structure was established in all cases, even for a hydrocarbon. The procedures in which restraints are coded explicitly in terms of other structural parameters enable the Flack parameter to correlate with these other parameters, so that it is determined along with those parameters during refinement

  11. Study on generation and granulometry of a standard aerosol of CINa for use in determinations of filtration efficiency of absolute filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milla, E.

    1978-01-01

    This work has as objective the study of the conditions of generation and granulometry of an aerosol generated by atomizing with compressed a i r a solution of CINa in water in order to obtain particles, CINa cubes. The droplets of the spray formed are dried in a stream of air, acting as a carrier, inside the pipe of a bank of test filters. The granulometric analysis has been carried out by sampling in the gaseous phase. A dispersion photometer was used that yields the size spectrum of particles. The variables concerned in generation, whose influence on aerosol granulometry were analyzed are: characteristic diameter of atomizer unit, pressure of compressed air of generation, concentration of saline solution, temperature of air carrier, length of bank pipe, sampling position across a section, length of sampling duct and ratio between speeds in pipe and duct. (Author) 50 refs

  12. SPECIES DETERMINATION OF ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS USING ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY WITH LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.; Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-01-01

    Over the past several years we have devised and expanded the capabilities of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy (ZAA). Using this technique, trace elements in a complex matrix can be directly analyzed with high accuracy even when there is only one atom of interest contained in several million atoms of the host material. Quantities in the nanogram, or in some cases picogram, range can be determined within IS seconds for more than 30 elements. Because of its high selectivity and high sensitivity, ZAA can be used as a new technique for organometallic species determination by interfacing with a high pressure liquid chromatograph (HPLC). The HPLC separates various molecular species. Different kinds of mobil solvents can be directly introduced in the ZAA detection system; even organic solvents or high concentration salt solutions. Then, organometallic species in the ppb range are separately detected according to their retention times. This technique has a much larger field of application than HPLC coupled with conventional AA. The advantages of the ZAA technique are described in a recent publication. In this case, a steady magnetic field at 11 kgauss is applied to the sample vapor perpendicular to the incident light beam. The difference in absorption of the polarized constituents P{perpendicular} and P{parallel} is proportional to the atomic density, but is not affected by the various kind of spectral interferences caused by thermal decomposition of the eluants. The recently developed HPLC technique has many advantages over gas chromatography. Nonvolatile, polar, thermally unstable molecules or high molecular weight compounds can be separated. In the present system, the main requirement is that the solute be soluble in the mobile solvent. A demonstration of the operation of this system is provided by the analysis of a mixture of vitamin B12 and Co(No{sub 3}){sub 2}. As shown in Figure 1, vitamin B12 has a Co in its functional center. Sample 1 contained Co of 0

  13. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, penalized regression using the L-1 norm on the estimated parameters is proposed for chemometric je calibration. The algorithm is of the lasso type, introduced by Tibshirani in 1996 as a linear regression method with bound on the absolute length of the parameters, but a modification...

  14. Approach to Absolute Zero

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. Approach to Absolute Zero 0.3 K. to a Few Milli-Kelvin. R Srinivasan. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 6 June 1997 pp 6-14. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/06/0006-0014 ...

  15. Approach to Absolute Zero

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. Approach to Absolute Zero From 4. 22 K. to 0. 3 K. R Srinivasan. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 2 February 1997 pp 8-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/02/0008-0016 ...

  16. Approach to Absolute Zero

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Approach to Absolute Zero Below 10 milli-Kelvin. R Srinivasan. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 8-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/10/0008-0016 ...

  17. Approach to Absolute Zero

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Approach to Absolute Zero Below 10 milli-Kelvin. R Srinivasan. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 8-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/10/0008-0016 ...

  18. The dressed mobile atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Amour, B; Guillot, L

    2005-01-01

    We consider free atoms and ions in $\\R^3$ interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Because of the translation invariance we consider the reduced hamiltonian associated with the total momentum. After introducing an ultraviolet cutoff we prove that the reduced hamiltonian for atoms has a ground state if the coupling constant and the total momentum are sufficiently small. In the case of ions an extra infrared regularization is needed. We also consider the case of the hydrogen atom in a constant magnetic field. Finally we determine the absolutely continuous spectrum of the reduced hamiltonian. \\end{abstract}

  19. Influence of citric acid as chemical modifier for lead determination in dietary calcium supplement samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cezar Paz de Mattos, Julio; Medeiros Nunes, Adriane; Figueiredo Martins, Ayrton; Luiz Dressler, Valderi; Marlon de Moraes Flores, Erico

    2005-01-01

    Citric acid was used as a chemical modifier for Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in dietary supplement samples (calcium carbonate, dolomite and oyster shell samples) and its efficiency was compared to the use of palladium. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were established without use of chemical modifier, with the addition of 20, 100 and 200 μg of citric acid, and with 3 μg of palladium. The citric acid modifier made possible the interference-free Pb determination in the presence of high concentrations of Ca and Mg nitrates. Acid sample digestion involving closed vessels (microwave-assisted and conventional heating) and acid attack using polypropylene vessels at room temperature were compared. All digestion procedures presented similar results for calcium carbonate and dolomite samples. However, for oyster shell samples accurate results were obtained only with the use of closed vessel systems. Analyte addition and matrix-matched standards were used for calibration. The characteristic mass for Pb using citric acid and palladium were 16 and 25 pg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was always less than 5% when citric acid was used. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.02 μg g -1 and 8 pg with citric acid and 0.1 μg g -1 and 44 pg with the Pd modifier, respectively (n = 10, 3σ). The recovery of Pb in spiked calcium supplement samples (10 μg l -1 ) was between 98% and 105%. With the use of 100 μg of citric acid as chemical modifier, problems such as high background absorption and high RSD values were minimized in comparison to the addition of 3 μg of palladium

  20. Determining the 13C(α, n)16O absolute cross section through the concurrent application of ANC and THM and astrophysical consequences for the s-process in AGB-LMSs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippella, Oscar; La Cognata, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The 13C(α, n)16O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for the s-process main component in low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars. No direct experimental data exist at very low energies and measurements performed through direct techniques show inconsistent results, mostly in their absolute values. In this context, we reversed the usual normalization procedure combining two indirect approaches, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan Horse Method, to unambiguously determine the absolute value of the 13C(α, n)16O astrophysical S(E)-factor in the most relevant energy-region for astrophysics. Adopting the new reaction rate for the n-source in the NEWTON s-process nucleosynthesis code, astrophysical calculations show only limited variations, less than 1%, for those nuclei whose production is considered to be totally due to slow neutron captures.

  1. Determination of effective atomic numbers, effective electrons numbers, total atomic cross-sections and buildup factor of some compounds for different radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levet, A.; Özdemir, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, effective electron density, buildup factor have been measured for Fe(NO3)3, V4O2, NaCO3·H2O, C6H5FeO7·H2O and CuCI compounds using 137Ba, 157Gd and 241Am γ-rays sources in stable geometry. The mass attenuation coefficients have been determined experimentally via Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF) system and theoretically by using WinXCom computer program. Then, effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, Neff, have been calculated by using the mass attenuation coefficients. The obtained values of effective atomic numbers have been compared with the ones calculated according to a different approach proposed by Hine and the calculated ones from theory. Also, photon buildup factors were obtained by changing collimator diameters in the different photon energies. We observed that the buildup factor increased as the collimator diameter increased for all sources used.

  2. Determination of the Elastic Properties of Tomato Fruit Cells with an Atomic Force Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kurenda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the mechanical properties of single cells together with the intercellular adhesive properties determine the macro-mechanical properties of plants, a method for evaluation of the cell elastic properties is needed to help explanation of the behavior of fruits and vegetables in handling and food processing. For this purpose, indentation of tomato mesocarp cells with an atomic force microscope was used. The Young’s modulus of a cell using the Hertz and Sneddon models, and stiffness were calculated from force-indentation curves. Use of two probes of distinct radius of curvature (20 nm and 10,000 nm showed that the measured elastic properties were significantly affected by tip geometry. The Young’s modulus was about 100 kPa ± 35 kPa and 20 kPa ± 14 kPa for the sharper tip and a bead tip, respectively. Moreover, large variability regarding elastic properties (>100% among cells sampled from the same region in the fruit was observed. We showed that AFM provides the possibility of combining nano-mechanical properties with topography imaging, which could be very useful for the study of structure-related properties of fruits and vegetables at the cellular and sub-cellular scale.

  3. Determining the resolution of scanning microwave impedance microscopy using atomic-precision buried donor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrymgeour, D. A.; Baca, A.; Fishgrab, K.; Simonson, R. J.; Marshall, M.; Bussmann, E.; Nakakura, C. Y.; Anderson, M.; Misra, S.

    2017-11-01

    To quantify the resolution limits of scanning microwave impedance microscopy (sMIM), we created scanning tunneling microscope (STM)-patterned donor nanostructures in silicon composed of 10 nm lines of highly conductive silicon buried under a protective top cap of silicon, and imaged them with sMIM. This dopant pattern is an ideal test of the resolution and sensitivity of the sMIM technique, as it is made with nm-resolution and offers minimal complications from topography convolution. It has been determined that typical sMIM tips can resolve lines down to ∼80 nm spacing, while resolution is independent of tip geometry as extreme tip wear does not change the resolving power, contrary to traditional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). Going forward, sMIM is an ideal technique for qualifying buried patterned devices, potentially allowing for quantitative post-fabrication characterization of donor structures, which may be an important tool for the study of atomic-scale transistors and state of the art quantum computation schemes.

  4. Bismuth determination in environmental samples by hydride generation-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscoso-Perez, Carmen; Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge; Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Fernandez-Fernandez, Esther; Prada-Rodriguez, Dario [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071, A Coruna (Spain)

    2003-12-04

    A hydride generation procedure, via flow injection, coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was optimised for Bi determination in sea water and hot-spring water and acid extracts from coal, coal fly ash and slag samples. The effects of several variables such as hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate concentrations, hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rates, reaction coil length, trapping and atomisation temperatures, trapping time and the Ar flow rate have been investigated by using a 2{sup 9}*3/128 Plackett-Burman design. From these studies, certain variables (sodium tetrahydroborate concentration and trapping time) showed up as significant, and they were optimised by a 2{sup 2}+star central composite design. In addition, a study of the bismuthine trapping and atomisation efficiency from graphite tubes (GTs) permanently treated with uranium, tantalum, lanthanum oxide, niobium, beryllium oxide, chromium oxide and tantalum carbide were investigated. The results obtained were compared with those achieved by iridium and zirconium-treated GTs. The best analytical performances, with characteristic mass of 35 pg and detection limit of 70 ng l{sup -1}, were achieved by using U-treated GTs. Accuracy were checked using several reference materials: 1643d (Trace Elements in Water), TM-24 (Reference Water), GBW-07401 (Soil) and 1632c (Trace Elements in Coal)

  5. Channelling enhanced microanalysis: A high resolution analytical technique for atomic site and species determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, K.N.

    1987-11-01

    The formulation, development and applications of novel crystallographic technique to determine sepcific-site occupations of elemental additions in crystalline materials, using the channeling or Borrman effect in electron diffraction, is reviewed. This technique is based on the effect of incident beam orientations on the intensities of either the characteristic x-ray emissions or the characteristic electron energy-loss edges. The formulation of the technique under both planer and axial channeling conditions for crystalline materials is presented. In general, this technique can distinguish neighbors in the periodic table; involves no adjustable parameters, external standards or special specimen preparations; is applicable to trace elemental concentrations (0.2-0.3 wt % or 10/sup 25/ atoms/m/sup 3/); is very accurate and can be applied routinely at high spatial resolutions (approx.10-40nm). In the EELS formulation the technique can also provide specific site valence information. Finally, applications of this technique to site-occupation studies in a variety of materials is outlined. 35 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Determination of some metal ions in various meat and baby food samples by atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, we report a simple and rapid solid phase extraction system for the separation/preconcentration and determination of Cd(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This method is based upon the retention of metal ions on a column packed with poly[N-(3-methyl-1H-indole-1-yl)]-2-methacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid-co divinylbenzene] (MMAD) resin as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent at pH 8. At the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (3 s/b) between 0.12 and 1.6 μg L(-1), preconcentration factor of 100, and the relative standard deviation of ⩽1.8% were achieved (n=10). The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing certified reference materials (CRMs) and performing recovery experiments. The developed method was successfully applied to the various natural water, meat products and baby food samples. The recoveries of analyte ions were found in added real samples and CRMs from 95% to 102%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of thallium in potassium chloride and electrolyte replenishers by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukatsuka, Isoshi; Horiguchi, Ryo; Seitoh, Hiroyuki; Ohzeki, Kunio; Miyashita, Fumihide

    2004-01-01

    Thallium in potassium chloride and electrolyte replenishers was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with direct injection of a resin suspension. Thallium(III) was extracted on fine particles of a cellulose nitrate resin (CNR) from dilute HCl (pH 1.6) in the presence of ammonium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate. The CNR particles were collected on a membrane filter by filtration under suction, suspended in 1.0 mL 10mM HNO3, and then delivered directly to ETAAS as the suspension. The effects of chloride ions were thoroughly investigated. The results showed that the addition of 0.5mM NaCl to the suspension (10mM HNO3) was recommended, after CNR and a membrane filter holding the CNR were washed thoroughly with 0.025M HCl, to eliminate interference from chloride ions. No chemical modifier was required. Extraction from the solution containing up to 2M chloride ion was allowable. The proposed method gave a concentration factor of 50 for a 50 mL sample volume. The detection limit (3sigma, n = 5) was 1 ng (20 pg/mL). The relative standard deviation was 4.9% (n = 5) at 30 ng level of thallium. The content of thallium in potassium chloride was 15.7-32.8 ng/g, and in electrolyte replenishers was 0.18-4.16 ng/mL.

  8. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO 2 , H 2 and H 2 O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L -1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L -1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  9. Performance evaluation of indigenous thermal ionization mass spectrometer for determination of 235U/238U atom ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamelu, D.; Parab, A.R.; Sasi Bhushan, K.; Shah, Raju V.; Jagdish Kumar, S.; Rao, Radhika M.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Bhatia, R.K.; Yadav, V.K.; Sharma, Madhavi P.; Tulsyan, Puneet; Chavda, Pradip; Sriniwasan, P.

    2014-07-01

    A magnetic sector based Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) designed and developed at Technical Physics Division, B.A.R.C., was evaluated for its performance for the determination of 235 U/ 238 U atom ratios in uranium samples. This consisted of evaluating the precision and accuracy on the 235 U/ 238 U atom ratios in various isotopic reference materials as well as indigenously generated uranium samples. The results obtained by the indigenous TIMS were also compared with those obtained using a commercially available TIMS system. The internal and external precision were found to be around 0.1% for determining 235 U/ 238 U atom ratios close to those of natural uranium ( i.e. 0.00730). (author)

  10. Determining Selenium Serum Level in Healthy Young Couples by Furnace Atomic Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Salmani nodoushan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metal ions are required for various vital body functions and metabolism. Selenium is an active element in selenoproteins and plays an important role in public health, though the increase of its concentration in the body can cause toxicity. Therefore, it seems essential to investigate the serum selenium status of individuals of a society. This study was conducted to determine serum level of selenium in healthy young couples. Methods: This descriptive study was done on 60 young couples who were chosen in 2013 via convenience sampling. The participants' general health was determined using a GHQ28 questionnaire and their serum selenium concentration was measured by furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed by SPSS software utilizing descriptive statistics. Results: The participants' mean age was 23.18 ± 4.31 years. The 44.6% of subjects had university degrees, 35.7% were reported to have diploma and 19.6% were under diploma. The mean serum selenium level was obtained as 89.1 ± 24.2 µg/l in males, and 80.5 ± 20.7 µg/l in females. The data analysis revealed a statistically significant difference of the serum selenium at the 95% confidence level in regard with participants' gender and education level. Conclusion: The present study showed that the mean serum selenium of participants lay in the lower part of its normal range. Regarding the role of selenium in human health and prevention of disease, nutrition education is recommended for taking selenium-rich foods to enhance community health and to prevent disease progression

  11. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. ► It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. ► Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. ► By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 ± 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 ± 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 ± 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  12. C12/C13-ratio determination in nanodiamonds by atom-probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Josiah B; Isheim, Dieter; Floss, Christine; Seidman, David N

    2015-12-01

    The astrophysical origins of ∼ 3 nm-diameter meteoritic nanodiamonds can be inferred from the ratio of C12/C13. It is essential to achieve high spatial and mass resolving power and minimize all sources of signal loss in order to obtain statistically significant measurements. We conducted atom-probe tomography on meteoritic nanodiamonds embedded between layers of Pt. We describe sample preparation, atom-probe tomography analysis, 3D reconstruction, and bias correction. We present new data from meteoritic nanodiamonds and terrestrial standards and discuss methods to correct isotopic measurements made with the atom-probe tomograph. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Pupat, N. B. M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg+/Dy+, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  14. Trapped individual ion at absolute zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Dehmelt, Hans; Nagourney, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Laser cooling and ion trapping have progressed to such an extent that one can now speak of realizing a confined atom at absolute zero temperature. In this short publication, we analyze an experiment toward such realization using a single Ba+ ion in a miniature rf trap. The Ba+ ion is first laser-cooled to the limit where the ion spends most of its time in the zero-point energy state. Then a test sequence allows one to verify whether or not the ion is actually in its zero-point state. The test sequence may also serve as a device for state selection of an atom at absolute zero temperature. PMID:16594054

  15. Nonflame atomic absorption determination of total mercury in natural waters using an HS-3 mercury-hydride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evdokimova, E.V.; Solov`eva, M.Kh.; Telegin, G.F. [Institute of Problems in the Technology of Microelectronics and High-Purity Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-02-01

    A method for nonflame atomic absorption determination of mercury with a detection limit of 1 x 10{sup -3} {mu}g/ml in natural waters without preconcentration is described. The method can be applied successfully in analysis of the environment.

  16. Lifetime determination of the 5d(2) F-3(2) state in barium using trapped atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De, S.; Dammalapati, U.; Willmann, L.

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-optically trapped atoms enable the determination of lifetimes of metastable states and higher lying excited states like the 5d(2) F-3(2) state in barium. The state is efficiently populated by driving strong transitions from metastable states within the cooling cycle of the barium

  17. A COMPARISON OF A SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC (QUERCETIN) METHOD AND AN ATOMIC-ABSORPTION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF TIN IN FOOD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Å

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for the determination of tin in food, which involve a spectrophotometric method (with the quercetin-tin complex) and an atomic-absorption method, are described. The precision of the complete methods and of the individual analytical steps required is evaluated, and the parameters...

  18. Determination of total selenium in nutritional supplements and selenised yeast by Zeeman-effect graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Ekelund, J.

    1989-01-01

    -effect background corrected graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A furnace ashing step at 1100 °C was necessary in order to obtain a total recovery of selenium when present in the organic form. Palladium nitrate-magnesium nitrate was used as a matrix modifier. Independent methods were used to determine...

  19. DETERMINATION OF TOTAL MERCURY IN FISH TISSUES USING PYROLYSIS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH GOLD AMALGAMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in fish tissues is evaluated and compared with conventional techniques. Using an automated instrument incorporating combustion, preconcentration by amalgamation with gold, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), mill...

  20. Determination of Delta m(d) and absolute calibration of flavor taggers for the Delta m(s) analysis, in fully reconstructed decays at the CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Jonatan Piedra [University of Cantabria, (Spain). Inst. of Physics

    2005-04-21

    The new trigger processor, the Silicon Vertex Tracking (SVT), has dramatically improved the B physics capabilities of the upgraded CDF II Detector; for the first time in a hadron collider, the SVT has enabled the access to non-lepton-triggered B meson decays. Within the new available range of decay modes, the B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ signature is of paramount importance in the measurement of the Δms mixing frequency. The analysis reported here is a step towards the measurement of this frequency; two where our goals: carrying out the absolute calibration of the opposite side flavor taggers, used in the Δms measurement; and measuring the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing frequency in a B → Dπ sample, establishing the feasibility of the mixing measurement in this sample whose decay-length is strongly biased by the selective SVT trigger. We analyze a total integrated luminosity of 355 pb-1 collected with the CDF II Detector. By triggering on muons, using the conventional di-muon trigger; or displaced tracks, using the SVT trigger, we gather a sample rich in bottom and charm mesons.

  1. Direct Determination of Absolute Absorption Cross Sections at the L-Edge of Dilute Mn Complexes in Solution Using a Transmission Flatjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubin, Markus; Guo, Meiyuan; Ekimova, Maria; Baker, Michael L; Kroll, Thomas; Källman, Erik; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko; Nibbering, Erik T J; Lundberg, Marcus; Wernet, Philippe

    2018-04-10

    The 3d transition metals play a pivotal role in many charge transfer processes in catalysis and biology. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the L-edge of metal sites probes metal 2p-3d excitations, providing key access to their valence electronic structure, which is crucial for understanding these processes. We report L-edge absorption spectra of Mn II (acac) 2 and Mn III (acac) 3 complexes in solution, utilizing a liquid flatjet for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in transmission mode. With this, we derive absolute absorption cross-sections for the L-edge transitions with peak magnitudes as large as 12 and 9 Mb for Mn II (acac) 2 and Mn III (acac) 3 , respectively. We provide insight into the electronic structure with ab initio restricted active space calculations of these L-edge transitions, reproducing the experimental spectra with excellent agreement in terms of shapes, relative energies, and relative intensities for the two complexes. Crystal field multiplet theory is used to assign spectral features in terms of the electronic structure. Comparison to charge transfer multiplet calculations reveals the importance of charge transfer in the core-excited final states. On the basis of our experimental observations, we extrapolate the feasibility of 3d transition metal L-edge absorption spectroscopy using the liquid flatjet approach in probing highly dilute biological solution samples and possible extensions to table-top soft X-ray sources.

  2. Optimized determination of calcium in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, Manuel; González, Maria Cruz; Cabrera, Carmen; Gimenez, Rafael; López, Maria Carmen

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the different methods of sample preparation for the determination of calcium in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by flame atomic absorption spectrometry; results are also reported for the practical application of these methods to the analysis of commercial samples produced in Spain. The methods tested included dealcoholization, dry mineralization, and wet mineralization with heating by using different acids and/or mixtures of acids. The sensitivity, detection limit, accuracy, precision, and selectiviy of each method were established. Such research is necessary because of the better analytical indexes obtained after acid digestion of the sample, as recommended by the European Union, which advocates the direct method. In addition, although high-temperature mineralization with an HNO3-HCIO4 mixture gave the best analytical results, mineralization with nitric acid at 80 degrees C for 15 min gave the most satisfactory results in all cases, including those for wines with high levels of sugar and beverages with high alcoholic content. The results for table wines subjected to the latter treatment had an accuracy of 98.70-99.90%, a relative standard deviation of 2.46%, a detection limit of 19.0 microg/L, and a determination limit of 31.7 microg/L. The method was found to be sufficiently sensitive and selective. It was applied to the determination of Ca in grape juice, different types of wines, and beverages with high alcoholic content, all of which are produced and widely consumed in Spain. The values obtained for Ca were 90.00 +/- 20.40 mg/L in the grape juices, 82.30 +/- 23.80 mg/L in the white wines, 85.00 +/- 30.25 mg/L in the sweet wines, 84.92 +/- 23.11 mg/L in the red wines, 85.75 +/- 27.65 mg/L in the rosé wines, 9.51 +/- 6.65 mg/L in the brandies, 11.53 +/- 6.55 mg/L in the gin, 7.3 +/- 6.32 mg/L in the pacharán, and 8.41 +/- 4.85 mg/L in the anisettes. The method is therefore useful for routine analysis in the

  3. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alvarez Mendez, J.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.M. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes - due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities - have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  4. Determination of trace elements in soy milk using ICP atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoko; Chayama, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the optimal method for the multi-element quantification of 9 elements in soy milk: calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc. Results obtained using ICP atomic emission spectrometry were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry, which is the standard method. The same sample was measured using both ICP atomic emission spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The percentage of minerals recovered by ICP atomic emission spectrometry ranged from 99.3% to 102%, which was equivalent to that by atomic absorption spectrometry. Therefore, a good result with standard deviation was obtained. The mineral contents of 16 samples of commercially-available soy milk products were measured. The Cu content was significantly proportional to the amount of soybean solids (P < 0.001). Moreover, although relation-ships did not attain statistical significance, the consents of Fe, Zn, K, Mg and P were proportional to the amount of soybean solids, and were highest in soy milk, followed by prepared soy milk and so milk beverage. The Ca content of modified soy milk was significantly higher than that of soy milk and soy milk-based beverages (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the Na content in soy milk was significantly lower. (author)

  5. Determination of Gamma-Prime Site Occupancies in Nickel Superalloys Using Atom Probe Tomography and X-Ray Diffraction (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0390 DETERMINATION OF γ’SITE OCCUPANCIES IN NICKEL SUPERALLOYS USING ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION...IN NICKEL SUPERALLOYS USING ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-08-C-5226 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...sublattice sites while cobalt is likely to occupy both the aluminum and nickel sublattice sites. The x-ray results on the chromium occupancy disagree with

  6. Effect of organic solvents on desorption and atomic absorption determination of heavy metal ions after ion exchange concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Safronova, V.G.; Zakrevskaya, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of organic solvents (acetone, methylethylketone, dioxane, ethanol) on desorption of Cu, Mn, Co, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni from cationite KU-23 ion exchange resin and on the detection limits of their atomic absorption determination has been examined. Cobalt and cadmium can be separated quantitatively using desorption by a mixture of HCl and acetone. Addition of an organic solvent results in a higher absorbance, mainly due to a high rate and efficiency of atomization. Acetone has proved to be the best solvent: addition of 60 vol. % of this solvent to the concentrate provides 2 times lower detection limits for the heavy metas in water

  7. Effect of different assumptions for brain water content on absolute measures of cerebral oxygenation determined by frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy in preterm infants: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demel, Anja; Wolf, Martin; Poets, Christian F; Franz, Axel R

    2014-08-19

    Brain-water content (BWC) decreases with maturation of the brain and potentially affects parameters of cerebral oxygenation determined by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Most commercially available devices do not take these maturational changes into account. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different assumptions for BWC on parameters of cerebral oxygenation in preterm infants. Concentrations of oxy-, deoxy- and total hemoglobin and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rcStO2) were calculated based on absolute coefficients of absorption and scattering determined by multi-distance Frequency-Domain-NIRS assuming BWCs of 75-95%, which may be encountered in newborn infants depending on gestational and postnatal age. This range of BWC gave rise to a linear modification of the assessed NIRS parameters with a maximum change of 10%. This may result in an absolute overestimation of rcStO2 by (median (range)) 4 (1-8)%, if the calculation is based on the lowest BWC (75%) in an extremely preterm infant with an anticipated BWC of 95%. Clinicians wishing to rely on parameters of cerebral oxygenation determined by NIRS should consider that maturational changes in BWC not taken into account by most devices may result in a deviation of cerebral oxygenation readings by up to 8% from the correct value.

  8. Determination of yttrium and rare-earth elements in rocks by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen Gupta, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    With use of synthetic solutions and several international standard reference materials a method has been developed for determining traces of Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in rocks by electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytically-coated graphite furnace. Depending on the element, the sensitivity is of the order of 10 -9 to 10 -12 g at 2500 0 . To avoid matrix interferences the lanthanides are separated from the common elements by co-precipitation with calcium and iron as carriers. The data for Canadian reference rock SY-2 (syenite), U.S.G.S. reference rocks W-2 (diabase), DNC-1 (diabase) and BIR-1 (basalt), and South African reference rock NIM-18/69 (carbonatite) obtained by graphite-furnace atomization are compared with the values obtained by flame atomic-absorption. The results are in good agreement with literature values. (author)

  9. [Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of H2O2 using (Au) core (Ag) shell nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Liang; Tang, Ya-Fang; Liang, Ai-Huiz; Gong, Qi

    2009-07-01

    The 10 nm gold nanoparticles were prepared by Frens procedure. Using tri-sodium citrate as reducer of AgNO3, and 10 nm gold nanoparticles as seed, the (Au)core(Ag)shell nanoparticles the size of about 30 nm were prepared at 90 degrees C for 10 min. Then it was separated by centrifuge at 10000 r x min(-1) for 15 min to obtain pure (Au)core(Ag)shell nanoparticles. In pH 3.8 sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer solution, hydroxyl free radical from Fenton reaction between Fe(II)-H2O2 oxidized (Au)core(Ag)shell nanoparticles to form silver ions. The silver ions in the centrifugal solutions can be measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry at 328.1 nm. The silver ions in the centrifugal solutions increased with the H2O2 concentration increasing, and the absorption value at 328. 1 nm was enhanced linearly. The influence factors such as pH value, buffer solution volume, concentration of (Au)core(Ag)shell and Fe(II), reaction temperature and time, and centrifuging velocity and time were considered, respectively. Under the conditions of 0.20 mL pH 3.8 sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer solution, 50 microL of 2.0 mmol x L(-1) FeSO4, 60 microL of 2.94 x 10(-4) mol x L(-1) (Au)core(Ag)shell nanoparticle solution, reaction time of 20 min at 60 degrees C, and centrifugalization at 14 000 rpm for 10 min, the increased value deltaA is proportional to the H2O2 concentration (c) from 2. 64 to 42.24 micromol x L(-1), with a detection limit of 0.81 micromol x L(-1). The regress equation was deltaA = 0.014c-0.013 1, with a coefficient of 0.998 4. The effect of foreign substances such as 100-times glucose, Cu2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, 50-times urea, bovine serum albumin, Mn2+, Pb2+, and 30-times Cr3+ on the determination of 13.2 micromol x L(-1) H2O2 was examined respectively, with a relative error of +/- 10%. Results showed that there was no interference. This assay showed high sensitivity and good selectivity for quantitative determination of H2O2 in waste water samples, with satisfactory

  10. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, S; Rojhirunsakool, T; Nandwana, P; Tiley, J; Banerjee, R

    2015-12-01

    The analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered γ' precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr (at%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within γ' precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of metallic elements in water by the combined preconcentration techniques of ion exchange and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, M.H. de.

    1981-01-01

    Having as an aim the utilization of atomic absorption method with flame's excitement, the limits of detection in water of six metals (Ag, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn) were determined in synthetical samples through atomic absorption spectroscopy. Techniques to optimize the data have been pointed out and presented their statistical treatment. By means of the routine and the addition methods three 'real' samples have also been analysed in order to determine the contents of Cu and Zn. Aiming a pre-concentration and by utilizing the 60 Co obtained activating a sample of cobalt in the CDTN/NUCLEBRAS TRIGA MARK-I reactor, the retainement of this cobalt in ion exchange resin and the variation of the factor of elution within different concentration of HCl in water have been determined. The limits of detection are presented and so are the quantitative ones, with and without pre-concentration in an ion exchanger resin and latter elution. (Author) [pt

  12. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Farinas, M. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Barciela Garcia, J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Garcia Martin, S. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Pena Crecente, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Herrero Latorre, C. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain)]. E-mail: cherrero@lugo.usc.es

    2007-05-22

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1}), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged

  13. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar Farinas, M.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.; Herrero Latorre, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO 3 ) 2 and (NH 4 )H 2 PO 4 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 ] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 μg L -1 ), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged -1

  14. [Evaluation of uncertainty for determination of tin and its compounds in air of workplace by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiuning; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Fangfang; Ding, Yalei

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the method for uncertainty evaluation of determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The national occupational health standards, GBZ/T160.28-2004 and JJF1059-1999, were used to build a mathematical model of determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace and to calculate the components of uncertainty. In determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace using flame atomic absorption spectrometry, the uncertainty for the concentration of the standard solution, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, sample digestion, parallel determination, least square fitting of the calibration curve, and sample collection was 0.436%, 0.13%, 1.07%, 1.65%, 3.05%, and 2.89%, respectively. The combined uncertainty was 9.3%.The concentration of tin in the test sample was 0.132 mg/m³, and the expanded uncertainty for the measurement was 0.012 mg/m³ (K=2). The dominant uncertainty for determination of tin and its compounds in the air of workplace comes from least squares fitting of the calibration curve and sample collection. Quality control should be improved in the process of calibration curve fitting and sample collection.

  15. Absolute marine gravimetry with matter-wave interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidel, Y; Zahzam, N; Blanchard, C; Bonnin, A; Cadoret, M; Bresson, A; Rouxel, D; Lequentrec-Lalancette, M F

    2018-02-12

    Measuring gravity from an aircraft or a ship is essential in geodesy, geophysics, mineral and hydrocarbon exploration, and navigation. Today, only relative sensors are available for onboard gravimetry. This is a major drawback because of the calibration and drift estimation procedures which lead to important operational constraints. Atom interferometry is a promising technology to obtain onboard absolute gravimeter. But, despite high performances obtained in static condition, no precise measurements were reported in dynamic. Here, we present absolute gravity measurements from a ship with a sensor based on atom interferometry. Despite rough sea conditions, we obtained precision below 10 -5  m s -2 . The atom gravimeter was also compared with a commercial spring gravimeter and showed better performances. This demonstration opens the way to the next generation of inertial sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope) based on atom interferometry which should provide high-precision absolute measurements from a moving platform.

  16. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, penalized regression using the L-1 norm on the estimated parameters is proposed for chemometric je calibration. The algorithm is of the lasso type, introduced by Tibshirani in 1996 as a linear regression method with bound on the absolute length of the parameters, but a modification...... to the lasso. The lasso is applied both directly as a calibration method and as a method to select important variables/wave lengths. It is demonstrated that the lasso algorithm, in general, leads to parameter estimates of which some are zero while others are quite large (compared to e.g. the traditional PLS...

  17. Determination of concentration of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Fe) in animal tissues using atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAZAFINTSALAMA, V.T.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy metals are classified among the inorganic compounds. The latter type of metal is found in rocks, fertilizers, urban mud but may also originate from the atmospheric pollution. A particular characteristic of heavy metals is their bioaccumulation in the food chain. Therefore, lead and cadmium, which are classified as heavy metals may be easily found in animal products and can lead to food poisoning if their concentrations are higher than the maximum permissible values as requested by international agencies such as the c odex alimentarius . The values are set down and differ according to types of food for human consuption and the trading companies take action accordingly. Therefore, it is necessary to set up a quality control system through analytical laboratory measurements and testings. This study underlies the method of determination of lead, cadmium and iron in animal tissues by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed that the method is sensitive and reliable. For each analyte, the Z-score lies between -2 and 2, indicating that the method is working properly. The analytical results showed that: (i) only beef and chicken meats and beef liver contain lead [0,09μg.g - 1; 0,29μg.g - 1]. The limit value of 0,1μg.g - 1 is almost reached in beef and chicken meats, (ii) as far as cadmium is concerned, the five studied samples contain this analyte [0,02μg.g - 1; 0,9μg.g - 1]. Except the chicken liver of which the concentration (0,15μg.g - 1) exceeds the maximum permissible value (0,1μg.g - 1), the others are in conformity with the standards and appropriate to be consumed,(iii) iron is higher in the liver and kidney samples: beef liver 282mg.g - 1, chicken liver 250 mg.g - 1, pork kidney 247mg.g - 1. The study also showed that the calcium concentration in animal tissues is low and they can be classified as poor-calcium food. [fr

  18. Absolute Gravimetry in Fennoscandia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersen, B. R; TImmen, L.; Gitlein, O.

    away from this central location. An oval shaped zero uplift isoline tracks the general western and northern coastline of Norway and the Kola peninsula. It returns southwest through Russian Karelia and touches the southern tip of Sweden and northern Denmark. The uplift area (as measured by present day...... motions) has its major axis in the direction of southwest to northeast and covers a distance of about 2000 km. Absolute gravimetry was made in Finland and Norway in 1976 with a rise-and fall instrument. A decade later the number of gravity stations was expanded by JILAg-5, in Finland from 1988, in Norway...... acquired by IfE (FG5-220), FGI (FG5-221), and UMB (FG5-226). New absolute gravity stations were established by the national mapping agencies in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The total number of prepared sites in Fennoscandia is now about 30. Most of them are co-located with permanent GPS, for many of which...

  19. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtková, Blanka; Dočekal, Bohumil

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, S (2005), s489-s491 ISSN 0009-2770. [Meeting on Chemistry and Life /3./. Brno, 20.09.2005-22.09.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : solid sampling * electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry * trace analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2005

  20. Arsenic determination in gasoline by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy combined with a factorial experimental design approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jemmla Meira Trindade; Aldalea Lopes Marques; Gisele Simone Lopes; Edmar Pereira Marques; Jiujun Zhang [Federal University of Maranhao UFMA, Sao Luis (Brazil). Department of Chemistry

    2006-10-15

    Three locally collected gasoline samples were analyzed for arsenic content using factorial experimental design (FED) with hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). Five factors (including the reduction agent flow, the acid flow, the sample flow, the reductor concentration and the acid concentration) in two levels (low and high) were used in this optimization process. In order to design the surface response, five levels of central composite with 15 central points were down-selected. The results were compared with those determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and a 95% confidence interval (regression procedure) was obtained. The HGAAS and GFAAS measurement sensitivities determined arsenic levels of 0.02 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.08 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. 23 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Standardization of digestion procedure for the determination of heavy metals in biological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.; Chaudhri, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Proper decomposition of the sample is one of the basic requirements of the atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis. In the present studies, heavy metals (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) were determined in biological samples by designating them in a mixture of nitric acid and perchloric acid. The quantification was made with atomic absorption spectrometry using an air-acetylene flame. The reliability of the procedure used was checked by analysing standard reference materials from NBS and IAEA, such as Rice flour (NBS-SRM-1568), Horse Kidney (IAEA H-8), Mixed Human diet(IAEA H-9), Copepod (IAEA MA-A-1) and fish flesh (IAEA MA-A-2) under identical conditions. A good agreement was observed between determined and the certified values reported by NBS and IAEA. (author)

  2. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  3. Thermodynamics of negative absolute pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.; Martinas, K.

    1984-03-01

    The authors show that the possibility of negative absolute pressure can be incorporated into the axiomatic thermodynamics, analogously to the negative absolute temperature. There are examples for such systems (GUT, QCD) processing negative absolute pressure in such domains where it can be expected from thermodynamical considerations. (author)

  4. Absolute determination by X-ray diffraction of a binary or ternary mixture: nickel oxide and fluoride in a nickel powder (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpin, P.; Hauptman, A.

    1960-01-01

    The method employed is based upon the comparison between computed and measured intensities for conveniently selected X-Ray diffraction lines of each component of the powder. Care must be taken to allow for absorption, both inside each grain and in overall sample. This method has been applied to the determination of nickel oxide and fluoride in a nickel powder. (author) [fr

  5. Resolution and Determination of the Absolute Configuration of a Twisted Bis-Lactam Analogue of Troger's Base: A Comparative Spectroscopic and Computational Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rúnarsson, Ögmundur Vidar; Benkhäuser, Christian; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2015-01-01

    unambiguously confirming the results from the spectroscopic studies. We conclude that, for the Troger's base (TB) analogue (2), we may rank the reliability of the individual methods for AC determination as AXRD >> VCD > ECD, while the synergy of all three methods provides very strong confidence in the assigned...

  6. Determination of trace amounts of selenium in minerals and rocks by flame less atomic-absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F. A.; Capdevilla, C.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of trace amounts of selenium In silicate rocks and feldspar by solvent extraction and graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been stu- died. Sodium diethyl-ditio carbamate and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate have been tried as chelating agents. The best results are achieved when selenium is extracted Into carbon tetrachloride as the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate complex. The method allows to detect 0,75 ppm of selenium in the sample. Recoveries are about 100%. (Author) 7 refs

  7. Determination by vibrational spectra of the strength and the bond length of atoms U and O in uranyl complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Martinez Q, E.

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of different uranyl compounds were studied. The wave number was related to the harmonic oscillator model and to the mathematical expression of Badger as modified by Jones, to determine the strength and the bond length of atoms U and O in UO 2 2+ . A mathematical simplification develop by us is proposed and its results compared with values obtained by other methods. (Author)

  8. Determination of copper and iron in the human aqueous humor by atomic absorption spectrometer with graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Z.; Mohammad, Z.; Shah, M.T.; Saeed, M.; Imdadullah

    1999-01-01

    The concentration of copper and iron was determined in human aqueous humor using atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with graphite furnace. The mean (+- SEM) concentrations of copper (n=16) and iron (n=14) were 0.0234 -+ 0.0045 mu g.ml/sup -1/ and 0.045 -+ 0.0092 mu.ml/sup -1/ respectively. In male and female, the concentrations of copper (p< 0.82) and iron (p<0.38) were not significantly different. (author)

  9. Interference of nitrite and nitrogen dioxide on mercury and selenium determination by chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes Nunes, Dayana; Pereira dos Santos, Eliane Pereira; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Mortari, Sergio Roberto; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Moraes Flores, Erico Marlon de

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a systematic investigation was performed concerning the interference of nitrogen oxides on the determination of selenium and mercury by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG AAS) and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). The effect of nitrate, nitrite and NO 2 dissolved in the condensed phase was evaluated. No effect of NO 3 - on Se and Hg determination was observed up to 100 mg of sodium nitrate added to the reaction vessel. The Se signal was reduced by about 80% upon the addition of 6.8 mg NO 2 - . For Hg, no interference of nitrite was observed up to 20 mg of NO 2 - . A complete suppression of the Se signal was observed when gaseous NO 2 was introduced into analytical solutions. For Hg, a signal decrease between 8 and 13% occurred. For Se, bubbling argon or heating the solution was not able to recover the original absorbance values, whereas Hg signals were recovered with these procedures. When gaseous NO 2 was passed directly into the atomizer, Se signals decreased similarly to when NO 2 was bubbled in analytical solutions. The addition of urea, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sulfamic acid (SA) was investigated to reduce the NO 2 effect in sample digests containing residual NO 2 , but only SA was effective in reducing the interference. Based on the results, it is possible to propose the use of SA to prevent interferences in Se and Hg determinations by HG AAS and CV AAS, respectively

  10. Comparative studies of method for determining total mercury in fish. Dithizone and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protasowicki, M.; Ociepa, A.; Chodyniecki, A.

    1977-01-01

    Two methods for determining total mercury in fish were compared: the dithizone and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry techniques. The studies involved determination of recovery when 1μg of mercury as solutions of HgCl 2 or CH 3 HgC were added to each sample of herring flesh. Mean recoveries in the dithizone method were found to be 91.4+-7.47% and 90.25+-4.73% for the two solutions respectively, while the recoveries obtained with the flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry were 95.00+-9.13% and 98.70+-7.14%, respectively. Both techniques were used to determine the mercury content in the same herring flesh sample. The first technique showed the content of 0.050+-0.018μg Hg g -1 while the result obtained with the other one was 0.062+-0.013μg Hg g -1 . The statistical treatment of the results obtained showed no difference between the two techniques, the significance level being α=0.05. Therefore, the results obtained with the dithizone method are comparable with those obtained with the flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry for mercury contents of the magnitude order of 0.050 ug.g -1 . (author)

  11. The growth of sodium rough films on mica (0001) as determined by Helium Atom Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Rolf; Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2001-01-01

    , which is addressed to Na atoms that fill cleavage-induced holes in the mica surface. It provides a convenient means of calibrating the coverage of the surface. With increasing surface coverage Na clusters are formed on the mica surface. A broad angular distribution of the scattered Helium intensity......Elastic helium atom scattering (HAS) and linear optical extinction measurements are used to investigate the growth of sodium (Na) films on mica substrates in the surface temperature range between 90 and 300 K. At half a monolayer (ML) surface coverage we observe a maximum of scattered He intensity...... is observed with a coverage-independent angular width above eight monolayers coverage. From simultaneous optical extinction measurements we deduce that the clusters are oblate with a ratio of semiaxes perpendicular and parallel to the surface plane between 0.23 and 0.165....

  12. A new hydride generator for the determination of volatile elements by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersabiec, A.M. de

    1979-01-01

    The production of hydrides in order to use them for analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry depends on many parameters. A new apparatus has been designed for this specific operation. It is characterized by a reaction chamber with variable size and by appliances for regulation and control of the physical conditions of operation. Properties are both methodological studies and utilization in large scale analysis. The entire description of the apparatus is completed by an analytical study [fr

  13. Prediction of absolute infrared intensities for the fundamental vibrations of H2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute infrared intensities are predicted for the vibrational bands of gas-phase H2O2 by the use of a hydrogen atomic polar tensor transferred from the hydroxyl hydrogen atom of CH3OH. These predicted intensities are compared with intensities predicted by the use of a hydrogen atomic polar tensor transferred from H2O. The predicted relative intensities agree well with published spectra of gas-phase H2O2, and the predicted absolute intensities are expected to be accurate to within at least a factor of two. Among the vibrational degrees of freedom, the antisymmetric O-H bending mode nu(6) is found to be the strongest with a calculated intensity of 60.5 km/mole. The torsional band, a consequence of hindered rotation, is found to be the most intense fundamental with a predicted intensity of 120 km/mole. These results are compared with the recent absolute intensity determinations for the nu(6) band.

  14. New directional results and determination of absolute archaeointensity using both the classical Thellier and the multi-specimen procedures for two kilns excavated at Osterietta, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tema, Evdokia; Camps, Pierre; Ferrara, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    A detailed rock-magnetic and archaeomagnetic study has been carried out on two rescue excavation kilns discovered during the works to expand a highway at the location of Osterietta, in Northen Italy. Systematic archaeomagnetic sampling was carried out collecting 15 samples from the first kiln (OSA) and 8 samples from the second kiln (OSB), all of them oriented in situ with a magnetic compass and an inclinometer. Magnetic mineralogy measurements have been carried out in order to determine the main magnetic carrier of the samples and to check their thermal stability. Standard thermal demagnetization procedures have been used to determine the archaeomagnetic direction registered by the bricks during their last firing. Demagnetization results show a very stable characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM). We averaged the directions for each kiln separately and calculated the statistical parameters assuming a Fisherian distribution. The archaeointensity of both kilns has also been recovered with both the classical Thellier-Thellier method and the multi-specimen procedure (MSP-DSC). During the Thellier experiments, regular partial thermoremanent magnetization checks have been performed and the effect of the anisotropy of the thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) and cooling rate upon TRM intensity acquisition have been investigated in all samples. The multi-specimen procedure was performed with a very fast-heating oven developed at Montpellier (France). The intensity results obtained from both methods have been compared and the full geomagnetic field vector determined for each kiln has been used for archaeomagnetic dating. The obtained results show that the kilns were almost contemporaneous and their last use occurred in the 1750-1850 AD time interval.

  15. Influence of physical and chemical properties of HTSXT-FTIR samples on the quality of prediction models developed to determine absolute concentrations of total proteins, carbohydrates and triglycerides: a preliminary study on the determination of their absolute concentrations in fresh microalgal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano León, Esteban; Coat, Rémy; Moutel, Benjamin; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack; Gonçalves, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Absolute concentrations of total macromolecules (triglycerides, proteins and carbohydrates) in microorganisms can be rapidly measured by FTIR spectroscopy, but caution is needed to avoid non-specific experimental bias. Here, we assess the limits within which this approach can be used on model solutions of macromolecules of interest. We used the Bruker HTSXT-FTIR system. Our results show that the solid deposits obtained after the sampling procedure present physical and chemical properties that influence the quality of the absolute concentration prediction models (univariate and multivariate). The accuracy of the models was degraded by a factor of 2 or 3 outside the recommended concentration interval of 0.5-35 µg spot(-1). Change occurred notably in the sample hydrogen bond network, which could, however, be controlled using an internal probe (pseudohalide anion). We also demonstrate that for aqueous solutions, accurate prediction of total carbohydrate quantities (in glucose equivalent) could not be made unless a constant amount of protein was added to the model solution (BSA). The results of the prediction model for more complex solutions, here with two components: glucose and BSA, were very encouraging, suggesting that this FTIR approach could be used as a rapid quantification method for mixtures of molecules of interest, provided the limits of use of the HTSXT-FTIR method are precisely known and respected. This last finding opens the way to direct quantification of total molecules of interest in more complex matrices.

  16. Determination of Gd, Sm, Eu and Dy in uranium compounds by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modenesi, C.R.; Abrao, A.

    1984-01-01

    The separation of Gd, Sm, Eu and Dy from uranium and its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry is outlined. The lanthanides were separated by means of the percolation of the uranyl nitrate solution 0,3 M in HF (50-250g of U 3 O 8 perliter) through an Al 2 O 3 column. The lanthanides retained in the column were eluted with 1M HCl. As thorium is also retained into the column under these conditions, its interference was studied. The determination limits of the method range from 0,01 to 0,1 μg of lanthanide per gram of uranium. (Author) [pt

  17. Development of an absolute x-ray fluorescence technique and high accuracy analytical methods for the determination of metals in catalytic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Parker, W.C.

    1982-09-01

    A technique to produce characteristic x-rays by direct beta excitation for x-ray fluorescence analysis is presented. This is carried out by the introduction of 100 uCi of Pm-147 or Ni-63 to a small sample, which is placed directly in the window of a modified Si(Li) semiconductor. Corrected intensities are only given at 300 seconds for synthetic standards oscillating within the range 22 3 was used, to which the radioisotope was directly added. Preliminary results of the determination of eleven different radionuclides by means of an elementary x-ray analysis by using a new analytical technique, are discussed. In this technique the radioisotope and the sample are directly mixed, then this source-sample in the detector window and is protected from contamination with a thin plastic film. Future and possible applications of this technique are presented

  18. Absolute determination of neutron detection efficiencies of NE213 detectors using a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source in time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, D

    2001-01-01

    Neutron detection efficiencies of NE213 scintillation detectors were determined by comparison of the measured neutron time-of-flight spectrum of a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source deposited in a parallel-plate, low-mass ionization chamber with its reference neutron energy distribution. Measurement conditions and parameters were systematically varied to study their influence on the efficiencies obtained. The efficiencies derived from the measurement were compared with well-established efficiencies of the detectors used. These efficiencies were calculated with a Monte Carlo code and corrected after comparison with a proton recoil telescope in neutron fluence measurements. Details of the measurement and the data analysis including the corrections needed are discussed.

  19. Combined Absolute/Relative Hypocenter Determination and Moment Tensor Inversion of a VT-B Event Cluster Before the 1998 Eruption of the Mt. Merapi Volcano (Java)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, J.; Krüger, F.

    2001-12-01

    In the ongoing Indonesian-German MERAPI project the seismic signals at Merapi volcano are recorded continuously since July 1997 with a combined seismic network-array approach. With this network it was possible to record the seismicity before the onset of the eruption in July 1998 with a high dynamic and broad frequency range. The automatic standard analysis of the recorded seismic data before the first of two larger pyroclastic density flows emphasized the importance of a seismic swarm of VT-B type events in order to forecast the location of the newly formed lava lobe during this eruptive phase. To improve the location accuracy, we relocate these events using an extended cluster analysis technique. We first estimate the amount of events in three different seismic clusters. After this we estimate the relative onset times of all event combinations within one cluster using the SmoothedCOherencyTransform algorithm. Further we use the amplitude of the computed cross-correlation coefficients of each event-event waveform pair to further restrict our hypocenter constrain. In the final step we invert iteratively all estimated travel times, the relative travel times within the different arrays and the correlation coefficients in one single matrix. The resulting high precision hypocenter determination of the distinct clusters indicate a small source volume in the intersection of a old crater floor and the active part of Mt. Merapi. The high precision in hypocenter determination make a detailed analysis of the source mechanisms of these VTB events feasible. We use a point source full moment tensor inversion and simple source time functions to invert for the source mechanism. Greens functions are calculated with the reflectivity method and local 1D models based on refraction on different scales. The bias in the results due to not modelled topography and 3D-structure is estimated using a bootstrap approach.

  20. Direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry - feasibility of Na and K determination in desalted crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Tassia S.; Machado, Eduarda Q.; Flores, Erico M. M.; Mello, Paola A.; Duarte, Fabio A.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, Na and K were determined in desalted crude oil by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (DS-GF AAS), with the use of a Zeeman-effect background correction system with variable magnetic field. The analysis was performed in low and high sensitivity conditions. Sodium determination was performed in two low-sensitivity conditions: 1) main absorption line (589.0 nm), gas stop flow during the atomization step and 3-field dynamic mode (0.6-0.8 T); and 2) secondary absorption line (330.3 nm), gas stop flow during the atomization and 2-field mode (0.8 T). In K determination, some parameters, such as high-sensitivity mode, main absorption line (766.5 nm), gas stop flow during the atomization and 2-field mode (0.8 T), were used. Suitability of chemical modifiers, such as Pd and W-Ir was also evaluated. The heating program for Na and K was based on the pyrolysis and atomization curves. Calibration was performed by aqueous standards. Accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of Green Petroleum Coke (SRM NIST 2718) and Trace Elements in Fuel Oil (SRM NIST 1634c). Recovery tests were also performed and results were compared with those obtained by GF AAS after crude oil digestion by microwave-assisted digestion. The characteristic mass of Na was 17.1 pg and 0.46 ng in conditions 1 and 2, respectively, while the one of K was 1.4 pg. Limits of detection and quantification by DS-GF AAS were 30 and 40 ng g-1 for Na and 3.2 and 4.2 ng g-1 for K, respectively. Sodium and K were determined in three crude oil samples with API density ranging from 20.9 to 28.0. Sodium and K concentration ranged from 1.5 to 73 μg g-1 and from 23 to 522 ng g-1, respectively.

  1. Determination of molybdenum wear metal in lubricating oils by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with a particle size independent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, C.S.; Eisentraut, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A particle size independent procedure for the quantitative determination of molybdenum wear metal in used lubricating oils using conventional flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. The oil sample containing molybdenum was treated with a mixture containing hydrofluoric and nitric acids and shaken for 2 minutes before dillution with methyl isobutyl ketone. The effect of the type and amount of acid added, sequence of acid addition with respect to diluent, shaking time, and solubility of oxidized molybdenum species were studied. Samples containing molybdenum powder as large as 200 mesh were analyzed with an accuracy of 95.5 +-2.6%. A comparison is made between the results obtained from this procedure with those of other atomic absorption and emission techniques. 6 tables

  2. Sequential determination of arsenic, selenium, antimony, and tellurium in foods via rapid hydride evolution and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, J.A.; Jones, J.W.; Capar, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of acid digests of foods for As, Se, Sb, and Te was semiautomated. Hydrides generated by controlled addition of base stabilized NaBH 4 solution to acid digests are transported directly into a shielded, hydrogen (nitrogen diluted), entrained-air flame for atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of the individual elements. The detection limits, based on 1 g of digested sample, are approximately 10 to 20 ng/g for all four elements. Measurement precision is 1 to 2 percent relative standard deviation for each element measured at 0.10 μg. A comparison is made of results of analysis of lyophilized fish tissues for As and Se by instrumental neutron activation (INAA), hydride generation with atomic absorption spectrometry, fluorometry, and spectrophotometry. NBS standard reference materials (orchard leaves and bovine liver) analyzed for As, Se, and Sb by this method show excellent agreement with certified values and with independent NAA values

  3. Determination of As, Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb in biological samples by modern electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardans, Jordi, E-mail: j.sardans@creaf.uab.ca [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain); Montes, Fernando [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), C/ Senda del Rey 9. 28040 Madrid (Spain); Penuelas, Josep [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Pollution from heavy metals has increased in recent decades and has become an important concern for environmental agencies. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, mercury and lead are among the trace elements that have the greatest impact and carry the highest risk to human health. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has long been used for trace element analyses and over the past few years, the main constraints of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) methods, namely matrix interferences that provoked high background absorption and interferences, have been reduced. The use of new, more efficient modifiers and in situ trapping methods for stabilization and pre-concentration of these analytes, progress in control of atomization temperatures, new designs of atomizers and advances in methods to correct background spectral interferences have permitted an improvement in sensitivity, an increase in detection power, reduction in sample manipulation, and increase in the reproducibility of the results. These advances have enhanced the utility of Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) for trace element determination at mug L{sup -1} levels, especially in difficult matrices, giving rise to greater reproducibility, lower economic cost and ease of sample pre-treatment compared to other methods. Moreover, the recent introduction of high resolution continuum source Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-ETAAS) has facilitated direct solid sampling, reducing background noise and opening the possibility of achieving even more rapid quantitation of some elements. The incorporation of flow injection analysis (FIA) systems for automation of sample pre-treatment, as well as chemical vapor generation renders (ETAAS) into a feasible option for detection of As and Hg in environmental and food control studies wherein large numbers of samples can be rapidly analyzed. A relatively inexpensive approach with low sample consumption provide additional advantages

  4. Influence of supersaturated carbon on the diffusion of Ni in ferrite determined by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kresse, T.

    2013-09-01

    In patented and cold-drawn pearlitic steel wires dissociation of cementite occurs during mechanical deformation. In this study the influence of the carbon decomposition on the diffusion of nickel in ferrite is investigated by means of atom probe tomography. In the temperature range 423-523 K we observed a much smaller activation energy of Ni diffusion than for self-diffusion in body-centered cubic iron, indicating an increased vacancy density owing to enhanced formation of vacancy-carbon complexes. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants; Spectroscopie atomique et mesures de grande precision: determination de constantes fonfamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwob, C

    2006-12-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm{sup -1}). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10{sup -9} began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is {alpha}{sub -1} = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10{sup -9}. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  6. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backenstoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of exotic atoms are presented. The improved quality of accelerator facilities and experimental techniques leads to a more precise determination of data. This opens new fields in nuclear and particle physics to which exotic atoms may contribute valuable knowledge. (author)

  7. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of boron in the waters of Troia by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASAN OZCAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry method (ICP-EAS is proposed for the determination of boron in Troia water sources. In this study, boron samples were taken from 25 different locations during November 2002 and May 2003. The 249.773 nm boron emmision line was not affected by the samplematrix. The boron content was determined without further pretreatment of samples proposed ICP-AES method. An analysis of a given sample was completed in about 15 min. The determined boron concentrations in surface and ground water sources were between 0.00444–1.11200mgl-1. Inorder to compare the results obtained by the proposed method, selected water samples were also analysed titrimetically. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that there is a close relationship between the ICP-AES and the titrimetric method and the determination coefficient (R2 was calculated to be 91.34 %.

  9. The Absolute Shielding Constants of Heavy Nuclei: Resolving the Enigma of the (119)Sn Absolute Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Elena; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2013-02-07

    We demonstrate that the apparent disagreement between experimental determinations and four-component relativistic calculations of the absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei is due to the breakdown of the commonly assumed relation between the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the NMR shielding constants. We demonstrate that this breakdown has significant consequences for the absolute shielding constant of (119)Sn, leading to errors of about 1000 ppm. As a consequence, we expect that many absolute shielding constants of heavy nuclei will be in need of revision.

  10. Metal-binding proteins scanning and determination by combining gel electrophoresis, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbi, F M; Arruda, S C C; Rodriguez, A P M; Pérez, C A; Arruda, M A Z

    2005-02-28

    In the present work, protein bands from in vitro embriogenic callus (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) were investigated using micro-synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (muSR-XRF) after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation. Metal-binding protein quantification was done after microwave oven decomposition of gel by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF), flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and flame atomic emission spectrometry (FAES). According to the analysis of the protein bands, it is possible to observe that both 81 and ca. 14 kDa proteins present different Fe signal intensity at different positions. The analysis of 53 kDa protein, showed even more interesting results. Besides Fe, the muSR-XRF experiments indicate the presence of Ca, Cu, K and Zn. Chemical elements such as Cu, K, Fe and Zn were determined by SR-TXRF, Mg by FAAS and Na by FAES. Ca was determined by SR-TXRF and FAAS only for accuracy check. In the mineralised protein bands of 81 and around 14 kDa band, only Fe was determined (105 and 21.8 microg g(-1)). For those protein bands (86-ca. 14 kDa) were determined, Ca, K, Cu and Zn in a wide concentration range (42.4-283, 2.47-96.8, 0.91-15.9 and 3.39-29.7 microg g(-1), respectively).

  11. Accurate absolute frequencies of the ν1+ν3 band of 13C2H2 determined using an infrared mode-locked Cr:YAG laser frequency comb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madej, Alan A.; Bernard, John E.; John Alcock, A.; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Absolute frequency measurements, with up to 1x10 -11 level accuracies, are presented for 60 lines of the P and R branches for the ν 1 +ν 3 band of 13 C 2 H 2 at 1.5 μm (194 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line and a second laser system stabilized to the line whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG frequency comb was employed to accurately measure the tetrahertz level frequency intervals. The results are compared with recent work from other groups and indicate that these lines would form a basis for a high-quality atlas of reference frequencies for this region of the spectrum

  12. Nickel and strontium nitrates as modifiers for the determination of selenium in wine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, J. [Inst. of Agriculture, Skopje (Yugoslavia); Stafilov, T. [Inst. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science Sts. Cyril and Methodius Univ., Skopje (Yugoslavia); Mihajlovic, D. [RZ Tehnicka Kontrola, Skopje (Yugoslavia)

    2001-08-01

    A mixed matrix modifier of nickel and strontium nitrates was used as a chemical modifier for the determination of selenium in wines by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Wine samples were heated on a boiling water bath with small amounts of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. For complete elimination of interference, especially from sulfates and phosphates, selenium is complexed with ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDTC), extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and measured by ETAAS. The graphite furnace temperature program was optimized for both aqueous and organic solutions. Pyrolysis temperatures of 1300 C and 800 C were chosen for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively; 2700 C and 2100 C were used as optimum atomization temperatures for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively. The optimum modifier mass established is markedly lower than those presented in the literature. The platform atomization ensures pretreatment stabilization up to 1100 C and 1600 C, respectively, for organic and aqueous selenium solutions. The procedure was verified by the method of standard addition. The investigated wine samples originated from the different regions of the Republic of Macedonia. The selenium concentration varied from not detectable to 0.93 {mu}g L{sup -1}. (orig.)

  13. Determination of the 1s-2s two-photon excitation cross-section in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, G.A.; McRae, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms are ablated from zirconium alloys into the gas phase by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and photo-ionized with three photons at 243 nm via the two-photon 1s 2 S 1/2 -2s 2 S 1/2 resonant transition. A determination of the effective 1s-2s two-photon excitation cross-section is necessary to quantify the hydrogen atom density in the ablation plume. A measurement of the ion signal vs photo-ionization beam energy is fitted to an expression derived from the rate equations. The temporal and spatial properties of the photo-ionization laser beam, transit of the H atoms through the beam, and detector geometry are taken into account. The effective two-photon cross-section for this experimental configuration, derived with the rate equation formalism, is 3.3 ± 0.8 X 10 -28 cm 4 W -1 . This compares well with the ab initio prediction of 5 ± 1 X 10 -28 cm 4 W -1 under these experimental conditions. (author)

  14. Determining Nuclear Fingerprints: Glove Boxes, Radiation Protection, and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentetzi, Maria

    2017-06-01

    In a nuclear laboratory, a glove box is a windowed, sealed container equipped with two flexible gloves that allow the user to manipulate nuclear materials from the outside in an ostensibly safe environment. As a routine laboratory device, it invites neglect from historians and storytellers of science. Yet, since especially the Gulf War, glove boxes have put the interdependence of science, diplomacy, and politics into clear relief. Standing at the intersection of history of science and international history, technological materials and devices such as the glove box can provide penetrating insight into the role of international diplomatic organizations to the global circulation and control of scientific knowledge. The focus here is on the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of mineral elements in fresh olive fruits by flame atomic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Hernandez, A; Mateos, R.; Garcia-Mesa, J.A.; Beltran, G.; Fernandez-Escobar, R.

    2010-07-01

    The mineral element characterisation of olive fruits is acquiring interest to evaluate the link between their nutritional status and the olive oil quality. A method for the analysis of mineral elements in fresh olive fruits is proposed. The presence of mineral elements such as potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, and manganese in olive fruits was quantified by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The limits of quantification were (expressed in mg kg.1 of dry weight) 1.266, 1.569, 0.272, 0.172, 0.268, 0.316, 1.017 and 0.513 for K, Na, Ca, Mg, Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn, respectively. The results showed the method is a robust, reliable, and simple analytical procedure for the mineral element characterisation of olive fruit. (Author).

  16. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  17. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  18. Absolute risk, absolute risk reduction and relative risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Andres Calvache

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article illustrates the epidemiological concepts of absolute risk, absolute risk reduction and relative risk through a clinical example. In addition, it emphasizes the usefulness of these concepts in clinical practice, clinical research and health decision-making process.

  19. Air quality status in Kinshasa as determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry and ion-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, K.K.

    1991-01-01

    Three independent analytical techniques - instrumental neutron activation analysis. Atomic absorption spectrometry and ion-exchange chromatography - were applied to airborne particulate collected on filters and to atmospheric acid gases collected in carbonate buffer solutions. 20 trace elements and 7 acid gases and acid aerosols were determined. Results were compared with those observed elsewhere and showed that air pollution is low in Kinshasa and does not give rise to anxieties. The main known sources of pollutants are: vehicle exhaust and aeolian process on stripped soils. (author). 13 refs, 2 figs, 6 tabs

  20. Total uncertainty budget calculation for the determination of mercury in incineration ash (BCR 176R) by atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirez, Kristof; Beutels, Filip; Brusten, Wilfried; Noten, Bart; De Brucker, Nicole

    2002-11-01

    The mercury mass fraction has been determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in the framework of the project "Certification of a reference material (trace elements in fly ash) in replacement of BCR CRM 176". Calculation of the uncertainty budget, as described in this manuscript, emphasizes a practical and realistic approach to estimation of uncertainty components on the basis of statistical assumptions. GUM Workbench software was used, and resulted in a mercury mass fraction of 1.58+/-0.11 mg kg(-1) (with coverage factor k=2.2, 95% probability) related to dry mass, submitted in the certification exercise. The calculated total uncertainty budget applies to analogous samples analyzed by this procedure.

  1. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dancsak, Stacia E.; Silva, Sidnei G.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Donati, George L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg −1 . •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg −1 for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg −1 for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg −1 for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are

  2. Determination of Sodium, Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium Minerals Level in Fresh and Boiled Broccoli and Cauliflower by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerdy

    2018-01-01

    Vegetables from the cabbage family vegetables consumed by many people, which is known healthful, by eaten raw, boiled, or cooked (stir fry or soup). Vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber. This study aims to determine the decrease percentage of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level caused by boiled broccoli and cauliflower by atomic absorption spectrometry. Boiled broccoli and cauliflower prepared by given boiled treatment in boiling water for 3 minutes. Fresh and boiled broccoli and cauliflower carried out dry destruction, followed by quantitative analysis of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals respectively at a wavelength of 589.0 nm; 766.5 nm; 285.2 nm; and 422.7 nm, using atomic absorption spectrometry methods. After the determination of the sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level followed by validation of analytical methods with accuracy, precision, linearity, range, limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantitation (LOQ) parameters. Research results show a decrease in the sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level in boiled broccoli and cauliflower compared with fresh broccoli and cauliflower. Validation of analytical methods gives results that spectrometry methods used for determining sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium minerals level are valid. It concluded that the boiled gives the effect of decreasing the minerals level significantly in broccoli and cauliflower.

  3. Surfactant/oil/water system for the determination of selenium in eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieggli, C. V. S.; Bohrer, D.; Noremberg, S.; do Nascimento, P. C.; de Carvalho, L. M.; Vieira, S. L.; Reis, R. N.

    2009-06-01

    An oil-in-water formulation has been optimized to determine trace levels of selenium in whole hen eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. This method is simpler and requires fewer reagents when compared with other sample pre-treatment procedures. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GF AAS) measurement was carried out using standard addition calibration and Pd as a modifier. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was better than 5% and the limit of detection was 1 µg L - 1 . The validation of the method was performed against a standard reference material Whole Egg Powder (RM 8415), and the measured Se corresponded to 95.2% of the certified value. The method was used for the determination of the Se level in eggs from hens treated with Se dietary supplements. Inorganic and organic Se sources were added to hen feed. The Se content of eggs was higher when hens were fed with organic Se compared to the other treatments. The proposed method, including sample emulsification for subsequent Se determination by GF AAS has proved to be sensitive, reproducible, simple and economical.

  4. Surfactant/oil/water system for the determination of selenium in eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieggli, C.V.S. [Departamento de Quimica, Avenida Roraima, 1000, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, CEP 97110-970, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bohrer, D. [Departamento de Quimica, Avenida Roraima, 1000, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, CEP 97110-970, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: ndenise@quimica.ufsm.br; Noremberg, S.; Nascimento, P.C. do; Carvalho, L.M. de [Departamento de Quimica, Avenida Roraima, 1000, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, CEP 97110-970, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Vieira, S.L.; Reis, R.N. [Faculdade de Agronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 7712, CEP 90540-000, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    An oil-in-water formulation has been optimized to determine trace levels of selenium in whole hen eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. This method is simpler and requires fewer reagents when compared with other sample pre-treatment procedures. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GF AAS) measurement was carried out using standard addition calibration and Pd as a modifier. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was better than 5% and the limit of detection was 1 {mu}g L{sup - 1}. The validation of the method was performed against a standard reference material Whole Egg Powder (RM 8415), and the measured Se corresponded to 95.2% of the certified value. The method was used for the determination of the Se level in eggs from hens treated with Se dietary supplements. Inorganic and organic Se sources were added to hen feed. The Se content of eggs was higher when hens were fed with organic Se compared to the other treatments. The proposed method, including sample emulsification for subsequent Se determination by GF AAS has proved to be sensitive, reproducible, simple and economical.

  5. Standard test method for determining elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the specimen. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and nonnuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable to process control within waste treatment facilities. This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels which do not require special personnel or environmental protection. A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is included

  6. Extraction atomic absorption determination of Cu, Ca, Mg and In in potassium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, G.F.; Chaplygin, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    Determination of microadmixtures of Cu, Ca, Mg, and In in potassium chloride by means of extraction separation of hydroxyquinolines of the elements determined by isoamyl alcohol from the sample basis is described. In is extracted in 10 min at pH 1.5-2.5% (100%). The extract is sprayed in the acetylene-air flame. Lower limits of the concentrations determined are 10 -5 -10 -7 %

  7. Absolute age determination of quaternary faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Chang Sik; Lee, Seok Hoon; Choi, Man Sik

    2000-03-01

    To constrain the age of neotectonic fault movement, Rb-Sr, K-Ar, U-series disequilibrium, C-14 and Be-10 methods were applied to the fault gouges, fracture infillings and sediments from the Malbang, Ipsil, Wonwonsa faults faults in the Ulsan fault zone, Yangsan fault in the Yeongdeog area and southeastern coastal area. Rb-Sr and K-Ar data imply that the fault movement of the Ulan fault zone initiated at around 30 Ma and preliminary dating result for the Yang san fault is around 70 Ma in the Yeongdeog area. K-Ar and U-series disequilibrium dating results for fracture infillings in the Ipsil fault are consistent with reported ESR ages. Radiocarbon ages of quaternary sediments from the Jeongjari area are discordant with stratigraphic sequence. Carbon isotope data indicate a difference of sedimentry environment for those samples. Be-10 dating results for the Suryum fault area are consistent with reported OSL results

  8. Absolute age determination of quaternary faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Chang Sik; Lee, Seok Hoon; Choi, Man Sik [Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-03-15

    To constrain the age of neotectonic fault movement, Rb-Sr, K-Ar, U-series disequilibrium, C-14 and Be-10 methods were applied to the fault gouges, fracture infillings and sediments from the Malbang, Ipsil, Wonwonsa faults faults in the Ulsan fault zone, Yangsan fault in the Yeongdeog area and southeastern coastal area. Rb-Sr and K-Ar data imply that the fault movement of the Ulan fault zone initiated at around 30 Ma and preliminary dating result for the Yang san fault is around 70 Ma in the Yeongdeog area. K-Ar and U-series disequilibrium dating results for fracture infillings in the Ipsil fault are consistent with reported ESR ages. Radiocarbon ages of quaternary sediments from the Jeongjari area are discordant with stratigraphic sequence. Carbon isotope data indicate a difference of sedimentry environment for those samples. Be-10 dating results for the Suryum fault area are consistent with reported OSL results.

  9. Determining Absolute Zero in the Kitchen Sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Robert; Siegel, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Presents an experiment to demonstrate Charles's Law of Ideal Gases by creating a constant-pressure thermometer from materials that can be found in the kitchen. Discusses the underlying mathematical relationships and a step-by-step description of the experiment. (MDH)

  10. Concept of effective states of atoms in compounds to describe properties determined by the densities of valence electrons in atomic cores

    OpenAIRE

    Titov, Anatoly V.; Lomachuk, Yuriy V.; Skripnikov, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for describing the effective electronic states of "atoms in compounds" to study the properties of molecules and condensed matter which are circumscribed by the operators heavily concentrated in atomic cores is proposed. Among the properties are hyperfine structure, space parity (P) and time reversal invariance (T) nonconservation effects, chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines (XES), M\\"{o}ssbauer effect, etc. Advantage of the approach is that a good quantitative agreement of ...

  11. Ultrasound assisted pseudo-digestion of street dust samples prior to determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elik, Adil

    2005-05-15

    A sample preparation method based on ultrasound assisted pseudo-digestion of Pb, Cu, Zn and Ni from street dust samples under ultrasonic effect has been described. Parameters influencing pseudo-digestion, such as sonication time, sample mass, particle size and solvent system were fully optimized. Final solutions obtained upon sonication were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. The best conditions for metal pseudo-digestion were as follows: a 25min sonication time, a 0.3g sample mass (in 25ml solvent), a particle size <63mum and a mixture of concentrated HNO(3)-HClO(4)-HF (2:1:1, v/v/v). Analytical results for the four metals by ultrasound assisted pseudo-digestion, acid bomb and conventional wet digestion methods showed a good agreement, thus indicating the possibility of using mild conditions for sample preparation instead of intensive treatments inherent with the digestion methods. In addition, this method reduces the time required for all treatments (pseudo-digestion or digestion, heating to dryness, cooling and separation) with acid bomb and conventional wet digestion methods approximately from 9 to 1h. The accuracy of the method was tested either by comparing obtained results with those of acid bomb and conventional wet digestion methods or by application on two standard reference materials. The average relative standard deviation of ultrasound assisted pseudo-digestion method varied between 0.9 and 1.8% for N=12, depending on the analyte.

  12. Determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer in Tongkat Ali preparations obtained in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Hooi-Hoon; Lee, Ee-Lin; Cheang, Hui-Seong

    2004-01-01

    The DCA (Drug Control Authority), Malaysia, has implemented the phase 3 registration of traditional medicines on 1 January 1992, with special emphasis on the quality, efficacy, and safety (including the presence of heavy metals) in all pharmaceutical dosage forms of traditional medicine preparations. As such, a total of 100 products in various pharmaceutical dosage forms of a herbal preparation, containing Tongkat Ali, were analyzed for mercury content using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that 36% of the above products possessed 0.52 to 5.30 ppm of mercury and, therefore, do not comply with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia. Out of these 36 products, 5 products that possessed 1.05 to 4.41 ppm of mercury were in fact have already registered with the DCA, Malaysia. However, the rest of the products that contain 0.52 to 5.30 ppm of mercury still have not registered with the DCA, Malaysia. Although this study showed that only 64% of the products complied with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia pertaining to mercury, they cannot be assumed safe from mercury contamination because of batch-to-batch inconsistency.

  13. Determination of toxic metals in some herbal drugs through atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Bushra; Rizwani, Ghazala Hafeez; Naseem, Shahid

    2011-07-01

    This study presents a picture of occurrence of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Co, Fe, Ni, Zn) in some selected valuable herbal drugs (G. glabra, O. bracteatum, V. odorata , F. vulgare, C. cyminum, C. sativum, and Z. officinalis) purchased from three different zones (southern, eastern, and western) of Karachi city using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metal concentrations in these drugs were found in the range of: 3.26-30.46 for Pb, 1.6-4.91 for Cd, 0.65-120.21 for Cu, 83.74-433.76 for Zn, 1.61-186.75 for Cr, 0.48-76.97 for Ni, 5.54-77.97 for Co and 65.68-1652.89 µg/g for Fe. Percentage of heavy metals that were found beyond the permissible limits were: 71.4% for Pb, 28.51% for Cd, 14.2% for Cu, and 9.5 % for Cr. Significant difference was noticed for each heavy metal among herbal drugs as well as their zones of collection using two way ANOVA followed by least significant (LSD) test at pmetal contaminant of herbal drugs by environmental pollution, as well as to highlight the health risks associated with the use of such herbal drugs that contain high levels of toxic heavy metals.

  14. Simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrzycka-Szelewa, Elżbieta; Lulewicz, Marta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2017-07-01

    In the present paper a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) was developed. Among six pairs of absorption atomic lines of Rh and Ru, which are close enough to enable their simultaneous detection, two pairs were selected for further studies. Best results were obtained for measurements of the resonance line of rhodium at 343.489 nm and the adjacent secondary line of ruthenium at 343.674 nm (23% intensity of this line). For evaluated lines, the absorbance values were obtained using three pixels. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1200 °C and 2600 °C, respectively. Under these conditions the limits of detection achieved for Rh and Ru were found to be 1.0 μg L- 1 and 1.9 μg L- 1, respectively. The characteristic mass was 12.9 pg for Rh and 71.7 pg for Ru. Repeatability of the results expressed as a relative standard deviation was typically below 6%. The trueness of the method was confirmed by analysis of the certified reference material - platinum ore (SARM 76). The recovery of Rh and Ru from the platinum ore was 93.0 ± 4.6% and 90.1 ± 2.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the direct simultaneous determination of trace amounts of rhodium and ruthenium in spiked river water, road runoff, and municipal sewage. Separation of interfering matrix on cation exchange resin was required before analysis of road dust and tunnel dust (CW-7) by HR-CS GFAAS.

  15. Flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for trace element determination in vegetable oils, margarine and butter after sample emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieggli, C V S; Bohrer, D; Do Nascimento, P C; De Carvalho, L M

    2011-05-01

    Trace element analysis plays an important role in oil characterisation and in the detection of oil adulteration because the quality of edible oils and fats is affected by their trace metal content. In this study, the quantification of selected metals in various oils and fats (rice oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, corn oil, soy oil, olive oil, light margarine, regular margarine and butter) was carried out using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after sample emulsification. FAAS was used to determine the Na, K, Ca, Mg, Zn and Fe levels in the samples, while GFAAS was used for quantifying Cr, Ni, As, Pb, Cd, Cu and Mn, as these elements appeared in the samples at much lower concentrations. Tween-80 and Triton X-100 were employed as surfactants, and emulsions were prepared by a conventional method that involved heating and mixing of the constituents. Complete stabilisation was achieved through magnetic stirring for 15 min at room temperature. The evaluated figures of merit were linearity, accuracy and sensitivity, which were determined by the characteristic concentration and mass. Analysis of spiked samples demonstrated accuracy, which ranged from 90% (Na) to 112% (Fe) for FAAS and from 83% (Cd) to 121% (Pb) for GFAAS measurements. Atomic absorption spectrometry proved to be a promising approach for the analysis of metals in emulsified edible oils and fats. Additionally, under appropriate emulsification conditions (formulation, stirring time and temperature), the emulsions were homogeneous, had excellent stability, and had appropriate viscosity. The proposed method has proved to be simple, sensitive, reproducible, and economical.

  16. Determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery streams by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after multivariate optimization based on Doehlert design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassella, Ricardo J.; de Sant'Ana, Otoniel D.; Santelli, Ricardo E.

    2002-12-01

    This paper reports the development of a methodology for the determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery aqueous streams containing large amounts of unknown volatile organic compounds, employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with polarized Zeeman-effect background correction. In order to make the procedure applicable, the influence of chemical modification and the drying step was examined. Also, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of nitric acid added to the sample were optimized using a multivariate approach based on Doehlert matrix. Obtained results indicate that, in this kind of sample, arsenic must be determined by standard addition procedure with a careful control of the drying step temperature and ramp pattern. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure, a test was performed in six spiked samples of petroleum refinery aqueous streams and the relative errors verified in the analysis of such samples (added As between 12.5 and 190 μg l -1) ranged from -7.2 to +16.7%. The detection limit and the relative standard deviation were also calculated and the values are 68 pg and 7.5% (at 12.5 μg l -1 level), respectively.

  17. Determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery streams by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after multivariate optimization based on Doehlert design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassella, Ricardo J.; Sant'Ana, Otoniel D. de; Santelli, Ricardo E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a methodology for the determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery aqueous streams containing large amounts of unknown volatile organic compounds, employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with polarized Zeeman-effect background correction. In order to make the procedure applicable, the influence of chemical modification and the drying step was examined. Also, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of nitric acid added to the sample were optimized using a multivariate approach based on Doehlert matrix. Obtained results indicate that, in this kind of sample, arsenic must be determined by standard addition procedure with a careful control of the drying step temperature and ramp pattern. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure, a test was performed in six spiked samples of petroleum refinery aqueous streams and the relative errors verified in the analysis of such samples (added As between 12.5 and 190 μg l -1 ) ranged from -7.2 to +16.7%. The detection limit and the relative standard deviation were also calculated and the values are 68 pg and 7.5% (at 12.5 μg l -1 level), respectively

  18. Determination of Zinc Ions in Environmental Samples by Dispersive Liquid- Liquid Micro Extraction and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Arabi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work preconcentration of the Zn ions was investigated in water sample by Dispersive liquid- liquid micro extraction (DLLME using chloroform as an extraction solvent, methanol as a disperser solvent and 8-Hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. The determination of extracted ions was done by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The influence of various analytical parameters including pH, extraction and disperser solvent type and volume and concentration of the chelating agent on the extraction efficiency of analyses was investigated. After extraction, the enrichment factor was 26 and the detection limit of the method was 0.0033 µg l-1 and the relative standard deviations (R.S.D for five determinations of 1 ng/ml Zn were 7.41%. 

  19. Determination of vanadium in sea water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a tube coated with pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Tokuo; Sakai, Kaoru

    1981-01-01

    The trace amount of vanadium in sea water was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a tube coated with pyrolytic graphite. To correct the background absorption, a deuterium lamp with a higher-brilliant thermal cathode was used. The sensitivity for vanadium increased 10 -- 20 fold by the use of the tube coated with pyrolytic graphite, and the utility lifetime of the tube was greatly extended. Vanadium(V) - 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) complexes were extracted into chloroform as an ion-pair with benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium (Zephiramine) cation alternatively. The sample of sea water, which was made to 0.1 N in sulfuric acid and 0.1% in hydrogen peroxide, was loaded onto the column of Dowex 1-X 4 resin (SO 4 2- -form). Vanadium was then eluted from the resin with 1 N sulfuric acid-0.1% hydrogen peroxide or 1 N hydrochloric acid-0.1% hydrogen peroxide evaporated to dry. After dissolution of the elute in 0.2 N nitric acid, vanadium was extracted. Secondly, the sample of sea water was adjusted to pH 5.0, and loaded onto the column of Chelex-100 resin. Vanadium was eluted from the resin with 2 N ammonia. The above two methods took much time, but the coprecipitation method was not so and recommended for the determination of vanadium in sea water. Vanadium was coprecipitated with iron(III) hydroxide-hydrous titanium(IV) oxide at pH 6.0. The precipitate was digested with nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide. The solution was diluted to 50 ml with water. The resulting solutions were employed to determine the vanadium concentration by the graphite furnace atomic absorption measurement. The trace amounts of vanadium in various kinds of the coastal sea water were determined by the coprecipitation method. (author)

  20. Determination of boron in waters by using methyl borate generation and flame atomic-emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, J.R.; Mir, J.M.; Martinez, C.; Bendicho, C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method is proposed for the determination of boron in waters. The esterification reaction between boric acid and methanol in a concentrated sulphuric acid medium and the vaporisation of the methyl borate formed (boiling-point, 68 C) are used in the determination by boron by measuring the emission of the BO 2 radical at 548 nm. This reaction is carried out in a simple and inexpensive generator, designed for this purpose, and the heat developed in it causes the rapid volatilisation of the methyl borate. Thus no collection systems or carrier gas are required. The proposed method gives an improved detection limit and it can be applied to the determination of boron in water samples. It is both rapid and highly selective. (author)

  1. Indium determination by spectral overlappings of lines in atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J.J.; Huicque, L. d'; Garcia Vior, L.O.

    1991-01-01

    A molybdenum hollow-cathode lamp filled with neon can be used to determine indium. Characteristic concentration for this element is 4.5 mg/L in the 325 nm spectral region for the Mo(I) 325.621 nm line. In addition, values of 0.4 mg/L and 0.3 mg/L are obtained with the Mo(I) 410.215 nm and Ne(I) 451.151 nm lines, respectively. These spectral overlappings allow the determination of indium in silver-cadmium-indium alloys. (Author) [es

  2. "Absolute" sterility and "absolute" freedom from particle contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, J Z

    1998-01-01

    Until the recent past, sterility of an injectable product was only discussed in absolute terms. Any description of sterility other than as an absolute could simply not be envisioned. While dealing in absolute yes/no statements is philosophically satisfying, these yes/no statements can't accommodate all real world scientific problems. Among these problems is the sterility problems faced in the mass production of injectable compounds. Many descriptions of procedures employed to achieve sterility in parenteral production batches were reported in the literature. The theoretical framework that could unite the widespread observations and practices into practical methodology was missing until recently. Production line control of the sterility of injectable products was essentially based on gut evaluations. The present achievement of rational, production line control of product sterility is based on the recognition that product sterility could not be simply regarded as a sharply edged yes/no affair. The present rational control is based on the fact that the sterility of a product is determined by the degree of contamination in the product prior to sterilization and to the parameters of the sterilization process. The end result of the sterilization process is now described as a probabalistic reduction of the initial contamination. The essential laboratory measurements on which this conclusion was based is due to Pflug (1-3). He assembled a theoretical framework, based on experimental data, that characterizes the sterility achieved in an injectable product with a single number. The end result of the sterilization process is now described as a probabalistic reduction of the initial contamination. As in many disciplines, the ability to achieve an objective evaluation of this important attribute provided the basis for scientific analysis, improved control and thus improved production and reduced cost. An equivalent framework is essential for the communication and

  3. Determination of silicon in biomass and products of pyrolysis process via high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadi, Flávio V; Prodanov, Caroline; Boschetti, Wiliam; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2018-03-01

    Thermochemical processes can convert the biomass into fuels, such as bio-oil. The biomass submitted to pyrolysis process, such as fibers, are generally rich in silicon, an element that can lead to damages in an engine when there is high concentration in a fuel. High-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) is an interesting alternative for Si determination in the products and byproducts of the pyrolysis process because, besides the flame (F) and graphite furnace (GF) atomizers, it has enhanced the application of direct analysis of solid samples (SS) within GF. This study aimed the development of methods to determine Si in biomass samples, their products and byproducts using HR-CS AAS. A high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer contrAA 700 equipped with F and GF atomizers was used throughout the study. HR-CS F AAS (λ = 251.611nm, 1 detection pixel, N 2 O/C 2 H 2 flame) was used to evaluate Si content in biomass and ash, after a microwave-assisted acid digestion with HNO 3 and HF. HR-CS GF AAS (T pyr = 1400°C, T atom = 2650°C) has evaluated Si in pyrolysis water and bio-oil at 251.611nm, and in peach pit biomass and ash at 221.174nm using SS, both wavelengths with 1 detection pixel. Rhodium (300μg) was applied as permanent modifier and 10μgPd + 6μg Mg were pipetted onto the standards/samples at each analysis. Three different biomass samples were studied: palm tree fiber, coconut fiber and peach pit, and three certified reference materials (CRM) were used to verify the accuracy of the methods. The figures of merit were LOD 0.09-20mgkg -1 , and LOQ 0.3-20mgkg -1 , considering all the methods. There were no significant differences between the CRM certified values and the determined ones, using a Student t-test with a confidence interval of 95% (n = 5). Si concentration ranged from 0.11-0.92% mm -1 , 1.1-1.7mgkg -1 , 3.3-13mgkg -1 , and 0.41-1.4%mm -1 , in biomass, bio-oil, pyrolysis water and ash, respectively

  4. Determination of selection criteria for spray drift reduction from atomization data

    Science.gov (United States)

    When testing and evaluating drift reduction technologies (DRT), there are different metrics that can be used to determine if the technology reduces drift as compared to a reference system. These metrics can include reduction in percent of fine drops, measured spray drift from a field trial, or comp...

  5. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanovic, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Bronsted acidity. As Bronsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework

  6. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  7. Direct determination by atomic absorption of calcium, cobalt and zinc in nuclear grade uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guido, O.O.; Amaya, Carlos.

    1975-05-01

    A study has been made of the effect of flame composition (fuel: C 2 H 2 , comburent: air or N 2 O) and location of the burner on the three analytes in a nitric medium, in presence and in absence of uranium. For calcium it was necessary to use N 2 O, while for zinc and cobalt the use of air was found more adequate. The standard additions method for the quantitative determination was adopted. The absorption at the analytical wavelength not corresponding to the elements studied was determined by comparison between this method and another indirect one, using extraction with TBP, and the results were expressed as equivalent concentrations. Confidence intervals of the analytical results were evaluated statistically using a scheme of calculation adapted to the proposed method. This evaluation allowed an estimation of the detection limits (calcium: 5 ppm, cobalt: 3 ppm, zinc: 1 ppm). (author)

  8. Determination of Cd and Pb in canned pineapple by atomic absorption spectroscopy using a graphite oven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares P, G.; Sanchez P, L.; Benavides M, A.; Acosta L, C.

    1997-01-01

    Owing to the food susceptibility to be contaminated it is necessary to realize pursuit studies or frequent monitoring about the content of certain metals which represent health risks by its toxicological effects in the human being and another living organisms. In this work the cadmium and lead concentrations are determined in six national brands of canned pineapple analysing separately sugar sirup and the fruit. (Author)

  9. Direct determination of beryllium in coal slurries using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with automatic injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsen, L.; Pougnet, M.A.B. (University of Cape Town (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-10-01

    A Perkin-Elmer autosampler (AS-40) was modified by incorporating magnetic stirring of the samples for the analysis of slurries. Platform atomisation and matrix modification were used for the determination of beryllium in three South African Reference Material coals SARMs 18, 19 and 20. The good precision and accuracy of the procedure are illustrated by the results obtained for the SARM samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Absolute ion hydration enthalpies from absolute hardness and some VBT relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Savaş; Fernandes de Farias, Robson

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, absolute hydration enthalpies are calculated from ion absolute hardness for a series of +1 and -1 ions. The calculated values are compared with those previously reported (Housecroft, 2017) [2] and relationships between Vm-1/3 and absolute hardness are stablished. The following empirical equations have been derived, for cations and anions, respectively: ΔhydHo = -(9.645 η+ + 245.930) and ΔhydHo = -(64.601 η- + 12.321). In such equations, η+ and η- are the absolute hardness. It is shown that for d block monocations (Cu+, Ag+ and Au+), hydration enthalpy is closely related with Clementi effective nuclear charge by the equation: ΔhydHo = -(9.645 η+ + 245.930) (Zeff/(n - 1)), where n is the main quantum number. Furthermore, is shown that a typical VBT parameter (Vm-1/3) is related with η+ and η- values and so, with the energies of the frontier orbitals, that is, is stablished a direct relationship between a structural parameter available by X-ray data and the energy of atomic/molecular orbitals.

  11. On-line preconcentration and determination of mercury in biological and environmental samples by cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrua, N.; Cerutti, S.; Salonia, J.A.; Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    An on-line procedure for the determination of traces of total mercury in environmental and biological samples is described. The present methodology combines cold vapor generation associated to atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) with preconcentration of the analyte on a minicolumn packed with activated carbon. The retained analyte was quantitatively eluted from the minicolumn with nitric acid. After that, volatile specie of mercury was generated by merging the acidified sample and sodium tetrahydroborate(III) in a continuous flow system. The gaseous analyte was subsequently introduced via a stream of Ar carrier into the atomizer device. Optimizations of both, preconcentration and mercury volatile specie generation variables were carried out using two level full factorial design (2 3 ) with 3 replicates of the central point. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 13-fold was obtained. The detection limit (3σ) was 10 ng L -1 and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.1% (n = 10) at the 5 μg L -1 level. The calibration curve using the preconcentration system for mercury was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 at levels near the detection limit up to at least 1000 μg L -1 . Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of mercury in tap water and hair samples

  12. Determination of thermodynamic affinities of various polar olefins as hydride, hydrogen atom, and electron acceptors in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Zhang, Song-Chen; Zhang, Min; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2013-07-19

    A series of 69 polar olefins with various typical structures (X) were synthesized and the thermodynamic affinities (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the polar olefins obtaining hydride anions, hydrogen atoms, and electrons, the thermodynamic affinities of the radical anions of the polar olefins (X(•-)) obtaining protons and hydrogen atoms, and the thermodynamic affinities of the hydrogen adducts of the polar olefins (XH(•)) obtaining electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The pure C═C π-bond heterolytic and homolytic dissociation energies of the polar olefins (X) in acetonitrile and the pure C═C π-bond homolytic dissociation energies of the radical anions of the polar olefins (X(•-)) in acetonitrile were estimated. The remote substituent effects on the six thermodynamic affinities of the polar olefins and their related reaction intermediates were examined using the Hammett linear free-energy relationships; the results show that the Hammett linear free-energy relationships all hold in the six chemical and electrochemical processes. The information disclosed in this work could not only supply a gap of the chemical thermodynamics of olefins as one class of very important organic unsaturated compounds but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of olefins.

  13. Absolute Calibration of Si iRMs used for Measurements of Si Paleo-nutrient proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocke, R. D., Jr.; Rabb, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Silicon isotope variations (reported as δ30Si and δ29Si, relative to NBS28) in silicic acid dissolved in ocean waters, in biogenic silica and in diatoms are extremely informative paleo-nutrient proxies. The resolution and comparability of such measurements depend on the quality of the isotopic Reference Materials (iRMs) defining the delta scale. We report new absolute Si isotopic measurements on the iRMs NBS28 (RM 8546 - Silica Sand), Diatomite, and Big Batch using the Avogadro measurement approach and comparing them with prior assessments of these iRMs. The Avogadro Si measurement technique was developed by the German Physikalish-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to provide a precise and highly accurate method to measure absolute isotopic ratios in highly enriched 28Si (99.996%) material. These measurements are part of an international effort to redefine the kg and mole based on the Planck constant h and the Avogadro constant NA, respectively (Vocke et al., 2014 Metrologia 51, 361, Azuma et al., 2015 Metrologia 52 360). This approach produces absolute Si isotope ratio data with lower levels of uncertainty when compared to the traditional "Atomic Weights" method of absolute isotope ratio measurement calibration. This is illustrated in Fig. 1 where absolute Si isotopic measurements on SRM 990, separated by 40+ years of advances in instrumentation, are compared. The availability of this new technique does not say that absolute Si isotopic ratios are or ever will be better for normal Si isotopic measurements when seeking isotopic variations in nature, because they are not. However, by determining the absolute isotopic ratios of all the Si iRM scale artifacts, such iRMs become traceable to the metric system (SI); thereby automatically conferring on all the artifact-based δ30Si and δ29Si measurements traceability to the base SI unit, the mole. Such traceability should help reduce the potential of bias between different iRMs and facilitate the replacement of delta

  14. Split-step eigenvector-following technique for exploring enthalpy landscapes at absolute zero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, John C; Loucks, Roger J; Balakrishnan, Jitendra

    2006-03-16

    The mapping of enthalpy landscapes is complicated by the coupling of particle position and volume coordinates. To address this issue, we have developed a new split-step eigenvector-following technique for locating minima and transition points in an enthalpy landscape at absolute zero. Each iteration is split into two steps in order to independently vary system volume and relative atomic coordinates. A separate Lagrange multiplier is used for each eigendirection in order to provide maximum flexibility in determining step sizes. This technique will be useful for mapping the enthalpy landscapes of bulk systems such as supercooled liquids and glasses.

  15. Ultrasensitive determination of mercury in human saliva by atomic fluorescence spectrometry based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C.-G.; Wang, J.; Jin, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new, rapid and simple method for the determination of ultra-trace quantities of mercury ion in human saliva. It is based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction and detection by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Mercury ion was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate, and the hydrophobic complex was then extracted into fine droplets of 1-undecanol. By cooling in an ice bath after extraction, the droplets in solution solidify to form a single ball floating on the surface of solution. The solidified micro drop containing the mercury complex was then transferred for determination by CV-AFS. The effects of pH value, concentration of chelating reagent, quantity of 1-undecanol, sample volume, equilibration temperature and time were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the preconcentration of a 25-mL sample is accomplished with an enrichment factor of 182. The limit of detection is 2.5 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations at 0.1 ng mL -1 level is 4.1%. The method was applied to the determination of mercury in saliva samples collected from four volunteers. Two volunteers having dental amalgam fillings had 0.4 ng mL -1 mercury in their saliva, whereas mercury was not detectable in the saliva of two volunteers who had no dental fillings. (author)

  16. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of microamounts of beryllium in aluminum and copper using solvent extraction with acetylacetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsusaki, Koji

    1975-01-01

    A sensitive method for the determination of microamounts of beryllium in aluminum and copper by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using the methylisobutylketone (MIBK) extraction with acetylacetone (AA) was investigated. An aqueous sample solution containing (0.5--5)μg of beryllium and less than 100 mg of aluminum or less than 500 mg of copper was taken into a 100-ml separation funnel, and 2 ml of 5% AA, 20 mg of EDTA for 1 mg of aluminum or 8.8 mg of EDTA for 1 mg of copper, and 10 ml of saturated NaCl solution were added. The pH was adjusted to 5--7 with 10 ml of 2 M NaCH 3 COO-CH 3 COOH buffer, and the solution was diluted to 50 ml. After 10 minutes, the solution was shaken for 2 minutes with 10 ml of MIBK. The organic phase was introduced into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame and the absorption measured at 234.9 nm against a reagent blank. None of metal elements interfered with the determination of beryllium, and beryllium above 0.001% in aluminum, and above 0.0002% in copper was determined. This method was successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in aluminum and copper alloys. (auth.)

  17. Determination of total and inorganic mercury in fish samples with on-line oxidation coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lijun; Gan Wuer; Su Qingde

    2006-01-01

    An atomic fluorescence spectrometry system for determination of total and inorganic mercury with electromagnetic induction-assisted heating on-line oxidation has been developed. Potassium peroxodisulphate was used as the oxidizing agent to decompose organomercury compounds. Depending on the temperature selected, inorganic or total mercury could be determined with the same manifold. Special accent was put on the study of the parameters influencing the on-line digestion efficiency. The tolerance to the interference of coexisting ions was carefully examined in this system. Under optimal conditions, the detection limits (3σ) were evaluated to be 2.9 ng l -1 for inorganic mercury and 2.6 ng l -1 for total mercury, respectively. The relative standard deviations for 10 replicate determinations of 1.0 μg l -1 Hg were 2.4 and 3.2% for inorganic mercury and total mercury, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of total and inorganic mercury in fish samples

  18. Determination of organic forms of mercury and arsenic in water and atmospheric samples by gas chromatography-atomic absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudyn, A.; Van Loon, J.C.

    1986-10-01

    A study of the determination of dimethylmercury, methylmercury, ethylmercury, dimethylarsine and methylarsine in water and in atmospheric samples was carried out. The studied compounds were extracted from water by a benzene-toluene mixture, evaporated if necessary and analyzed by gas chromatography with atomic absorption spectrometry as a detector. A 45 cm column packed with Tenax was used. The detection limits of the procedure were: 4 ng Hg in dimethylmercury and methylmercury, 5 ng Hg in ethylmercury and 25 ng As in dimethyl and methylarsine in 1 l water. Methylmercury and ethylmercury were detected in Ontario natural waters and snow at 12-45 and 7-15 ng Hg l/sup -1/ respectively. The level of methylarsine varied from 40 to 90 ng l/sup -1/. Dimethylmercury and dimethylarsine were detected only in the Humber River.

  19. Separation and enrichment of gold(III) from environmental samples prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senturk, Hasan Basri; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    A simple and accurate method was developed for separation and enrichment of trace levels of gold in environmental samples. The method is based on the adsorption of Au(III)-diethyldithiocarbamate complex on Amberlite XAD-2000 resin prior to the analysis of gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after elution with 1 mol L -1 HNO 3 in acetone. Some parameters including nitric acid concentration, eluent type, matrix ions, sample volume, sample flow rate and adsorption capacity were investigated on the recovery of gold(III). The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit of gold were greater than 95% and 16.6 μg L -1 , respectively. The preconcentration factor was 200. The relative standard deviation of the method was -1 . The validation of the presented procedure was checked by the analysis of CRM-SA-C Sandy Soil certified reference material. The presented procedure was applied to the determination of gold in some environmental samples

  20. Study of new technique of solid combustible materials to determination of volatile elements by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, R.C. de.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique for direct trace element analysis of solid combustible materials is described. The samples (up to 10 mg) are weighed on a graphite platform wich is then placed in a quartz tube, at the focal point of three infrared lamps. When the lamps are turned on, the sample burns in a stream of air, and the resulting dry aerosol containing volatile elements such as Hg, Cd, Bi, Tl, Zn, Pb and Cu is carried into the mixing chamber and thence into the flame, where the atomic absorption measurement is carried out. This technique overcomes chemical sample preparation steps, avoiding contaminations of losses associated with these steps. A ''furnace in flame'' system where the aerosol is transported to a flame heated T-tube is also described. The influence of flame stoichiometry, observation height, platform material and air flux intensity was studied inorder to determine optimal analytical conditions. (author) [pt

  1. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry to determine metallic impurities in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.J.S.F. da.

    1983-01-01

    The Brazilian Energetic Alternative Program expects the reduction of our dependence on foreign energy sources, by replacing fuel oil by mineral coal. Its gasification by means of nuclear energy must be also considered. However, the intensive burning of coal leads to serious environmental problems. During its combustion the release to atmosphere of toxic elements such as As, Hg, Pb, Zn and others is of great concern. Hence, it is important to have reliable analytical methods which can monitor inorganic constituents at various stages of coal production and utilization. The AAS is a suitable analytical technique to determine pollutants in coal because it is sensitive, simple, economic and cover a large range of concentration. The need of a previous treatment of sample is overcome by using an acid attack (HNO 3 + HClO 4 + HF) which has been proved to be rapid and efficient. (Author) [pt

  2. Determination of atomic hydrogen content of metal specimens by anelastic diffusion persistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlhaas, G.

    1983-03-01

    The elastic deformation of H-charged metal grids involves H-diffusion which leads to a gradual anelastic deformation of the grids. The phenomenon known as Gorsky-effect allows the determination of diffusion-, effusion- and conversion processes. Therefore it suits very well for parametric investigation of the H-concentration influencing in specimens and component parts - e.g. by thermal treatments. A first investigation of this field of application carried out as part of the present study showed, in spite of the simple test technique, measuring results that are appropriate for interpretation and reproduction: At constant border- and environmental conditions there is a firm relation between the anelastic specimen persistance and the H-concentration of a specimen.

  3. Does Absolute Synonymy exist in Owere-Igbo? | Omego | AFRREV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among Igbo linguistic researchers, determining whether absolute synonymy exists in Owere–Igbo, a dialect of the Igbo language predominantly spoken by the people of Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria, has become a thorny issue. While some linguistic scholars strive to establish that absolute synonymy exists in the lexical ...

  4. Direct determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in beer by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascentes, Clesia C.; Kamogawa, Marcos Y.; Fernandes, Kelly G.; Arruda, Marco A.Z.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nobrega, Joaquim A.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) was employed for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn determination in beer without any sample digestion. The system was optimized and calibration was based on the analyte addition technique. A sample volume of 300 μl was introduced into the hot Ni tube at a flow-rate of 0.4 ml min -1 using 0.14 mol l -1 nitric acid solution or air as carrier. Different Brazilian beers were directly analyzed after ultrasonic degasification. Results were compared with those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The detection limits obtained for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in aqueous solution were 2.2, 18, 1.6, and 0.9 μg l -1 , respectively. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.7% to 7.3% (n=8) for solutions containing the analytes in the 25-50 μg l -1 range. The concentration ranges obtained for analytes in beer samples were: Cu: 38.0-155 μg l -1 ; Mn: 110-348 μg l -1 , Pb: 13.0-32.9 μg l -1 , and Zn: 52.7-226 μg l -1 . Results obtained by TS-FF-AAS and GFAAS were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. The proposed method is fast and simple, since sample digestion is not required and sensitivity can be improved without using expensive devices. The TS-FF-AAS presented suitable sensitivity for determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in the quality control of a brewery

  5. Direct As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) cold vapor/hydride generation from coal fly ash slurry samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Fernández-Fernández, Esther; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío.

    2002-05-01

    Direct cold vapor and hydride generation procedures for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) from aqueous slurry of coal fly ash samples have been developed by using a batch mode generation system. Ir-treated graphite tubes have been used as a preconcentration and atomization medium of the vapors generated. A Plackett-Burman experimental design has been used as a strategy for evaluation of the effects of several parameters affecting the vapor generation efficiency from solid particles, vapor trapping and atomization efficiency from Ir-treated graphite tubes. The effects of parameters such as hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate, argon flow rate, trapping and atomization temperatures, trapping time, acid solution volume and mean particle size have been investigated. The significant parameters obtained (trapping and atomization temperatures for As and Ge; trapping temperature and trapping time for Bi; argon flow rate and atomization temperature for Se) have been optimized by 2 2+star central composite design. For Hg, the trapping temperature has been also significant. Optimum values of the parameters have been selected for the development of direct cold vapor/hydride generation methods from slurry particles. The accuracy of methods have been verified by using NIST-1633a coal fly ash certified reference material. Absolute detection limits of 11.5, 48.0, 600, 55.0 and 11.0 ng l -1 for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se have been achieved, respectively. A particle size less than 50 μm has shown to be adequate to obtain total cold vapor/hydride generation of metals content in the aqueous slurry particles.

  6. Atomic Resolution Structures of Human Bufaviruses Determined by Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ilyas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bufavirus strain 1 (BuV1, a member of the Protoparvovirus genus of the Parvoviridae, was first isolated from fecal samples of children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso. Since this initial discovery, BuVs have been isolated in several countries, including Finland, the Netherlands, and Bhutan, in pediatric patients exhibiting similar symptoms. Towards their characterization, the structures of virus-like particles of BuV1, BuV2, and BuV3, the current known genotypes, have been determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction to 2.84, 3.79, and 3.25 Å, respectively. The BuVs, 65–73% identical in amino acid sequence, conserve the major viral protein, VP2, structure and general capsid surface features of parvoviruses. These include a core β-barrel (βB-βI, α-helix A, and large surface loops inserted between these elements in VP2. The capsid contains depressions at the icosahedral 2-fold and around the 5-fold axes, and has three separated protrusions surrounding the 3-fold axes. Structure comparison among the BuVs and to available parvovirus structures revealed capsid surface variations and capsid 3-fold protrusions that depart from the single pinwheel arrangement of the animal protoparvoviruses. These structures provide a platform to begin the molecular characterization of these potentially pathogenic viruses.

  7. Determination of microamounts of potassium in sodium iodide by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Ken; Ohta, Masatoshi; Abe, Kenzo

    1980-01-01

    Microdetermination of potassium in sodium iodide was developed by the standard addition method. Twenty grams of sample were dissolved in 50 ml of water in a quartz beaker. To the solution, 30 ml of concentrated hydrochloric acid and 30 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide were added, and evaporated to dryness. By this process sodium iodide was converted into sodium chloride. The cake thus obtained was dissolved in water and diluted to exactly 200 ml. To 25 ml aliquots of the solution, the standard potassium and cesium chloride solutions were added and diluted to 50 ml with water; the concentration of potassium was 0 -- 1 mg/l and that of cesium 4 mM. These solutions were introduced into an air-propane flame and the absorbances were measured at 769.9 nm. During the conversion reaction, hydrochloric acid was completely decomposed, and remained hydrogen peroxide had no influence for absorbance, and other backgrounds were negligible. The linear calibration curve was obtained in the range 0 -- 2 mg of potassium per liter. Potassium in sodium iodide was determined by this method within the coefficient of variation of +-(20 -- 3)% in the range (1.7 -- 32.5) ppm. (author)

  8. [Determination of trace elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn from different habitat by microwave digestion-atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke; Xue, Yue-Qin; Gui, Ren-Yi; Sun, Su-Qin; Yin, Ming-Wen

    2010-03-01

    A method of microwave digestion technique was proposed to determine the content of Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, K, Ca, Mg, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Al, Se and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The RSD of the method was between 1.23% and 3.32%, and the recovery rates obtained by standard addition method were between 95.8% and 104.20%. The results of the study indicate that the proposed method has the advantages of simplicity, speediness and sensitivity. It is suitable for the determination of the contents of metal elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn. The experimental results also indicated that different areas' Lophantherum gracile brongn had different trace elements content. The content of trace elements K, Mg, Ca, Fe and Mn beneficial to the human body was rich. The content of the heavy metal trace element Pb in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Hunan province was slightly high. The content of the heavy metal trace element Cu in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Guangdong province and Anhui province is also slightly higher. Beside, the contents of harmful trace heavy metal elements Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat are all lower than the limits of Chinese Pharmacopoeia and Green Trade Standard for Importing and Exporting Medicinal Plant and Preparation and National Food Sanitation Standard. These determination results provided the scientific data for further discussing the relationship between the content of trace elements in Lophantherum gracile brongn and the medicine efficacy.

  9. Determination of inorganic arsenic and its organic metabolites in urine by flow-injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, C P; Tyson, J F; McIntosh, S

    1993-08-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of inorganic arsenic [As(III) and As(V)] and its organic metabolites (monomethylarsenic and dimethylarsenic) in urine by flow-injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. The nontoxic seafood-derived arsenobetaine and arsenocholine species were first separated by a solid-phase extraction procedure. The remaining sample was digested with a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids and potassium dichromate, followed by attack with hydrogen peroxide. The resulting As(V) was reduced to As(III) with potassium iodide in hydrochloric acid before injection into the flow-injection manifold. The percentage analytical recoveries (mean +/- 95% confidence interval) of various arsenic species added to a urine specimen at 250 micrograms/L were 108 +/- 2, 112 +/- 11, 104 +/- 7, and 95 +/- 5 for As(III), As(V), monomethylarsenic, and dimethylarsenic, respectively. For the determination of arsenic in Standard Reference Material 2670 (toxic metals in human urine), results agreed with the certified value (480 +/- 100 micrograms/L). Analyses of samples for the Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec, containing seafood-derived species, demonstrated the viability of the separation procedure. Detection limits were between 0.1 and 0.2 microgram/L in the solution injected into the manifold, and precision at 10 micrograms/L was between 2% and 3% (CV). These preliminary results show that the method might be applicable to determinations of arsenic in a range of clinical urine specimens.

  10. Determination of total arsenic in fish by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry: method validation, traceability and uncertainty evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, W. C.; Elishian, C.; Ketrin, R.

    2017-03-01

    Fish containing arsenic compound is one of the important indicators of arsenic contamination in water monitoring. The high level of arsenic in fish is due to absorption through food chain and accumulated in their habitat. Hydride generation (HG) coupled with atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS) detection is one of the most popular techniques employed for arsenic determination in a variety of matrices including fish. This study aimed to develop a method for the determination of total arsenic in fish by HG-AAS. The method for sample preparation from American of Analytical Chemistry (AOAC) Method 999.10-2005 was adopted for acid digestion using microwave digestion system and AOAC Method 986.15 - 2005 for dry ashing. The method was developed and validated using Certified Reference Material DORM 3 Fish Protein for trace metals for ensuring the accuracy and the traceability of the results. The sources of uncertainty of the method were also evaluated. By using the method, it was found that the total arsenic concentration in the fish was 45.6 ± 1.22 mg.Kg-1 with a coverage factor of equal to 2 at 95% of confidence level. Evaluation of uncertainty was highly influenced by the calibration curve. This result was also traceable to International Standard System through analysis of Certified Reference Material DORM 3 with 97.5% of recovery. In summary, it showed that method of preparation and HG-AAS technique for total arsenic determination in fish were valid and reliable.

  11. Semi-automated determination of chromium in whole blood and serum by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermaier, A J; O'Connor, L H; Pearson, K H

    1985-10-31

    Direct determination of normal and elevated levels of chromium in whole blood and serum can be achieved using Zeeman effect electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Whole blood and serum levels of chromium were determined for an apparently healthy population and whole blood chromium levels for renal dialysis patients. Blood and serum specimens were diluted with distilled deionized water and Triton X-100. The analyses were performed utilizing air as the alternate gas to facilitate ashing in one of the char steps. Within-run precision studies for whole blood chromium determinations gave relative SD values of 4.75 and 4.65% for 0.358 and 0.172 microgram/l, respectively. Within-run precision studies for the serum chromium analysis yield relative SD values of 5.26 and 2.67% for 0.156 and 0.300 microgram/l, respectively. Detection limits were 0.025 and 0.018 microgram/l for whole blood and serum, respectively. The mean chromium level found in whole blood and serum specimens from apparently normal individuals were 0.371 microgram/l (n = 37) and 0.130 microgram/l (n = 19), with ranges of 0.120-0.673 and 0.058-0.388 microgram/l, respectively.

  12. A method optimization study for atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of total zinc in insulin using direct aspiration technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Ata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, reliable and relative fast method has been developed for the determination of total zinc in insulin by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This designed study was used to optimize the procedures for the existing methods. Spectrograms of both standard and sample solutions of zinc were recorded by measuring the absorbance at 213.9 nm for determination of total zinc. System suitability parameters were evaluated and were found to be within the limits. Linearity was evaluated through graphical representation of concentration versus absorbance. Repeatability (intra-day and intermediate precision (inter-day were assessed by analyzing working standard solutions. Accuracy and robustness were experimented from the standard procedures. The percentage recovery of zinc was found to be 99.8%, relative standard deviation RSD 1.13%, linearity of determination LOD 0.0032 μg/mL, and limit of quantization LOQ 0.0120 μg/mL. This developed and proposed method was then validated in terms of accuracy, precision, linearity and robustness which can be successfully used for the quantization of zinc in insulin.

  13. Sensitive determination of cadmium in water samples by room temperature ionic liquid-based preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinis, Estefania M. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Olsina, Roberto A. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis (Argentina); Altamirano, Jorgelina C. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Wuilloud, Rodolfo G. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina)], E-mail: rwuilloud@mendoza-conicet.gov.ar

    2008-10-17

    A sensitive preconcentration methodology for Cd determination at trace levels in water samples was developed in this work. 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C{sub 4}MIM][PF{sub 6}]) room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was successfully used for Cd preconcentration, as cadmium-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complex [Cd-5-Br-PADAP]. Subsequently, Cd was back-extracted from the RTIL phase with 500 {mu}L of 0.5 mol L{sup -1} nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). A preconcentration factor of 40 was achieved with 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under optimum conditions was 3 ng L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 10 replicates at 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} Cd{sup 2+} concentration level was 3.5%, calculated at peak heights. The calibration graph was linear from concentration levels near the detection limits up to at least 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}. A correlation coefficient of 0.9997 was achieved. Validation of the methodology was performed by standard addition method and analysis of certified reference material (CRM). The method was successfully applied to the determination of Cd in river and tap water samples.

  14. Graphene oxide sheets immobilized polystyrene for column preconcentration and sensitive determination of lead by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Aminul; Ahmad, Hilal; Zaidi, Noushi; Kumar, Suneel

    2014-08-13

    A novel solid-phase extractant was synthesized by coupling graphene oxide (GO) on chloromethylated polystyrene through an ethylenediamine spacer unit to develop a column method for the preconcentration/separation of lead prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, far-infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The abundant oxygen-containing surface functional groups form a strong complex with lead, resulting in higher sorption capacity (227.92 mg g(-1)) than other nanosorbents used for sorption studies of the column method. Using the column procedure here is an alternative to the direct use of GO, which restricts irreversible aggregation of GO and its escape into the ecosystem, making it an environmentally sustainable method. The column method was optimized by varying experimental variables such as pH, flow rate for sorption/desorption, and elution condition and was observed to exhibit a high preconcentration factor (400) with a low preconcentration limit (2.5 ppb) and a high degree of tolerance for matrix ions. The accuracy of the proposed method was verified by determining the Pb content in the standard reference materials and by recovery experiments. The method showed good precision with a relative standard deviation <5%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of lead in tap water, electroplating wastewater, river water, and food samples after preconcentration.

  15. Coprecipitation with metal hydroxides for the determination of beryllium in seawater by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraide, M.; Ishikawa, K.; Chen, Z.S.; Kawaguchi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Coprecipitation first with magnesium hydroxide. next with tin(IV) hydroxide is developed for the determination of traces of beryllium in seawater. To a 200-ml sample is added a sodium hydroxide solution to form magnesium hydroxide at pH 11.5, on which beryllium is quantitatively coprecipitated. The precipitate is separated by centrifugation and dissolved in 2 ml of 12 mol/l hydrochloric acid. The resulting solution (ca. 10 ml) is mixed with 2 mg of tin(IV) carrier and the pH is adjusted to 5.0 to collect the beryllium on tin(IV) hydroxide, leaving magnesium ions in the solution. The tin(IV) hydroxide is centrifuged, dissolved in 0.1 ml of 5 mol/l hydrobromic acid, and then diluted to 1 ml with water. Magnesium is so added as to be 500 μg/ml for increasing the sensitivity about four times, and the beryllium in the solution is determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The experiments with synthetic seawater samples showed that pg-μg amounts of beryllium can be coprecipitated on the metal hydroxides and beryllium at the low ng/l level can be determined with reasonable precision (RSD < 10%). The detection limit of the proposed method is 0.5 ng/l of beryllium in seawater. (author)

  16. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  17. Direct As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) cold vapor/hydride generation from coal fly ash slurry samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreda-Pineiro, J.; Lopez-Mahia, P; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S.; Fernandez-Fernandez, E.; Prada-Rodriguez, D. [University of La Coruna, La Coruna (Spain). Faculty of Science, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    Direct cold vapor and hydride generation procedures for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) from aqueous slurry of coal fly ash samples have been developed by using a batch mode generation system. Ir-treated graphite tubes have been used as a preconcentration and atomization medium of the vapors generated. A Plackett-Burman experimental design has been used as a strategy for evaluation of the effects of several parameters affecting the vapor generation efficiency from solid particles, vapor trapping and atomization efficiency from Ir-treated graphite tubes. The effects of parameters such as hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate, argon flow rate, trapping and atomization temperatures, trapping time, acid solution volume and mean particle size have been investigated. Optimum values of the parameters have been selected for the development of direct cold vapor/hydride generation methods from slurry particles. The accuracy of methods have been verified by using NIST-1633a coal fly ash certified reference material. Absolute detection limits of 11.5, 48.0, 600, 55.0 and 11.0 ng l{sup -1} for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se have been achieved, respectively. A particle size less than 50 {mu}m has shown to be adequate to obtain total cold vapor/hydride generation of metals content in the aqueous slurry particles.

  18. The Path to an Up-to-date Absolute Gravity Reference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmes, H.; Falk, R.; Wziontek, H.

    2014-12-01

    The determination of precise gravity field parameters is of great importance in a period in which earth sciences are achieving the necessary accuracy to monitor and document global change processes. This is the reason why experts from geodesy and metrology joined in a successful cooperation to make absolute gravity observations traceable to SI quantities, to improve the metrological kilogram definition and to monitor mass movements and smallest height changes for geodetic and geophysical applications. How can we determine such a gravity reference system and secure it over multiple decades? Precise knowledge of the gravity acceleration and definition of standards, models and corrections are an important prerequisite to the definition of the gravity system. Over more than three decades, the absolute gravity community cooperated successfully to obtain the gravity reference in comparisons at intervals of 4 years and to certify metrological equivalence between National Metrology Institutes. With increasing resolution of the absolute gravimeter sensors and new measurement principles it becomes obvious that such comparisons are not sufficient for all applications. Mainly for geodetic purposes it is necessary to sub-divide comparison intervals and maintain a connected network of gravity reference sites where compared absolute gravimeters operate together with superconducting gravimeters to derive a continuous gravity reference function. By means of this distributed monitoring of the gravity reference it will also be possible to relate observations of earlier absolute gravimeters to the present-day and to future instruments. It will be possible to include new sensors like atom interferometers and in future to relate the results of precise optical clocks. With co-located space geodetic sensors like GNSS, SLR and VLBI, these reference sites fulfill the conditions of a geodetic fundamental station as a component of IAG's Global Geodetic Observing System.

  19. Investigation of artifacts caused by deuterium background correction in the determination of phosphorus by electrothermal atomization using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Lepri, Fabio G.; Borges, Daniel L.G.; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Marcia M.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The artifacts created in the measurement of phosphorus at the 213.6-nm non-resonance line by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using line source atomic absorption spectrometry (LS AAS) and deuterium lamp background correction (D 2 BC) have been investigated using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS). The absorbance signals and the analytical curves obtained by LS AAS without and with D 2 BC, and with HR-CS AAS without and with automatic correction for continuous background absorption, and also with least-squares background correction for molecular absorption with rotational fine structure were compared. The molecular absorption due to the suboxide PO that exhibits pronounced fine structure could not be corrected by the D 2 BC system, causing significant overcorrection. Among the investigated chemical modifiers, NaF, La, Pd and Pd + Ca, the Pd modifier resulted in the best agreement of the results obtained with LS AAS and HR-CS AAS. However, a 15% to 100% higher sensitivity, expressed as slope of the analytical curve, was obtained for LS AAS compared to HR-CS AAS, depending on the modifier. Although no final proof could be found, the most likely explanation is that this artifact is caused by a yet unidentified phosphorus species that causes a spectrally continuous absorption, which is corrected without problems by HR-CS AAS, but which is not recognized and corrected by the D 2 BC system of LS AAS

  20. High gas temperature furnace for species determination of organometallic compounds with a high pressure liquid chromatograph and a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.; McLaughlin, R.D.; Hadeishi, T.

    1979-03-01

    A new furnace has been constructed that allows atomic absorption detection of volatile organometallic compounds. The operation of this furnace is demonstrated by analyzing the eluent of a high pressure liquid chromatograph utilizing Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry. The content of tetraethyllead in National Bureau of Standards gasoline standards was determined. Data are presented on the ability of this furnace to suppress interference with cadmium and lead determinations by MgCl/sub 2/, CuCl/sub 2/, and CaCl/sub 2/. It was found that two orders of magnitude more interferent can be tolerated. The determination of lead in automotive exhaust is also described. 7 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Determination of essential and toxic elements in commercial baby foods by instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallinoto, Priscila

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that infants should be breast fed exclusively for at least six months after birth. After this period, it is recommended to start introducing complementary foods, in order to meet the child's nutritional, mineral and energy needs. Commercial food products for infants form an important part of the diet for many babies. Thus, it is very important that such food contains sufficient amounts of minerals. Inadequate complementary feeding is a major cause of high rates of infant malnutrition in developing countries. In this study, essential elements: Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Se and Zn and toxic elements: As, Cd, Hg levels were determined in twenty seven different commercial infant food product samples by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). In order to validate both methodologies the reference material: INCT MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs and NIST - SRM 1577b Bovine Liver by INAA and NIST - SRM 1548th Typical Diet and NIST - SRM 1547 Peach Leaves by AAS were analyzed. The twenty seven baby food samples were acquired from Sao Paulo city supermarkets and stores. Essential and toxic elements were determined. Most of the essential element concentrations obtained were lower than the World Health Organization requirements, while concentrations of toxic elements were below the tolerable upper limit. These low essential element concentrations in these samples indicate that infants should not be fed only with commercial complementary foods. (author)

  2. Influence of soil composition in the determination of chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry with flame air / acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Sosa, Ibis; Granda Valdes, Mayra; Pomares Alfonso, Mario Simeon

    2014-01-01

    The Air-acetylene Flame Atomic Absorption determination of chromium is a complex task, being strongly influenced by sample composition and instrumental conditions. The objective of this work was to study the influence of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, and Na on the absorption of chromium in the air-acetylene flame, both separately and combined in solution, when acetylene flow and burner height vary. Dissolutions of the mixtures simulated the composition of four soils from the Quibu River Basin in Havana, Cuba. Chromium absorption first increased and then decreased with increment of acetylene flow for shorter burner heights (∼ 2-4 mm); while a continuous increase was observed for larger heights (> 4 mm). This behavior was the same in the presence and absence of interfering chemical element, mentioned above. On the other hand, the dependence of the magnitude of the interference with acetylene flow and burner height was complex and dependent on the interfering element, particularly at larger heights where the behavior of Al was remarkably different. The interference of the four mixtures of Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg and Na decreased in comparison to individual interfering effects and was less dependent on acetylene flow and burner height. Finally, a significant reduction of interference on chromium determination in soil samples was achieved by an adequate selection of acetylene flow and burner height

  3. [Indirect determination of rare earth elements in Chinese herbal medicines by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xue, Min-Hua; Tan, Fang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    Based on their similarity in chemical properties, rare earth elements were able to form stable coordinated compounds with arsenazo III which were extractable into butanol in the presence of diphenylguanidine. The butanol was removed under reduced pressure distillation; the residue was dissolved with diluted hydrochloric acid. As was released with the assistance of KMnO4 and determined by hydrogen generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry in terms of rare earth elements. When cesium sulfate worked as standard solution, extraction conditions, KMnO4 amount, distillation temperature, arsenazo III amount, interfering ions, etc were optimized. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated using national standard certified materials, showing a good agreement. Under optimum condition, the linear relationship located in 0.2-25 microg x mL(-1) and detection limit was 0.44 microg x mL(-1). After the herbal samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, the rare earth elements were determined by this method, showing satisfactory results with relative standard deviation of 1.3%-2.5%, and recoveries of 94.4%-106.0%. The method showed the merits of convenience and rapidness, simple instrumentation and high accuracy. With the rare earths enriched into organic phase, the separation of analytes from matrix was accomplished, which eliminated the interference. With the residue dissolved by diluted hydrochloric acid after the solvent was removed, aqueous sample introduction eliminated the impact of organic phase on the tubing connected to pneumatic pump.

  4. Application of cryofocusing hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection for dissolved mercury species determination in natural water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoichev, T; Rodriguez Martin-Doimeadios, R C; Amouroux, D; Molenat, N; Donard, O F X

    2002-08-01

    The concentration levels of mercury (Hg) species in natural water samples are usually low. Consequently, accurate analysis with low detection limits is still a major problem. In this work, a method was applied for the simultaneous direct determination of dissolved mercury species in water samples by on-line hydride generation (HG), cryogenic trapping (CT), gas chromatography (GC) and detection by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The suitability of the method for real samples with different organic matter and chloride contents was evaluated by recovery experiments in synthetic and natural spiked water samples. The HG method was compared with other current available methods for mercury analysis with respect to the different fraction of mercury analysed, i.e. 'reactive', 'reducible' or total. HG derivatization and SnCl2 reduction (with and without previous oxidation with BrCl) were applied to synthetic and natural (spiked and non-spiked) water samples. The influence of chloride and dissolved organic matter concentrations was studied. The results suggest that the HG procedure is suitable for the simultaneous determination of Hg2+ and MeHg+ in surface water samples. Inorganic mercury analysed by HG (i.e. reducible) is close to the total inorganic mercury.

  5. Atomic-absorption spectrometric determination of cobalt, nickel, and copper in geological materials with matrix masking and chelation-extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.; Crenshaw, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    An atomic-absorption spectrometric method is reported for the determination of cobalt, nickel, and copper in a variety of geological materials including iron- and manganese-rich, and calcareous samples. The sample is decomposed with HP-HNO3 and the residue is dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Ammonium fluoride is added to mask iron and 'aluminum. After adjustment to pH 6, cobalt, nickel, and copper are chelated with sodium diethyl-dithiocarbamate and extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone. The sample is set aside for 24 h before analysis to remove interferences from manganese. For a 0.200-g sample, the limits of determination are 5-1000 ppm for Co, Ni, and Cu. As much as 50% Fe, 25% Mn or Ca, 20% Al and 10% Na, K, or Mg in the sample either individually or in various combinations do not interfere. Results obtained on five U.S. Geological Survey rock standards are in general agreement with values reported in the literature. ?? 1979.

  6. Determination of molybdenum and vanadium in seawater by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with metal chelate coprecipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kitao; Morikawa, Toshiki; Fuwa, Keiichiro

    1986-01-01

    Coprecipitation with metal chelate complex formation has been studied for determining molybdenum and vanadium in seawater. As coprecipitation carriers, several pairs of metal ion and chelating agent were applied : Co(II)-ammonium pyrrolydinedithiocarbamate (APDC), Cu(II)-APDC, Cr(VI)-APDC, Co(II)-sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, AI(III)-8-quinolinol, Cu(II)-cupferron, and Ni(II)-dimethylglyoxime. The procedure was as follows : A 100 ml molybdate {Mo(VI)} and metavanadate {V(V)} sample solution was taken to which were added acetate buffer solution. After addition of the carrier metal ion, the pH of the solution was adjusted and the chelating agent was then added. After stood for 1 h, the precipitate was collected by a membrane filter(pore size 0.2 μm), and dissolved in 5 ml of nitric acid(1 mol/l). It was then analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. The coprecipitation done with Co(II)-APDC surpassed the others in recoveries of molybdenum and vanadium ; which were 94 ± 3 and 96 ± 3 %, respectively. The minimum detectable amounts in the initial solution were found to be 0.05 μg/l for molybdenum and 0.1 μg/l for vanadium. Molybdenum and vanadium were determined in seawater sampled at the Japan Trench in the North Pacific Ocean. (author)

  7. The use of slurry sampling for the determination of manganese and copper in various samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokman, Nilgun

    2007-01-01

    Manganese and copper in multivitamin-mineral supplements and standard reference materials were determined by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Slurries were prepared in an aqueous solution containing Triton X-100. The effects of different parameters such as ratio of solid to liquid phase volume, total slurry volume and addition of Triton X-100 as a dispersant on the analytical results were investigated. The graphite furnace programs were optimized for slurry sampling depending on the analytes and their concentrations in the samples. The linear calibration method with aqueous standard solutions was used for the quantification. At optimum experimental conditions, R.S.D. values were below 5%. The analytes were determined in the limits of 95% confidence level with respect to certified values in coal and soil standard reference materials and to those found by wet-digestion in multivitamin-mineral supplements. Detection limits (3δ) for Mn and Cu were 0.10 μg L -1 and 1.82 μg L -1 for 10 μL coal standard reference material slurry, respectively

  8. Selective speciation of inorganic antimony on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel column and its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendil, Durali; Bardak, Hilmi; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-03-30

    A speciation system for antimony (III) and antimony (V) ions that based on solid phase extraction on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel has been established. Antimony was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). Analytical conditions including pH, sample volume, etc., were studied for the quantitative recoveries of Sb (III) and Sb (V). Matrix effects on the recovery were also investigated. The recovery values and detection limit for antimony (III) at optimal conditions were found as >95% and 0.020 μg L(-1), respectively. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 50. The capacity of adsorption for the tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel was 7.9 mg g(-1). The validation was checked by analysis of NIST SRM 1573a Tomato laves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was successfully applied to speciation of antimony in tap water, mineral water and spring water samples. Total antimony was determined in refined salt, unrefined salt, black tea, rice, tuna fish and soil samples after microwave digestion and presented enrichment method combination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of electrostatic potential distribution by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on model silica and alumina surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelken, Gulnihal Ozek; Polat, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy was employed to quantitatively determine the surface potential on silica and alumina surfaces immersed in aqueous electrolyte solutions at various pH values using the DLVO theory. • Potential distributions could be presented in the form of a potential map by repeating the procedure on multiple locations on these surfaces. • The average potential of the distributions agreed very well with the surface potentials measured by electrophoretic techniques. • Several experimental procedures required to achieve the very sensitive force measurements were outlined and demonstrated. - Abstract: AFM was employed as a physicochemical probe to determine the electrostatic potential distribution quantitatively on selected ideal oxide surfaces (quartz 0 0 0 1 and sapphire 0 0 0 1) in aqueous media. The force of interaction between a silicon nitride tip and the oxide surface was measured at a given point under well-defined solution conditions. Relevant theories were used to isolate the electrostatic component from the total force of interaction which was then employed to estimate the surface potential at that point. Repeating the procedure on selected locations generated a potential map of the surface. Comparison of these potentials with those obtained from independent electrokinetic measurements confirmed the validity of the approach

  10. Standard test method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead and cadmium extracted from ceramic foodware

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) to quantitatively determine lead and cadmium extracted by acetic acid at room temperature from the food-contact surface of foodware. The method is applicable to food-contact surfaces composed of silicate-based materials (earthenware, glazed ceramicware, decorated ceramicware, decorated glass, and lead crystal glass) and is capable of determining lead concentrations greater than 0.005 to 0.020 g/mL and cadmium concentrations greater than 0.0005 to 0.002 g/mL, depending on instrument design. 1.2 This test method also describes quality control procedures to check for contamination and matrix interference during GFAAS analyses and a specific sequence of analytical measurements that demonstrates proper instrument operation during the time period in which sample solutions are analyzed. 1.3 Cleaning and other contamination control procedures are described in this test method. Users may modify contamination cont...

  11. Sensitive determination of cadmium using solidified floating organic drop microextraction-slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Erhan; Chormey, Dotse Selali; Bakırdere, Sezgin

    2017-09-20

    In this study, solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) by 1-undecanol was combined with slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) for the determination of cadmium at trace levels. Formation of a complex with 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine facilitated the extraction of cadmium from aqueous solutions. Several chemical variables were optimized in order to obtain high extraction outputs. Parameters such as concentration of the ligand, pH, and amount of buffer solution were optimized to enhance the formation of cadmium complex. The SFODME method was assisted by dispersion of extractor solvent into aqueous solutions using 2-propanol. Under the optimum extraction and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection and limit of quantitation values obtained for cadmium using the combined methods (SFODME-SQT-FAAS) were found to be 0.4 and 1.3 μg L -1 , respectively. Matrix effects on the method were also examined for tap water and wastewater, and spiked recovery results were found to be very satisfactory. Graphical Abstract SFODME-SQT-FAAS system for sensitive determination of cadmium.

  12. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in shellfish samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using matrix modifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalobos Aranda, Juan; Cortez Diaz, Mirella

    2003-01-01

    Serious problems of environmental contamination due to the activity of the man exist at the present time. Where the greater impact is the produced one by heavy metals that go to the sea. Where the shellfish can collect some of them, the highly toxic ones, since these are bioaccumulation of these metals. Therefore one becomes necessary to count with the reliable analytical procedures to determine these elements. The purpose of this work is to present the determination of arsenic and cadmium in shellfish, by spectroscopy of atomic absorption with graphite furnace. For each determined element, solutions of nickel and phosphate like matrix modifiers were used respectively The validation was made using a Reference Certified Material, Oyster ' Tissue 156 (National Institute of Standards and Technology). The sample previously was digested in triplicate by two consecutive days, with nitric acid in a pressure digestion system DAB 11. For each element it was evaluated: limit of detection and quantification, sensitivity, repeatability, linear, slope rank and uncertainty. In addition, the obtained results were compared with the certified values of the certified material of reference using like statistical tools the tests of Student and Fisher. In both tests the calculated values were smaller to the shown ones in table, for degrees of freedom with 95% of confidence. Thus it was verified that it does not exist significant differences between the precision and the average values of the results obtained with respect to the values of the certified material. In addition, the obtained parameters are appropriate for the determination of these trace elements in this type of environmental sample (author)

  13. Site determination of Ni atoms in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys by electron channelling enhanced microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Yoshiyuki; Tadaki, Tsugio; Shimizu, Ken-ichi

    1990-01-01

    The crystallographic site of Ni atoms in the parent phase of differently heat-treated Cu-28.6Al-3.7Ni (at.%) shape memory alloys has been examined by electron channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) in order to clarify effects of heat-treatments on the Ni atom site and M s temperature. The heat-treatments were as follows: (a) Quenching into a 10% NaOH solution at 263 K, (b) Quenching into hot water at 363 K and (c) Aging at 523 K for 3.6 ks after treatment (b). The M s temperatures of specimens (a), (b) and (c) were 158, 185 and 259 K, respectively, increasing with lowering quenching rate or aging. ALCHEMI revealed that Ni atoms occupied an identical site in all the three kinds of specimens: The Ni atoms were located at the nearest neighbor sites around Al atoms. This preferential occupation of Ni atoms was attributed to the strong binding force between Ni and Al atoms. Thus, the change in M s temperature due to different heat-treatments was not directly related to the crystallographic site of Ni atoms, but might be caused by the ordering between the next nearest neighbor Cu and Al atoms. (author)

  14. Determination of the positions of aluminum atoms introduced into SSZ-35 and the catalytic properties of the generated Brønsted acid sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Akimitsu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Shiga, Akinobu; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Nishitoba, Toshiki; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2017-03-01

    The positions of aluminum (Al) atoms in SSZ-35 together with the characteristics of the generated protons were investigated by 27 Al multiple quantum magic-angle spinning (MQ-MAS), 29 Si MAS, and 1 H MAS NMR data analyses accompanied by a variable temperature 1 H MAS NMR analysis. The origin of the acidic -OH groups (Brønsted acid sites) generated by introducing Al atoms into the T sites was investigated and the T sites introduced into the Al atoms were revealed. To further determine the catalytic properties of the acidic protons generated in SSZ-35, the influence of the concentration of the Al atoms on the catalytic activity and selectivity during the transformation of toluene was examined.

  15. Determination of ultra trace arsenic species in water samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulusoy, Halil Ibrahim, E-mail: hiulusoy@yahoo.com [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey); Akcay, Mehmet; Ulusoy, Songuel; Guerkan, Ramazan [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey)

    2011-10-10

    Graphical abstract: The possible complex formation mechanism for ultra-trace As determination. Highlights: {yields} CPE/HGAAS system for arsenic determination and speciation in real samples has been applied first time until now. {yields} The proposed method has the lowest detection limit when compared with those of similar CPE studies present in literature. {yields} The linear range of the method is highly wide and suitable for its application to real samples. - Abstract: Cloud point extraction (CPE) methodology has successfully been employed for the preconcentration of ultra-trace arsenic species in aqueous samples prior to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). As(III) has formed an ion-pairing complex with Pyronine B in presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 10.0 and extracted into the non-ionic surfactant, polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114). After phase separation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 2 mL of 1 M HCl and 0.5 mL of 3.0% (w/v) Antifoam A. Under the optimized conditions, a preconcentration factor of 60 and a detection limit of 0.008 {mu}g L{sup -1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.9918 was obtained with a calibration curve in the range of 0.03-4.00 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The proposed preconcentration procedure was successfully applied to the determination of As(III) ions in certified standard water samples (TMDA-53.3 and NIST 1643e, a low level fortified standard for trace elements) and some real samples including natural drinking water and tap water samples.

  16. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagarová, Ingrid, E-mail: hagarova@fns.uniba.sk; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb–dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l{sup −1} HNO{sub 3}. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l{sup −1}, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l{sup −1}, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l{sup −1} of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5–4.0 μg l{sup −1} (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91–96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters. - Highlights: • The potential of coacervates for the extraction of metal ions is examined. • No difficulties in coupling of ETAAS with the proposed CAE are observed. • Achieved preconcentration factor results in enhanced sensitivity. • Analytical performance is confirmed by the reliable determination of trace Pb. • The proposed CAE is ecofriendly and efficient.

  17. Freon (CHF3)-assisted atomization for the determination of titanium using ultrasonic slurry sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (USS-GFAAS): a simple and advantageous method for solid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2004-06-01

    A simple and advantageous method for the determination of titanium using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling has been developed. Titanium is one of the refractory elements that form thermally stable carbides in the graphite tube, which leads to severe memory effects. Trifluoromethane (Freon-23) was applied in the purge gas during the atomization step or alternatively just prior to the atomization to successfully eliminate the problems of carbide formation and increase the lifetime of the furnace tube which could be used for more than 600 heating cycles. A flow rate of 40 mL min(-1) (5% of Freon in argon) was used to obtain symmetrical peaks with no tailing. However, when the gas flow rate was too high (250 mL min(-1)) the peak-tailing and memory effects reappeared. Ti was determined in various materials covering a wide range of concentrations, from 2.8 microg g(-1) to 12% (m/m) Ti. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analyzing certified reference materials (CRMs) or by comparing the results with those obtained using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after decomposition of the samples. The materials analyzed were soil, plant, human hair, coal, urban particulate matters, toothpaste, and powdered paint.

  18. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageotte, S M; Day, J P

    1998-01-01

    A major source of environmental lead, particularly in urban areas, has been from the combustion of leaded petrol. Street dust has previously been used to assess urban lead contamination, and the dust itself can also be a potential source of lead ingestion, particularly to children. The progressive reduction of lead in petrol, in recent years, would be expected to have been reflected in a reduction of lead in urban dust. We have tested this hypothesis by repeating an earlier survey of Manchester street dust and carrying out a comparable survey in Paris. Samples were collected from streets and parks, lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead isotope ratios were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Manchester show that lead concentrations have fallen by about 40% (street dust averages, 941 micrograms g-1 (ppm) in 1975 down to 569 ppm in 1997). In Paris, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between types of street (not seen in Manchester). Additionally, lead levels in parks were much lower than in Manchester. Samples collected under the Eiffel Tower had very high concentrations and lead isotope ratios showed that this was unlikely to be fallout from motor vehicles but could be due to the paint used on the tower. Isotope ratios measurements also revealed that lead additives used in France and the UK come from different sources.

  19. Determination of trace impurities of aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper and nickel in indium phosphate by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chruscinska, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The sample (0.25 g) was treated with a nitric (0.9 ml) + hydrochloric (0.25 ml) acid mixture, heated to syrup under glass and then dissolved with 5 mol · 1 -1 HNO 3 (1 ml). The traces were determined in 0.2 mol · 1 -1 HNO 3 using Perkin-Elmer Model 430 Atomic Absorption Spectrometer equipped with a HGA 76B Graphite Furnace and an AS-1 Auto Sampling System. Pyrolytically coated and then tantalum treated tubes was employed. Additive errors due to contamination with, and loss of, the analyte element were controlled by estimation of the blank value and recovery. Background was corrected throughout. The background correction system efficiency was checked for the continuum background by two line method and for structured background by decreasing the slit or choosing different analytical lines. No other multiplicative (influencing the slope of the analytical curve) matrix interferences were found except for cadmium. (author). 12 refs, 4 tabs, 3 figs

  20. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium

  1. Extraction of butyltins from sediments and their determination by liquid chromatography interfaced to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivaro, P.; Frache, R. [Genoa Univ., Genoa (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Sez. di Chimica Analitica ed Ambientale

    2000-06-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction of the butyltin compounds from sediment, suitable for their subsequent following determination by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission detector system, is proposed. Recoveries of 86%, 80% and 42% for tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) respectively were achieved. The relative detection limits of butyltin compounds by this method ranged from 27 to 62 ng of tin per gram of dry sediment. The method was applied to real sediment samples collected in the Venice lagoon (Italy). The results showed that, despite the restrictions on the use of butyltin contained in antifoulting paints, a considerable amount of organotin compounds is still present in Venice sediments. [Italian] E' stato messo a punto un metodo per l'estrazione di composti butilstannici da sedimenti, impiegando un'opportuna estrazione liquido-liquido per la successiva determinazione di tali composti mediante cromatografia liquida ad alta prestazione interfacciata tramite un sistema di generazione di idruri, ad uno spettrometro di emissione a plasma indotto per radiofrequenza. Sono stati ottenuti limiti di rilevabilita' tra i 27 e i 62 ng Sn/g sedimento, a seconda della specie butistannica considerata. La metodica e' stata impiegata per l'analisi di campioni di sedimento raccolti nella laguna di Venezia. I risultati ottenuti mostrano che, nonostante le limitazioni legislative sul loro impiego, considerevoli quantita' di composti butilstannici sono ancora presenti nei sedimenti.

  2. Separation and enrichment of gold(III) from environmental samples prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senturk, Hasan Basri; Gundogdu, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Bulut, Volkan Numan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 28049 Giresun (Turkey); Duran, Celal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr; Elci, Latif [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey); Tufekci, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2007-10-22

    A simple and accurate method was developed for separation and enrichment of trace levels of gold in environmental samples. The method is based on the adsorption of Au(III)-diethyldithiocarbamate complex on Amberlite XAD-2000 resin prior to the analysis of gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after elution with 1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} in acetone. Some parameters including nitric acid concentration, eluent type, matrix ions, sample volume, sample flow rate and adsorption capacity were investigated on the recovery of gold(III). The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit of gold were greater than 95% and 16.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The preconcentration factor was 200. The relative standard deviation of the method was <6%. The adsorption capacity of the resin was 12.3 mg g{sup -1}. The validation of the presented procedure was checked by the analysis of CRM-SA-C Sandy Soil certified reference material. The presented procedure was applied to the determination of gold in some environmental samples.

  3. Microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge for the determination of mercury by atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-11-15

    A low-power, atmospheric-pressure microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been developed for use in atomic emission spectrometry. The small plasma (0.6 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm) is generated within a glass cell by using electrodes that do not contact the plasma. Powered by an inexpensive ozone generator, the discharge ignites spontaneously, can be easily sustained in Ar or He at gas flow rates ranging from 5 to 200 mL min(-1), and requires less than 1 W of power. The effect of operating parameters such as plasma gas identity, plasma gas flow rate, and residual water vapor on the DBD source performance has been investigated. The plasma can be operated without removal of residual water vapor, permitting it to be directly coupled with cold vapor generation sample introduction. The spectral background of the source is quite clean in the range from 200 to 260 nm with low continuum and structured components. The DBD source has been applied to the determination of Hg by continuous-flow, cold vapor generation and offers detection limits from 14 (He-DBD) to 43 pg mL(-1) (Ar-DBD) without removal of the residual moisture. The use of flow injection with the He-DBD permits measurement of Hg with a 7.2 pg limit of detection, and with repetitive injections having an RSD of <2% for a 10 ng mL(-1) standard.

  4. The determination of molybdenum in sea water by atomic absorption spectrophotometric method with BMPP-iso-amyl alcohol extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Yoshifumi; Nakai, Toshio; Kawamura, Fumikazu

    1979-01-01

    A trace of molybdenum in sea water is determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using solvent extraction. Molybdenum (VI) is complexed with 4-benzoyl-3-methyl-1-phenyl-5-pyrazolone (BMPP) and extracted into iso-amyl alcohol. To find the optimum condition for the extraction of molybdenum, experiments are tried on the effects of pH, concentration of BMPP, and interference of divers ions. It is shown that extraction is complete in the pH range 1.0 - 3.0 at 0.2 w/v% BMPP concentration and that Na, K, Sr, Ca and Mg at high concentration have no effects on the extraction but in excess of 2 mg Fe(III), Cr(VI), and V(V) depress the absorbance of molybdenum markedly, probably because of complex formation or preferential extraction. One liter of sea water in which 10 ml of concentrated hydrochloric acid is added is concentrated to 200 ml by heating and then filtered using Toyo Roshi No. 3 filter paper. The solution adjusted to pH 2.5 by the addition of sodium acetate is placed in a separatory funnel, and then extracted with 10 ml of 0.2 w/v% solution of BMPP in iso-amyl alcohol by shaking for 10 min. It is found out that the sea water samples contain 7 - 11 μg Mo/liter and the results are agreed well with those that have previously been published. (author)

  5. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals.

  6. Determination of Gold in Various Environment Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Dispersive Liquid–Liquid Microextraction Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şerife Saçmacı

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction separation/preconcentration procedure as a rapid sample-preparation technique is proposed for detection of ultra trace amounts of Au(III in various media by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using 1,5-diphenyl-1,3,5-pentanetrione as chelating agent. Carbon tetrachloride and methanol were used as extraction and dispersive solvents, respectively. Various parameters that affect the extraction efficiency such as pH, centrifugation rate and time, chelating agent concentration and sampling volume on the recovery of Au(III were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the enhancement factor of 750, relative standard deviation of 2.7 % and calibration graphs obtained in the concentration range of 0.04–5.6 μg L−1 for gold were obtained. The limit of detection was 1.1 ng L−1. The accuracy of the method was performed by analysis of the certified reference material (CDN-PGMS-10. The developed method was applied successfully to the determination of gold in the catalytic converter, anode slime, ore and seawater samples. The results show that dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction procedure is sensitive, rapid, simple and safe for the separation/preconcentration of gold from complex sample media.

  7. Preconcentration and determination of some lanthanide elements with immobilized bacteria by flow injection inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maquieira, A.; Elmahadi, H.; Puchades, R. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    1996-02-01

    The on-line combination of flow injection column preconcentration with sequential inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is shown to provide an enrichment factor of 36 for La{sup 3+}, 34 for Ce{sup 3+} and 51 for Nd{sup 3+}, at 1 {mu}g ml{sup -1} for 5 ml of sample. The significant improvement in the (3s) detection limit by preconcentration compared with that without preconcentration demonstrates the efficiency of preconcentration with the bacterium Spirulina platensis immobilized on controlled-pore glass. Recovery of all the lanthanide cations is quantitative and the capacity was calculated. Practical application of the method was demonstrated by the determination of La{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+} impurities in a cerium(III) nitrate reagent. Adsorption isotherm studies were used to describe the mechanisms and the nature of the column binding sites. Isotherm plots showed a Langmuirian shape for La{sup 3+} and an anti-Lanmuirian shape for Ce{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}. Equilibrium constants were also calculated. (Author).

  8. In-situ suspended aggregate microextraction of gold nanoparticles from water samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choleva, Tatiana G; Kappi, Foteini A; Tsogas, George Z; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Giokas, Dimosthenis L

    2016-05-01

    This work describes a new method for the extraction and determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental samples by means of in-situ suspended aggregate microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The method relies on the in-situ formation of a supramolecular aggregate phase through ion-association between a cationic surfactant and a benzene sulfonic acid derivative. Gold nanoparticles are physically entrapped into the aggregate phase which is separated from the bulk aqueous solution by vacuum filtration on the surface of a cellulose filter in the form of a thin film. The film is removed from the filter surface and is dissociated into an acidified methanolic solution which is used for analysis. Under the optimized experimental conditions, gold nanoparticles can be efficiently extracted from water samples with recovery rates between 81.0-93.3%, precision 5.4-12.0% and detection limits as low as 75femtomolL(-1) using only 20mL of sample volume. The satisfactory analytical features of the method along with the simplicity indicate the efficiency of this new approach to adequately collect and extract gold nanoparticle species from water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neutron diffraction determination of mean-square atomic displacements in InAs and GaSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibballs, J.E.; Feteris, S.M.; Barnea, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Integrated intensities for Bragg reflection of neutrons from single crystals of the III-V compounds InAs and GaSb have been measured at room temperature. The data were collected at two wave-lengths, 0.947 and 1.241 A, in order to establish the adequacy of a correction for moderate to severe anisotropic extinction. Data were also obtained for InAs at four temperatures from 408 to 933 K. Corrections for thermal diffuse scattering were applied. The results were analysed in the one-particle potential perturbation approximation with terms to fourth order in the atomic displacements u(u 1 , u 2 , u 3 ). At 296 K, the mean-square components usub(s) 2 determined were: In, 0.0116(2) A 2 ; As, 0.0102(1) A 2 ; and Ga, 0.0120(3)A 2 ; Sb, 0.0107(3)A 2 . The third-order coefficients for InAs are comparable with those for Si and Ge, while those for GaSb are comparable with those for zinc chalcogenides. Below 400 K, the mean-square displacements in InAs decrease faster than predicted by the present perturbation approach

  10. Cadmium and lead determination in foods by beam injection flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleixo, Poliana Carolina; Junior, Dario Santos; Tomazelli, Andrea Cristina; Rufini, Iolanda A.; Berndt, Harald; Krug, Francisco Jose

    2004-01-01

    A simple method for cadmium and lead determination in foods by beam injection flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (BIFF-AAS) was proposed. Food slurries were prepared by transferring an exact amount of cryogenic-ground homogenized material (50-100 mg) to centrifuge tubes, followed by addition of 5 ml (up to 2.8 mol l -1 ) nitric acid solution and sonication in an ultrasonic bath during 5-10 min. Thereafter, slurries were diluted with water to 10 ml, centrifuged during 5 min at 5400 rpm and 400 μl aliquot of the supernatant was analyzed by BIFF-AAS. The detection limits based on peak height measurements were 0.03 μg g -1 Cd and 1.6 μg g -1 Pb for 2% (m/v) slurry (200 mg/10 ml). For method validation, the certified reference materials Pig Kidney (BCR 186) and Rice Flour (NIES 10) were used. Quantitative cadmium and lead recoveries were obtained and no statistical differences were found at 95% level by applying the t-test

  11. Discussion of parameters associated with the determination of arsenic by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry in slurried environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassileva, E.; Baeten, H.; Hoenig, M. [Centre for Veterinary and Agrochemical Research (CERVA), Tervuren (Belgium)

    2001-01-01

    A slurry sampling - fast program procedure has been developed for the determination of arsenic in plants, soils and sediments by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Efficiencies of various single and mixed modifiers for thermal stabilization of arsenic and for a better removal of the matrix during pyrolysis step were compared. The influence of the slurry concentration, amounts of modifier and parameters of the pyrolysis step on the As integrated absorbance signals have been studied and a comparison between fast and conventional furnace programs was also made. The ultrasonic agitation of the slurry followed by a fast electrothermal program using an Ir/Mg modifier provides the most consistent performance in terms of precision and accuracy. The reliability of the whole procedure has been compared with results obtained after application of a wet digestion method with an HF step and validated by analyzing eleven certified reference materials. Arsenic detection and quantitation limits expressed on dry sample matter were about 30 and 100 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, respectively. (orig.)

  12. Experimental design applied to the development of a copper direct determination method in gasoline samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Janyeid Karla Castro; Marques, Aldalea Lopes Brandes [Programa de Pos Graduacao em Quimica, Av. dos Portugueses S/N, Campus Bacanga, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Dantas, Allan Nilson de Sousa; Lopes, Gisele Simone [Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, bloco 939, Campus do Pici, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60.000-000, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this work was to develop an experimental design to optimize the direct determination of copper in gasoline by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimization of the process was carried out firstly by evaluating the variables in the procedure (pyrolysis time and temperature, atomization temperature and sample volume) using a factorial design (2{sup 4}). The response surface was constructed and it presented pyrolysis optimal temperature on 800 C, sample volume of 30 {mu}L using the atomization temperature of 2500 C. The amount of copper in the gasoline samples from Sao Luis City (Brazil) varied from 3.65 to 16.21 {mu}g L{sup -} {sup 1}, with 0.65 and 1.9 {mu}g L{sup -} {sup 1} as detection limit and quantification limit, respectively. Accuracy was evaluated by a comparative procedure and the results proved the viability of copper direct determination in fuel samples. (author)

  13. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in shellfish samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using matrix modifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez Diaz, Mirella del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Heavy metals are a big source of environmental contamination and are also highly toxic to humans. Since shellfish are bio-accumulators of these metals, proper techniques for quantifying them should be available. This work aims to develop an analytical method for the quantitative determination of heavy metals in biological materials (shellfish), specifically arsenic and cadmium at the trace level, using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, for which nickel and phosphate solutions were used to modify the modifiers. Prior to the analysis, the sample was diluted with nitric acid in a DAB II pressure digestion system order to destroy the organic matter. The instrument conditions were initially set (wavelength, slit, integration peaks, graphite tube, etc.), then the work range was defined for each element and the most appropriate operational parameters were studied, such as: temperature, ramp times, hold times and internal gas flow, in the different stage of the electrothermal treatment (drying, calcination, atomization) for the furnace program. Once the above mentioned conditions were set and since this was a biological sample, a matrix chemical modifier had to be used, in order to make the elements that accompany the element being studied more volatile. In this way the chemical and spectral interferences decrease together with the high background absorption of the matrix. Therefore, different matrix modifiers were studied for the definition of each analyte. The method validation was done using Certified Oyster Tissue Reference Material N o 1566a from the National Institute of Standards and Technology applying different tests in order to eliminate outliers. Repeatability, uncertainty, sensitivity, lineal range, working range, detection limit and quantification limit were evaluated for each element, and the results were compared with the values for the certified material. The Fisher and Student tests were the statistical tools used. The experimental values

  14. Solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of boron in plant tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resano, M.; Briceno, J.; Aramendia, M.; Belarra, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the potential of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of B in plant tissues has been investigated. Three certified reference materials (NIST SRM 1570a spinach leaves, NIST SRM 1573a tomato leaves and BCR CRM 679 white cabbage) were selected for this study, the goal always being to develop a fast procedure that could be robust enough to provide a satisfactory performance for all of them, without any modifications in the conditions applied. The use of a suitable chemical modifier was found to be essential for obtaining a reproducible and sufficiently sensitive signal for boron solutions. In this regard, the performance of the combination of citric acid plus W (added as a permanent modifier) was noteworthy, resulting in well-defined signal profiles, a remarkable analyte stabilization during the pyrolysis step (up to 2100 deg. C) and minimal memory effects. This mixture of modifiers provided a good performance for the direct analysis of solid samples as well, but only if a suitable temperature program, favoring the interaction between the analyte and the modifiers, was used. Thus, such a temperature program, with two pyrolysis steps and the addition of NH 4 NO 3 in order to carry out the in situ sample microdigestion, was optimized. Under these conditions, the peak areas obtained for both solid samples and aqueous standards were comparable. Finally, the analysis of the samples was carried out. In all cases, a good agreement with the certified values was obtained, while R.S.D. values ranged between 6 and 10%. It can be concluded that the method proposed shows significant advantages for the determination of this complicated element in solid samples such as the use of aqueous standards for calibration, a high sample throughput (20 min per sample), a suitable limit of detection (0.3 μg g -1 ) and reduced risk of analyte losses and contamination

  15. Selective cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of molybdenum (VI) ion in seawater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filik, Hayati, E-mail: filik@istanbul.edu.tr [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey); Cengel, Tayfun; Apak, Resat [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-09-30

    A cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract molybdenum from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of Mo(VI) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarine: QA) and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature, incubation and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for Mo(VI) was 7.0 ng L{sup -1} with an preconcentration factor of {approx}25 when 10 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.4 mL. The proposed method (with extraction) showed linear calibration within the range 0.03-0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 3.7% (C{sub Mo(VI)} = 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1}, n = 5) for pure standard solutions, whereas RSD for the recoveries from real samples ranged between 2 and 8% (mean RSD = 3.9%). The method was applied to the determination of Mo(VI) in seawater and tap water samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 98-103%. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water sample was analysed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values.

  16. Determination of inorganic and total mercury by vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry using different temperatures of the measurement cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, Luiz Eduardo [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Goldschmidt, Fabiane [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Paniz, Jose Neri Gottfried [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Moraes Flores, Erico Marlon de [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Dressler, Valderi Luiz [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: valdres@quimica.ufsm.br

    2005-06-30

    A simple and inexpensive laboratory-built flow injection vapor generation system coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-VG AAS) for inorganic and total mercury determination has been developed. It is based on the vapor generation of total mercury and a selective detection of Hg{sup 2+} or total mercury by varying the temperature of the measurement cell. Only the inorganic mercury is measured when the quartz cell is at room temperature, and when the cell is heated to 650 deg. C or higher the total Hg concentration is measured. The organic Hg concentration in the sample is calculated from the difference between the total Hg and Hg{sup 2+} concentrations. Parameters such as the type of acid (HCl or HNO{sub 3}) and its concentration, reductant (NaBH{sub 4}) concentration, carrier solution (HCl) flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, sample volume and quartz cell temperature, which influence FI-VG AAS system performance, were systematically investigated. The optimized conditions for Hg{sup 2+} and total Hg determinations were: 1.0 mol l{sup -1} HCl as carrier solution, carrier flow rate of 3.5 ml min{sup -1}, 0.1% (m/v) NaBH{sub 4}, reductant flow rate of 1.0 ml min{sup -1} and carrier gas flow rate of 200 ml min{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (RSD) is lower than 5.0% for a 1.0 {mu}g l{sup -1} Hg solution and the limit of quantification (LOQ, 10 s) is 55 ng g{sup -1}. Certified samples of dogfish muscle (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and non-certified fish samples were analyzed, using a 6.0 mol l{sup -1} HCl solution for analyte extraction. The Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} concentrations found were in agreement with certified ones.

  17. Determination of mercury and selenium in herbal medicines and hair by using a nanometer TiO{sub 2}-coated quartz tube atomizer and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shun-Xing, E-mail: lishunxing@fjzs.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science (Zhangzhou Normal University), Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zheng, Feng-Ying [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science (Zhangzhou Normal University), Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Cai, Shu-Jie; Cai, Tian-Shou [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The nanometer TiO{sub 2} particle was coated onto the inner wall of a T-shaped quartz tube atomizer (QTA) and then was used as a new atomizer (NT-QTA) for the determination of Hg and Se by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). After coating 67.4 mg TiO{sub 2} on a quartz tube, the analytical performance of NT-QTA-HGAAS was compared to conventional QTA-HGAAS and it was improved as follows: (a) the linear range of the calibration curves was expanded from 10.0-80.0 ng mL{sup -1} to 5.0-150.0 ng mL{sup -1} for Hg, and from 10.0-70.0 ng mL{sup -1} to 5.0-100.0 ng mL{sup -1} for Se; (b) the characteristic concentration of was decreased from 2.8 ng mL{sup -1}/1% to 1.1 ng mL{sup -1}/1% for Hg and from 1.2 ng mL{sup -1}/1% to 0.8 ng mL{sup -1}/1% for Se; and (c) the interference from the coexistence of As on the determination of Hg and Se could be eliminated. The achieved technique was applied for the determination of Hg and Se in herbal medicines and hair.

  18. Investigations into the Role of Modifiers for Entrapment of Hydrides in Flow Injection Hydride Generation Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry as Exemplified for the Determination of Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Bo; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Hansen, Elo Harald

    1997-01-01

    Pd-conditioned graphite tubes, placed in the furnace of an atomic absorption spectrometry instrument, are used for entrapment of germane as generated in an associated flow injection system. Two different approaches are tested with the ultimate aim to allow multiple determinations, that is...

  19. Determination of Fe Content of Some Food Items by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS): A Guided-Inquiry Learning Experience in Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; King, Angela G.; Yakubu, Mamudu; Mohammed, Abdul K.; Pollard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a guided-inquiry (GI) hands-on determination of Fe in food samples including plantains, spinach, lima beans, oatmeal, Frosted Flakes cereal (generic), tilapia fish, and chicken using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The utility of the GI experiment, which is part of an instrumental analysis laboratory course,…

  20. The determination by gas chromatography with atomic emission detection of total sulfur in fuels used as forensic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2008-05-20

    In Japan, taxed diesel fuel from non-taxed fuel oil-A is illegally produced by removing coumarin, which is added as a non-taxed marker. The coumarin is removed using concentrated sulfuric acid and this produces a high viscosity and hazardous material, called "sulfuric acid pitch", as a by-product. This compound has a detrimental effect on the environment and is hazardous to humans. The actions have been associated with organized crime with the illegally gained taxes becoming financial bases. To discriminate legal and diesel oil from illegal product, the peak area ratio R(SC), the ratio of total sulfur to carbon (>C(14)), was used. R(SC) is calculated by the total areas of sulfur and carbon (>C(14)) from the gas chromatogram obtained by gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Sulfur in legal diesel fuels is strictly regulated by a maximum limit, which was 50ppm (and is now 10ppm), but in the preparation of illegal diesel oil, in which coumarin is eliminated, sulfur cannot be removed. Therefore, the R(SC) of fuel oil-A and illegal fuel oil is over 15, whereas those for legal fuel oil and diesel fuel are under 2.0. Furthermore, these ratios do not change in weathering experiments. GC-AED was applied to an actual arson case and was found to be effective for the determination of total sulfur in trace amounts of accelerants detected in fire debris at the arson scene, and hence was effective for the characterization of the ignitable liquids used.