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Sample records for determine endocrine effects

  1. Immunochemical determination of xenobiotics with endocrine disrupting effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez-Alberola, M.C.; Marco, M.P. [Department of Biological Organic Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona, 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    This paper is a review with more than 100 references discussing the immunochemical methods reported in the literature for the most important man-made chemicals with suspected endocrine disrupting activity. Details regarding immunizing hapten design, antibody production, and the features (limit of detection, dynamic range, specificity) of the most important immunochemical methods developed (ELISA, FIIA, immunosorbents, immunosensors, etc.) are presented for important environmental pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, alkylphenols, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and dioxins. Availability of commercial reagents and methods is reported. (orig.)

  2. Effects of crossbreeding on endocrine patterns determined in pregnant beef/dairy cows naturally infected with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ispierto, I; Serrano-Pérez, B; Almería, S; Martínez-Bello, D; Tchimbou, A F; de Sousa, N M; Beckers, J F; López-Gatius, F

    2015-03-01

    Neospora caninum is an intracellular coccidian parasite causing abortion worldwide in dairy cattle. Studies have shown that N caninum infection modifies endocrine patterns and that beef cows or cows with a crossbreed pregnancy, especially for a greater maternal-paternal genetic distance, show a reduced risk of abortion when naturally infected compared with pure-breed Holstein Friesian (HF) pregnancies. This study examined the effects of crossbreeding on plasma progesterone (P4), pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG)-1 and -2, and prolactin patterns produced during gestation in N caninum-infected beef/dairy cows. We analyzed 74 pregnancies in nonaborting cows carrying a single fetus established in 26 lactating HF cows bred with Holstein bulls (H-H), 13 HF cows bred with Limousin bulls (H-L), 12 HF cows used as recipients of transferred in vivo-produced frozen-thawed Rubia Gallega (beef breed; RG) embryos (H-RG-ET), and 23 RG suckling cows bred with RG bulls (RG-RG). Of the cows, 29 (39%) were seropositive for N caninum. Blood samples for hormone and placental protein determinations were collected on Days 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 of gestation. Procedures of repeated measures analysis of variance throughout gestation revealed higher PAG-1 levels in the H-L and H-RG-ET groups compared with H-H and RG-RG. Higher prolactin levels were detected in RG-RG than in the remaining groups. N caninum seropositivity and fetal genotype had a significant effect on PAG-2 concentrations, such that highest levels of PAG-2 occurred in RG-RG seropositive cows and lowest in H-H seropositive cows, whereas Neospora-seropositive cows showed lower P4 concentrations than their seronegative partners. In conclusion, chronic N caninum infection modifies endocrine patterns of PAG-2 and P4 during pregnancy, whereas PAG-1 and prolactin concentrations are affected by breed and fetal genotype, irrespective of Neospora infection status.

  3. The effects of metals as endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    This review reports current knowledge regarding the roles that cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (PB), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) play as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The influence of these metals on the endocrine system, possible mechanisms of action, and consequent health effects were correlated between experimental animals and humans. Analysis of the studies prompted us to identify some critical issues related to this area and showed the need for more rigorous and innovative studies. Consequently, it was recommended that future studies need to: (1) identify the mechanisms of action, because at the present time only a few have been elucidated-in this context, the possible presence of hormesis need to be determined, as currently this was reported only for exposure Cd and As; (2) study the possible additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects on the endocrine system following exposure to a mixture of metals since there is a lack of these studies available, and in general or occupational environments, humans are simultaneously exposed to different classes of xenobiotics, including metals, but also to organic compounds that might also be EDCs; (3) assess the potential adverse effects on the endocrine system of low-level exposures to metals, as most of the information currently available on EDCs originates from studies in which exposure levels were particularly high; and (4) assess the effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems of other metals that are present in the general and occupational environment that have not yet been evaluated.

  4. Neuroimmune endocrine effects of antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonioli M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marco Antonioli, Joanna Rybka, LA CarvalhoPsychoimmunology Translational Laboratory, Health Science Research Centre, Roehampton University, London, UKAbstract: Antidepressant pharmacotherapy is to date the most often used treatment for depression, but the exact mechanism of action underlying its therapeutic effect is still unclear. Many theories have been put forward to account for depression, as well as antidepressant activity, but none of them is exhaustive. Neuroimmune endocrine impairment is found in depressed patients; high levels of circulating corticosteroids along with hyperactivation of the immune system, high levels of proinflammatory cytokines, low levels of melatonin in plasma and urine, and disentrainment of circadian rhythms have been demonstrated. Moreover, antidepressant treatment seems to correct or at least to interfere with these alterations. In this review, we summarize the complex neuroimmune endocrine and chronobiological alterations found in patients with depression and how these systems interact with each other. We also explain how antidepressant therapy can modify these systems, along with some possible mechanisms of action shown in animal and human models.Keywords: antidepressant agents, biological markers, human, cytokines, neuroinflammation, psychoneuroimmunology, endophenotype

  5. The effects of nanomaterials as endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Leso, Veruscka; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-08-14

    In recent years, nanoparticles have been increasingly used in several industrial, consumer and medical applications because of their unique physico-chemical properties. However, in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that these properties are also closely associated with detrimental health effects. There is a serious lack of information on the potential nanoparticle hazard to human health, particularly on their possible toxic effects on the endocrine system. This topic is of primary importance since the disruption of endocrine functions is associated with severe adverse effects on human health. Consequently, in order to gather information on the hazardous effects of nanoparticles on endocrine organs, we reviewed the data available in the literature regarding the endocrine effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure to different types of nanoparticles. Our aim was to understand the potential endocrine disrupting risks posed by nanoparticles, to assess their underlying mechanisms of action and identify areas in which further investigation is needed in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the role of nanoparticles as endocrine disruptors. Current data support the notion that different types of nanoparticles are capable of altering the normal and physiological activity of the endocrine system. However, a critical evaluation of these findings suggests the need to interpret these results with caution since information on potential endocrine interactions and the toxicity of nanoparticles is quite limited.

  6. [Endocrine effects of antiepileptic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    Both seizures and antiepileptic drugs may induce disturbances in hormonal system. Regarding endocrine effects of anticonvulsants, an interaction of these drugs with gonadal, thyroid, and adrenal axis deserves attention. Since majority of antiepileptic drugs block voltage dependent sodium and calcium channels, enhance GABAergic transmission and/or antagonize glutamate receptors, one may expect that similar neurochemical mechanisms are engaged in the interaction of these drugs with synthesis of hypothalamic neurohormones such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH). Moreover some antiepileptic drugs may affect hormone metabolism via inhibiting or stimulating cytochrome P-450 iso-enzymes. An influence of antiepileptic drugs on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appears to be sex-dependent. In males, valproate decreased follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) but elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations. Carbamazepine decreased testosterone/sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) ratio, whereas its active metabolite--oxcarbazepine--had no effect on androgens. In females, valproate decreased FSH-stimulated estradiol release and enhanced testosterone level. On the other hand, carbamazepine decreased testosterone level but enhanced SHBG concentration. It has been reported that carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine or joined administration of carbamazepine and valproate decrease thyroxine (T4) level in patients with no effect on thyrotropin (TSH). While valproate itself has no effect on T4, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone, as metabolic enzyme inducers, can decrease the level of free and bound thyroxine. On the other hand, new antiepileptics such as levetiracetam, tiagabine, vigabatrine or lamotrigine had no effect on thyroid hormones. With respect to hormonal regulation of metabolic processes, valproate was

  7. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS OF BUTYLPARABEN: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Pallabi Goswami; J.C Kalita

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing concern in the field of endocrine disruption over the presence of various endocrine disrupting chemicals in Pharmaceuticals and Personal care products (PPCPs). This concern has also been as PPCPs are most widely used and had led to introduction of thousands of new and complex chemicals that enter the environment in large quantities. The effect of the chemicals has not only been restricted to human who are exposed directly to the chemicals or the a...

  8. Effects of alcohol on the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2013-09-01

    Chronic consumption of a large amount of alcohol disrupts the communication between nervous, endocrine, and immune system and causes hormonal disturbances that lead to profound and serious consequences at physiologic and behavioral levels. These alcohol-induced hormonal dysregulations affect the entire body and can result in various disorders such as stress abnormalities, reproductive deficits, body growth defect, thyroid problems, immune dysfunction, cancers, bone disease, and psychological and behavioral disorders. This review summarizes the findings from human and animal studies that provide consistent evidence on the various effects of alcohol abuse on the endocrine system.

  9. Endocrine effects on heart function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Gamberini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the factors associated with thalassemic heart disease, endocrine disturbance is also a contributing factor. We present a retrospective, cross sectional study, which aims to establish the prevalence of cardiac complications in thalassaemia major (TM patients with endocrine complications and to evaluate the influence of endocrine disease on cardiac complications. Endocrinological and cardiological parameters were considered on 957 TM patients who are enrolled in the Myocardial Iron Overload in Thalassemia (MIOT network in 68 sites in Italy. Patients with pubertal hypogonadism (163 males and 175 females, hypothyroidism (192, diabetes mellitus (87 and hypoparathyroidism (61, were compared according to cardiac complications: global heart T2*, cardiac dysfunction, heart failure, arrythmias, pulmonary hypertension and myocardial fibrosis. Control groups were made up according to the age range of patients with the corresponding endocrinopathy. The prevalence of cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias and heart failure was significantly increased in patients with endocrinopathies. Cardiac complications tended to increase according to the number of endocrinologies affecting the patient. 与地中海贫血心脏疾病相关的因素中,内分泌失调也是一个促进因素。 我们进行了回顾和断面研究,旨在患有内分泌并发症的重型地中海贫血患者中建立心脏并发症的患病率,以及评估内分泌疾病对心脏并发症的影响。 曾考虑到意大利地中海贫血心肌铁过载(MIOT)网络的68个站点上注册的957名重型地中海贫血患者的内分泌和心脏病学参数。 根据以下心脏并发症对青春期性腺机能减退的患者(男性163名、女性175名)、甲状腺机能减退患者(192名)、糖尿病患者(87名)和甲状旁腺机能减退患者(61名)进行了比较: 心脏 T2*、心功能障碍、心脏衰竭、心率不齐、肺动脉高

  10. DIAGNOSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Endocrine late-effects of childhood cancer and its treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaitilly, Wassim; Cohen, Laurie E

    2017-04-01

    Endocrine complications are frequently observed in childhood cancer survivors (CCS). One of two CCS will experience at least one endocrine complication during the course of his/her lifespan, most commonly as a late-effect of cancer treatments, especially radiotherapy and alkylating agent chemotherapy. Endocrine late-effects include impairments of the hypothalamus/pituitary, thyroid and gonads, as well as decreased bone mineral density and metabolic derangements leading to obesity and/or diabetes mellitus. A systematic approach where CCS are screened for endocrine late-effects based on their cancer history and treatment exposures may improve health outcomes by allowing the early diagnosis and treatment of these complications.

  11. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS OF BUTYLPARABEN: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallabi Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing concern in the field of endocrine disruption over the presence of various endocrine disrupting chemicals in Pharmaceuticals and Personal care products (PPCPs. This concern has also been as PPCPs are most widely used and had led to introduction of thousands of new and complex chemicals that enter the environment in large quantities. The effect of the chemicals has not only been restricted to human who are exposed directly to the chemicals or the animals which gets exposed to the chemicals through wide variety of veterinary drugs, but also the aquatic organisms and other form of Wildlife which are non target and indirectly gets exposed to the chemicals through individual human activity. Parabens includes a group of compound of which methylparaben, butylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben are most widely used as preservatives in various PPCPs. Recent concern over the use of parabens has been drawn by the scientific community as these chemicals are reported to exert a weak estrogenic activity, with butylparaben showing the most potent activity among methyl-, ethyl- and propyl esters in in vitro recombinant yeast assay and in in vivo uterotrophic assay. Human exposure to butylparaben which occur mainly through inhalation, ingestion, or eye or skin contact, from intake of foods or drugs or use of cosmetics and personal care products where butylparaben is mainly used as a preservative. Effects of butylparaben are studied in various animal model systems like rodents to determine the possible effects in human which showed various effects which include defects in male reproductive system like increase in weight of epididymis, also change in serum testosterone level and a significant increase in uterine weight in ovariectomized and immature rats. Other effects include irritation to the respiratory tract, allergic skin reactions, atrophy of lymphoid tissue in the spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes and multifocal

  12. Endocrine determinants of haemostasis and thrombosis risk: Focus on thyroid hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, L.P.B.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores endocrine determinants of the haemostatic system and thrombosis risk with main focus on thyroid hormone. It describes, in three parts, the effects of thyroid hormone on the haemostatic system, the effects of thyroid hormone (mimetics) on lipids and the effects of other hormones

  13. Methods for the Determination of Endocrine-Disrupting Phthalate Esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Munawar Saeed; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim bin Mohd; Wirzal, Mohd Dzul Hakim; Sirajuddin; Barek, Jiri; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Üstündag, Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are endocrine disruptors frequently occurring in the general and industrial environment and in many industrial products. Moreover, they are also suspected of being carcinogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic, and they show diverse toxicity profiles depending on their structures. The European Union and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) have included many phthalates in the list of priority substances with potential endocrine-disrupting action. They are: dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DINP), di-iso-decyl phthalate (DIDP), di-n-decyl phthalate (DnDP), and dioctyl phthalate (DOP). There is an ever-increasing demand for new analytical methods suitable for monitoring different phthalates in various environmental, biological, and other matrices. Separation and spectrometric methods are most frequently used. However, modern electroanalytical methods can also play a useful role in this field because of their high sensitivity, reasonable selectivity, easy automation, and miniaturization, and especially low investment and running costs, which makes them suitable for large-scale monitoring. Therefore, this review outlines possibilities and limitations of various analytical methods for determination of endocrine-disruptor phthalate esters in various matrices, including somewhat neglected electroanalytical methods.

  14. Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit Roig; Olivier Thomas; Aghleb Bartegi; Wissem Mnif; Aicha Bouaziz; Aziza Ibn Hadj Hassine

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soi...

  15. Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Roig

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air. For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health.

  16. Effect of endocrine disruptor pesticides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

    2011-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health.

  17. Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health. PMID:21776230

  18. Analytical Methodologies for the Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Biological and Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs) can mimic natural hormones and produce adverse effects in the endocrine functions by interacting with estrogen receptors. EDCs include both natural and synthetic chemicals, such as hormones, personal care products, surfactants, and flame retardants, among others. EDCs are characterised by their ubiquitous presence at trace-level concentrations and their wide diversity. Since the discovery of the adverse effects of these pollutants on wildlife and human health, analytical methods have been developed for their qualitative and quantitative determination. In particular, mass-based analytical methods show excellent sensitivity and precision for their quantification. This paper reviews recently published analytical methodologies for the sample preparation and for the determination of these compounds in different environmental and biological matrices by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The various sample preparation techniques are compared and discussed. In addition, recent developments and advances in this field are presented. PMID:23738329

  19. Analytical methodologies for the determination of endocrine disrupting compounds in biological and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs) can mimic natural hormones and produce adverse effects in the endocrine functions by interacting with estrogen receptors. EDCs include both natural and synthetic chemicals, such as hormones, personal care products, surfactants, and flame retardants, among others. EDCs are characterised by their ubiquitous presence at trace-level concentrations and their wide diversity. Since the discovery of the adverse effects of these pollutants on wildlife and human health, analytical methods have been developed for their qualitative and quantitative determination. In particular, mass-based analytical methods show excellent sensitivity and precision for their quantification. This paper reviews recently published analytical methodologies for the sample preparation and for the determination of these compounds in different environmental and biological matrices by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The various sample preparation techniques are compared and discussed. In addition, recent developments and advances in this field are presented.

  20. ENDOCRINE DISORDERS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN ORTHODONTICS

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    Sunil Kumar KHARE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available the periodontal tissue to orthodontic forces, which leads to modeling and remodeling of the surrounding alveolar bone. The endocrine system is responsible for hormonal secretion, being closely related to the central nervous sys‑ tem, as it diversifies its functions through the hypothala‑ mus and pituitary glands. It controls physiological processes and maintains homeostasis. The neuroendocrine system is responsible for adaptation to environmental changes. Also, the nervous system may provide a correct organic response, of primary type, with the release of neu‑ rotransmitters or, if the stimulus prevails, the endocrine system secretes hormones. This is especially important in dentistry because many of the patients attending dental clinics face stressful situations. Awareness is therefore nec‑ essary on the risks and difficulties that may arise during the dental and orthodontic management of patients with endocrine disorders and most common oral manifesta‑ tions.

  1. Endocrine disrupting chemicals – probability of adverse environmental effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryka Langauer-Lewowicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some information about current state of knowledge of the risk due to exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs. Endocrine disruptors are defined as chemicals substances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and wildlife. Exposure to EDCs in animals models correlate positively with an increased incidence of malformations of genital tract, on neoplasmas, obesity, alternations on male and female reproduction and changes in neuroendocrinology and behavior. Results from animal models, human clinical observations and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant risk to public health.

  2. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    'The overall objective of the basic research grant is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. The three major lines of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects. and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at a variety of DOE sites that need to be examined for endocrine disrupting effects. By relating results obtained from this research project to contamination problems at various DOE sites. CBR will provide data and information on endocrine disrupting contaminants to DOE for consideration in risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities needed at the sites.'

  3. Cognitive effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, S L; Widholm, J J

    2001-12-01

    A large number of chemical pollutants including phthalates, alkylphenolic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, organochlorine pesticides, bisphenol A, and metals including lead, mercury, and cadmium have the ability to disrupt endocrine function in animals. Some of these same chemicals have been shown to alter cognitive function in animals and humans. Because hormonally mediated events play a central role in central nervous system development and function, a number of researchers have speculated that the changes in cognitive function are mediated by the endocrine-like actions of these chemicals. In this paper we review the evidence that cognitive effects of chemicals classified as environmental endocrine disruptors are mediated by changes in hormonal function. We begin by briefly reviewing the role of gonadal steroids, thyroid hormones, and glucocorticoids in brain development and brain function. We then review the endocrine changes and cognitive effects that have been reported for selected endocrine-disrupting chemicals, discuss the evidence for causal relationships between endocrine disruption and cognitive effects, and suggest directions for future research.

  4. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives.

  5. In vitro profiling of endocrine disrupting effects of phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2010-02-01

    Some phenols have been suspected to modulate the endocrine systems of wildlife and humans, but less is known about their interactions with different types of nuclear receptors. In this study, the ability of 2-tert-butylphenol, 2-isopropylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 3,4-dichlorophenol (3,4-DCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), bisphenols A (BPA), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrachlorobisphenol A (TCBPA) and 4-phenylphenol to activate estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR), progesterone receptor (PR) and estrogen-related receptor (ERR) were determined using a set of recombined yeast strains. It was found that 4-t-OP, 3,4-DCP, PCP, BPA, TBBPA, TCBPA and 4-phenylphenol were ERalpha agonists, while 4-t-OP, PCP and 4-phenylphenol showed ERalpha antagonistic activities. 2-tert-Butylphenol, 4-t-OP, 2-isopropylphenol, 2,4-DCP, 3,4-DCP, BPA, TCBPA and 4-phenylphenol were antagonists for AR, whereas none of the compounds studied were found to be an AR agonist. TCBPA, TBBPA and PCP were PR antagonists, and 2-tert-butylphenol, 3,4-DCP, 4-t-OP, 4-phenylphenol and 2-isopropylphenol were weak inhibitors on expression under control of the PR. None of the phenols were PR agonists. 2-tert-Butylphenol, 4-t-OP and PCP were ERRgamma inverse agonists, while 2,4-DCP, 3,4-DCP, PCP, BPA, TBBPA and TCBPA exhibited the ability to reverse the ERR inhibition induced by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Based on the functional agonistic or antagonistic receptor-mediated effects, we further discussed the possible action mechanisms of these phenols as endocrine disrupting chemicals.

  6. Possible endocrine disrupting effects of parabens and their metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie

    2010-01-01

    Parabens are preservatives used in a wide range of cosmetic products, including products for children, and some are permitted in foods. However, there is concern for endocrine disrupting effects. This paper critically discusses the conclusions of recent reviews and original research papers...

  7. Approaches for predicting effects of unintended environmental exposure to an endocrine active pharmaceutical, tamoxifen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamoxifen is an endocrine-active pharmaceutical (EAP) that is used world-wide. Because tamoxifen is a ubiquitous pharmaceutical and interacts with estrogen receptors, a case study was conducted with this compound to (1) determine effects on reproductive endpoints in a nontarget s...

  8. Approaches for predicting effects of unintended environmental exposure to an endocrine active pharmaceutical, tamoxifen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamoxifen is an endocrine-active pharmaceutical (EAP) that is used world-wide. Because tamoxifen is a ubiquitous pharmaceutical and interacts with estrogen receptors, a case study was conducted with this compound to (1) determine effects on reproductive endpoints in a nontarget s...

  9. Transgenerational epigenetic imprinting of the male germline by endocrine disruptor exposure during gonadal sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung-Shu; Anway, Matthew D; Rekow, Stephen S; Skinner, Michael K

    2006-12-01

    Embryonic exposure to the endocrine disruptor vinclozolin at the time of gonadal sex determination was previously found to promote transgenerational disease states. The actions of vinclozolin appear to be due to epigenetic alterations in the male germline that are transmitted to subsequent generations. Analysis of the transgenerational epigenetic effects on the male germline (i.e. sperm) identified 25 candidate DNA sequences with altered methylation patterns in the vinclozolin generation sperm. These sequences were identified and mapped to specific genes and noncoding DNA regions. Bisulfite sequencing was used to confirm the altered methylation pattern of 15 of the candidate DNA sequences. Alterations in the epigenetic pattern (i.e. methylation) of these genes/DNA sequences were found in the F2 and F3 generation germline. Therefore, the reprogramming of the male germline involves the induction of new imprinted-like genes/DNA sequences that acquire an apparent permanent DNA methylation pattern that is passed at least through the paternal allele. The expression pattern of several of the genes during embryonic development were found to be altered in the vinclozolin F1 and F2 generation testis. A number of the imprinted-like genes/DNA sequences identified are associated with epigenetic linked diseases. In summary, an endocrine disruptor exposure during embryonic gonadal sex determination was found to promote an alteration in the epigenetic (i.e. induction of imprinted-like genes/DNA sequences) programming of the male germline, and this is associated with the development of transgenerational disease states.

  10. Environmental endocrine disruptors: Effects on the human male reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, M F; Hasan, N; Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C

    2015-12-01

    Incidences of altered development and neoplasia of male reproductive organs have increased during the last 50 years, as shown by epidemiological data. These data are associated with the increased presence of environmental chemicals, specifically "endocrine disruptors," that interfere with normal hormonal action. Much research has gone into testing the effects of specific endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on the development of male reproductive organs and endocrine-related cancers in both in vitro and in vivo models. Efforts have been made to bridge the accruing laboratory findings with the epidemiological data to draw conclusions regarding the relationship between EDCs, altered development and carcinogenesis. The ability of EDCs to predispose target fetal and adult tissues to neoplastic transformation is best explained under the framework of the tissue organization field theory of carcinogenesis (TOFT), which posits that carcinogenesis is development gone awry. Here, we focus on the available evidence, from both empirical and epidemiological studies, regarding the effects of EDCs on male reproductive development and carcinogenesis of endocrine target tissues. We also critique current research methodology utilized in the investigation of EDCs effects and outline what could possibly be done to address these obstacles moving forward.

  11. Endocrine side effects of broad-acting kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-09-01

    Targeted therapy in oncology consists of drugs that specifically interfere with abnormal signaling pathways that are dysregulated in cancer cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) take advantage of unique oncogenes that are activated in certain types of cancer, and also target common mechanisms of growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. However, many kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy are somewhat nonselective, and most have additional mechanisms of action at the cellular level, which are not completely understood. The use of these agents has increased our knowledge of important side effects, of which the practicing clinician must be aware. Recently, proposed endocrine-related side effects of these agents include alterations in thyroid function, bone metabolism, linear growth, gonadal function, fetal development, and glucose metabolism, and adrenal function. This review summarizes the most recent data on the endocrine side effects of TKIs.

  12. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert ...

  13. Mixture effects of endocrine disrupting compounds in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Taxvig, Camilla; Andersen, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    on the AR (flutamide, procymidone and vinclozolin) and of compounds with and without effects on the AR [finasteride, mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, prochloraz and vinclozolin]. For a paraben mixture (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, propyl paraben, butyl paraben and iso-butyl paraben) antagonistic effect...... assuming additivity. Overall these and other studies show that weak endocrine disrupting compounds, like parabens and azole fungicides, give rise to combination effects when they occur in mixtures. These combination effects should be taken into account in regulatory risk assessment not to under...

  14. Effects of Common Equine Endocrine Diseases on Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Teresa A

    2016-12-01

    Endocrine diseases, such as equine metabolic syndrome and pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, are common in domesticated horse populations, and the frequency with which these diseases are encountered and managed by equine veterinary practitioners is expected to increase as the population ages. As clinicians learn more about the effects of these diseases on equine reproductive physiology and efficiency (including effects on reproductive seasonality, ovulation efficiency, implantation, early pregnancy loss, duration of pregnancy, and lactation), strategies and guidelines for improving fertility in affected animals continue to evolve. It is hoped that further research will establish these recommendations more firmly.

  15. Contribution of the Endocrine Perspective in the Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Juul, Anders; Franssen, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    to low doses of tenths or hundreds of chemicals since prenatal life, causation is most difficult to demonstrate and justifies a translational approach using animal models. Studies in rodents indicate an exquisite sensitivity of neuroendocrine endpoints to EDCs. Altogether, the data from both human......Debate makes science progress. In the field of endocrine disruption, endocrinology has brought up findings that substantiate a specific perspective on the definition of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), the role of the endocrine system and the endpoints of hormone and EDC actions among other...... that the increasing burden of EDCs could be an explanation. In fact, pubertal timing currently shows complex changes since advancement of some manifestations of puberty (e.g. breast development) and no change or delay of others (e.g. menarche, pubic hair development) can be observed. In a human setting with exposure...

  16. Informative importance of determination of trace elements in biologocal mediums in patients with endocrine pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ирина Николаевна Андрусишина

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The changes of mineral metabolism in human organism caused by the deficiency or excess of trace elements in environment (air, food stuffs, water can lead to disorder of functional status of organism.An excess or deficiency of the certain metals disturb the balance of metabolic processes in organism that causes the different changes in endocrine system too. That is why the aim of research was to detect the peculiarities of distribution of macro and trace elements in patients with different endocrine pathology and to show the reasonability of the complex approach in assessment of microelementoses at hyperthyroidism and diabetes mellitus.Methods. The balance of 15 macro and trace elements in different biological mediums (hairs, whole blood, blood serum, urine was studied using EAAS and AES-ICP methods.Result. There was demonstrated the high informative importance of determination of K, Mg, Mn, Cr, Zn at pancreas pathology and Cr, Mn, Se, Zn- at thyroid pathology in human. There was detected that endocrine pathology is characterized with the surplus accumulation of Al, As and Pb in organism of examined patients.Conclusions. To increase the reliability and efficiency of the clinical diagnostics of endocrine human pathology there was demonstrated the high informative importance of the complex approach in choice of biological mediums at assessment of the trace elements imbalance. 

  17. Effects of orthostasis on endocrine responses to psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nater, Urs M; Ditzen, Beate; Strahler, Jana; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-12-01

    Standardized psychological procedures have been designed to induce physiological stress responses. However, the impact of standing (orthostasis) on the physiological reaction after psychological stress remains unclear. The purpose of the current analysis was to examine and quantify the relative contribution of orthostasis to the physiological stress response by comparing a "standing with stress" to a "standing without stress" condition. We investigated the effect of standing with and without stress on responses of the sympathetic-adrenomedullary (SAM) system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis using a standardized psychosocial stress protocol (Trier Social Stress Test) and a non-stress condition in a repeated measures design. Subjects (N=30) were exposed to both conditions in randomized order and had to maintain a standing, upright position for 10minutes. In the "standing with stress" condition, significant increases in repeatedly assessed plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EP), as well as in saliva cortisol were found, while in the "standing without stress" condition, no significant changes in plasma epinephrine and saliva cortisol were observed. Calculations of the relative contribution of orthostasis to physiological stress responses revealed that 25.61% of the NE increase, 82.94% of the EP increase, and 68.91% of the cortisol increase, could be attributed to psychosocial stress adjusted for the effects of orthostasis and basal endocrine output. Although these results are indicative for a marked endocrine reaction that is caused by psychosocial stress alone, our findings show that the contribution of orthostasis must be taken into account when interpreting endocrine data collected in a psychosocial stress test.

  18. Endocrine side effects induced by immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Barnabei, Agnese; Marchetti, Paolo; De Vecchis, Liana; Salvatori, Roberto; Torino, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, progress has been made in cancer immunotherapy by the development of drugs acting as modulators of immune checkpoint proteins, such as the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1), two co-inhibitory receptors that are expressed on T cells upon activation. These molecules play crucial roles in maintaining immune homeostasis by down-regulating T-cell signaling, thereby preventing unbridled T-cell proliferation while maintaining tolerance to self-antigens, such as tumor-associated antigens. CTLA4 blockade through systemic administration of the CTLA4-blocking antibody ipilimumab was shown to confer significant survival benefit and prolonged stable disease in patients affected by advanced cutaneous melanoma. Other immune checkpoint inhibitors are under clinical evaluation. However, immune checkpoint blockade can lead to the breaking of immune self-tolerance, thereby inducing a novel syndrome of autoimmune/autoinflammatory side effects, designated as "immune-related adverse events," mainly including rash, colitis, hepatitis, and endocrinopathies. We searched the medical literature using the words "hypophysitis," "hypopituitarism," "thyroid," "adrenal insufficiency," and "endocrine adverse events" in association with "immune checkpoint inhibitors," "ipilimumab," "tremelimumab," "PD-1," and "PD-1-L." The spectrum of endocrine disease experienced by patients treated with ipilimumab includes most commonly hypophysitis, more rarely thyroid disease or abnormalities in thyroid function tests, and occasionally primary adrenal insufficiency. Hypophysitis has emerged as a distinctive side effect of CTLA4-blocking antibodies, establishing a new form of autoimmune pituitary disease. This condition, if not promptly recognized, may be life-threatening (due to secondary hypoadrenalism). Hypopituitarism caused by these agents is rarely reversible, and prolonged or lifelong substitutive hormonal treatment is often required. The precise

  19. Effects of endocrine disruptors on developmental and reproductive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevini, Tiziana A L; Zanetto, Simona Bertola; Cillo, Fabiana

    2005-03-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are exogenous environmental molecules that may affect the synthesis, secretion, transport, metabolism, binding, action, and catabolism of natural hormones in the body. EDs may thus interact with the endocrine system of animals and humans and can exert this effect even when present in minute amounts. EDs have adverse impacts on a number of developmental functions in wildlife and humans. Critical periods of urogenital tract and nervous system development in-utero and during early post-natal life are especially sensitive to hormonal disruption. Furthermore a wide range of hormone-dependent organs (pituitary gland, hypothalamus, reproductive tract) are targets of EDs disrupting effects in adult subjects, possibly resulting in cell transformation and cancer. At present about 60 chemicals have been identified and characterized as EDs and belong to three main groups: (a) synthetic compounds utilized in industry, agriculture and consumer products; (b) synthetic molecules used as pharmaceutical drugs and (c) natural chemicals found in human and animal food (phytoestrogens). In the present review we will give special attention to the family of Polychlorinated biphenyls (also indicated as PCBs) because of their persistence in the environment, ability to concentrate up the food chain, continued detection in environmental matrices, and ability to be stored in the adipose tissue of animals as well as humans. The detrimental effects of these compounds, and of EDs more in general, on health and reproduction will be discussed, presenting experimental data aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in their action.

  20. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately.

  1. Endocrine effects of Fukushima: Radiation-induced endocrinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Asfandyar Khan; Niazi, Shaharyar Khan

    2011-01-01

    The unfortunate accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima have led to an enormous amount of radioactive material being released into the atmosphere. Radiation exposure to the human body may be as a result of accidents, such as those in Chernobyl and Fukushima, or due to occupational hazards, such as in the employees of nuclear plants, or due to therapeutic or diagnostic procedures. These different sources of radiations may affect the human body as a whole or may cause localized damage to a certain area of the body, depending upon the extent and dosage of the irradiation. More or less every organ is affected by radiation exposure. Some require a higher dose to be affected while others may be affected at a lower dose. All the endocrine glands are susceptible to damage by radiation exposure; however, pituitary, thyroid and gonads are most likely to be affected. In addition to the endocrine effects, the rates of birth defects and carcinomas may also be increased in the population exposed to excessive radiation. PMID:21731864

  2. Endocrine effects of Fukushima: Radiation-induced endocrinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Asfandyar Khan; Niazi, Shaharyar Khan

    2011-04-01

    The unfortunate accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima have led to an enormous amount of radioactive material being released into the atmosphere. Radiation exposure to the human body may be as a result of accidents, such as those in Chernobyl and Fukushima, or due to occupational hazards, such as in the employees of nuclear plants, or due to therapeutic or diagnostic procedures. These different sources of radiations may affect the human body as a whole or may cause localized damage to a certain area of the body, depending upon the extent and dosage of the irradiation. More or less every organ is affected by radiation exposure. Some require a higher dose to be affected while others may be affected at a lower dose. All the endocrine glands are susceptible to damage by radiation exposure; however, pituitary, thyroid and gonads are most likely to be affected. In addition to the endocrine effects, the rates of birth defects and carcinomas may also be increased in the population exposed to excessive radiation.

  3. Analytical methods for the endocrine disruptor compounds determination in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Marcello; Sciascia, Francesco; Cifelli, Roberta; Malatesta, Luciano; Bruni, Pantaleone; Croce, Fausto

    2016-02-19

    The potential risk of exposure to different xenobiotics, which can modulate the endocrine system and represent a treat for the wellness of an increasing number of people, has recently drawn the attention of international environmental and health agencies. Several agents, characterized by structural diversity, may interfer with the normal endocrine functions that regulate cell growth, homeostasis and development. Substances such as pesticides, herbicides, plasticizers, metals, etc. having endocrine activity (EDCs) are used in agriculture and industry and are also used as drugs for humans and animals. A difficulty in the analytical determination of these substances is the complexity of the matrix in which they are present. In fact, the samples most frequently analyzed consist of groundwater and surface water, including influent and effluent of wastewater treatment plants and drinking water. In this review, several sample pretreatment protocols, assays and different instrumental techniques recently used in the EDCs determination have been considered. This review concludes with a paragraph in which the most recent hyphenated-instrument techniques are treated, highlighting their sensitivity and selectivity for the analyses of environmental water samples.

  4. Endocrine function as a target of perinatal drug effects: methodologic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, C; Ignar, D; Windh, R

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to indicate potential endocrine targets of perinatal drug exposure, to describe the methodologic issues involved in detecting changes in hormone secretion, and to provide examples of several endocrine systems in which exposure to drugs during development significantly impaired normal endocrine development. Finally, we attempted to show that endocrine function is both a target and useful marker for detecting effects of drug of abuse on development that provides the advantages of accurate quantitation and relative response stability across ontogeny.

  5. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  6. Organizational and activational effects of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silbergeld Ellen K.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruption is a hypothesis of common mode of action that may define a set of structurally varied chemicals, both natural and synthetic. Their common mode of action may suggest that they produce or contribute to similar toxic effects, although this has been difficult to demonstrate. Insights from developmental biology suggest that development of hormone sensitive systems, such as the brain and the genitourinary tract, may be particularly sensitive to EDCs. Because these systems are both organized and later activated by hormones, the brain and vagina may be valuable model systems to study the toxicity of EDCs in females and to elucidate mechanisms whereby early exposures appear to affect long term function.

  7. Inverse Effects on Growth and Development Rates by Means of Endocrine Disruptors in African Clawed Frog Tadpoles ("Xenopus Laevis")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Zachary Carl

    2007-01-01

    Previous work on fish, frogs, and salamanders, showed the ability for estrogen (EE2) and anthropogenic endocrine disruptors to skew sex ratios and cause hermaphrodism. This study addressed the effects of estrogens on growth and development rates of African clawed frog tadpoles ("Xenopus laevis") during their gender determination stages. The…

  8. Biomonitoring of Human Exposure to Prestige Oil: Effects on DNA and Endocrine Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pérez-Cadahía

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1960, about 400 tankers spilled more than 377765 tons of oil, with the Prestige accident (Galician coast, NW Spain, November 2002 the most recent. Taking into account the consistent large number of individuals exposed to oil that exists all over the world, it seems surprising the absence in the literature of studies focused on the chronic effects of this exposure on human health. In this work we evaluated the level of DNA damage by means of comet assay, and the potential endocrine alterations (prolactin and cortisol caused by Prestige oil exposure in a population of 180 individuals, classified in 3 groups according to the tasks performed, and 60 controls. Heavy metals in blood were determined as exposure biomarkers, obtaining significant increases of aluminum, nickel and lead in the exposed groups as compared to controls. Higher levels of genetic damage and endocrine alterations were also observed in the exposed population. DNA damage levels were influenced by age, sex, and the use of protective clothes, and prolactin concentrations by the last two factors. Surprisingly, the use of mask did not seem to protect individuals from genetic or endocrine alterations. Moreover, polymorphisms in genes encoding for the main enzymes involved in the metabolism of oil components were analyzed as susceptibility biomarkers. CYP1A1-3’UTR and EPHX1 codons 113 and 139 variant alleles were related to higher damage levels, while lower DNA damage was observed in GSTM1 and GSTT1 null individuals.

  9. Biomonitoring of Human Exposure to Prestige Oil: Effects on DNA and Endocrine Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cadahía, Beatriz; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Lafuente, Anunciación; Cabaleiro, Teresa; Laffon, Blanca

    2008-01-01

    Since 1960, about 400 tankers spilled more than 377765 tons of oil, with the Prestige accident (Galician coast, NW Spain, November 2002) the most recent. Taking into account the consistent large number of individuals exposed to oil that exists all over the world, it seems surprising the absence in the literature of studies focused on the chronic effects of this exposure on human health. In this work we evaluated the level of DNA damage by means of comet assay, and the potential endocrine alterations (prolactin and cortisol) caused by Prestige oil exposure in a population of 180 individuals, classified in 3 groups according to the tasks performed, and 60 controls. Heavy metals in blood were determined as exposure biomarkers, obtaining significant increases of aluminum, nickel and lead in the exposed groups as compared to controls. Higher levels of genetic damage and endocrine alterations were also observed in the exposed population. DNA damage levels were influenced by age, sex, and the use of protective clothes, and prolactin concentrations by the last two factors. Surprisingly, the use of mask did not seem to protect individuals from genetic or endocrine alterations. Moreover, polymorphisms in genes encoding for the main enzymes involved in the metabolism of oil components were analyzed as susceptibility biomarkers. CYP1A1-3′UTR and EPHX1 codons 113 and 139 variant alleles were related to higher damage levels, while lower DNA damage was observed in GSTM1 and GSTT1 null individuals. PMID:21572833

  10. Endocrine disruptors and estrogenic effects on male reproductive axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suresh C. Sikka; Run Wang

    2008-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane [DDT], dioxin,and some pesticides) are estrogen-like and anti-androgenic chemicals in the environment. They mimic natural hormones,inhibit the action of hormones, or alter the normal regulatory function of the endocrine system and have potential hazardous effects on male reproductive axis causing infertility. Although testicular and prostate cancers, abnormal sexual development, undescended testis, chronic inflammation, Sertoli-cell-only pattern, hypospadias, altered pituitary and thyroid gland functions are also observed, the available data are insufficient to deduce worldwide conclusions.The development of intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is beyond doubt the most important recent breakthrough in the treatment of male infertility, but it does not necessarily treat the cause and may inadvertently pass on adverse genetic consequences. Many well-controlled clinical studies and basic scientific discoveries in the physiology,biochemistry, and molecular and cellular biology of the male reproductive system have helped in the identification of greater numbers of men with male factor problems. Newer tools for the detection of Y-chromosome deletions have further strengthened the hypothesis that the decline in male reproductive health and fertility may be related to the presence of certain toxic chemicals in the environment. Thus the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of male factor infertility remain a real challenge. Clinicians should always attempt to identify the etiology of a possible testicular toxicity, assess the degree of risk to the patient being evaluated for infertility, and initiate a plan to control and prevent exposure to others once an association between occupation/toxicant and infertility has been established.

  11. Effect of hydration on plasma volume and endocrine responses to water immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. H.; Keil, L. C.; Wade, C. A.; Silver, J. E.; Geelen, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of hydration status on early endocrine responses and on osmotic and intravascular volume changes during immersion was determined in humans undergoing successive periods of dehydration, immersion, rehydration, and immersion. Immersion caused an isotonic expansion of plasma volume, as well as suppression of plasma renin activity and aldosterone, which all occurred independently of hydration status. On the other hand, the concentration of plasma vasopressin (PVP) was found to decrease during dehydrated immersion, but not during rehydrated immersion. It is concluded that plasma tonicity is not a factor influencing PVP suppression during water immersion.

  12. Endocrine-disrupting effect of the ultraviolet filter benzophenone-3 in zebrafish, Danio rerio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnberg, Karin Lund; Petersen, Gitte I.; Albrektsen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    The chemical ultraviolet (UV) filter benzophenone-3 (BP-3) is suspected to be an endocrine disruptor based on results from in vitro and in vivo testing. However, studies including endpoints of endocrine adversity are lacking. The present study investigated the potential endocrine-disrupting effects...... not affect the vitellogenin concentration in TG 234. After 12 d exposure of adult male zebrafish, a slight but yet significant increase in the vitellogenin concentration was observed at 268 µg/L but not at 63 µg/L and 437 µg/l BP-3. Skewing of the sex ratio is a marker of an endocrine mediated mechanism...... as well as a marker of adversity and therefore the conclusion of the investigation is that BP-3 is an endocrine-disrupting chemical in accordance with the World Health Organization's definition....

  13. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-06-01

    This annual report summarizes the progress of three years of a three-year grant awarded to the Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) at Tulane and Xavier Universities. The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major areas of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects; and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular focus in this study are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The focus of the literature research was to provide an analysis of the contaminants located on or around various Department of Energy (DOE) sites that are or have the potential to function as endocrine disruptors and to correlate the need for studying endocrine disruptors to DOE's programmatic needs. Previous research within the Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier Universities has focused on understanding the effects of environmental agents on the human and wildlife health and disease. In particular this research has focused on how exogenous agents can function to mimic or disrupt normal endocrine signaling, i.e. estrogen, thyroid within various systems from whole animal studies with fish, amphibians and insects to human cancer cell lines. Significant work has focused on the estrogenic and anti-estrogenic action of both synthetic organochlorine chemicals and naturally produced phytochemicals. Recent projects have extended these research objectives to examination of these environmental agents on the symbiotic relationship between

  14. Long-term and late treatment consequences: endocrine and metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Thang S; Gleeson, Helena K

    2017-09-01

    Cancer therapies often result in the 'late effect of cancer treatment' whereby secondary health complications emerge years after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review focuses on endocrine and metabolic consequences in adult cancer survivors as late treatment effects. Endocrine and metabolic disorders are among the most common late effects. Endocrine disorders include hypopituitarism, which leads to growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency and hypothyroidism and related clinical manifestations. Hypogonadism in particular is associated with a wide range of health complications requiring input from the like of endocrine and fertility specialists. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are novel anticancer agents, some of which are uniquely associated with hypophysitis which requires early recognition and management, including steroid replacement. Metabolic syndrome, a significant risk for cardiovascular disease, is highly prevalent. Although the effects of cranial irradiation on the hypothalamic-pituitary system are more apparent, the relationship between chemotherapy and endocrine/metabolic disorders remains to be elucidated. There exist published guidelines for monitoring endocrine and cardiometabolic risk in cancer survivors, but the extent of monitoring appears insufficient. Regular monitoring and early management of endocrine/metabolic disorders is required to prevent the elevated rates of health complications after cancer treatment, and thereby improve cancer survivorship.

  15. Endocrine Disruptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ediz Yeşilkaya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors are of special interest because they mimic, block, or in some way alter the activity of endogenous chemicals that are synthesized by the endocrine system. Besides many other organs, they especially affect the urinary system and the thyroid glands. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals are typically identified as compounds that can interact with oestrogen or androgen receptors and thus act as agonists or antagonists of endogenous hormones. During the last decade, numerous studies have been published, reporting an increase in reproductive organ anomalies, as well as in testicular cancer, and a decline in the relative number of male births, and in semen quality. In this review, the effects of endocrine distruptors on the reproductive health are discussed in the light of the recent literature. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2008; 6: 76-82

  16. Determination of endocrine disrupting compounds using temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography: I. Optimization of separation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Włodarczyk, Elzbieta; Baran, Michał J

    2009-10-30

    In the present work we optimised the separation of battery of key UV non-transparent low-molecular-mass compounds having possible endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) activity or which may be used as the endocrine effect biomarkers. Simple optimization strategy was based on strong temperature effect that is driven by electrostatic interactions between macrocyclic mobile phase additives like cyclodextrins and eluted components of interest under C18 stationary phase and acetonitrile/water mobile phase conditions. Particularly, the effect of temperature involving native beta-cyclodextrin and its hydroxypropyl derivative to improve separation of number of natural (d-equilenin, equilin, estetrol, estriol, estrone, 17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, 20alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, cortisol, cortisone, progesterone, testosterone, tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone) and artificial steroids (ethynylestradiol, norgestrel isomers, medroxyprogesterone, mestranol, methyltestosterone, norethindrone, 17alpha-estradiol) as well as non-steroidal compounds (diethylstilbesterol, bisphenol A, 4-tert-butylphenol, dimethyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate and dioctyl phthalate) was investigated. It has been found that successful isocratic separation of 27 chemicals can be achieved using acetonitrile/water eluents modified with beta-cyclodextrin or hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin at concentration of 10 mM and temperature of 47 degrees C. Separation protocol is simple, reliable, direct and non-radioactive and may be easily adapted for rapid separation and quantification of wide range of given steroids and related EDCs in environmental samples, particularly those that are characterised by unstable biological matrix and components of interest load.

  17. Effects of endocrine disruption during pregnancy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Llopis-Gonzalez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors are ubiquitous natural and synthetic environmental pollutants that can mimic, block or disturb normal hormonal function. Environmental exposure to these pollutants is almost impossible to prevent due to their presence in the air, water, soil, food and in many other materials with which we come in contact daily, such as plastics. Foetuses are vulnerable during pregnancy because their organism is in a developmental stage, and any disruption may affect their health in the short and/or long term. There is some evidence that these substances disrupt tissue differentiation and growth processes, cause birth defects and affect the length of pregnancy. In this review we will focus on environmental epidemiology and related literature in order to update current knowledge based on the actual evidence of the effects of these substances on the aetiology of preterm delivery, miscarriages, low birth weight, malformations, cryptorchidism, hypospadias and micropenis. The difficulty in studying this topic is due to the high number of involved factors, which makes the available results inconclusive or even contradictory. Consequently, further research is necessary.

  18. Suggesting a testing strategy for possible endocrine effects of drug metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, N W; Brooks, B W; Halling-Sørensen, B

    2012-04-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are extensively metabolized by organisms, which results in internal exposure to mixtures of parent compounds and various metabolites. Many of these metabolites are considered non-toxic, but some metabolites retain toxic properties of the parent compound or elicit other undesirable outcomes. Unfortunately, the effects of metabolites are often not considered when endocrine activities of chemicals are evaluated in vitro. In this study two approaches, an "effect-based" and a "compound-by-compound" testing design, were used to determine the effects of metabolites of the antidepressant sertraline on aromatase enzyme activity. In the "effect-based" approach, a mixture of sertraline metabolites, produced by liver microsomes, inhibited aromatase, but was less potent than sertraline. In the "compound-by-compound" testing design, three specific metabolites were evaluated individually and in mixtures. Though two N-desmethylated metabolites were more potent aromatase inhibitors than sertraline, hydroxyl ketone sertraline did not inhibit the enzyme and mixtures of these metabolites and sertraline were less potent than predicted from a concentration addition model. Our findings highlight the importance of considering aromatase inhibition, and potentially other biological activities, of pharmaceutical metabolites produced by liver microsome preparations and then comparing such observations to studies of specific metabolites available for testing in pure form. Subsequently, a five step integrated strategy for screening of the potential endocrine effects of drugs and their metabolites are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Early and late endocrine effects in pediatric central nervous system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Ivy R; Cheung, Clement C

    2014-01-01

    Endocrinopathies are frequently linked to central nervous system disease, both as early effects prior to the disease diagnosis and/or late effects after the disease has been treated. In particular, tumors and infiltrative diseases of the brain and pituitary, such as craniopharyngioma, optic pathway and hypothalamic gliomas, intracranial germ cell tumor, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis, can present with abnormal endocrine manifestations that precede the development of neurological symptoms. Early endocrine effects include diabetes insipidus, growth failure, obesity, and precocious or delayed puberty. With improving prognosis and treatment of childhood brain tumors, many survivors experience late endocrine effects related to medical and surgical interventions. Chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary axes governing growth, thyroid, gonadal, and adrenal function. In addition, obesity and metabolic alterations are frequent late manifestations. Diagnosing and treating both early and late endocrine manifestations can dramatically improve the growth, well-being, and quality of life of patients with childhood central nervous system diseases.

  20. Multiple endocrine disrupting effects in rats perinatally exposed to butylparaben

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Parabens comprise a group of preservatives commonly added to cosmetics, lotions and other consumer products. Butylparaben has estrogenic and anti-androgenic properties and is known to reduce sperm counts in rats following perinatal exposure. Whether butylparaben exposure can affect other endocrine...

  1. Two Virus Based Endocrine Disruptor Assays Effective Across Vertebrate Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of hormone mimics, or endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC’s), in the environment are increasing. Sources range from agricultural run–off, pharmaceuticals in waste water, to industrial operations. Current levels of contamination are sufficient to alter sexual develo...

  2. Multiple endocrine disrupting effects in rats perinatally exposed to butylparaben

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Parabens comprise a group of preservatives commonly added to cosmetics, lotions and other consumer products. Butylparaben has estrogenic and anti-androgenic properties and is known to reduce sperm counts in rats following perinatal exposure. Whether butylparaben exposure can affect other endocrine...

  3. Two Virus Based Endocrine Disruptor Assays Effective Across Vertebrate Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of hormone mimics, or endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC’s), in the environment are increasing. Sources range from agricultural run–off, pharmaceuticals in waste water, to industrial operations. Current levels of contamination are sufficient to alter sexual develo...

  4. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    of effective concentrations (ECx). After having demonstrated that larval development of A. tonsa was a very sensitive endpoint for evaluating effects of chemicals that might interfere with the endocrine system of crustaceans, the larval development test has been applied to two groups of emerging environmental...... of in vitro assays and (sub)chronic copepod tests, as applied in this study, is a valuable tool when screening chemicals suspected to be specifically toxic, in particular, to interfere with the endocrine system. The results of the experimental work as well as the literature survey demonstrated clearly......New and updated test methods to detect and characterise endocrine disrupting chemicals are urgently needed for the purpose of environmental risk assessment. Although endocrine disruption in invertebrates has not been studied as extensive as in vertebrates, in particular in fish, numerous reports...

  5. Effects of sedation during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy on endocrine response and cardiorespiratory function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yetkin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is often accompanied by tachycardia which is known to be an important pathogenic factor in the development of myocardial ischemia. The pathogenesis of tachycardia is unknown but the condition is thought to be due to the endocrine response to endoscopy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of sedation on the endocrine response and cardiorespiratory function. Forty patients scheduled for diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were randomized into 2 groups. While the patients in the first group did not receive sedation during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the patients in the second group were sedated with intravenous midazolam at the dose of 5 mg for those under 65 years or 2.5 mg for those aged 65 years or more. Midazolam was administered by slow infusion. In both groups, blood pressure, ECG tracing, heart rate, and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 were monitored during endoscopy. In addition, blood samples for the determination of cortisol, glucose and C-reactive protein levels were obtained from patients in both groups prior to and following endoscopy. Heart rate and systolic arterial pressure changes were within normal limits in both groups. Comparison of the two groups regarding the values of these two parameters did not reveal a significant difference, while a statistically significant reduction in SpO2 was found in the sedation group. No significant differences in serum cortisol, glucose or C-reactive protein levels were observed between the sedated and non-sedated group. Sedation with midazolam did not reduce the endocrine response and the tachycardia developing during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, but increased the reduction in SpO2.

  6. Cognitive effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in animals.

    OpenAIRE

    Schantz, S L; Widholm, J J

    2001-01-01

    A large number of chemical pollutants including phthalates, alkylphenolic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, organochlorine pesticides, bisphenol A, and metals including lead, mercury, and cadmium have the ability to disrupt endocrine function in animals. Some of these same chemicals have been shown to alter cognitive function in animals and humans. Because hormonally mediated events play a central role in central nervous system development and function, ...

  7. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-09-14

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites.

  8. Reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects of triclosan: Population exposure, present evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Feng; Tian, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Triclosan has been used as a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for over 40 years worldwide. Increasing reports indicate frequent detection and broad exposure to triclosan in the natural environment and the human body. Current laboratory studies in various species provide strong evidence for its disrupting effects on the endocrine system, especially reproductive hormones. Multiple modes of action have been suggested, including disrupting hormone metabolism, displacing hormones from hormone receptors and disrupting steroidogenic enzyme activity. Although epidemiological studies on its effects in humans are mostly negative but conflicting, which is typical of much of the early evidence on the toxicity of EDCs, overall, the evidence suggests that triclosan is an EDC. This article reviews human exposure to triclosan, describes the current evidence regarding its reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects, and discusses potential mechanisms to provide insights for further study on its endocrine-disrupting effects in humans.

  9. Metabolic Effects of Obesity and Its Interaction with Endocrine Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melissa; Hoenig, Margarethe

    2016-09-01

    Obesity in pet dogs and cats is a significant problem in developed countries, and seems to be increasing in prevalence. Excess body fat has adverse metabolic consequences, including insulin resistance, altered adipokine secretion, changes in metabolic rate, abnormal lipid metabolism, and fat accumulation in visceral organs. Obese cats are predisposed to endocrine and metabolic disorders such as diabetes and hepatic lipidosis. A connection likely also exists between obesity and diabetes mellitus in dogs. No system has been developed to identify obese pets at greatest risk for development of obesity-associated metabolic diseases, and further study in this area is needed.

  10. Effects of preoperative ketamine on the endocrine-metabolic and inflammatory response to laparoscopic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jin; HUANG Yu-guang; YU Xue-rong; ZHAO Na

    2011-01-01

    Background Ketamine is hypothesized to reduce perioperative endocrine-metabolic and inflammatory responses in cardiac surgery patients.This randomized,placebo-controlled,double-blind study was performed to determine whether perioperative endocrine-metabolic and inflammatory responses are attenuated by preoperative administration of ketamine to healthy females receiving elective laparoscopic surgery.Methods Forty female patients with American Society of Anesthesiologist classification Ⅰ or Ⅱ who elected to receive gynecological laparoscopic surgery were randomly assigned to the ketamine-treated (group K; n = 20) or control (group C;n = 20) group.At 2 minutes prior to induction patients in group K received ketamine (0.25 mg/kg) whereas those in group C received normal saline.All patients received standardized general anesthesia.Serum glucose and cortisol values were measured before ketamine administration (TO),2 minutes after tracheal intubation (T1),30 minutes after skin incision (T2),2 minutes after tracheal extubation (T3) and 1 hour postoperatively (T4).Serum interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α values were determined at TO and T4.Postoperative analgesic efficacy,side effects of administered drugs,and time to discharge were recorded.Results Compared with subjects in group C,those in group K had lower serum glucose values at T1,T2,T3 and T4 and lower serum cortisol values at T4 (P <0.05).Postoperative interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α concentrations for group K were lower than those for group C (P <0.05).Postoperative visual analog scale scores at rest,cumulative fentanyl consumption,and time to discharge were lower in group K as compared to group C (P <0.05).No significant differences in drug side effects were observed postoperatively between the two groups.Conclusion Endocrine-metabolic and inflammatory responses to laparoscopic surgery are attenuated in part by pre-incisional administration of ketamine.

  11. Scientific Opinion on the hazard assessment of endocrine disruptors: Scientific criteria for identification of endocrine disruptors and appropriateness of existing test methods for assessing effects mediated by these substances on human health and the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Scientific Committee (SC

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Upon request of the European Commission, the Scientific Committee (SC of the European Food Safety Authority reviewed existing information related to the testing and assessment of endocrine active substances (EASs and endocrine disruptors (EDs. This work was conducted by a working group of experts in endocrinology, risk assessment and toxicology, together with observers from other EU agencies, namely EMA, ECHA and EEA. To distinguish between EDs and other groups of substances with different modes of action, it was concluded that an ED is defined by three criteria: the presence of i an adverse effect in an intact organism or a (subpopulation; ii an endocrine activity; and iii a plausible causal relationship between the two. As scientific criteria for adversity have not been generally defined, specific criteria for endocrine disrupting effects could not be identified. Hence, expert judgement is required to assess on a case-by-case basis the (ecotoxicological relevance of changes at the molecular to individual and/or (subpopulation level following exposure to an EAS. The SC concluded that a reasonably complete suite of standardised assays for testing the effects of EASs is (or will soon be available for the oestrogenic, androgenic, thyroid and steroidogenic modalities in mammals and fish, with fewer tests for birds and amphibians. Shortcomings in current tests and for other endocrine modalities and species were reviewed. Critical effect, severity, (irreversibility and potency aspects are part of the hazard characterisation of EDs. To inform on risk and level of concern for the purpose of risk management decisions, risk assessment (taking into account hazard and exposure data/predictions makes best use of available information. Levels of concern are not determined exclusively by risk assessment but also by protection goals set by the risk management.

  12. Endocrine Disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust the font size, or print this page. Endocrine Disruptors Table of Contents Health Studies & Clinical Trials What ... Disruptors General Information For Educators Related Topics Introduction Endocrine Disruptors Introduction Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that may interfere ...

  13. Pathophysiology of the Effects of Alcohol Abuse on the Endocrine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol can permeate virtually every organ and tissue in the body, resulting in tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Considerable evidence indicates that alcohol abuse results in clinical abnormalities of one of the body’s most important systems, the endocrine system. This system ensures proper communication between various organs, also interfacing with the immune and nervous systems, and is essential for maintaining a constant internal environment. The endocrine system includes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis, the hypothalamic–pituitary–growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis, and the hypothalamic–posterior pituitary axis, as well as other sources of hormones, such as the endocrine pancreas and endocrine adipose tissue. Alcohol abuse disrupts all of these systems and causes hormonal disturbances that may result in various disorders, such as stress intolerance, reproductive dysfunction, thyroid problems, immune abnormalities, and psychological and behavioral disorders. Studies in both humans and animal models have helped shed light on alcohol’s effects on various components of the endocrine system and their consequences.

  14. Cognitive effects of endocrine therapy for breast cancer : keep calm and carry on?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Wilbert; Terra, Huub; Linn, Sabine C.; Schagen, Sanne B.

    2015-01-01

    The number of breast cancer survivors is gradually increasing and a subset of these patients experience long-term adverse effects of adjuvant systemic therapy, including cognitive decline. Surprisingly, relatively little is known about the long-term adverse effects of endocrine treatment on cognitio

  15. Effects of two endocrine disruptors Prochloraz and Ethinylestradiol on development of Rana Temporaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Korsgaard, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    on the effect of endocrine disruptors on the sexsteroid axis and reproductive function. However, another hormone system, the thyroid hormone axis may equally well be affected by xenobiotics. Thyroid hormones are essential in stimulating all aspects of amphibian metamorphosis and thyroid hormone disruptors may...... of phenotypic males. Moreover, ethinylestradiol caused estrogen-dependent induction of the egg yolk precursor protein vitellogenin. These results show that gonadal development and vitellogenin induction may be used as biomarkers for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Most studies have focused...

  16. β-blockers as endocrine disruptors: the potential effects of human β-blockers on aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarsky, Andrey; Trudeau, Vance L; Moon, Thomas W

    2011-06-01

    β-Adrenergic blockers or β-blockers have been used therapeutically to treat human hypertension since the late 1960s. The global market value and prescription rates of β-blockers keep rising substantially each year, and over the past decade the number of prescriptions has doubled. The widespread use of β-blockers has resulted in their appearance in the aquatic environment originating primarily from sewage effluents. The objective of this review is to analyze the literature as a means to determine the endocrine-disrupting potential of β-blockers in aquatic organisms. The mammalian adrenergic system is compared with the adrenergic system of fish and the homologous octopaminergic system in aquatic invertebrates, in particular mollusks. The structure and functions of these systems are linked to the molecular similarities between adrenoceptors and the octopaminergic/tyraminergic receptors, the various catecholamine molecules (epinephrine, norepinephrine, octopamine, and tyramine), and the processes controlled. Knowledge of these similarities as well as the effects of β-blockers, mainly in humans, is then used to create a broad picture of the endocrine-disrupting potential of β-blockers, particularly during the stress response. The main conclusion is that β-blockers have endocrine-disrupting effects.

  17. Prevalence and determinants of adherence to oral adjuvant endocrine therapy among breast cancer patients in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskinder Eshetu Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The success of oral adjuvant endocrine therapy (OAET is greatly influenced by patients' level of adherence to treatment. The objective of this study is to measure the prevalence and determinants of adherence to OAET among breast cancer patients in Singapore. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of patients supplemented by analysis of their prescription records was used to collect data. Adherence to OAET was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items and evaluation of refill gaps. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done to evaluate the association between patients' characteristics and adherence to OAET. Results: A total of 157 women who have started OAET at least 6 months before the time of interview participated in the study, of which less than half (64 patients, 40.8% of the patients had high adherence. Univariate analysis identified patients who were 57 years or older (P = 0.027, unemployed (P = 0.027, on aromatase inhibitors (P = 0.023, on three or more concurrent medications (P = 0.001, and had one or more comorbidities (P = 0.000 to be significantly more adherent. However, only the number of comorbidities was found to be an independent predictor of adherence in a multiple logistic regression analysis (adjusted odds ratio = 2.60; 95% confidence interval = 1.208–5.593; P = 0.015. Forgetfulness was the main reason for nonadherence mentioned by 63 (67.7% of the 93 nonadherent patients. Conclusions: Low level of OAET adherence was found in this study, and forgetfulness was cited as the main reason for nonadherence. Patients were generally receptive to the implementation of various strategies to assist them with their medication-taking behavior

  18. Development of a fish test to determine endocrine effects in surface waters. Pt. 3: application of the fish test to monitoring surface waters by an environmental agency. Final report; Entwicklung eines Fischtests zur Erfassung von Stoffen mit endokrinen Wirkungen in Oberflaechengewaessern. Teilprojekt 3: Der neue Fischtest in der Gewaesserueberwachung durch eine Landesbehoerde. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allner, B.; Schaat, A.; Theimer, S.; Stahlschmidt-Allner, P.

    1999-07-01

    The aim of the presented study was to establish a method to detect estrogen-induced effects in the aquatic environment, basing on the determination of yolk-proteins in the blood of male or juvenile fish by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The method is suitable for the use in routine testing of sewage treatment works (STW) effluents as well as monitoring of free living fish. Effects of 1 ng/L etylestradiol or 100 ng/L estradiol are reliably detectable. In surface waters no estrogen-induced effects could be found, whereas effluents of some industrial STWs showed a weak estrogenic effect. Histology of normal gonadal development of the test fish is compared to the situation after exposure to endocrine disrupters and to the gonadal development of roach caught in the wild. A method to detect effects on the gonadotropin mediated control of reproduction was tested within a monitoring programme. At certain locations a high degree of juvenile male perch showed gonadal hypertrophy (pubertas praecox). It could be shown by chemical analysis that the effects on perch were highly correlated with the tributyl tin (TBT) burden of the sediment from the respective location. Exposing small fish species to TBT in single compound studies confirmed the finding that TBT may act as an endocrine disrupter on vertebrates. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Studie wurde ein Verfahren zum Nachweis oestrogener Effekte in der aquatischen Umwelt etabliert. Die Methode basiert auf der Identifikation von Dotterproteinen im Blut maennlicher oder juveniler Fische mittels Gelelektrophorese und ist sowohl zum Einsatz in Monitoringprogrammen freilebender Fische als auch fuer die Routine der Abwasseruntersuchung nach DIN geeignet. Effekte von 1 ng/L Ethinyloestradiol und 100 ng/L Oestradiol sind sicher nachweisbar. Oestrogene Effekte von Oberflaechengewaessern wurden nicht gefunden, im Ablauf einzelner Industrieklaeranlagen war ein geringer oestrogener Effekt nachweisbar. Der Bericht enthaelt eine

  19. Late-life effects on rat reproductive system after developmental exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isling, Louise Krag; Boberg, Julie; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold

    2014-01-01

    This study examined late-life effects of perinatal exposure of rats to a mixture of endocrine-disrupting contaminants. Four groups of 14 time-mated Wistar rats were exposed by gavage from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 to a mixture of 13 anti-androgenic and estrogenic chemicals including phthalate...... of pituitary tumors. These delayed effects highlight the need for further studies on the role of endocrine disrupters in hormone-related disorders in aging humans.......This study examined late-life effects of perinatal exposure of rats to a mixture of endocrine-disrupting contaminants. Four groups of 14 time-mated Wistar rats were exposed by gavage from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 to a mixture of 13 anti-androgenic and estrogenic chemicals including phthalates...... group. Developmental exposure of rats to the highest dose of a human-relevant mixture of endocrine disrupters induced adverse effects late in life, manifested as earlier female reproductive senescence, reduced sperm counts, higher score for prostate atypical hyperplasia, and higher incidence...

  20. Endocrine disrupting effects on Chinese rare minnow(Gobiocypris rarus) fed with field collected Limnodrilus sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Tao-wu; WANG Zi-jian; LIU Jian-kang

    2004-01-01

    The potential endocrine disrupting effects and other toxicity effects on aquatic biota resulted from food uptake was simulated by feeding the laboratory cultured rare minnow(Gobiocypris rarus) with field collected Limnodrilus sp. The results indicated that the food chain processes affected significantly the growth, slightly reduced gonadosomatic indices, and elevated hepatosomatic indices. There was an obvious vitellogenin(VTG) induction, which generally only occurred in mature female, in the serum of juvenile rare minnow and mature male when fed with Limnodrilus sp. In addition, the rare minnow feeding on Limnodrilus sp. had significantly high renal indices, it meant obvious renal hyperplasia. The present work suggested that Limnodrilus sp. from field water may contain toxic pollutants and could lead to endocrine disruption effects to the predators. It was concluded that endocrine disruptors may not only be assimilated through water, but also be bioconcentrated through food web. The results also suggested the importance of food selection in conducting the study of endocrine disruption effects using sensitive species.

  1. Effect of reserpine on development and its neuro-endocrine regulation in Galleria mellonella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cymborowski, B.; Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin

    1975-01-01

    1. Studies were made on the effect of reserpine on development and its neuro-endocrine regulation in Galleria mellonella. It was shown that resperine greatly restricts the development of this insect. 2. Reserpine causes inhibition of the activity of the neurosecretory cells of pars intercerebralis...

  2. Informing women with breast cancer about endocrine therapy: effects on knowledge and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisig, Sarah R; Shedden-Mora, Meike C; von Blanckenburg, Pia; Schuricht, Franziska; Rief, Winfried; Albert, Ute-Susann; Nestoriuc, Yvonne

    2015-02-01

    Adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer is low, and patients are not informed sufficiently. This study analyzes the effects of a structured treatment information on patients' satisfaction, knowledge, and adherence. An interventional single cohort study of postoperative women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer was conducted to study the effects of enhanced information about endocrine therapy given additionally to clinical routine information. Knowledge and satisfaction with additional information given 1-3 weeks after surgery were assessed before and after informing patients; adherence and knowledge were measured 3 months after start of treatment. A total of 137 patients were analyzed before and after provision of enhanced treatment information as well as 3 months after start of endocrine therapy. Enhanced information increased satisfaction with information and knowledge. The percentage of patients who knew their estrogen receptor status increased from 50% to 93%. At 3 months follow-up, 60% still had correct knowledge. Patients who learned their receptor status were older, and those who forgot had lower cognitive abilities and lower educational level. Patients with higher satisfaction, better learning, and comprehension directly after enhanced information showed better adherence at 3 months follow-up. Patients, especially older ones, can benefit from enhanced treatment information given additionally to routine care. Enhanced information about mode of action and potential side effects of endocrine therapy when included into clinical routine might foster patient autonomy and prevent early disruptions in adherence. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. VEGF-targeted cancer therapeutics-paradoxical effects in endocrine organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yihai

    2014-09-01

    Systemic administration of antiangiogenic drugs that target components of the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A; VEGF) signal transduction pathway has become a viable therapeutic option for patients with various types of cancer. Nevertheless, these drugs can drive alterations in healthy vasculatures, which in turn are associated with adverse effects in healthy tissues. VEGF is crucial for vascular homeostasis and the maintenance of vascular integrity and architecture in endocrine organs. Given these critical physiological functions, systemic delivery of drugs that target VEGF signalling can block VEGF-mediated vascular functions in endocrine organs, such as the thyroid gland, and lead to endocrine dysfunction, including hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and altered insulin sensitivity. This Review discusses emerging evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that contributes to understanding the mechanisms that underlie the vascular changes and subsequent modulations of endocrine function that are induced by targeted inhibition of VEGF signalling. Understanding these mechanisms is crucial for the design of antiangiogenic drugs with minimal associated adverse effects that will enable effective treatment of patients with cancer.

  4. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted...

  5. Effects of endocrine disrupters on the expression of growth hormone and prolactin mRNA in the rainbow trout pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is now widely accepted that chemical pollutants in the environment can interfere with the endocrine system of animals, thus affecting development and reproduction. Some of these endocrine disrupters (EDs) can have estrogenic or antiestrogenic effects. Most studies to date have focused on the ef...

  6. Endocrine potency of wastewater: Contents of endocrine disrupting chemicals and effects measured by in vivo and in vitro assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Krüger, Tanja; Long, Manhai

    2011-01-01

    properties: phthalate metabolites, parabens, industrial phenols, ultraviolet screens, and natural and synthetic steroid estrogens. The endocrine disrupting bioactivity and toxicity of the extracts were analyzed in cell culture assay for the potency to affect the function of the estrogen, androgen, aryl...

  7. The Effects of Endocrine Disruptors on Adipogenesis and Osteogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Marjorie E.; Strong, Amy L.; McLachlan, John A.; Burow, Matthew E.; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are prevalent in the environment, and epidemiologic studies have suggested that human exposure is linked to chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. In vitro experiments have further demonstrated that EDCs promote changes in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), leading to increases in adipogenic differentiation, decreases in osteogenic differentiation, activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, increases in oxidative stress, and epigenetic changes. Studies have also shown alteration in trophic factor production, differentiation ability, and immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs, which have significant implications to the current studies exploring MSCs for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications and the treatment of inflammatory conditions. Thus, the consideration of the effects of EDCs on MSCs is vital when determining potential therapeutic uses of MSCs, as increased exposure to EDCs may cause MSCs to be less effective therapeutically. This review focuses on the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation effects of EDCs as these are most relevant to the therapeutic uses of MSCs in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and inflammatory conditions. This review will highlight the effects of EDCs, including organophosphates, plasticizers, industrial surfactants, coolants, and lubricants, on MSC biology. PMID:28119665

  8. Effects of endocrine disruptors in the development of the female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elaine Maria Frade; Spritzer, Poli Mara; Hohl, Alexandre; Bachega, Tânia A S S

    2014-03-01

    Environmental agencies have identified a growing number of environmental contaminants that have endocrine disrupting activity, and these can become a major public health problem. It is suggested that endocrine disruptors could account for the higher-than-expected increase in the prevalence of some non-communicable diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, thyroid diseases, and some cancers. Several endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs), such as pesticides, bisphenol A, phthalates, dioxins, and phytoestrogens, can interact with the female reproductive system and lead to endocrine disruption. Initially, it was assumed that EDCs exert their effects by binding to hormone receptors and transcription factors, but it is currently known that they may also alter the expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis or catabolism of steroids. Biomonitoring studies have identified these compounds in adults, children, pregnant women, and fetuses. Among the diseases of the female reproductive tract associated with EDCs exposure are the following: precocious puberty, polycystic ovary syndrome, and premature ovarian failure. The different populations of the world are exposed to a great number of chemicals through different routes of infection; despite the various available studies, there is still much doubt regarding the additive effect of a mixture of EDCs with similar mechanisms of action.

  9. Environmental epigenomics: Current approaches to assess epigenetic effects of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC's) on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Orozco, Natalia; Santiago-Toledo, Gerardo; Barrón, Valeria; Espinosa-García, Ana María; García-García, José Antonio; García-Arrazola, Roeb

    2017-04-01

    Environmental Epigenomics is a developing field to study the epigenetic effect on human health from exposure to environmental factors. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been detected primarily in pharmaceutical drugs, personal care products, food additives, and food containers. Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been associated with a high incidence and prevalence of many endocrine-related disorders in humans. Nevertheless, further evidence is needed to establish a correlation between exposure to EDC and human disorders. Conventional detection of EDCs is based on chemical structure and concentration sample analysis. However, substantial evidence has emerged, suggesting that cell exposure to EDCs leads to epigenetic changes, independently of its chemical structure with non-monotonic low-dose responses. Consequently, a paradigm shift in toxicology assessment of EDCs is proposed based on a comprehensive review of analytical techniques used to evaluate the epigenetic effects. Fundamental insights reported elsewhere are compared in order to establish DNA methylation analysis as a viable method for assessing endocrine disruptors beyond the conventional study approach of chemical structure and concentration analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Endocrine determinants of incident sarcopenia in middle-aged and elderly European men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Evelien; O'Neill, Terence W; Pye, Stephen R; Adams, Judith E; Wu, Frederick C; Laurent, Michaël R; Claessens, Frank; Ward, Kate A; Boonen, Steven; Bouillon, Roger; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Verschueren, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background In men, the long-term consequences of low serum levels of sex steroids, vitamin D metabolites, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on the evolution of muscle mass, muscle strength, or physical performance are unclear. Moreover, there are no data about the relationship between these hormones and incident sarcopenia defined as low muscle mass and function. The aim of this study was to determine whether the baseline levels of sex hormones, vitamin D metabolites, and IGF-1 predict changes in muscle mass, muscle strength, physical performance, and incident sarcopenia. Methods In 518 men aged 40–79 years, recruited for participation in the European Male Ageing Study, total, free, and bioavailable testosterone (T), oestradiol (E), sex hormone-binding globulin, IGF-1, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), and parathyroid hormone were assessed at baseline. Appendicular lean mass (aLM), gait speed, and grip strength were measured at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 4.3 years. Sarcopenia was defined by the definition of Baumgartner (relative aLM ≤7.26 kg/m2), the International Working Group on Sarcopenia (IWGS), and the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). Results aLM significantly decreased from age 50 years, while gait speed and grip strength significantly decreased from age 70 years. The incidence of sarcopenia by the definitions of Baumgartner, IWGS, and EWGSOP was 8.1%, 3.0%, and 1.6%, respectively. After adjustment for age, centre, body mass index, smoking, and number of comorbidities at baseline, baseline levels of T and vitamin D metabolites were not associated with change in aLM, gait speed, and/or grip strength, while a high baseline level of total E2 was associated with a greater decrease in aLM. In men aged ≥70 years, low IGF-1 was associated with a greater decrease in gait speed. Baseline endocrine variables were not independently associated with an increased risk of incident

  11. [The crisis of the hormonal system: the health-effects of endocrine disruptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2017-09-01

    The endocrine disruptors are natural or arteficial molecules wich are present in the animal (human) environment and entering into the organism. They are bound by hormone receptors, simulating or inhibiting the normal hormonal message. This way they are able to stimulate or hinder the function of the given cell, as well as the synthesis and transport of hormones or receptors. They can cause faulty hormonal imprinting in critical periods of development with lifelong consequences, as alteration of hormone-influenced cell functions, inclination to or manifestation of diseases, so they have medical importance. The number of endocrine disruptors as well as their amount are large and continously growing. Numerous, in adult age manifested disease (e.g. malignant tumors) can be deduced to perinatal harms. Their long-lasting effect can cause the alteration of basal human developmental characteristics (e.g. start of menarche). Vitamins A and D are hormones (exohormones) and could be endocrine disruptors. Perinatal imprinting caused by endocrine disruptors is transmitted to the progenies epigenetically, which also can influence the drug-sensitivity of offspring' receptors. If the epigenetic change is continuously transmitted to the progeny generations, this could have human-evolutionary importance. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(37): 1443-1451.

  12. Are in vitro methods for the detection of endocrine potentials in the aquatic environment predictive for in vivo effects? Outcomes of the Projects SchussenAktiv and SchussenAktivplus in the Lake Constance Area, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Henneberg

    Full Text Available Many studies about endocrine pollution in the aquatic environment reveal changes in the reproduction system of biota. We analysed endocrine activities in two rivers in Southern Germany using three approaches: (1 chemical analyses, (2 in vitro bioassays, and (3 in vivo investigations in fish and snails. Chemical analyses were based on gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. For in vitro analyses of endocrine potentials in water, sediment, and waste water samples, we used the E-screen assay (human breast cancer cells MCF-7 and reporter gene assays (human cell line HeLa-9903 and MDA-kb2. In addition, we performed reproduction tests with the freshwater mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to analyse water and sediment samples. We exposed juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario to water downstream of a wastewater outfall (Schussen River or to water from a reference site (Argen River to investigate the vitellogenin production. Furthermore, two feral fish species, chub (Leuciscus cephalus and spirlin (Alburnoides bipunctatus, were caught in both rivers to determine their gonadal maturity and the gonadosomatic index. Chemical analyses provided only little information about endocrine active substances, whereas the in vitro assays revealed endocrine potentials in most of the samples. In addition to endocrine potentials, we also observed toxic potentials (E-screen/reproduction test in waste water samples, which could interfere with and camouflage endocrine effects. The results of our in vivo tests were mostly in line with the results of the in vitro assays and revealed a consistent reproduction-disrupting (reproduction tests and an occasional endocrine action (vitellogenin levels in both investigated rivers, with more pronounced effects for the Schussen river (e.g. a lower gonadosomatic index. We were able to show that biological in vitro assays for endocrine potentials in natural stream water reasonably reflect reproduction and endocrine

  13. Adiponectin action: a combination of endocrine and autocrine/paracrine effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eSweeney

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The widespread physiological actions of adiponectin have now been well characterized as clinical studies and work in animal models have established strong correlations between circulating adiponectin levels and various disease-related outcomes. Thus, conventional thinking attributes many of adiponectins beneficial effects to endocrine actions of adipose-derived adiponectin. However, it is now clear that several tissues can themselves produce adiponectin and there is growing evidence that locally produced adiponectin can mediate functionally important autocrine or paracrine effects. In this review article we discuss regulation of adiponectin production, its mechanism of action via receptor isoforms and signaling pathways and its principal physiological effects (ie. metabolic and cardiovascular. The role of endocrine actions of adiponectin and changes in local production of adiponectin or its receptors in whole body physiology is discussed.

  14. Effects of environmental endocrine disruptors and phytoestrogens on the kisspeptin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patisaul, Heather B

    2013-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones, most notably estradiol, play a pivotal role in the sex-specific organization and function of the kisspeptin system. Endocrine--disrupting compounds are anthropogenic or naturally occurring compounds that interact with steroid hormone signaling. Thus, these compounds have the potential to disrupt the sexually dimorphic ontogeny and function of kisspeptin signaling pathways, resulting in adverse effects on neuroendocrine physiology. This chapter reviews the small but growing body of evidence for endocrine disruption of the kisspeptin system by the exogenous estrogenic compounds bisphenol A, polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures, and the phytoestrogen genistein. Disruption is region, sex, and compound specific, and associated with shifts in the timing of pubertal onset, irregular estrous cycles, and altered sociosexual behavior. These effects highlight that disruption of kisspeptin signaling pathways could have wide ranging effects across multiple organ systems, and potentially underlies a suite of adverse human health trends including precocious female puberty, idiopathic infertility, and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Endocrine effects of the herbicide linuron on the American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughrue, K.M.; Brittingham, M.C.; French, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Certain contaminants alter normal physiological function, morphology, and behavior of exposed organisms through an endocrine mechanism. We evaluated how the herbicide linuron, an endocrine-active compound, affects physiological parameters and secondary sex characteristics of the American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis). When administered at relatively low doses (control, 1.0, 4.0, and 16.0 mu g linuron per gram of body mass per day), linuron delayed prealternate molt progression in a dose-dependent manner. At the high dose level, linuron exposure lowered hematocrit and female plasma thyroxine concentrations and increased body mass. Neither plasma testosterone concentrations nor the color of plumage or integument of birds in the treatment groups were different from those of the control group. Overall, the physiological effects that were measured suggested disruption of thyroid function. These results highlight the importance of continual monitoring of avian populations for potential effects of exposure to pesticides and other chemicals at sublethal concentrations.

  16. Endocrine effects of the herbicide linuron on the American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughrue, K.M.; Brittingham, M.C.; French, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Certain contaminants alter normal physiological function, morphology, and behavior of exposed organisms through an endocrine mechanism. We evaluated how the herbicide linuron, an endocrine-active compound, affects physiological parameters and secondary sex characteristics of the American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis). When administered at relatively low doses (control, 1.0, 4.0, and 16.0 μg linuron per gram of body mass per day), linuron delayed prealternate molt progression in a dose-dependent manner. At the high dose level, linuron exposure lowered hematocrit and female plasma thyroxine concentrations and increased body mass. Neither plasma testosterone concentrations nor the color of plumage or integument of birds in the treatment groups were different from those of the control group. Overall, the physiological effects that were measured suggested disruption of thyroid function. These results highlight the importance of continual monitoring of avian populations for potential effects of exposure to pesticides and other chemicals at sublethal concentrations.

  17. Endocrine disrupting effects in rats perinatally exposed to a dietary relevant mixture of phytoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Julie; Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Isling, Louise Krag; Hadrup, Niels; Berthelsen, Line; Elleby, Anders; Kiersgaard, Maria; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hass, Ulla; Nellemann, Christine

    2013-09-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens may prevent certain human diseases, but endocrine activity has been reported in animal studies. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed perinatally to a 1-, 10- or 100-fold "high human dietary intake" mixture of 12 phytoestrogens consisting of mainly the lignan secoisolarici resinol and the isoflavones genistein and daidzein. This mixture induced persistent adverse effects, as adult male mammary glands showed hypertrophic growth. A reduced anogenital distance in newborn males indicated an anti-androgenic mode of action. Testosterone levels, testis and prostate weights, and expression of selected genes in testis and prostate were unaffected. Decreased serum estradiol was seen in genistein-exposed dams. This study indicated adverse effects at high intake levels in rats, but does not provide evidence for risk of phytoestrogen-mediated endocrine disruption at normal human dietary consumption levels. Further studies are warranted to increase the knowledge upon which risk assessment on dietary phytoestrogen exposure during pregnancy and infancy is based.

  18. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They ... levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They ...

  19. Reproductive and developmental effects of endocrine disrupters in invertebrates: in vitro and in vivo approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H

    2002-05-10

    In order to gain basic understanding in the ecotoxicity of endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs (including natural chemicals and some pharmaceuticals), many international research groups are currently testing these chemicals using aquatic invertebrates. This paper discusses relevant examples to address key questions: which aquatic invertebrates are likely to be vulnerable to mammalian and non-mammalian EDCs; and which types of invertebrate chronic tests might be most sensitive and cost-effective to address potential environmental exposures? For a full review of invertebrate endocrine disrupter research see Endocrine Disruption in Invertebrates: Endocrinology, Testing and Assessment (1999). As an example, crustaceans are a particular focus of EDC research, reflecting their abundance in nature, commercial importance and their inclusion in the regulatory assessment schemes for active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). There is a diverse literature on the developmental and reproductive effects of mammalian EDCs in Crustacea, although there is growing evidence that such effects are probably not mediated via arthropod hormone systems. For example, recent studies in Europe using a marine copepod (Tisbe battagliai) life-cycle test have evaluated ecdysteroid agonists (e.g. 20-hydroxyecdysone), oestrogen agonists (e.g. diethylstilbestrol (DES), 17beta-oestradiol, oestrone and 17alpha-ethynylestradiol) and the pharmaceutical anti-oestrogen (ZM189, 154). While 20-hydroxyecdysone and DES were highly toxic, the other compounds tested show no significant toxicity to copepods. Furthermore, in vitro studies indicate that these environmental EDCs and several related APIs are not active against the ecdysteroid receptor. Therefore, other undefined modes of action appear to be responsible for crustacean toxicity in vivo and caution should be exercised before ascribing any apical effects to endogenous endocrine mechanisms, or before crustacean "EDC" data are extrapolated to other

  20. Mixtures of endocrine-disrupting contaminants induce adverse developmental effects in preweaning rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    2014-01-01

    paracetamol dose was tested (350 mg/kg per day). All exposures and a vehicle were administered by oral gavage to time-mated Wistar dams rats throughout gestation and lactation, and their offspring were assessed for reproductive effects at birth and in prepuberty. The mixture doses, which included the anti...... to the safety margin covered by the regulatory uncertainty factor of 100. This suggests that highly exposed human population groups may not be sufficiently protected against mixtures of endocrine-disrupting chemicals....

  1. An Emerging Role of micro-RNA in the Effect of the Endocrine Disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derghal, Adel; Djelloul, Mehdi; Trouslard, Jérôme; Mounien, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are diverse natural and synthetic chemicals that may alter various mechanisms of the endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, metabolic, and neurological effects in both humans and wildlife. Research on EDCs has revealed that they use a variety of both nuclear receptor-mediated and non-receptor-mediated mechanisms to modulate different components of the endocrine system. The molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of EDCs are still under investigation. Interestingly, some of the effects of EDCs have been observed to pass on to subsequent unexposed generations, which can be explained by the gametic transmission of deregulated epigenetic marks. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without a change in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and specific micro-RNAs (miRNAs) expression, have been proposed to mediate transgenerational transmission and can be triggered by environmental factors. MiRNAs are short non-coding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally repress the expression of genes by binding to 3'-untranslated regions of the target mRNAs. Given that there is mounting evidence that miRNAs are regulated by hormones, then clearly it is important to investigate the potential for environmental EDCs to deregulate miRNA expression and action.

  2. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals from leather industry effluents on male reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Majumdar, Chandrajeetbalo; Roy, Partha

    2008-09-01

    The leather tanning industry is characterized by the production of different kinds of effluents, generated in each step of leather processing. These effluents have various chemical compounds which may cause toxicity and endocrine disruption and are thus known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). This study was aimed to examine the androgenic potential of leather industry effluents collected from northern region of India. Hershberger assay data showed a significant increase (pGC-MS, it was found to contain various aromatic compounds (nonylphenol, hexaclrobenzene and several azo dyes) some of which independently demonstrated similar effects as shown by water samples. Our data suggests that the effluents from leather industry have potential EDC demonstrating androgenic activities.

  3. Long-term effects of valproic acid on reproductive endocrine functions in Turkish women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkemli, Huseyin; Genc, Bulent Oguz; Dogan, Ebru Apaydin; Genc, Emine; Ozdemir, Suna

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effects of valproic acid (VPA) on reproductive endocrine functions in women with epilepsy (WWE) were studied. Serum reproductive hormone concentrations, clinical findings and ovarian morphology were analyzed in 71 WWE who had been receiving antiepileptic drugs (AED) for a minimum of 2 years. Of the 71 WWE, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) (p = 0.011) and menstrual irregularities (p = 0.009) were found to be more prevalent in women receiving VPA treatment when compared to women on non-VPA treatment. There was no statistically significant dose or duration-related rise of risk for patients who developed PCOS and menstrual irregularities and those who were not on long-term VPA therapy. The lack of a duration-related reproductive dysfunction in this patient population may support the hypothesis of early occurring VPA-associated metabolic and endocrine changes.

  4. Long-term effects of environmental endocrine disruptors on reproductive physiology and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B Patisaul

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that, over the course of development, hormones shape the vertebrate brain such that sex specific physiology and behaviors emerge. Much of this occurs in discrete developmental windows that span gestation through the prenatal period, although it is now becoming clear that at least some of this process continues through puberty. Perturbation of this developmental progression can permanently alter the capacity for reproductive success. Wildlife studies have revealed that exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs, either naturally occurring or man made, can profoundly alter reproductive physiology and ultimately impact entire populations. Laboratory studies in rodents and other species have elucidated some of the mechanisms by which this occurs and strongly indicate that humans are also vulnerable to disruption. Use of hormonally active compounds in human medicine has also unfortunately revealed that the developing fetus can be exposed to and affected by endocrine disruptors, and that it might take decades for adverse effects to manifest. Research within the field of environmental endocrine disruption has also contributed to the general understanding of how early life experiences can alter reproductive physiology and behavior through non-genomic, epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation. These types of effects have the potential to impact future generations if the germ line is affected. This review provides an overview of how exposure to EDCs, particularly those that interfere with estrogen action, impacts reproductive physiology and behaviors in vertebrates.

  5. Effect of pharmaceutical potential endocrine disruptor compounds on protein disulfide isomerase reductase activity using di-eosin-oxidized-glutathione.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danièle Klett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI in the endoplasmic reticulum of all cells catalyzes the rearrangement of disulfide bridges during folding of membrane and secreted proteins. As PDI is also known to bind various molecules including hormones such as estradiol and thyroxin, we considered the hypothesis that adverse effects of endocrine-disrupter compounds (EDC could be mediated through their interaction with PDI leading to defects in membrane or secreted proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Taking advantage of the recent description of the fluorescence self quenched substrate di-eosin-oxidized-glutathione (DiE-GSSG, we determined kinetically the effects of various potential pharmaceutical EDCs on the in-vitro reductase activity of bovine liver PDI by measuring the fluorescence of the reaction product (E-GSH. Our data show that estrogens (ethynylestradiol and bisphenol-A as well as indomethacin exert an inhibition whereas medroxyprogesteroneacetate and nortestosterone exert a potentiation of bovine PDI reductase activity. CONCLUSIONS: The present data indicate that the tested EDCs could not only affect endocrine target cells through nuclear receptors as previously shown, but could also affect these and all other cells by positively or negatively affecting PDI activity. The substrate DiE-GSSG has been demonstrated to be a convenient substrate to measure PDI reductase activity in the presence of various potential EDCs. It will certainly be usefull for the screening of potential effect of all kinds of chemicals on PDI reductase activity.

  6. The effects of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disruptors on the immune system of fish: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Sylvain; Depiereux, Sophie; Kestemont, Patrick

    2011-03-01

    During the last decade, a number of studies have shown that, in addition to their classically described reproductive function, estrogens and androgens also regulate the immune system in teleosts. Today, several molecules are known to interfere with the sex-steroid signaling. These chemicals are often referred to as endocrine disrupting contaminants (EDCs). We review the growing evidence that these compounds interfere with the fish immune system. These studies encompass a broad range of approaches from field studies to those at the molecular level. This integrative overview improves our understanding of the various endocrine-disrupting processes triggered by these chemicals. Furthermore, the research also explains why fish that have been exposed to EDCs are more sensitive to pathogens during gametogenesis. In this review, we first discuss the primary actions of sex-steroid-like endocrine disruptors in fish and the specificity of the fish immune system in comparison to mammals. Then, we review the known interactions between the immune system and EDCs and interpret the primary effects of sex steroids (estrogens and androgens) and their related endocrine disruptors on immune modulation. The recent literature suggests that immune parameters may be used as biomarkers of contamination by EDCs. However, caution should be used in the assessment of such immunotoxicity. In particular, more attention should be paid to the specificity of these biomarkers, the external/internal factors influencing the response, and the transduction pathways induced by these molecules in fish. The use of the well-known mammalian models provides a useful guide for future research in fish.

  7. Effect of Sediment Humic Substances on Sorption of Selected Endocrine Disruptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W. L., E-mail: sunweiling@iee.pku.edu.cn; Ni, J. R.; Liu, T. T. [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University (China)

    2006-12-15

    Characterizing sorption processes is essential to understand the environmental distribution and toxicity potential of endocrine disruptors in terrestrial and aquatic systems. The sorption behaviors of three endocrine disruptors (bisphenol A (BPA), 17{beta}-estradiol (E2), and 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2)) on sediments were investigated using batch techniques. Samples were taken from some representative reaches in several major Chinese rivers. More attention has been paid to the effect of sediment organic components on the sorption of BPA, E2, and EE2. The results show that the sediment organic carbon-normalized partition coefficients (K{sub oc}(sed)) for three endocrine disruptors are in the order of EE2 > E2 > BPA, which corresponds to the octanol-water partitioning coefficients (logK{sub ow}) of the compounds. Moreover, the K{sub oc} values for humic substances (K{sub oc}(hs)) are comparable with the K{sub oc}(sed) values and highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of humic substances in sediments. The UV absorptivity at 272 nm (A{sub 272}), which suggests the abundance of aromatic rings in humic substance structure, correlates well with the K{sub oc}(hs) values. In addition, the infrared spectra of the humic substances extracted from sediments show four strong bands centered at 3,400 cm{sup -1}, 1,625 cm{sup -1}, 1,390 cm{sup -1}, and 1,025 cm{sup -1}. The K{sub oc}(hs) values have a positive linear relation with the peak area ratio for peak at 1,025 cm{sup -1} and a negative linear relation with the peak area ratio between peaks at 1,625 cm{sup -1} and 1,025 cm{sup -1}. Hence, the hydrogen bonds play a critical role to the sorption of selected endocrine disruptors.

  8. Risk assessment of 'endocrine substances': guidance on identifying endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard W

    2013-12-16

    The European regulation on plant protection products (1107/2009) and other related legislation only support the marketing and use of chemical products on the basis that they do not induce endocrine disruption in humans or wildlife species. This legislation would appear to make the assumption that endocrine active chemicals should be managed differently from other chemicals presumably due to an assumed lack of a threshold for adverse effects. In the absence of agreed scientific criteria and guidance on how to identify and evaluate endocrine activity and disruption within these pieces of legislation, a European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) task force was formed to provide scientific criteria that may be used within the context of these three legislative documents. The first ECETOC technical report and associated workshop, held in 2009, presented a science-based concept on how to identify endocrine activity and disrupting properties of chemicals for both human health and the environment. Specific scientific criteria for the determination of endocrine activity and disrupting properties that integrate information from both regulatory toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies were proposed. These criteria combined the nature of the adverse effects detected in studies which give concern for endocrine toxicity with an understanding of the mode of action of toxicity so that adverse effects can be explained scientifically. A key element in the data evaluation is the consideration of all available information in a weight-of-evidence approach. Both sets of data (evidence of the adverse effect in apical studies and conclusive mode of action knowledge) are essential in order to correctly identify endocrine disruption according to accepted definitions. As the legislation seeks to regulate chemicals on a mode of action rather than the more traditional approach of adverse endpoints, then conclusive evidence of the mode of action of concern

  9. Endocrine disruption in soil invertebrates: assessing multigeneration effects of insect growth regulators on "Folsomia Candida" and developing a toxicoproteomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Campiche, Sophie; Tarradellas, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    In the past years, it has been observed that some compounds present in our environment can disturb the reproduction and development of animals like fishes, birds, or reptiles by interfering with their endocrine system. Indeed, these endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) can mimic or antagonize the effects of hormones, alter the pattern of synthesis and metabolism of hormones or modify hormone receptor levels. These substances represent a risk for wildlife, and possibly for humans. Up to now, e...

  10. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Endocrine, Metabolism and Ovulatory Performance in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Insulin Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕立群; 刘义

    2004-01-01

    The effect of rosiglitazone on endocrine, metabolism and ovulatory performance in the paitents with polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS) and insulin resistance was investigated. Twentyfive patients diagnosed as having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) combined with insulin resistance were treated with rosiglitazone for 12 weeks. Before and after treatment, serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), androstenedione (A), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), insulin and glucose concentration, total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein-cholestero (LDL-C), apolipoprotein A, apolipoprotein B levels and ovulatory performance were determined. The results showed that after treatment serum insulin levels was decreased significantly (P<0.01). The HDL-C was increased while LDL-C decreased significantly (P<0.05, P<0.01). The serum LH, T, A concentrations and the ratio of LH/FSH were decreased, while SHBG levels increased significantly (P<0.01). The ovulation rate during clomiphene citrate therapy was 72 %, significantly higher than that before treatment. It is likely that reduction of hyperinsulinemia that is produce by rosiglitazone may effectively improve the endocrine, metabolism and ovulatory performance in the patients with PCOS and insulin resistance.

  11. The endocrine effects of acylated and des-acylated ghrelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Pierre DH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available David E Andrich,1 Katherine Cianflone,2 Alain-Steve Comtois,1 Simon Lalonde,1 David H St-Pierre11Department of Kinesiology, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM, Montreal, Canada; 2Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: Acylated ghrelin is one of the few peptides known whose isolation and characterization follow the description of its receptor and its basic biological functions. Characterized initially for its somatotrophic properties, ghrelin was shown later to exert various effects on other important physiological functions in mammals, such as appetite, gastric acid secretion, gut motility, insulin sensitivity, adiposity, and energy expenditure. Further, ghrelin influences cardiac function, reproduction, and the immune system as well. Here we present an overview of the discovery and subsequent development of ghrelin as an important peptide hormone involved in the control of energy metabolism in humans and other mammals. Recently reported effects of acylated ghrelin on glucose/lipid uptake, de novo lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, lipid-droplet formation, fatty acid transport into mitochondria, and mitochondrial activity are particularly emphasized and discussed.Keywords: Acylated ghrelin, des-acylated ghrelin, physiological functions, adipogenesis

  12. Mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells changed by endocrine effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yun LIU; Dong-mei Li; Xiao-fang ZHANG; Jian-hui WU; Zu-yue SUN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of androgen and estrogen on mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells of male rats. Methods: Castrated rats were treated with a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) or benzogynestry (E2). There were 8 rats in the control group and TP-treated or E2-treated group. Prostate, liver, a specimen of skin, and a segment of the jejunum and colon were removed after the corresponding treatment. The results were observed through immunohistochemistry and iron hematoxylin-eosin staining.Results: All mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats with TP were oriented parallel to the basement membrane; however, mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats in E2 and the control group were oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane. TP treatment resulted in marked changes in mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled positive cells could be seen throughout the stroma and prostate epithelial cells with an injection of TP; however, the positive cells could only be seen in the stroma of prostate with an injection of E2, and the positive cells could hardly be seen in the control group. Conclusion: We found a novel effect of TP in the prostate as a marked change of mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells.

  13. Characterization of behavioral and endocrine effects of LSD on zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Leah; Utterback, Eli; Stewart, Adam; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Chung, Kyung Min; Suciu, Christopher; Wong, Keith; Elegante, Marco; Elkhayat, Salem; Tan, Julia; Gilder, Thomas; Wu, Nadine; Dileo, John; Cachat, Jonathan; Kalueff, Allan V

    2010-12-25

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a potent hallucinogenic drug that strongly affects animal and human behavior. Although adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) are emerging as a promising neurobehavioral model, the effects of LSD on zebrafish have not been investigated previously. Several behavioral paradigms (the novel tank, observation cylinder, light-dark box, open field, T-maze, social preference and shoaling tests), as well as modern video-tracking tools and whole-body cortisol assay were used to characterize the effects of acute LSD in zebrafish. While lower doses (5-100 microg/L) did not affect zebrafish behavior, 250 microg/L LSD increased top dwelling and reduced freezing in the novel tank and observation cylinder tests, also affecting spatiotemporal patterns of activity (as assessed by 3D reconstruction of zebrafish traces and ethograms). LSD evoked mild thigmotaxis in the open field test, increased light behavior in the light-dark test, reduced the number of arm entries and freezing in the T-maze and social preference test, without affecting social preference. In contrast, LSD affected zebrafish shoaling (increasing the inter-fish distance in a group), and elevated whole-body cortisol levels. Overall, our findings show sensitivity of zebrafish to LSD action, and support the use of zebrafish models to study hallucinogenic drugs of abuse. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of the mycotoxin alternariol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frizzell, Caroline [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ndossi, Doreen [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro (Tanzania, United Republic of); Kalayou, Shewit [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Mekelle University College of Veterinary Medicine, Mekelle (Ethiopia); Eriksen, Gunnar S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Verhaegen, Steven [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Sørlie, Morten [Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås (Norway); Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ropstad, Erik [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Alternariol (AOH) is a mycotoxin commonly produced by Alternaria alternata on a wide range of foods. Few studies to date have been performed to evaluate the effects of AOH on endocrine activity. The present study makes use of in vitro mammalian cellular based assays and gene expression to investigate the ability of AOH to act as an endocrine disruptor by various modes of action. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), incorporating natural steroid hormone receptors for oestrogens, androgens, progestagens and glucocorticoids were used to identify endocrine disruption at the level of nuclear receptor transcriptional activity, and the H295R steroidogenesis assay was used to assess endocrine disruption at the level of gene expression and steroid hormone production. AOH exhibited a weak oestrogenic response when tested in the oestrogen responsive RGA and binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of AOH. H295R cells when exposed to 0.1–1000 ng/ml AOH, did not cause a significant change in testosterone and cortisol hormones but exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH resulted in a significant increase in estradiol and progesterone production. In the gene expression study following exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH, only one gene NR0B1 was down-regulated, whereas expression of mRNA for CYP1A1, MC2R, HSD3B2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B2 and CYP19 was up-regulated. Expression of the other genes investigated did not change significantly. In conclusion AOH is a weak oestrogenic mycotoxin that also has the ability to interfere with the steroidogenesis pathway. - Highlights: • Alternariol was investigated for endocrine disrupting activity. • Reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been used. • An oestrogenic effect of alternariol was observed. • This can lead to an increase in expression of the progesterone receptor. • Alternariol is capable of modulating hormone production and gene expression.

  15. Cardiovascular, endocrine, and renal effects of urodilatin in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestle, M H; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Christensen, P

    1999-01-01

    Effects of urodilatin (5, 10, 20, and 40 ng. kg-1. min-1) infused over 2 h on separate study days were studied in eight normal subjects with use of a randomized, double-blind protocol. All doses decreased renal plasma flow (hippurate clearance, 13-37%) and increased fractional Li+ clearance (7......-22%) and urinary Na+ excretion (by 30, 76, 136, and 99% at 5, 10, 20, and 40 ng. kg-1. min-1, respectively). Glomerular filtration rate did not increase significantly with any dose. The two lowest doses decreased cardiac output (7 and 16%) and stroke volume (10 and 20%) without changing mean arterial blood...... urodilatin) and plasma cGMP increased dose dependently. The urinary excretion rate of albumin was elevated up to 15-fold (37 +/- 17 micrograms/min). Use of a newly developed assay revealed that baseline urinary urodilatin excretion rate was low (...

  16. Cardiovascular, endocrine and renal effects of urodilatin in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestle, M.H.; Olsen, N.V.; Christensen, P.

    1999-01-01

    Effects of urodilatin (5, 10, 20, and 40 ng. kg-1. min-1) infused over 2 h on separate study days were studied in eight normal subjects with use of a randomized, double-blind protocol. All doses decreased renal plasma flow (hippurate clearance, 13-37%) and increased fractional Li+ clearance (7......-22%) and urinary Na+ excretion (by 30, 76, 136, and 99% at 5, 10, 20, and 40 ng. kg-1. min-1, respectively). Glomerular filtration rate did not increase significantly with any dose. The two lowest doses decreased cardiac output (7 and 16%) and stroke volume (10 and 20%) without changing mean arterial blood...... urodilatin) and plasma cGMP increased dose dependently. The urinary excretion rate of albumin was elevated up to 15-fold (37 +/- 17 micrograms/min). Use of a newly developed assay revealed that baseline urinary urodilatin excretion rate was low (

  17. Effect of a randomized controlled exercise trial on bone outcomes: influence of adjuvant endocrine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobf, M Tish; Jeon, Sangchoon; Smith, Barbara; Harris, Lyndsay; Kerstetter, Jane; Thompson, A Siobhan; Insogna, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Bone loss is a significant clinical problem for female cancer survivors (FCS) and increases fracture risk. The aim of the Yale Fitness Intervention Trial (Yale FIT) was to determine the effects of a 12-month aerobic-resistance exercise intervention compared to a home-based physical activity group on bone outcomes [bone mineral density (BMD)] and biomarkers bone turnover). Early postmenopausal FCS (N = 154) were randomized to the exercise intervention (3 times/week) or to a home-based physical activity group. Calcium (1200 mg) and Vitamin D (400 IU) supplements were provided to both groups. BMD was measured at baseline and 12 months. No significant difference in BMD was observed for the exercise vs home-based group. However, subjects on Tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy did not significantly lose BMD, with the exception of the femoral neck (FN). In contrast subjects on aromatase inhibitors (AIs) had significant BMD loss at all sites. The majority of subjects had sufficient serum levels of Vitamin D (>20 ng/mL) but there was significantly less bone loss in subjects in the 20-29 ng/mL range at the LS (p = 0.01), hip (p = 0.03), and GT (p = 0.008) compared to lower or higher levels. Exercise stimulates bone remodeling but the intervention was not superior for BMD outcomes at one year. The dose of the osteogenic stimulus in the intervention has been effective in preserving BMD in healthy postmenopausal women but it may be inadequate for survivors with chemotherapy-induced menopause and for those on adjuvant AI therapy.

  18. Towards an internationally harmonized test method for reproductive and developmental effects of endocrine disrupters in marine copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Wollenberger, Leah

    2007-01-01

    New and updated methods to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are urgently needed for the purpose of environmental risk assessment since these substances are often not detected using existing chronic toxicity tests. Numerous reports on the effects of EDCs on crustacean...... development and reproduction have been published and the development of life-cycle tests with crustaceans has been prioritized within the OECD work program for endocrine disrupter testing and assessment. As a result, Sweden, and Denmark initiated a proposal for development of a full life-cycle test...... with marine copepods (Acartia tonsa, Nitocra spinipes, Tisbe battagliai, and Amphiascus tenuiremis). The present paper gives an overview on the endocrine system of crustaceans with special emphasis on development and reproduction, which are targets for endocrine disruption, and reviews available methods...

  19. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proliferative endocrine effects of adipose tissue from obese animals on MCF7 cells are ameliorated by resveratrol supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriau, Christopher F; Sauvé, O'Llenecia S; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Wright, David C; Connor, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is clearly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The purpose was to determine if obesity alters the adipocyte adipokine secretion profile, thereby altering the adipose-dependent paracrine/endocrine growth microenvironment surrounding breast cancer cells (MCF7). Additionally, we determined whether resveratrol (RSV) supplementation can counteract any obesity-dependent effects on breast cancer tumor growth microenvironment. Obese ZDF rats received standard chow diet or diet supplemented with 200 mg/kg body weight RSV. Chow-fed Zucker rats served as lean controls. After 6 weeks, conditioned media (CM) prepared from inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) was added to MCF7 cells for 24 hrs. Experiments were also conducted using purified isolated adipocytes to determine whether any endocrine effects could be attributed specifically to the adipocyte component of adipose tissue. scAT from ZDF rats promoted cell cycle entry in MCF7 cells which was counteracted by RSV supplementation. RSV-CM had a higher ratio of ADIPO:LEP compared to ZDF-CM. This altered composition of the CM led to increased levels of pAMPKT172, p27, p27T198 and AdipoR1 while decreasing pAktT308 in MCF7 cells grown in RSV-CM compared to ZDF-CM. RSV-CM increased number of cells in G0/G1 and decreased cells in S-phase compared to ZDF-CM. Co-culture experiments revealed that these obesity-dependent effects were driven by the adipocyte component of the adipose tissue. Obesity decreased the ratio of adiponectin:leptin secreted by adipocytes, altering the adipose-dependent growth microenvironment resulting in increased breast cancer cell proliferation. Supplementation with RSV reversed these adipose-dependent effects suggesting a potential for RSV as a nutritional supplementation to improve breast cancer treatment in obese patients.

  1. The multigenerational effects of water contamination and endocrine disrupting chemicals on the fitness of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Calderón, Suany; Bacigalupe, Leonardo Daniel; Toro-Vélez, Andrés Fernando; Madera-Parra, Carlos Arturo; Peña-Varón, Miguel Ricardo; Cárdenas-Henao, Heiber

    2017-08-01

    Water pollution due to human activities produces sedimentation, excessive nutrients, and toxic chemicals, and this, in turn, has an effect on the normal endocrine functioning of living beings. Overall, water pollution may affect some components of the fitness of organisms (e.g., developmental time and fertility). Some toxic compounds found in polluted waters are known as endocrine disruptors (ED), and among these are nonhalogenated phenolic chemicals such as bisphenol A and nonylphenol. To evaluate the effect of nonhalogenated phenolic chemicals on the endocrine system, we subjected two generations (F0 and F1) of Drosophila melanogaster to different concentrations of ED. Specifically, treatments involved wastewater, which had the highest level of ED (bisphenol A and nonylphenol) and treated wastewater from a constructed Heliconia psittacorum wetland with horizontal subsurface water flow (He); the treated wastewater was the treatment with the lowest level of ED. We evaluated the development time from egg to pupa and from pupa to adult as well as fertility. The results show that for individuals exposed to treated wastewater, the developmental time from egg to pupae was shorter in individuals of the F1 generation than in the F0 generation. Additionally, the time from pupae to adult was longer for flies growing in the H. psittacorum treated wastewater. Furthermore, fertility was lower in the F1 generation than in the F0 generation. Although different concentrations of bisphenol A and nonylphenol had no significant effect on the components of fitness of D. melanogaster (developmental time and fertility), there was a trend across generations, likely as a result of selection imposed on the flies. It is possible that the flies developed different strategies to avoid the effects of the various environmental stressors.

  2. Metabolic and endocrine profiles and reproductive parameters in dairy cows under grazing conditions: effect of polymorphisms in somatotropic axis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Isabel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study hypothesized that GH-AluI and IGF-I-SnabI polymorphisms do change the metabolic/endocrine profiles in Holstein cows during the transition period, which in turn are associated with productive and reproductive parameters. Methods Holstein cows (Farm 1, primiparous cows, n = 110, and Farm 2, multiparous cows, n = 76 under grazing conditions were selected and GH and IGF-I genotypes were determined. Blood samples for metabolic/endocrine determinations were taken during the transition period and early lactation in both farms. Data was analyzed by farm using a repeated measures analyses including GH and IGF-I genotypes, days and interactions as fixed effects, sire and cow as random effects and calving date as covariate. Results and Discussion Frequencies of GH and IGF-I alleles were L:0.84, V:0.16 and A:0.60, B:0.40, respectively. The GH genotype was not associated with productive or reproductive variables, but interaction with days affected FCM yield in multiparous (farm 2 cows (LL yielded more than LV cows in early lactation. The GH genotype affected NEFA and IGF-I concentrations in farm 1 (LV had higher NEFA and lower IGF-I than LL cows suggesting a better energy status of LL cows. There was no effect of IGF-I genotype on productive variables, but a trend was found for FCM in farm 2 (AB cows yielded more than AA cows. IGF-I genotype affected calving first service interval in farm 1, and the interaction with days tended to affect FCM yield (AB cows had a shorter interval and yielded more FCM than BB cows. IGF-I genotype affected BHB, NEFA, and insulin concentrations in farm 1: primiparous BB cows had lower NEFA and BHB and higher insulin concentrations. In farm 2, there was no effect of IGF-I genotype, but there was an interaction with days on IGF-I concentration, suggesting a greater uncoupling somatropic axis in AB and BB than AA cows, being in accordance with greater FCM yield in AB cows. Conclusion The GH and

  3. Determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in drinking waters by fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Emanuele; Scapolla, Carlo; Di Carro, Marina; Liscio, Camilla

    2010-09-01

    Growing attention has been recently paid to safety of food and drinking water, making necessary the adoption of policies for water sources protection and the development of sensitive and rapid analytical methods to identify micropollutants. Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) have emerged as a major issue as they alter the functioning of the endocrine system. Since ingestion of EDCs via food is considered the major exposure route, there is a growing interest in understanding EDC fate during drinking water treatment and in monitoring potential contamination of surface waters and groundwaters. In this work, a fast liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in drinking waters. In the literature analytical articles seldom provide details regarding fragmentation pathways. In this paper spectra of the five EDCs in negative ESI were interpreted with the support of accurate mass spectra acquired by a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument; fragmentation pathways were also proposed. The chromatographic separation of EDCs was optimized on a Pinnacle DB Biphenylic column with a water-acetonitrile gradient. Quantitative analysis was performed in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using bisphenol A-d(16) (BPA-d(16)) as internal standard; calibration curves showed good correlation coefficients (0.9989-0.9997). All figures of merit of the method were satisfactory; limits of detection were in the range 0.2-0.4 ng/ml. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in waters sampled by polar organic chemical integrative samplers in a drinking water treatment plant. Rather low concentration of BPA, NP and E1 were measured in the inlet, while none of the considered EDCs was detected in the outlet. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Triclosan on the Placenta in Pregnant Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixing Feng

    Full Text Available Triclosan (TCS is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that is frequently used in pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Reports have shown that TCS is a potential endocrine disruptor; however, the potential effects of TCS on placental endocrine function are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the endocrine disrupting effects of TCS on the placenta in pregnant rats. Pregnant rats from gestational day (GD 6 to GD 20 were treated with 0, 30, 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg/d TCS followed by analysis of various biochemical parameters. Of the seven tissues examined, the greatest bioaccumulation of TCS was observed in the placenta. Reduction of gravid uterine weight and the occurrence of abortion were observed in the 600 mg/kg/d TCS-exposed group. Moreover, hormone detection demonstrated that the serum levels of progesterone (P, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and prolactin (PRL were decreased in groups exposed to higher doses of TCS. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in mRNA levels for placental steroid metabolism enzymes, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1, estrogen sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1, steroid 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and steroid 5α-reductase 2 (SRD5A2. Furthermore, the transcriptional expression levels of progesterone receptor (PR, estrogen receptor (ERα and androgen receptor (AR were up-regulated. Taken together, these data demonstrated that the placenta was a target tissue of TCS and that TCS induced inhibition of circulating steroid hormone production might be related to the altered expression of hormone metabolism enzyme genes in the placenta. This hormone disruption might subsequently affect fetal development and growth.

  5. Effects of endocrine modulators on sexual differentiation and reproductive function in male Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldin, Krister; Axelsson, Jeanette; Brunström, Björn

    2005-04-15

    A number of environmental contaminants have been shown to interfere with the endocrine system. Many of these compounds bind to estrogen receptors, thereby potentially disrupting estrogen-regulated functions. In this paper, we review some background data on avian sexual differentiation and present some of the results from our studies on effects of estrogenic chemicals administered during sexual differentiation in the Japanese quail. Initially, our goal was to elucidate whether a decreased male sexual behavior in quail is a suitable endpoint for studying long-term effects of exposure to estrogenic compounds during sexual differentiation in ovo. We thereafter tested some environmental pollutants, suspected to act via mimicking estrogens, using the test system developed. Results from our studies on the synthetic estrogens ethinylestradiol and diethylstilbestrol, as well as the environmental pollutants bisphenol A, tetrabromobisphenol A, and o,p'-DDT are reviewed in this paper. We conclude that the Japanese quail is well suited as an animal model for studying various long-term effects after embryonic exposure to estrogenic compounds. Depressed sexual behavior proved to be the most sensitive of the variables studied in males and we find this endpoint appropriate for studying effects of endocrine modulating chemicals in the adult quail following embryonic exposure.

  6. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high or too low, you may have an endocrine disease or disorder. Endocrine diseases and disorders also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Featured Topics Adrenal Insufficiency ... Topics Research Discoveries & News Children with Cushing ...

  7. Assessment of the effects of the carbamazepine on the endogenous endocrine system of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, A L; Floro, A M; Palma, P

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the endocrine activity of the antiepileptic pharmaceutical carbamazepine (CBZ) in the crustacean Daphnia magna was assessed. To assess the hormonal activity of the drug, we exposed maternal daphnids and embryos to environmental relevant concentrations of CBZ (ranging from 10 to 200 μg/L) and to mixtures of CBZ with fenoxycarb (FEN; 1 μg/L). Chronic exposure to CBZ significantly decreased the reproductive output and the number of molts of D. magna at 200 μg/L. This compound induced the production of male offspring (12 ± 1.7 %), in a non-concentration-dependent manner, acting as a weak juvenile hormone analog. Results showed that this substance, at tested concentrations, did not antagonize the juvenoid action of FEN. Further, CBZ has shown to be toxic to daphnid embryos through maternal exposure interfering with their normal gastrulation and organogenesis stages but not producing direct embryo toxicity. These findings suggest that CBZ could act as an endocrine disruptor in D. magna as it decreases the reproductive output, interferes with sex determination, and causes development abnormality in offspring. Therefore, CBZ could directly affect the population sustainability.

  8. Reversibility of endocrine disruption in zebrafish (Danio rerio) - comparison of different effect levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Lisa; Holbech, Henrik; Schiller, V.S.;

    -term effects on populations, it is essential to know whether such EDC-related effects are reversible. Three different substances selected for different modes of action were tested for their long-term impact on sex ratio, gonadal development, vitellogenin (VTG) induction and aromatase activity in zebrafish...... to estrogens. All compounds have previously been shown to cause striking effects in zebrafish, but recovery has never been studied in detail. In order to test whether EDC-related effects are reversible, an exposure scenario limited to 60 d was followed by (a) a recovery period of 40 d or (b) continued exposure...... of effects at all levels, but clear-cut differences between the two different exposure groups. We conclude that endocrine disruption in zebrafish following discontinuous exposure is only partially reversible and may thus have serious implications for fish....

  9. A Method for the Determination of Genetic Sex in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas, to Support Testing of Endocrine-active Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathead minnows are used as a model fish species for the characterization of the endocrine-disrupting potential of environmental contaminants. This research describes the development of a PCR method that can determine the genetic sex in this species. This method, when incorpora...

  10. Stress-induced endocrine response and anxiety: the effects of comfort food in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, Daniela; Garcia, Márcia Carvalho; Melo-Thomas, Liana; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina Celia

    2014-05-01

    The long-term effects of comfort food in an anxiogenic model of stress have yet to be analyzed. Here, we evaluated behavioral, endocrine and metabolic parameters in rats submitted or not to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), with access to commercial chow alone or to commercial chow and comfort food. Stress did not alter the preference for comfort food but decreased food intake. In the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, stressed rats were less likely to enter/remain in the open arms, as well as being more likely to enter/remain in the closed arms, than were control rats, both conditions being more pronounced in the rats given access to comfort food. In the open field test, stress decreased the time spent in the centre, independent of diet; neither stress nor diet affected the number of crossing, rearing or grooming episodes. The stress-induced increase in serum corticosterone was attenuated in rats given access to comfort food. Serum concentration of triglycerides were unaffected by stress or diet, although access to comfort food increased total cholesterol and glucose. It is concluded that CUMS has an anorexigenic effect. Chronic stress and comfort food ingestion induced an anxiogenic profile although comfort food attenuated the endocrine stress response. The present data indicate that the combination of stress and access to comfort food, common aspects of modern life, may constitute a link among stress, feeding behavior and anxiety.

  11. Testing Potential Effect of Environmental Endocrine Disruptors in Cow Milk on Reproductive Index in Female Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG-MING LI; DAVAASAMBUU GANMAA; LI-QIANG QIN; AKIO SATO

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of endocrine disruptor chemicals in cow milk on female reproductive system. Methods A two-generation reproduction was conducted according to U. S. FDA standard. Milk was fed in special bottle to Wistar rats of both sexes through two successive generations (F0 and F1) in the milk group while artificial milk was fed to rats in the control group. Twenty-four rats of each sex were mated in each group. Measurements were made according to this guideline. Results Reproductive parameters in the milk group such as fertility index, gestation index, weights of uterus and ovary, days of vaginal opening, estrous cycles, histological morphological changes were comparable to those in the control group. However, the means of body weight had some differences. The body weight gains increased significantly in the milk-treated group in F1 and F2 generation compared with those in the control group. The concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in blood in the milk group was comparable to that in the control group, but the standard deviation changed greatly in the milk-treated rats. Conclusion Endocrine disruptor chemicals in milk have no severe effects on the female reproductive system.

  12. Study of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Juvancz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC cause more and more seriousenvironmental pollutions. The EDCs show only ng-μg/l concentration level in theenvironment, therefore their determinations require multistep sample preparationprocesses and highly sophisticated instrumentation. This paper discuss the EDC effects,and show examples for determination of such compounds.

  13. Effect of a straw-derived xylooligosaccharide on broiler growth performance, endocrine metabolism, and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenping, Sun; Wenting, Lv; Ruikui, Yu; Jia, Li; Honghong, Liu; Wei, Sun; Zhongmie, Wang; Jingpan, Li; Zhe, Shan; Yuling, Qin

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of 3 levels of supplemental xylooligosaccharides (XOS) from straw on the growth performance, endocrine metabolism, and immune response of broiler chickens. Day-old, healthy Arbor Acres broilers (n = 192) received a basal diet of maize-soybean meal and, depending on the group to which they were allocated, no additive (control group) or the following experimental treatments for 59 d: treatment 1: 5 g XOS/kg; treatment 2: 10 g XOS/kg; and treatment 3: 20 g XOS/kg. By day 59 the body weight gain of the chickens receiving treatment 2 had increased by 9.44% (P < 0.01) over the gain of the control group. The levels of serum triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and insulin on day 44 were significantly higher in the treatment groups than in the control group. The titers of antibody to the avian influenza H5N1 virus on day 24 were also significantly higher in the treatment groups than in the control group, and on day 59 the titer of the chickens receiving treatment 2 were still significantly increased (P < 0.05). Thus, the addition of XOS to feed can increase growth performance, enhance endocrine metabolism, and improve immune function in broiler chickens.

  14. Differential effects of melatonin as a broad range UV-damage preventive dermato-endocrine regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleszczyński, Konrad; Hardkop, Lena H; Fischer, Tobias W

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin or N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is a compound derived from tryptophan that is found in all organisms from single cells to vertebrates and the human. It is one of the most evolutionarily conserved and pleiotropic hormone still active in humans and has been implicated in vital skin functions such as hair growth, fur pigmentation as well as melanoma control. Being a main secretory product of the pineal gland, melatonin regulates seasonal biorhythms, reproductive mechanisms or mammary gland metabolism. Due to its wide range endocrine properties it is also recognized to modulate numerous additional functions ranging from scavenging free radicals, immunomodulation-mediated DNA repair, wound healing, involvement in gene expression connected with circadian clocks and modulation of secondary endocrine signaling including prolactin release. Recently, apart from above mentioned entities, it was shown that melatonin suppresses ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage in human skin and human derived cell lines (e.g., keratinocytes, fibroblasts). The magnitude of UV-induced damage is mediated apparently by various molecular mechanisms related to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis and mitochondrial-mediated cell death which are all counteracted or modulated by melatonin. We provide here an update of the relevant protective effects and molecular mechanisms of action of melatonin in the skin.

  15. Endocrine determinants of changes in insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion during a weight cycle in healthy men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Karschin

    Full Text Available Changes in insulin sensitivity (IS and insulin secretion occur with perturbations in energy balance and glycemic load (GL of the diet that may precede the development of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Determinants of changes in IS and insulin secretion with weight cycling in non-obese healthy subjects remain unclear.In a 6wk controlled 2-stage randomized dietary intervention 32 healthy men (26±4y, BMI: 24±2kg/m2 followed 1wk of overfeeding (OF, 3wks of caloric restriction (CR containing either 50% or 65% carbohydrate (CHO and 2wks of refeeding (RF with the same amount of CHO but either low or high glycaemic index at ±50% energy requirement. Measures of IS (basal: HOMA-index, postprandial: Matsuda-ISI, insulin secretion (early: Stumvoll-index, total: tAUC-insulin/tAUC-glucose and potential endocrine determinants (ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, thyroid hormone levels, 24h-urinary catecholamine excretion were assessed.IS improved and insulin secretion decreased due to CR and normalized upon RF. Weight loss-induced improvements in basal and postprandial IS were associated with decreases in leptin and increases in ghrelin levels, respectively (r = 0.36 and r = 0.62, p<0.05. Weight regain-induced decrease in postprandial IS correlated with increases in adiponectin, fT3, TSH, GL of the diet and a decrease in ghrelin levels (r-values between -0.40 and 0.83, p<0.05 whereas increases in early and total insulin secretion were associated with a decrease in leptin/adiponectin-ratio (r = -0.52 and r = -0.46, p<0.05 and a decrease in fT4 (r = -0.38, p<0.05 for total insulin secretion only. After controlling for GL associations between RF-induced decrease in postprandial IS and increases in fT3 and TSH levels were no longer significant.Weight cycling induced changes in IS and insulin secretion were associated with changes in all measured hormones, except for catecholamine excretion. While leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin seem to be the major

  16. Metabolic and Endocrine Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Tahiroglu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available omorbid psychiatric disorders, frequent hospitalization, multiple outpatient treatment, prior history of hypertension, obesity and lipid dysregulation are associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome in children. Side effects of antipsychotic drugs and their management have recently become a major subject of research due to enhanced antipsychotic drug usage in child and adolescents. Prevention strategies are usually preferred to secondary or tertiary strategies in the management of metabolic syndrome associated with antipsychotic drugs. Clinicians should present multidisciplinary approach to endocrine and metabolic side effects due to antipsychotic use in pediatric patient groups and avoid multiple drug use in such patients. In this paper, we briefly reviewed metabolic side effects of second generation antipsychotic drugs in child and adolescent population, possible mechanisms of susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and pharmacological and non pharmacological treatment approach to prevention of weight gain.

  17. Development of an analytical method to determine phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals in sewage and sludge by GC/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Gang; YU Gang; CAI Zhenxiao; ZHANG Zulin

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to determine bisphenol A and five degradation products of alkylphenol ethoxylates in sewage and sludge. The parameters of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) were optimized. C18 cartridge was used to clean up the sewage and the extract of sludge. The sensitivity of the mass detector was improved by adjusting the voltage of the lens manually. The instrumental detection limit was 3.2―17.8 pg. The method detection limits were 2.5―11.4 ng/L and 0.3―2.1 ng/g for sewage and sludge analysis respectively. The recovery and relative standard deviation for sewage analysis were 79.2%―111.4% and 6.9%―12.6%; for sludge analysis were 68.5%―114.0% and 8.9%―16.0%. Finally this method was applied to determining the phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals in sewage and sludge from a sewage treatment plant in Beijing.

  18. Endocrine system: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella; Johnstone, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    This article, the last in the life sciences series, is the second of two articles on the endocrine system. It discusses human growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands. The relationships between hormones and their unique functions are also explored. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health to provide effective care to patients. Several disorders caused by human growth hormone or that affect the pancreas and adrenal glands are examined.

  19. Endocrine disrupting activities in sewage effluent and river water determined by chemical analysis and in vitro assay in the context of granular activated carbon upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, D P; Balaam, J; Pacitto, S; Readman, J W; White, S; Zhou, J L

    2011-09-01

    As part of endocrine disruption in catchments (EDCAT) programme, this work aims to assess the temporal and spatial variations of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in River Ray, before and after the commissioning of a full-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) plant at a sewage treatment works (STW). Through spot and passive sampling from effluent and river sites, estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities were determined by chemical analysis and in vitro bio-assay. A correlation was found between chemical analyses of the most potent estrogens (estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)) and yeast estrogen screen (YES) measurement, both showing clearly a reduction in estrogenic activity after the commissioning of the GAC plant at the STW. During the study period, the annual average concentrations of E1, E2 and EE2 had decreased from 3.5 ng L(-1), 3.1 ng L(-1) and 0.5 ng L(-1) to below their limit of detection (LOD), respectively, with a concentration reduction of at least 91%, 81% and 60%. Annual mean estrogenic activity measured by YES of spot samples varied from 1.9 ng L(-1) to 0.4 ng L(-1) E2 equivalent between 2006 and 2008 representing a 79% reduction. Similarly, anti-androgenic activity measured by yeast anti-androgen screen (anti-YAS) of spot samples was reduced from 148.8 to 22.4 μg flutamide L(-1), or by 85%. YES and anti-YAS values were related to each other, suggesting co-existence of both types of activities from chemical mixtures in environmental samples. The findings confirm the effectiveness of a full-scale GAC in removing both estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities from sewage effluent.

  20. Distrubution of the Endocrine Disruptor Nonylphenol and the Effects of Topographical Sheilding in an Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountain Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, R. A.; Van de Bittner, K.; Morgan Jones, S.

    2013-12-01

    Nonylphenol is a biodegradation product of nonylphenol polyethoxylates, a pervasive compound used in many industrial processes and notably in pesticides as a surfactant. Nonylphenol has been shown to act as an endocrine disruptor at low concentrations. It causes hermaphrodism, birth defects, and high mortality in fish, frogs and other amphibians. The Sierra Nevada Mountains separate the Central Valley in the west from the high desert of Mono Country on the east side of the state of California. The Central Valley represents some of the most heavily cultivated agricultural land in the United States. San Joaquin County alone had an annual pesticide use of over 8 million pounds in 2009 according to the Pesticide Action Network, compared with 4800 pounds in Mono County the same year. Fragile alpine ecosystems in the Sierra Nevadas may be highly susceptible to the effects of endocrine disruptors like nonylphenol. The distribution of nonylphenol is affected by localized topography in a steep walled montane canyon in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains, Convict Creek canyon. The concentration of nonylphenol in snow and surface water increases as the elevation in Convict Creek canyon decreases in an easterly direction from not detectable at the highest elevations to as much as .01mg/L in water and 1.8 mg/L in snow at the lowest elevations. The steep head wall of Convict Creek canyon, facing southeast, provides shielding to the higher elevation lakes from deposition of compounds and particulate matter. As a canyon becomes less steep and broader, more nonylphenol is deposited. Identifying these deposition patterns may assist in determining amphibian and fish populations that are at higher risk of negative impact from these compounds.

  1. On-Line Derivatization Gas Chromatography Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for Determination of Endocrine Disruptors in Surface Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2004-03-31

    A method has been developed for the determination of endocrine disruptors (EDs) (containing hydroxyl groups) in surface water from different sources. The surface water samples from different sites including school and local dormitory sewage effluents, lake water and river water were collected and analyzed. In this method, the pretreated sample is directly analyzed by GC-MS using on-line derivatization, where tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMA-OH) was used as the derivatizing agent. Use of large-volume direct sample introduction (DSI) and co-injection of the sample and TMAOH avoids external contaminations as observed in conventional derivatization protocols. Additionally, the use of chemical ionization (CI) and CI-MS/MS could enable detection of EDs at lower concentrations and reduce the matrices' interference thereby enhancing detection sensitivity of EDs for quantification. In this work, the use of dichloromethane as CI reagent for EDs is reported for the first time and could detect EDs to concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL. The recovery ranged from 74 to 112 % and the relative standard derivations for replicate analyses ranged from 5 to 17 %. We hope that this method will be applicable for routine analysis of EDs with hydroxyl functional groups.

  2. Validation and application of reporter gene assays for the determination of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disruptor activity in sport supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T; Oplatowska, Michalina; Connolly, Lisa

    2012-07-01

    Previously developed estrogen and androgen mammalian reporter gene assays (RGAs) were assessed for their potential use as a quantitative screening method in the detection of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disruptors (EDs) in sport supplements. The validation of both RGAs coupled with dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) was performed in accordance with European Commission Decision EC/2002/6579 for biological screening methods. Decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) were established for both the estrogen and androgen RGAs. All samples were compliant with CCα and CCβ in both bioassays. Recovery rates were 96 % for 17β-estradiol and 115 % for dihydrotestosterone as obtained in their corresponding RGA. Both estrogens and androgens were stable in samples for more than 3 weeks, when stored at -20 °C. Specificity, good repeatability (coefficients of variation (CV), 12-25 %), reproducibility and robustness of both bioassays were also observed. Four different ED modes of action were determined for estrogens and androgens in 53 sport supplements, using the validated RGAs. This study revealed that 89 % of the investigated sport supplements contained estrogenic EDs and 51 % contained androgenic compounds. In conclusion, both bioassays are suitable for sport supplement screening of estrogenic and androgenic EDs.

  3. Examining the effects of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas P J; Knudsen, Sine H; Karstoft, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the impact of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function promotes our understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia-related disease.......Investigating the impact of hyperglycemia on pancreatic endocrine function promotes our understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia-related disease....

  4. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    /antagonistic activity with the ecdysteroid-responsive Drosophila melanogaster BII cell line 6) to draft an OECD guideline proposal for testing of chemicals based on the experimental work performed within this study In preliminary investigations with A. tonsa were studied various parameters related to processes...... regulated by hormones such as growth, molting, sexual maturation and reproduction. The primary endpoints were larval development ratio, egg production and sex ratio. Exposure experiments were conducted with naturally occurring and synthetic vertebrate and invertebrate hormones as well as compounds known...... contribution of the present work with BFRs was to establish data on their (sub)chronic toxicity towards marine copepods. To discriminate between general toxicological and endocrine-mediated toxic effects, the model compounds were assessed in vitro for ecdysteroid agonistic/antagonistic activity using...

  5. Endocrine-Disrupting Effects of Pesticides through Interference with Human Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Rui; Gan, Jay; Liu, Jing; Liu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Many pesticides have been identified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) due to their ability to bind sex-steroid hormone receptors. However, little attention has been paid to the ability of pesticides to interfere with other steroid hormone receptors such as glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that plays a critical role in metabolic, endocrine, immune, and nervous systems. In this study, the glucocorticoidic and antiglucocorticoidic effects of 34 pesticides on human GR were investigated using luciferase reporter gene assay. Surprisingly, none of the test chemicals showed GR agonistic activity, but 12 chemicals exhibited apparent antagonistic effects. Bifenthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, resmethrin, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDT, methoxychlor, ethiofencarb, and tolylfluanid showed remarkable GR antagonistic properties with RIC20 values lower than 10(-6) M. The disruption of glucocorticoid-responsive genes in H4IIE and J774A.1 cells was further evaluated on these 12 GR antagonists. In H4IIEcells, four organochlorine insecticides, bifenthrin, and 3-PBA decreased cortisol-induced PEPCK gene expression, while o,p'-DDT and methoxychlor inhibited cortisol-stimulated Arg and TAT gene expression. Cypermethrin and tolyfluanid attenuated cortisol-induced TAT expression. In J774A.1 cells, λ-cyhalothrin, resmethrin, 3-PBA, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, methoxychlor- and tolylfluanid-reduced cortisol-stimulated GILZ expression. Furthermore, molecular docking simulation indicated that different interactions may stabilize the binding between molecules and GR. Our findings suggest that comprehensive screening and evaluation of GR antagonists and agonists should be considered to better understand the health and ecological risks of man-made chemicals such as pesticides.

  6. PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID (PFOA): INVESTIGATION FOR POSSIBLE ENDOCRINE EFFECTS IN FACTORY WORKERS AND CORRELATION WITH RESULTS FROM ANIMAL STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation summarizes a quantitative risk assessment procedure that was performed in West Virginia in response to a Court Order. Briefly, two putative endocrine effects had been observed in factory workers and even though a large number of animal studies which had already ...

  7. Effect of serotonin receptor blockade on endocrine and cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, S; Secher, N H; Knigge, U

    1993-01-01

    Effects of blockade of serotonin (5-HT) receptors on the integrated cardiovascular and endocrine adaptations during head-up tilt were investigated in normal men. In control experiments 50 degrees head-up tilt increased heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance (TPR), plasma renin activity (PRA...

  8. Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Nitrate after In Utero Exposure in Rats and of Nitrate and Nitrite in the H295R and T-Screen Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille Reimer; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie;

    2009-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that nitrate acts as an endocrine disrupter affecting the androgen production in adult males. This raises a concern for more severe endocrine disrupting effects after exposure during the sensitive period of prenatal male sexual development. As there are no existing studi...

  9. Adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen in young women with breast cancer: determinants of interruptions vary over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluze, C; Rey, D; Huiart, L; BenDiane, M K; Bouhnik, A D; Berenger, C; Carrieri, M P; Giorgi, R

    2012-04-01

    In premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer (BC), 5 years of tamoxifen is recommended. Little is known about reasons for interruption in this population. The aim was to estimate the incidence of tamoxifen interruption and its correlates among younger women. Using a prospective cohort Elippse 40 of women with BC aged ≤ 40 diagnosed between 2005 and 2008, we studied 196 women. Tamoxifen interruption was defined as two or more consecutive months without dispensed prescription of tamoxifen, based on pharmacy refill database. Two periods were studied: between tamoxifen initiation and 16 months after BC diagnosis, and between 16 and 28 months. Among women treated with tamoxifen, 42% interrupted within the first 2 years of treatment. During the first period, treatment interruptions were associated with a lack of understandable information about endocrine treatment and insufficient social support. During the second period, another set of factors were associated with interruption: treatment side-effects, no longer fearing cancer relapse, lack of social support, no opportunity to ask questions at the time of diagnosis, and fewer treatment modalities. Improving information and patient-provider relationship might prevent interruption. Particular attention should be paid to women with little social support.

  10. The non-genomic effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on mammalian sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, R S; Escada-Rebelo, S; Correia, M; Mota, P C; Ramalho-Santos, J

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to toxicants present in the environment, especially the so-called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), has been associated with decreased sperm quality and increased anomalies in male reproductive organs over the past decades. Both human and animal populations are continuously exposed to ubiquitous synthetic and natural-occurring EDCs through diet, dermal contact and/or inhalation, therefore potentially compromising male reproductive health. Although the effects of EDC are likely induced via multiple genomic-based pathways, their non-genomic effects may also be relevant. Furthermore, spermatozoa are transcriptionally inactive cells that can come in direct contact with EDCs in reproductive fluids and secretions and are therefore a good model to address non-genomic effects. This review thus focuses on the non-genomic effects of several important EDCs relevant to mammalian exposure. Notably, EDCs were found to interfere with pre-existing pathways inducing a panoply of deleterious effects to sperm function that included altered intracellular Ca(2) (+) oscillations, induction of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased DNA damage and decreased sperm motility and viability, among others, potentially jeopardizing male fertility. Although many studies have used non-environmentally relevant concentrations of only one compound for mechanistic studies, it is important to remember that mammals are not exposed to one, but rather to a multitude of environmental EDCs, and synergistic effects may occur. Furthermore, some effects have been detected with single compounds at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  11. Parental effects of endocrine disrupting compounds in aquatic wildlife: Is there evidence of transgenerational inheritance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Adam R

    2015-08-01

    The effects of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on aquatic wildlife are increasingly being recognized for their complexity. Investigators have detected alterations at multiple levels of biological organization in offspring exposed to EDCs through the blood or germ line of the parents, suggesting that generational consequences of EDCs are evident. Exposure to EDCs through the parents is concerning because if the resulting phenotype of the offspring is heritable and affects fitness, then evolutionary consequences may be evident. This review summarizes the evidence for transgenerational effects of EDCs in aquatic wildlife and illustrates cases where alterations appear to be transmitted maternally, paternally, or parentally. The literature indicates that EDC exposure to the parents induces developmental, physiological, endocrinological, and behavioral changes as well as increased mortality of offspring raised in clean environments. What is lacking, however, is a clear demonstration of heritable transgenerational effects in aquatic wildlife. Therefore, it is not known if the parental effects are the result of developmental or phenotypic plasticity or if the altered phenotypes are durably passed to subsequent generations. Epigenetic changes to gene regulation are discussed as a possible mechanism responsible for EDC induced parental effects. Additional research is needed to evaluate if heritable effects of EDCs are evident in aquatic wildlife, as has been demonstrated for terrestrial mammals.

  12. Adverse effects of endocrine disruptors on the foetal testis development: focus on the phthalates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Pairault

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are great concerns about the increasing incidence of abnormalities in male reproductive function. Human sperm counts have markedly dropped and the rate of testicular cancer has clearly augmented over the past four decades. Moreover, the prevalence rates of cryptorchidism and hypospadias are also probably increasing. It has been hypothesized that all these adverse trends in male reproduction result from abnormalities in the development of the testis during foetal and neonatal life. Furthermore, many recent epidemiological, clinical and experimental data suggest that these male reproductive disorders could be due to the effects of xenobiotics termed endocrine disruptors, which are becoming more and more concentrated and prevalent in our environment. Among these endocrine disruptors, we chose to focus this review on the phthalates for different reasons: 1 they are widespread in the environment; 2 their concentrations in many human biological fluids have been measured; 3 the experimental data using rodent models suggesting a reprotoxicity are numerous and are the most convincing; 4 their deleterious effects on the in vivo and in vitro development and function of the rat foetal testis have been largely studied; 5 some epidemiological data in humans suggest a reprotoxic effect at environmental concentrations at least during neonatal life. However, the direct effects of phthalates on human foetal testis have never been explored. Thus, as we did for the rat in the 1990s, we recently developed and validated an organ culture system which allows maintenance of the development of the different cell types of human foetal testis. In this system, addition of 10-4 M MEHP (mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, the most produced phthalate, had no effect on basal or LH-stimulated production of testosterone, but it reduced the number of germ cells by increasing their apoptosis, without modification of their proliferation. This is the first experimental demonstration

  13. Neuroendocrine targets of endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Andrea C

    2010-01-01

    The central neuroendocrine systems are responsible for the control of homeostatic processes in the body, including reproduction, growth, metabolism and energy balance, as well as stress responsiveness. These processes are initiated by signals in the central nervous system, specifically the hypothalamus, and are conveyed first by neural and then by endocrine effectors. The neuroendocrine systems, as the links between the brain and peripheral endocrine organs, play critical roles in the ability of an organism to respond to its environment under normal circumstances. When neuroendocrine homeostasis is disrupted by environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals, a variety of perturbations can ensue, particularly when endocrine disruption occurs during critical developmental time periods. This article will discuss the evidence for environmental endocrine disruption of neuroendocrine systems and the effects on endocrine and reproductive functions.

  14. Neuroendocrine and behavioral effects of embryonic exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Mary Ann; Lavoie, Emma; Thompson, Nichola; Barton, Ashley; Whitehouse, Kasen; Barton, Meredith; Abdelnabi, Mahmoud; Quinn, Michael; Panzica, GianCarlo; Viglietti-Panzica, Carla

    2008-03-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) exert hormone-like activity in vertebrates and exposure to these compounds may induce both short- and long-term deleterious effects including functional alterations that contribute to decreased reproduction and fitness. An overview of the effects of a number of EDCs, including androgenic and estrogenic compounds, will be considered. Many studies have been conducted in the precocial Japanese quail, which provides an excellent avian model for testing these compounds. Long-term impacts have also been studied by raising a subset of animals through maturation. The EDCs examined included estradiol, androgen active compounds, soy phytoestrogens, and atrazine. Effects on behavior and hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems were examined. All EDCs impaired reproduction, regardless of potential mechanism of action. Male sexual behavior proved to be a sensitive index of EDC exposure and embryonic exposure to a variety of EDCs consistently resulted in impaired male sexual behavior. Several hypothalamic neural systems proved to be EDC responsive, including arginine vasotocin (VT), catecholamines, and gonadotropin releasing hormone system (GnRH-I). Finally, EDCs are known to impact both the immune and thyroid systems; these effects are significant for assessing the overall impact of EDCs on the fitness of avian populations. Therefore, exposure to EDCs during embryonic development has consequences beyond impaired function of the reproductive axis. In conclusion, behavioral alterations have the advantage of revealing both direct and indirect effects of exposure to an EDC and in some cases can provide a valuable clue into functional deficits at different physiological levels.

  15. Side Effects of Neem Oil on the Midgut Endocrine Cells of the Green Lacewing Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, E L; Santos, D C

    2014-04-01

    We described the ultrastructure of Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás) midgut endocrine cells in larva, pupa, and adult, and evaluated the side effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica), on these cells. During the larval period, C. claveri were fed (ad libitum) Diatraea saccharalis (F.) eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, or 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that two subtypes of endocrine cells, namely granular and vesicular, occurred in the midgut epithelium during the three stages of the life cycle. Both cell types did not reach the midgut lumen and were positioned basally in the epithelium. The endocrine cells did not show extensive infoldings of the basal plasma membrane, and there were numerous secretory granules in the basal region of the cytoplasm. In the granular endocrine cells, the granules were completely filled with a dense matrix. In the vesicular endocrine cells, the main secretory products consisted of haloed vesicles. Ultrastructural examination indicated that only the granular endocrine cells exhibited signs of morphologic changes of cell injury present in all life cycle stages after the larvae were chronically exposed to neem oil by ingestion. The major cellular damage consisted of dilatation and vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial swelling. Our data suggest that cytotoxic effects on midgut endocrine cells can contribute to a generalized disruption of the physiological processes in this organ due to a general alteration of endocrine function.

  16. Adipogenic Effects of a Combination of the Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds Bisphenol A, Diethylhexylphthalate, and Tributyltin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Biemann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The food contaminants bisphenol A (BPA, diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP, and tributyltin (TBT are potent endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC known to interfere with adipogenesis. EDC usually act in mixtures and not as single compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a simultaneous exposure of BPA, DEHP, and TBT on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into adipocytes. Methods: Multipotent murine mesenchymal stem cells (C3H10T1/2 were exposed to EDC mixtures in high concentrations, i.e. MIX-high (10 µmol/l BPA, 100 µmol/l DEHP, 100 nmol/l TBT, and in environmentally relevant concentrations, i.e. MIX-low (10 nmol/l BPA, 100 nmol/l DEHP, 1 nmol/l TBT. The exposure was performed either for the entire culture time (0-12 days or at distinct stages of adipogenic differentiation. At day 12 of cell culture, the amount of adipocytes, triglyceride content (TG, and adipogenic marker gene expression were analyzed. Results: MIX-high increased the development of adipocytes and the expression of adipogenic marker genes independently of the exposure window. The total TG amount was not increased. The low-concentrated EDC mixture had no obvious impact on adipogenesis. Conclusion: In EDC mixtures, the adipogenic effect of TBT and DEHP predominates single effects of BPA. Mixture effects of EDC are not deducible from single compound experiments.

  17. The Effects of Electromagnetic Field on the Endocrine System in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangün, Özlem; Dündar, Bumin; Çömlekçi, Selçuk; Büyükgebiz, Attila

    2015-12-01

    Children are exposed to various kind of non-ionizan radiation in their daily life involuntarily. The potential sensitivity of developing organism to the effects of radiofrequency (RF) signals, the higher estimated specific absorption rate (SAR) values of children and greater lifetime cumulative risk raised the scientific interest for children's vulnerability to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). In modern societies, children are being exposed to EMFs in very early ages. There are many researches in scientific literature investigating the alterations of biological parameters in living organisms after EMFs. Although the international guidelines did not report definite, convincing data about the causality, there are unignorable amount of studies indicating the increased risk of cancer, hematologic effects and cognitive impairment. Although they are less in amount; growing number of studies reveal the impacts on metabolism and endocrine function. Reproductive system and growth look like the most challenging fields. However there are also some concerns on detrimental effects of EMFs on thyroid functions, adrenal hormones, glucose homeostasis and melatonin levels. It is not easy to conduct a study investigating the effects of EMFs on a fetus or child due to ethical issues. Hence, the studies are usually performed on virtual models or animals. Although the results are conflicting and cannot be totally matched with humans; there is growing evidence to distress us about the threats of EMF on children.

  18. Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology Also Govern Effects of Chemicals on the Endocrine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Barile, Frank A; Blaauboer, Bas J

    2015-01-01

    The present debate on chemicals with Hormonal activity, often termed 'endocrine disruptors', is highly controversial and includes challenges of the present paradigms used in toxicology and in hazard identification and risk characterization. In our opinion, chemicals with hormonal activity can...

  19. The effect of pheochromocytoma treatment on subclinical inflammation and endocrine function of adipose tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BOSANSKA, L; PETRAK, O; ZELINKA, T; MRAZ, M; WIDIMSKY, Jr, J; HALUZIK, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of surgical removal of pheochromocytoma on the endocrine function of adipose tissue and subclinical inflammation as measured by circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) levels...

  20. Effect of endocrine treatment on voiding and prostate size in men with prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise L; Klarskov, Peter; Mommsen, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and quantify changes in voiding parameters and prostate size in men with prostate cancer from before the start of endocrine treatment and during long-term follow-up.......The aim of this study was to assess and quantify changes in voiding parameters and prostate size in men with prostate cancer from before the start of endocrine treatment and during long-term follow-up....

  1. Investigating apical adverse effects of four endocrine active substances in the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Arnaud; Lagadic, Laurent; Barsi, Alpar; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Joaquim-Justo, Célia; Ducrot, Virginie

    2014-09-15

    The hermaphroditic gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis is proposed as a candidate species for the development of OECD guidelines for testing of the reprotoxicity of chemicals, including endocrine active substances (EASs). Up to now, only a few putative EASs have been tested for their reproductive toxicity in this species. In this study, we investigate the effects of four EASs with different affinities to the vertebrate estrogen and androgen receptors (chlordecone as an estrogen; cyproterone acetate, fenitrothion and vinclozolin as anti-androgens) on the reproduction of L. stagnalis in a 21-day semi-static test. Testosterone and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were used as the reference compounds. The tested EASs had no significant effect on growth and survival at the tested concentration ranges (ng to μg/L). Classical reproduction endpoints (i.e., oviposition and fecundity) were not responsive to the tested chemicals, except for chlordecone and 17α-ethinylestradiol, which hampered reproduction from 19.6 μg/L and 17.6 μg/L, respectively. The frequency of polyembryonic eggs, used as an additional endpoint, demonstrated the effects of all compounds except EE2. The molecular pathways, which are involved in such reproduction impairments, remain unknown. Our results suggest that egg quality is a more sensitive endpoint as compared to other reproductive endpoints commonly assessed in mollusk toxicity tests.

  2. Direct power-frequency electric field effects on mammalian endocrine tissue. [60-Hz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymangrover, J.R.; Keku, E.; Hsieh, S.T.; Dunlap, W.P.; Seto, Y.J.

    1987-06-01

    A number of studies have investigated the in vivo biological effects of power-frequency electric fields (EF). Direct effects of EF on mammalian tissues, however, have rarely been reported. They now report that a 60-Hz EF can directly enhance the steroidogenic response of superfused rat adrenocortical tissue. The EF did not influence basal steroidogenic activity, however the corticosterone response to 10 mU of ACTH was almost doubled by an unperturbed 1000 kV/m EF during the initial 2 hr of exposure and was enhanced fourfold by 5.5 to 7 hr of exposure with a 10 kV/m EF. Other EF intensities (e.g., 5 and 100 kV/m) were without effect at these times. Turning the 1000 kV/m EF on and off at 30-min intervals did not influence the initial enhanced steroidogenic response but did cause an additional two- to threefold elevation in the response following 5.5-7 hr of exposure. It is not clear what EF exposure parameters or mechanisms were primarily responsible for these bioeffects, but it appears that direct exposure of mammalian endocrine tissue to a 60-Hz EF is capable of significantly influencing important cellular processes.

  3. Determination of endocrine disruptors in Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) samples from the Lochinvar National Park of Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichilongo, Kwenga; Torto, Nelson

    2006-08-01

    Analysis of serum, whole blood and liver tissue samples from Kafue lechwe in the Lochinvar National Park of Zambia for suspected endocrine disrupting compounds revealed high concentrations for some of the compounds. 45 samples of serum, whole blood and liver tissue were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction followed by an analysis using Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detection (GC-ECD). The following endocrine disruptors were analyzed: deltamethrin, aldrin, endosulfan, dieldrin, pp-DDD, heptachlor, d-t-allethrin, pp-DDE, endrin and pp-DDT. For all the samples, dieldrin showed the highest concentration ranging from 1.7 to 44.4 microg/ml in serum and whole blood sample extracts and 0.10-5.1 microg/g wet weight in liver sample extracts. The most frequently detected was deltamethrin in 62% of the samples. Percent recoveries in spiked laboratory blanks ranged between 60% and 100% while calculated detection limits ranged from 0.004 to 0.21 microg/ml for all the endocrine disruptors evaluated. Where endocrine disruptors were detected, the concentrations of most of them far exceeded the maximum residue limits (MRLs) and the extraneous maximum residue limits (EMRLs) set by the Codex Alimentarius of the United Nations (UN), Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

  4. Targeting the UPR to Circumvent Endocrine Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT An endocrine therapy is the most effective means to (initially) manage many hormone -dependent breast cancers. Unfortunately...positive (ER+) [2,3]. However, 50% of all ER+ breast tumors will not respond to endocrine therapy [4]. Tamoxifen produces an overall 26% proportional...determine cell cycle profiles, cells were cultured at 60-80% confluence in growth medium for 24 h. The following day, cells were treated with vehicle, NPPTA

  5. Surgical treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Cerqueira Cesar Machado

    localization of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1related tumors are crucial for determining the best surgical strategies in each individual case with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  6. Endocrine disruptors and the breast: early life effects and later life disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macon, Madisa B; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer risk has both heritable and environment/lifestyle components. The heritable component is a small contribution (5-27 %), leaving the majority of risk to environment (e.g., applied chemicals, food residues, occupational hazards, pharmaceuticals, stress) and lifestyle (e.g., physical activity, cosmetics, water source, alcohol, smoking). However, these factors are not well-defined, primarily due to the enormous number of factors to be considered. In both humans and rodent models, environmental factors that act as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have been shown to disrupt normal mammary development and lead to adverse lifelong consequences, especially when exposures occur during early life. EDCs can act directly or indirectly on mammary tissue to increase sensitivity to chemical carcinogens or enhance development of hyperplasia, beaded ducts, or tumors. Protective effects have also been reported. The mechanisms for these changes are not well understood. Environmental agents may also act as carcinogens in adult rodent models, directly causing or promoting tumor development, typically in more than one organ. Many of the environmental agents that act as EDCs and are known to affect the breast are discussed. Understanding the mechanism(s) of action for these compounds will be critical to prevent their effects on the breast in the future.

  7. Histologic, immunologic and endocrine biomarkers indicate contaminant effects in fishes of the Ashtabula River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Blazer, V.S.; Hitt, N.P.; McCormick, S.D.; Devault, D.S.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fish as sentinels of aquatic ecosystem health is a biologically relevant approach to environmental monitoring and assessment. We examined the health of the Ashtabula River using histologic, immunologic, and endocrine biomarkers in brown bullhead (BB; Ameiurus nebulosus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and compared fish collected from a reference site (Conneaut Creek). Seasonal analysis was necessary to distinguish differences in fish between the two rivers. Overall BB from the Ashtabula River had a lower condition factor and significantly more macrophage aggregates than those from the reference site. Reduced bactericidal and cytotoxic-cell activity was observed in anterior kidney leukocytes from both BB and largemouth bass from the Ashtabula River. Lower plasma thyroxine and triiodo-L-thyronine in both species in the Ashtabula River indicated disruption of the thyroid axis. Differences in physiological biomarker responses were supported by body burden chemical concentrations when data were analyzed on a seasonal basis. The use of two fish species added a level of rigor that demonstrated biological effects were not exclusive to a single species. The results provide strong evidence that contaminants have affected fish in the Ashtabula River, a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and provide a baseline by which to evaluate remediation activities.

  8. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioids and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jennifer A; Opper, Susan E; Agarwal, Sonali; Fibuch, Eugene E

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are among the oldest known and most widely used analgesics. The application of opioids has expanded over the last few decades, especially in the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain. This upsurge in opioid use has been accompanied by the increasingly recognized occurrence of opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This may arise after exposure to enteral, parenteral, or neuraxial opioids. Opioid-associated endocrinopathy consists primarily of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and may manifest with symptoms of hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, and other hormonal disturbances. Additionally, opioid related endocrine dysfunction may be coupled with such disorders as osteoporosis and mood disturbances including depression. Undesirable changes in pain sensitivity such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and reduced potency of opioid analgesia may also be potential consequences of chronic opioid consumption. Few studies to date have been able to establish what degree of opioid exposure, in terms of dose or duration of therapy, may predispose patients to opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This article will review the currently available literature concerning opioid-associated endocrinopathy and will provide recommendations for the evaluation, monitoring, and management of opioid-associated endocrinopathy and its other accompanying undesired effects.

  9. Endocrine and Metabolic Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Aktepe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Much as an increase in the use of psychotropic drugs is observed in children and adolescents over the last decade, the endocrine and metabolic side effects of these drugs can limit their use. Atypical antipsychotics can cause many side effects, which are not suitable for the developmental periods of children and adolescents, such as those related with thyroid, blood sugar, level of sex hormones, growth rate and bone metabolism. Children are under a more serious risk regarding the weight increasing effects of atypical antipsychotics and weight gain that is not proportionate with age is especially important due to the association between glucose or lipid abnormalities and cardiovascular mortality. Aripiprazole and ziprasidone are the least risky antipsychotic drugs when it comes to metabolic side affects. The antipsychotic drug that is associated with weight increase and diabetes in children and adolescents most is olanzapine. Even though there are no comparative long-term data concerning children, it is suggested by the currently available information that metabolic side effects including dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance are at an alarming level when it comes to long-term treatment with antipsychotics. The most risky agents in terms of hyperglycemia and glucosuria development are olanzapine and clozapine. Use of risperidone and haloperidol should be undertaken with caution since it may bring about the risk of hyperprolactinemia. Among the antidepressants associated with weight loss and suppression of appetite are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, bupropion and venlafaxine. Thyroid functions can be affected by lithium, carbamazepine and valproate treatments. It is reported that the side effect most frequently associated with valproate is weight increase. The relationship between valproate treatment and the development of hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary syndrome in young women should also be kept in mind. [TAF Prev

  10. Specific transgenerational imprinting effects of the endocrine disruptor methoxychlor on male gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouder, Christelle; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2011-02-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), among which methoxychlor (MXC), have been reported to affect the male reproductive system. This study evaluates the possible deleterious effects of MXC on imprinted genes. After administration of the chemical in adult male mice or in pregnant mice we analyzed by pyrosequencing possible methylation defects in two paternally imprinted (H19 and Meg3 (Gtl2)) and three maternally imprinted (Mest (Peg1), Snrpn, and Peg3) genes in the sperm and in the tail, liver, and skeletal muscle DNAs of the adult male mice and of the male offspring. MXC treatment of adult mice decreased the percentages of methylated CpGs of Meg3 and increased those of Mest, Snrpn, and Peg3 in the sperm DNA. MXC treatment of pregnant mice decreased the mean sperm concentrations by 30% and altered the methylation pattern of all the imprinted genes tested in the F1 offspring. In the latter case, MXC effects were transgenerational but disappeared gradually from F1 to F3. MXC did not affect imprinting in the somatic cells, suggesting that it exerts its damaging effects via the process of reprogramming that is unique to gamete development. A systematic analysis at the CpG level showed a heterogeneity in the CpG sensitivity to MXC. This observation suggests that not only DNA methylation but also other epigenetic modifications can explain the transgenerational effects of MXC. The reported effects of EDCs on human male spermatogenesis might be mediated by complex imprinting alterations analogous to those described in this study.

  11. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    BACKGROUND: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to reproductive changes in boys in the Western world, however, less is known about influence of EDCs in women. The incidence of precocious breast development is increasing in USA and Europe and mammary gland development has been...... suggested as particularly sensitive to endocrine disruption. Mammary gland examination in toxicological studies may be useful for improving knowledge on possible influences of EDCs on human mammary glands and also be useful for detection of endocrine disrupting effects of chemicals as part of safety testing...... and genistein, a mixture of phytoestrogens, and a mixture of environmentally relevant estrogenic EDCs of various origins. Moreover, mixtures of antiandrogenic chemicals were investigated. These include a mixture of pesticides and a mixture of environmentally relevant anti-androgenic EDCs of various origins...

  12. Estrogenic compounds -endocrine disruptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Constantin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors (polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane [DDT], dioxin, and some pesticides are estrogen-like and anti-androgenic chemicals in the environment. They mimic natural hormones, inhibit the action of hormones, or alter the normal regulatory function of the endocrine system and have potential hazardous effects on male reproductive axis causing infertility. Although testicular and prostate cancers, abnormal sexual development, undescended testis, chronic inflammation, Sertoli-cell-only pattern, hypospadias, altered pituitary and thyroid gland functions are also observed, the available data are insufficient to deduce worldwide conclusions.

  13. Studying the effects of genistein on gene expression of fish embryos as an alternative testing approach for endocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Viktoria; Wichmann, Arne; Kriehuber, Ralf; Muth-Köhne, Elke; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Fenske, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of endocrine disruption currently relies on testing strategies involving adult vertebrates. In order to minimize the use of animal tests according to the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement, we propose a transcriptomics and fish embryo based approach as an alternative to identify and analyze an estrogenic activity of environmental chemicals. For this purpose, the suitability of 48 h and 7 days post-fertilization zebrafish and medaka embryos to test for estrogenic disruption was evaluated. The embryos were exposed to the phytoestrogen genistein and subsequently analyzed by microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR. The functional analysis showed that the genes affected related to multiple metabolic and signaling pathways in the early fish embryo, which reflect the known components of genistein's mode of actions, like apoptosis, estrogenic response, hox gene expression and steroid hormone synthesis. Moreover, the transcriptomic data also suggested a thyroidal mode of action and disruption of the nervous system development. The parallel testing of two fish species provided complementary data on the effects of genistein at gene expression level and facilitated the separation of common from species-dependent effects. Overall, the study demonstrated that combining fish embryo testing with transcriptomics can deliver abundant information about the mechanistic effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals, rendering this strategy a promising alternative approach to test for endocrine disruption in a whole organism in-vitro scale system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Estrogenic environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical effects on reproductive neuroendocrine function and dysfunction across the life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Sarah M; Gore, Andrea C

    2007-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the normal function of an organism's endocrine system. Many EDCs are resistant to biodegradation, due to their structural stability, and persist in the environment. The focus of this review is on natural and artificial EDCs that act through estrogenic mechanisms to affect reproductive neuroendocrine systems. This endocrine axis comprises the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary gonadotropins, and gonadal steroid hormones, including estrogens. Although it is not surprising that EDCs that mimic or antagonize estrogen receptors may exert actions upon reproductive targets, the mechanisms for these effects are complex and involve all three levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) system. Nevertheless, considerable evidence links exposure to estrogenic environmental EDCs with neuroendocrine reproductive deficits in wildlife and in humans. The effects of an EDC are variable across the life cycle of an animal, and are particularly potent when exposure occurs during fetal and early postnatal development. As a consequence, abnormal sexual differentiation, disrupted reproductive function, or inappropriate sexual behavior may be detected later in life. This review will cover the effects of two representative classes of estrogenic EDCs, phytoestrogens and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), on neuroendocrine reproductive function, from molecules to behavior, across the vertebrate life cycle. Finally, we identify the gaps of knowledge in this field and suggest future directions for study.

  15. Contaminant mixtures and repoductive health: Developmental toxicity effects in rats after mixed exposure to environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals, with focus on effects in females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Christiansen, Sofie; Hass, Ulla

    disorders or later onset adult diseases. However, experimental evidence on the effects of developmental exposure to environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals in females has been missing attention. Since chemical exposure can affect female reproductive development it is important to investigate......Background: In toxicological testing, effects of endocrine disrupters are in most cases more thoroughly investigated in males than in females. In males the hypothesis of testicu lar dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) proposes that there is a common origin in fetal life of the increase in frequency observed...... in later years of for example incidence of boys born with hypospadias and young men with low semen quality in the human male population. Furthermore, it has been observed in animal studies that exposure during fetal life to endocrine disrupters may lead to similar adverse reproductive effects. It has been...

  16. Pain sensitivity, mood and plasma endocrine levels in man following long-distance running: effects of naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janal, M N; Colt, E W; Clark, W C; Glusman, M

    1984-05-01

    The effects of intense exercise on pain perception, mood, and plasma endocrine levels in man were studied under naloxone and saline conditions. Twelve long-distance runners (mean weekly mileage = 41.5) were evaluated on thermal, ischemic, and cold pressor pain tests and on mood visual analogue scales (VAS). Blood was drawn for determination of plasma levels of beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (BEir), growth hormone (GH), adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), and prolactin (PRL). These procedures were undertaken before and after a 6.3 mile run at 85% of maximal aerobic capacity. Subjects participated on two occasions in a double-blind procedure counterbalanced for drug order: on one day they received 2 i.v. injections of naloxone (0.8 mg in 2 ml vehicle each) at 20 min intervals following the run; on the other day, 2 equal volume injections of normal saline (2 ml). Sensory decision theory analysis of the responses to thermal stimulation showed that discriminability, P(A), was significantly reduced post-run under the saline condition, a hypoalgesic effect; response bias, B, was unaffected. Ischemic pain reports were significantly reduced post-run on the saline day, also a hypoalgesic effect. Naloxone reversed the post-run ischemic but not thermal hypoalgesic effects. Joy, euphoria, cooperation, and conscientiousness VAS ratings were elevated post-run; naloxone attenuated the elevation of joy and euphoria ratings only. Plasma levels of BEir, ACTH, GH, and PRL were significantly increased post-run. The results show that long-distance running produces hypoalgesia and mood elevation in man. The effects of naloxone implicate endogenous opioid neural systems as mechanisms of some but not all of the run-induced alterations in mood and pain perception.

  17. Putative effects of endocrine disrupters on pubertal development in the human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, Grete; Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Pubertal development is regulated by gonadotrophins and sex hormones. There has been a clear secular trend in the timing of puberty during the last century, puberty becoming earlier. Although improved nutrition is assumed to be the cause, this could partly be associated with exposure to so......-called endocrine disrupters. Precocious puberty has been described in several case reports of accidental exposure to oestrogenic compounds in cosmetic products, food and pharmaceuticals. Local epidemics of premature thelarche have also been suggested to be linked to endocrine disrupters. Children adopted from...

  18. Study of the effect of iron overload on the function of endocrine glands in male thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulzahra Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron overload is an important issue in the state of thalassemic patients due to the harmful effect of high concentration of iron deposited in different tissues in human body including endocrine glands. In the present work, an attempt is carried out to estimate the effect of iron overload in thalassemic patients on the function of endocrine glands through the estimation of their ability to secrete adequate amounts of certain hormones. Materials and Methods: Seventy eight male children with beta-thalassemia, in the age-group of 4-11 years, were enrolled for this research. These children were being treated with frequent transfusions and long-term iron chelation therapy. Thirty age and sex matched children without thalassemia constituted the control group. Ferritin and different hormones were estimated by ELISA technique. Results: The results showed a mild reduction in the function of endocrine glands through the decrease in the level of some hormones. These changes due mainly to the hypoxia and precipitation of iron in certain glands and overlapping with the synthesis or secretion of the hormones. Conclusion: There is a different hormonal disturbances in beta thalassemia patients. Reduction of total body iron store is an important goal of the treatment of thalassemia and measuring the hormones concentration is necessary for the follow up of the thalassemic patients especially during puberty.

  19. Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology Also Govern Effects of Chemicals on the Endocrine System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Autrup, Herman; Barile, Frank A.; Blaauboer, Bas J.; Degen, Gisela H.; Dekant, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Daniel; Domingo, Jose L.; Gori, Gio Batta; Greim, Helmuth; Hengstler, Jan G.; Kacew, Sam; Marquardt, Hans; Pelkonen, Olavi; Savolainen, Kai; Vermeulen, Nico P.

    2015-01-01

    The present debate on chemicals with Hormonal activity, often termed 'endocrine disruptors', is highly controversial and includes challenges of the present paradigms used in toxicology and in hazard identification and risk characterization. In our opinion, chemicals with hormonal activity can be sub

  20. Endocrine effects of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in a one-generation reproduction study in Wistar rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van der L.T.M.; Kuil, van de T.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Slob, W.; Lilienthal, H.; Litens, S.; Herlin, M.; Hakansson, H.; Canton, R.F.; Berg, M.; Visser, T.J.; Loveren, van H.; Vos, J.G.; Piersma, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The brominated flame retardant (BFR) hexabromocyclododecane was tested in a one-generation reproduction assay in Wistar rats, enhanced for endocrine parameters. A solution of the compound in corn oil was mixed in the feed, targeting at dietary exposure of 0-0.1-0.3-1-3-10-30-100 mg/kg body weight/da

  1. Endocrine effects of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in a one-generation reproduction study in Wistar rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ven, L.T.; van de Kuil, T.; Leonards, P.E.; Slob, W.; Lilienthal, H.; Litens, S.; Herlin, M.; Hakansson, H.; Canton, R.F.; van den Berg, M.; Visser, T.J.; van Loveren, H.; Vos, J.G.; Piersma, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The brominated flame retardant (BFR) hexabromocyclododecane was tested in a one-generation reproduction assay in Wistar rats, enhanced for endocrine parameters. A solution of the compound in corn oil was mixed in the feed, targeting at dietary exposure of 0-0.1-0.3-1-3-10-30-100 mg/kg body weight/da

  2. Identification of Endocrine Disruptive Effects in the Aquatic Environment - a Partial Life Cycle Study in Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wester PW; Brandhof EJ van den; Vos JH; Ven LTM van der; TOX; LER

    2003-01-01

    In this project, an assay was developed and applied to identify hormone active substances in the aquatic environment. Laboratory fish were exposed during the reproductive and development phase to a range of established endocrine active compounds; these were estrogen (17 beta-estradiol), anti-estroge

  3. The Role of Epigenetics in the Latent Effects of Early Life Exposure to Obesogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stel, Jente; Legler, Juliette

    2015-10-01

    Recent research supports a role for exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the global obesity epidemic. Obesogenic EDCs have the potential to inappropriately stimulate adipogenesis and fat storage, influence metabolism and energy balance and increase susceptibility to obesity. Developmental exposure to obesogenic EDCs is proposed to interfere with epigenetic programming of gene regulation, partly by activation of nuclear receptors, thereby influencing the risk of obesity later in life. The goal of this minireview is to briefly describe the epigenetic mechanisms underlying developmental plasticity and to evaluate the evidence of a mechanistic link between altered epigenetic gene regulation by early life EDC exposure and latent onset of obesity. We summarize the results of recent in vitro, in vivo, and transgenerational studies, which clearly show that the obesogenic effects of EDCs such as tributyltin, brominated diphenyl ether 47, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are mediated by the activation and associated altered methylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, the master regulator of adipogenesis, or its target genes. Importantly, studies are emerging that assess the effects of EDCs on the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modifications in altered chromatin structure. These types of studies coupled with genome-wide rather than gene-specific analyses are needed to improve mechanistic understanding of epigenetic changes by EDC exposure. Current advances in the field of epigenomics have led to the first potential epigenetic markers for obesity that can be detected at birth, providing an important basis to determine the effects of developmental exposure to obesogenic EDCs in humans.

  4. Endocrine effects of tobacco smoke exposure during lactation in weaned and adult male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Silva, A P; Oliveira, E; Pinheiro, C R; Santana, A C; Nascimento-Saba, C C; Abreu-Villaça, Y; Moura, E G; Lisboa, P C

    2013-07-01

    Children from pregnant smokers show more susceptibility to develop obesity in adult life. Previously, we failed to demonstrate a program for obesity in rat offspring only when the mothers were exposed to tobacco smoke during lactation. Here, we studied the short- and long-term effects of smoke exposure (SE) to both dams and their pups during lactation on endocrine and metabolic parameters. For this, we designed an experimental model where nursing rats and their pups were divided into two groups: SE group, exposed to smoke in a cigarette smoking machine (four times/day, from the third to the 21st day of lactation), and group, exposed to filtered air. Pups were killed at 21 and 180 days. At weaning, SE pups showed lower body weight (7%), length (5%), retroperitoneal fat mass (59%), visceral adipocyte area (60%), and higher subcutaneous adipocyte area (95%) with hypoinsulinemia (-29%), hyperthyroxinemia (59%), hypercorticosteronemia (60%), and higher adrenal catecholamine content (+58%). In adulthood, SE offspring showed higher food intake (+10%), body total fat mass (+50%), visceral fat mass (retroperitoneal: 55%; mesenteric: 67%; and epididymal: 55%), and lower subcutaneous adipocyte area (24%) with higher serum glucose (11%), leptin (85%), adiponectin (1.4-fold increase), total triiodothyronine (71%), free thyroxine (57%), TSH (36%), triglycerides (65%), VLDL cholesterol (+66%), and HDL cholesterol (91%) levels and lower corticosteronemia (41%) and adrenal catecholamine content (57%). Our present findings suggest that tobacco SE to both dams and their pups during lactation causes malnutrition in early life that programs for obesity and hormonal and metabolic disturbances in adulthood, only if the pups are submitted to the same smoke environment as the mother.

  5. Environmental epigenetics: a role in endocrine disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisch, Abby F; Wright, Robert O; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2012-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals that are structurally similar to steroid or amine hormones have the potential to mimic endocrine endpoints at the receptor level. However, more recently, epigenetic-induced alteration in gene expression has emerged as an alternative way in which environmental compounds may exert endocrine effects. We review concepts related to environmental epigenetics and relevance for endocrinology through three broad examples: 1) effect of early-life nutritional exposures on future obesity and insulin resistance, 2) effect of lifetime environmental exposures such as ionizing radiation on endocrine cancer risk, and 3) potential for compounds previously classified as endocrine disrupting to additionally or alternatively exert effects through epigenetic mechanisms. The field of environmental epigenetics is still nascent, and additional studies are needed to confirm and reinforce data derived from animal models and preliminary human studies. Current evidence suggests that environmental exposures may significantly impact expression of endocrine-related genes and thereby affect clinical endocrine outcomes.

  6. [Determination of four phenolic endocrine disruptors in environmental water samples by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with derivatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Qi, Weimei; Zhao, Xian'en; Lü, Tao; Wang, Xiya; Zheng, Longfang; Yan, Yehao; You, Jinmao

    2014-06-01

    To achieve accurate, fast and sensitive detection of phenolic endocrine disruptors in small volume of environmental water samples, a method of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with fluorescent derivatization was developed for the determination of bisphenol A, nonylphenol, octylphenol and 4-tert-octylphenol in environmental water samples by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD). The DLLME and derivatization conditions were investigated, and the optimized DLLME conditions for small volume of environmental water samples (pH 4.0) at room temperature were as follows: 70 microL chloroform as extraction solvent, 400 microL acetonitrile as dispersing solvent, vortex mixing for 3 min, and then high-speed centrifugation for 2 min. Using 2-[2-(7H-dibenzo [a, g] carbazol-7-yl)-ethoxy] ethyl chloroformate (DBCEC-Cl) as precolumn derivatization reagent, the stable derivatives of the four phenolic endocrine disruptors were obtained in pH 10.5 Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer/acetonitrile at 50 degrees C for 3 min, and then separated within 10 min by HPLC-FLD. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0.9-1.6 ng/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 3.8-7.1 ng/L. This method had perfect linearity, precision and recovery results, and showed obvious advantages and practicality comparing to the previously reported methods. It is a convenient and validated method for the routine analysis of phenolic endocrine disruptors in waste water of paper mill, lake water, domestic wastewater, tap water, etc.

  7. Effect of Acute Administration of Recombinant Human Leptin during the Neonatal Period on Body Temperature and Endocrine Profile of the Piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litten, J C; Mostyn, A; Laws, J; Corson, A M; Symonds, M E; Clarke, L

    2008-01-01

    Leptin is produced predominantly by white adipocytes; in adults it regulates appetite and energy expenditure but its role in the neonate remains to be fully established. To examine the effects of acute administration of recombinant human leptin on the endocrine profile and thermoregulation of neonatal pigs. 24 pairs of siblings (n = 48) were administered with either a single dose (4 microg ml(-1) kg(-1) body weight) of leptin (L: n = 24) or a placebo (P: n = 24) on day 6 of neonatal life. Rectal temperature was recorded, and tissue samples were taken at 1 (n = 12), 2 (n = 12), 4 (n = 12) or 6 (n = 12) hours post-administration. Plasma concentrations of hormones and metabolites were determined in conjunction with messenger RNA (mRNA) for leptin and uncoupling protein-2. Plasma leptin increased following leptin administration, and differences in concentrations of insulin, thyroxine and non-esterified fatty acids were observed between the two groups. Initially, rectal temperature decreased in L pigs but returned to start values by 1.5 h. This decline in rectal temperature was delayed in placebo animals, resulting in differences between treatments at 1.5 and 2 h. Acute leptin administration alters the endocrine profile of pigs and influences the thermoregulatory ability of the neonate. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Multigenerational and transgenerational effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals: A role for altered epigenetic regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Frances; Susiarjo, Martha; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the critical role of early life environment in shaping the future health outcomes of an individual. Moreover, recent studies have revealed that early life perturbations can affect the health of subsequent generations. Hypothesized mechanisms of multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental phenotypes include epigenetic misregulation in germ cells. In this review, we will focus on the available data demonstrating the ability of endocrine...

  9. Endocrine disrupting effects in rats perinatally exposed to a dietary relevant mixture of phytoestrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Mandrup, Karen; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold

    2013-01-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens may prevent certain human diseases, but endocrine activity has been reported in animal studies. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed perinatally to a 1-, 10- or 100-fold “high human dietary intake” mixture of 12 phytoestrogens consisting of mainly the lignan secoisolarici resin....... Further studies are warranted to increase the knowledge upon which risk assessment on dietary phytoestrogen exposure during pregnancy and infancy is based....

  10. Endocrine and cellular stress effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles and nifedipine in marsh frogs Pelophylax ridibundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falfushynska, Halina; Gnatyshyna, Lesya; Horyn, Oksana; Sokolova, Inna; Stoliar, Oksana

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater organisms including amphibians experience increasing exposures to emerging pollutants such as nanoparticles and pharmaceuticals, which can affect their fitness and performance. We studied the effects of two common pollutants extensively used in industry, pharmaceutical and personal care products, nano-zinc oxide (nZnO) and a Ca-channel blocker nifedipine (Nfd), on endocrine status and cellular stress markers of the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus. Males were exposed for 14days to nZnO (3.1μM), Zn(2+) (3.1μM, as a positive control for nZnO exposures), Nfd (10μM), and combination of nZnO and Nfd (nZnO+Nfd). Exposure to nZnO and Zn(2+) led to an increase in Zn burdens, elevated concentrations of the metal-bound metallothioneins (MT-Me) in the liver and increased vitellogenin in the serum, whereas exposures to Nfd and nZnO+Nfd resulted in the metal release from MTs and a significant increase in the ratio of total to metal-bound MTs. This likely reflects oxidative stress caused by Nfd exposures as manifested in the elevated levels of oxyradical production, upregulation of superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) and increase in the total and oxidized glutathione concentrations in Nfd-exposed frogs. Zn-containing exposures upregulated activity of deiodinase (in nZnO and nZnO+Nfd exposures) and serum thyrotropin level (in the case of Zn(2+)). All exposures caused an increase in DNA fragmentation, lipofuscin accumulation as well as upregulation of caspase-3 and CYP450 levels reflecting cytotoxicity of the studied compounds in the liver. Across all experimental treatments, nZnO exposures in the absence of Nfd had the least impact on the cellular stress traits or redox status in frogs. This indicates that at the low environmentally relevant levels of pollution, pharmaceuticals such as Nfd and free metals (such as Zn(2+)) may represent a stronger threat to the health of the frogs than nZnO particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of single or combined climatic and hygienic stress in four layer lines: 2. Endocrine and oxidative stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, L; Decuypere, E; Parmentier, H K; Kemp, B

    2008-06-01

    Effects of long-term climatic stress (heat exposure), short-term hygienic stress [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)], or combined exposure to these stressors on endocrine and oxidative stress parameters of 4 layer lines (B1, WA, WB, and WF) were investigated. The lines were earlier characterized for natural humoral immune competence and survival rate. Eighty hens per line were randomly divided over 2 identical climate chambers and exposed to constant high temperature (32 degrees C) or a control temperature (21 degrees C) for 23 d. Half of the hens housed in each chamber were i.v. injected with LPS at d 1 after the start of the heat stress period. The effect of heat, LPS, or combined exposure on plasma levels of corticosterone, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)), glucose, uric acid (UA), and TBA reacting substances (TBARS) were investigated. Except for UA, there were no interactions between heat stress and LPS administration. Heat stress enhanced levels of corticosterone, glucose, and TBARS, whereas levels of T(3) and UA were decreased. The T(3) levels, however, were enhanced by LPS administration, whereas levels of UA were decreased. Administration of LPS had no effect on levels of corticosterone and TBARS. Because both stressors caused a reduction in feed intake, it is assumed that changes in most of the plasma levels of the endocrine and oxidative stress parameters are related with the reduction in feed intake. Neither natural humoral immune competence nor survival rate, for which the lines have been characterized, was indicative for the endocrine and oxidative stress responses to different stressors. The present data suggest that hens were able to cope with single or combined heat stress and LPS administration and that heat stress and LPS administration acted like 2 independent stressors. Furthermore, the 4 layer lines differed in response patterns and response levels; line WB was physiologically most sensitive to environmental changes.

  12. Effect of in utero exposure to endocrine disruptors on fetal steroidogenesis governed by the pituitary-gonad axis: a study in rats using different ways of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyazono, Yudai; Taura, Junki; Hattori, Yukiko; Ishii, Yuji; Narimatsu, Shizuo; Fujimura, Masatake; Takeda, Tomoki; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    The effects of endocrine disruptors on testicular steroidogenesis in fetal rats were investigated in a study involving in utero exposure. In the major part of this study, pregnant rats at gestational day (GD)15 were given a single oral administration of the test substance, and then the expression of the following mRNAs in GD20 fetuses was determined: testicular steroidogenic acute-regulatory protein (StAR), a cholesterol transporter mediating the rate-limiting step of steroidogenesis, a ß-subunit of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH), and a regulator of gonadal steroidogenesis. Among the substances tested, only di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) reduced the expression of fetal testicular StAR. The others listed below exhibited little effect on fetal StAR: 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenylether, tributyltin chloride, atrazine, permethrin, cadmium chloride (Cd), lead acetate (Pb) and methylmercury (CH3HgOH). None of them, including DEHP, lacked the ability to reduce the expression of pituitary LHß mRNA. The present study also examined the potential of metals as modifiers of fetal steroidogenesis by giving them to pregnant dams in drinking water during GD1 and GD20. Under these conditions, Cd and Pb at a low concentration (0.01 ppm) significantly attenuated the fetal testicular expression of StAR mRNA without a concomitant reduction in LHß. No such effect was detected with CH3HgOH even at 1 ppm. These results suggest that: 1) DEHP, Cd and Pb attenuate the fetal production of sex steroids by directly acting on the testis, and 2) chronic treatment during the entire gestational period is more useful than a single administration for determining the hazardous effect of a suspected endocrine disruptor on fetal steroidogenesis.

  13. Determination of acidic pharmaceuticals and potential endocrine disrupting compounds in wastewaters and spring waters by selective elution and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Richard; Becerril-Bravo, Elías; Silva-Castro, Vanessa; Jiménez, Blanca

    2007-10-26

    Although the trend in development of analytical methods for emerging contaminants is towards reduced sample preparation and increased detector selectivity, there are still benefits from removal of matrix material during sample preparation. This paper describes a simple method for acidic pharmaceuticals and a range of potential endocrine disrupting compounds in untreated wastewaters and spring waters. It is based on separation of the two classes during elution from the extraction cartridge with final analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. 3,4-D was used as the recovery standard for the acids while 4-n-nonylphenol and [2H4]estrone were used for the endocrine disrupters; mean recoveries varied between 89% and 111%. The method was also extensively validated by fortification with the target compounds. Recoveries of acids were from 68% to 97% with relative standard deviations generally less than 10% and recoveries of endocrine disrupters were 68-109% with relative standard deviations less than 20%. Detection limits varied from 0.005 to 1 ng/L in spring water, and from 0.5 to 100 ng/L in untreated wastewater. Concentrations of the analytes in the wastewater ranged from 0.018 to 22.4 microg/L. Values were comparable to reported data, although concentrations were generally relatively high, probably because of a lack of treatment. Triclosan, phthalates, estrone, 17beta-estradiol, ibuprofen, and naproxen were present in the spring water from aquifers recharged indirectly with this wastewater after its use for irrigation; concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 25.0 ng/L. The much lower concentrations compared to wastewater indicate effective removal processes on passage through the soil and subsoil.

  14. Development of a fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carro, Marina; Scapolla, Carlo; Liscio, Camilla; Magi, Emanuele

    2010-09-01

    A fast liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed to study five endocrine-disrupting compounds (4-n-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol) in water. Different columns were tested; the chromatographic separation of the analytes was optimized on a Pinnacle DB biphenylic column with a water-acetonitrile gradient elution, which allowed the separation of the selected endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in less than 6 min. Quantitative analysis was performed in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode; two transitions were chosen for each compound, using the most abundant for quantitation. Calibration curves using bisphenol A-d (16) as internal standard were drawn, showing good correlation coefficients (0.9993-0.9998). All figures of merit of the method were satisfactory; limits of detection were in the low pg range for all analytes. The method was then applied to the determination of the analytes in real water samples: to this aim, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were deployed in the influent and in the effluent of a drinking water treatment plant in Liguria (Italy). The EDC level was rather low in the influent and negligible in the outlet, reflecting the expected function of the treatment plant.

  15. An investigation of endocrine disrupting effects and toxic mechanisms modulated by benzo[a]pyrene in female scallop Chlamys farreri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Shuangmei; Pan, Luqing, E-mail: panlq@ouc.edu.cn; Sun, Xiaohua

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •B[a]P disturbed progesterone, 17β-estradiol and testosterone production in scallop. •B[a]P inhibited 3β-HSD, CYP17 and 17β-HSD expression after a 10-day exposure. •B[a]P of lower dose elevated AHR-CYP1A expression but high dose B[a]P inhibited them. •ER and vitellogenin transcription was consistent with AHR after B[a]P exposure. •B[a]P exposure induced relatively developmental delay and impairment of ovary. -- Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the endocrine disrupting effects induced by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and explore the underlying mechanisms in mollusks. In this study, sexually mature female Chlamys farreri were exposed to benzo[a]pyrene for 10 days at four different concentrations as 0, 0.025, 0.5 and 10 μg/L. Sex steroids were identified and quantified by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) method and results showed that exposure to B[a]P exerts great suppression on 17β-estradiol, testosterone production and disrupts progesterone levels in ovary. Transcription of genes were detected and measured by real-time RT-PCR. It showed that at day 10 B[a]P inhibited 3β-HSD, CYP17 and 17β-HSD mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that they could be potential targets of B[a]P that disrupt steroidogenic machinery. Moreover, 0.025 μg/L B[a]P activated transcription of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), CYP1A1 and estrogen receptor (ER), while 10 μg/L B[a]P suppressed all of them. The consistency of their responses to B[a]P exposure implies that AHR action may be involved in invertebrate CYP regulation and ER transcription despite of unknown mechanisms. Additionally, B[a]P exposure could induce ovarian impairment and developmental delay in C. farreri. Overall, sensitivity of C. farreri to endocrine disruption and toxicity suggests that C. farreri is a suitable species for study of endocrine-disrupting effects in marine invertebrates. This study will form a

  16. Endocrine Tumor: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Endocrine Tumor Endocrine Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Endocrine Tumor. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Endocrine Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs ...

  17. Endocrine and Ovarian Changes in Response to the Ram Effect in Medroxyprogesterone Acetate-primed Corriedale Ewes During the Breeding and Nonbreeding Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubianes E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were performed to determine the endocrine and ovarian changes in medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP-primed ewes after ram introduction. Experiment 1 was performed during the mid-breeding season with 71 ewes primed with an intravaginal MAP sponge for 12 days. While the control (C ewes (n = 35 were in permanent contact with rams, the ram effect (RE ewes (n = 36 were isolated for 34 days prior to contact with rams. At sponge withdrawal, all ewes were joined with eight sexually experienced marking Corriedale rams and estrus was recorded over the next 4 days. The ovaries were observed by laparoscopy 4–6 days after estrus. Four weeks later, pregnancy was determined by transrectal ultrasonography. In eight ewes from each group, ovaries were ultrasonographically scanned; FSH, LH, and estradiol-17β were measured every 12 hours until ovulation or 96 hours after estrus. The response to the rams was not affected by the fact that ewes had been kept or not in close contact with males before teasing. No differences were found in FSH, LH, estradiol-17β concentrations, growth of the ovulatory follicle, onset of estrus, ovulation rate, or pregnancy rate. Experiment 2 was performed with 14 ewes during the nonbreeding season. Ewes were isolated from rams for 1 month, and received a 6-day MAP priming. Ovaries were ultrasonographically scanned every 12 hours, and FSH, LH, estradiol-17β, and progesterone were measured. Ewes that ovulated and came into estrus had higher FSH and estradiol-17β levels before introduction of the rams than did ewes that had a silent ovulation. The endocrine pattern of the induced follicular phase of ewes that came into estrus was more similar to a normal follicular phase, than in ewes that had a silent ovulation. The follicle that finally ovulated tended to emerge earlier and in a more synchronized fashion in those ewes that did come into estrus. All ewes that ovulated had an LH surge and reached higher maximum FSH

  18. Adverse effects on sexual development in rat offspring after low dose exposure to a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a mixture of low doses of five environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting pesticides, epoxiconazole, mancozeb, prochloraz, tebuconazole and procymidone, would cause adverse developmental toxicity effects in rats. In rat dams, a significant increase...... in gestation length was seen, while in male offspring increased nipple retention and increased incidence and severity of genital malformations were observed. Severe mixture effects on gestation length, nipple retention and genital malformations were seen at dose levels where the individual pesticides caused...... no or smaller effects when given alone. Generally, the mixture effect predictions based on dose-additivity were in good agreement with the observed effects. The results indicate that there is a need for modification of risk assessment procedures for pesticides, in order to take account of the mixture effects...

  19. Effects of Monoclonal Antibody Against Porcine 40-kDa Adipocyte-Specific Membrane Protein on Endocrine Secretion in Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling-yun; HU Hong-mei; ZHAO Su-mei; ZHANG Xi; DUAN Gang; GAO Shi-zheng

    2009-01-01

    The present study was to investigate the effect of monocional antibody against porcine 40-kDa adipocyte-specific membrane protein on endocrine secretion in pigs, in order to provide the evidence for application of this antibody to reduce excessive fat deposition in pig production. 40 Landrace × Saba pigs were randomly divided into 8 groups: 2 control groups were given saline with 10 mL, respectively, and the 6 treatment groups were given monoclonal antibody against porcine 40-kDa adipocyte-specific membrane protein with 0.1,0.5, and 1.0 mg kg-1 body weight at 15 or 60 kg body weight,respectively, all treatments were performed by intraperitoneal injection. The results showed that this monoclonal antibody could significantly reduce serum insulin level and increase levels of serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), triiodothyronine (T3), and tetraiodothyronine (T4) either at 15 or 60 kg body weight injection. However,more marked effect was observed at 15 kg body weight treatment. Moreover, the dose-dependent effect of this monoclonal antibody on endocrine secretion was also observed. This result revealed that this monoclonal antibody increased secretion of hormones regulating fat lysis and reduced secretion of hormones regulating fat synthesis, suggests the reduction of porcine excessive fat deposition by this monoclonal antibody was carried out through affecting hormones regulating fat metabolism.

  20. Endocrine effects of valproic acid therapy in girls with epilepsy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Yaacobi, Eyal; Phillip, Moshe; de Vries, Liat

    2014-11-01

    It is controversial whether the endocrine dysfunction in epilepsy patients is caused by the epilepsy itself, the antiepileptic therapy, or both. We prospectively evaluated the long-term impact of valproic acid monotherapy compared to other anti-epileptic drugs on anthropometric, metabolic, hormonal, and ultrasonographic parameters in girls with epilepsy. Fifty-seven female patients with epilepsy who had started therapy at mean age of 11.5 ± 3.3 years, 42 with valproic acid (mean dose 13.1 ± 7.0 mg/kg/day and 15 with other anti-epileptic agents were followed for a mean of 3.2 years (range 1.0-8.5 years) in our center. Clinical, hormonal and transabdominal pelvic ultrasound data were collected at 3 time points: before and 6-12 months after onset of anti-epileptic drug treatment; and at the last visit while patients were still taking anti-epileptic drugs. There were no significant between-group differences regarding changes in height, body mass index standard deviation score, levels of glucose and insulin, or lipid and endocrine profile from first to last visits. Mean thyroid-stimulating hormone level increased significantly between first and last visit only in the valproic acid group (p endocrine function over an average follow-up of 3.2 years. Valproic acid appears to be safe for use in girls with epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes in male reproductive health and effects of endocrine disruptors in Scandinavian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toppari Jorma

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Male reproductive health has deteriorated in many ways during the last decades. The incidence of testicular cancer has rapidly increased in Europe and European-derived populations. Sperm concentrations have declined and sperm motility and morphology have worsened in many areas. Both adverse trends have been shown to be associated with year of birth. Older birth cohorts have better reproductive health than the younger generations. Incidences of cryptorchidism and hypospadias have also increased according to several studies. The reasons for secular trends are unknown, but the rapid pace of the change points to environmental causes. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been hypothesized to influence male reproductive health.

  2. Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology Also Govern Effects of Chemicals on the Endocrine System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrup, Herman; Barile, Frank A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Degen, Gisela H; Dekant, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Daniel; Domingo, Jose L; Gori, Gio Batta; Greim, Helmuth; Hengstler, Jan G; Kacew, Sam; Marquardt, Hans; Pelkonen, Olavi; Savolainen, Kai; Vermeulen, Nico P

    2015-07-01

    The present debate on chemicals with Hormonal activity, often termed 'endocrine disruptors', is highly controversial and includes challenges of the present paradigms used in toxicology and in hazard identification and risk characterization. In our opinion, chemicals with hormonal activity can be subjected to the well-evaluated health risk characterization approach used for many years including adverse outcome pathways. Many of the points arguing for a specific approach for risk characterization of chemicals with hormonal activity are based on highly speculative conclusions. These conclusions are not well supported when evaluating the available information.

  3. Effects of 1-week head-down tilt bed rest on bone formation and the calcium endocrine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Whalen, Robert T.; Fung, Paul; Sherrard, Donald J.; Maloney, Norma

    1992-01-01

    The -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) is employed in the study of 8 subjects to determine early responses in human bone and calcium endocrines during spaceflight. The average rates of bone formation in the iliac crest are determined by means of a single-dose labeling schedule and are found to decrease in 6 of the subjects. The decrease varies directly with walking miles, and increased excretion of urinary Ca and Na are observed preceding increased levels of ionized serum calcium on a bed-rest day late in the week. Reduced phosphorous excretions are also followed by increased serum phosphorous on day six, and reductions are noted in parathyroid hormone and vitamin D by the end of the experiment. The data demonstrate the responsiveness of the skeletal system to biomechanical stimuli such as the HDT.

  4. Effects of un-ionized ammonia on histological, endocrine, and whole organism endpoints in slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, P. [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B3 (Canada)], E-mail: paula.spencer@usask.ca; Pollock, R.; Dube, M. [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B3 (Canada)

    2008-12-11

    Ammonia is known to be an important toxicant in aquatic environments. Although ammonia toxicity has been well studied in many fish species, effects of chronic exposure on slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), a critical biomonitoring species for northern aquatic habitats, are not well known. Further, with increasing mining development in Canada's north, this information is critical to better predict potential effects of mine effluent discharges on northern fish species. Slimy sculpin were exposed to six concentrations of un-ionized ammonia (NH{sub 3}) relevant to concentrations found in northern mining effluents: control (0 ppm), 0.278 ppm, 0.556 ppm, 0.834 ppm, 1.112 ppm, and 1.668 ppm. An LC{sub 50} of 1.529 ppm was calculated from mortality data. Histopathological examination of gills indicated significant tissue damage, measured as lamellar fusion and epithelial lifting, at 0.834 ppm, 1.112 ppm, and 1.668 ppm. Using gill endpoints, NOEC and LOEC were calculated as 0.556 ppm and 0.834 ppm, respectively. An EC{sub 50} of 0.775 ppm was determined for lamellar fusion and an EC{sub 50} of 0.842 ppm for epithelial lifting. Hemorrhage of gills was present in mortalities, which occurred at 1.668 ppm of un-ionized ammonia. A significant decrease in liver somatic index (LSI) was seen in both male and female fish at 0.834 ppm and 1.112 ppm, respectively. Gonadosomatic index (GSI) in female fish significantly increased at 1.668 ppm un-ionized ammonia with an associated significant increase in total wholebody testosterone concentrations. GSI in male fish also significantly increased at 1.668 ppm but no differences were seen in testosterone concentrations. No significant differences were seen in gonad histopathological assessments or condition factor. Gill histopathology endpoints may be a more sensitive indicator for detecting effects in slimy sculpin exposed to ammonia than traditional chronic endpoints. Results from this study indicate that ammonia concentrations commonly

  5. The effect of perinatal exposure to ethinyl oestradiol or a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides on kisspeptin neurons in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Agnete; Holst, Klaus; Mandrup, Karen R; Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie; Jacobsen, Pernille R; Hass, Ulla; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2013-07-01

    Early life exposure to endocrine disruptors is considered to disturb normal development of hormone sensitive parameters and contribute to advanced puberty and reduced fecundity in humans. Kisspeptin is a positive regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and plays a key role in the initiation of puberty. In the adult, Kiss1 gene expression occurs in two hypothalamic nuclei, namely the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and the arcuate nucleus (ARC), which are differentially regulated by peripheral sex steroid hormones. In this study we determined the effects on puberty onset and Kiss1 mRNA levels in each of the two nuclei after long-term perinatal exposure of rats to ethinyl oestradiol (EE2) or to five different pesticides, individually and in a mixture. Rat dams were per orally administered with three doses of EE2 (5, 15 or 50 μg/kg/day) or with the pesticides epoxiconazole, mancozeb, prochloraz, tebuconazole, and procymidone, alone or in a mixture of the five pesticides at three different doses. Kiss1 mRNA expression was determined in the AVPV and in the ARC of the adult male and female pups in the EE2 experiment, and in the adult female pups in the pesticide experiment. We find that perinatal EE2 exposure did not affect Kiss1 mRNA expression in this study designed to model human exposure to estrogenic compounds, and we find only minor effects on puberty onset. Further, the Kiss1 system does not exhibit persistent changes and puberty onset is not affected after perinatal exposure to a pesticide mixture in this experimental setting. However, we find that the pesticide mancozeb tends to increase Kiss1 expression in the ARC, presumably through neurotoxic mechanisms rather than via classical endocrine disruption, calling for increased awareness that Kiss1 expression can be affected by environmental pollutants through multiple mechanisms.

  6. Endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity of low dose MCLR on male frogs (Rana nigromaculata) in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiuying; Cai, Chenchen; Wang, Jia; Gao, Nana; Zhang, Hangjun

    2014-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are potential global threats to aquatic ecosystems and human health. The World Health Organization has set a provisional guideline limit of 1 μg/L microcystin-LR (MCLR) in freshwater. However, MCLR concentrations in several water bodies have exceeded this level. Despite this recommended human safety standard, MCLR-induced endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity on male frog (Rana nigromaculata) were demonstrated in this study. Results showed that sperm motility and sperm count were significantly and negatively correlated with exposure time and concentration. By contrast, abnormal sperm rate was positively correlated with both parameters. Ultrastructural observation results revealed abnormal sperm morphologies, vacuoles in spermatogenic cells, cell dispersion, incomplete cell structures, and deformed nucleoli. These results indicated that MCLR could induce toxic effects on the reproductive system of frogs, significantly decrease testosterone content, and rapidly increase estradiol content. Prolonged exposure and increased concentration enhanced the relative expression levels of P450 aromatase and steroidogenic factor 1; thus, endocrine function in frogs was disrupted. This study is the first to demonstrate in vivo MCLR toxicity in the reproductive system of male R. nigromaculata. This study provided a scientific basis of the global decline in amphibian populations.

  7. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene as highly-sensitive sensor for simultaneous determination of endocrine disruptors: diethylstilbestrol and estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lintong; Cheng, Qin; Chen, Danchao; Ma, Ming; Wu, Kangbing

    2015-01-01

    It is quite important to develop convenient and rapid analytical methods for trace levels of endocrine disruptors because they heavily affect health and reproduction of humans and animals. Herein, graphene was easily prepared via one-step exfoliation using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as solvent, and then used to construct an electrochemical sensor for highly-sensitive detection of diethylstilbestrol (DES) and estradiol (E2). On the surface of prepared graphene film, two independent and greatly-increased oxidation waves were observed at 0.28V and 0.49V for DES and E2. The remarkable signal enlargements indicated that the detection sensitivity was improved significantly. The influences of pH value, amount of graphene and accumulation time on the oxidation signals of DES and E2 were discussed. As a result, a highly-sensitive and rapid electrochemical method was newly developed for simultaneous detection of DES and E2. The values of detection limit were evaluated to be 10.87 nM and 4.9 nM for DES and E2. Additionally, this new method was successfully used in lake water samples and the accuracy was satisfactory.

  8. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene as highly-sensitive sensor for simultaneous determination of endocrine disruptors: Diethylstilbestrol and estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lintong; Cheng, Qin [Key Laboratory for Large-Format Battery Materials and System, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Danchao; Ma, Ming [Ningbo Entry-exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of China, Ningbo 315012 (China); Wu, Kangbing, E-mail: kbwu@hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Large-Format Battery Materials and System, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel electrochemical sensor was developed for diethylstilbestrol and estradiol. • Graphene prepared by solvent exfoliation greatly enhances the detection sensitivity. • The newly-developed method has promising application and the accuracy is good. - Abstract: It is quite important to develop convenient and rapid analytical methods for trace levels of endocrine disruptors because they heavily affect health and reproduction of humans and animals. Herein, graphene was easily prepared via one-step exfoliation using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as solvent, and then used to construct an electrochemical sensor for highly-sensitive detection of diethylstilbestrol (DES) and estradiol (E2). On the surface of prepared graphene film, two independent and greatly-increased oxidation waves were observed at 0.28 V and 0.49 V for DES and E2. The remarkable signal enlargements indicated that the detection sensitivity was improved significantly. The influences of pH value, amount of graphene and accumulation time on the oxidation signals of DES and E2 were discussed. As a result, a highly-sensitive and rapid electrochemical method was newly developed for simultaneous detection of DES and E2. The values of detection limit were evaluated to be 10.87 nM and 4.9 nM for DES and E2. Additionally, this new method was successfully used in lake water samples and the accuracy was satisfactory.

  9. Exposure assessment of prepubertal children to steroid endocrine disruptors. 2. Determination of steroid hormones in milk, egg, and meat samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, Frédérique; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Laille, Julie; Monteau, Fabrice; Andre, François; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2008-05-14

    In the present study, the occurrence of the main sex steroid hormones in milk, egg, and meat was evaluated on the basis of a highly specific gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry measurement method. Globally, the results indicated that targeted estrogens and androgens occurred at similar levels (concentration levels in the 10-100 ng kg (-1) range) in the analyzed muscle and milk samples. The same compounds occurred at about 10-fold higher concentrations (i.e., in the 100-1000 ng kg (-1) range) in eggs and kidney samples. More precisely, egg and milk appeared as a non-negligible sources of estradiol (i.e., 2.2 +/- 0.8 and 3.1 +/- 2.0 ng day (-1), respectively), whereas testosterone exposure is caused by ingestion of meat and/or egg (i.e., 12.2 +/- 48.2 and 5.2 +/- 2.3 ng day (-1), respectively). The provided exposure data will be further exploited in the scope of a risk assessment study regarding endocrine disruption associated with these molecules.

  10. Endocrine Disruptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo F. Ricci

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Law and science combine in the estimation of risks from endocrine disruptors (EDs and actions for their regulation. For both, dose–response models are the causal link between exposure and probability (or percentage change of adverse response. The evidence that leads to either regulations or judicial decrees is affected by uncertainty and limited knowledge, raising difficult policy issues that we enumerate and discuss. In the United States, some courts have dealt with EDs, but causation based on animal studies has been a stumbling block for plaintiffs seeking compensation, principally because those courts opt for epidemiological evidence. The European Union (EU has several regulatory tools and ongoing research on the risks associated with bisphenol A, under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH Regulation and other regulations or directives. The integration of a vast (in kind and in scope number of research papers into a statement of causation for either policy or to satisfy legal requirements, in both the United States and the EU, relies on experts. We outline the discursive dilemma and issues that may affect consensus-based results and a Bayesian causal approach that accounts for the evolution of information, yielding both value of information and flexibility associated with public choices.

  11. Effects of PYY on the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex in the small intestine in vivo and the neural and endocrinal mechanisms of the effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of peptide YY (PYY) on the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) in the small intestine in vivo and explore the neural and endocrinal mechanisms of the effects. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were supplied with a venous catheter and bipolar electrodes in the duodenum and jejunum for electromyography of stomach and small intestine in wake state. PYY,phentolamine,nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA,the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) and atropine were served with PYY res...

  12. Environmental Epigenetics: A Role in Endocrine Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Fleisch, Abby F.; Wright, Robert O.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals that are structurally similar to steroid or amine hormones have the potential to mimic endocrine endpoints at the receptor level. However, more recently, epigenetic-induced alteration in gene expression has emerged as an alternative way in which environmental compounds may exert endocrine effects. We review concepts related to environmental epigenetics and relevance for endocrinology through three broad examples, 1) effect of early-life nutritional exposures on ...

  13. A hybrid material as a sorbent phase for the disposable pipette extraction technique enhances efficiency in the determination of phenolic endocrine-disrupting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Gabriela; Merib, Josias; Magosso, Hérica A; Bittencourt, Otávio R; Carasek, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the hybrid material 3-n-propyl(3-methylpyridinium) silsesquioxane chloride (Si3Py(+)Cl(-)) was synthesized and investigated as a novel sorbent phase for the disposable pipette extraction (DPX) technique coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography-florescence detection. This sorbent phase was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Aqueous samples containing the phenolic endocrine-disrupting compounds bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-octylphenol (4-OP) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) were subjected to DPX procedures and a series of optimizations was performed to determine the ideal extraction conditions using this approach. The proposed sorbent phase exhibited higher extraction efficiency than DPX-RP (reversed phase tips containing styrene-divinylbenzene), commonly used for the determination of the phenolic endocrine- disrupting-compounds under study. Satisfactory analytical performance was achieved with linear ranges from 2 to 100μgL(-1) for 4-t-OP and 1-100μgL(-1) for the other analytes. Limits of detection of 0.60μgL(-1) for 4-t-OP and 0.30μgL(-1) for other analytes, RSDs ranging from 1 to 20% and relative recoveries of 83-116% were obtained. Based on these satisfactory results, this sorbent phase represents a valuable alternative for the extraction of compounds with polar moieties in their structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An investigation of the endocrine-disruptive effects of bisphenol a in human and rat fetal testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millissia Ben Maamar

    Full Text Available Few studies have been undertaken to assess the possible effects of bisphenol A (BPA on the reproductive hormone balance in animals or humans with often contradictory results. We investigated possible direct endocrine disruption by BPA of the fetal testes of 2 rat strains (14.5-17.5 days post-coitum and humans (8-12 gestational weeks and under different culture conditions. BPA concentrations of 10(-8M and 10(-5M for 72 h reduced testosterone production by the Sprague-Dawley fetal rat testes, while only 10-5M suppressed it in the Wistar strain. The suppressive effects at 10-5M were seen as early as 24h and 48 h in both strains. BPA at 10(-7-10(-5M for 72 h suppressed the levels of fetal rat Leydig cell insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3. BPA exposure at 10(-8M, 10(-7M, and 10(-5M for 72 h inhibited testosterone production in fetal human testes. For the lowest doses, the effects observed occurred only when no gonadotrophin was added to the culture media and were associated with a poorly preserved testicular morphology. We concluded that (i BPA can display anti-androgenic effects both in rat and human fetal testes; (ii it is essential to ascertain that the divergent effects of endocrine disruptors between species in vitro do not result from the culture conditions used, and/or the rodent strain selected; (iii the optimization of each in vitro assay for a given species should be a major objective rather than the search of an hypothetical trans-species consensual model-system, as the organization of the testis is intrinsically different between mammalian species; (iv due to the uncertainty existing on the internal exposure of the human fetal testis to BPA, and the insufficient number of epidemiological studies on the endocrine disruptive effects of BPA, caution should be taken in the extrapolation of our present results to the human reproductive health after fetal exposure to BPA.

  15. Effects of combined perioperative epidural bupivacaine and morphine, ibuprofen, and incisional bupivacaine on postoperative pain, pulmonary, and endocrine-metabolic function after minilaparotomy cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Hjortsø, N C; Stage, J G

    1994-01-01

    cholecystectomy improves pain relief in the immediate postoperative period, compared to intramuscular morphine. Pulmonary and endocrine-metabolic function is not changed to such degree after minicholecystectomy that epidural analgesia can be demonstrated to have beneficial effects.......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES. The study investigates the effects of combined perioperative continuous epidural bupivacaine and morphine, ibuprofen, and incisional bupivacaine, compared with intermittent systemic morphine, ibuprofen, and incisional bupivacaine, on postoperative pain, respiratory...... function, and endocrine-metabolic alterations associated with minilaparotomy cholecystectomy. METHODS. Thirty-two patients scheduled for cholecystectomy, performed through a minilaparotomy, were randomized to receive general anesthesia with pre- and postoperative thoracic (T7-9) epidural analgesia...

  16. Determination of atrazine and degradation products in Luxembourgish drinking water: origin and fate of potential endocrine-disrupting pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, T; Cocco, E; Gourdol, L; Guignard, C; Hoffmann, L

    2011-08-01

    Several pesticides have been hypothesized to act as endocrine-disrupting compounds, exhibiting hormonal activity and perturbing normal physiological functions. Among these, especially s-triazine herbicides have received increased attention. Despite being banned in many countries, including the European Union, atrazine is still the world's most widely used herbicide. Despite its discontinued use, considerable concentrations of atrazine and its degradation products, mainly desethylatrazine (DEA) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA), are still found in the environment, including drinking water sources. The aim of this investigation was to study concentrations of especially s-triazine herbicides and major degradation products in drinking water, including spring water, tap water and bottled water in Luxembourg. Spring water (2007/2008/2009, n = 69/69/69), tap water (2008/2009, n = 19/26), and bottled water (2007/2008/2009, n = 5/13/7) were sampled at locations in Luxembourg and investigated for pesticides by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Atrazine was the predominant triazine, detectable in many spring water locations, tap and bottled water, ranging (mean) from 0-57 (9), 0-44 (4), and 0-4 (1) ng l(-1), respectively. DEA and DIA in spring water ranged (mean) from 0-120 (19) and 0-27 (3) ng l(-1), with higher concentrations from agricultural areas and low molar ratios of DEA:atrazine high ratios of atrazine:nitrate suggesting point-source contamination. Levels (mean) of DEA and DIA in tap water were 0-62 (14) and 0-6 (water 0-11 (2) and 0-7 (2) ng l(-1). Simazine and other triazines were detected in traces (water, presumably partly due to non-agricultural contamination, with concentrations being below thresholds advocated by the European Union Directive 98/83/EC.

  17. Assessment of the endocrine-disrupting effects of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Wang, Jinghua; Zhu, Jianqiang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhao, Meirong

    2016-09-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs), which are candidate persistent organic pollutants (POPs) according to the Stockholm Convention, are of great concern because of their persistent bioaccumulation, long-range transport and potential adverse health effects. However, data on the endocrine-disrupting effects of SCCPs remain scarce. In this study, we first adopted two in vitro models (reporter gene assays and H295R cell line) to investigate the endocrine-disrupting effects of three SCCPs (C10-40.40%, C10-66.10% and C11-43.20%) via receptor mediated and non-receptor mediated pathway. The dual-luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that all test chemicals significantly induced estrogenic effects, which were mediated by estrogen receptor α (ERα), in the following order: C11-43.20%>C10-66.10%>C10-40.40%. Notably, C10-40.40% and C10-66.10% also demonstrated remarkable anti-estrogenic activities. Only C11-43.20% showed glucocorticoid receptor-mediated (GR) antagonistic activity, with a RIC20 value of 2.6×10(-8)mol/L. None of the SCCPs showed any agonistic or antagonistic activities against thyroid receptor β (TRβ). Meanwhile, all test SCCPs stimulated the secretion of 17β-estradiol (E2). Both C10-66.10% and C11-43.20% increased the production of cortisol at a high level in H295R cell lines. In order to explore the possible mechanism underlying the endocrine-disrupting effects of SCCPs through the non-receptor pathway, the mRNA levels of 9 steroidogenic genes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). StAR, 17βHSD, CYP11A1, CYP11B1, CYP19 and CYP21 were upregulated in a concentration-dependent manner by all chemicals. The data provided here emphasized that comprehensive assessments of the health and ecological risks of emerging contaminants, such as SCCPs, are of great concern and should be investigated further.

  18. The endocrine disruptor effect of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate on Biomphalaria alexandrina snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Nahla Elsayed; Salama, Wesam Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Atrazine (AZ) and glyphosate (GL) are herbicides that are widely applied to cereal crops in Egypt. The present study was designed to investigate the response of the snailBiomphalaria alexandrina(Mollusca: Gastropoda) as a bioindicator for endocrine disrupters in terms of steroid levels (testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E)), alteration of microsomal CYP4501B1-like immunoreactivity, total protein (TP) level, and gonadal structure after exposure to sublethal concentrations of AZ or GL for 3 weeks. In order to study the ability of the snails' recuperation, the exposed snails were subjected to a recovery period for 2 weeks. The results showed that the level of T, E, and TP contents were significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.05) in both AZ- and GL-exposed groups compared with control (unexposed) group. The level of microsomal CYP4501B1-like immunoreactivity increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) in GL- and AZ-exposed snails and reach nearly a 50% increase in AZ-exposed group. Histological investigation of the ovotestis showed that AZ and GL caused degenerative changes including azoospermia and oocytes deformation. Interestingly, all the recovered groups did not return back to their normal state. It can be concluded that both herbicides are endocrine disrupters and cause cellular toxicity indicated by the decrease of protein content and the increase in CYP4501B1-like immunoreactivity. This toxicity is irreversible and the snail is not able to recover its normal state. The fluctuation of CYP4501B1 suggests that this vertebrate-like enzyme may be functional also in the snail and may be used as a biomarker for insecticide toxicity.

  19. Generation and characterization of gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish for evaluating endocrine-disrupting effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaoxia [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chen, Xiaowen; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Yin, Zhan, E-mail: zyin@ihb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Ningbo Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology (China)

    2014-07-01

    The glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα) gene encodes the shared α subunit of the three pituitary heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones: follicle-stimulating hormone β (Fshβ), luteinizing hormone β (Lhβ) and thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ). In our current study, we identified and characterized the promoter region of zebrafish gsuα and generated a stable gsuα:EGFP transgenic line, which recapitulated the endogenous gsuα expression in the early developing pituitary gland. A relatively conserved regulatory element set is presented in the promoter regions of zebrafish and three other known mammalian gsuα promoters. Our results also demonstrated that the expression patterns of the gsuα:EGFP transgene were all identical to those expression patterns of the endogenous gsuα expression in the pituitary tissue when our transgenic fish were treated with various endocrine chemicals, including forskolin (FSK), SP600125, trichostatin A (TSA), KClO{sub 4}, dexamethasone (Dex), β-estradiol and progesterone. Thus, this gsuα:EGFP transgenic fish reporter line provides another valuable tool for investigating the lineage development of gsuα-expressing gonadotrophins and the coordinated regulation of various glycoprotein hormone subunit genes. These reporter fish can serve as a novel platform to perform screenings of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in vivo as well. - Highlights: • Identification of the promoter of zebrafish glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα) gene • Generation of stable transmission gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish reporter • Demonstration of the recapitulation of the gsuα:EGFP and endogenous gsuα expression • Suggestion of the gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a novel platform for EDC study.

  20. Biomarkers of effect in endocrine disruption: how to link a functional assay to an adverse outcome pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lorenzetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of in vitro testing strategies may achieve a cost-effective generation of comprehensive datasets on a large number of chemicals, according to the requirements of the European Regulation REACH. Much emphasis is placed on in vitro methods based on subcellular mechanisms (e.g., nuclear receptor interaction, but it is necessary to define the predictive value of molecular or biochemical changes within an adverse outcome pathway (AOP. AOP pivots on the description of the flow from a molecular initiating event through a cascade of intermediate events needed to produce a specific adverse effect at organism level: downstream responses at cell level are, therefore, essential to define an AOP. Several in vitro assays are based on human cell lines representative of endocrine-targeted tissues (e.g., prostate and on functional biomarkers of clinical relevance (e.g., PSA secretion in human prostate epithelial cells. We discuss the implementation of such functional biomarkers in the AOP context.

  1. Endocrine side-effects of anti-cancer drugs: thyroid effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illouz, Frédéric; Braun, Doreen; Briet, Claire; Schweizer, Ulrich; Rodien, Patrice

    2014-09-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are currently used by most oncologists. Among their side effects, thyroid dysfunctions are nowadays clearly observed. Whereas changes in thyroid function tests have been originally described with sunitinib, we now know that many TKIs can induce hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. In this study, the various molecules implicated in thyroid dysfunctions are analysed and the latest data on physiopathological mechanisms are approached in order to propose a strategy of thyroid monitoring of patients on TKI therapy. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  2. Enantioselective endocrine disrupting effects of omeprazole studied in the H295R cell assay and by molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Amalie Møller; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Bonomo, Silvia; Olsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Weisser, Johan Juhl; Kretschmann, Andreas Christopher; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2016-08-01

    Enantiomers possess different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and this may not only influence the therapeutic effect of a drug but also its toxicological effects. In the present work we investigated the potential enantioselective endocrine disrupting effects of omeprazole (OME) and its two enantiomers on the human steroidogenesis using the H295R cell line. Differences in production of 16 steroid hormones were analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Additionally, to evaluate the differences in binding modes of these enantiomers, docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of S-omeprazole (S-OME) and R-omeprazole (R-OME) in CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2 were carried out. Exposing H295R cells to OME and its enantiomers resulted in an increase of progesterone (PRO) and 17α-hydroxy-progesterone (OH-PRO) levels. At the same time, a decrease in the corticosteroid and androgen synthesis was observed, indicating inhibition of CYP21A2 and CYP17A1. In both cases, the effect of R-OME was smaller compared to that of the S-OME and a certain degree of enantioselectivity of CYP17A1 and CYP21A2 was suggested. Docking indicated that the N-containing rings of OME possibly could interact with the iron atom of the heme for S-OME in CYP17A1 and S- and R-OME in CYP21A2. However, density functional theory calculations suggest that the direct N-Fe interaction is weak. The study demonstrates enantioselective differences in the endocrine disrupting potential of chiral drugs such as omeprazole. These findings may have potential implications for drug safety and drug design.

  3. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Kedzia, Agnieszka; Krupej-Kedzierska, Joanna; Okopień, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with a number of adverse consequences, including endocrine disorders. The endocrine changes associated with HIV infection have been studied in depth and, as the results of so far carried out studies suggest, their aetiology is usually multifactoral. Their pathogenesis includes direct infection of endocrine glands by HIV or opportunistic organisms, infiltration by neoplasms and adverse effects of drugs. Endocrine problems that most frequently affect this group of patients include: hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency, thyroid disorders, impaired growth hormone release, lipodystrophy and bone loss. They may develop in both the early as well as late stages of the infection, ranging from subclinical disturbances to overt endocrine symptoms. The purpose of this paper is to review the aetiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of HIV-associated endocrine disturbances with a special emphasis on the most recent literature.

  4. Endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity of low dose MCLR on male frogs (Rana nigromaculata) in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Xiuying; Cai, Chenchen; Wang, Jia; Gao, Nana; Zhang, Hangjun, E-mail: zhanghangjun@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Low-dose MCLR (1 μg/L) elicits a potential ecological effect on amphibian populations. • MCLR can induce abnormal sperm morphologies and activities on male frogs. • MCLR can induce a decrease in serum testosterone and an increase in serum estradiol of male frogs. • MCLR can increase SF-1 protein levels and decrease P450 aromatase levels in the gonads of frogs. - Abstract: Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are potential global threats to aquatic ecosystems and human health. The World Health Organization has set a provisional guideline limit of 1 μg/L microcystin-LR (MCLR) in freshwater. However, MCLR concentrations in several water bodies have exceeded this level. Despite this recommended human safety standard, MCLR-induced endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity on male frog (Rana nigromaculata) were demonstrated in this study. Results showed that sperm motility and sperm count were significantly and negatively correlated with exposure time and concentration. By contrast, abnormal sperm rate was positively correlated with both parameters. Ultrastructural observation results revealed abnormal sperm morphologies, vacuoles in spermatogenic cells, cell dispersion, incomplete cell structures, and deformed nucleoli. These results indicated that MCLR could induce toxic effects on the reproductive system of frogs, significantly decrease testosterone content, and rapidly increase estradiol content. Prolonged exposure and increased concentration enhanced the relative expression levels of P450 aromatase and steroidogenic factor 1; thus, endocrine function in frogs was disrupted. This study is the first to demonstrate in vivo MCLR toxicity in the reproductive system of male R. nigromaculata. This study provided a scientific basis of the global decline in amphibian populations.

  5. Endocrine Consequences of Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anorexia nervosa (AN) is prevalent in adolescents and young adults, and endocrine changes include hypothalamic amenorrhea, a nutritionally acquired growth hormone resistance with low insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), relative hypercortisolemia, decreases in leptin, insulin, amylin and incretins, and increases in ghrelin, PYY and adiponectin. These changes in turn have deleterious effects on bone, and may affect neurocognition, anxiety, depression and eating disorder psychopathology. Low bone density is particularly concerning; clinical fractures occur and changes in both bone microarchitecture and strength estimates have been reported. Recovery causes improvement of many, but not all, hormonal changes, and deficits in bone accrual may persist despite recovery. Physiologic, primarily transdermal, estrogen replacement increases bone density in adolescents, although catch-up is incomplete. In adults, oral estrogen co-administered with rhIGF-1 in one study, and bisphosphonates in another increased bone density, though not to normal. More studies are necessary to determine the optimal therapeutic approach in AN. PMID:24731664

  6. Dose-related Behavioral, Subjective, Endocrine and Psychophysiological Effects Of the Kappa Opioid Agonist Salvinorin A in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Schnakenberg, Ashley; Skosnik, Patrick D.; Cohen, Bruce; Pittman, Brian; Sewell, R. Andrew; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Background Salvia divinorum (Salvia) is an increasingly popular recreational drug amongst adolescents and young adults. Its primary active ingredient, Salvinorin A (SA), a highly selective agonist at the kappa opiate receptor (KOR), is believed to be one of the most potent naturally occurring hallucinogens. However, there is little experimental data on the effects of SA in humans. Methods In a 3-day, double-blind, randomized, crossover, counterbalanced study, the behavioral, subjective, cognitive, psychophysiological and endocrine effects of 0 mg, 8 mg and 12 mg of inhaled SA were characterized in 10 healthy individuals who had previously used Salvia. Results SA produced psychotomimetic effects and perceptual alterations including dissociative and somaesthetic effects, increased plasma cortisol and prolactin and reduced resting EEG spectral power. SA administration was associated with a rapid increase of its levels in the blood. SA did not produce euphoria, cognitive deficits or changes in vital signs. The effects were transient and not dose-related. SA administration was very well tolerated without acute or delayed adverse effects. Conclusions SA produced a wide range of transient effects in healthy subjects. The perceptual altering effects and lack of euphoric effects would explain its intermittent use pattern. Such a profile would also suggest a low addictive potential similar to other hallucinogens and consistent with KOR agonism. Further work is warranted to carefully characterize a full spectrum of its effects in humans, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved and to explore the basis for individual variability in its effects. PMID:22817868

  7. Neuro-endocrine effects of aqueous extract of Amaranthus viridis (Linn. leaf in male Wistar rat model of cyclophosphamide-induced reproductive toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoka Oladele Abiodun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophosphamide (CP is a widely used cytotoxic alkylating agent with antitumor and immunosuppressant properties that is associated with various forms of reproductive toxicity. The significance of natural antioxidants of plant origin should be explored, especially in a world with increasing incidence of patients in need of chemotherapy. The neuro-endocrine effects of aqueous extract of Amaranthus viridis (Linn. leaf (AEAVL in Wistar rats with CP-induced reproductive toxicity was determined. Forty rats were used for this study such that graded doses of the extract were administered following CP-induced reproductive toxicity and comparisons were made against control, toxic and standard (vitamin E groups at p < 0.05. The synthetic drugs (CP, 65 mg/kg i.p. for 5 days; Vitamin E, 100 mg/kg p.o. for 30 days as well as the extract (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. for 30 days were administered to the rats at 0.2 mL/100 g. CP induced reproductive toxicity as evidenced by significantly lowered levels of FSH, LH and testosterone, perturbation of sperm characterization, deleterious disruptions of the antioxidant system as evidenced by decreased levels of GSH as well as elevation of TBARS activity. Histopathological examination showed hemorrhagic lesions with scanty and hypertrophied parenchymal cells in the pituitary while the testis showed ballooned seminiferous tubules with loosed connective tissues and vacuolation of testicular interstitium. These conditions were significantly reversed (p < 0.05 following administration of the graded doses of the extract. It was, therefore, concluded that AEAVL could potentially be a therapeutic choice in patients with CP-induced neuro-endocrine dysfunction and reproductive toxicity.

  8. The effect of electroacupuncture at the MA-IC 3 endocrine ear acupoint on fasting blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, C.; Budihardjo, F. A.; Srilestari, A.

    2017-08-01

    The management of diabetes mellitus (DM) involves education, nutritional intervention, and physical exercise, in addition to pharmacological interventions, with the long-term goal of preventing complications through the control of blood glucose levels. Several studies have shown that acupuncture, both conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture, is useful for lowering blood glucose levels in patients with DM. This study aimed to determine the additional effect of electroacupuncture at the MA-IC 3 Endocrine ear acupoint on fasting blood glucose levels in patients with Type 2 DM who were receiving oral hypoglycemic agents at Banjar General Hospital. In this randomized controlled study, fifty-four study participants who were being treated with oral antidiabetics were allocated into two groups, receiving either electroacupuncture (EA) at the MA-IC 3 ear acupoint with dense disperse wave for 30 minutes or acupuncture at the same point and for the same duration but without EA (No EA). Fasting blood glucose levels were measured before and after the intervention. In Group A (EA), the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) level decreased from 157.26±24.485 to 142.59±26.771 (p < 0.05), whereas in Group B (No EA), the mean FBG decreased from 149.67±21.485 to 148.74±21.326 (p < 0.05). The difference in the amount of FBG decrease between Group A (EA) and Group B (No EA) was statistically significant (p < 0.05). EA at the MA-IC 3 Endocrine lowers FBG levels to a greater degree than acupuncture with no EA in patients with type 2 DM.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the toxic effects and endocrine disrupting potential of oil sands processed water and naphthenic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.; Wiseman, S.; Higley, E.; Jones, P.D.; Hecker, M.; Giesy, J.P. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Gamel El Din, M.; Martin, J.W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are the primary toxic constituents of oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW). This presentation reported on a series of in vitro studies that were initiated to evaluate potential endocrine modulating effects of OSPW and their constituent NAs. The H295R steroidogenesis bioassay was used to examine the impact of OSPW and NA on 52 steroidogenesis. In particular, dose-response and time course studies were conducted to evaluate the impact of OSPW and NAs on testosterone and estradiol production. Aromatase activity and transcript abundance of the key 11 steroidogenic enzymes were also quantified to complement analysis of hormone levels. The MVLN trans-activation assay was used to test the estrogenicity/anti-estrogenicity of OSPW and NAs. In vitro cell viability and apoptosis (live-dead) caused by OSPW and NAs was quantified by the MTS reduction and caspase-3/7 activity in H295R and MVLN cells.

  10. No effect of menstrual cycle phase on glucose and glucoregulatory endocrine responses to prolonged exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Robert R; Francois, Michelle; Webb, Nancy Dardis; Worley, Jennifer R; Rogers, Sharon N; Norman, Reid L; Shah, Urvi; Castracane, V Daniel; Daniel Castracane, V

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged exercise requires increased utilization of blood glucose and adjustment of glucoregulatory hormones. Estrogen can reduce hepatic gluconeogenesis which could affect insulin concentrations. Amylin is co-secreted with insulin and controls influx of glucose into the blood. To determine the effect of menstrual cycle stage on glucose, leptin, and pancreatic hormone responses to prolonged (90 min) exercise. Five healthy, eumenorrheic women (24.6 ± 5.1 years; 67.4 ± 1 kg) were monitored for 3 months to determine menstrual cycle length. Subjects completed a preliminary session to determine exercise workloads and, in a fasted condition, completed two randomized 90-min treadmill exercise trials at 60 % VO2max during the early follicular (EFX) and mid-luteal phase (MLX) of their menstrual cycle. Blood samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin, C-peptide, amylin, glucagon, leptin, and cortisol concentrations at rest (-30 and 0 min), during exercise (18, 36, 54, 72, and 90 min) and after 20 min of recovery. No changes in amylin, leptin, or cortisol occurred for EFX and MLX trials. A significant (p effect occurred for glucose, insulin, and glucagon with reduced insulin across the exercise trial and increases in glucose and glucagon later in the trial, but there were no differences between the EFX and MLX trials. Menstrual cycle stage does not affect glucose, insulin, C-peptide, amylin, glucagon, cortisol, and leptin responses to prolonged exercise; however, the exercise reduces insulin and increases glucose and glucagon concentrations. This is the first study to determine acute effects of exercise on amylin and other glucoregulatory hormone responses in women.

  11. Effects of different green light intensities on the growth performance and endocrine properties of barfin flounder Verasper moseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Kasagi, Satoshi; Murakami, Naoto; Furufuji, Sumihisa; Kikuchi, Shigeto; Mizusawa, Kanta; Andoh, Tadashi

    2017-04-17

    We previously reported that the somatic growth of barfin flounder, Verasper moseri, was effectively stimulated by the green light compared to the blue and red lights. Herein, we report the effects of different green light intensities on the growth and endocrine system of the fish. Fish were reared in a dark room with light from a light-emitting diode (LED) at a peak wavelength of 518nm under controlled photoperiod (10.5:13.5h, light:dark cycle; 06:00-16:30, light) with three levels of photon flux density (PFD)-2 (low), 7 (medium), or 21 (high) μmol·m(-2)·s(-1) at the water surface. The average water temperature was 10.2°C, and the fish were fed until satiety. The fish reared under high PFD of green light showed the highest specific growth rates, followed by the medium PFD group. Under high PFD, the fish showed the highest amount of melanin-concentrating hormone mRNA in their brains and insulin in plasma, while the lowest amount of growth hormone was observed in their pituitary glands. These results suggest that the green light stimulated the growth of barfin flounders in a light intensity-dependent manner in association with their central and peripheral endocrine systems. However, when the fish were reared in an ordinary room where they received both ambient and green LED lights, the fish under LED and ambient light grew faster than those under ambient light only (control). Moreover, no difference was observed in the specific growth rate of the fish reared under the three different green LED light intensities, suggesting that the growth was equally stimulated by the green light within a certain range of intensities under ambient light. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of IQPLUS Focus on cognitive function, mood and endocrine response before and following acute exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simbo Sunday

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylserine (PS is a phospholipid found in cell membranes of most animals and plants. PS has been shown to reduce stress and increase performance in runners, cyclists and golfers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a PS containing formulation on cognitive function, mood and endocrine response before and after intense resistance exercise. Methods 18 lower body, resistance trained, college aged males ingested 14 days of supplement (IQPLUS Focus, providing 400 mg of soy-derived PS and a Placebo (PL, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over manner. Following 14 days of supplementation, participants performed an acute bout of lower body resistance training. Mood (Profile of Mood States, POMS and cognitive function (Serial Subtraction Test, SST were measured prior to, 5 minutes after, and 60 minutes after exercise. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 5, 15, 25, 40 and 60 minutes after exercise. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma cortisol and testosterone. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results PS supplementation significantly reduced the time needed for a correct calculation on the SST by 20% (reduced by 1.27 s per calculation; PL: 6.4 s, PS: 5.13 s; p = 0.001, and reduced the total amount of errors by 39% (PL: 1.28 + .69, PS: .78 + .27, p = 0.53, and increased the amount of correct calculations by 13% (PL: 22.1 + 2.24, PS: 24.9 + 1.52, p = 0.07 prior to or in response to exercise compared to PL. Following exercise, there was no difference in SST scores between PS and PL. There were no significant changes in regards to mood or endocrine response to exercise as a result of PS supplementation. Conclusion PS supplementation significantly increased cognitive function prior to exercise. Improved cognitive function could benefit athletes and non-athletes alike. PS did not appear to affect mood or endocrine response prior to or following resistance

  13. Using fetal endocrine and genomic signatures to predict the relative potency of phthalate esters and their effects on postnatal development of the male rat reproductive tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first part of this presentation will address concerns expressed by some scientist that the screening and testing protocols for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are 1) unable to adequately detect the low dose effects of EDCs, 2) they are unable to define the shape of the ...

  14. Endocrine System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of or replacing specific hormones can treat many endocrine disorders in children and adolescents, some of which include: ... System Your Child's Growth Female Reproductive System Activity: Endocrine System Word! Hormones Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? Your Endocrine ...

  15. Effect of simulated microgravity on endocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in physically fit men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksinantova, L; Koska, J; Kvetnansky, R; Marko, M; Hamar, D; Vigas, M

    2002-03-01

    Adaptation to microgravity is associated with alteration in some endocrine functions. In the present longitudinal study, the counterregulatory hormonal response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (ITT, 0.1 IU/kg short acting insulin i. v.) was evaluated under simulated microgravity conditions in 15 physically fit subjects. ITT was performed at the beginning of the investigation, and again after completion of 6 weeks of endurance training and after a subsequent period of 4 days of head-down bed rest at a backward tilt of 6 degrees from the horizontal. Endurance training showed a significant increase in maximal aerobic capacity in previously well-trained subjects (increase by 12 %), as well as on attenuation of counterregulatory response of epinephrine to hypoglycemia. After 4 days of bed rest, basal concentrations of plasma norepinephrine was diminished (p < 0.002) and plasma renin activity was enhanced (p < 0.02). After bed rest, decreased responses of the two catecholamines (norepinephrine, p < 0.001; epinephrine, p < 0.001), growth hormone (p < 0.001), and cortisol (p < 0.05) were observed. Response of plasma renin activity after bed rest was increased (p < 0.01). This longitudinal study indicated that 4 days of bed rest in endurance-trained subjects induced increased response of PRA to hypoglycemia and attenuation of other counterregulatory neuroendocrine responses.

  16. Multigenerational and transgenerational effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals: A role for altered epigenetic regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Frances; Susiarjo, Martha; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the critical role of early life environment in shaping the future health outcomes of an individual. Moreover, recent studies have revealed that early life perturbations can affect the health of subsequent generations. Hypothesized mechanisms of multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental phenotypes include epigenetic misregulation in germ cells. In this review, we will focus on the available data demonstrating the ability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and parabens, to alter epigenetic marks in rodents and humans. These epigenetic marks include DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and non-coding RNAs. We also review the current evidence for multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental changes in the offspring following EDC exposure. Based on published results, we conclude that EDC exposure can alter the mouse and human epigenome, with variable tissue susceptibilities. Although increasing data suggest that exposure to EDCs is linked to transgenerational inheritance of reproductive, metabolic, or neurological phenotypes, more studies are needed to validate these observations and to elucidate further whether these developmental changes are directly associated with the relevant epigenetic alterations. PMID:26026600

  17. Multigenerational and transgenerational effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals: A role for altered epigenetic regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Frances; Susiarjo, Martha; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2015-07-01

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the critical role of early life environment in shaping the future health outcomes of an individual. Moreover, recent studies have revealed that early life perturbations can affect the health of subsequent generations. Hypothesized mechanisms of multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental phenotypes include epigenetic misregulation in germ cells. In this review, we will focus on the available data demonstrating the ability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and parabens, to alter epigenetic marks in rodents and humans. These epigenetic marks include DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and non-coding RNAs. We also review the current evidence for multi- and transgenerational inheritance of abnormal developmental changes in the offspring following EDC exposure. Based on published results, we conclude that EDC exposure can alter the mouse and human epigenome, with variable tissue susceptibilities. Although increasing data suggest that exposure to EDCs is linked to transgenerational inheritance of reproductive, metabolic, or neurological phenotypes, more studies are needed to validate these observations and to elucidate further whether these developmental changes are directly associated with the relevant epigenetic alterations.

  18. Fetal and neonatal endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unüvar, Tolga; Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2012-06-01

    Endocrine disruptors are substances commonly encountered in every setting and condition in the modern world. It is virtually impossible to avoid the contact with these chemical compounds in our daily life. Molecules defined as endocrine disruptors constitute an extremely heterogeneous group and include synthetic chemicals used as industrial solvents/lubricants and their by-products. Natural chemicals found in human and animal food (phytoestrogens) also act as endocrine disruptors. Different from adults, children are not exposed only to chemical toxins in the environment but may also be exposed during their intrauterine life. Hundreds of toxic substances, which include neuro-immune and endocrine toxic chemical components that may influence the critical steps of hormonal, neurological and immunological development, may affect the fetus via the placental cord and these substances may be excreted in the meconium. Children and especially newborns are more sensitive to environmental toxins compared to adults. Metabolic pathways are immature, especially in the first months of life. The ability of the newborn to metabolize, detoxify and eliminate many toxins is different from that of the adults. Although exposures occur during fetal or neonatal period, their effects may sometimes be observed in later years. Further studies are needed to clarify the effects of these substances on the endocrine system and to provide evidence for preventive measures.

  19. Chronobiology in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Erhard

    2007-08-31

    Biological signaling occurs in a complex web with participation and interaction of the central nervous system, the autonomous nervous system, the endocrine glands, peripheral endocrine tissues including the intestinal tract and adipose tissue, and the immune system. All of these show an intricate time structure with rhythms and pulsatile variations in multiple frequencies. Circadian (about 24-hour) and circannual (about 1-year) rhythms are kept in step with the cyclic environmental surrounding by the timing and length of the daily light span. Rhythmicity of many endocrine variables is essential for their efficacy and, even in some instances, for the qualitative nature of their effects. Indeed, the continuous administration of certain hormones and their synthetic analogues may show substantially different effects than expected. In the design of drug-delivery systems and treatment schedules involving directly or indirectly the endocrine system, consideration of the human time organization is essential. A large amount of information on the endocrine time structure has accumulated, some of which is discussed in this review.

  20. Application of solid-phase extraction coupled with freezing-lipid filtration clean-up for the determination of endocrine-disrupting phenols in fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yun Gyong [Hazardous Substance Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Civil Environment Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jeoung Hwa; Kim, Hye-Young [Hazardous Substance Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Khim, Jeehyeong [Department of Civil Environment Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Kyoung [College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jongki [College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhong@khu.ac.kr

    2007-11-05

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of endocrine-disrupting phenols (eight alkylphenols and bisphenol A) in fish samples. The extraction of nine phenols from fish samples was carried out by ultrasonification. After the extraction, high levels of lipids were removed by freezing-lipid filtration instead of the traditional methods of column chromatography or saponification. During freezing-lipid filtration, about 90% of the lipids were eliminated without any significant loss of phenolic compounds. For further purification, hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced copolymer (HLB) sorbent with a poly(divinylbenzene-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) phase and Florisil-solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges were used to eliminate the remaining interferences. Silyl-derivatization, with N,N'-methyl-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), was applied to enhance the sensitivity of detection of phenolic compounds. Quantification was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, using deuterium-labeled internal standards. Spiking experiments were carried out to determine the recovery, precision and detection limit of the method. The overall recoveries ranged between 70 and 120%, with relative standard deviations of 3-17% for the entire procedure. The detection limits of the method for the nine phenols ranged from 0.02 to 0.41 ng g{sup -1}. The method provided simultaneous screening and accurate confirmation of each phenol when applied to biological samples.

  1. The lack of endocrine disrupting effects in catfish (Clarias gariepinus) from a DDT sprayed area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Kerry; van Vuren, Johan Jansen; Bornman, Riana

    2012-05-01

    The exposure and response of the catfish, Clarias gariepinus, was studied in male specimens collected in the vicinity of a DDT spraying programme to control malaria. Two sites were situated in the DDT sprayed areas and one site upstream from exposed areas, used as a reference site. The collected specimens were analysed for DDT bioaccumulation and the extent of associated effects. The concentration of all DDT metabolites including p,p'-and o,p'-forms of DDT, DDE and DDD, were measured in the adipose tissue, whilst the effects were measured using a range of biomarkers. This included assessing the effectiveness of plasma calcium, magnesium, zinc and alkali-labile phosphates (ALPs) as indirect measures of vitellogenin (VTG). Gonad condition was determined by calculating the gonadosomatic index (GSI) for each individual and comparing it with the gonad mass that were adjusted with Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). The presence of intersex in gonads was identified and the overall body condition determined using the condition factor (CF). Overall, none of the biomarkers showed significant change in the presence of high levels of DDT nor lindane, dieldrin and endosulfan II. Subtle responses in the plasma concentrations of calcium, ALP and gonad condition were evident in the catfish where DDT concentrations were highest, whilst no effects related to intersex and body condition were evident. Overall this study highlighted the tolerance of C. gariepinus to DDT contamination, the practical implications of using biomarkers in developing countries, and the need for further research into developing biomarkers for much needed biomonitoring programmes in areas where malarial control programmes continue to use DDT.

  2. Full automation of solid-phase microextraction/on-fiber derivatization for simultaneous determination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and steroid hormones by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Lan, Chongyu; Liu, Hongtao; Dong, Jun; Luan, Tiangang

    2006-09-01

    A fully automated method using direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) and headspace on-fiber silylation for simultaneous determinations of exogenous endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and endogenous steroid hormones in environmental aqueous and biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed and compared to a previously reported manual method. Three EDCs and five endocrine steroid hormones were selected to evaluate this method. The extraction and derivatization time, ion strength, pH, incubation temperature, sample volume, and extraction solvent were optimized. Satisfactory results in pure water were obtained in terms of linearity of calibration curve (R2=0.9932-1.0000), dynamic range (3 orders of magnitude), precision (4-9% RSD), as well as LOD (0.001-0.124 microg L(-1)) and LOQ (0.004-0.413 microg L(-1)), respectively. These results were similar to those obtained using a manual method, and moreover, the precision was improved. This new automated method has been applied to the determinations of target compounds in real samples used in our previous study on a manual SPME method. Exogenous octylphenol (OP), technical grade nonylphenol (t-NP), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) were at 0.13, 5.03, and 0.02 microg L(-1) in river water and 3.76, 13.25, and 0.10 microg L(-1) in fish serum, respectively. Natural steroid hormones estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and testosterone (T) were at 0.19, 0.11, and 6.22 microg L(-1) in river water; and in female fish serum E1, E2, and pregnenolone (PREG) were at 1.37, 1.95, and 6.25 microg L(-1), respectively. These results were confirmed by the manual method. The developed fully automated SPME and on-fiber silylation procedures showed satisfactory applications in environmental analysis and the performances show improved precision and a reduced analysis time compared to the manual method.

  3. Effect of wastewater treatment facility closure on endocrine disrupting chemicals in a Coastal Plain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insight into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The U.S. Geological Survey assessed the fate of select endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and streambed sediment one year before and one year after closure of a long-term WWTF located within the Spirit Creek watershed at Fort Gordon, Georgia. Sample sites included a WWTF-effluent control located upstream from the outfall, three downstream effluent-impacted sites located between the outfall and Spirit Lake, and one downstream from the lake's outfall. Prior to closure, the 2.2-km stream segment downstream from the WWTF outfall was characterized by EDC concentrations significantly higher (α = 0.05) than at the control site; indicating substantial downstream transport and limited in-stream attenuation of EDC, including pharmaceuticals, estrogens, alkylphenol ethoxylate (APE) metabolites, and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFR). Wastewater-derived pharmaceutical, APE metabolites, and OPFR compounds were also detected in the outflow of Spirit Lake, indicating the potential for EDC transport to aquatic ecosystems downstream of Fort Gordon under effluent discharge conditions. After the WWTF closure, no significant differences in concentrations or numbers of detected EDC compounds were observed between control and downstream locations. The results indicated EDC pseudo-persistence under preclosure, continuous supply conditions, with rapid attenuation following WWTF closure. Low concentrations of EDC at the control site throughout the study and comparable concentrations in downstream locations after WWTF closure indicated additional, continuing, upstream contaminant sources within the Spirit Creek watershed. 

  4. Effects of therapy with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate on endocrine function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teunissen, Jaap J.M.; Kwekkeboom, Dik J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Krenning, Eric P. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Frank H. de; Feelders, Richard A.; Aken, Maarten O. van; Herder, Wouter W. de [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijke, Yolanda B. de [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a novel therapy for patients with somatostatin receptor-positive tumours. We determined the effects of PRRT with [{sup 177}Lu-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate ({sup 177}Lu-octreotate) on glucose homeostasis and the pituitary-gonadal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-adrenal axes. Hormone levels were measured and adrenal function assessed at baseline and up to 24 months of follow-up. In 35 men, mean serum inhibin B levels were decreased at 3 months post-therapy (205 {+-} 16 to 25 {+-} 4 ng/l, p < 0.05) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased (5.9 {+-} 0.5 to 22.7 {+-} 1.4 IU/l, p < 0.05). These levels returned to near baseline levels. Total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels decreased (15.0 {+-} 0.9 to 10.6 {+-} 1.0 nmol/l, p < 0.05 and 61.8 {+-} 8.7 to 33.2 {+-} 3.7 nmol, p < 0.05), respectively, whereas non-SHBG-bound T did not change. An increase (5.2 {+-} 0.6 to 7.7 {+-} 0.7 IU/l, p < 0.05) of luteinizing hormone (LH) levels was found at 3 months of follow-up returning to baseline levels thereafter. In 21 postmenopausal women, a decrease in levels of FSH (74.4 {+-} 5.6 to 62.4 {+-} 7.7 IU/l, p < 0.05) and LH (26.8 {+-} 2.1 to 21.1 {+-} 3.0 IU/l, p < 0.05) was found. Of 66 patients, 2 developed persistent primary hypothyroidism. Free thyroxine (FT{sub 4}) levels decreased (17.7 {+-} 0.4 to 15.6 {+-} 0.6 pmol/l, p < 0.05), whereas thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) levels did not change. Reverse triiodothyronine (rT{sub 3}) levels decreased (0.38 {+-} 0.03 to 0.30 {+-} 0.01 nmol/l, p < 0.05). Before and after therapy adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation tests showed an adequate response of serum cortisol (> 550 nmol/l, n = 18). Five patients developed elevated HbA{sub 1c} levels (> 6.5%). In men {sup 177}Lu-octreotate therapy induced transient inhibitory effects on spermatogenesis, but non

  5. Immunologic endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Aaron W; Eisenbarth, George S

    2010-02-01

    Autoimmunity affects multiple glands in the endocrine system. Animal models and human studies highlight the importance of alleles in HLA-like molecules determining tissue-specific targeting that, with the loss of tolerance, leads to organ-specific autoimmunity. Disorders such as type 1A diabetes, Graves disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Addison disease, and many others result from autoimmune-mediated tissue destruction. Each of these disorders can be divided into stages beginning with genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, active autoimmunity, and finally metabolic derangements with overt symptoms of disease. With an increased understanding of the immunogenetics and immunopathogenesis of endocrine autoimmune disorders, immunotherapies are becoming prevalent, especially in patients with type 1A diabetes. Immunotherapies are being used more in multiple subspecialty fields to halt disease progression. Although therapies for autoimmune disorders stop the progress of an immune response, immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and chronic infections can also provoke an unwanted immune response. As a result, there are now iatrogenic autoimmune disorders arising from the treatment of chronic viral infections and malignancies. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunologic Endocrine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Aaron W.; Eisenbarth, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmunity affects multiple glands in the endocrine system. Animal models and human studies highlight the importance of alleles in HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-like molecules determining tissue specific targeting that with the loss of tolerance leads to organ specific autoimmunity. Disorders such as type 1A diabetes, Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Addison's disease, and many others result from autoimmune mediated tissue destruction. Each of these disorders can be divided into stages beginning with genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, active autoimmunity, and finally metabolic derangements with overt symptoms of disease. With an increased understanding of the immunogenetics and immunopathogenesis of endocrine autoimmune disorders, immunotherapies are becoming prevalent, especially in type 1A diabetes. Immunotherapies are being used more in multiple subspecialty fields to halt disease progression. While therapies for autoimmune disorders stop the progress of an immune response, immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and chronic infections can also provoke an unwanted immune response. As a result, there are now iatrogenic autoimmune disorders arising from the treatment of chronic viral infections and malignancies. PMID:20176260

  7. Passive sampling and stir bar sorptive extraction for the determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in water by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Emanuele; Di Carro, Marina; Liscio, Camilla

    2010-06-01

    A new method using the extraction and preconcentration capabilities of stir bar sorptive extraction, combined with high-resolution gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, was developed for the determination of five selected endocrine-disrupting compounds (4-n-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17beta-estradiol, and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol) in water. In situ derivatization to transform the phenolic compounds into lipophilic and volatile analytes was carried out with acetic anhydride. Two different methods of headspace derivatization to further improve the chromatographic properties of 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol were developed and compared. The optimized method provided good sensitivity (limits of quantitation 1.2-2.6 ng), repeatability (relative standard deviation 2-9%), and reproducibility (relative standard deviation 10-17%). Passive sampling by means of polar organic chemical integrative samplers was applied to monitor river waters used as supply sources for drinking water treatment plants in the Liguria region of Italy. The analytes showed a different distribution at the three sites considered; bisphenol A proved to be the most abundant, ranging from 185 to 459 ng per sampler.

  8. Pt/graphene-CNTs nanocomposite based electrochemical sensors for the determination of endocrine disruptor bisphenol A in thermal printing papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhixiang; Du, Yongling; Wang, Zaihua; Feng, Qingliang; Wang, Chunming

    2013-01-21

    A facile and green method was developed to synthesize the graphene-carbon nanotubes (Gr-CNTs) nanocomposite with a sandwich lamination structure. Pt nanoparticles were loaded on the as-synthesized Gr-CNTs nanocomposite to prepare an electrochemical sensor for determining bisphenol A (BPA) in thermal printing paper. The electrochemical behavior of BPA on the Pt/Gr-CNTs nanocomposite was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronocoulometry (CC). The direct determination of BPA was accomplished by using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) under optimized conditions. The oxidation peak current was proportional to the BPA concentration in the range from 6.0 × 10(-8) to 1.0 × 10(-5) M and 1.0 × 10(-5) to 8.0 × 10(-5) M with a correlation coefficient of 0.987 and 0.998, respectively. The detection limit was 4.2 × 10(-8) M (S/N = 3). The fabricated electrode showed good reproducibility, stability and selectivity. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine BPA in thermal printing papers samples and the results were satisfactory.

  9. THERAPY OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Surgery in microprolactinomas: effectiveness and risks based on contemporary literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampourlou, Metaxia; Trifanescu, Raluca; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Ahmed, Shahzada K; Karavitaki, Niki

    2016-09-01

    Microprolactinomas are the most common pituitary adenomas. In symptomatic patients, dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment of choice; when cabergoline is used, biochemical control rates between 85 and 93% have been reported. Long-term treatment is needed in most of the cases with compliance, patient convenience, and potential adverse effects representing areas requiring attention. Based on the literature published in the past 15 years, transsphenoidal surgery can lead to normal prolactin in the postoperative period in usually 71-100% of the cases with very low postoperative complication rates. Surgical expertise is the major determinant of the outcomes, and it may be a cost-effective option in young patients with life expectancy greater than 10 years (provided it is performed by experienced surgeons at high volume centers with confirmed optimal outcomes). Larger series of patients with adequate follow-up could further validate the place of transsphenoidal surgery (particularly through the endoscopic approach for which long-term results are currently limited) in the management algorithm of patients with microprolactinoma.

  10. Evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles to serve as solid-phase extraction sorbents for the determination of endocrine disruptors in milk samples by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synaridou, Maria-Evangelia S; Sakkas, Vasilios A; Stalikas, Constantine D; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2014-06-27

    A rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) is proposed based on C18-functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles as sorbents, for the determination of endocrine disruptors - 20 organochlorine pesticides and 6 polychlorinated biphenyls - in milk samples. Magnetic nanoparticles are characterized by several techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-Ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Fourier transform-infrared. The MSPE is performed by dispersion of the Fe3O4@SiO2@C18 nanoparticles in milk samples with sonication, after protein precipitation. Then, the sorbent is collected by applying an external magnetic field and the analytes are desorbed by n-hexane. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of target analytes by the magnetic nanoparticles are investigated, including washing and elution solvents, amount of sorbents, time of extraction and elution, sample and elution solvent volume. The proposed method is optimized by means of experimental design and response surface methodology. When coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection and under optimum extraction conditions, average recoveries of target analytes are found to be in the range of 79% to 116%. The proposed MSPE-GC-MS analytical method has a linear calibration curve for all target analytes with coefficients of determination to range from 0.9950 to 0.9999. The limits of quantification are found to be between 0.2 and 1μg/L ensuring compliance with the maximum residue limits established by European Commission and Codex Alimentarius, for OCPs and PCBs residues in milk. The proposed method is applied to the determination of target analytes in milk samples from local markets.

  11. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    OpenAIRE

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Contents The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive sys...

  12. Endocrine Disruptors (Chapter 14) in Mammalian Toxicology Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that alter endocrine system function(s) and consequently cause adverse health effects in intact organisms or its progeny. The endocrine system is important for a wide range of biological processes, from normal cell si...

  13. Endocrine links between food reward and caloric homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattemann, Dianne Figlewicz

    2008-11-01

    Both intrinsic and extrinsic (endocrine) inputs to the central nervous system (CNS) modulate motivation for feeding. Endocrine inputs such as insulin and leptin can have very rapid effects, but also the potential for chronic actions to decrease rewarding attributes of food. Future studies should elucidate the neural and cellular mechanisms which underlie these endocrine actions in the CNS.

  14. Investigating potential for effects of environmental endocrine disrupters on wild populations of amphibians in UK and Japan: status of historical databases and review of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickford, Daniel B; Larroze, Severine; Takase, Minoru; Mitsui, Naoko; Tooi, Osamu; Santo, Noriaki

    2007-01-01

    Concern over global declines among amphibians has resulted in increased interest in the effects of environmental contaminants on amphibian populations, and more recently, this has stimulated research on the potential adverse effects of environmental endocrine disrupters in amphibians. Laboratory studies of the effects of single chemicals on endocrine-relevant endpoints in amphibian, mainly anuran, models are valuable in characterizing sensitivity at the individual level and may yield useful bioassays for screening chemicals for endocrine toxicity (for example, thyroid disrupting activity). Nevertheless, in the UK and Japan as in many other countries, it has yet to be demonstrated unequivocally that the exposure of native amphibians to endocrine disrupting environmental contaminants results in adverse effects at the population level. Assessing the potential of such effects is likely to require an ecoepidemiological approach to investigate associations between predicted or actual exposure of amphibians to (endocrine disrupting) environmental contaminants and biologically meaningful responses at the population level. In turn, this demands recent but relatively long-term population trend data. We review two potential sources of such data for widespread UK anurans that could be used in such investigations: records for common frogs and common toads in several databases maintained by the Biological Records Centre (UK Government Centre for Ecology and Hydrology), and adult toad count data from 'Toads on Roads' schemes registered with the UK wildlife charity 'Froglife'. There were little abundance data in the BRC databases that could be used for this purpose, while count data from the Toads on Roads schemes is potentially confounded by the effects of local topology on the detection probabilities and operation of nonchemical anthropogenic stressors. For Japan, local and regional surveys of amphibians and national ecological censuses gathering amphibian data were reviewed to

  15. Effects of benzophenone-3 exposure on endocrine disruption and reproduction of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)—A two generation exposure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sujin; Jung, Dawoon [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kho, Younglim [Department of Health, Environment and Safety, Eulji University, Seongnam 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyungho, E-mail: kyungho@snu.ac.kr [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Exposure to BP-3 led to adverse reproduction effects on Japanese medaka at 26 μg/L. • Changes in sex hormones and steroidogenic gene transcription were observed. • Parental exposure to BP-3 influenced on the growth of second generation fish. - Abstract: Benzophenone-3 (BP-3) has been widely used in sunscreens and cosmetics to protect human skin from the harmful effects of UV irradiation. While BP-3 has been frequently detected in surface waters, sediments and biota, only limited information is available on its in vivo toxicity, particularly in fish. In the present study the endocrine disrupting capacity of BP-3 and its underlying mechanisms were investigated using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Adult Japanese medaka pairs (F0) were exposed to 0, 4.7, 8.4, 26, or 90 μg/L (or 0, 15, 50, 150, or 500 μg/L of BP-3 based on nominal concentration) for 14 d and its effects on sex steroid hormones, and transcription of various associated genes were determined. Following additional 14 d of exposure, the F1 eggs reproduced were counted and were further exposed to 0, 5.4, 12, or 30 μg/L of BP-3 (or 0, 15, 50, or 150 μg/L based on nominal concentrations) until 30 d after hatching. Chemical analysis of the exposed media confirmed transformation of BP-3 to benzophenone-1 (BP-1), a more potent estrogen agonist. After 14 d of the adult fish exposure, plasma concentrations of testosterone (T) significantly increased in male fish. The 17β-estradiol (E2) to T (E2/T) ratio showed significant decreases in both male and female fish. Overall down-regulation of gonadal steroidogenic genes such as star, cyp11a, cyp17, hsd3b, hsd17b3, and cyp19a was also observed. After 28 d of exposure, the daily average egg reproduction per female was significantly reduced at 26 μg/L of BP-3. However, hatchability of F1 eggs was not affected by continuous exposure. After continued exposure until 30 dph, juvenile fish showed concentration-dependent decrease of condition factor

  16. Effect of pirenzepine on gastric endocrine cell kinetics during lansoprazole administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, N; Kashiwagi, H; Gang, C; Omura, K; Aoki, T

    1998-10-01

    We studied the effect of pirenzepine on gastric secretion kinetics in rats in a hypochlorhydric state induced by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor. Pirenzepine was administered intramuscularly at a dosage of 20 mg/kg twice daily; and lansorprazole, subcutaneously at 50 mg/kg once daily, both every day for 4 weeks. After the 4-week treatment, serum gastrin and plasma somatostatin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. In addition, gastrin cells, somatostatin cells, and enterochromaffin-like cells were immunostained and counted. Serum gastrin levels were elevated, and gastrin and enterochromaffin-like cell numbers increased in the group on lansoprazole alone, compared with these values in the control group (which received distilled water). In the group on the lansoprazole and pirenzepine combination, serum gastrin levels decreased, and gastrin and enterochromaffin-like cell numbers were significantly decreased, compared with the respective variables in the group on lansoprazole alone, while the number of somatostatin cells increased in the group on the combination. Plasma somatostatin levels did not vary significantly in any group. It was thus demonstrated that pirenzepine corrects the abnormal gastric secretion kinetics resulting from treatment with lansoprazole alone, such as hypergastrinemia and gastrin and enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia.

  17. Age and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noth, R H; Mazzaferri, E L

    1985-02-01

    The pattern of age-induced changes in each endocrine system is unique. Both hormone levels and target organ responsivity are altered in the aging endocrine-cardiovascular system. Serum levels of vasopressor hormones both increase (norepinephrine) and decrease (renin, aldosterone). Target organ responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation in the heart and probably also in vascular smooth muscle decrease due to postreceptor changes. These effects contribute to the clinical problems of hypertension and orthostatic hypotension which characterize the elderly. Aging produces mild carbohydrate intolerance and a minimal increase in fasting serum glucose in healthy, nonobese individuals, primarily due to decreasing postreceptor responsiveness to insulin. Aging decreases the metabolism of thyroxine, including its conversion to triiodothyronine, but clinically significant alterations of thyroid hormone levels do not occur. Changes in the end-organ response to thyroid hormones, however, significantly alter the clinical presentation of thyroid diseases. Aging shifts the serum vasopressin-serum osmolality relationship toward higher serum vasopressin levels probably due to altered baroreceptor input, probably contributing to the tendency toward hyponatremia in the elderly. Aging slows the metabolism of cortisol, but glucocorticoid levels in the human are essentially unaltered by age. However, recent data indicate that delta-5 adrenal steroids decrease markedly in both men and women. Nodules in the anterior pituitary, the thyroid, and the adrenal increase in frequency with aging. Finally, the reproductive system is primarily altered by endocrine cell death, by unknown mechanisms, resulting in decreased estrogen and testosterone levels in women and men. This most obvious age-related endocrine change turns out to be incompletely understood and is not representative of most age-related endocrine changes. Despite characterization of these many age-related alterations in endocrine systems

  18. Determination of 13 endocrine disrupting chemicals in sediments by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using subcritical water extraction coupled with dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke; Kang, Haining; Yue, Zhenfeng; Yang, Lihua; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Luan, Tiangang

    2015-03-25

    In this study, a sample pretreatment method was developed for the determination of 13 endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in sediment samples based on the combination of subcritical water extraction (SWE) and dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The subcritical water that provided by accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) was the sample solution (water) for the following DLLME and the soluble organic modifier that spiked in the subcritical water was also used as the disperser solvent for DLLME in succession. Thus, several important parameters that affected both SWE and DLLME were investigated, such as the extraction solvent for DLLME (chlorobenzene), extraction time for DLLME (30s), selection of organic modifier for SWE (acetone), volume of organic modifier (10%) and extraction temperature for SWE (150 °C). In addition, good chromatographic behavior was achieved for GC-MS after derivatisation by using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). As a result, proposed method sensitive and reliable with the limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.006 ng g(-1) (BPA) to 0.639 ng g(-1) (19-norethisterone) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) between 1.5% (E2) and 15.0% (DES). Moreover, the proposed method was compared with direct ASE extraction that reported previously, and the results showed that SWE-DLLME was more promising with recoveries ranging from 42.3% (dienestrol) to 131.3% (4,5α-dihydrotestosterone), except for diethylstilbestrol (15.0%) and nonylphenols (29.8%). The proposed method was then successfully applied to determine 13 EDCs sediment of Humen outlet of the Pearl River, 12 of target compounds could be detected, and 10 could be quantitative analysis with the total concentration being 39.6 ng g(-1), and which indicated that the sediment of Humen outlet was heavily contaminated by EDCs.

  19. The effects of music intervention on the emotion, haemodynamics and endocrine hormone level of senile patients during the perianesthesia period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to explore the effects of music intervention on haemodynamics and endocrine hormone level of senile patients. Methods: choosing ASA II-III level and selecting 60 senile patients performed with intraspinal anesthesia; randomly dividing them into the intervention group and control group with 30 cases in each group. Both the two groups of patients completed the SAS before entering the operating room. When the patients of the intervention group entered the operating room, selected music would be played in a continuous loop immediately till the end of the operation while the doctors of the control group just told the patient to relax without music or other special treatment. Recording and comparing the SAS scores, SBP, HR and salivary cortisol concentration of the two groups before and after intervention. Results: the SAS scores, SBP, HR and salivary cortisol concentration of the intervention group were significantly decreased compared with the value before intervention and the differences within and between the groups were significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: music intervention can effectively reduce the preoperative anxiety, ease intranperative tension and maintain the stability of hemodynamics, so it is beneficial for senile parents to live through the perianesthesia period.

  20. Commonly used endocrine drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Mário Miguel; Dias, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine drugs are agents directed to a malfunctioning endocrine path. Several agents are secreted in or target the nervous system, and are thus more prone to cause neurologic adverse events (AEs). This chapter focuses on commonly used endocrine agents directed to the hypothalamus-pituitary axis, thyroid, and antidiabetic agents. The therapeutic agents are discussed in terms of indication, mechanism of action, description, and frequency of AEs, and risk factors for occurrence where available. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of in vivo exposure to UV filters (4-MBC, OMC, BP-3, 4-HB, OC, OD-PABA) on endocrine signaling genes in the insect Chironomus riparius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    There is increasing evidence indicating that several UV filters might have endocrine disruptive effects. Numerous studies have evaluated hormonal effects in vertebrates, mainly reporting estrogenic and androgenic activities in mammals and fishes. There is only limited knowledge about potential endocrine activity in invertebrate hormonal systems. In this work, the effects on endocrine signaling genes of six frequently used UV filters were investigated in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. The UV filters studied were: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also called 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC); benzophenone-3 (BP-3); 4-hidroxybenzophenone (4-HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). After in vivo exposure at different dosages, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR), the ultraspiracle (usp, ortholog of the RXR) and the estrogen-related receptor (ERR) were quantified by Real Time PCR. The EcR gene was significantly upregulated by 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA, with a dose-related response following 24h exposure. In contrast, the benzophenones, BP-3 and 4-HB, as well as OC did not alter this gene at the same exposure conditions. The transcription profiles of the usp and ERR genes were not significantly affected, except for BP-3 that inhibited the usp gene at the highest concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence in invertebrates of a direct effect of UV filters on endocrine-related genes, and is consistent with the known effects on vertebrate hormonal receptor genes. The capability of 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA to stimulate the expression of the ecdysone receptor, a key transcription factor for the ecdysone-genomic response in arthropods, suggests the possibility of a broad and long-term effect on this hormonal pathway. These findings strengthen the need for further research about the ecotoxicological implications

  2. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on lead bioconcentration and toxicity on thyroid endocrine system and neuronal development in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Wei; Zhu, Biran; Xiao, Xiaohong; Li, Ying; Dirbaba, Niguse Bekele; Zhou, Bingsheng; Wu, Hongjuan

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Interactions between heavy metals (e.g., Pb) and NPs in aquatic environments may modify the bioavailability and toxicity of heavy metals. Therefore, this study investigated the influence of NPs (e.g., nano-TiO2) on the bioavailability and toxicity of Pb and its effects in the thyroid endocrine and nervous systems of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Zebrafish embryos (2-h post-fertilization) were exposed to five concentrations of Pb alone (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30μg/L) or in combination with nano-TiO2 (0.1mg/L) until 6 days post-fertilization. Results showed that the bioconcentration of Pb was significantly enhanced when combined with nano-TiO2 than when used alone. Zebrafish exposure to Pb alone at 30μg/L significantly decreased the thyroid hormone levels (T4 and T3), whereas nano-TiO2 treatment alone did not produce detectable changes. The levels of T4 and T3 were further decreased when Pb was combined with nano-TiO2 than when used alone. The transcription of the thyroid hormone-related factor tg gene was remarkably down-regulated by Pb treatment alone but up-regulated when Pb was combined with nano-TiO2. The significant up-regulation of tshβ gene and the down-regulation of TTR gene expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid were observed in Pb with or without nano-TiO2 treatment groups. In addition, the transcription of genes involved in central nervous system (CNS) development (α-tubulin, mbp, gfap and shha) were significantly down-regulated by Pb and nano-TiO2 co-exposure as compared with Pb exposure alone. The locomotion activity analyzes confirmed that nano-TiO2 might enhance the toxicity of Pb to CNS development. These results suggest that nano-TiO2 increase bioconcentration of lead, which lead to the disruption of thyroid endocrine and neuronal system in zebrafish larvae.

  3. Endocrine system: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolyn; Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    2014-05-27

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series and is the first of two articles on the endocrine system, examines the structure and function of the organs of the endocrine system. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health. The role of the endocrine system and the types, actions and control of hormones are explored. The gross structure of the pituitary and thyroid glands are described along with relevant physiology. Several disorders of the thyroid gland are outlined. The second article examines growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands.

  4. [Postpartum endocrine syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarme, G; Châtel, P; Luton, D

    2008-05-01

    Postpartum endocrine syndromes occur in the year after delivery. They are due to immunologic and vascular modifications during pregnancy. The Sheehan syndrome is the first described postpartum endocrine syndrome and consists on a hypophyse necrosis in relation with a hypovolemic shock during delivery. The immunologic consequences of the pregnancy are the most frequent, sometimes discrete and transitory. The physiological evolution of the endocrine glands during pregnancy and the most frequent post-partum endocrine syndromes are discussed: postpartum lymphocytic hypophysitis, thyroiditis and Sheehan' syndrome.

  5. Subtle sabotage: endocrine disruption in wild populations

    OpenAIRE

    Cheek, Ann Oliver

    2016-01-01

    How important is endocrine disruption as a threat to wildlife populations? This review applies causal criteria to existing studies of wild populations of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals to answer three questions: (1) Have endocrine-mediated effects of contaminant exposure been documented? (2) Have individual adverse effects that could lead to population effects been documented? (3) Have population level effects been documented? In fish, the possibility of population level effec...

  6. Integration of in silico approaches to determination of endocrine-disrupting perfluorinated chemicals binding potency with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranthi Kumar, K; Uma Devi, B; Neeraja, P

    2017-09-30

    A myriad of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have the ability to interfere with steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. Consequently, PFCs breaches cholesterol biotransformation in mitochondria and cause fatal consequences in steroidogenesis, however, these were poorly characterized. In the present study, we have evaluated toxic potencies, nuclear mediated probabilities and interaction profiles with StAR of PFCs using computational system biology tools. Toxicity endpoints revealed that PFCs contain high carcinogenicity, developmental toxicity, skin sensitization effects with low mutagenic activity. Consensus qualitative nuclear receptor agonist models show higher probability rates towards ER and PPAR-γ receptor than AR and AhR models were observed. To poise the subtle fluctuations of actual predictions, balanced accuracy and MCC were computed, and they signify perfect correlation ranges in all models. Screening studies resulting protein-ligand interaction profiles showed that residues Asn148, Asn150, Glu169, Ala171, Arg182, Phe184, Arg188, Trp241, Thr263 and Phe267 were identified as novel hotspots, participated in halogen bonds, H-bonds, atomic π-stacking, π-cation interactions and salt-bridges formation. Thus, the additional bonds contribute conformer stability that holds the protein structure at flexible state, so that PFCs acts as a barrier to cholesterol binding. From docking outcomes, representation space was created, that specifies high and medium StAR binders were occupied in toxic endpoints space with active concern. PFCs restrain molecular features and mitochondrial membrane disruption functions were revealed by efficient toxicogenomics studies. These data indicate toxicity and StAR protein binding levels of PFCs, sorted pinpoints could be useful in a promising way to know the other environmental pollutants and health risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Refinement of the ECETOC approach to identify endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Weyers, Arnd; Galay-Burgos, Malyka

    2013-12-16

    To use and implement an assessment scheme for the evaluation of endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology, the types of effect need to be agreed. Effects that merit further consideration in this context should fulfil the following three criteria: caused by an endocrine mode of action, be adverse, and be relevant at the population level to reflect the protection goal of ecotoxicological assessments. Thereafter, a comparison of effect values, regardless of the causative mechanisms, should be made, firstly to determine if endocrine toxicity generates the lowest endpoint within a taxon, and secondly if it is the lowest endpoint compared to that of other taxa living in the same compartment. These comparisons inform on two levels of specificity and determine if endocrine-mediated side-effects determine the ecotoxicological profile of a chemical. Various quantitative measures for the assessment of potency are also presented, which could assist in determining how to handle substances in the risk assessment when a regulatory concern is identified. Finally, derogation criteria should be defined for compounds that were designed as endocrine disruptors for non-vertebrates and those for which there is 'negligible exposure'. This paper discusses and provides proposals on how to apply these concepts for assessment of substances.

  8. Phytotoxic, clastogenic and bioaccumulation effects of the environmental endocrine disruptor bisphenol A in various crops grown hydroponically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Elisabetta; Senesi, Nicola

    2006-04-01

    The effects of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) at concentrations of 10 and 50 mg l(-1) were evaluated on the germination and morphology, micronuclei (MN) content in root tip cells and BPA bioaccumulation of hydroponic seedlings of broad bean (Vicia faba L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) after 6 and 21 days of growth. In general, BPA at any dose used did not inhibit germination and early growth (6 days) of seedlings of the species examined, with the exception of primary root length of tomato which decreased at the higher BPA dose. In contrast, an evident phytotoxicity was induced by BPA in all species after 21 days of growth with evident morphological anomalies and significant reductions of the lengths and fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots of seedlings. With respect to the nutrient medium without seedlings, BPA concentration decreased markedly during the growth period in the presence of broad bean and tomato seedlings, and limitedly in the presence of durum wheat and, especially, lettuce. Further, the presence of BPA measured in roots and shoots of broad bean and tomato after 21-day growth indicated that bioaccumulation of BPA had occurred. The number of MN in broad bean and durum wheat root tip cells increased markedly by treatment with BPA at both concentrations, thus suggesting a potential clastogenic activity of BPA in these species.

  9. Role of beta2 agonists in respiratory medicine with particular attention to novel patents and effects on endocrine system and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Nancy E; Moreno, Dolores; Garmendia, Jenny V; De Sanctis, Juan B

    2011-09-01

    Beta adrenergic receptors are very important in respiratory medicine. Traditionally, the stimulation of beta adrenergic receptors by beta2-agonists is commonly used for giving bronchodilation in chronic airflow obstruction However; the wide distribution of these receptors in cells and tissues other than airway smooth muscle suggests that beta agonists should offer other beneficial effects in respiratory disease. Recent studies have shown the importance of these receptors in the modulation of endocrine and immune system that affect respiratory function and may decrease therapy effectiveness in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New patented compound and uses have provided new insights in future therapeutics of respiratory diseases in which genetic, endocrine and immune response should be considered.

  10. [Environmental contaminants and endocrine disruptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenele, Eveline Gadelha Pereira; Martins, Manoel Ricardo Alves; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães

    2010-02-01

    The toxicity of various pollutants has been routinely investigated according to their teratogenic and carcinogenic effects. In the last few decades, however, many of such pollutants have been shown to adversely affect the endocrine system of human beings and other species. Currently, more than eleven million chemical substances are known in the world, and approximately 3,000 are produced on a large scale. Numerous chemical composites of domestic, industrial and agricultural use have been shown to influence hormonal activity. Examples of such chemical products with estrogenic activity are substances used in cosmetics, anabolizing substances for animal feeding, phytoestrogens and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). These agents are seen in residential, industrial and urban sewerage system effluents and represent an important source of environmental contamination. The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) defines as endocrine disruptors substances or mixtures seen in the environment capable of interfering with endocrine system functions resulting in adverse effects in an intact organism or its offspring. In this article the authors present a current literature review about the role of these pollutants in endocrine and metabolic diseases, probable mechanisms of action, and suggest paths of investigation and possible strategies for prevention and reduction of its possible damages.

  11. An overview of estrogen-associated endocrine disruption in fishes: evidence of effects on reproductive and immune physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Blazer, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    Simply and perhaps intuitively defined, endocrine disruption is the abnormal modulation of normal hormonal physiology by exogenous chemicals. In fish, endocrine disruption of the reproductive system has been observed worldwide in numerous species and is known to affect both males and females. Observations of biologically relevant endocrine disruption most commonly occurs near waste water treatment plant outfalls, pulp and paper mills, and areas of high organic loading sometimes associated with agricultural practices. Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EEDCs) have received an overwhelmingly disproportionate amount of scientific attention compared to other EDCs in recent years. In male fishes, exposure to EEDCs can lead to the induction of testicular oocytes (intersex), measurable plasma vitellogenin protein, altered sex steroid profiles, abnormal spawning behavior, skewed population sex ratios, and lessened reproductive success. Interestingly, contemporary research purports that EDCs modulate aspects of non-reproductive physiology including immune function. Here we present an overview of endocrine disruption in fishes associated with estrogenic compounds, implications of this phenomenon, and examples of EDC related research findings by our group in the Potomac River Watershed, USA.

  12. Determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in water by carbon nanotubes solid-phase microextraction fiber coupled online with high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoxia; Li, Quanlong; Yuan, Dongxing

    2011-09-30

    The commercial solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers are not stable enough in organic solvent and tend to swell and strip off from the silica fiber in the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mobile phase, and therefore the application of SPME coupled online with HPLC is limited. In this study, an SPME fiber coated with single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), prepared by means of electrophoretic deposition, was coupled on line to HPLC for the determination of four endocrine-disrupting compounds, i.e. bisphenol A (BPA), estrone (E(1)), 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE(2)) and octylphenol (OP), in aqueous samples. The results showed that the SWCNTs coating on the prepared fiber did not swell and strip off from the platinum fiber throughout the experiment, thus indicating a high resistance to the HPLC mobile phase, the mixture of water and acetonitrile. The SWCNTs fiber had similar (for OP) or higher (for BPA, EE(2) and E(1)) extraction efficiencies than the commonly used polyacrylate fiber, and had a lifetime of more than 120 operation times. Under the optimized conditions, the linearity of the proposed method was 1.0-30.0 μg/L for BPA and OP and 3.0-90.0 μg/L for E(1) and EE(2). The limits of detection (LODs; S/N=3) and limits of quantification (LOQs; S/N=10) of the method were 0.32-0.52 μg/L and 1.06-1.72 μg/L, respectively. Repeatability for one fiber (n=3) was in the range of 1.3-7.1% and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility (n=3) was in the range of 1.6-8.4%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of spiked tap water and seawater samples with recoveries from 81.8 to 97.3%.

  13. Determination of endocrine disrupting compounds in fish liver, brain, and muscle using focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction and dispersive solid phase extraction as clean-up strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Oihana; Vallejo, Asier; Olivares, Maitane; Etxebarria, Nestor; Prieto, Ailette

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new method for the simultaneous extraction of several endocrine disrupting compounds, including alkylphenols (APs), estrogen, bisphenol-A (BPA) and one phthalate metabolite (mono-2-ethylhexyl ester, MEHP) in fish liver, brain, and muscle. Parameters affecting the extraction (extraction solvent and temperature) and the clean-up (dispersive phase nature and amount) steps were evaluated. The extraction was performed by means of focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction (FUSLE) using 10 mL of n-hexane:acetone (50:50, v/v) for 5 min at ~0 °C, and the clean-up was done by means of dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) using 100 mg of ENVI-CARB and 100 mg of MgSO4 for the cleaning of brain and muscle extracts together with 100 mg of PSA in the case of liver extracts. Good apparent recoveries were obtained in the case of liver (62-132 %), brain (66-120 %), and muscle (74-129 %), relative standard deviation (RSD%) was always below 26 %, and the method detection limits (MDLs) were at low ng/g level. The developed method was applied to fish captured in Urdaibai estuary (Bay of Biscay) in December 2015, and the concentrations obtained were in the range MDL-1115 ng/g in brain, MDL-962 ng/g in muscle, and MDL-672 ng/g in liver. In general, the highest concentrations were measured in liver, followed by brain and muscle. In addition, diethylstilbestrol was only detected in fish brain. Graphical Abstract MS method scheme for the/MS method scheme for the determination of EDCs in fish liver, brain and muscle.

  14. Weight classification does not influence the short-term endocrine or metabolic effects of high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heden, Timothy D; Liu, Ying; Kearney, Monica L; Kanaley, Jill A

    2014-05-01

    Obesity and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)-sweetened beverages are associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, but it is not clear whether obese (Ob) individuals are more susceptible to the detrimental effects of HFCS-sweetened beverages. The purpose of this study was to examine the endocrine and metabolic effects of consuming HFCS-sweetened beverages, and whether weight classification (normal weight (NW) vs. Ob) influences these effects. Ten NW and 10 Ob men and women who habitually consumed ≤355 mL per day of sugar-sweetened beverages were included in this study. Initially, the participants underwent a 4-h mixed-meal test after a 12-h overnight fast to assess insulin sensitivity, pancreatic and gut endocrine responses, insulin secretion and clearance, and glucose, triacylglycerol, and cholesterol responses. Next, the participants consumed their normal diet ad libitum, with 1065 mL per day (117 g·day(-1)) of HFCS-sweetened beverages added for 2 weeks. After the intervention, the participants repeated the mixed-meal test. HFCS-sweetened beverages did not significantly alter body weight, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or clearance, or endocrine, glucose, lipid, or cholesterol responses in either NW or Ob individuals. Regardless of previous diet, Ob individuals, compared with NW individuals, had ∼28% lower physical activity levels, 6%-9% lower insulin sensitivity, 12%-16% lower fasting high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, 84%-144% greater postprandial triacylglycerol concentrations, and 46%-79% greater postprandial insulin concentrations. Greater insulin responses were associated with reduced insulin clearance, and there were no differences in insulin secretion. These findings suggest that weight classification does not influence the short-term endocrine and metabolic effects of HFCS-sweetened beverages.

  15. Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting compounds and men's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D

    2010-07-01

    Human exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have received increased attention in recent years due to the documentation of widespread exposure to a number of EDCs among the general population, experimental data demonstrating endocrine-related effects on reproduction, development, metabolism, and cancer, and observations for increasing trends (as well as geographic trends) in endocrine-related disorders among populations. However, human studies of exposure to most environmental EDCs in relation to adverse health outcomes remain limited. This review focuses on the human data generated to date on the relationship between exposures to environmental EDCs and men's health. The agents discussed here, which include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were chosen based on their exposure prevalence and the presence of existing human data in studies of male reproductive health, altered reproductive and thyroid hormone levels, diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome, and endocrine-related cancers. Taken together, the epidemiologic data on the environmental EDCs suggest that there may be associations between exposure and adverse health outcomes in men. However, the limited human data, and in many instances inconsistent data across studies, highlight the need for further research on these chemicals. Future longitudinal molecular epidemiology studies with appropriately designed exposure assessments are needed to determine potential causal relationships, to identify the most important time windows/life stages of exposure, and to define individual susceptibility factors for adverse effects on men's health in response to exposure.

  16. Endocrine, metabolic, and behavioral effects of and recovery from acute stress in a free-ranging bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviche, Pierre; Bittner, Stephanie; Davies, Scott; Valle, Shelley; Gao, Sisi; Carpentier, Elodie

    2016-08-01

    Acute stress in vertebrates generally stimulates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and is often associated with multiple metabolic changes, such as increased gluconeogenesis, and with behavioral alterations. Little information is available, especially in free-ranging organisms, on the duration of these reversible effects once animals are no longer exposed to the stressor. To investigate this question, we exposed free-ranging adult male Rufous-winged Sparrows, Peucaea carpalis, in breeding condition to a standard protocol consisting of a social challenge (conspecific song playback) followed with capture and restraint for 30min, after which birds were released on site. Capture and restraint increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) and decreased plasma testosterone (T), glucose (GLU), and uric acid (UA). In birds that we recaptured the next day after exposure to conspecific song playback, plasma CORT and UA levels no longer differed from levels immediately after capture the preceding day. However, plasma T was similar to that measured after stress exposure the preceding day, and plasma GLU was markedly elevated. Thus, exposure to social challenge and acute stress resulted in persistent (⩾24h) parameter-specific effects. In recaptured sparrows, the territorial aggressive response to conspecific song playback, as measured by song rate and the number of flights over the song-broadcasting speakers, did not, however, differ between the first capture and the recapture, suggesting no proximate functional association between plasma T and conspecific territorial aggression. The study is the first in free-ranging birds to report the endocrine, metabolic, and behavioral recovery from the effects of combined social challenge and acute stress.

  17. The unsolved case of “bone-impairing analgesics”: the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coluzzi F

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flaminia Coluzzi,1,2 Joseph Pergolizzi,3,4 Robert B Raffa,5 Consalvo Mattia1,2 1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Unit of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine – Polo Pontino, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy; 2SIAARTI Study Group on Acute and Chronic Pain, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 4Naples Anesthesia and Pain Associates, Naples, FL, 5Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1 the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2 reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3 chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine. Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. Keywords: opioids side effects, bone metabolism, fractures, OPIAD, endocrine system, chronic pain

  18. Endocrine system and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Doyle D; Reed, Mary Jane

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is associated with significant alterations in endocrine function. An association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia has been well documented. This article highlights the complexities of treating endocrine system disorders in obese patients. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The endocrine quiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the recent explosion in endocrine conferences, audience fatigue has set in and conference planners are now looking at newer pedagogic methods to revive the interest of audiences in these conferences. The endocrine quiz has finally come of vogue and is increasingly becoming one of the most popular attractions of any ranking endocrine conference. The endocrine quiz has a large and varied palette and draws questions from religious scriptures, history, literature, current affairs, sports, movies and basic and paramedical sciences. The more we delve into the quizzable aspects of endocrinology, the more we realize that endocrinology is ubiquitous and there is no sphere in human life untouched by endocrine disorders. Be it epic characters like Kumbhakarna and Bheema, fiction characters like Tintin or Orphan Annie, sportspersons like Gail Devers or heads of state like George Bush Sr and Boris Yeltsin, all have contributed to the melting pot of endocrine quizzing. Adding further grist to the endocrine mill are the Nobel prizes, with their attendant anecdotes and controversies. Step into this world of endocrine quizzing to have an up close and personal look at the diverse facets of this subject.

  20. [Acne vulgaris: endocrine aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, O M; Thio, B H; Romijn, J A; Smit, J W A

    2006-06-10

    Androgens play an important part in the development of acne vulgaris. Androgen levels in patients with acne are higher than those in controls and people with the androgen insensitivity syndrome do not develop acne. Local factors other than androgen plasma levels, also play a part in the development of acne. The skin contains enzymes that convert precursor hormones to the more potent androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Androgen synthesis can therefore be regulated locally. The effects of androgens on the skin are the result of circulating androgens and enzyme activity in local tissues and androgen receptors. Acne is a clinical manifestation of some endocrine diseases. The polycystic ovary syndrome has the highest prevalence. In women with acne that persists after puberty, in 10-200% of cases polycystic ovary syndrome is later diagnosed. The mechanism of hormonal anti-acne therapy may work by blocking the androgen-production (oestrogens) or by blocking the androgen receptor (cyproterone, spironolactone).

  1. Endocrine Disrupters in Human Blood and Breast Milk: Extraction Methodologies, Cellular Uptake and Effect on Key Nuclear Receptor Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    -products from incineration plants, plastic additives, technical industry products, pesticides from the farming industry and detergent degradation products. Many of these substances can interfere with the hormonal system in organisms. The common name for these compounds is endocrine disrupters (EDCs). Some EDCs...... the level of endocrine disrupting activity in the sample. Paper IV. Breast milk was extracted using SPE and these extracts were further processed using polyethylene membranes in a dialytic setup (MDE extraction). The purpose of the dialysis was to reduce the content of lipids in the raw SPE extracts because...

  2. Endocrine-Active Pharmaceuticals: An Environmental Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, there has been growing interest in pharmaceuticals that are specifically designed to have endocrine activity, such as the estrogens used in birth control pills, exerting unintended effects on fish and other aquatic organisms. These pharmaceuticals may not be persistent...

  3. Endocrine-Active Pharmaceuticals: An Environmental Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, there has been growing interest in pharmaceuticals that are specifically designed to have endocrine activity, such as the estrogens used in birth control pills, exerting unintended effects on fish and other aquatic organisms. These pharmaceuticals may not be persistent...

  4. The menace of endocrine disruptors on thyroid hormone physiology and their impact on intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastorakos, George; Karoutsou, Eftychia I; Mizamtsidi, Maria; Creatsas, George

    2007-06-01

    The delivery of the appropriate thyroid hormones quantity to target tissues in euthyroidism is the result of unopposed synthesis, transport, metabolism, and excretion of these hormones. Thyroid hormones homeostasis depends on the maintenance of the circulating 'free' thyroid hormone reserves and on the development of a dynamic balance between the 'free' hormones reserves and those of the 'bound' hormones with the transport proteins. Disturbance of this hormone system, which is in constant interaction with other hormone systems, leads to an adaptational counter-response targeting to re-establish a new homeostatic equilibrium. An excessive disturbance is likely to result, however, in hypo- or hyper- thyroid clinical states. Endocrine disruptors are chemical substances forming part of 'natural' contaminating agents found in most ecosystems. There is abundant evidence that several key components of the thyroid hormones homeostasis are susceptible to the action of endocrine disruptors. These chemicals include some chlorinated organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, herbicides, and pharmaceutical agents. Intrauterine exposure to endocrine disruptors that either mimic or antagonize thyroid hormones can produce permanent developmental disorders in the structure and functioning of the brain, leading to behavioral changes. Steroid receptors are important determinants of the consequences of endocrine disruptors. Their interaction with thyroid hormones complicates the effect of endocrine disruptors. The aim of this review is to present the effect of endocrine disruptors on thyroid hormones physiology and their potential impact on intrauterine development.

  5. Determination of Effective Thoracic Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. Marcus

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective thoracic mass is an important parameter in specifying mathematical and mechanical models (such as crash dummies of humans exposed to impact conditions. A method is developed using a numerical optimizer to determine effective thoracic mass (and mass distribution given a number of acceleration signals and a force signal response. Utilizing previously reported lateral and frontal impact tests with human cadaveric test specimens in a number of different conditions, the effective thoracic mass is computed. The effective thoracic masses are then computed for a variety of crash dummies exposed to identical test conditions.

  6. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo AG

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends. PMID:24369128

  7. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo A G

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  8. Endocrine effects of real-life mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POP) in experimental models and wild fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Vidar; Kraugerud, Marianne; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Olsvik, Pål A; Skåre, Janneche U; Alestrøm, Peter; Ropstad, Erik; Zimmer, Karin Elisabeth; Lyche, Jan L

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies have assessed the occurrence, levels, and potential adverse effects of persistent organic pollutants (POP) in fish from Lake Mjøsa. In this lake, high levels of various POP were detected in biota. Fish from the nearby Lake Losna contain background levels of POP and served as reference (controls) in these studies. Significantly higher prevalence of mycobacteriosis and pathological changes were documented in burbot (Lota lota) from Mjøsa compared to burbot from Losna. Further, transcriptional profiling identified changes in gene expression in burbot from Mjøsa compared to burbot from Losna associated with drug metabolism enzymes and oxidative stress. POP extracted from burbot liver oil from the two lakes was used to expose zebrafish (Danio rerio) during two consecutive generations. During both generations, POP mixtures from both lakes increased the rate of mortality, induced earlier onset of puberty, and skewed sex ratio toward males. However, opposite effects on weight gain were found in exposure groups compared to controls during the two generations. Exposure to POP from both lakes was associated with suppression of ovarian follicle development. Analyses of genome-wide transcription profiling identified functional networks of genes associated with weight homeostasis, steroid hormone functions, and insulin signaling. In human cell studies using adrenocortical H295R and primary porcine theca and granulosa cells, exposure to lake extracts from both populations modulated steroid hormone production with significant difference from controls. The results suggest that POP from both lakes may possess the potential to induce endocrine disruption and may adversely affect health in wild fish.

  9. Chronic effects of light irradiated from LED on the growth performance and endocrine properties of barfin flounder Verasper moseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Kasagi, Satoshi; Murakami, Naoto; Furufuji, Sumihisa; Kikuchi, Shigeto; Mizusawa, Kanta; Andoh, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of specific wavelengths of light on the growth of barfin flounder. The fish, reared in white tanks in a dark room, were irradiated with light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with peak wavelengths of 464nm (blue), 518nm (green), and 635nm (red) under a controlled photoperiod (10.5:13.5, light-dark cycle; 06:00-16:30, light). Fish were reared for four weeks in three independent experiments at three different water temperatures (averages of 14.9°C, 8.6°C, and 6.6°C). The fish irradiated with blue and green light had higher specific growth rates (% body weight⋅day(-1)) than fish irradiated with red light. Notably, green light had the greatest effect on growth among the three light wavelengths at 6.6°C. In the brains of fish reared at 6.6°C, the amounts of melanin-concentrating hormone 1 mRNA under green light were lower than those under red light, and amounts of proopiomelanocortin-C mRNA under blue and green light were higher than those under red light. No differences were observed for other neuropeptides tested. In the pituitary, no difference was observed in growth hormone mRNA content. In plasma, higher levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I were observed in fish under green light than those of fish under red light. These results suggest that the endocrine systems of barfin flounder are modulated by a specific wavelength of light that stimulates somatic growth.

  10. Effects of arsenic supplementation in feed on laying performance, arsenic retention of eggs and organs, biochemical indices and endocrine hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X Y; Zhou, M Y; Li, L L; Jiang, Y J; Zou, X T

    2017-02-01

    1. The primary objective of this experiment was to estimate the toxic effects of arsenic (As) supplementation in feed on laying performance, As retention by eggs and organs, serum biochemical indices and endocrine hormones in laying hens. 2. A total of 320 "Jinghong Number 1" hens, 56-week-old, were randomly allocated into four treatments of four replicates with 20 layers in each. Graded arsenical was added to the basal diet in the experimental diets at As levels of 0, 17, 34 and 51 mg/kg, respectively. The trial lasted for 9 weeks including 1 week for acclimatisation. 3. Supplementation of dietary As for eight weeks had no effect on laying performance. As retention in albumen, yolk, egg, liver and kidney increased as As levels increased The level of serum phosphorus (P) was minimised at the 17 mg As/kg group. The activity of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) increased linearly. No differences were observed for levels of serum calcium (Ca), alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT). Concentrations of estradiol (E2) and progesterone (PG) declined at 34 and 51 mg/kg As levels compared with the control group. As supplementation exerted no influence on levels of serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and the ratio between T3 and T4. 4. In conclusion, dietary As supplementation accelerated retention in tissues and eggs, and affected the laying rate by diminishing hormone levels of E2 and PG at 51 mg/kg.

  11. Effects of different endocrine disruptor (EDC) mixtures on gene expression in neonatal rat brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtensteiger, Walter; Bassetti-Gaille, Catherine; Faass, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    EDC mixtures on gene expression in developing brain. Amix (8 anti-androgenic chemicals), Emix (4 estrogenic chemicals) and Tmix (Amix + Emix + paracetamol recently identified as anti-androgenic) were administered by oral gavage to rat dams from gestational day 7 until weaning, at doses corresponding...... to 450×, 200× and 100× high end human intakes (S. Christiansen et al., 2012. International Journal of Andrology 35, 303). At postnatal day 6, during the last part of sexual brain differentiation, exon microarray analyses were performed in medial preoptic area (MPO) in the highest dose group, and real...... of individual mRNAs demonstrated treatment- and sex-dependent differences between MPO and VMH. Effects were dose-dependent. Prominent are effects on the expression of genes involved in excitatory glutamatergic synapse formation and function. These data indicate that effects of complex EDC mixtures on developing...

  12. The modifying effect of anesthetic technique on the metabolic and endocrine responses to anesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1988-01-01

    and the widespread use of the term "stress free anesthesia" in surgery is therefore not valid. However, continuous administration of local anesthetic agents in the epidural space is the most effective technique in so far as reduction of the stress response is concerned. The clinical implication of a variable...... reduction in the stress response to surgery by different anesthetic techniques remains largely unsettled, since only few controlled studies have been published on the clinical effects of pain relief and general anesthesia. However, a vast amount of data exist from controlled studies comparing regional...... anesthesia with local anesthetics and general anesthesia. The cumulative experience from these studies have demonstrated an advantageous effect on postoperative morbidity parameters such as blood loss, postoperative thromboembolic complications, pulmonary infective complications, gastrointestinal motility...

  13. Fluoride caused thyroid endocrine disruption in male zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianjie, Chen; Wenjuan, Xue; Jinling, Cao; Jie, Song; Ruhui, Jia; Meiyan, Li

    2016-02-01

    Excessive fluoride in natural water ecosystem has the potential to detrimentally affect thyroid endocrine system, but little is known of such effects or underlying mechanisms in fish. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of fluoride on growth performance, thyroid histopathology, thyroid hormone levels, and gene expressions in the HPT axis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to different determined concentrations of 0.1, 0.9, 2.0 and 4.1 M of fluoride to investigate the effects of fluoride on thyroid endocrine system and the potential toxic mechanisms caused by fluoride. The results indicated that the growth of the male zebrafish used in the experiments was significantly inhibited, the thyroid microtrastructure was changed, and the levels of T3 and T4 were disturbed in fluoride-exposed male fish. In addition, the expressional profiles of genes in HPT axis displayed alteration. The expressions of all studied genes were significantly increased in all fluoride-exposed male fish after exposure for 45 days. The transcriptional levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TG), sodium iodide symporter (NIS), iodothyronine I (DIO1), and thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα) were also elevated in all fluoride-exposed male fish after 90 days of exposure, while the inconsistent expressions were found in the mRNA of iodothyronineⅡ (DIO2), UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family a, b (UGT1ab), transthyretin (TTR), and thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ). These results demonstrated that fluoride could notably inhibit the growth of zebrafish, and significantly affect thyroid endocrine system by changing the microtrastructure of thyroid, altering thyroid hormone levels and endocrine-related gene expressions in male zebrafish. All above indicated that fluoride could pose a great threat to thyroid endocrine system, thus detrimentally affected the normal function of thyroid of male zebrafish. Copyright © 2015

  14. On the rumors about the silent spring: review of the scientific evidence linking occupational and environmental pesticide exposure to endocrine disruption health effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocco Pierluigi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to some pesticides, and particularly DBCP and chlordecone, may adversely affect male fertility. However, apart from the therapeutic use of diethylstilbestrol, the threat to human reproduction posed by "endocrine disrupting" environmental contaminants has not been supported by epidemiological evidence thus far. As it concerns other endocrine effects described in experimental animals, only thyroid inhibition following occupational exposure to amitrole and mancozeb has been confirmed in humans. Cancer of the breast, endometrium, ovary, prostate, testis, and thyroid are hormone-dependent, which fostered research on the potential risk associated with occupational and environmental exposure to the so-called endocrine-disrupting pesticides. The most recent studies have ruled out the hypothesis of DDT derivatives as responsible for excess risks of cancer of the reproductive organs. Still, we cannot exclude a role for high level exposure to o,p'-DDE, particularly in post-menopausal ER+ breast cancer. On the other hand, other organochlorine pesticides and triazine herbicides require further investigation for a possible etiologic role in some hormone-dependent cancers.

  15. Exposure to modern, widespread environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals and their effect on the reproductive potential of women: an overview of current epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwacka, Anetta; Zamkowska, Dorota; Radwan, Michał; Jurewicz, Joanna

    2017-07-31

    Growing evidence indicates that exposure to widespread, environmental contaminants called endocrine disruptors (EDCs) negatively affects animal and human reproductive health and has been linked to several diseases including infertility. This review aims to evaluate the impact of environmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals [phthalates, parabens, triclosan, bisphenol A (BPA), organochlorine (PCBs) and perfluorinated (PFCs) compounds] on the reproductive potential among women, by reviewing most recently published literature. Epidemiological studies focusing on EDCs exposure and reproductive potential among women for the last 16 years were identified by a search of the PUBMED, MEDLINE, EBSCO and TOXNET literature databases. The results of the presented studies show that exposure to EDCs impacts the reproductive potential in women, measured by ovarian reserve and by assisted reproductive technology outcomes. Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals decrease: (i) oestradiol levels (BPA); (ii) anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations (PCBs); (iii) antral follicle count (BPA, parabens, phthalates); (iv) oocyte quality (BPA, triclosan, phthalates, PCBs); (v) fertilization rate (PFCs, PCBs); (vi) implantation (BPA, phthalates, PCBs); (vii) embryo quality (triclosan, PCBs, BPA); (viii) rate of clinical pregnancy and live births (parabens, phthalates). The studies were mostly well-designed and used prospective cohorts with the exposure assessment based on the biomarker of exposure. Considering the suggested health effects, more epidemiological data is urgently needed to confirm the presented findings.

  16. Effects of Exposure to Four Endocrine Disrupting-Chemicals on Fertilization and Embryonic Development of Barbel Chub (Squaliobarbus curriculus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Cuijuan; WANG Wei; GAO Ying; LI Li

    2013-01-01

    The toxicities of 4 common endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs),17β-estradiol (E2),p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloro-ethylene (DDE),4-nonylphenol (NP) and tributyltin (TBT),to sperm motility,fertilization rate,hatching rate and embryonic development of Barbel chub (Squaliobarbus curriculus) were investigated in this study.The duration of sperm motility was significantly shortened by exposure to the EDCs at the threshold concentrations of 10ngL-1 for E2 and TBT,1 μgL-1 for NP and 100μgL-1 for DDE,respectively.The fertilization rate was substantially reduced by the EDCs at the lowest observable effect concentrations (LOECs) of 10ng L-1 for E2 and TBT and 10 lg L-1 for DDE and NP,respectively.Of the tested properties of S.curriculus,larval deformity rate was most sensitive to EDC exposure and was significantly increased by DDE at the lowest experimental level of 0.1 μgL-1.Other EDCs increased the larval deformity rate at the LOECs of 1 ngL-1 for E2,10ngL-1 for TBT and 1 μgL-1 for NP,respectively.Despite their decreases with the increasing EDC concentrations,the hatching rate and larval survival rate ofS.curriculus were not significantly affected by the exposure to EDCs.The results indicated that all the 4 EDCs affected significantly and negatively the early life stages of the freshwater fish S.curriculus.Overall,E2 and TBT were more toxic than NP and DDE,while DDE might be more toxic to larval deformity rate than to other measured parameters.Thus,the 4 EDCs showed potential negative influences on natural population dynamics of S.curriculus.Our findings provided valuable basic data for the ecological risk assessment of E2,DDE,NP and TBT.

  17. Effects of perceived control and cognitive coping on endocrine stress responses to pharmacological activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, James L.; Khan, Samir; Liberzon, Israel; Erickson, Thane M.; Young, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Background The hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis may mediate negative health effects of stress. It is sensitive to cognitive/emotional factors like novelty, perceived control and coping. Psychological intervention that reduces novelty, and enhances cognitive coping and sense of control can reduce cortisol responses to pentagastrin, a pharmacological HPA activator. This study attempted to identify the core factors that modulate HPA axis activity in this model. Methods Varying instructions were administered prior to drug exposure in a two-visit (placebo first) pentagastrin infusion paradigm. Healthy subjects (n=40) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 instruction groups: (1) Standard instruction (SI); (2) Full cognitive intervention (CI); (3) The CI control component alone; or (4) The CI novelty reduction/coping components alone. Blood samples were obtained via intravenous catheter before and after pentagastrin. Results Subjects receiving an intervention had smaller cortisol responses than subjects receiving standard instructions. “Coping” alone had as strong an impact as the more complex intervention that combined “coping” and “control.” “Control alone” also reduced cortisol but its HPA impact appeared less robust. Conclusions Brief psychological manipulation can significantly reduce HPA activation in challenge paradigms. Cognitive preparation that focused on side effects, reduced potential surprise and enhanced cognitive coping modulated HPA axis activity as effectively as a previously tested intervention that combined coping and control manipulations. A sense of control alone also reduced cortisol release. The results support development of “control” or “coping” techniques to combat negative health effects of stress that are mediated by HPA axis activation. PMID:18571624

  18. Effects of DHEA on metabolic and endocrine functions of adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowska, Joanna; Kochan, Zdzislaw

    2013-08-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate ester, DHEAS, are the major circulating adrenal steroids and serve as substrates for sex hormone biosynthesis. DHEA is effectively taken up by adipose tissue, where the concentrations of free DHEA are four to ten times higher than those found in the circulation. DHEA reduces adipose tissue mass and inhibits the proliferation and differentiation of adipocytes; it may also protect against obesity by lowering the activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in fat cells. Recent studies demonstrate that DHEA stimulates triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipose tissue by increasing the expression and activity of adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase, the key enzymes of lipolysis. DHEA has been shown to modulate insulin signaling pathways, enhance glucose uptake in adipocytes, and increase insulin sensitivity in patients with DHEA deficiency or abnormal glucose tolerance. Additionally, by suppressing the activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 in adipocytes, DHEA may promote intra-adipose inactivation of cortisol to cortisone. Several studies have demonstrated that DHEA may also regulate the expression and secretion of adipokines such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin. The effects of DHEA on adipokine expression in adipose tissue are depot-specific, with visceral fat being the most responsive. The mechanisms underlying DHEA actions in adipose tissue are still unclear; however, they involve nuclear receptors such as androgen receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ and α. Because clinical trials investigating the effects of DHEA failed to yield consistent results, further studies are needed to clarify the role of DHEA in the regulation of human adipose tissue physiology.

  19. Plasticizer endocrine disruption: Highlighting developmental and reproductive effects in mammals and non-mammalian aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Wallace, Sarah J; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valerie S

    2015-08-01

    Due to their versatility, robustness, and low production costs, plastics are used in a wide variety of applications. Plasticizers are mixed with polymers to increase flexibility of plastics. However, plasticizers are not covalently bound to plastics, and thus leach from products into the environment. Several studies have reported that two common plasticizers, bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, induce adverse health effects in vertebrates; however few studies have addressed their toxicity to non-mammalian species. The aim of this review is to compare the effects of plasticizers in animals, with a focus on aquatic species. In summary, we identified three main chains of events that occur in animals exposed to BPA and phthalates. Firstly, plasticizers affect development by altering both the thyroid hormone and growth hormone axes. Secondly, these chemicals interfere with reproduction by decreasing cholesterol transport through the mitochondrial membrane, leading to reduced steroidogenesis. Lastly, exposure to plasticizers leads to the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, the increase of fatty acid oxidation, and the reduction in the ability to cope with the augmented oxidative stress leading to reproductive organ malformations, reproductive defects, and decreased fertility. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of stress on women's preference for male facial masculinity and their endocrine correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzen, Beate; Palm-Fischbacher, Simona; Gossweiler, Lara; Stucky, Livia; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2017-08-01

    Women's preferences for masculinity in men's faces seem to vary across the menstrual cycle and are assumed to be strongest around ovulation. A number of hormones have been proposed to underlie these subtle cyclic shifts. Furthermore, mating preferences are context-dependent, and stress has been found to alter mate choice, both in animals and humans. Currently, the effects of stress on women's preference for masculinity remain unknown. To examine the hormonal basis and the impact of stress on facial masculinity preference, we tested for within-subject changes in 52 healthy young women who underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and the placebo-TSST in randomized order in the late follicular and mid-luteal phases of their menstrual cycle. Menstrual cycle phase and hormone levels were confirmed using estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, and cortisol analyses from saliva. Results show that women were more likely to be attracted to masculine-faced men right before ovulation than in the mid-luteal phase. Estradiol modulated this masculinity preference with high estradiol levels being related to stronger masculinity preference. When stressed however, women experienced a decrease in male facial masculinity preference. In line with these findings, the higher the cortisol increase to stress, the less were masculine faces preferred to more feminine faces. Mate choice is a central component of reproduction. The present results provide information about the effects of stress and hormonal influences on mate preferences in women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tamoxifen as an emerging endocrine disruptor. effects on fish reproduction and detoxification target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradonna, Francesca; Batti, Stefania; Marino, Maria; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Carnevali, Oliana

    2009-04-01

    The effect of tamoxifen (TAM) on the black goby Gobius niger exposed to different contaminants was analyzed by investigating the response of a set of biomarkers involved in reproduction and cell recovery. While the effects of TAM are well known in mammalian breast and endometrial cells (with severe consequences on physiology), few contrasting data are available for fish. In this work the expression of vitellogenin (vtg), estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) genes was evaluated in fish treated with TAM alone or co-injected with nonylphenol, estradiol, and beta-naphtoflavone. The induction of vtg observed in male fish treated with estrogens was significantly lowered by the co-injection of TAM. ERalpha and HSP70 gene expressions were significantly upregulated in all experimental groups; however, TAM treatment did not change CYP1A1 gene expression. Together these data confirm the mixed estrogenic/anti-estrogenic action of TAM, indicating its interference in fish reproduction and physiology.

  2. Endocrine disrupting effects of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane analogues on gonadotropin hormones in pituitary gonadotrope cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinghua; Yang, Ye; Xiong, Kang; Liu, Jing

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) analogues leads to disharmony of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). However, the effects and mechanisms of DDT analogues on the expression of gonadotropin genes (FSHβ, LHβ and Cgα), which is the rate-limiting step of FSH and LH biosynthesis, remain unknown. In this study, we assessed the effects of p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and methoxychlor (MXC) on gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in gonadotrope cells. p,p'-DDT and MXC at test concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-7)mol/L, stimulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was required for the induction of gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis by p,p'-DDT or MXC exposure. This study showed for the first time that p,p'-DDT and MXC regulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis through ERK pathway in gonadotrope cells.

  3. The effects of phosphatidylserine on endocrine response to moderate intensity exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purpura Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has indicated that phosphatidylserine (PS supplementation has the potential to attenuate the serum cortisol response to acute exercise stress. Equivocal findings suggest that this effect might be dose dependent. This study aimed to examine the influence of short-term supplementation with a moderate dose of PS (600 mg per day on plasma concentrations of cortisol, lactate, growth hormone and testosterone before, during, and following moderate intensity exercise in healthy males. Methods 10 healthy male subjects participated in the study. Each subject was assigned to ingest 600 mg PS or placebo per day for 10 days using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Serial venous blood samples were taken at rest, after a 15 minute moderate intensity exercise protocol on a cycle ergometer that consisted of five 3-minute incremental stages beginning at 65% and ending at 85% VO2 max, and during a 65 minute passive recovery. Plasma samples were assessed for cortisol, growth hormone, testosterone, lactate and testosterone to cortisol ratio for treatment (PS or placebo. Results Mean peak cortisol concentrations and area under the curve (AUC were lower following PS (39 ± 1% and 35 ± 0%, respectively when compared to placebo (p Conclusion The findings suggest that PS is an effective supplement for combating exercise-induced stress and preventing the physiological deterioration that can accompany too much exercise. PS supplementation promotes a desired hormonal status for athletes by blunting increases in cortisol levels.

  4. Effect of endocrine disruptor nonylphenol on physiologic features and proteome during growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Sheng; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2013-04-01

    We studied the effects of nonylphenol (NP) on physiological features and proteome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during growth. Shoot biomass, root biomass and root length were decreased after 10d of NP treatment, especially in high NP concentration treatment (10 and 50 mg L(-1)). Levels of chlorophyll decreased but proline increased in leaves. NP caused oxidative stress; malondialdehyde content was increased with NP treatment, and the activities of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, CuZnSOD and MnSOD were induced in leaves. The proteome of leaf tissue was analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. NP might adversely affect the CO2 assimilation, signal transduction, the endomembrane system and photosynthetic oxygen evolution. NP affects the proteome and physiologic and morphological features of A. thaliana during growth at the concentration can be observed in the environment. Because plants might be exposed to NP for a long time in the surroundings, more attention needs to be paid to the effect of NP on plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Endocrine disorders in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2011-01-01

    The endocrinology of pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes as a consequence of physiological alterations at the foetoplacental boundary between mother and foetus. The vast changes in maternal hormones and their binding proteins complicate assessment of the normal level of most hormones...... hormones and their precursors across the foeto-maternal interface. The endocrine system is the earliest system developing in foetal life, and it is functional from early intrauterine existence through old age. Regulation of the foetal endocrine system relies, to some extent, on precursors secreted...

  6. Epigenetic transgenerational actions of endocrine disruptors and male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anway, Matthew D; Cupp, Andrea S; Uzumcu, Mehmet; Skinner, Michael K

    2005-06-01

    Transgenerational effects of environmental toxins require either a chromosomal or epigenetic alteration in the germ line. Transient exposure of a gestating female rat during the period of gonadal sex determination to the endocrine disruptors vinclozolin (an antiandrogenic compound) or methoxychlor (an estrogenic compound) induced an adult phenotype in the F1 generation of decreased spermatogenic capacity (cell number and viability) and increased incidence of male infertility. These effects were transferred through the male germ line to nearly all males of all subsequent generations examined (that is, F1 to F4). The effects on reproduction correlate with altered DNA methylation patterns in the germ line. The ability of an environmental factor (for example, endocrine disruptor) to reprogram the germ line and to promote a transgenerational disease state has significant implications for evolutionary biology and disease etiology.

  7. Endocrine disruptive effects in vitro of conazole antifungals used as pesticides and pharmaceutical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Taxvig, Camilla; Nellemann, Christine Lydia

    2010-01-01

    potent than the triazoles (epoxiconazole, propiconazole, tebuconazole). The critical mechanism seems to be disturbance of steroid biosynthesis. In the H295R cell assay, the conazoles decreased the formation of estradiol and testosterone, and increased the concentration of progesterone, indicating...... inhibition of enzymes involved in the conversion of progesterone to testosterone. Prochloraz was most potent followed by econazole~miconazole>ketoconazole>tebuconazole>epoxiconazole>propiconazole. In the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, the conazoles showed anti-estrogenic effect, including aromatase...... inhibition, since they inhibited the response induced by both 17β-estradiol (miconazole>econazole~ketoconazole>prochloraz>tebuconazole>epoxiconazole>propiconazole) and testosterone (econazole>miconazole>prochloraz>ketoconazole>tebuconazole>epoxiconazole>propiconazole). The triazoles were anti...

  8. Pregnant ewes exposed to multiple endocrine disrupting pollutants through sewage sludge-fertilized pasture show an anti-estrogenic effect in their trabecular bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. Monica, E-mail: Monica.Lind@medsci.uu.se [Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Ullerakersvaegen 40, 751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Oberg, Denise [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Larsson, Sune [Department of Orthopaedics, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Kyle, Carol E. [Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Orberg, Jan [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Rhind, Stewart M. [Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    Pregnant ewes were maintained on pastures fertilized, twice yearly, with either sewage sludge (2.25 tonnes dry matter/ha; Treated; T) or inorganic fertilizer containing equivalent amounts of nitrogen (Control; C), to determine effects on maternal and fetal bone structures, density and mechanical properties of exposure to environmental concentrations of multiple endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and heavy metal pollutants. The ewes were maintained on the respective pastures from the age of about 8 months until they were 4-6 years of age and they were slaughtered at 110 d gestation. Metaphyseal parts of adult ewe femurs exhibited a significantly reduced mean, total cross sectional area (CSA, - 4%; p < 0.05), lower trabecular bone mineral content (BMC, mg/mm; - 18%; p < 0.05), trabecular bone mineral density (BMD, mg/cm{sup 3}, - 8.0%; p < 0.05) and trabecular CSA, mm{sup 2}, - 11.1%; p < 0.05) in T compared with C animals. Femurs of T ewes were stronger than those of C ewes but this may reflect greater body weights. At the mid-diaphyseal part of the fetal bones, there was a reduction in endosteal circumference (- 6.7%, p < 0.05) and marrow cavity area (- 13.8%, p < 0.05) in the female T fetuses compared with female C fetuses. In the male fetuses the mid-diaphyseal part total bone mineral content was higher (+ 3.0%, p < 0.05) in T than in C animals. No treatment difference in biomechanical bending was detected in the fetuses. It is concluded that ewes grazing pasture fertilized with sewage sludge exhibited an anti-estrogenic effect on their trabecular bone in the form of reduced mineral content and density, despite increased body weight. It is suggested that human exposure to low levels of multiple EDCs may have implications for bone structure and human health.

  9. Surgical strategies in endocrine tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreinemakers, J.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine surgery has become more custom-made throughout the years. Endocrine tumors can be sporadic or develop as part of familial syndromes. Several familial syndromes are known to cause endocrine tumors. The most common are multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes type 1, 2A and 2B. This

  10. Selecting appropriate animal models and experimental designs for endocrine disruptor research and testing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William S

    2004-01-01

    Evidence that chemicals in the environment may cause developmental and reproductive abnormalities in fish and wildlife by disrupting normal endocrine functions has increased concern about potential adverse human health effects from such chemicals. US laws have now been enacted that require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop and validate a screening program to identify chemicals in food and water with potential endocrine-disrupting activity. EPA subsequently proposed an Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program that uses in vitro and in vivo test systems to identify chemicals that may adversely affect humans and ecologically important animal species. However, the endocrine system can be readily modulated by many experimental factors, including diet and the genetic background of the selected animal strain or stock. It is therefore desirable to minimize or avoid factors that cause or contribute to experimental variation in endocrine disruptor research and testing studies. Standard laboratory animal diets contain high and variable levels of phytoestrogens, which can modulate physiologic and behavioral responses similar to both endogenous estrogen as well as exogenous estrogenic chemicals. Other studies have determined that some commonly used outbred mice and rats are less responsive to estrogenic substances than certain inbred mouse and rat strains for various estrogen-sensitive endpoints. It is therefore critical to select appropriate biological models and diets for endocrine disruptor studies that provide optimal sensitivity and specificity to accomplish the research or testing objectives. An introduction is provided to 11 other papers in this issue that review these and other important laboratory animal experimental design considerations in greater detail, and that review laboratory animal and in vitro models currently being used or evaluated for endocrine disruptor research and testing. Selection of appropriate animal models and experimental design

  11. Analysis of endocrine disruption effect of Roundup® in adrenal gland of male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparamita Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Roundup® on adrenal gland steroidogenesis and signaling pathway associated with steroid production was investigated. Doses of 10, 50, 100 and 250 mg/kg bw/d Roundup® were administered for two weeks to adult male rats. The 10 mg/kg bw/d dose which reduced circulatory corticosterone levels, but did not change food consumption and body weight, was selected for further study. The expression of cholesterol receptor (low density lipoprotein receptor, de novo cholesterol synthesis enzyme (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, hormone-sensitive lipase, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR mRNA and phosphorylated form was decreased. Adrenocorticotropic hormone receptor (ACTH, melanocortin-2 receptor, expression was not changed but circulatory ACTH levels and adrenal cortex protein kinase A (PKA activity were reduced. Surprisingly, exogenous ACTH treatment rescued steroidogenesis in Roundup®-treated animals. Apoptosis was evident at 250 mg/kg bw/d, but not at 10 mg/kg bw/d dose. These results suggest that Roundup® may be inhibitory to hypothalamic–pituitary axis leading to reduction in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP/PKA pathway, StAR phosphorylation and corticosterone synthesis in the adrenal tissue.

  12. Inhibitory effect of a new opioid agonist on reproductive endocrine activity in rats of both sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markó, M; Römer, D

    1983-07-18

    Morphine and other opioid compounds such as the new benzomorphan derivative, bremazocine, inhibit the secretion of luteinizing hormone in rats of both sexes (1, 2, 3, 4). The aim of our work was to compare in rats the LH-secretion inhibiting properties of bremazocine, a putative opiate kappa agonist (5), with those of the mu agonist morphine. Acute administration of bremazocine (0.005 - 1 mg/kg s.c.) or of morphine (10 - 20 mg/kg s.c.) diminished serum LH levels and spontaneous ovulation in female rats in a dose-dependent manner. Chronic treatment with bremazocine significantly diminished LH and testosterone secretions in male rats which in turn led to a fall in weight of the prostate gland; prolactin and FSH secretions were not influenced significantly. The mu-antagonist naloxone, which increases LH release in rats, in acute experiments significantly antagonized the inhibiting effect of morphine, but not that of bremazocine on LH secretion. Neither the basal nor the LHRH-stimulated secretion of LH in pituitary cell cultures were changed by bremazocine (10(-11) to 10(-5) M), however the release of LHRH-like activity from hypothalamic fragments was significantly impaired by 10(-7) M bremazocine. In conclusion, the data presented here show that bremazocine is a new non-morphine-like opioid agonist which selectively inhibits LH release in rats.

  13. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Disease Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are tho...

  14. Warming modulates the effects of the endocrine disruptor progestin levonorgestrel on the zebrafish fitness, ovary maturation kinetics and reproduction success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, P G; Rodrigues, D; Madureira, T V; Oliveira, N; Rocha, M J; Rocha, E

    2017-10-01

    Interactive effects between multiple stressors, namely climate drivers (e.g., temperature) and chemical pollution (e.g., endocrine disruptors) are poorly studied. Here, it was for the first time evaluated the combinatory effects of temperature and a synthetic progestin, levonorgestrel (LNG), on the fitness and reproductive-related endpoints of zebrafish (Danio rerio). A multi-factorial design was implemented by manipulating both temperature [setting as baseline an ambient temperature of 27 °C, against warming (+3 °C)] and LNG levels (10 ngL(-1) and 1000 ngL(-1)). Groups of males and females were exposed sub-acutely, for 21-days. Increased temperature caused an overall decrease in the females' gonadosomatic index (GSI), during the pre-reproduction phase, LNG did not affect GSI. In addition, fecundity (number of ovulated eggs) was negatively affected by both temperature and LNG, being the effect of the latter more intense. Fish exposed to the highest LNG concentration (at both temperatures) did not reproduce, but also in those exposed to the lowest dose of progestin at a higher temperature, a complete reproductive failure occurred. These results reflect what was observed in the stereological analysis of the ovary maturation stages prior to reproduction. Accordingly, the higher the LNG concentration, the lower the degree of maturation of the ovary. This was exacerbated by the higher temperature. As to embryonated eggs, they hatched significantly faster at higher temperatures, but exposure to 10 ngL(-1) of LNG (at 27 °C) reduced significantly the hatching rate, comparing to control. Further, the recrudescence of the ovary 48 h after spawning seems to be not affected by both stressors. Our data suggest that in a future scenario of global warming and synthetic hormones exposure, the reproduction of fish species, such as the zebrafish, can be endangered, which can put at risk their success, and consequently affect the structure and functioning of associated

  15. Research on Endocrine Disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA researchers are developing innovative approaches, tools, models and data to improve the understanding of potential risks to human health and wildlife from chemicals that could disrupt the endocrine system.

  16. Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for disorders of endocrine glands other than the thyroid, compared to 3.1 percent of visits made by women. The rate of visits due to metabolic and immunity disorders was also higher among men than women (2. ...

  17. [Diabetes and prediabetes in endocrine disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Rudzki, Henryk; Okopień, Bogusław

    2012-01-01

    Complex hormonal regulation of carbohydrate metabolism causes that presence of many endocrine disorders may disturb glucose homeostasis. Impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and frank diabetes are observed in patients with both common and rare endocrine disorders, particularly in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome, hyperthyroidism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency and endocrine tumors of the digestive system. Because most of these disorders may be effectively treated and the treatment often results in a restoration of normal insulin secretion and receptor action as well as glucose absorption, production and metabolism, it is important to differentiate these disorders from other more common types of diabetes. This article reviews the etiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of endocrine disorders leading to diabetes and prediabetic states with special emphasis on the pathogenesis and clinical consequences of these disorders.

  18. Endocrine disruption in aquatic insects: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soin, Thomas; Smagghe, Guy

    2007-02-01

    There is mounting evidence that a wide variety of compounds can have endocrine disrupting effects on humans and wildlife. However, investigations so far have focused primarily on exposure to human and other vertebrates, with invertebrate findings largely restricted to marine mollusks or to the ecdysteroid and juvenile hormone agonists as purposely synthesized endocrine disrupters for the pest management of insects. This article provides a brief description of the insect hormone system, a short sum-up of the relevant insect groups with aquatic life stages, and an overview of the additional evidence for endocrine disruption in aquatic insects from laboratory and field studies since 1999. In addition, the suitability of insects as sentinels for endocrine disrupting chemicals in aquatic ecosystems is discussed. Conclusions are drawn and research needs are defined.

  19. The clandestine organs of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia

    2017-08-16

    This review analyzes what could be regarded as the "clandestine organs" of the endocrine system: the gut microbiome, the immune system, and the stress system. The immune system is very closely related to the endocrine system, with many intertwined processes and signals. Many researchers now consider the microbiome as an 'organ' that affects the organism at many different levels. While stress is certainly not an organ, it affects so many processes, including endocrine-related processes, that the stress response system deserved a special section in this review. Understanding the connections, effects, and feedback mechanisms between the different "clandestine organs" and the endocrine system will provide us with a better understanding of how an organism functions, as well as reinforce the idea that there are no independent organs or systems, but a complex, interacting network of molecules, cells, tissues, signaling pathways, and mechanisms that constitute an individual. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Phosphodiesterases in endocrine physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2011-08-01

    The cAMP-protein kinase A pathway plays a central role in the development and physiology of endocrine tissues. cAMP mediates the intracellular effects of numerous peptide hormones. Various cellular and molecular alterations of the cAMP-signaling pathway have been observed in endocrine diseases. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are key regulatory enzymes of intracellular cAMP levels. Indeed, PDEs are the only known mechanism for inactivation of cAMP by catalysis to 5'-AMP. It has been suggested that disruption of PDEs could also have a role in the pathogenesis of many endocrine diseases. This review summarizes the most recent advances concerning the role of the PDEs in the physiopathology of endocrine diseases. The potential significance of this knowledge can be easily envisaged by the development of drugs targeting specific PDEs.

  1. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  2. Differential effects of imipramine and CORT 118335 (Glucocorticoid receptor modulator/mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist) on brain-endocrine stress responses and depression-like behavior in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Elizabeth T; Caldwell, Jody L; Streicher, Joshua; Ghisays, Valentina; Balmer, Nikolaus J; Estrada, Christina M; Solomon, Matia B

    2017-09-01

    Depression is commonly associated with hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction that primarily manifests as aberrant glucocorticoid secretion. Glucocorticoids act on Type I mineralocorticoid (MR) and Type II glucocorticoid receptors (GR) to modulate mood and endocrine responses. Successful antidepressant treatment normalizes HPA axis function, in part due to modulatory effects on MR and GR in cortico-limbic structures. Although women are twice as likely to suffer from depression, little is known about how antidepressants modulate brain, endocrine, and behavioral stress responses in females. Here, we assessed the impact of CORT 118335 (GR modulator/MR antagonist) and imipramine (tricyclic antidepressant) on neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to restraint or forced swim stress (FST) in female rats (n=10-12/group). Increased immobility in the FST is purported to reflect passive coping or depression-like behavior. CORT 118335 dampened adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to the FST, but did not affect immobility. Imipramine suppressed ACTH, but had minimal effects on corticosterone responses to FST. Despite these marginal effects, imipramine decreased immobility, suggesting antidepressant efficacy. In an effort to link brain-endocrine responses with behavior, c-Fos was assessed in HPA axis and mood modulatory regions in response to the FST. CORT 118335 upregulated c-Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Imipramine decreased c-Fos in the basolateral amygdala and hippocampus (CA1 and CA3), but increased c-Fos in the central amygdala. These data suggest the antidepressant-like (e.g., active coping) properties of imipramine may be due to widespread effects on cortico-limbic circuits that regulate emotional and cognitive processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of SMP-028 on steroidogenesis in rats; mechanism of toxicological events on endocrine organs of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizato, Yohei; Imai, Satoki; Yabunaka, Atsushi; Okahashi, Noriko; Kunimatsu, Takeshi; Yabuki, Masashi

    2014-04-01

    SMP-028 is a new compound for treatment of asthma. Oral administration of SMP-028 to rats was associated with toxicological events in endocrine organs. These events mainly consisted of pathological changes in the adrenal gland, testis, prostate, seminal vesicle, ovaries, and uterus. In this study, we set to clarify whether SMP-028 inhibits steroidogenesis in primary culture cells obtained from rat endocrine organs in vitro. Adrenal cells, testicular cells, and ovarian cells were treated with SMP-028 and the production of steroid hormones, i.e., progesterone, aldosterone, corticosterone, total testosterone, and estradiol from these cells was measured by radioimmunoassay. We found that the production of progesterone from these cells treated with SMP-028 at 1 μM decreased to 16-67% that of the control. These findings indicate that SMP-028 inhibits steroidogenesis in rat endocrine organs in vitro. Considering that free maximum concentration in rats treated with SMP-028 are higher than the IC50 values for the inhibition of steroidogenesis in vitro, it is therefore believed that the toxicological events seen in rats following treatment with SMP-028 are due to inhibition of steroidogenesis in vivo.

  4. Endocrine disorders & female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unuane, David; Tournaye, Herman; Velkeniers, Brigitte; Poppe, Kris

    2011-12-01

    Female infertility occurs in about 37% of all infertile couples and ovulatory disorders account for more than half of these. The ovaries are in continuous interaction with the other endocrine organs. The interplay may account for infertility occurring at different levels and may render the diagnosis of infertility a difficult exercise for the involved physician. A hypothalamic cause of female infertility should be considered in an appropriate clinical context, with tests pointing to a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. It can be functional, physiological or related to organic causes. Hyperprolactinemia has well characterized effects on the normal gonadal function and treatment is well established. Acromegaly and Cushing's disease may impair fertility at different levels, mechanisms involved however remain ill defined. Thyroid disorders, both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, can interact with the ovaries, through a direct effect on ovarian function, but autoimmunity may be involved, as well as alterations of the sex hormone binding protein levels. Primary ovarian disorders, such as the polycystic ovary syndrome and primary ovarian insufficiency are frequent diseases, for which novel treatments are currently being developed and discussed. We will propose an algorithm for the diagnosis and approach of the female patient presenting with infertility on the basis of the available evidence in literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of cold exposure on profiles of metabolic and endocrine responses and on responses to feeding and arginine injection in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, H; Nakamura, S; Kobayashi, S; Takahashi, H; Terashima, Y

    1995-07-01

    The effect of cold exposure (0 degrees C) on profiles of total heat production (HP), energy metabolism, and blood metabolite and hormone concentrations were measured in nine shorn Suffolk rams. Blood metabolite and hormone responses to feeding and to i.v. arginine injection (.625 mmol/kg BW) and postprandial changes in HP were also measured. Heat production was greater (P sheep exposed to cold is maintained by enhanced nonprotein oxidation and 2) endocrine responses to stimulants are influenced by cold exposure, even though profiles after cold exposure change little.

  6. Computational Intelligence Determines Effective Rationality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Rationality is a fundamental concept in economics. Most researchers will accept that human beings are not fully rational.Herbert Simon suggested that we are "bounded rational". However, it is very difficult to quantify "bounded rationality", and therefore it is difficult to pinpoint its impact to all those economic theories that depend on the assumption of full rationality. Ariel Rubinstein proposed to model bounded rationality by explicitly specifying the decision makers' decision-making procedures. This paper takes a computational point of view to Rubinstein's approach. From a computational point of view, decision procedures can be encoded in algorithms and heuristics. We argue that, everything else being equal, the effective rationality of an agent is determined by its computational power - we refer to this as the computational intelligence determines effective rationality (CIDER) theory. This is not an attempt to propose a unifying definition of bounded rationality. It is merely a proposal of a computational point of view of bounded rationality. This way of interpreting bounded rationality enables us to (computationally) reason about economic systems when the full rationality assumption is relaxed.

  7. Endocrine Dysregulation in Anorexia Nervosa Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Context: Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder with serious endocrine consequences, including dysregulation of the gonadal, adrenal, and GH axes, and severe bone loss. This Update reviews recent advances in the understanding of the endocrine dysregulation observed in this state of chronic starvation, as well as the mechanisms underlying the disease itself. Evidence Acquisition: Findings of this update are based on a PubMed search and the author's knowledge of this field. Evidence Synthesis: Recent studies have provided insights into the mechanisms underlying endocrine dysregulation in states of chronic starvation as well as the etiology of anorexia nervosa itself. This includes a more complex understanding of the pathophysiologic bases of hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, GH resistance, appetite regulation, and bone loss. Nevertheless, the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown, and effective therapies for the endocrine complications and for the disease itself are lacking. Conclusions: Despite significant progress in the field, further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia nervosa and its endocrine complications. Such investigations promise to yield important advances in the therapeutic approach to this disease as well as to the understanding of the regulation of endocrine function, skeletal biology, and appetite regulation. PMID:21976742

  8. The endocrine system in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefai, Hisham; Allababidi, Hisham; Levy, Shiri; Levy, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus is complex and not fully understood. However, it emerges as an abnormal metabolic condition associated with a systemic damage to the vascular bed. Cumulative evidence also reveals that the endocrine system is not intact in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is not clear whether the changes observed in the endocrine system represent a primary defect or reflect the effects of the impaired insulin action and abnormal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism on the hormonal milieu. Review of the literature reveals that the function of the entire endocrine system including the functions of hormones from the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid, parathyroid, the vitamin D system, the gonads, and the endocrine function of the adipose tissue, is impaired. Good metabolic control and insulin treatment may reverse some of these abnormalities. It remains unanswered as to what extent these changes in the endocrine system contribute to the vascular pathologies observed in individuals affected by diabetes mellitus and whether part of the abnormalities observed in the endocrine system reflect a basic cellular defect in the diabetic syndrome.

  9. Endocrine active chemicals and endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes: implications for aquatic resources, 1994-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Blazer, Vicki; Keisling, Richard L.; Ferrey, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with St. Cloud State University, Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Metropolitan Council Environmental Services, and the University of Minnesota, has conducted field monitoring studies and laboratory research to determine the presence of endocrine active chemicals and the incidence of endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes during 1994–2008. Endocrine active chemicals are chemicals that interfere with the natural regulation of endocrine systems, and may mimic or block the function of natural hormones in fish or other organisms. This interference commonly is referred to as endocrine disruption. Indicators of endocrine disruption in fish include vitellogenin (female egg yolk protein normally expressed in female fish) in male fish, oocytes present in male fish testes, reduced reproductive success, and changes in reproductive behavior.

  10. Science based guidance for the assessment of endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bars, Remi; Broeckaert, Fabrice; Fegert, Ivana; Gross, Melanie; Hallmark, Nina; Kedwards, Tim; Lewis, Dick; O'Hagan, Sue; Panter, Grace H; Weltje, Lennart; Weyers, Arnd; Wheeler, James R; Galay-Burgos, Malyka

    2011-02-01

    The European legislation on plant protection products (Regulation (EC) No. 1107/2009) and biocides (Directive 98/8/EC), as well as the regulation concerning chemicals (Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 'REACH') only support the marketing and use of chemical products on the basis that they do not induce endocrine disruption in humans or non-target species. However, there is currently no agreed guidance on how to identify and evaluate endocrine activity and disruption. Consequently, an ECETOC task force was formed to provide scientific criteria that may be used within the context of these three legislative documents. Specific scientific criteria for the determination of endocrine disrupting properties that integrate information from both regulatory (eco)toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies are proposed. These criteria combine the nature of the adverse effects detected in studies which give concern for endocrine toxicity with an understanding of the mode of action of toxicity so that adverse effects can be explained scientifically. The criteria developed are presented in the form of flow charts for assessing relevant effects for both humans and wildlife species. In addition, since not all chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties are of equal hazard, assessment of potency is also proposed to discriminate chemicals of high concern from those of lower concern. The guidance presented in this paper includes refinements made to an initial proposal following discussion of the criteria at a workshop of invited regulatory, academic and industry scientists.

  11. Analysis of synthetic endocrine-disrupting chemicals in food: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezcua, M; Martínez-Uroz, M A; Gómez-Ramos, M M; Gómez, M J; Navas, J M; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2012-10-15

    This work focuses on a revision of analytical methodologies for the determination of industrial chemicals that have an endocrine-disrupting effect on food commodities. These food commodities have been divided into two major categories: crops and food of animal origin. The reviewed methods have been commented on in terms of sample preparation, analytical methods, and the occurrence of the studied compounds.

  12. Effects of (Anti) Androgenic Endocrine Disruptors (DEHP and Butachlor) on Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and Leukocytes Counts of Male Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadivand, Sohrab; Farahmand, Hamid; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Eagderi, Soheil; Zargar, Ashkan

    2015-06-01

    The effect of two anti-androgenic endocrine disrupting compounds, i.e. the plasticizer di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and herbicide butachlor, were evaluated for their effects on immunoglobulin M (IgM) and leukocytes in male rainbow trout. Also, plasma testosterone (T) concentration was measured to confirm their anti-androgenic effects. In the first experiment, trout were treated with 50 mg/kg (body weight) DEHP intraperitoneally, and in the second one, fish were exposed to 0.39 mg/L butachlor for 10 days. The results showed that T concentrations and white blood cells were significantly lower in fish exposed to either DEHP or butachlor compared to control fish (p butachlor (p  0.05). In addition, no significant differences were found in IgM, eosinophil and monocyte parameters in either DEHP or butachlor treatments (p > 0.05). These results confirmed that leukocytes counts can be considered as a novel marker of immunotoxicity triggered by (anti) androgenic endocrine disruptors.

  13. Isolation and molecular characterization of porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its endocrine effects in the porcine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, T N; Bersani, M; Schmidt, P;

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of the endocrine porcine pancreas. Initially, we isolated and purified CGRP from extracts of porcine adrenal glands and pancreases. A single molecular form of the peptide...... was found in the two tissues. The adrenal peptide was sequenced and found to differ from human alpha-CGRP at six positions and from human beta-CGRP at three positions. By immunohistochemistry, CGRP was found in nerve fibers in the pancreatic ganglia. A synthetic replica of the porcine peptide was infused...

  14. [Affective disorders: endocrine and metabolic comorbidities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Links between affective and endocrine-metabolic disorders are numerous and complex. In this review, we explore most frequent endocrine-metabolic comorbidities. On the one hand, these comorbidities imply numerous iatrogenic effects from antipsychotics (metabolic side-effects) or from lithium (endocrine side-effects). On the other hand, these comorbidities are also associated with affective disorders independently from medication. We will successively examine metabolic syndrome, glycemic disturbances, obesity and thyroid disorders among patients with affective disorders. Endocrinemetabolic comorbidities can be individually encountered, but can also be associated. Therefore, they substantially impact morbidity and mortality by increasing cardiovascular risk factors. Two distinct approaches give an account of processes involved in these comorbidities: common environmental factors (iatrogenic effects, lifestyle), and/or shared physiological vulnerabilities. In conclusion, we provide a synthesis of important results and recommendations related to endocrine-metabolic comorbidities in affective disorders : heavy influence on morbidity and mortality, undertreatment of somatic diseases, importance of endocrine and metabolic side effects from main mood stabilizers, impact from sex and age on the prevalence of comorbidities, influence from previous depressive episodes in bipolar disorders, and relevance of systematic screening for subclinical (biological) disturbances.

  15. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. (Univ. Ulm (West Germany)); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. (Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Duesseldorf (West Germany))

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  16. Organic synthetic environmental endocrine disruptors: structural classes and metabolic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jan; Peterlin-Mašič, Lucija

    2012-12-01

    Endocrine disruption is the modification of the endocrine system causing harmful effects in healthy subjects or their offspring. Physiological endocrine hormones act at very low plasma concentrations, and certain chemicals known as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are suspected of modifying endocrine function at similarly low concentrations. In our review we focus mainly on the structural classes of organic synthetic environmental endocrine disruptors and their common structural elements that enable them to interact with estrogen signalling. EDCs can affect estrogenic signalling directly through interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) or indirectly through transcription factors such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or by modulation of critical metabolic enzymes engaged in estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism. However, some structural elements can also pose a great risk of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, especially after biotransformation to reactive metabolites.

  17. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system of farm animals as well as in dogs and cats are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence for clinical cases of endocrine disruption by chemical pollutants is weak, whereas for phytooestrogens, it is well established. However, there is concern that particular dogs and cats may be exposed to man-made endocrine disruptors.

  18. Alteration of steroidogenesis in H{sub 2}95R cells by organic sediment contaminants and relationships to other endocrine disrupting effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaha, L.; Hilscherova, K.; Mazurova, E.; Hecker, M.; Jones, P.D.; Newsted, J.L.; Bradley, P.W.; Gracia, T.; Duris, Z.; Horka, I.; Holoubek, I.; Giesy, J.P. [Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2006-08-15

    A novel bioassay with the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line H{sub 2}95R can be used to screen for endocrine disrupting chemicals that affect the expression of genes important in steroidogenesis. This assay was employed to study the effects of organic contaminants associated with the freshwater pond sediments collected in the Ostrava-Karvina region, Czech Republic. The modulation of ten major genes involved in the synthesis of steroid hormones (CYP11A, CYP11B2, CYP17, CYP19, 17 beta HSD1, 17 beta HSD4, CYP21, 3 beta HSD2, HMGR, StAR) after exposure of H{sub 2}95R cells to sediment extracts was investigated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Crude sediment extracts, containing high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and moderate amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) significantly stimulated expression of the CYP11B2 gene (up to 10-fold induction), and suppressed expression of 3 beta HSD2 and CYP21 genes. Comparison of the results with other mechanistically based bioassays (arylhydrocarbon receptor, AhR, mediated responses in H{sub 4}IIE-luc cells, and estrogen receptor mediated effects in MVLN cells) revealed significant endocrine disrupting potencies of organic contaminants present in the sediments (most likely antiestrogenicity).

  19. Effects of Common Pesticides on Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) Inhibition in SC5 Mouse Sertoli Cells, Evidence of Binding at the COX-2 Active Site, and Implications for Endocrine Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugathas, Subramaniam; Audouze, Karine; Ermler, Sibylle; Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are concerns that diminished prostaglandin action in fetal life could increase the risk of congenital malformations. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals have been found to suppress prostaglandin synthesis, but to our knowledge, pesticides have never been tested for these effects. Objectives: We assessed the ability of pesticides that are commonly used in the European Union to suppress prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) synthesis. Methods: Changes in PGD2 secretion in juvenile mouse Sertoli cells (SC5 cells) were measured using an ELISA. Coincubation with arachidonic acid (AA) was conducted to determine the site of action in the PGD2 synthetic pathway. Molecular modeling studies were performed to assess whether pesticides identified as PGD2-active could serve as ligands of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) binding pocket. Results: The pesticides boscalid, chlorpropham, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fludioxonil, imazalil (enilconazole), imidacloprid, iprodione, linuron, methiocarb, o-phenylphenol, pirimiphos-methyl, pyrimethanil, and tebuconazole suppressed PGD2 production. Strikingly, some of these substances—o-phenylphenol, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, linuron, and imazalil (enilconazole)—showed potencies (IC50) in the range between 175 and 1,500 nM, similar to those of analgesics intended to block COX enzymes. Supplementation with AA failed to reverse this effect, suggesting that the sites of action of these pesticides are COX enzymes. The molecular modeling studies revealed that the COX-2 binding pocket can accommodate most of the pesticides shown to suppress PGD2 synthesis. Some of these pesticides are also capable of antagonizing the androgen receptor. Conclusions: Chemicals with structural features more varied than previously thought can suppress PGD2 synthesis. Our findings signal a need for in vivo studies to establish the extent of endocrine-disrupting effects that might arise from simultaneous interference with PGD2 signaling and androgen action

  20. Zearalenone as an endocrine disruptor in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Karolina; Habrowska-Górczyńska, Dominika Ewa; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka Wanda

    2016-12-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA), a fungal mycotoxin, is present in a wide range of human foods. Many animal studies have found ZEA to possess a disruptive effect on the hormonal balance, mainly due to its similarity to naturally-occurring estrogens. With increasing consciousness of the adverse effects of endocrine disruptors on human health, it is becoming more important to monitor ZEA concentrations in food and identify its potential effects on human health. Based on a review of recent studies on animal models and molecular pathways in which ZEA is reported to have an influence on humans, we postulate that ZEA might act as an endocrine disruptor in humans in a similar way to animals. Moreover, its endocrine-disrupting effect might be also a causative factor in carcinogenesis. This review article summarizes the latest knowledge about the influence of ZEA on the human hormonal balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of endurance training on endocrine response to physical exercise after 5 days of bed rest in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Juraj; Ksinantová, Lucia; Kvetnanský, Richard; Hamar, Dusan; Martinkovic, Miroslav; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    The study was designed to evaluate how a bout of endurance training (ET) influences the endocrine response after head-down bed rest (HDBR). Eleven healthy males completed the study, which consisted of a 6-wk ET followed by 5 days of -6 degrees head-down HDBR. Treadmill exercise at 80% of pretraining maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) was performed before and after ET as well as after HDBR. ET increased VO(2max) by 13%. The response of norepinephrine was attenuated after ET and exaggerated after HDBR (P < 0.001). The differences in epinephrine responses were not statistically significant. The responses of cortisol and plasma renin activity (PRA) were unchanged after ET and were enhanced after HDBR (P < 0.001). The response of growth hormone after HDBR was reduced (P < 0.05). Only the change in cortisol response was associated with the increment of VO(2max) after ET (r = 0.68, P < 0.01). Endurance training failed to completely prevent changes in endocrine responses seen after HDBR. Improvement of physical fitness was associated with an enhancement of the cortisol response to exercise following the period of bed rest.

  2. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals use distinct mechanisms of action to modulate endocrine system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Derek V; Korach, Kenneth S

    2006-06-01

    The term endocrine-disrupting chemicals is used to define a structurally diverse class of synthetic and natural compounds that possess the ability to alter various components of the endocrine system and potentially induce adverse health effects in exposed individuals and populations. Research on these compounds has revealed that they use a variety of both nuclear receptor-mediated and non-receptor-mediated mechanisms to modulate different components of the endocrine system. This review will describe in vitro and in vivo studies that highlight the spectrum of unique mechanisms of action and biological effects of four endocrine-disrupting chemicals--diethylstilbestrol, genistein, di(n-butyl)phthalate, and methoxyacetic acid--to illustrate the diverse and complex nature of this class of compounds.

  3. The heart is the center of a new endocrine, paracrine, and neuroendocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssmann, W G; Nokihara, K; Gagelmann, M; Hock, D; Feller, S; Schulz-Knappe, P; Herbst, F

    1989-01-01

    This review indicates that the heart is a polypeptide-producing organ which should be classified among the traditional endocrine tissues. Cardiac hormones have only been known for a few years, the discovery of their endocrine functions, however, occurred in the 1950ies when Gauer, Henry and Kisch observed specific physiological and morphological features of the heart atria indicative of an endocrine activity. Because of their basic effects many target organs involved in the regulation of body fluid pressure and composition are related to this endocrine organ located in the atrial appendages of the heart. The compact endocrine portion of the heart is built up by myoendocrine cells which form the functional endocrine units and produce a variety of polypeptide hormones called cardiodilatin (CDD) or atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP), which belong to one family. Also, co-storage of a partially homologous regulatory polypeptide called brain natriuretic polypeptide (BNP) occurs, as has been determined by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay. CDD and/or BNP are found in numerous organs where they exert paracrine and neurocrine functions, e.g., in the brain, peripheral nervous system, kidney, and adrenal medulla. In these organs, a differential post-translational processing of cardiac polypeptides is observed, resulting in different functional activities according to discriminating receptor interactions and degrading metabolism. Some of the extra-auricular sites of synthesis and storage of CDD-like peptides are briefly mentioned. In summary the heart constitutes the center of a multilocal and multifunctional system of specific cardiac polypeptides of endocrine, paraneuronal, and neuronal character.

  4. Gastrointestinal manifestations of endocrine disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Maser; Arnbjorn Toset; Sanziana Roman

    2006-01-01

    The hormonal interactions among the systems throughout the body are not fully understood; many vague clinical symptoms may in fact be manifestations of underlying endocrine diseases. The aim of the following review is to discuss gastrointestinal manifestations of surgically correctable endocrine diseases, focusing on abnormalities of thyroid function, cancer and finally autoimmune diseases. We also review manifestations of pancreatic endocrine tumors, and multiple endocrine neoplasia.

  5. Selenium and endocrine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Geoffrey J; Arthur, John R

    2005-03-01

    The trace element selenium (Se) is capable of exerting multiple actions on endocrine systems by modifying the expression of at least 30 selenoproteins, many of which have clearly defined functions. Well-characterized selenoenzymes are the families of glutathione peroxidases (GPXs), thioredoxin reductases (TRs) and iodothyronine deiodinases (Ds). These selenoenzymes are capable of modifying cell function by acting as antioxidants and modifying redox status and thyroid hormone metabolism. Se is also involved in cell growth, apoptosis and modifying the action of cell signalling systems and transcription factors. During thyroid hormone synthesis GPX1, GPX3 and TR1 are up-regulated, providing the thyrocytes with considerable protection from peroxidative damage. Thyroidal D1 in rats and both D1 and D2 in humans are also up-regulated to increase the production of bioactive 3,5,3'-tri-iodothyronine (T3). In the basal state, GPX3 is secreted into the follicular lumen where it may down-regulate thyroid hormone synthesis by decreasing hydrogen peroxide concentrations. The deiodinases are present in most tissues and provide a mechanism whereby individual tissues may control their exposure to T3. Se is also able to modify the immune response in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Low sperm production and poor sperm quality are consistent features of Se-deficient animals. The pivotal link between Se, sperm quality and male fertility is GPX4 since the enzyme is essential to allow the production of the correct architecture of the midpiece of spermatozoa. Se also has insulin-mimetic properties, an effect that is probably brought about by stimulating the tyrosine kinases involved in the insulin signalling cascade. Furthermore, in the diabetic rat, Se not only restores glycaemic control but it also prevents or alleviates the adverse effects that diabetes has on cardiac, renal and platelet function.

  6. Disentangling breast cancer patients' perceptions and experiences with regard to endocrine therapy: nature and relevance for non-adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Hans; van Geffen, Erica C G; Baas-Thijssen, Monique C; Krol-Warmerdam, Elly M; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Belitser, Svetlana; Bouvy, Marcel L; van Dijk, Liset

    2013-10-01

    Adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents recurrence and progression of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. However, studies reveal substantial non-adherence. The objective was therefore to identify the nature of the experiences and beliefs of women treated with endocrine therapy in an attempt to find potential determinants of non-adherence. Online Focus Groups (OFGs) and individual interviews were conducted with 37 women who were treated with endocrine therapy. Sixty-three statements derived from the OFGs and 11 belief items from the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ) were used in a Q-sorting task conducted with 14 of the women. The quantitative Q-sorting data were statistically analyzed with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. A six cluster solution was revealed that included the clusters 'information', 'efficacy', 'tenacity', 'coping', 'side effects' and 'usage'. Women's own experiences and perceptions were not clearly delineated from the beliefs measured with the BMQ. However, women judged their own experiences and perceptions with regard to endocrine therapy as more relevant for adherence than the BMQ beliefs. In order to understand and to improve women's adherence to endocrine therapy, women's own perceptions and experiences about endocrine therapy should be targeted in addition to common beliefs that apply to a wide range of medicines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk assessment of endocrine active chemicals: identifying chemicals of regulatory concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bars, Remi; Fegert, Ivana; Gross, Melanie; Lewis, Dick; Weltje, Lennart; Weyers, Arnd; Wheeler, James R; Galay-Burgos, Malyka

    2012-10-01

    The European regulation on plant protection products (1107/2009) (EC, 2009a), the revisions to the biocides Directive (COM[2009]267) (EC, 2009b), and the regulation concerning chemicals (Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 'REACH') (EC.2006) only support the marketing and use of chemical products on the basis that they do not induce endocrine disruption in humans or wildlife species. In the absence of agreed guidance on how to identify and evaluate endocrine activity and disruption within these pieces of legislation a European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) task force was formed to provide scientific criteria that may be used within the context of these three legislative documents. The resulting ECETOC technical report (ECETOC, 2009a) and the associated workshop (ECETOC, 2009b) presented a science-based concept on how to identify endocrine activity and disrupting properties of chemicals for both human health and the environment. The synthesis of the technical report and the workshop report was published by the ECETOC task force (Bars et al., 2011a,b). Specific scientific criteria for the determination of endocrine activity and disrupting properties that integrate information from both regulatory (eco)toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies were proposed. These criteria combined the nature of the adverse effects detected in studies which give concern for endocrine toxicity with an understanding of the mode of action of toxicity so that adverse effects can be explained scientifically. A key element in the data evaluation is the consideration of all available information in a weight-of-evidence approach. However, to be able to discriminate chemicals with endocrine properties of low concern from those of higher concern (for regulatory purposes), the task force recognised that the concept needed further refinement. Following a discussion of the key factors at a second workshop of invited regulatory, academic and industry scientists

  8. 环境内分泌干扰物复合效应研究进展%Research Advance in Joint Effects of Environmental Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春花; 蒋萍; 胡伟; 王玉秋

    2011-01-01

    As the constant progress has been made in environmental toxicology, scientists begin to pay more attention to lowdose and multi-chemicals pollutions. Environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (EEDCs) are such pollutants which are characteristic of variety, complexity and low exposing dose. The present paper reviewed the recent researches on joint effects of EEDCs during the past two decades, predicted the further studies in this field, and also discussed the importance of establishment of detection and evaluation system which is proper in China.%随着环境毒理学的不断发展,低剂量复合污染问题逐渐成为研究热点.近年来,越来越多的环境内分泌干扰物(environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals,EEDCs)进入人们视线,这类物质以其种类繁多、暴露剂量低、作用复杂等特性引起广泛关注.该文综述了EEDCs复合效应的研究进展,预测了今后可能的研究方向.并提出建立我国特有的EEDCs检测评估体系的重要性.

  9. Your Endocrine System (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Your Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Endocrine System Print A A A en español Tu sistema endocrino You might say endocrine (say: EN-doh-krin) glands are a little ...

  10. Asthma and endocrine disorders: shared mechanisms and genetic pleiotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesse, Riccardina; Schieck, Maximilian; Kabesch, Michael

    2011-02-20

    Asthma is a common inflammatory disease for which the cause is not yet known. Studies of the epidemiology and natural history of childhood asthma into adulthood demonstrate a change in gender prevalence with age. Hormones and inflammation may interact in asthma pathogenesis and determine its course. The same may be true for some endocrine disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Obesity plays a major role in the development of the metabolic syndrome and has been identified as an important risk factor for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of asthma has paralleled the rise in obesity, suggesting that shared environmental factors could affect both conditions. In addition, endocrine diseases and asthma may share common genetic determinants. In the first part of this review we assess endocrine influences on asthma and overlaps between endocrine disorders and asthma while in the second part we explore the potential benefit of comparative genetic analyses between asthma and endocrine diseases.

  11. Endocrine Drugs in Aircrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Treatment of Hypothyroidism hyperthyroidism . Thyroid hormones are necessary Hypothyroidism is treated with synthetic thyroid for normal LH and FSH secretion...that Since hyperthyroidism is an unstable clinical both hormones become available even though only condition which requires definitive treatment , its one...P. Gobetti - 00185, Rome, Italy INTRODUCTION Hormonal therapy is, usually, a substitutive treatment for endocrine disease resulting from Hormones

  12. The Japanese Quail as an avian model for testing endocrine disrupting chemicals: endocrine and behavioral end points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, M.A.; Abdelnabi, M.A.; Thompson, N.; Wu, J.; Henry, K.; Humphries, E.; Henry, P.F.P.

    2000-01-01

    Birds have extremely varied reproductive strategies. As such, the impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can greatly differ across avian species. Precocial species, such as Japanese quail appear to be most sensitive to EDC effects during embryonic development, particularly sexual differentiation. A great deal is known about the ontogeny of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) relative to endocrine, neuro-endocrine, and behavioral components of reproduction. Therefore, this species provides an excellent model for understanding effects of EDCs on reproductive biology with exposure at specific stages of the life cycle. The purpose of these experiments was to conduct a 1- or 2- generation experiment with positive or negative control chemicals and to determine changes in selected end points. Japanese quail embryos were exposed to estradiol benzoate (EB; positive control) in a 2-generation design or to fadrozole (FAD; negative control) in a 1-generation design. Embryonic EB treatment resulted in significant reductions (p< 0.5) in hen day production (90.2 vs 54.1; control vs EB, resp.) and fertility (85.3 vs 33.4%, control vs EB, resp.). Males showed sharply reduced courtship and mating behaviors as well as increased lag time (26 vs 148 sec; control vs EB) in behavioral tests. Fadrozole exposure resulted in reduced hatchability of fertile eggs, particularly at higher doses. There were no significant effects on courtship and mating behavior of males although males showed an increased lag time in their responses, nally, a behavioral test for studying motor and fear responses in young chicks was used; chicks exposed to an estrogenic pesticide (methoxychlor) showed some deficits. In summary, the use of appropriate and reliable end points that are responsive to endocrine disruption are critical for assessment of EDCs. Supported in part by EPA grant R826134.

  13. In Vitro Endocrine Disruption Screening of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    bioassays that measure endocrine mediated endpoints were performed. Determining if NTO acts as an endocrine disruptor is important because...restrictions on the use of these compounds by the U.S. Army. 1.3 Conclusions NTO was tested in nine endocrine disruptor bioassays. Five of... endocrine disruptors : development of a stably transfected human ovarian cell line for the detection of estrogenic and anti- estrogenic chemicals. In

  14. Environmental endocrine disruptors: A proposed classification scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fur, P.L. de; Roberts, J. [Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A number of chemicals known to act on animal systems through the endocrine system have been termed environmental endocrine disruptors. This group includes some of the PCBs and TCDDs, as well as lead, mercury and a large number of pesticides. The common feature is that the chemicals interact with endogenous endocrine systems at the cellular and/or molecular level to alter normal processes that are controlled or regulated by hormones. Although the existence of artificial or environmental estrogens (e.g. chlordecone and DES) has been known for some time, recent data indicate that this phenomenon is widespread. Indeed, anti-androgens have been held responsible for reproductive dysfunction in alligator populations in Florida. But the significance of endocrine disruption was recognized by pesticide manufacturers when insect growth regulators were developed to interfere with hormonal control of growth. Controlling, regulating or managing these chemicals depends in no small part on the ability to identify, screen or otherwise know that a chemical is an endocrine disrupter. Two possible classifications schemes are: using the effects caused in an animal, or animals as an exposure indicator; and using a known screen for the point of contact with the animal. The former would require extensive knowledge of cause and effect relationships in dozens of animal groups; the latter would require a screening tool comparable to an estrogen binding assay. The authors present a possible classification based on chemicals known to disrupt estrogenic, androgenic and ecdysone regulated hormonal systems.

  15. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  16. Exercise and the Regulation of Endocrine Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Anthony C; Lane, Amy R

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system has profound regulatory effects within the human body and thus the ability to control and maintain appropriate function within many physiological systems (i.e., homeostasis). The hormones associated with the endocrine system utilize autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine actions on the cells of their target tissues within these physiologic systems to adjust homeostasis. The introduction of exercise as a stressor to disrupt homeostasis can greatly amplify and impact the actions of these hormones. To that end, the endocrine response to an acute exercise session occurs in a progression of phases with the magnitude of the response being relative to the exercise work intensity or volume. Various physiologic mechanisms are considered responsible for these responses, although not all are completely understood or elucidated. Chronic exercise training does not eliminate the acute exercise response but may attenuate the overall effect of the responsiveness as the body adapts in a positive fashion to the training stimulus. Regrettably, an excessive intensity and/or volume of training may lead to maladaptation and is associated with inappropriate endocrine hormonal responses. The mechanisms leading to a deleterious maladaptive state are not well understood and require additional research for elucidation.

  17. Osteoporosis in celiac disease and in endocrine and reproductive disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Velia Stazi; Antonello Trecca; Biagino Trinti

    2008-01-01

    As the increase in lifespan brings to light diseases that were previously not clinically detectable, osteoporosis has become an issue of worldwide significance. The disease is marked by a loss of bone mass; the bones become less dense, fragile and more prone to fracturing. Because it is regulated by endocrine and environmental factors, osteoporosis presents a multifactorial etiopathogenesis, with the genetic component accounting for 70% of an individual variation in bone mass density (BMD), the principal determinant, with age, of fracture risk. Pathological conditions such as celiac disease (CD) exacerbate the process of bone loss, so that the occurrence of osteoporosis in celiac subjects is of particular note: indeed, the screening of osteoporosis patients for this disease is advisable, since it may be the only sign of undiagnosed CD. An increase in interleukin IL-1β, of the IL-1 system, in the relatives of celiac patients confirms the genetic predisposition to osteoporosis and its presence is evidence of an association between the two conditions. The direct effect on the bones of CD is secondary to poor absorption of calcium and vitamin D. In women osteoporosis is indirectly associated with early menopause and amenorrhea, and it may follow prolonged breast-feeding and frequent pregnancies, while in men it is associated with hypogonadism and GH deficit. These endocrine and non-endocrine factors exert their effects on bones by modulating the RANK/RANK-L/OPG system. An appropriate lifestyle from adolescence onwards, together with early diagnosis of and treatment for CD and primary and secondary endocrine pathologies are important for the prevention of damage to the bones.

  18. Tumorigenic effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals are alleviated by licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract through suppression of AhR expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiao Ting; de la Cruz, Joseph; Hwang, Seong Gu; Hong, Heeok

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been reported to interfere with estrogen signaling. Exposure to these chemicals decreases the immune response and causes a wide range of diseases in animals and humans. Recently, many studies showed that licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract (LRE) commonly called "gamcho" in Korea exhibits antioxidative, chemoprotective, and detoxifying properties. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of LRE and to determine if and how LRE can alleviate the toxicity of EDCs. LRE was prepared by vacuum evaporation and freeze-drying after homogenization of licorice root powder that was soaked in 80% ethanol for 72 h. We used 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a representative EDC, which is known to induce tumors or cancers; MCF-7 breast cancer cells, used as a tumor model, were treated with TCDD and various concentrations of LRE (0, 50, 100, 200, 400 μg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. As a result, TCDD stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation, but LRE significantly inhibited TCDD-induced MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression of TCDD toxicity-related genes, i.e., aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), AhR nuclear translocator, and cytochrome P450 1A1, was also down-regulated by LRE in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of cell cycle distribution after treatment of MCF-7 cells with TCDD showed that LRE inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells via G2/M phase arrest. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis also revealed that LRE dose-dependently increased the expression of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and p27 and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related genes. These data suggest that LRE can mitigate the tumorigenic effects of TCDD in breast cancer cells by suppression of AhR expression and cell cycle arrest. Thus, LRE can be used as a potential toxicity-alleviating agent against EDC-mediated diseases.

  19. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Writer, J.H.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kiesling, R.L.; Ferrey, M.L.; Jahns, N.D.; Bartell, S.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17??-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use. ?? 2010.

  20. Effects of antalarmin, a CRF receptor 1 antagonist, on fright reaction and endocrine stress response in crucian carp (Carassius carassius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lastein, Stine; Höglund, Erik; Overli, Oyvind

    2008-01-01

    and stress reactions in non-mammalian vertebrates are largely unknown. Crucian carp displays the olfactory-mediated fright reaction, a stereotypic behavioral response to waterborne cues from damaged skin of conspecifics. This reaction shows several similarities to basic components of avoidance behavior......The corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors show striking homogeneity throughout the vertebrate subphylum. In mammals, the CRF1 receptor (CRFR1) plays an important role in mediating behavioral and endocrine responses to fear and stress. The specific roles of this receptor subtype in fear...... in mammals. In the present study, we applied the non-peptide CRFR1 antagonist, antalarmin, to crucian carp 1 h before exposure to conspecific skin extract. This treatment resulted in a suppression of the fright reaction. After skin extract exposure, antalarmin treatment also lead to lower plasma cortisol...

  1. To observe the clinical therapeutic effect of gynecological endocrine disorder%妇科内分泌失调的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康玉彬

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析女性内分泌失调的治疗方式与疗效。方法研究对象为我院2014年1月~12月收治的100例妇科内分泌失调患者,将其分为对照组和观察组,各50例,其中对照组采用常规西药治疗干预,观察组在对照组基础上添加中药辅助治疗,而后分析两组患者的疗效和相关性激素的水平变化。结果在治疗有效率上,观察组为96%,对照组为78%;在性激素指标上,观察组提升的比例均高于对照组。结论女性内分泌失调可以通过中西药联合治疗来达到更好的调节作用,各项指标恢复程度更优质。%ObjectiveTo analyze the female endocrine disorders treatment and effect.MethodsThe study from our hospital admissions during 2014 January to December 100 cases of gynecological endocrine disorders patients, divided into control group and observation group with 50 cases in each group, the control group was treated by routine western medicine intervention, while the observation group was added Chinese medicine adjunctive therapy group based on the analysis of effect and correlation, the changes in the levels of hormone in patients of two groups and after treatment.ResultsThe effective rate in the treatment, the observation group was 96%, 78% in the control group;sex hormones in the index, the observation group to enhance the proportion was higher than that of control group. ConclusionThe female endocrine disorders can be achieved better regulation through the combination of Chinese and Western medicine in the treatment of various indicators of the degree of recovery, better quality.

  2. Assimilating endocrine anatomy through simulation: a pre-emptive strike!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowse, Phillip G; Ruparel, Raaj K; Brahmbhatt, Rushin D; Dy, Benzon M; AlJamal, Yazan N; Abdelsattar, Jad; Farley, David R

    2015-03-01

    We sought to determine if endocrine anatomy could be learned with the aid of a hands-on, low-cost, low-fidelity surgical simulation curriculum and pre-emptive 60-second YouTube video clip. A 3-hour endocrine surgery simulation session was held on back-to-back Fridays. A video clip was made available to the 2nd group of learners. A comprehensive 40-point test was administered before (pre-test) and after (post-test) the sessions. General surgery interns (n = 26) participated. The video was viewed 19 times by 80% (12 of 15) of interns with access. Viewers outperformed nonviewers on subsequent post-testing (mean [SD], 29.7 [1.3] vs 24.4 [1.6]; P = .015). Mean scores on the anatomy section of the post-test were higher among viewers than nonviewers (mean [SD] 14.2 [.9] vs 10.3 [1.0]; P = .012). Low-cost simulation models can be used to teach endocrine anatomy. Pre-emptive viewing of a 60-second video may have been a key factor resulting in higher post-test scores compared with controls, suggesting that the video intervention improved the educational effectiveness of the session. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing Potential Endocrine Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many ...

  4. Endocrine mechanisms of intrauterine programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, A L; Forhead, A J

    2004-05-01

    Epidemiological findings and experimental studies in animals have shown that individual tissues and whole organ systems can be programmed in utero during critical periods of development with adverse consequences for their function in later life. Detailed morphometric analyses of the data have shown that certain patterns of intrauterine growth, particularly growth retardation, can be related to specific postnatal outcomes. Since hormones regulate fetal growth and the development of individual fetal tissues, they have a central role in intrauterine programming. Hormones such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, thyroxine and the glucocorticoids act as nutritional and maturational signals and adapt fetal development to prevailing intrauterine conditions, thereby maximizing the chances of survival both in utero and at birth. However, these adaptations may have long-term sequelae. Of the hormones known to control fetal development, it is the glucocorticoids that are most likely to cause tissue programming in utero. They are growth inhibitory and affect the development of all the tissues and organ systems most at risk of postnatal pathophysiology when fetal growth is impaired. Their concentrations in utero are also elevated by all the nutritional and other challenges known to have programming effects. Glucocorticoids act at cellular and molecular levels to alter cell function by changing the expression of receptors, enzymes, ion channels and transporters. They also alter various growth factors, cytoarchitectural proteins, binding proteins and components of the intracellular signalling pathways. Glucocorticoids act, directly, on genes and, indirectly, through changes in the bioavailability of other hormones. These glucocorticoid-induced endocrine changes may be transient or persist into postnatal life with consequences for tissue growth and development both before and after birth. In the long term, prenatal glucocorticoid exposure can permanently reset endocrine

  5. Application of ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid phase microextraction for highly sensitive simultaneous determination of three endocrine disrupting compounds in food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Danfeng; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-15

    Ionic liquid (IL) dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method was successfully developed for extracting three endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) (bisphenol A, bisphenol AF and bisphenol AP) from the food packaging. 1-Octyl-3-methylimidazoliumhexafluorophosphate ([C8MIM][PF6]) was selected as extraction solution. The extraction procedure did not require a dispersive solvent. Three EDCs extraction kinetics were found to be very fast and the equilibrium was attained within 3.0 min following the pseudo-first-order model. The H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions play an important role in the partitioning of EDCs into IL from aqueous solution. The recovered IL could be reused for three runs without significant loss of extraction efficiencies. The spiked recoveries of three targets in food packaging were in the range of 97.8-103.1%. The limits of detection ranged from 0.50 to 1.50 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). As a result, this method has been successfully applied for the sensitive detection of three EDCs in real samples.

  6. [The immuno-endocrine system. A new endocrine theory: the problem of the packed transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2011-05-15

    Since the eighties of the last century hormone content was justified in immune cells (lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells), which produce, store and secrete these hormones. Although the amount of these materials in immune cells is relatively small, the mass of the producers (immune cells) is so large, that the phenomenon must be considered from endocrinological point of view, underlying the important differences between the "classical" and immuno-endocrine systems. Cells of the classic (built-in) endocrine system are mono-producers, while immune cells can synthesize many types of hormones (polyproducers). In addition, these cells can transport the whole hormone-producing machinery to the site of need, producing a local effect. This can be observed, for example, in the case of endorphin producing immune cells during inflammation and during early pregnancy around the chorionic villi. Hormone producing immune cells also have receptors for many hormones, so that they are poly-receivers. Via hormone producing and receiving capacity there is a bidirectional connection between the neuro-endocrine and immuno-endocrine systems. In addition, there is a network inside the immuno-endocrine system. The packed transport theory attempts to explain the mechanism and importance of the immuno-endocrine system.

  7. Novel in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays elucidating the effects of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on thyroid hormone action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schriks, M.

    2006-01-01

    The last years, both scientific and public concern about the possible threat of compounds in the environment that may affect endocrine functions has increased. Thus far, the majority of endocrine disruptor research has focused on the interference of compounds with the sex hormone homeostasis. Less a

  8. Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGown, Christine; Birerdinc, Aybike; Younossi, Zobair M

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most important health challenges faced by developed countries and is increasingly affecting adolescents and children. Obesity is also a considerable risk factor for the development of numerous other chronic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The epidemic proportions of obesity and its numerous comorbidities are bringing into focus the highly complex and metabolically active adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is increasingly being considered as a functional endocrine organ. This article discusses the endocrine effects of adipose tissue during obesity and the systemic impact of this signaling.

  9. Zearalenone endocrine system catch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bursić Vojislava P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the contamination of our environment with thousands of both natural and man-made chemicals which affect the endocrine system of humans and animals. These so-called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are thought to mimic or block the action of hormones and therefore disrupt sexual development in utero. EDCs are organochlorine pesticides, dioxin compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, alkylpolyethoxylates, plastic additives and phytoestrogens (occurring naturally in foods: isoflavones coumenestans and zearalenone. The structure of zearalenone is similar to the structure of estrogens and it enables binding to the estrogenic receptors. DNA laddering on gel electrophoresis was present 12 h after dosing thus indicating a conclusion that there was apoptosis. Apoptosis is the principal mechanism contributing to germ cell depletion and testicular atrophy following zearalenone exposure.

  10. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-05-25

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity.

  11. Liver abnormalities and endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Patrizia

    2013-08-01

    that are features of the syndrome, including insulin resistance, central obesity, and hyperlipidaemia. Clinical practice must integrally evaluate the effects of the intricate and tight relationship between the liver and the endocrine system, in order to better address all manifestations, complications, and prevent deterioration of one or the other organ-system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Faniband

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  13. Effect of walking stress on growth, physiological adaptability and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes in a semi-arid tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Syed M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Sheep in hot semi-arid environments are mostly reared using extensive systems. In addition to thermal stress and feed scarcity, the animals need to walk long distances for grazing in this ecological zone. A study was conducted to assess the effect of long-distance walking on adaptive capability in terms of physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes. Fourteen adult Malpura non-pregnant ewes weighing between 33 and 35 kg were used in the study. The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of seven animals each: GI ( n = 7; Control), and GII ( n = 7; walking stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. Both GI and GII ewes had uniform access to feed and water. The walking stress group (GII) ewes were made to walk 14 km in two spans between 0900 and 1500 hours with 1 h 30 min for each span (7 km) of walking. The ewes subjected to walking stress (GII) were prevented from grazing by applying a face mask made of cotton thread. The study was conducted for a period of two estrous cycles (35 days) during the autumn season (October-November). Physiological responses were recorded twice daily at 0800 and 1400 hours at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at weekly intervals to study the effects of walking stress on blood biochemical and endocrine parameters. The results indicate that walking stress had significant ( P stress did not influence the reproductive hormone levels. The significant changes in RR, RT, plasma cortisol, T3 and T4 show that Malpura ewes have the capability to adapt to long-distance walking, and that adrenal and thyroid gland hormones play a significant role in such adaptation.

  14. Effect of walking stress on growth, physiological adaptability and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes in a semi-arid tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P; Naqvi, Syed M K

    2012-03-01

    Sheep in hot semi-arid environments are mostly reared using extensive systems. In addition to thermal stress and feed scarcity, the animals need to walk long distances for grazing in this ecological zone. A study was conducted to assess the effect of long-distance walking on adaptive capability in terms of physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes. Fourteen adult Malpura non-pregnant ewes weighing between 33 and 35 kg were used in the study. The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of seven animals each: GI (n = 7; Control), and GII (n = 7; walking stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. Both GI and GII ewes had uniform access to feed and water. The walking stress group (GII) ewes were made to walk 14 km in two spans between 0900 and 1500 hours with 1 h 30 min for each span (7 km) of walking. The ewes subjected to walking stress (GII) were prevented from grazing by applying a face mask made of cotton thread. The study was conducted for a period of two estrous cycles (35 days) during the autumn season (October-November). Physiological responses were recorded twice daily at 0800 and 1400 hours at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at weekly intervals to study the effects of walking stress on blood biochemical and endocrine parameters. The results indicate that walking stress had significant (P stress did not influence the reproductive hormone levels. The significant changes in RR, RT, plasma cortisol, T(3) and T(4) show that Malpura ewes have the capability to adapt to long-distance walking, and that adrenal and thyroid gland hormones play a significant role in such adaptation.

  15. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and other substances of concern in food contact materials: an updated review of exposure, effect and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muncke, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Food contact materials (FCM) are an underestimated source of chemical food contaminants and a potentially relevant route of human exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Quantifying the exposure of the general population to substances from FCM relies on estimates of food consumption and leaching into food. Recent studies using polycarbonate plastics show that food simulants do not always predict worst-case leaching of bisphenol A, a common FCM substance. Also, exposure of children to FCM substances is not always realistically predicted using the common conventions and thus possibly misjudged. Further, the exposure of the whole population to substances leaching into dry foods is underestimated. Consumers are exposed to low levels of substances from FCM across their entire lives. Effects of these compounds currently are assessed with a focus on mutagenicity and genotoxicity. This approach however neglects integrating recent new toxicological findings, like endocrine disruption, mixture toxicity, and developmental toxicity. According to these new toxicology paradigms women of childbearing age and during pregnancy are a new sensitive population group requiring more attention. Furthermore, in overweight and obese persons a change in the metabolism of xenobiotics is observed, possibly implying that this group of consumers is insufficiently protected by current risk assessment practice. Innovations in FCM risk assessment should therefore include routine testing for EDCs and an assessment of the whole migrate toxicity of a food packaging, taking into account all sensitive population groups. In this article I focus on recent issues of interest concerning either exposure to or effects of FCM-related substances. Further, I review the use of benzophenones and organotins, two groups of known or suspected EDCs, in FCM authorized in the US and EU.

  16. The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation to symptomatic perimenopausal women on serum endocrine profiles, lipid parameters, and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, K T; Freeman, E; Grisso, J A; Rader, D J; Sammel, M; Kapoor, S; Nestler, J E

    1999-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an androgenic steroid hormone, exhibits an age-related decline. Perimenopausal women have only approximately 50% of peak DHEA levels. Despite limited scientific data, DHEA has gained recognition as a dietary supplement to reduce the symptoms of aging and improve well-being. This randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial examined the effects of 50 mg/day of oral DHEA supplementation, for 3 months, on 60 perimenopausal women with complaints of altered mood and well-being. Changes in the serum endocrine profile of women in the DHEA group were significantly greater than the placebo group, including a 242% [95% confidence interval (CI) +60.1, +423.9] increase in DHEAS, a 94.8% (95% CI +34.2, +155.4) increase in testosterone, and a 13.2% (95% CI -27.88, +0.5) decline in cortisol compared to baseline. Women receiving DHEA had a 10.1% (95% CI -15.0, -5.1) decline in high-density lipoprotein and an 18.1% (95% CI -32.2, -3.9) decline in Lp(a) from baseline, but these declines did not significantly differ from women who received placebo. Women receiving DHEA did not have any improvements significantly greater than placebo in the severity of perimenopausal symptoms, mood, dysphoria, libido, cognition, memory, or well-being. DHEA supplementation significantly effects the endocrine profile, may affect the lipid profile, but does not improve perimenopausal symptoms or well-being compared to placebo.

  17. Effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on several eukaryotic cell lines: elucidating cytotoxicity, endocrine disruption, and reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anne; Maletz, Sibylle X; Hollert, Henner; Schäffer, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M

    2014-01-01

    To date, only a few reports about studies on toxic effects of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are available, and their results are often controversial. Three different cell lines (rainbow trout liver cells (RTL-W1), human adrenocortical carcinoma cells (T47Dluc), and human adrenocarcinoma cells (H295R)) were exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the antimicrobial agent triclocarban (TCC) as well as the mixture of both substances in a concentration range of 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L, 31.25 to 500 μg TCC/L, and 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L + 1% TCC (percentage relative to carbon nanotubes concentration), respectively. Triclocarban is a high-production volume chemical that is widely used as an antimicrobial compound and is known for its toxicity, hydrophobicity, endocrine disruption, bioaccumulation potential, and environmental persistence. Carbon nanotubes are known to interact with hydrophobic organic compounds. Therefore, triclocarban was selected as a model substance to examine mixture toxicity in this study. The influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on various toxicological endpoints was specified: neither cytotoxicity nor endocrine disruption could be observed after exposure of the three cell lines to carbon nanotubes, but the nanomaterial caused intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in all cell types. For TCC on the other hand, cell vitality of 80% could be observed at a concentration of 2.1 mg/L for treated RTL-W1 cells. A decrease of luciferase activity in the ER Calux assay at a triclocarban concentration of 125 μg/L and higher was observed. This effect was less pronounced when multiwalled carbon nanotubes were present in the medium. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes induce the production of reactive oxygen species in RTL-W1, T47Dluc, and H295R cells, reveal no cytotoxicity, and reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of the biocide triclocarban.

  18. Endocrine disorders in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2011-01-01

    The endocrinology of pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes as a consequence of physiological alterations at the foetoplacental boundary between mother and foetus. The vast changes in maternal hormones and their binding proteins complicate assessment of the normal level of most hormones...... during gestation. The neuroendocrine events and their timing in the placental, foetal and maternal compartments are critical for initiation and maintenance of pregnancy, for foetal growth and development, and for parturition. As pregnancy advances, the relative number of trophoblasts increase...

  19. Effects of young coconut juice on the numbers of argyrophil endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract of male rats: Novel preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisaudah Radenahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Apart from calcium itself, there are many factors including vitamin D and estrogen, that play important roles in bone formation. Hormones, especially estrogen, used for replacement therapy is highly effective at reducing the rate of bone loss and can also replace lost bone in postmenopausal women. Estrogen replacement therapy has been proposed to prevent bone loss in males as well as in females. Estrogen, however, has been considered to be one of the hormonal risk factors of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer and also other side effects. With this background, in the present study, young coconut juice (YCJ, that is known to contain the phytoestrogen, -sitosterol, was investigated for its possible beneficial effects on delaying osteoporosis using a male orchidectomized rat model, and as a replacement for estrogen replacement therapy. In the present study we used the Grimelius stain which is a broad endocrine cell marker, especially in the gastrointestinal (GI tract to quantify the argyrophil endocrine cells and if possible to relate this to reflex GI functions, e.g. calcium absorption, GI motility etc. that might have an influence on osteoporosis. There were five groups of rats (6 per group included in this study. The first group consisted of sham-operated rats, the second group consisted of orchidectomized (orx rats, and the third group consisted of orx rats injected intraperitoneally with exogenous estrogen (2.5 g/kgBW of estradiol benzoate, EB five days a week for two weeks. The fourth group consisted of orx rats that received YCJ (100 mL/ kgBW/day and the fifth group was sham-operated rats receiving YCJ (100 mL/kgBW/day for two weeks. After sacrifice, the GI tract including stomach, small and large intestines were removed, fixed and paraffin embedded for routine H&E and Grimelius silver staining. Most of the argyrophil cells were dispersed in the mucosa, particularly in the basal mucosa and were generally round or spindle

  20. Enantioselective endocrine disrupting effects of omeprazole studied in the H295R cell assay and by molecular modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Amalie Møller; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Bonomo, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    ) and its two enantiomers on the human steroidogenesis using the H295R cell line. Differences in production of 16 steroid hormones were analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Additionally, to evaluate the differences in binding modes of these enantiomers, docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of S-omeprazole (S......-OME) and R-omeprazole (R-OME) in CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2 were carried out. Exposing H295R cells to OME and its enantiomers resulted in an increase of progesterone (PRO) and 17α-hydroxy-progesterone (OH-PRO) levels. At the same time, a decrease in the corticosteroid and androgen synthesis was observed...... of the heme for S-OME in CYP17A1 and S- and R-OME in CYP21A2. However, density functional theory calculations suggest that the direct N-Fe interaction is weak. The study demonstrates enantioselective differences in the endocrine disrupting potential of chiral drugs such as omeprazole. These findings may have...

  1. Effects of β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate Free Acid Ingestion and Resistance Exercise on the Acute Endocrine Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Townsend

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the endocrine response to a bout of heavy resistance exercise following acute β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid (HMB-FA ingestion. Design. Twenty resistance trained men were randomized and consumed either 1 g of HMB-FA (BetaTor or placebo (PL 30 min prior to performing an acute heavy resistance exercise protocol. Blood was obtained before (PRE, immediately after (IP, and 30 min after exercise (30P. Circulating concentrations of testosterone, growth hormone (GH, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, and insulin were assayed. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC was analyzed by the trapezoidal rule. Results. The resistance exercise protocol resulted in significant elevations from PRE in testosterone P<0.01, GH P<0.01, and insulin P=0.05 at IP, with GH P<0.01 and insulin P<0.01 remaining elevated at 30P. A significant interaction was noted between groups in the plasma GH response at IP, which was significantly higher following HMB-FA compared to PL P<0.01. AUC analysis revealed an elevated GH and IGF-1 response in the HMB-FA group compared to PL. Conclusion. HMB-FA prior to resistance exercise augments the GH response to high volume resistance exercise compared to PL. These findings provide further support for the potential anabolic benefits associated with HMB supplementation.

  2. Microsomal cytochrome P450-3A4 (CYP3A4) nanobiosensor for the determination of 2,4-dichlorophenol-An endocrine disruptor compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, Nicolette R.; Waryo, Tesfaye T.; Arotiba, Omotayo; Jahed, Nazeem; Baker, Priscilla G.L. [SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of Western Cape, Moderddam Road, Bellville, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Iwuoha, Emmanuel I. [SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of Western Cape, Moderddam Road, Bellville, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa)], E-mail: eiwuoha@uwc.ac.za

    2009-02-28

    Cytochrome P450-3A4 (CYP3A4) is a monooxygenase enzyme that plays a major role in the detoxification of bioactive compounds and hydrophobic xenobiotics (e.g. medicines, drugs, environmental pollutants, food supplements and steroids). Physiologically the monooxygenation reactions of this class II, microsomal, b-type heme enzyme, usually requires cytochrome P450 reductase, NADPH. A novel CYP3A4 biosensor system that essentially simplified the enzymatic redox processes by allowing electron transfer between the electrode and the enzyme redox centre to occur, without any need for the physiological redox partners, was developed for the detection of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), a priority environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor. The biosensor, GC/Naf-Co(Sep){sup 3+}/CYP3A4/Naf, was constructed by encapsulating CYP3A4 in a Nafion-cobalt (III) sepulchrate (Naf-Co(Sep){sup 3+}) composite film on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The responses of the biosensor to 2,4-dichlorophenol, erythromycin (CYP3A4 native substrate) and ketoconazole (CYP 3A4 natural inhibitor) were studied by cyclic and square wave voltammetric techniques. The detection limit (DL) of the biosensor for 2,4-dichlorophenol was 0.043 {mu}g L{sup -1}, which is by an order of magnitude lower than the EU limit (0.3 {mu}g L{sup -1}) for any pesticide compound in ground water. The biosensor's DL is lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water equivalent level (DWEL) value for 2,4-DCP, which is 2 {mu}g L{sup -1}.

  3. Use of radioimmunoassay to diagnose some forms of endocrine sterility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balabolkin, M.I.; Gerasimov, G.A. (Moskovskij Meditsinskij Stomatologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-11-01

    The possibility is considered of using a metoclopramide test combined with radioimmunoassay for determining prolactin in the blood to diagnose some forms of endocrine sterility of 17 women examined 5 are practically healthy, sterility of 6 women is caused by tumor of hypophysis verified by X-rayograms, 6 women suffered from disorderded prolactin secretion and sterility without roentgenologic signs of disordered sella turcica. Metoclopramide has been injected intravenously in the 10 mm dose. A series of advantages is noted of the metoclopramide sample characteristic of high availability of the preparation and practically complete absence of side-effects.

  4. Effects of Environmental Endocrine Disruptors on Mother and Child Health%环境内分泌干扰物对母婴健康影响研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘洪明

    2012-01-01

    在概述环境内分泌干扰物的基础上,从通过与核受体结合的基因作用及非基因信号通路作用方面阐述了环境内分泌干扰物的作用机制,并探讨了环境内分泌干扰物对母婴健康的影响,包括对母亲的影响及对胎儿、婴儿的影响方面。同时强调应重视其对激素水平不稳定的孕期母体及敏感初期生命的影响。%On the basis of an overview of environmental endocrine disruptors, the action mechanism of environmental endocrine disruptors is introduced from the aspects of gene function with nuclear receptor and non-gene signaling pathway. The effect of environmental endocrine disruptors on maternal and child health is also discussed, including the effects on mother, fetus n and infant. Meanwhile, it also emphasizes that the effect of environmental endocrine disrupto~ on mother with unstable hormone levels and sensitive early life should be paid great attention.

  5. Effect of matrine combined with cisplatin on endocrine function and malignant biological behavior of cervical cancer SiHa cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Jiao Guo; Fang Lan; Meng-Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of matrine combined with cisplatin on endocrine function and malignant biological behavior of cervical cancer SiHa cell line.Methods:Cervical cancer SiHa cell lines were cultured and divided into control group,cisplatin (CDDP) group, oxymatrine (OMT) group and combined group. Then cell viability and migration capability as well as malignant biological molecules and miRNAs contents were detected.Results: (1) Malignant biological behavior: cell viability and migration rate of CDDP group, OMT group and combined group were lower than those of control group; cell viability and migration rate of combined group were lower than those of CDDP group and OMT group; (2) Endocrine function: HIF-1α, GDF-15, P450arom, HDAC2, ANXA2, miR-21 and miR-155 contents of CDDP group , OMT group and combined group were lower than those of control group, and miR-143 and miR-424 contents were higher than those of control group; HIF-1α, GDF-15, P450arom, HDAC2, ANXA2, miR-21 and miR-155 contents of combined group were lower than those of CDDP group and OMT group, and miR-143 and miR-424 contents were higher than those of CDDP group and OMT group.Conclusions:Matrine combined with cisplatin treatment can inhibit cell proliferation and migration, reduce the expression of malignant biological molecules and regulate the contents of related miRNAs.

  6. Endocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meko, J B; Norton, J A

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare, yet can cause significant morbidity due to excessive secretion of hormones. Octreotide is effective in reducing the plasma concentrations of many of these hormones. The availability of potent H2-receptor antagonists and omeprazole has altered the emphasis in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome away from total gastrectomy and towards resection of the gastrinoma for potential cure. Fifty percent of insulinomas and gastrinomas are not evident on preoperative imaging studies, despite their sophistication. Calcium angiography, endoscopic ultrasonography, isotope-labeled octreotide scanning, and injection of methylene blue during secretin angiography are recent imaging modalities that have shown promise in the localization of these tumors. Intraoperative ultrasound has emerged as the best method for operative detection of insulinomas. Duodenotomy and intraoperative endoscopic transillumination are especially important in the surgical management of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome because 30% to 40% of gastrinomas are located in the duodenum. The management of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome continues to be controversial. Some advocate an aggressive surgical approach, whereas others have had little success in rendering patients eugastrinemic.

  7. Heavy Metals Acting as Endocrine Disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Georgescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Last years researches focused on several natural and synthetic compounds that may interfere with the major functionsof the endocrine system and were termed endocrine disrupters. Endocrine disrupters are defined as chemicalsubstances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and animals. These effects may be achievedby interferences with the biosynthesis or activity of several endogenous hormones. Recently, it was demonstratedthat heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd, arsen (As, mercury (Hg, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn may exhibitendocrine-disrupting activity in animal experiments. Emerging evidence of the intimate mechanisms of action ofthese heavy metals is accumulating. It was revealed, for example, that the Zn atom from the Zn fingers of theestrogen receptor can be replaced by several heavy metal molecules such as copper, cobalt, Ni and Cd. By replacingthe Zn atom with Ni or copper, binding of the estrogen receptor to the DNA hormone responsive elements in the cellnucleus is prevented. In both males and females, low-level exposure to Cd interferes with the biological effects ofsteroid hormones in reproductive organs. Arsen has the property to bind to the glucocorticoid receptor thusdisturbing glucocorticoids biological effects. With regard to Hg, this may induce alterations in male and femalefertility, may affect the function of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis,and disrupt biosynthesis of steroid hormones.

  8. Neuro-endocrine disruption in molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bech Sanderhoff, Lene; Waller, Stine P.

    The Mollusca phylum is the second largest animal phylum with around 85,000 registered mollusc species and increasing attention to effects of chemicals on the molluscan endocrine system have been given during the last years. This includes initiation of the development of OECD test guidelines (TG) ...

  9. Effects of soybean isoflavones, probiotics, and their interactions on lipid metabolism and endocrine system in an animal model of obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ali A; Velasquez, Manuel T; Hansen, Carl T; Mohamed, Ali I; Bhathena, Sam J

    2004-10-01

    The effects of soybean isoflavones with or without probiotics on tissue fat deposition, plasma cholesterol, and steroid and thyroid hormones were studied in SHR/N-cp rats, an animal model of obesity, and were compared to lean phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that probiotics by promoting the conversion of isoflavone glycosides to their metabolically active aglycone form will have a synergistic effect on body fat, cholesterol metabolism, and the endocrine system. Obese and lean SHR/N-cp rats were fed AIN-93 diets containing 0.1% soy isoflavone mixture, 0.1% probiotic mixture, or both together. Different fat tissues were teased and weighed. Plasma was analyzed for cholesterol and steroid and thyroid hormones. In both phenotypes, isoflavones lowered fat deposition in several fat depots. Probiotics alone had no significant effect on fat depots. Isoflavones lowered total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol in lean rats, but in obese rats isoflavones lowered only total and LDL cholesterol. Isoflavones also lowered many of the steroid hormones involved in lipid metabolism but had no significant effect on thyroid hormones. Probiotics had no significant effect on cholesterol or hormones. Thus, our data show that soy isoflavones also lower plasma cholesterol and that this hypocholesterolemic effect appears to be due in part to the modulation of steroid hormones. Probiotics do not seem to enhance the effect of isoflavones.

  10. Neurological Complications of Endocrine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Karen S; Grunwald, Tal; De Luca, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The endocrine system is a complex group of organs and glands that relates to multiple other organs and systems in the body with the ultimate goal of maintaining homeostasis. This complex network functions through hormones excreted by several glands and released in the blood, targeting different body tissues and modulating their function. Any primary disorders affecting the endocrine glands and altering the amount of hormones synthesized and released will lead to disruption in the functions of multiple organs. The central nervous system of a developing child is particularly sensitive to endocrine disorders. A variety of neurological manifestations have been described as features of several endocrine diseases in childhood. Their knowledge may contribute to an early diagnosis of a particular endocrine condition, especially when more typical features are not present yet. In this article, we discuss specific neurological manifestations found in various endocrine disorders in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Endocrine disruptors targeting ERbeta function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedenborg, E; Pongratz, I; Gustafsson, J-A

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs) circulating in the environment constitute a risk to ecosystems, wildlife and human health. Oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta are targeted by various kinds of EDCs but the molecular mechanisms and long-term consequences of exposure are largely unknown. Some biological effects of EDCs are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is a key player in the cellular defence against xenobiotic substances. Adding complexity to the picture, there is also accumulating evidence that AhR-ER pathways have an intricate interplay at multiple levels. In this review, we discuss some EDCs that affect the oestrogen pathway by targeting ERbeta. Furthermore, we describe some effects of AhR activities on the oestrogen system. Mechanisms as well as potential adverse effects on human health are discussed.

  12. Endocrine disrupting chemicals: harmful substances and how to test them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olea-Serrano Nicolás

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the opinions of different groups from: scientists, international regulatory bodies, non-governmental organizations and industry; with an interest in the problem of identifying chemical substances with endocrine disrupting activity. There is also discussion of the consequences that exposure to endocrine disruptors may have for human health, considering concrete issues related to: the estimation of risk; the tests that must be used to detect endocrine disruption; the difficulties to establish an association between dose, time of exposure, individual susceptibility, and effect; and the attempts to create a census of endocrine disruptors. Finally, it is proposed that not all hormonal mimics should be included under the single generic denomination of endocrine disruptors.

  13. Effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors use on endocrine therapy adherence and breast cancer mortality: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valachis, Antonis; Garmo, Hans; Weinman, John; Fredriksson, Irma; Ahlgren, Johan; Sund, Malin; Holmberg, Lars

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the concomitant use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) with tamoxifen influences the risk of death due to breast cancer, and we also investigated the association between SSRI use and adherence to oral endocrine therapy (ET). We analyzed data from BCBaSe Sweden, which is a database created by the data linkage of Registries from three different regions of Sweden. To investigate the association between ET adherence and SSRI use, we included all women who were diagnosed with non-distant metastatic ER-positive invasive breast cancer from July 2007 to July 2011 and had at least one dispensed prescription of oral tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor. To investigate the role of concurrent administration of SSRI and tamoxifen on breast cancer prognosis, we performed a nested case-control study. In the adherence cohort, 9104 women were included in the analyses. Women who received SSRI, either before or after breast cancer diagnosis, were at higher risk for low adherence to ET. However, when the overlapping period between SSRI use and ET was >50 %, no excess risk for low adherence was observed. Non-adherence (breast cancer survival (OR 4.07; 95 % CI 3.27-5.06). In the case-control study, 445 cases and 11125 controls were included. The concomitant administration of SSRI and tamoxifen did not influence breast cancer survival, neither in short-term (OR 1.41; 95 % CI 0.74-2.68) nor in long-term SSRI users (OR 0.85; 95 % CI 0.35-2.08). Concomitant SSRI and tamoxifen use does not seem to increase risk for death due to breast cancer. Given the positive association between continuing antidepressive pharmacotherapy for a longer period of time and adherence to ET, it is essential to capture and treat depression in breast cancer patients to secure adherence to ET.

  14. In vitro effects of selected brominated flame retardants on the adreno cortical enzyme (CYP17). A novel endocrine mechanism of action?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Canton, R.; Sanderson, T.; Nijmeijer, S.; Berg, M. van den [Utrecht Univ. (NL). Inst. for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS); Berkman, Aa. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    Fire incidents have decreased over the last 20 years partly due to regulations requiring addition of flame retardants (FRs) to materials. These compounds can be divided into different chemical classes: inorganic, nitrogen, phosphorus and halogen containing flame retardants (usually brominated or chlorinated). Not surprisingly, the use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in a variety of commercial and household products has increased over the years due to their low cost and high effectiveness. Consequence of the high production of BFRs is that these compounds are now readily detectable in air, water, birds, fish, marine mammals, and in human adipose tissue and blood. The five major BFRs are hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and three commercial mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (penta, octa, deca), which are extensively used as FRs at high production volume levels. In addition, concentrations of PBDEs concentration have been rapidly increasing during the last 10 years in human breast milk from European and American women and a number of endocrine (in vitro) effects have been reported. Consequently, the concern about BFRs and their metabolites with respect to their potential as endocrine disruptors (EDs) has been growing. Studies in our laboratory are focused on potential interactions of a wide range of BFRs with sex hormone synthesis and metabolism. Previous results from our research group, showed inhibitory and inductive effects on aromatase (CYP19) (the key enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens) by certain BFRs, in particular the hydroxylated PBDEs and several bromophenols. In the present study, the effects of ten of these BFRs on CYP17 activity were investigated. This enzyme also catalyzes an important step in the sex steroidogenesis and is responsible for the biosynthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). DHEA, produced in the adrenal gland, is the most abundant sex steroid hormone in human blood and has been

  15. Embryonic exposure to butachlor in zebrafish (Danio rerio): endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenqing; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping; Xu, Chao

    2013-03-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide widely employed in weeding important crops. Recently, the study of the possible toxic effects of butachlor in non-target organisms has increased substantially. However, the endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity effects of butachlor in fish have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of butachlor concentrations from 4 to 20 μM to evaluate the embryonic toxicity of butachlor until 84 hours postfertilization (hpf). The results demonstrated that butachlor was highly toxic to zebrafish embryos, hindering the hatching process, resulting in a series of malformations and followed by mortality. The malformations observed included pericardial edema (PE) and yolk sac edema (YSE), which showed concentration-dependent responses. The analysis of endocrine gene transcription indicated that butachlor significantly induced the expression of the estrogen-responsive gene Vtg1 but had no effect on the expression of the ERα gene. The innate immune system appeared to be another possible target of butachlor. At 72 hpf, butachlor significantly up-regulated the innate immune system-related genes, including IL-1β, CC-chem, CXCL-C1c and IL-8. These data suggest that butachlor causes developmental toxicity, endocrine disruption and immune toxicity in the zebrafish embryo. Bidirectional interactions between the endocrine system and the immune system might be present, and further studies are needed to determine these possible pathways.

  16. Comparison of Individual and Combined Effects of Four Endocrine Disruptors on Estrogen Receptor Beta Transcription in Cerebellar Cell Culture: The Modulatory Role of Estradiol and Triiodo-Thyronine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Jocsak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Humans and animals are continuously exposed to a number of environmental substances that act as endocrine disruptors (EDs. While a growing body of evidence is available to prove their adverse health effects, very little is known about the consequences of simultaneous exposure to a combination of such chemicals; Methods: Here, we used an in vitro model to demonstrate how exposure to bisphenol A, zearalenone, arsenic, and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, alone or in combination, affect estrogen receptor β (ERβ mRNA expression in primary cerebellar cell cultures. Additionally, we also show the modulatory role of intrinsic biological factors, such as estradiol (E2, triiodo-thyronine (T3, and glial cells, as potential effect modulators; Results: Results show a wide diversity in ED effects on ERβ mRNA expression, and that the magnitude of these ED effects highly depends on the presence or absence of E2, T3, and glial cells; Conclusion: The observed potency of the EDs to influence ERβ mRNA expression, and the modulatory role of E2, T3, and the glia suggests that environmental ED effects may be masked as long as the hormonal milieu is physiological, but may tend to turn additive or superadditive in case of hormone deficiency.

  17. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been

  18. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2011-11-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and components of plastics such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. EDCs are found in many everyday products--including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food additives, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. EDCs interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity, or elimination of natural hormones. This interference can block or mimic hormone action, causing a wide range of effects. This review focuses on the mechanisms and modes of action by which EDCs alter hormone signaling. It also includes brief overviews of select disease endpoints associated with endocrine disruption.

  19. Endocrine and Metabolic Aspects of OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Goswami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by repeated spells of apnea.Collapsibility of hypopharynx due to multiple factors involving pharyngeal dilatormuscles and deposition of fat or fluid in the surrounding soft tissues are importantcontributing factors in its pathogenesis. OSA commonly affects obese individuals.Males are more commonly affected than the females probably due to the disturbingeffect of testosterone on sleep.The impact of OSA on human health include disturbances in endocrine and metabolicsystem affecting hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, adrenocorticotrophic-cortisolaxis, growth hormone, antidiuretic hormones and insulin resistance. There is atendency for predisposition of the metabolic syndrome or its components includingglycemic dysregulation, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and physical parameters relatedto adiposity. On the other hand, several endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism,growth hormone excess, polycystic ovarian disease and testosterone replacement areassociated with increased prevalence of OSA.There is limited information on the effect of treatment of OSA by continuous positiveairway pressure (CPAP on the endocrine and metabolic disturbances. There is a needto conduct randomized controlled trials using CPAP therapy in patients with OSA andto study its cause and effect relationship with endocrine and metabolic disturbances.

  20. Endocrine disrupting compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, I B; Christensen, P; Dantzer, V

    2001-01-01

    With the growing concern that environmental chemicals might impair human and animal fertility, it is important to investigate the possible influence of these substances on sexual differentiation and genital development of mammals. Many of these substances are suspected to interfere with endocrine...... generations. Sows were treated daily from D 23 to 85 of pregnancy with either 0, 10 or 1000 micrograms OP/kg body weight. Treatment with OP extended pregnancy length and induced basal cell proliferation in the cervical epithelium of the parental generation. In F1 offspring of sows treated with the low dosage...

  1. Analysis of endocrine disruptor compounds in marine sediments by in cell clean up-pressurized liquid extraction-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2014-12-10

    A less time-, solvent- and sorbent-consuming analytical methodology for the determination of bisphenol A and alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol) in marine sediment was developed and validated. The method was based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) with a simultaneous in cell clean up combined with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative mode (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The SPLE extraction conditions were optimized by a Plackett-Burman design followed by a central composite design. Quantitation was performed by standard addition curves in order to correct matrix effects. The analytical features of the method were satisfactory: relative recoveries varied between 94 and 100% and repeatability and intermediate precision were <6% for all compounds. Uncertainty assessment of measurement was estimated on the basis of an in-house validation according to EURACHEM/CITAC guide. Quantitation limits of the method (MQL) ranged between 0.17 (4-n-nonylphenol) and 4.01 ng g(-1) dry weight (nonylphenol). Sensitivity, selectivity, automaticity and fastness are the main advantages of this green methodology. As an application, marine sediment samples from Galicia coast (NW of Spain) were analysed. Nonylphenol and 4-tert-octylphenol were measured in all samples at concentrations between 20.1 and 1409 ng g(-1) dry weight, respectively. Sediment toxicity was estimated and no risk to aquatic biota was found.

  2. The impact of endocrine disruptors on endocrine targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, E; Palioura, E; Kandarakis, S A; Koutsilieris, M

    2010-07-01

    Endocrine disruption represents one of the most controversial environmental issues of our époque. So far, many substances, both natural and artificial, have been recognized to interfere with endocrine signaling pathways. In intact laboratory animals, this interaction has been documented to generate adverse health outcomes by impairing normal functions. With regard to humans, evidence is limited and inconsistent to clearly establish a causal inference, however, accumulating data incriminate endocrine disrupting chemicals to reproductive disorders and disturbed thyroid homeostasis. Recently, as a result of animal models and preliminary human studies, a new area of interest has arisen concerning the implication of endocrine disruptors in the etiology of obesity and diabetes, the two major, life-threatening, epidemics of modern world. This article reviews the evidence linking endocrine disrupting chemicals to a broad spectrum of clinical perturbations from reproduction and thyroid to metabolic regulation.

  3. Endocrine effects of hCG supplementation to recombinant FSH throughout controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF: a dose–response study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Leif; Smitz, J; Loft, A;

    2013-01-01

    To analyse the endocrine response in relation to the Δ-4 and Δ-5 pathways of ovarian steroidogenesis after different doses of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) supplementation to recombinant FSH from Day 1 of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF.......To analyse the endocrine response in relation to the Δ-4 and Δ-5 pathways of ovarian steroidogenesis after different doses of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) supplementation to recombinant FSH from Day 1 of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF....

  4. Effects of Supplementing Brown Seaweed By-products in the Diet of Holstein Cows during Transition on Ruminal Fermentation, Growth Performance and Endocrine Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Hong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine the effects of supplementing brown seaweed by-products (BSB in the diet of ruminants on ruminal fermentation characteristics, growth performance, endocrine response, and milk production in Holstein cows. In Experiment 1, the effects of different levels (0%, 2%, and 4% of basal diet as Control, 2% BSB, 4% BSB, respectively of BSB were evaluated at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h in vitro batch culture rumen fermentation. The pH tended to be higher for the higher level of BSB supplementation, with the pH at 12 h being significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of the control. The concentration of ammonia nitrogen was lower at 3, 9, 12, and 24 h incubation (p<0.05 compared with the control, and tended to be low at other incubation times. Volatile fatty acid concentration appeared to be minimally changed while lower values were observed with 4% BSB treatment at 24 h (p<0.05. In Experiment 2, effects of levels (0%, 2%, and 4% of BSB on growth performance, endocrine responses and milk production were studied with Holstein dairy cows during transition. Dry matter intake, daily gain and feed efficiency were not affected by BSB supplementation. The concentration of plasma estrogen for the control, 2% BSB and 4% BSB after three months of pregnancy were 55.7, 94.1, and 72.3 pg/mL, respectively (p = 0.08. Although the differences of progesterone levels between BSB treatments and the control were minimal, the concentration in 4% BSB treatment increased to 157.7% compared with the initial level of the study. Triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels were also higher after both three months and eight months of pregnancy than the initial level at the beginning of the study. In addition, BSB treatments during one month after delivery did not affect daily milk yield and composition. In conclusion, the present results indicate that supplementation of BSB did not compromise ruminal fermentation, and animal performance at lower levels and hence may

  5. Upregulation of circulating IL-15 by treadmill running in healthy individuals: is IL-15 an endocrine mediator of the beneficial effects of endurance exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Keiichi; Kantani, Tomomi; Hayashi, Junichi; Ishida, Nobuhiko; Kaneki, Masao

    2011-01-01

    The beneficial effects of endurance exercise include insulin-sensitization and reduction of fat mass. Limited knowledge is available about the mechanisms by which endurance exercise exerts the salutary effects. Myokines, cytokines secreted by skeletal muscle, have been recognized as a potential mediator. Recently, a role of skeletal muscle-derived interleukin-15 (IL-15) in improvement of fat-lean body mass composition and insulin sensitivity has been proposed. Yet, previous studies have reported that endurance training does not increase production or secretion of IL-15 in skeletal muscle. Here, we show that in opposition to previous findings, 30-min treadmill running at 70% of age-predicted maximum heart rate resulted in a significant increase in circulating IL-15 level in untrained healthy young men. These findings suggest that IL-15 might play a role in the systemic anti-obesogenic and insulin-sensitizing effects of endurance exercise, not only as a paracrine and autocrine but also as an endocrine factor.

  6. Referral patterns for endocrine surgical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ixel; Boucai, Laura; Andreopoulou, Panagiota; Libutti, Steven K; Hughes, David T

    2014-06-01

    Referrals between physician specialties are common practice, and clear patterns develop. The increasing availability of high-volume endocrine surgery subspecialists with better outcomes may change these patterns. This study aimed to determine what factors influence endocrinologists' referral patterns for the surgical treatment of endocrine disease. A national, cross-sectional, voluntary survey of members of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists examined physician demographics, physician's opinions on referral to endocrine surgery, preferred surgeon specialty, knowledge about surgeon characteristics, and how these factors influenced which surgeons they referred patients, as well as what changes in these factors would alter their referral patterns. The survey response rate was 15% (73/500), and 97% were endocrinologists. On average, 0 to 5 patients/week were referred for surgery. Most respondents (91.8%) felt that endocrinologists should decide which surgeon to refer. General surgery was the preferred surgeon specialty (43.7%), and endocrine surgery was the preferred subspecialty (70.8%). The factors most often cited as very important in referral to a surgeon included surgeon outcome/complications (71%), familiarity with surgeon (65%), surgeon's communication with referring physician (61%), and surgeon volume (59%). The factors most often cited as likely to change physician referral patterns included patient satisfaction (62%), complication rates (57%), surgeon outcomes (54%), and surgeon volume (50%). The factors most often cited as unlikely to change referral patterns included new surgeon availability (70%) and hospital/surgeon advertising (58%). Referring physicians want experienced endocrine surgeons with high operative volumes and good outcomes whom they are familiar with. The promotion of referral to high-volume surgeons requires communication, good outcomes, and satisfied patients.

  7. Mitochondrial disease and endocrine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jasmine; Rahman, Joyeeta; Achermann, John C; Dattani, Mehul T; Rahman, Shamima

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are critical organelles for endocrine health; steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs in these organelles and they provide energy in the form of ATP for hormone production and trafficking. Mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders that feature defective oxidative phosphorylation, and are characterized by enormous clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mitochondrial diseases have been found to result from >250 monogenic defects encoded across two genomes: the nuclear genome and the ancient circular mitochondrial genome located within mitochondria themselves. Endocrine dysfunction is often observed in genetic mitochondrial diseases and reflects decreased intracellular production or extracellular secretion of hormones. Diabetes mellitus is the most frequently described endocrine disturbance in patients with inherited mitochondrial diseases, but other endocrine manifestations in these patients can include growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid disease. Although mitochondrial endocrine dysfunction frequently occurs in the context of multisystem disease, some mitochondrial disorders are characterized by isolated endocrine involvement. Furthermore, additional monogenic mitochondrial endocrine diseases are anticipated to be revealed by the application of genome-wide next-generation sequencing approaches in the future. Understanding the mitochondrial basis of endocrine disturbance is key to developing innovative therapies for patients with mitochondrial diseases.

  8. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma.

  9. [Endocrine disruptors and obesity: obesogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mayor, Ricardo V; Larrañaga Vidal, Alejandra; Docet Caamaño, Maria F; Lafuente Giménez, Anunciación

    2012-04-01

    Incidence and prevalence of owerweight and obesity have greatly increased over the past three decades in almost all countries around the world. This phenomenon is not easily explained by lifestyle changes in populations with very different initial habits. This has led to consider the influence of other factors, the so-called endocrine disruptors, and more specifically obesogens. This study reviewed the available evidence about polluting chemical substances which may potentially be obesogens in humans: DES, genistein, bisphenol A, organotins (TBT, TPT), and phthalates. The first three groups of substances mainly act upon estrogen receptors, while organotins and phthalates activate PPARγ. It was concluded that evidence exists of the obesogenic effect of these chemical substances in tissues and experimental animals, but few data are available in humans.

  10. Human skin: an independent peripheral endocrine organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The historical picture of the endocrine system as a set of discrete hormone-producing organs has been substituted by organs regarded as organized communities in which the cells emit, receive and coordinate molecular signals from established endocrine organs, other distant sources, their neighbors, and themselves. In this wide sense, the human skin and its tissues are targets as well as producers of hormones. Although the role of hormones in the development of human skin and its capacity to produce and release hormones are well established, little attention has been drawn to the ability of human skin to fulfil the requirements of a classic endocrine organ. Indeed, human skin cells produce insulin-like growth factors and -binding proteins, propiomelanocortin derivatives, catecholamines, steroid hormones and vitamin D from cholesterol, retinoids from diet carotenoids, and eicosanoids from fatty acids. Hormones exert their biological effects on the skin through interaction with high-affinity receptors, such as receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones and thyroid hormones. In addition, the human skin is able to metabolize hormones and to activate and inactivate them. These steps are overtaken in most cases by different skin cell populations in a coordinated way indicating the endocrine autonomy of the skin. Characteristic examples are the metabolic pathways of the corticotropin-releasing hormone/propiomelanocortin axis, steroidogenesis, vitamin D, and retinoids. Hormones exhibit a wide range of biological activities on the skin, with major effects caused by growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, neuropeptides, sex steroids, glucocorticoids, retinoids, vitamin D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands, and eicosanoids. At last, human skin produces hormones which are released in the circulation and are important for functions of the entire organism, such as sex hormones, especially in aged individuals, and insulin-like growth

  11. Endocrine disorders in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andrew M; Walker, Mark; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2013-10-15

    Endocrine dysfunction in mitochondrial disease is commonplace, but predominantly restricted to disease of the endocrine pancreas resulting in diabetes mellitus. Other endocrine manifestations occur, but are relatively rare by comparison. In mitochondrial disease, neuromuscular symptoms often dominate the clinical phenotype, but it is of paramount importance to appreciate the multi-system nature of the disease, of which endocrine dysfunction may be a part. The numerous phenotypes attributable to pathogenic mutations in both the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA creates a complex and heterogeneous catalogue of disease which can be difficult to navigate for novices and experts alike. In this article we provide an overview of the endocrine disorders associated with mitochondrial disease, the way in which the underlying mitochondrial disorder influences the clinical presentation, and how these factors influence subsequent management. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. [Dementia due to Endocrine Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Akiko; Yoneda, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine diseases affecting various organs, such as the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the adrenal glands and the pancreas, occasionally cause dementia. While Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and is untreatable, dementia caused by endocrine diseases is treatable in most cases. However, patients with dementia associated with endocrine diseases show memory impairments similar to those found in AD, often leading to misdiagnoses. Patients with endocrine diseases often present with other characteristic systemic and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by altered hormone levels. Such neuropsychiatric symptoms include involuntary movements, depression, seizures, and muscle weakness. In these cases, abnormalities in imaging and blood or urine tests are helpful in making a differential diagnosis. As delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients may cause irreversible brain damage, it is imperative for clinicians to carefully exclude the possibility of latent endocrine diseases when treating patients with dementia.

  13. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CONTAMINANTS AND ALLIGATOR EMBRYOS: A LESSON FROM WILDLIFE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many xenobiotic compounds introduced into the environment by human activity adversely affect wildlife. A number of these contaminants have been hypothesized to induce non lethal, multigenerational effects by acting as endocrine disrupting agents. One case is that of the alligator...

  14. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and public health protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoeller, R Thomas; Brown, T R; Doan, L L

    2012-01-01

    exposures to have potent and irreversible effects. Finally, with regard to the current program designed to detect putative EDC, namely, the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program, we offer recommendations for strengthening this program through the incorporation of basic endocrine principles to promote......An endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) is an exogenous chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that can interfere with any aspect of hormone action. The potential for deleterious effects of EDC must be considered relative to the regulation of hormone synthesis, secretion, and actions and the variability...... in regulation of these events across the life cycle. The developmental age at which EDC exposures occur is a critical consideration in understanding their effects. Because endocrine systems exhibit tissue-, cell-, and receptor-specific actions during the life cycle, EDC can produce complex, mosaic effects...

  15. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day eac...... as endocrine disruptors in vivo, although the profile of action in vivo varies. As ketoconazole is known to implicate numerous endocrine-disrupting effects in humans, the concern for the effects of the other tested azole fungicides in humans is growing.......The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each...

  16. Comparison of activation media and pyrolysis temperature for activated carbons development by pyrolysis of potato peels for effective adsorption of endocrine disruptor bisphenol-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzidou, Anastasia C; Deliyanni, Eleni A

    2016-03-15

    Activated carbon prepared from potato peels, a solid waste by product has been studied for the adsorption of an endocrine disruptor, Bisphenol-A, from aqueous solutions. The potato peels biomass was activated with H3PO4, KOH and ZnCl2 in order the effect of the activation agent to be evaluated. The activated biomass was carbonized at 400, 600 and/or 800 °C in order the effect of carbonization temperature on the texture, surface chemistry and adsorption properties to be found. The activated carbons prepared were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscope, thermal analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Equilibrium adsorption data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption followed second order rate kinetics. The adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found 454.62 mg g(-1) at an initial pH 3 at 25 °C for the phosphoric acid activated carbon carbonized at 400 °C that proved to be the best adsorbent.

  17. Endocrine disruptive effects of cadmium on steroidogenesis: human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line NCI-H295R as a cellular model for reproductive toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knazicka, Zuzana; Forgacs, Zsolt; Lukacova, Jana; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Massanyi, Peter; Lukac, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a known endocrine disruptor with the ability to affect the production of hormones involved in the regulation of reproductive processes. In this study human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line NCI-H295R was used as an in vitro biological model to study the effect of cadmium (CdCl2) on steroidogenesis. The cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of CdCl2 (1.90, 3.90, 7.80, 15.60, 31.20 and 62.50 μM) and compared to control (medium without CdCl2). Cell viability was measured by the metabolic activity (MTT) assay for estimation of mitochondria structural integrity. Quantification of sexual steroid production directly from aliquots of the medium was performed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Following 48 h culture of the cells in the presence of CdCl2 a concentration-dependent depletion in progesterone production was observed at the lower concentrations of CdCl2. The lowest amount of progesterone was significantly detected in groups with the higher doses (≥ 31.20 μM) of CdCl2, which elicited significant (P 75%) up to 7.80 μM of CdCl2 and significantly (P disruptive effects on sexual steroid synthesis even at very low concentrations.

  18. Evaluation of a screening system for obesogenic compounds: screening of endocrine disrupting compounds and evaluation of the PPAR dependency of the effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pereira-Fernandes

    Full Text Available Recently the environmental obesogen hypothesis has been formulated, proposing a role for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs in the development of obesity. To evaluate this hypothesis, a screening system for obesogenic compounds is urgently needed. In this study, we suggest a standardised protocol for obesogen screening based on the 3T3-L1 cell line, a well-characterised adipogenesis model, and direct fluorescent measurement using Nile red lipid staining technique. In a first phase, we characterised the assay using the acknowledged obesogens rosiglitazone and tributyltin. Based on the obtained dose-response curves for these model compounds, a lipid accumulation threshold value was calculated to ensure the biological relevance and reliability of statistically significant effects. This threshold based method was combined with the well described strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD method for classification of non-, weak- or strong obesogenic compounds. In the next step, a range of EDCs, used in personal and household care products (parabens, musks, phthalates and alkylphenol compounds, were tested to further evaluate the obesogenicity screening assay for its discriminative power and sensitivity. Additionally, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ dependency of the positive compounds was evaluated using PPARγ activation and antagonist experiments. Our results showed the adipogenic potential of all tested parabens, several musks and phthalate compounds and bisphenol A (BPA. PPARγ activation was associated with adipogenesis for parabens, phthalates and BPA, however not required for obesogenic effects induced by Tonalide, indicating the role of other obesogenic mechanisms for this compound.

  19. Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Endocrine Outcomes in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilian, Mehri; Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Talaee, Rezvan; Monavari, Mahshid; Asemi, Zatollah

    2016-04-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the effects of zinc supplementation on endocrine outcomes, biomarkers of inflammation, and oxidative stress in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study was a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty-eight women (18-40 years) with PCOS diagnosed according to Rotterdam criteria were randomly assigned to receive either 220 mg zinc sulfate (containing 50 mg zinc) (group 1; n = 24) and/or placebo (group 2; n = 24) for 8 weeks. Hormonal profiles, biomarkers of inflammation, and oxidative stress were measured at study baseline and after 8-week intervention. After 8 weeks of intervention, alopecia (41.7 vs. 12.5%, P = 0.02) decreased compared with the placebo. Additionally, patients who received zinc supplements had significantly decreased hirsutism (modified Ferriman-Gallwey scores) (-1.71 ± 0.99 vs. -0.29 ± 0.95, P zinc intake on reducing high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels (P = 0.06) was also observed. We did observe no significant changes of zinc supplementation on hormonal profiles, inflammatory cytokines, and other biomarkers of oxidative stress. In conclusion, using 50 mg/day elemental zinc for 8 weeks among PCOS women had beneficial effects on alopecia, hirsutism, and plasma MDA levels; however, it did not affect hormonal profiles, inflammatory cytokines, and other biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  20. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part I: Plants with carcinogenic, teratogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the use of herbal medicines and food products has been widely embraced in many developed countries. These products are generally highly accepted by consumers who often believe that "natural" equals "safe". This is, however, an oversimplification because several botanicals have been found to contain toxic compounds in concentrations harmful to human health. Acutely toxic plants are in most cases already recognised as dangerous as a result of their traditional use, but plants with subacute and chronic toxicity are difficult or even impossible to detect by traditional use or by clinical research studies. In this review, we systematically address major issues including the carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine-disrupting effects associated with the use of herbal preparations with a strong focus on plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe. The basic information regarding the molecular mechanisms of the individual subtypes of plant-induced non-acute toxicity is given, which is followed by a discussion of the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. We describe the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of alkenylbenzenes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and bracken fern ptaquiloside, the teratogenicity issues regarding anthraquinone glycosides and specific alkaloids, and discuss the human health concerns regarding the phytoestrogens and licorice consumption in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential effect of severe and moderate social stress on blood immune and endocrine measures and susceptibility to collagen type II arthritis in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Volker; Hemschemeier, Susanne K; Schunke, Kerstin; Hahnel, Anja; Wolff, Christine; Straub, Rainer H

    2013-03-01

    The effects of social stress on several blood immune measures and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated in Wistar rats using the resident-intruder confrontation paradigm to induce stress of different intensity. Male intruders were exposed for one week to a dominant opponent either repeatedly for 4h daily (moderate stress) or continuously (severe stress). Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of collagen type II (CII) into the tail skin at the end of day 3 of confrontation. Only severe stress was associated with decreased CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the increase in granulocyte numbers and body mass loss was more pronounced under these conditions. Only severe stress reduced the susceptibility to arthritis by about 50%. Severity scores did not differ in the first five days after disease onset between all groups. Subsequent experiments focused on severely stressed rats indicated that disease progressed until day 10 only in control animals, but not in severely stressed males. Stressor exposure resulted in increased blood monocyte numbers, but these males failed to accumulate macrophages into the skin at the site of CII injection. High numbers of attacks experienced by intruders correlated with delayed disease onset in severely stressed rats. We hypothesize that severe stress persisting after disease induction exhibits beneficial effects on the susceptibility of CIA and propose that the specific endocrine and immunological profile associated with severe stress is an important factor for disease outcome--a factor which probably explains many of the conflicting data of previous stress studies on CIA.

  2. Investigations of the Effects of Synthetic Chemicals on the Endocrine System of Common Carp in Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R.; Goodbred, Steven L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Leiker, Thomas A.; Orsak, Erik

    2006-01-01

    in Las Vegas Wash and Bay environments include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (including DDT and DDE), and 'emerging contaminants' such as fragrances/musks, flame retardants, triclosan and its breakdown products, personal care products, and pharmaceuticals (Bevans and others, 1996; Boyd and Furlong, 2002; Leiker and others, in press). Many of these compounds are able to interact with the endocrine system of animals and potentially cause reproductive impacts. The National Park Service (NPS) manages Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA) with about 8 million yearly visitors including 500,000 anglers drawn to its world-class recreational fishery. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) provides management for the federally designated, endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) and for more than 180 species of migratory birds that utilize LMNRA surface waters. These multiple uses of surface water in the area demonstrate their vital importance to the LMNRA as well as the need to maintain the quality of water at levels that are adequate for these uses.

  3. Development of partial life-cycle experiments to assess the effects of endocrine disruptors on the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis: a case-study with vinclozolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Virginie; Teixeira-Alves, Mickaël; Lopes, Christelle; Delignette-Muller, Marie-Laure; Charles, Sandrine; Lagadic, Laurent

    2010-10-01

    Long-term effects of endocrine disruptors (EDs) on aquatic invertebrates remain difficult to assess, mainly due to the lack of appropriate sensitive toxicity test methods and relevant data analysis procedures. This study aimed at identifying windows of sensitivity to EDs along the life-cycle of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a candidate species for the development of forthcoming test guidelines. Juveniles, sub-adults, young adults and adults were exposed for 21 days to the fungicide vinclozolin (VZ). Survival, growth, onset of reproduction, fertility and fecundity were monitored weekly. Data were analyzed using standard statistical analysis procedures and mixed-effect models. No deleterious effect on survival and growth occurred in snails exposed to VZ at environmentally relevant concentrations. A significant impairment of the male function occurred in young adults, leading to infertility at concentrations exceeding 0.025 μg/L. Furthermore, fecundity was impaired in adults exposed to concentrations exceeding 25 μg/L. Biological responses depended on VZ concentration, exposure duration and on their interaction, leading to complex response patterns. The use of a standard statistical approach to analyze those data led to underestimation of VZ effects on reproduction, whereas effects could reliably be analyzed by mixed-effect models. L. stagnalis may be among the most sensitive invertebrate species to VZ, a 21-day reproduction test allowing the detection of deleterious effects at environmentally relevant concentrations of the fungicide. These results thus reinforce the relevance of L. stagnalis as a good candidate species for the development of guidelines devoted to the risk assessment of EDs.

  4. Endocannabinoids and the Endocrine System in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, Cecilia J

    2015-01-01

    Some of the earliest reports of the effects of cannabis consumption on humans were related to endocrine system changes. In this review, the effects of cannabinoids and the role of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the regulation of the following endocrine systems are discussed: the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, prolactin and oxytocin, thyroid hormone and growth hormone, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Preclinical and human study results are presented.

  5. [Multiple endocrine neoplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Ludwig; Raue, Friedhelm

    2017-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and 2 are hereditary cancer syndromes. They are characterized by the occurrence of many benign and malignant tumor types, in MEN1 parathyroid tumors, pituitary tumors, and pancreas tumors, in MEN2 medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and parathyroid tumors. The autosomal dominant inherited tumor syndromes are caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene, a tumor suppressor gene, and mutations in the RET gene, an activated oncogene, in MEN2. The clinical expression of the different tumors can vary within and between families, with a good genotype-phenotype correlation in MEN2. Early diagnosis and therapy is possible by using biochemical and imaging screening in the families. Early thyroidectomy in young patients with MEN2 results in a high cure rate of MTC. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. 农药联苯菊酯对大鼠内分泌干扰作用的研究%Potential endocrine disrupting effects of bifenthrin in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭彦君; 王恒娟; 宋雁; 杨辉; 贾旭东; 李宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the potential endocrine disrupting effects of bifenthrin (BIF)by using uterotrophic assay and Hershberger assay. Methods In uterotrophic assay ,60 female SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups, 10 rats per group. Rats in bifenthrin-treated groups were given different doses of bifenthrin (1.47,4.41 and 13. 23mg/kg BW by gavage for 3 consecutive days). Rats in negative control groups were given com oil by gavage. Rats in ethinyl estradiol ( EE) oral positive control groups were given EE 1.0μg/kg BW by gavage. Rats in EE injected positive groups were given 0. 6μg/kg BW EE by subcutaneously injection while given corn oil by gavage. At necropsy, the wet and blotted uteri were weighed. The relative uteri weights were calculated,and the histology of uteri was observed. In Hershberger assay,60 castrated male SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups, with 10 rats in each group. Rats in BIF-treated groups were given different doses of BIF(1.4,4. 2 and 12.6mg/kg BW) by gavage. Flutamide(3. 0mg/kg BW)were given to animals in the positive control group by gavage. Rats in the negative control group and testosterone propionate group were given corn oil by gavage for 10 consecutive days. Rats in all groups except the negative control group were also treated with testosterone propionate(TP,0.2mg/kg BW)by subcutaneous injection. At necropsy, ventral prostate (VP), seminal vesicle plus fluids and coagulating glands ( SVCG) , levator ani-bulbocavernosus muscle ( LABC ), paired Cowper's glands (COW) and the glands penis ( GP ) , liver, kidneys, adrenals were weighed. Serum triiodothyronine(T3)and thyroxine(T4)were determined. Results In uterotrophic assay, compared with the negative control group, the mean relative wet weight and relative blotted weight of uterine were increased significantly in the female rats given by BIF at 13. 23mg/kg BW for 3 days( P < 0. 05 ) . BIF resulted in a significant increase of epithelial cell heights of uteri at 4.41 and 13

  7. Association between plasma metabolites and gene expression profiles in five porcine endocrine tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassols Anna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endocrine tissues play a fundamental role in maintaining homeostasis of plasma metabolites such as non-esterified fatty acids and glucose, the levels of which reflect the energy balance or the health status of animals. However, the relationship between the transcriptome of endocrine tissues and plasma metabolites has been poorly studied. Methods We determined the blood levels of 12 plasma metabolites in 27 pigs belonging to five breeds, each breed consisting of both females and males. The transcriptome of five endocrine tissues i.e. hypothalamus, adenohypophysis, thyroid gland, gonads and backfat tissues from 16 out of the 27 pigs was also determined. Sex and breed effects on the 12 plasma metabolites were investigated and associations between genes expressed in the five endocrine tissues and the 12 plasma metabolites measured were analyzed. A probeset was defined as a quantitative trait transcript (QTT when its association with a particular metabolic trait achieved a nominal P value Results A larger than expected number of QTT was found for non-esterified fatty acids and alanine aminotransferase in at least two tissues. The associations were highly tissue-specific. The QTT within the tissues were divided into co-expression network modules enriched for genes in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes or gene ontology categories that are related to the physiological functions of the corresponding tissues. We also explored a multi-tissue co-expression network using QTT for non-esterified fatty acids from the five tissues and found that a module, enriched in hypothalamus QTT, was positioned at the centre of the entire multi-tissue network. Conclusions These results emphasize the relationships between endocrine tissues and plasma metabolites in terms of gene expression. Highly tissue-specific association patterns suggest that candidate genes or gene pathways should be investigated in the context of specific tissues.

  8. Removal of an endocrine disrupting chemical (17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol) from wastewater effluent by activated carbon adsorption: Effects of activated carbon type and competitive adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ifelebuegu, A.O.; Lester, J.N.; Churchley, J.; Cartmell, E. [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). School of Water Science

    2006-12-15

    Granular activated carbon has been extensively used for the adsorption of organic micropollutants for potable water production. In this study the removal of an endocrine disrupting chemical from wastewater final effluent by three types of granular activated carbon (wood, coconut and coal based) has been investigated in batch adsorption experiments and correlated with the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and ultraviolet absorbance (UV). The results obtained demonstrated 17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol (EE2) removals of 98.6%, 99.3%, and 96.4% were achieved by the coal based (ACo), coconut based (ACn) and wood based (AWd) carbons respectively at the lowest dose of carbon (0.1 gl{sup -1}). The other adsorbates investigated all exhibited good removal. At an equilibrium concentration of 7 mgl{sup -1} the COD adsorption capacities were 3.16 mg g{sup -1}, 4.8 mg g{sup -1} and 7.1 mg g{sup -1} for the wood, coconut and coal based carbons respectively. Overall, the order of removal efficiency of EE2 and the other adsorbates for the three activated carbons was ACn {gt} ACo {gt} AWd. The adsorption capacities of the carbons were found to be reduced by the effects of other competing adsorbates in the wastewater effluent.

  9. Effects of Metformin Combined with Cyproterone Acetate on Clinical Features, Endocrine and Metabolism of Non-obese Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to explore the effects of metformin combined with cyproterone acetate (CPA) on the clinical features, endocrine and metabolism of the patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), 50 cases of non-obese PCOS were randomly subjected to CPA (CPA treatment group, n=25) and CPA+metformin (n= 25) treatment for 6 months. Before and after treatment the body mass index (BMI), waist: hip ratio (WHR), ovarian volume, serum gonadotrophin, androgen and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels, and fasting lipid, glucose and insulin levels were measured. The results showed that all of the parameters in two groups were similar before treatment. After treatment for 6 months in the CPA+ metformin group, BMI and WHR were significantly decreased, while insulin sensitivity was significantly decreased as compared with those before treatment. In CPA group, no significant changes were found before and after treatment. Combined use of CPA and metformin could result in the reduction of serum androstenedione and increases of serum SHBG levels as compared with the CPA treatment alone. It was concluded that combined use of CPA and metformin could improve the insulin sensitivity, and further suppress the hyperandrogenism in non-obese women with PCOS.

  10. Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals: Review of Toxicological Mechanisms Using Molecular Pathway Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Oneyeol; Kim, Hye Lim; Weon, Jong-Il; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to cause harmful effects to human through various exposure routes. These chemicals mainly appear to interfere with the endocrine or hormone systems. As importantly, numerous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of endocrine disruptors can induce fatal disorders including obesity and cancer. Using diverse biological tools, the potential molecular mechanisms related with these diseases by exposure of endocrine disruptors. Recently, pathway analysis, a bioinformatics tool, is being widely used to predict the potential mechanism or biological network of certain chemicals. In this review, we initially summarize the major molecular mechanisms involved in the induction of the above mentioned diseases by endocrine disruptors. Additionally, we provide the potential markers and signaling mechanisms discovered via pathway analysis under exposure to representative endocrine disruptors, bisphenol, diethylhexylphthalate, and nonylphenol. The review emphasizes the importance of pathway analysis using bioinformatics to finding the specific mechanisms of toxic chemicals, including endocrine disruptors. PMID:25853100

  11. 整体护理应用于内分泌失调型肥胖患者中的效果研究%Research on Application of General Nursing Effects to Endocrine Disorder in Patients With Obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴明玉; 朱虹

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究整体护理应用于内分泌失调型肥胖患者中的效果。方法选取我院2014年6月~2015年6月收治的内分泌失调型肥胖患者62例,分为两组,对照组行常规护理,研究组实施整体护理,分析两组护理效果。结果护理后,研究组护理总有效率、满意度优于对照组,比较有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论在内分泌失调型肥胖患者中实施整体护理的效果较为确切。%Objective To study the overall care applied to the effects of endocrine disorders obesity patients. Methods To select our June 2014 to June 2015 treated 62 patients with endocrine disorders obesity, divided into two groups, control group routine nursing care, the team to implement the overall care, nursing effect analysis of two groups. Results After nursing, group total effective rate, degree of satisfaction was better than control group, with statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion The implementation of overall nursing in patients with endocrine disorders obesity effect more exact.

  12. Exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Male Reproductive Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueiwang Anna Jeng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs can interfere with normal hormonal balance and may exert adverse consequences on humans. The male reproductive system may be susceptible to the effects of such environmental toxicants. This review discusses the recent progress in scientific data mainly from epidemiology studies on the associations between EDCs and male reproductive health and our understanding of possible mechanisms associated with the effects of EDCs on male reproductive health. Finally, the review provides recommendations on future research to enhance our understanding of EDCs and male reproductive health. The review highlights the need for 1 well-defined longitudinal epidemiology studies, with appropriately designed exposure assessment to determine potential causal relationships; 2 chemical and biochemical approaches aimed at a better understanding of the mechanism of action of xenoestrogens with regard to low-dose effects, and assessment of identify genetic susceptibility factors associated with the risk of adverse effects following exposure to EDCs.

  13. Endocrine Surgery: A Hopkins Legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udelsman, Robert

    2017-09-06

    : The field of Endocrine Surgery is linked to extraordinary contributions made by Hopkins leaders in surgery including William Stewart Halsted, Harvey Cushing, and John L Cameron. Halsted's contributions to the anatomic basis of thyroid and parathyroid surgery were based on his experimental and clinical work performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Halsted's disciple, Harvey Cushing, created the field of modern neurosurgery and recognized the disease and syndrome that are immortalized with his name. The Halstedian principles promulgated and transmitted by John L Cameron to subsequent generations of endocrine surgeons at Hopkins have transformed the field of Endocrine Surgery with the stamp of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  14. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on estrogen receptor alpha and heat shock protein 60 gene expression in primary cultures of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocci, Paolo; Capriotti, Martina; Mosconi, Gilberto; Palermo, Francesco Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) can be considered a good indicator species for studying the ecological impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on wildlife. However, the effect of these environmental pollutants on nuclear steroid hormone signaling has not yet been addressed in sea turtles mainly due to the legal constraints of their endangered status. Here we describe the use of primary erythrocyte cell cultures as in vitro models for evaluating the effects of different EDCs on the expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα). In addition, we evaluated erythrocyte toxicity caused by EDCs using Alamar Blue assay and heat shock proteins 60 (HSP60) expression. Primary cultures of erythrocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations of 4-nonylphenol (4NP), Diisodecyl phthalate (DiDP), Tri-m-cresyl phosphate (TMCP) and Tributyltin (TBT) for 48h. Alamar Blue demonstrated that exposure of erythrocytes to each contaminant for up to 48h led to a significant impairment of cellular metabolic activity at 100μM, with the exception of TBT. Moreover, our data indicate that loggerhead erythrocytes constitutively express ERα and HSP60 at the transcript level and respond to EDCs by up-regulating their expression. In this regard, ERα was up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner after 48h exposure to both 4NP and TMCP. Interestingly, the dosage-dependent effects of DiDP on ERα expression were opposite in comparison to that obtained following exposure to the other tested compounds. This work provides the first indication regarding the potential of primary erythrocytes as study models for evaluating the effects of EDCs on sea turtles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endocrine disrupters. The case of estrogen xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Olea Serrano

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest of the scientific community in chemical substances able to alter the hormone balance –endocrine disrupters- has grown with increasing evidence of the consequences for animal populations of exposure to these substances. As has occurred on previous occasions, observational data on animal populations have been sufficiently suggestive to cause concerns among clinicians that similar effects may be produced in human populations. Although data on the effects on populations of animals are more easily generated than those on individuals, clinical observations on human individuals alongside the few existing epidemiological studies have shown a certain parallelism. Indeed, in vitro and in vivo models have been able to designate many chemical compounds as hormonal mimics, including both natural and human-produced compounds to which there are exposure risks. The present work reviews the conceptual premises of endocrine disruption and the development of the use of this term.

  16. Simultaneous determination of endocrine disrupting compounds bisphenol F and bisphenol AF using carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jichun; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Danfeng; Wang, Lingling; Li, Qi; Zhang, Lei

    2014-12-01

    A novel, simple and selective electrochemical method was developed for simultaneous determination of bisphenol F (BPF) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) in aqueous media (phosphate buffer solution, pH 6.0) on carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNT-COOH/GCE) using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In DPV, MWCNT-COOH/GCE could separate the oxidation peak potentials of BPF and BPAF present in the same solution though, at the bare GCE, the peak potentials were indistinguishable. The results showed that the electrochemical sensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of the two analytes. The peak current in DPV of BPF and BPAF increased linearly with their concentration in the ranges of 0.6-1.6 mmol/L BPF and 0.6-1.6 mmol/L BPAF. The detection limits were 0.1243 mmol/L and 0.1742 mmol/L (S/N=3) correspondingly. The modified electrode was successfully used to simultaneously determine BPF and BPAF in real samples.

  17. Effect of treatment with depot somatostatin analogue octreotide on primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Tavares, Lidice Brandao; Tauchmanova, Libuse; Milone, Francesco; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Ramundo, Valeria; De Caro, Maria Laura Del Basso; Lombardi, Gaetano; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2008-11-01

    In patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), expression of somatostatin receptor (SST) in parathyroid adenomas and effectiveness of therapy with somatostatin analogues on primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) have been scarcely investigated. To evaluate the effects of depot long acting octreotide (OCT-LAR) in patients with MEN1-related PHP. Eight patients with a genetically confirmed MEN1, presenting both PHP and duodeno-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NET), were enrolled. The initial treatment was OCT-LAR 30 mg every 4 weeks. This therapy was established to stabilize the duodeno-pancreatic NET before to perform parathyroidectomy for PHP. Before OCT-LAR therapy, a SST scintigraphy was performed in all patients. SST subtype 2A immunohistochemistry was performed on parathyroid tumour samples from three patients undergone parathyroidectomy after OCT-LAR therapy. Serum concentrations of PTH, calcium and phosphorus as well as the 24-h urine calcium : creatinine ratio and the renal threshold phosphate concentration were evaluated before and after OCT-LAR. After OCT-LAR therapy, hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria normalized in 75% and 62.5% of patients, respectively, and serum phosphorus and renal threshold phosphate significantly increased. Serum PTH concentrations significantly decreased in all patients and normalized in two of them. SST subtype 2A immunostaining was found in all parathyroid adenomas investigated, while SST scintigraphy showed a positive parathyroid tumour uptake in three of eight patients (37.5%). Six months of OCT-LAR therapy controlled hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria in two-thirds of patients with MEN1-related PHP. Direct OCT-LAR effects mediated by binding to SST expression on parathyroid tumour cells are likely the main mechanism to explain the activity of this compound on calcium and phosphorus abnormalities in MEN1 PHP.

  18. Comparative effectiveness of everolimus-based therapy versus endocrine monotherapy among postmenopausal women with HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer: a retrospective chart review in community oncology practices in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jipan; Hao, Yanni; Li, Nanxin; Lin, Peggy L; Ohashi, Erika; Koo, Valerie; Signorovitch, James E; Wu, Eric Q; Yardley, Denise A

    2015-06-01

    Everolimus-based therapy and endocrine monotherapy are used among postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HR+/HER2-) metastatic breast cancer (mBC) whose disease progressed or recurred on a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI). However, limited evidence exists regarding the real-world comparative effectiveness of these agents. This retrospective chart review examined postmenopausal HR+/HER2- mBC patients in community-based oncology practices who received everolimus-based therapy or endocrine monotherapy (index therapy) as any line of therapy for mBC between 1 July 2012 and 15 April 2013 after NSAI failure. Time on treatment (TOT), progression-free survival (PFS), and time to chemotherapy (TTC) from index therapy initiation were compared using Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for baseline characteristics. A total of 243 and 270 patients received everolimus-based therapy or endocrine monotherapy in a quota-based sample. Patients treated with everolimus-based therapy had a higher proportion of visceral metastases, high tumor burden, and use of prior chemotherapies for mBC. After adjusting for baseline characteristics, everolimus-based therapy was associated with significantly longer TOT (HR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.51-0.87) and PFS (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.57-0.98) than endocrine monotherapy. No significant difference was found between everolimus-based therapy and endocrine monotherapy in TTC (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.52-1.27). Results stratified by line of therapy were generally consistent with the overall results. Limitations include recall and information bias with potentially absent or erroneous chart data, unobserved factors due to non-randomization, inability to measure outcome assessments paired with measuring outcomes prior to exposures, and potential patient selection bias associated with chart review. Among a nationwide sample of postmenopausal HR+/HER2- m

  19. Works Council Effectiveness: Determinants and Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapulete, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aimed to gain more insights into works council effectiveness in two ways: 1. studying the influence of works council presence on organizational outcomes; and, 2. studying the determinants of works council effectiveness. We found that productivity increases with the presence of a works co

  20. The effect of perinatal exposure to ethinyl oestradiol or a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides on kisspeptin neurons in the rat hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Agnete; Holst, Klaus; Mandrup, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Early life exposure to endocrine disruptors is considered to disturb normal development of hormone sensitive parameters and contribute to advanced puberty and reduced fecundity in humans. Kisspeptin is a positive regulator of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, and plays a key role...... exposure to a pesticide mixture in this experimental setting. However, we find that the pesticide mancozeb tends to increase Kiss1 expression in the ARC, presumably through neurotoxic mechanisms rather than via classical endocrine disruption, calling for increased awareness that Kiss1 expression can...

  1. Introduction to the Endocrine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissues, or cells. Some of the factors that affect endocrine organs include aging, certain diseases and conditions, stress, the environment, and ... Partners The Hormone Health Network partners with other organizations to further patient ...

  2. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment as needed. References [1] White ML, Doherty GM. Multiple endocrine neoplasia. Surgical Oncology Clinics of North ... for questions about any medications, contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration toll-free at 1-888- ...

  3. Biomarker Genes for Detecting Estrogenic Activity of Endocrine Disruptors via Estrogen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Yang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors (EDs are compounds used in various industrial products, drugs, and cosmetics. They can be found in the environment and disturb the endocrine and reproductive systems, resulting in adverse effects to humans and wildlife such as birth defects and developmental disorders. Since several EDs have a structure similar to that of endogenous steroid hormones such as estrogens, they intend to have an affinity for steroid hormone receptors and alter hormone-mediated metabolism by binding to these receptors. EDs are therefore a global concern and assays should be developed to efficiently determine whether these compounds are detrimental to biological systems. Diverse experimental methods may help determine the endocrine disrupting potential of EDs and evaluate the adverse effects of a single and/or combination of these reagents. Currently, biomarkers have been employed to objectively measure EDs potency and understand the underlying mechanisms. Further studies are required to develop ideal screening methods and biomarkers to determine EDs potency at environmentally relevant concentrations. In this review, we describe the biomarkers for estrogenicity of EDs identified both in vitro and in vivo, and introduce a biomarker, cabindin-D9k (CaBP-9k, that may be used to assess estrogenic activity of EDs.

  4. Biomarker genes for detecting estrogenic activity of endocrine disruptors via estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eui-Man; An, Beum-Soo; Yang, Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2012-03-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are compounds used in various industrial products, drugs, and cosmetics. They can be found in the environment and disturb the endocrine and reproductive systems, resulting in adverse effects to humans and wildlife such as birth defects and developmental disorders. Since several EDs have a structure similar to that of endogenous steroid hormones such as estrogens, they intend to have an affinity for steroid hormone receptors and alter hormone-mediated metabolism by binding to these receptors. EDs are therefore a global concern and assays should be developed to efficiently determine whether these compounds are detrimental to biological systems. Diverse experimental methods may help determine the endocrine disrupting potential of EDs and evaluate the adverse effects of a single and/or combination of these reagents. Currently, biomarkers have been employed to objectively measure EDs potency and understand the underlying mechanisms. Further studies are required to develop ideal screening methods and biomarkers to determine EDs potency at environmentally relevant concentrations. In this review, we describe the biomarkers for estrogenicity of EDs identified both in vitro and in vivo, and introduce a biomarker, cabindin-D(9k) (CaBP-9k), that may be used to assess estrogenic activity of EDs.

  5. 环境内分泌干扰物对胚胎发育调控基因DNA甲基化的影响%Effect of environmental endocrine disruptors on DNA methylation of embryonic developmental regulating gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵岩

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important genetic modification and an important part of epigenetics. Many studies have confirmed that environmental endocrine disruptors can affect the level of DNA methylation. The effect of environmental disruptors on DNA methylation has become the research focus of embryonic development. In order to provide reference for future mechanism study, we reviewed the effect of environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) on DNA methylation of embryonic developmental regulating gene.%DNA甲基化(DNA methylation)是一种重要的遗传修饰,是表观遗传学研究的重要内容.许多研究证实环境内分泌干扰物能够影响DNA甲基化的水平,有关环境内分泌干扰物对DNA甲基化的影响已经成为当前胚胎发育学的研究热点.本文就环境内分泌干扰物(environmental endocrine disruptor,EED)对胚胎发育调控基因DNA甲基化的影响进行综述,为今后的机制性研究提供参考.

  6. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disord...

  7. Wilson's disease: An endocrine revelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Nitin; Shetty, Sahana; Thomas, Nihal; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism. The affected patients, who otherwise have a near normal life span, may often suffer from some potentially treatable and under recognized endocrine disorders that may hinder their quality of life. We explored previously published literature on the various endocrine aspects of this disease with their probable underlying mechanisms, highlighting the universal need of research in this area. PMID:25364683

  8. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases

    OpenAIRE

    LENCU, CODRU?A; ALEXESCU, TEODORA; PETRULEA, MIRELA; LENCU, MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary ? cortical, and involuntary ? metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthy...

  9. Determination of bisphenol-type endocrine disrupting compounds in food-contact recycled-paper materials by focused ultrasonic solid-liquid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, David; Fernández-Recio, Miguel Ángel; Moreta, Cristina; Tena, María Teresa

    2012-09-15

    Focused ultrasonic solid-liquid extraction (FUSLE) and reverse-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to a quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometer (Q-TOF-MS) was applied to the determination of bisphenol-type endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in food-contact recycled-paper materials. Recycled paper is a potential source of EDCs. Bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF) and their derivatives bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) and bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE) are used for the production of epoxy resins employed in the formulation of printing inks. The FUSLE of bisphenol-type EDCs from packaging is reported for the first time. First, different extraction solvents were studied and methanol was selected. Then, the main FUSLE factors affecting the extraction efficiency (solvent volume, extraction time and ultrasonic irradiation power) were studied by means of a central composite design. The FUSLE conditions selected for further experiments were 20 ml of methanol at ultrasonic amplitude of 100% for 5s. Finally, the number of extraction cycles necessary for complete extraction was established in two. The analysis of the FUSLE extracts was carried out by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS with electrospray ionization and the determination of the four analytes took place in only 4 min. The FUSLE and UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS method was validated and applied to the analysis of different food-contact recycled-paper-based materials and packaging. The proposed method provided recoveries from 72% to 97%, repeatability and intermediate precision under 9% and 14%, respectively, and detection limits of 0.33, 0.16, 0.65 and 0.40 μg/g for BPA, BPF, BADGE and BFDGE, respectively. The analysis of paper and cardboard samples confirmed the presence of EDCs in these packaging.

  10. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debra Ouyang; Deepti Dhall; Run Yu

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults,which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery.α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia.Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge.Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels,and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  11. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Debra; Dhall, Deepti; Yu, Run

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults, which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery. α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia. Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge. Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:21245985

  12. Transcriptomic-based effects monitoring for endocrine active chemicals: Assessing relative contribution of treated wastewater to downstream pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated whether combining of targeted analytical chemistry methods with unsupervised, data-rich methodologies (i.e. transcriptomics) can be utilized to evaluate relative contributions of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to biological effects. The...

  13. Overview of the endocrine response to critical illness: how to measure it and when to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan-Smith, Zaki; Cooper, Mark S

    2011-10-01

    The assessment and manipulation of the endocrine system in patients with critical illness is one of the most complex and controversial areas in endocrinology. Severe acute illness causes dramatic changes in most endocrine systems. This can lead to considerable difficulty in recognising pre-existing endocrine disorders in severely ill patients. Critical care itself might also induce types of endocrine dysfunction not seen outside the critical care unit. It is important to clarify whether or not such endocrine dysfunction occurs. Where it does occur it is also important to determine whether endocrine intervention is useful in improving outcome. There is also the issue of whether endocrine manipulation in critically ill patients without endocrine dysfunction could benefit from endocrine intervention, e.g. to improve haemodynamics or reverse a catabolic state. This review will discuss some of these contentious issues. It will highlight how endocrine assessment of a patient with critical illness differs from that in other types of patient. It will emphasise the added need to place the biochemical assessment and its interpretation in the context of the patients underlying condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estrogenic endocrine disruptors: Molecular mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyama, Ryoiti; Wada-Kiyama, Yuko

    2015-10-01

    A comprehensive summary of more than 450 estrogenic chemicals including estrogenic endocrine disruptors is provided here to understand the complex and profound impact of estrogen action. First, estrogenic chemicals are categorized by structure as well as their applications, usage and effects. Second, estrogenic signaling is examined by the molecular mechanism based on the receptors, signaling pathways, crosstalk/bypassing and autocrine/paracrine/homeostatic networks involved in the signaling. Third, evaluation of estrogen action is discussed by focusing on the technologies and protocols of the assays for assessing estrogenicity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of estrogen action is important to assess the action of endocrine disruptors and will be used for risk management based on pathway-based toxicity testing.

  15. Gene therapy in endocrine tumors: a comprehensive overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Padmanaban S; Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2014-01-01

    Effective treatment strategies that help tackle the complex problems associated with managing endocrine cancers are in great demand. Because of the shortcomings in current treatments and the problems associated with the treatment strategies used in the cure and/or management of endocrine cancers, considerable effort must be devoted to developing new and effective therapeutic strategies. Gene therapy represents an area of both basic and clinical research that can potentially be considered a therapeutic option in treating endocrine cancers. Therefore, we consider it timely to summarize the studies related to gene-therapy interventions that are available for treating endocrine cancers and to highlight the major limitations of and the recent progress made in these therapies. After systematically reviewing the literature, we provide a comprehensive overview of distinct studies conducted to evaluate gene-therapy approaches in various endocrine cancers. Some of these successful studies have been extended toward translational investigations. The emerging view is that an integrative approach is required to combat the pitfalls associated with gene-therapy studies, especially in endocrine cancers.

  16. Effects of acute hypoxia on renal and endocrine function at rest and during graded exercise in hydrated subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Kanstrup, I L; Richalet, J P

    1992-01-01

    Renal effects of altitude hypoxia are unclear. Renal and hormonal function was investigated in eight males at rest and during graded exercise at sea level (SL) and 48 h after rapid ascent to 4,350 m (HA). HA did not change resting values of effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), glomerular filtration......-intensity hypoxic exercise may be secondary to increased adrenosympathetic activity. However, antidiuretic and antinatriuretic effects of exercise were maintained in hypoxia and in both environments seemed to be the consequence of decreased proximal tubular outflow. The results demonstrate that renal glomerular...... rate (GFR), sodium clearance (CNa), urine flow, or lithium clearance (CLi), which was used as an index of proximal tubular outflow. At rest, HA increased plasma norepinephrine concentration and decreased plasma concentrations of renin and aldosterone. Exercise decreased ERPF similarly in both...

  17. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis of Test Endpoints for Detecting the Effects of Endocrine Active Substances in Fish Full Life Cycle Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish full life cycle (FFLC) tests are increasingly required in the ecotoxicological assessment of endocrine active substances. However, FFLC tests have not been internationally standardized or validated, and it is currently unclear how such tests should best be designed to provid...

  18. A review on endocrine disruptors and their possible impacts on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Eva Rahman; Rahman, Monica Sharfin; Rahman, Imon

    2015-07-01

    Endocrine disruption is a named field of research which has been very active for over 10 years, although the effects of endocrine disruptors in wildlife have been studied mainly in vast since the 1940s. A large number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors and humans can be exposed to them either due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil and air). Endocrine disrupting chemicals are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both humans and wildlife. In order to understand the vulnerability and risk factors of people due to endocrine disruptors as well as the remedies for these, methods need to be developed in order to predict effects on populations and communities from the knowledge of effects on individuals. For several years there have been a growing interest on the mechanism and effect of endocrine disruptors and their relation with environment and human health effect. This paper, based on extensive literature survey, briefly studies the progress mainly in human to provide information concerning causative substances, mechanism of action, ubiquity of effects and important issues related to endocrine disruptors. It also reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptors on human health so that the effects can be known and remedies applied for the problem as soon as possible.

  19. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L.; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E.; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. Participants in Development of Scientific Statement: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. Evidence: The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. Consensus Process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the

  20. Health disparities in endocrine disorders: biological, clinical, and nonclinical factors--an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A; Chin, Marshall H; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E; Anton, Blair

    2012-09-01

    The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENTIFIC STATEMENT: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. consensus process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the Advocacy and Public

  1. Development of methods to detect occurrence and effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals: A fundamental shift in regulatory ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an editorial in ET&C describing the newer pathway-specific test methods for EDCs and their effect on ecotoxicology. Work conducted to support the development and application of these types of assays promises to be an important catalyst to advance the field of ecotoxicolo...

  2. Early effects of liver regeneration on endocrine pancreas: in vivo change in islet morphology and in vitro assessment of systemic effects on β-cell function and viability in the rat model of two-thirds hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, F; Seyfritz, E; Toti, F; Sigrist, S; Bietigier, W; Pinget, M; Kessler, L

    2014-12-01

    Liver and pancreas share key roles in glucose homeostasis. Liver regeneration is associated with systemic modifications and depends especially on pancreatic hormones. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of systemic factors released after two-thirds hepatectomy (2/3H) on early possible consequences of liver regeneration on endocrine pancreas structure and function. The pancreas and serum were harvested 1, 2, or 3 days after 2/3H or sham operation in Lewis rats. The HGF and VEGF serum concentrations and plasma microparticles levels were measured. The fate of endocrine pancreas was examined through islets histomorphometry and function in sham and 2/3H rats. β-Cell line RIN-m5F viability was assessed after 24 h of growth in media supplemented with 10% serum from 2/3H or sham rats instead of FCS. Three days after surgery, the pancreas was heavier in 2/3H compared to sham rats (0.56 vs. 0.40% of body weight, p viability of RIN-m5F cells (99 vs. 67%, p concentration and a significant increase in microparticles levels, were observed in 2/3H vs. sham rats (9.8 vs. 6.5 nM Phtd Ser Eq., p influence β-cell viability and function by systemic effect.

  3. Organizational and activational effects of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals Efeitos de organização e ativação dos desreguladores estrogênicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen K. Silbergeld

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruption is a hypothesis of common mode of action that may define a set of structurally varied chemicals, both natural and synthetic. Their common mode of action may suggest that they produce or contribute to similar toxic effects, although this has been difficult to demonstrate. Insights from developmental biology suggest that development of hormone sensitive systems, such as the brain and the genitourinary tract, may be particularly sensitive to EDCs. Because these systems are both organized and later activated by hormones, the brain and vagina may be valuable model systems to study the toxicity of EDCs in females and to elucidate mechanisms whereby early exposures appear to affect long term function.A desregulação endócrina é uma hipótese de um modo de ação comum capaz de definir um conjunto de substâncias químicas estruturalmente variadas, tanto naturais quanto sintéticas. O modo de ação comum pode sugerir que produzam ou contribuam para efeitos tóxicos semelhantes, embora tal hipótese tenha sido difícil de demonstrar. Evidências provenientes da biologia do desenvolvimento sugerem que o desenvolvimento de sistemas sensíveis aos hormônios, tais como o cérebro e o trato genito-urinário, podem ser particularmente sensíveis aos desreguladores endócrinos. Uma vez que tais sistemas são organizados, e depois ativados, por hormônios, o cérebro e a vagina podem representar modelos importantes para estudar a toxicidade dos desreguladores endócrinos e para elucidar os mecanismos pelos quais parecem afetar a função a longo prazo.

  4. The unsolved case of “bone-impairing analgesics”: the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Raffa, Robert B; Mattia, Consalvo

    2015-01-01

    The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine). Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily) should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. PMID:25848298

  5. Acute and cumulative effects of focused high-frequency vibrations on the endocrine system and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, Pierpaolo; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia; Gialluca, Glaugo; Fanò, Giorgio; Saggini, Raoul

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acute and long-term effects of local high-intensity vibration (HLV, f = 300 Hz) on muscle performance and blood hormone concentrations in healthy young men. Totally 18 subjects (cV group) were studied in two sessions, either without (control) or with HLV treatment. The protocol was the same on both control and test days, except that, in the second session, subjects underwent HLV treatment. Counter-movement jumping (CMJ), maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) test, and hormonal levels were measured before the procedure, immediately thereafter, and 1 h later. To assess the long-term effects of HLV, the cV group was subjected to HLV on the leg muscles for 4 weeks, and a second group (cR group, n = 18) embarked upon a resistance training program. All subjects underwent an MVC test and an isokinetic (100 deg/s) test before training, 4 weeks after training, and 2 months after the end of training. The HLV protocol significantly increased the serum level of growth hormone (GH, P neuromuscular performance. Our results indicate that HLV has a long-term beneficial effect comparable to that of resistance training.

  6. The effect of the UV photon flux on the photoelectrocatalytic degradation of endocrine-disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Salatiel Wohlmuth; Viegas, Cheila; Ferreira, Jane Zoppas; Rodrigues, Marco Antônio Siqueira; Bernardes, Andréa Moura

    2016-10-01

    The photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) degradation of 4-nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP4EO) using a low, moderate, or high UV photon flux in different treatment times was investigated. The byproducts were verified using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography with quadrupole mass analyzer (GC-qMS). The GC results showed that the use of a low (2.89 μmol m(-2)s(-1)) or a high (36.16 μmol m(-2)s(-1)) UV photon flux reaching the anode surface was associated to the production of alcohols and the toxic byproduct nonylphenol (NP), leading to the same degradation pathway. Meanwhile, the use of a moderate UV photon flux (14.19 μmol m(-2)s(-1)) reaching the anode surface did not produce alcohols or the NP toxic byproduct. This study demonstrates that different UV photon fluxes will have an influence in the degradation of NP4EO with or without generation of toxic byproducts. Furthermore, it is concluded that, after the determination of the UV photon flux able to degrade NP4EO without NP formation, the treatment time is essential in removal of NP4EO, since increasing the treatment time of 4 to 10 h, when using the PEC best conditions (moderate UV photon flux), implies in a higher treatment efficiency.

  7. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-12-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders.

  8. Multi-residue analytical method for the determination of endocrine disruptors and related compounds in river and waste water using dual column liquid chromatography switching system coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorga, Marina; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2013-06-21

    The present study describes a novel, fully automated method, based on column switching using EQuan™ columns for an integrated sample preconcentration and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-LC-MS/MS). The method allows the unequivocal identification and quantification of the most relevant environmental endocrine disruptors compounds (EDCs) and compounds suspected to be EDCs, such as natural and synthetic estrogens and their conjugates, antimicrobials, parabens, bisphenol A, alkylphenolic compounds, benzotriazoles, and organophosphorus flame retardants, in surface river water and wastewater samples. Applying this technique, water samples were directly injected into the chromatographic system and the target compounds were concentrated into the loading column. Thereafter, the analytes were transferred into the analytical column for subsequent detection by MS-MS (QqQ). A comparative study employing three types of columns, with different chemical modifications, was performed in order to determine the optimal column that allowed maximum retention and subsequent elution of the analytes. Using this new optimized methodology a fast and easy online methodology for the analysis of EDCs in surface river water and wastewater with low limits of quantification (LOQ) was obtained. LOQs ranged from 0.008 to 1.54 ng/L for surface river water and from 0.178/0.364 to 12.5/25.0 ng/L (except for alkylphenol monoethoxylates) for effluent/influent waste water. Moreover, employing approximately 1h, a complete analysis was performed which was significant improvement in comparison to other methods reported previously. This method was used to track the presence and fate of target compounds in the Ebro River which is the most important river in Spain whose intensive agricultural and industrial activities concentrate mainly close to the main cities in the basin, deteriorating soil and water quality.

  9. Nitric oxide control of steroidogenesis: Endocrine effects of N sup G -nitro-L-arginine and comparisons to alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.L.; Nock, B.; Truong, R.; Cicero, T.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) may regulate hormone biosynthesis and secretion. This was tested by treating male rats with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (NAME), a NO synthase inhibitor, and measuring serum and testicular interstitial fluid testosterone and serum corticosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin (PRL). The effect of N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (NA), a less-soluble form of the same NO synthase inhibitor, on the reproductive suppressant actions of alcohol was also examined. NAME increased testosterone and corticosterone secretion dose-dependently without affecting LH and PRL secretion. The alcohol-induced suppression of testosterone or LH secretion was not altered by treatment with NA. Although effects of NAME and NA on other systems may be involved, these results indicate that testicular and adrenal steroidogenesis are negatively regulated by endogenous NO and that NO does not regulate LH and PRL secretion or inhibit the testicular steroidogenic pathway in the same way as alcohol.

  10. Endocrine side-effects of anti-cancer drugs: mAbs and pituitary dysfunction: clinical evidence and pathogenic hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torino, Francesco; Barnabei, Agnese; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Marchetti, Paolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2013-12-01

    mAbs are established targeted therapies for several diseases, including hematological and solid malignancies. These agents have shown a favorable toxicity profile, but, despite their high selectivity, new typical side-effects have emerged. In cancer patients, pituitary dysfunction may be mainly due to brain metastases or primary tumors and to related surgery and radiotherapy. Anticancer agents may induce hypopituitarism in patients cured for childhood cancers. These agents infrequently affect pituitary function in adult cancer patients. Notably, hypophysitis, a previously very rare disease, has emerged as a distinctive side-effect of ipilimumab and tremelimumab, two mAbs inhibiting the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 receptor, being occasionally seen with nivolumab, another immune checkpoint inhibitor. Enhanced antitumor immunity is the suggested mechanism of action of these drugs and autoimmunity the presumptive mechanism of their toxicity. Recently, ipilimumab has been licensed for the treatment of patients affected by metastatic melanoma. With the expanding use of these drugs, hypophysitis will be progressively encountered by oncologists and endocrinologists in clinical practice. The optimal management of this potentially life-threatening adverse event needs a rapid and timely diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Hypopituitarism caused by these agents is rarely reversible, requiring prolonged or lifelong substitutive hormonal treatment. Further studies are needed to clarify several clinical and pathogenic aspects of this new form of secondary pituitary dysfunction.

  11. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Associated Disorders and Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam De Coster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and/or prevalence of health problems associated with endocrine-disruption have increased. Many chemicals have endocrine-disrupting properties, including bisphenol A, some organochlorines, polybrominated flame retardants, perfluorinated substances, alkylphenols, phthalates, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, solvents, and some household products including some cleaning products, air fresheners, hair dyes, cosmetics, and sunscreens. Even some metals were shown to have endocrine-disrupting properties. Many observations suggesting that endocrine disruptors do contribute to cancer, diabetes, obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility are listed in this paper. An overview is presented of mechanisms contributing to endocrine disruption. Endocrine disruptors can act through classical nuclear receptors, but also through estrogen-related receptors, membrane-bound estrogen-receptors, and interaction with targets in the cytosol resulting in activation of the Src/Ras/Erk pathway or modulation of nitric oxide. In addition, changes in metabolism of endogenous hormones, cross-talk between genomic and nongenomic pathways, cross talk with estrogen receptors after binding on other receptors, interference with feedback regulation and neuroendocrine cells, changes in DNA methylation or histone modifications, and genomic instability by interference with the spindle figure can play a role. Also it was found that effects of receptor activation can differ in function of the ligand.

  12. Predicting chemical impacts on vertebrate endocrine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, John W; Breen, Miyuki; Denver, Robert J; Distefano, Joseph J; Edwards, Jeremy S; Hoke, Robert A; Volz, David C; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2011-01-01

    Animals have evolved diverse protective mechanisms for responding to toxic chemicals of both natural and anthropogenic origin. From a governmental regulatory perspective, these protective responses complicate efforts to establish acceptable levels of chemical exposure. To explore this issue, we considered vertebrate endocrine systems as potential targets for environmental contaminants. Using the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT), hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as case examples, we identified features of these systems that allow them to accommodate and recover from chemical insults. In doing so, a distinction was made between effects on adults and those on developing organisms. This distinction was required because endocrine system disruption in early life stages may alter development of organs and organ systems, resulting in permanent changes in phenotypic expression later in life. Risk assessments of chemicals that impact highly regulated systems must consider the dynamics of these systems in relation to complex environmental exposures. A largely unanswered question is whether successful accommodation to a toxic insult exerts a fitness cost on individual animals, resulting in adverse consequences for populations. Mechanistically based mathematical models of endocrine systems provide a means for better understanding accommodation and recovery. In the short term, these models can be used to design experiments and interpret study findings. Over the long term, a set of validated models could be used to extrapolate limited in vitro and in vivo testing data to a broader range of untested chemicals, species, and exposure scenarios. With appropriate modification, Tier 2 assays developed in support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program could be used to assess the potential for accommodation and recovery and inform the development of mechanistically based models.

  13. The endocrine function of adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner de Jesus Pinto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is considered the adipose tissue as a dynamic structure involved in many physiological and metabolic processes, produces and releases a variety of active peptides known by the generic name of adipokines that act performing endocrine, paracrine and autocrine. Furthermore, numbers expressed receptors that respond allows the afferent signals from endocrine organs, and also central nervous system. In 1987, the adipose tissue has been identified as the major site of metabolism of steroid hormones, thereafter, in 1994, it was recognized as an endocrine organ and the leptin being an early secretory products identified. In addition other biologically active substances were being isolated, such as adiponectin, resistin, TNF-a, interleukin-6 and others. The adipokines derived from adipose tissue modulate many metabolic parameters such as control of food intake, energy balance and peripheral insulin sensitivity, for example. Thus, the altered secretion of adipokines by adipose tissue may have metabolic effects may present complex relations with the pathophysiological process of obesity, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, atherosclerosis and Diabetes mellitus. The understanding of the molecular processes occurring in the adipocytes may provide new tools for the treatment of pathophysiological conditions such as, for example, metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  14. The effects of low levels of light at night upon the endocrine physiology of western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoech, Stephan J; Bowman, Reed; Hahn, Thomas P; Goymann, Wolfgang; Schwabl, Ingrid; Bridge, Eli S

    2013-11-01

    Florida scrub-jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in the suburbs breed earlier than jays in native habitat. Amongst the possible factors that influence this advance (e.g., food availability, microclimate, predator regime, etc.), is exposure to artificial lights at night (LAN). LAN could stimulate the reproductive axis of the suburban jays. Alternatively, LAN could inhibit pineal melatonin (MEL), thus removing its inhibitory influence on the reproductive axis. Because Florida scrub-jays are a threatened species, we used western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) to investigate the effects of LAN upon reproductive hormones and melatonin. Jays were held under conditions in which the dark-phase of the light:dark cycle was without illumination and then under low levels of LAN. Under both conditions, birds were exposed first to short-days (9.5L:14.5D) that were gradually increased to long-days (14.5L:9.5D). At various times, blood samples were collected during the light part of the cycle to measure reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone, LH; testosterone, T; and estradiol, E2 ). Similarly, samples to assess melatonin were collected during the dark. In males, LAN caused a depression in LH levels and levels were ∼4× greater under long- than short-days. In females, there was no effect of LAN or photoperiod upon LH. LAN resulted in depressed T levels in females, although there was no effect on T in males. E2 levels in both sexes were lower under LAN than under an unlighted dark-phase. Paradoxically, MEL was higher in jays under LAN, and under long-days. MEL did not differ by sex. LAN disrupted the extraordinarily strong correlation between T and E2 that existed under unlighted nocturnal conditions. Overall, our findings fail to support the hypothesis that LAN stimulates the reproductive axis. Rather, the data demonstrate that LAN tends to inhibit reproductive hormone secretion, although not in a consistent fashion between the sexes. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of thyroid hormones from maternal milk on some measures of body growth and endocrine system in newborn sucklings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turakulov, Y K; Karimova, S F; Gainutdinov, M K

    1983-10-01

    The effect of thyroidectomy (TX) in lactating mother on the development of sucklings was studied during first 15 days of life. TX resulted in a decrease of thyroxine (T4) level in maternal milk which further resulted in a decrease of the level of T4, insulin and glucose in serum of newborns, and a decrease of body weight and of the glycogen content in liver. It is suggested that the hypoglycemia, decrease of liver glycogen and retardation of body growth under such conditions result from the inhibition of glucogenesis due to a deficiency of T4 and presumably also of GH in sucklings. These investigations showed that changes of glucose and glycogen in newborns during the early postnatal period together with some other measures of the development may be used in the evaluation of their adaptation capability.

  16. Overnight suppression of HPA axis after mineraolocorticoid receptor stimulation: A sleep endocrine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiralay, Cüneyt; Agorastos, Agorastos; Jahn, Holger; Kellner, Michael; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2015-05-30

    Nocturnal hyperactivity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) indicates decreased feedback inhibition with stress-related conditions such as major depression and sleep disorders. To characterize the role of mineralocorticoid (MR) in regulation of HPA axis activity during nocturnal sleep and involvement in sleep architecture, we investigated sleep endocrine effects of the MR agonist fludrocortisone in healthy men after pretreatment with metyrapone to minimize the impact of endogenous cortisol. Subjects (n=8) were treated on three occasions in a single-blinded design in random order with a) metyrapone, b) fludrocortisone after metyrapone, and c) placebo. Polysomnography was recorded and blood samples were drawn for determination of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol during the entire night. After metyrapone administration ACTH was significantly enhanced, while overall nocturnal cortisol secretion remained largely unchanged. Whereas administration of fludrocortisone induced a significant inhibitory effect on basal ACTH and cortisol secretion, no considerable effects on sleep pattern were detectable. While the involvement of MR in sleep regulation needs further study, endocrine findings underline the role of MR in tonic regulation of HPA axis during nocturnal sleep and demonstrate the ability of fludrocortisone to further suppress HPA axis activity overnight. Additional studies would be required to evaluate endocrine and clinical fludrocortisone effects in depressive patients showing HPA hyperactivity.

  17. Effects of thyroid endocrine manipulation on sex-related gene expression and population sex ratios in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prakash; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone reportedly induces masculinization of genetic females and goitrogen treatment delays testicular differentiation (ovary-to-testis transformation) in genetic males of Zebrafish. This study explored potential molecular mechanisms of these phenomena. Zebrafish were treated with thyroxine (T4, 2 nM), goitrogen [methimazole (MZ), 0.15 mM], MZ (0.15 mM) and T4 (2 nM) (rescue treatment), or reconstituted water (control) from 3 to 33 days postfertilization (dpf) and maintained in control water until 45 dpf. Whole fish were collected during early (25 dpf) and late (45 dpf) testicular differentiation for transcript abundance analysis of selected male (dmrt1, amh, ar) and female (cyp19a1a, esr1, esr2a, esr2b) sex-related genes by quantitative RT-PCR, and fold-changes relative to control values were determined. Additional fish were sampled at 45 dpf for histological assessment of gonadal sex. The T4 and rescue treatments caused male-biased populations, and T4 alone induced precocious puberty in ∼50% of males. Male-biased sex ratios were accompanied by increased expression of amh and ar and reduced expression of cyp19a1a, esr1, esr2a, and esr2b at 25 and 45 dpf and, unexpectedly, reduced expression of dmrt1 at 45 dpf. Goitrogen exposure increased the proportion of individuals with ovaries (per previous studies interpreted as delay in testicular differentiation of genetic males), and at 25 and 45 dpf reduced the expression of amh and ar and increased the expression of esr1 (only at 25 dpf), esr2a, and esr2b. Notably, cyp19a1a transcript was reduced but via non-thyroidal pathways (not restored by rescue treatment). In conclusion, the masculinizing activity of T4 at the population level may be due to its ability to inhibit female and stimulate male sex-related genes in larvae, while the inability of MZ to induce cyp19a1a, which is necessary for ovarian differentiation, may explain why its “feminizing” activity on gonadal

  18. Endocrine therapy for breast cancer: Assessing an array of women's treatment experiences and perceptions, their perceived self-efficacy and nonadherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Maatman, Gemma A.; Van Geffen, Erica C.G.; Vree, Robbert; Nortier, Johan W.; Van Dijk, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Background Although adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents breast cancer recurrence, nonadherence rates are substantial. We therefore examined associations of women's experiences and perceptions regarding the efficacy, side effects, and practical problems of endocrine therapy with nonadhere

  19. Endocrine therapy for breast cancer: Assessing an array of women's treatment experiences and perceptions, their perceived self-efficacy and nonadherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Maatman, Gemma A.; Van Geffen, Erica C.G.; Vree, Robbert; Nortier, Johan W.; Van Dijk, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Background Although adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents breast cancer recurrence, nonadherence rates are substantial. We therefore examined associations of women's experiences and perceptions regarding the efficacy, side effects, and practical problems of endocrine therapy with

  20. Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer : Assessing an Array of Women's Treatment Experiences and Perceptions, Their Perceived Self-Efficacy and Nonadherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Bouvy, Marcel L; Maatman, Gemma A; Van Geffen, Erica C G; Vree, Robbert; Nortier, Johan W; Van Dijk, Liset

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents breast cancer recurrence, nonadherence rates are substantial. We therefore examined associations of women's experiences and perceptions regarding the efficacy, side effects, and practical problems of endocrine therapy with

  1. Effects of acute low temperature stress on the endocrine reactions of the Qinghai toad-headed lizard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunwang LI; Yuan GU; Songhua TANG; Hongxia FANG; Guohua JIANG; Zhigang JIANG

    2011-01-01

    Endocrinological action is generally thought to be a way for animals to respond to stress at low temperatures.To learn the role of hormones in eetotherms inhabiting alpine environments,we studied the effects of acute low temperature exposure on the endocrinological reactions of Qinghai toad-headed lizards in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.We monitored plasma corticosterone and insulin concentration of the lizards under five low temperature treatments.We found no significant difference in plasma corticosterone or insulin in lizards among our five different treatments.For males and females the correlation between plasma corticosterone and insulin concentrations was not significant.In contrast to other studies on reptiles at low altitude,we suggest that due to the alpine environment (low temperature and low oxygen concentration) they inhabit,Qinghai toad-headed lizards respond to experimental cold stress slightly to mobilize energy and live their vivid life.In addition,corticosterone and insulin of Qinghai toad-headed lizards are secreted independently along with low temperature treatments [Current Zoology 57 (6):775-780,2011].

  2. Paracetamol, aspirin and indomethacin display endocrine disrupting properties in the adult human testis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, O; Desdoits-Lethimonier, C; Lesné, L; Legrand, A; Guillé, F; Bensalah, K; Dejucq-Rainsford, N; Jégou, B

    2013-07-01

    Do mild analgesics affect the endocrine system of the human adult testis? Mild analgesics induce multiple endocrine disturbances in the human adult testis in vitro. Mild analgesics have recently been incriminated as potential endocrine disruptors. Studies of the effects of these widely used molecules on the androgenic status of men are limited and somewhat contradictory. This prompted us to investigate whether these compounds could alter the adult human testicular function. We therefore assessed in parallel the effects of paracetamol, aspirin and indomethacin on organo-cultured adult human testis and on the NCI-H295R steroid-producing human cell line. Adult human testis explants or NCI-H295R adrenocortical human cells were cultured with 10(-4) or 10(-5) M paracetamol, aspirin or indomethacin for 24-48 h. The effect of 10(-5) M ketoconazole, used as an anti-androgenic reference molecule, was also assessed. Testes were obtained from prostate cancer patients, who had not received any hormone therapy. The protocol was approved by the local ethics committee of Rennes, France and informed consent was given by the donors. Only testes displaying spermatogenesis, as assessed by transillumination, were used in this study. Hormone levels in the culture media were determined by radioimmunoassay (testosterone, insulin-like factor 3), Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (inhibin B) or Enzyme Immunosorbent Assay [prostaglandin (PG) D2, and PGE2]. Tissues were observed and cells counted using classical immunohistochemical methods. The three mild analgesics caused multiple endocrine disturbances in the adult human testis. This was particularly apparent in the interstitial compartment. Effective doses were in the same range as those measured in blood plasma following standard analgesic treatment. The production of testosterone and insulin-like factor 3 by Leydig cells was altered by exposure to all these drugs. Inhibin B production by Sertoli cells was marginally affected by aspirin

  3. Endocrine and metabolic effects of metformin in combination with compound cyproterone acetate in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶碧绿; 杨海燕; 赵军招; 林金菊; 林文琴

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study the endocrinologic and metabolic effects of metformin in combi-nation with compound cyproterone acetate (CPA) on patients with polycystic ovariansyndrome (PCOS).Methods: A prospective study involved total 65 patients, 45 PCOS patients as group Aand 20 non-PCOS infertility patients as control (group B). Complete baseline work-up inclu-ding body mass index (BMI), waist/hip ratio(WHR), Ferriman-Gallwey score(FGS), gona-dotrophin, testosterone(T), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosteronesulfate (DHEAS), and fasting lipid, glucose (FG) , insulin (FI) and oral glucose tolerancetest (OGTT), were performed in all patients. Patients in group A were treated with CPA a-lone (group A1), metformin alone (group A2) or combination of CPA with metformin (groupA3) , respectively by randomizatior. At the end of the 12-week therapy, subjects were re-evaluated and above parameters were measured.Results: Women in group A had significant increases in BMI, WHR, FGS, LH, T,FI, insulin resistance (IR), triglycerides(TG), and significant decrease in HDL-C com-paring with the control group (P<0.01). No significant difference among A1, A2 andA3 were found at baseline. LH, T, FT (free testosterone) were significant decreasedfrom (13.9±5.9)IU/L, (2. 1±0. 8)nmol/L and (2.8±2.3)nmol/L respectively to(5.8±2.2)IU/L, (1.2±0. 4)nmol/L and (0. 8±0.5)nmol/L respectively and SHBGwas significant increased from (99 ± 42) nmol/L to (187±64)nmol/L in group A3,when compared with LH,T and FT from (13.8±7.6)IU/L, (2.2±1.1) nmol/L and(2. 5±1.9) nmol/L respectively to (11.8±6.5)IU/L, (1.8±0.8) nmol/L and (1.7±1.0) nmol/L respectively and SHBG from (99±40) nmol/L to (120±51) nmol/L ingroup A2 (P<0.05,P<0. 001). HDL-C was significant increased from (1.5±0.3)mmol/L to (1.8±0.3) mmol/L in group A3 comparing with HDL-C from (1.5±0.4)mmol/L to (1.6±0.4) mmol/L in groupA1(P<0.001).Conclusions: The PCOS patients treated with metformin in combination with

  4. Effect of Regular Yogic Training on Growth Hormone and Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate as an Endocrine Marker of Aging

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    Sridip Chatterjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS secretion decline with advancing age and are associated with the symptoms of aging. Yogic texts claimed that regular practice of yoga may restore and maintain general endocrinological properties in the human body. Objective of the Study. To observe the effect of yogic training for twelve weeks on basal level of GH and DHEAS in middle aged group. Method. Forty-five untrained volunteers were divided into two groups, that is, yoga practicing (experimental: male 15, age 42.80 ± 7.43 yrs; female 8, age 44.75 ± 8.40 yrs and waitlisted control group (male 15, age 41.67 ± 7.87 yrs; female 7, age 45.43 ± 7.00 yrs. The experimental group underwent combined yogic practices daily in the morning for 6 days/week for 12 weeks, whereas control group continued their usual routine activities. Standing height, body weight, body mass index, and basal level of GH and DHEAS were measured before commencement and after six and twelve weeks of yogic training period. The repeated measure ANOVA was used for data analysis. Results. 12 weeks of yogic training produces a significant increase in GH and DHEAS for both male and female groups as compared to their baseline data, whereas no as such changes were observed in the control group. Conclusion. Combined approach of graded yogic training may be beneficial for maintaining the basal level of GH and DHEAS in the human body, thus promoting healthy aging.

  5. Effects of a holistic yoga program on endocrine parameters in adolescents with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Ram; Padmalatha, Venkatram; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Amritanshu, Ram

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this trial were to compare the effects of a holistic yoga program with the conventional exercise program in adolescent polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). This was a prospective, randomized, active controlled trial. Ninety (90) adolescent (15-18 years) girls from a residential college in Andhra Pradesh who satisfied the Rotterdam criteria were randomized into two groups. The yoga group practiced a holistic yoga module, while the control group practiced a matching set of physical exercises (1 hour/day, for 12 weeks). Anti-müllerian hormone (AMH-primary outcome), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, prolactin, body-mass index (BMI), hirsutism, and menstrual frequency were measured at inclusion and after 12 weeks. Mann-Whitney test on difference score shows that changes in AMH (Y=-2.51, C=-0.49, p=0.006), LH, and LH/FSH ratio (LH: Y=-4.09, C=3.00, p=0.005; LH/FSH: Y=-1.17, C=0.49, p=0.015) were significantly different between the two intervention groups. Also, changes in testosterone (Y=-6.01, C=2.61, p=0.014) and Modified Ferriman and Gallway (mFG) score (Y=-1.14, C=+0.06, p=0.002) were significantly different between the two groups. On the other hand, changes in FSH and prolactin postintervention were nonsignificantly different between the two groups. Also, body weight and BMI showed nonsignificantly different changes between the two groups, while changes in menstrual frequency were significantly different between the two groups (Y=0.89, C=0.49, p=0.049). A holistic yoga program for 12 weeks is significantly better than physical exercise in reducing AMH, LH, and testosterone, mFG score for hirsutism, and improving menstrual frequency with nonsignificant changes in body weight, FSH, and prolactin in adolescent PCOS.

  6. The Protective Effect of Aloe Vera on Histological Structure of Endocrine Portion of Pancreas Gland in the Diabetic Rat

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    N Erfani-Majd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since aloe vera plant has many medical benefits, the present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of Aloe vera gel on the pancreatic islets and beta cells. Methods: This experimental study consisted of 50 mature male rats aged 2-3 months and weighed 200-250 g, who were randomly divided into five groups (n=10. Group I (control did not receive any treatments, and group II were diabetized via Streptozotocin (IP in 65 mg/kg, whose blood sample was taken after one week. Rats with blood glucose more than 250 mg/dL were considered as diabetic. Group III diabetic rats received the Aloe vera gel daily with dosage of 400 mg/kg, and group IV diabetic rats received insulin in 10 units/rat. Group V involved healthy rats which received only Aloe vera gel. After the last Aloe vera gel administration, blood glucose and body weight of all groups were measured on 15th and 30th days. Animals were euthanized with ether. Then tissues samples were collected from pancreas gland and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The 5-6 µ sections were made by paraffin embedding method and stained using haematoxylin-eosin (H&E and Aldehyde fuchsin stains. Ultimately, the histomorphometrical parameters were evaluated. Results: The mean number and size of pancreatic islets and beta cells of Langerhans islets decreased significantly in the diabetic group compared to the control group. The number of beta cells and diameter of langerhans islets increased significantly in the rats treated by Aloe vera gel in comparison to diabetic group at the end of 15th and 30th days. Conclusion: Applying Aloe vera gel seems to improve the renewal and restoration of langerhans islets and beta cells of pancreas gland in the diabetic rat.

  7. Endocrine causes of secondary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-07-01

    Secondary hypertension is common in clinical practice if a broad definition is applied. Various patterns of hypertension exist in the patient with an endocrine source of their disease, including new-onset hypertension in a previously normotensive individual, a loss of blood pressure control in a patient with previously well-controlled blood pressure, and/or labile blood pressure in the setting of either of these 2 patterns. A thorough history and physical exam, which can rule out concomitant medications, alcohol intake, and over-the-counter medication use, is an important prerequisite to the workup for endocrine causes of hypertension. Endocrine forms of secondary hypertension, such as pheochromocytoma and Cushing's disease, are extremely uncommon. Conversely, primary aldosteronism now occurs with sufficient frequency so as to be considered "top of the list" for secondary endocrine causes in otherwise difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. Primary aldosteronism can be insidious in its presentation since a supposed hallmark finding, hypokalemia, may be variable in its presentation. It is important to identify secondary causes of hypertension that are endocrine in nature because surgical intervention may result in correction or substantial improvement of the hypertension.

  8. PET and endocrine tumors; TEP et tumeurs endocrines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et d' Hematologie (Belgium)

    2000-08-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of {sup 18}FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  9. Evaluation of Endocrine Complications in Patients with Thalassemia Major

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    Birol Baytan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Multiple blood transfusions in beta thalassemia patients causes iron overload in various tissues including endocrine glands thereby leading to multiple endocrine dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the endocrine complications seen in beta thalassemia patients followed-up in outpatient clinics of Pediatric Hematology Division of Uludag University Faculty of Medicine. Materials and Methods: The files of patients with thalassemia major followed-up in outpatient clinics of Pediatric Hematology Division of Uludag University Faculty of Medicine from January 1976 to August 2008 were retrospectively evaluated for endocrine disorders. All patients had a detailed physical examination including palpation of thyroid gland and pubertal staging. Endocrine evaluation was performed in the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology.Results: A total of 44 [20 female (45.5%; 24 male (54.5%; and mean chronological age 13.54±7.32 (2.75-35.2 years] patients were evaluated. The ratios of patients with endocrine dysfunction were 27.2 % and 90.9%, respectively, when we exclude or include those with osteoporosis/osteopenia or growth failure other than growth hormone deficiency. Of all patients, 27 (61.3% had osteoporosis, 17 (38.6% had growth retardation, 11 (25% had osteopenia, 6 (13.6% had hypogonadism, 3 (6.8% had hypothyroidism, 2 (4.5% had hypoparathyroidism, 1 (2.3 had growth hormone deficiency, and 1 (2.3 had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Mean ferritin levels and monthly transfusion numbers were 1976.15±1494.75 ng/ml and 1.46±0.34, respectively. There were no significant association between ferritin levels, monthly transfusion needs, and endocrine dysfunctions studied. Endocrine dysfunctions did not differ significantly amongst those having different chelating agents. The ratio of patients with growth retardations in 10 to 19-age-group was significantly h